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Sample records for chagas parte iii

  1. Workshop 96. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.).

  2. Workshop 96. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.)

  3. Advanced megaesophagus (Group III secondary to vector-borne Chagas disease in a 20-month-old infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Rassi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the case of a female infant with Group III (or Grade III megaesophagus secondary to vector-borne Chagas disease, resulting in severe malnutrition that reversed after surgery (Heller technique. The infant was then treated with the antiparasitic drug benznidazole, and the infection was cured, as demonstrated serologically and parasitologically. After follow-up of several years without evidence of disease, with satisfactory weight and height development, the patient had her first child at age 23, in whom serological tests for Chagas disease yielded negative results. Thirty years after the initial examination, the patient's electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and chest radiography remained normal.

  4. [Guidelines for Chagas disease: Part III. Chagas disease in donors to blood banks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jotré M, Leonor; Muñoz C del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martin V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-08-01

    In this chapter it is emphasized the importance to guarantee safety and high quality blood transfusions. Besides, the following topics are analyzed: the importance of Trypanosoma cruzi infection acquired by blood transfusions, the obligatory screening implemented in Chilean blood banks and serological diagnostic techniques used that for, the seroprevalence observed, the importance to confirm results and methods recommended in this purpose and, to notify the donor once the infection is confirmed. In addition a facsímil of a letter used to notify the positive donor is included as guidelines to make advice after, attaching a pro-forma of clinical-epidemiological registration to refer the donor to medical evaluation and treatment.

  5. Standards in neurosonology. Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Wojczal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler. Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity.

  6. Drilling miniature holes, Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1978-07-01

    Miniature components for precision electromechanical mechanisms such as switches, timers, and actuators typically require a number of small holes. Because of the precision required, the workpiece materials, and the geometry of the parts, most of these holes must be produced by conventional drilling techniques. The use of such techniques is tedious and often requires considerable trial and error to prevent drill breakage, minimize hole mislocation and variations in hole diameter. This study of eight commercial drill designs revealed that printed circuit board drills produced better locational and size repeatability than did other drills when centerdrilling was not used. Boring holes 1 mm in dia, or less, as a general rule did not improve hole location in brass or stainless steel. Hole locations of patterns of 0.66-mm holes can be maintained within 25.4-..mu..m diametral positional tolerance if setup misalignments can be eliminated. Size tolerances of +- 3.8 ..mu..m can be maintained under some conditions when drilling flat plates. While these levels of precision are possible with existing off-the-shelf drills, they may not be practical in many cases.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi III from armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus novemcinctus) from Northeastern Venezuela and its biological behavior in murine model. Risk of emergency of Chagas' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morocoima, Antonio; Carrasco, Hernán J; Boadas, Johanna; Chique, José David; Herrera, Leidi; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio

    2012-11-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas' disease, was isolated from armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus novemcinctus) captured in rural communities Northeastern Venezuela from Nueva Esparta State (no endemic for Chagas' disease), Monagas and Anzoátegui States (endemics). The isolates, genetically typed by PCR-RFLP as belonging to the TcIII DTU, have demonstrated in murine model heterogenic parasitemia, mortality and histotropism with marked parasitism in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth myocytes that showed correlation with lymphobasophilic inflammatory infiltrates. Our finding of T. cruzi infected armadillos in Isla Margarita (Nueva Esparta State), together with reports of triatomine vectors in this region, the accentuated synanthropy of armadillos, intense economic activity, migration due to tourism and the lack of environmental education programs all of them represent risks that could cause the emergence of Chagas' disease in this area. This is the first report of the TcIII DTU in Northeastern Venezuela, thus widening the geographic distribution of this DTU. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate...... of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself....

  9. Introduction to Part III: Application of LCA in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.

    2018-01-01

    While Part II of this book presents the theoretical foundation and methodology of LCA, Part III is dedicated to a comprehensive discussion of how this methodology has been adapted and applied in practice. The chapters of Part III provide an easily readable and accessible introduction to different...

  10. Cubby : Multiscreen Desktop VR Part III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djajadiningrat, J.P.; Gribnau, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    In this month's final episode of our 'Cubby: Multiscreen Desktop VR' trilogy we explain how you read the InputSprocket driver from part II, how you use it as input for the cameras from part I and how you calibrate the input device so that it leads to the correct head position.

  11. Warship Radar Signatures (Ship Survivability Part III-A)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galle, L.F.; Heemskerk, H.J.M.; Ewijk, L.J. van

    2000-01-01

    Radar Cross Section (RCS) management is of paramount importance for a warships's survivability. In this first part of the paper (Part III-A), the operational benefits of low RCS will be explained. Basic RCS theory, measurement and simulation techniques will be addressed. The RCS of representative

  12. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Part III. Complications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Part III. Complications, Prognosis and management. ... It should be possible to set a definite prognosis within 2 weeks after the onset of facial paralysis, and in many cases even sooner. In the prognosis of facial paralysis the aetiological and time factors involved, the completeness of ...

  13. Trypanosomiasis americana en el Perú: III. Importancia del cobayo como reservorio de la enfermedad de Chagas en la región sudoccidental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arístides Herrer

    1955-12-01

    Full Text Available 1. En el Perú, a lo largo de toda la región infestada por el Triatoma infestans, la gente frecuentemente cría cobayos en las mismas habitaciones humanas o en corrales contiguos a éstas. 2. De la estrecha relación existente entre el cobayo y el T. infestans, en lo que concierne a la enfermedad de Chagas el citado roedor adquiere importancia como: a uno de los principales huéspedes del insecto; y b el reservorio más importante del Trypanosoma cruzi. 3. Debido al trasporte del cobayo de unas localidades a otras, deviene también este roedor como activo medio de diseminación del agente etiológico de la enfermedad de Chagas.

  14. Solar neutrino oscillation parameters after SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ping; Liu Qiuyu

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the recently published results from solar neutrino experiments SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III and show their constraints on solar neutrino oscillation parameters, especially for the mixing angle θ 12 . Through a global analysis using all existing data from SK, SNO, Ga and Cl radiochemical experiments and long base line reactor experiment KamLAND , we obtain the parameters Δm 12 2 =7.684 -0.208 +0.212 x 10 -5 eV 2 , tan 2 θ 12 =0.440 -0.057 +0.059 . We also find that the discrepancy between the KamLAND and solar neutrino results can be reduced by choosing a small non-zero value for the mixing angle θ 13 . (authors)

  15. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. III Appendix III to Part 27—Fair Housing Lending...

  16. Chagas disease in prehistory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luiz F; Jansen, Ana M; Araújo, Adauto

    2011-09-01

    The classical hypothesis proposes that Chagas disease has been originated in the Andean region among prehistoric people when they started domesticating animals, changing to sedentary habits, and adopting agriculture. These changes in their way of life happened nearly 6,000 years ago. However, paleoparasitological data based on molecular tools showed that Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas disease were commonly found both in South and North American prehistoric populations long before that time, suggesting that Chagas disease may be as old as the human presence in the American continent. The study of the origin and dispersion of Trypanosoma cruzi infection among prehistoric human populations may help in the comprehension of the clinical and epidemiological questions on Chagas disease that still remain unanswered.

  17. Thallium (III) salts utilization in organic synthesis. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz, H.M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The utilizations of thallium (III) salts in organic synthesis with carbonylic and acitylenic substrates are presented. The reactions of carbonylic substra3ts with kitones and the oxidation reactions of acetylenic substrates are shown. Others reactions including thallium (III) salts and non aromatic unsatured substracts, as cleasage of ethers and epoxide using thallium trinitrate, hydrazones treatments with thallium triacetates, etc, are also mentioned. (C.G.C.) [pt

  18. Tanzania 1895-1920 : Part III: 1914-1920s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    An earlier version of this African Postal Heritage Paper was published as African Studies Centre Leiden Working Paper 119 / 2015: "A postal history of the First World War in Africa and its aftermath - German colonies; III Deutsch Ostafrika / German East Africa", written by Ton Dietz.

  19. Chagas Disease (American trypanosomiasis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets/detail/chagas-disease-(american-trypanosomiasis)","@context":"http://schema.org","@type":"Article"}; العربية 中文 français русский español ... capacities, focusing on: strengthening world epidemiological surveillance and information systems; preventing transmission by blood transfusion and organ ...

  20. Inteligencia Artificial y Neurología. (III Parte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Camacho Pinto

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available

    De acuerdo con mi anuncio esta III Parte estaría constituida por los mecanismos cerebrales susceptibles de extrapolación tal como fueron enumerados por mí: control de input-output para realizar conductas, y de inteligencia y aprendizaje, de los cuales por razón de espacio sólo se publica la mitad en esta edición de Medicina. Se trata de una presentación esquemática, auncuando ahora encuentro quizás más atractivo el enfoque de J’urgen Ruech expuesto en el Capítulo Comunicación y Psiquiatría de la obra extensa de Freedman (1 así: Input = percepción; análisis de datos = reconocimiento; procesamiento de datos = pensamiento; almacenamiento de datos = memoria; output = expresión y acción. A mi modo de ver se completaría este encuadre funcional con el tópico aprendizaje, proceso contiguo al de la memoria. Antes de entrar en materia hago unas consideraciones preliminares. En la primera me refiero a otro enfoque del concepto de LA. no incluido anteriormente. Se trata de Schank Roger y Hunter Larry (2 para quienes las indagaciones a que conduce el trasegar acerca de lA son las más atrevidas de nuestra existencia: ¿cuál es la naturaleza de la mente, qué pasa cuando estamos pensando, sintiendo, viendo o entendiendo? ¿Es posible comprender cómo trabaja nuestra mente realmente? Preguntas milenarias en cuyas respuestas no se ha registrado progreso. La lA ofrece una nueva herramienta para avanzar en este sentido: el computador.

    Las teorías sobre la mente han consistido en procesos descriptivos. Y los planteamientos iníciales hechos sobre lA por los investigadores han sido enfocados hacia lo que ellos mismos consideraron como manifestaciones de alta inteligencia: problemas matemáticos, ajedrez, rompecabezas complejos, etc.; gran cantidad de energía fue dedicada y se encontraron técnicas computacionales exitosas. Pero se comprendió que las técnicas desarrolladas no eran las mismas que emplea el cerebro, por lo cual se

  1. Irradiated uranium reprocessing, Final report - I-IV, Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    This third part of the final report include the following: Annex 5 - device for opening the cover; Annex 6 - inner part of the device for sampling of the radioactive solution; Annex 7 - outer part of the device for sampling of the radioactive solution; Annex 8 - pneumatic taps [sr

  2. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called Mizer...

  3. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  4. Antipsychotics and Sexual Dysfunction: Sexual Dysfunction - Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Satisfying sexual experience is an essential part of a healthy and enjoyable life for most people. Antipsychotic drugs are among the various factors that affect optimal sexual functioning. Both conventional and novel antipsychotics are associated with significant sexual side effects. This review has presented various studies comparing different antipsychotic drugs. Dopamine antagonism, increased serum prolactin, serotonergic, adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms are all proposed to be the mechanisms for sexual dysfunction. Drug treatment for this has not given satisfactory long-term results. Knowledge of the receptor pharmacology of an individual antipsychotic will help to determine whether it is more or less likely to cause sexual side effects and its management.

  5. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part III: Normal tissue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, Elizabeth L.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This is the third part of a course designed for residents in radiation oncology preparing for their boards. This part of the course will focus on the mechanisms underlying damage in normal tissues. Although conventional wisdom long held that killing and depletion of a critical cell(s) in a tissue was responsible for the later expression of damage, histopathologic changes in normal tissue can now be explained and better understood in terms of the new molecular biology. The concept that depletion of a single cell type is responsible for the observed histopathologic changes in normal tissues has been replaced by the hypothesis that damage results from the interaction of many different cell systems, including epithelial, endothelial, macrophages and fibroblasts, via the production of specific autocrine, paracrine and endocrine growth factors. A portion of this course will discuss the clinical and experimental data on the production and interaction of those cytokines and cell systems considered to be critical to tissue damage. It had long been suggested that interindividual differences in radiation-induced normal tissue damage was genetically regulated, at least in part. Both clinical and experimental data supported this hypothesis but it is the recent advances in human and mouse molecular genetics which have provided the tools to dissect out the genetic component of normal tissue damage. These data will be presented and related to the potential to develop genetic markers to identify sensitive individuals. The impact on clinical outcome of the ability to identify prospectively sensitive patients will be discussed. Clinically it is well-accepted that the volume of tissue irradiated is a critical factor in determining tissue damage. A profusion of mathematical models for estimating dose-volume relationships in a number of organs have been published recently despite the fact that little data are available to support these models. This course will review the

  6. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware River...

  7. International Working Group on Past Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  8. Ventricular arrhythmias in Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Paulo Tomaz Barbosa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sudden death is one of the most characteristic phenomena of Chagas disease, and approximately one-third of infected patients develop life-threatening heart disease, including malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Fibrotic lesions secondary to chronic cardiomyopathy produce arrhythmogenic substrates that lead to the appearance and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmias. The objective of this study is to discuss the main clinical and epidemiological aspects of ventricular arrhythmias in Chagas disease, the specific workups and treatments for these abnormalities, and the breakthroughs needed to determine a more effective approach to these arrhythmias. A literature review was performed via a search of the PubMed database from 1965 to May 31, 2014 for studies of patients with Chagas disease. Clinical management of patients with chronic Chagas disease begins with proper clinical stratification and the identification of individuals at a higher risk of sudden cardiac death. Once a patient develops malignant ventricular arrhythmia, the therapeutic approach aims to prevent the recurrence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death by the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators, antiarrhythmic drugs, or both. In select cases, invasive ablation of the reentrant circuit causing tachycardia may be useful. Ventricular arrhythmias are important manifestations of Chagas cardiomyopathy. This review highlights the absence of high-quality evidence regarding the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias in Chagas disease. Recognizing high-risk patients who require specific therapies, especially invasive procedures such as the implantation of cardioverter defibrillators and ablative approaches, is a major challenge in clinical practice.

  9. Spatial patterns and eco-epidemiological systems--part II: characterising spatial patterns of the occurrence of the insect vectors of Chagas disease based on remote sensing and field data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Emmanuel; de Fátima Venâncio, Annamaria; Girres, Jean-François; Romaña, Christine A

    2011-11-01

    While the former part of this back-to-back paper dealt with the identification of multi-scale spatial patterns associated with the presence, abundance and dispersion of the insect vectors (Triatominae) of Chagas disease, this latter part examines the need for pattern characterisation by means of detailed data on environmental, residential, peri-domiciliary and human behaviour. The study site was, in both cases, a single village situated in Bahia, Brazil, wherefrom the data were collected through field observation and a standardised questionnaire, while the environmental characteristics were derived from satellite images and landscape characterisation. Following this, factorial analysis of mixed group (FAMG), an exploratory data analysis method, was applied to "mine" the huge dataset in a hierarchical way and to evaluate the relative impact of different factors such as the surrounding environment, the domiciliary/peri-domiciliary space properties and the presence of domestic animals. In the study village, five principal "districts" associated with different possible causes of infestation were identified. The results favour the role of depressions of the ground surface due to collapse of karstic subsoil (dolines) and open rock faces as infestation sources, vector attraction by outdoor lighting, risk of insect domiciliation in dwellings constructed without finishing materials and associated with apparent disorder. Ultimately, this study not only provides the basic information needed for decision-making and specification of vector control in the study village, but offers also a knowledge-base for more general control strategies in the region.

  10. ATWS: a reappraisal. Part III. Frequency of anticipated transients. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverenz, F.L. Jr.; Koren, J.M.; Erdmann, R.C.; Lellouche, G.S.

    1978-07-01

    The document is Part III of the Institute study of the ATWS question. The frequencies of the various events which have led to a reactor scram are documented from the nuclear power plant records. Some of these events, in the absence of scram, could lead to undesirable system response and are the ''transients of significance'' which comprise the anticipated transients of the ATWS question

  11. Chagas disease in Switzerland: history and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Y; Chappuis, F

    2011-09-15

    Chagas disease, endemic in Latin America, is an emerging health problem in Europe affecting an estimated 80,000 persons. Around 60,000 Latin American migrants live in Switzerland, and cases of Chagas disease have been reported since 1979. As of June 2011, 258 cases have been diagnosed, mostly adults in the indeterminate phase of the chronic stage of the disease. Vertical transmission has been identified and there is a high potential for blood- and organ-borne transmission in the absence of systematic screening. Major challenges include (i) raising awareness among migrants and healthcare professionals, (ii) developing national protocols for screening and treatment targeting high-risk groups such as pregnant woman, newborns, migrants from highly endemic areas (e.g. Bolivia), and immunocompromised migrants, (iii) preventing blood- and organ-borne transmission by appropriate screening strategies, (iv) taking into account the social vulnerability of individuals at risk in the design and implementation of public health programmes, and (v) facilitating contacts with the communities at risk through outreach programmes, for example in churches and cultural groups.

  12. Aspectos neurológicos da moléstia de chagas Neurological aspects of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritz Köberle

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Chagas related in more than two 200 cases, what he called "nervous forms" of trypanosomiasis, that is neurological manifestations from central origin (idiotism, infantilism, pseudo-bulbar paralysis, aphasia, cerebellar ataxia, atetosis, espostic or paralytic diplegia, disbasia. At that time Chagas expressed his concepts as follows: "In relation to the frequency of trypanosomiasis nervous forms we have performed many observations which allow us to state that this disease is the one which causes the largest number of organic affections of the central nervous system, in human pathology". We are plenty convinced by Chagas's statement. By experiments on animals of laboratory we have very often noticed a rather varied neurological symptomatology, being worth point out identical syndromes to those observed by Chagas. Our autopsy material non-rarely include chronic Chagas cases presenting a most varied symtomatology. Among them we have named only three cases of discerebral nanism, a rather rare affection in other parts of the world and relatively frequent in our material. The fact which we have demonstrated, i.e., a relatively great decreasing of number of nervous cells in the peripheral system could happen in the central nervous system as well. Provided that there are only two quantitative works on neuron number diminishing in the central nervous system in mice and rats we decline to go into further details about central neuropathies in man. We emphasized the necessity to perform researches on this field by means of intimate collaboration between clinicians and pathologists, as the only way to confirm on scientific basis all that was observed by the panoramic and genial vision of Carlos Chagas.

  13. Market Analysis and Consumer Impacts Source Document. Part III. Consumer Behavior and Attitudes Toward Fuel Efficient Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    This source document on motor vehicle market analysis and consumer impacts consists of three parts. Part III consists of studies and reviews on: consumer awareness of fuel efficiency issues; consumer acceptance of fuel efficient vehicles; car size ch...

  14. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2, chapter III: impurity control (engineering)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masahiro; Miki, Nobuharu; Shibutani, Yoji; Fujimura, Kaoru; Adachi, Jun-ichi; Sato, Kosuke; Fujii, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Itoh, Shin-ichi.

    1985-07-01

    This report corresponds to the second half of Chapter III of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2. Data base assessment are made on candidate materials for the divertor, limiter, and the first wall. Engineering trade-off studies are made for the high-recycling and low temperature conditions. The studies include material considerations, configuration, thermohydraulic and stress analysis, disruption, lifetime analysis, and tritium permeation. (author)

  15. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-09-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercialization LMFBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology of fuel fabrication, PHENIX fuel pins testing, heterogeneous cores, in service inspection of fuel elements, regulations and licensing, and related OECD activities. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BR-10, BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, RAPSODIE and PHENIX.

  16. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercialization LMFBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology of fuel fabrication, PHENIX fuel pins testing, heterogeneous cores, in service inspection of fuel elements, regulations and licensing, and related OECD activities. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BR-10, BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, RAPSODIE and PHENIX

  17. Tenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 29 March - 1 April 1977. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-11-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercial development of FBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology problems of containment design, fuel fabrication, fuel failures, sodium pressure, fuel-sodium interaction, computer codes needed for licensing. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, BOR-60, RAPSODIE, PHENIX.

  18. Tenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 29 March - 1 April 1977. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercial development of FBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology problems of containment design, fuel fabrication, fuel failures, sodium pressure, fuel-sodium interaction, computer codes needed for licensing. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, BOR-60, RAPSODIE, PHENIX

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride Terrain...

  20. Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Rodrigues Coura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS, (ii anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra, Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by

  1. Chagas Disease: No Longer Exotic

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-03

    This podcast is designed to inform health care providers about Chagas disease, diagnosis, and treatment and to assist in identifying infected patients.  Created: 4/3/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 4/8/2008.

  2. Chagas. From Exotic Tropical Disease to Pathology Globalized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz BASSO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, whose aetiological agent is Trypanosoma cruzi, is one of the main endemic diseases in Latin America, ranking fourth regarding the number of lost life years due to death or disability in the area; nevertheless, it is among the so-called “neglected diseases”. Despite its rural origin, where it is transmitted through vector insects belonging to the Reduviidae family, it has nowadays also become a problem in urbanized areas and is becoming globalized through inter-human transmission, above all congenital, but also through transfusions and transplants. Chagas, a Hidden Affliction (Chagas, Un mal escondido, a documentary by Ricardo Preve, focuses on both aspects of the disease: the rural and the global one, including interviews with North American doctors and European researchers. A significant part of the film takes place in the USA, showing the worst consequence of the evolution of the disease, which is death by chagasic cardiopathy which, being a reality that takes place during filming, increases the sense of drama. In this paper we approach specific topics related to Chagas disease from a biomedical point of view, including comments related to the highlights of the film that are connected with such aspects. Towards the end, there is mention of the film Houses of Fire (Casas de fuego and of certain illustrative aspects concerning the life of Dr Salvador Mazza and the Argentine Mission of Regional Pathology Studies (MEPRA, topics that have already been dealt with in this. 

  3. Building human resources capability in health care: a global analysis of best practice--Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zairi, M

    1998-01-01

    This is the last part of a series of three papers which discussed very comprehensively best practice applications in human resource management by drawing special inferences to the healthcare context. It emerged from parts I and II that high performing organisations plan and intend to build sustainable capability through a systematic consideration of the human element as the key asset and through a continuous process of training, developing, empowering and engaging people in all aspects of organisational excellence. Part III brings this debate to a close by demonstrating what brings about organisational excellence and proposes a road map for effective human resource development and management, based on world class standards. Healthcare human resource professionals can now rise to the challenge and plan ahead for building organisational capability and sustainable performance.

  4. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III: victims of the Third Reich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate neuroscientists survived Nazi concentration camps, but most were murdered. We discuss the circumstances and environment which stripped these neuroscientists of their profession, then of their personal rights and freedom, and then of their lives. We include a background analysis of anti-Semitism and Nazism in their various countries, then discuss in depth seven exemplary neuroscientist Holocaust victims; including Germans Ludwig Pick, Arthur Simons, and Raphael Weichbrodt, Austrians Alexander Spitzer and Viktor Frankl, and Poles Lucja Frey and Wladyslaw Sterling. by recognizing and remembering these victims of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself.

  5. Association of caspase-1 polymorphisms with Chagas cardiomyopathy among individuals in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Katherine Yih-Jia; Zamudio, Roxana; Henderson-Frost, Jo; Almuedo, Alex; Steinberg, Hannah; Clipman, Steven Joseph; Duran, Gustavo; Marcus, Rachel; Crawford, Thomas; Alyesh, Daniel; Colanzi, Rony; Flores, Jorge; Gilman, Robert Hugh; Bern, Caryn

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection is usually acquired in childhood in endemic areas, leading to Chagas disease, which progresses to Chagas cardiomyopathy in 20-30% of infected individuals over decades. The pathogenesis of Chagas cardiomyopathy involves the host inflammatory response to T. cruzi, in which upstream caspase-1 activation prompts the cascade of inflammatory chemokines/cytokines, cardiac remodeling, and myocardial dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of two caspase-1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with cardiomyopathy. We recruited infected (Tc+, n = 149) and uninfected (Tc-, n = 87) participants in a hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Cardiac status was classified (I, II, III, IV) based on Chagas cardiomyopathy-associated electrocardiogram findings and ejection fractions on echocardiogram. Genotypes were determined using Taqman probes via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of peripheral blood DNA. Genotype frequencies were analyzed according to three inheritance patterns (dominant, recessive, additive) using logistic regression adjusted for age and sex. The AA allele for the caspase-1 SNP rs501192 was more frequent in Tc+ cardiomyopathy (classes II, III, IV) patients compared to those with a normal cardiac status (class I) [odds ratio (OR) = -2.18, p = 0.117]. This trend approached statistical significant considering only Tc+ patients in class I and II (OR = -2.64, p = 0.064). Caspase-1 polymorphisms may play a role in Chagas cardiomyopathy development and could serve as markers to identify individuals at higher risk for priority treatment.

  6. Social class, political power, and the state: their implications in medicine--part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, V

    1977-01-01

    This is the third part of an article on the distribution of power and the nature of the state in Western industrialized societies and their implications in medicine. Parts I and II were published in the preceding issue of this Journal. Part I presented a critique of contemporary theories of the Western system of power; discussed the countervailing pluralist and power of elite theories, as well as those of bureaucratic and professional control; and concluded with an examination of the Marxist theories of economic determinism, structural determinism, and corporate statism. Part II presented a Marxist theory of the role, nature, and characteristics of state intervention. Part III focuses on the mode of that intervention and the reasons for its growth, with an added analysis of the attributes of state intervention in the health sector, and of the dialectical relationship between its growth and the current fiscal crisis of the state. In all three parts, the focus is on Western European countries and on North America, with many examples and categories from the area of medicine.

  7. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 960—Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process 1. This appendix... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE...

  8. Enfermedad de Chagas o Tripanosomiasis Americana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Guhl

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Situación Actual de Colombia.

    La enfermedad de Chagas o tripanosomiasis americana es una enfermedad parasitaria crónica causada por un protozoario flagelado el Trypanosoma cruzi, descrito por primera vez por Carlos Chagas, médico brasileño, a comienzos de este siglo y en su honor se denominó la enfermedad que lleva su nombre.

    Este parásito normalmente se transmite al ser humano a través de insectos triatomíneos estrictamente hematófagos de la familia Reduviidae, en el momento en que perforan la piel para succionar la sangre que los alimenta.

    Sin embargo, no se inocula directamente por intermedio de las estructuras bucales del insecto en el momento de la picadura como en el caso de las tripanosomiasis africanas, si no que se deposita pasivamente en la piel a través de las heces del insecto, penetrando en el cuerpo por la herida que causa la picadura u otras abrasiones de la piel o de la mucosa. El T. cruzi, también puede transmitirse por infección congénita, por transfusión de sangre contaminada o por el transplante de órganos contaminados. El ciclo vital del parásito es largo y complejo y su desarrollo tiene varias etapas, tanto en el vector triatomineo como en el huésped vertebrado .

    La Enfermedad de Chagas constituye una amenaza permanente para casi la cuarta parte de toda la población de América Latina. Si bien la enfermedad se encuentra presente en toda América Central y del Sur, sus manifestaciones y características epidemiológicas son altamente variables entre una y otra zona endémica. Existe una gran diversidad en las tasas de prevalencia, formas de transmisión, características parasitarias, patología clínica, vectores y reservorios.

    Más que cualquier otra enfermedad parasitaria, la enfermedad de Chagas se relaciona con el desarrollo económico y social de la población: los insectos triatomineos y las enfermedades que ellos transmiten existirán mientras en

  9. Experimental Chagas' disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta de Lana

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of experimental Chagas' disease in 64 out-bred young dogs. Twenty-nine animals were inoculated with the Be-62 and 35 with Be-78 Trypanosoma cruzi strains. Twenty-six were infected with blood trypomastigotes by different inoculation routes and 38 with metacyclic trypomastigotes from the vector via the conjunctival route. Twenty of the 26 dogs infected with blood trypomastigotes were autopsied during the acute phase. Eleven died spontaneously and nine were sacrificed. Six remained alive until they died suddenly (two or were autopsied (four. Twelve of the 38 dogs infected with metacyclic trypomastigotes evolved naturally to the chronic phase and remained alive for 24-48 months. The parasitemia, clinical aspects and serology (IgM and IgG as well as electrocardiogram, hemogram and heart anatomo-histopathologic patterns of acute and chronic cardiac forms of Chagas' disease as seen in human infections, were reproduced. The most important finding is the reproductibility of diffuse fibrosing chronic chagasic cardiopathy in all dogs infected with Be-78 T. cruzi strain autopsied between the 90th and 864th days of infection. Thus, the dog can be considered as a suitable experimental model to study Chagas' disease according to the requisites of the World Health Organization (1984. Futhermore the animal is easily obtained and easy to handle and maintain in experimental laboratory conditions.

  10. Enfermedad de Chagas en Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos N. Talavera - López

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available LA ENFERMEDAD DE CHAGAS ES UN PROBLEMA DE SALUD pública en toda Latinoamérica; alrededor de 20 millones de personas están infectadas y 200 millones están en riesgo de contraer la enfermedad. En 2006, la prevalencia en Centroamérica era del 7%. Actualmente no existe vacuna contra el protozoo y el tratamiento disponible resulta, aparte de poco efectivo, muy tóxico para el paciente. Los programas de control de vectores han ayudado a reducir los índices de infestación en Latinoamérica, pero aún falta mucho por hacer. En Nicaragua, la enfermedad de Chagas está subvalorada y los trabajos publicados son muy pocos. Es necesario investigar sobre esta enfermedad en nuestro país con otro enfoque, uno que no subvalore la enfermedad y ayude a desarrollar métodos diagnósticos y posibles tratamientos. Este artículo recopila información sobre los trabajos realizados porlos grupos más importantes de investigación en Chagas de Nicaragua en cuanto a epidemiología, control vectorial, diagnóstico y caracterización molecular.

  11. Chagas disease: What is known and what should be improved: a systemic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study consists of a broad review on what is known and what should be improved regarding knowledge of Chagas disease, not only through analysis on the main studies published on the topics discussed, but to a large extent based on experience of this subject, acquired over the past 50 years (1961-2011. Among the subjects covered, we highlight the pathogenesis and evolution of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, drugs in use and new strategies for treating Chagas disease; the serological tests for the diagnosis and the controls of cure the infection; the regional variations in prevalence, morbidity and response to treatment of the disease; the importance of metacyclogenesis of T. cruzi in different species of triatomines and its capacity to transmit Chagas infection; the risks of adaptation of wild triatomines to human dwellings; the morbidity and need for a surveillance and control program for Chagas disease in the Amazon region and the need to prioritize initiatives for controlling Chagas disease in Latin America and Mexico and in non-endemic countries, which is today a major international dilemma. Finally, we raise the need for to create a new initiative for controlling Chagas disease in the Gran Chaco, which involves parts of Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay.

  12. Chagas disease risk in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sahotra; Strutz, Stavana E; Frank, David M; Rivaldi, Chissa-Louise; Sissel, Blake; Sánchez-Cordero, Victor

    2010-10-05

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species) in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five-stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post-1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc-minute). The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence-based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag-York-Mollié model and post-1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This risk is concentrated in south Texas. 3. The

  13. Chagas disease risk in Texas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahotra Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five-stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post-1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc-minute. The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence-based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag-York-Mollié model and post-1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This

  14. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilce Mitiko Matsuda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer.

  15. Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments: Part III: whole-body sensation and comfort

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie; Han, Taeyoung

    2009-01-01

    A three-part series presents the development of models for predicting the local thermal sensation (Part I) and local thermal comfort (Part II) of different parts of the human body, and also the whole-body sensation and comfort (Part III) that result from combinations of local sensation and comfort. The models apply to sedentary activities in a range of environments: uniform and non-uniform, stable and transient. They are based on diverse findings from the literature and from body-part-specifi...

  16. A Paratransgenic Strategy for the Control of Chagas Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Hurwitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease results from infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This disease remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in central and south America. Chagas disease now exists and is detected worldwide because of human migration. Control of Chagas disease has relied mainly on vector eradication however, the development of insect resistance to pesticides, coupled with cost and adverse health effects of insecticide treatments, has prompted our group to investigate novel methods of transmission control. Our laboratory has been instrumental in the development of the paratransgenic strategy to control vectorial transmission of T. cruzi. In this paper, we discuss various components of the paratransgenic approach. Specifically, we describe classes of molecules that can serve as effectors, including antimicrobial peptides, endoglucanases, and highly specific single chain antibodies that target surface glycoprotein tags on the surface of T. cruzi. Furthermore, we address evolving concepts related to field dispersal of engineered bacteria as part of the paratransgenic control strategy and attendant risk assessment evaluation.

  17. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Darío BRAVO-TOBAR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35, II (n = 29, and III (n = 18. A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease.

  18. Chronic phase of Chagas disease: why should it be treated? A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis and evolutive pattern of Chagas disease suggests that the chronic phase should be more widely treated in order to (i eliminate Trypanosoma cruzi and prevent new inflammatory foci and the extension of tissue lesions, (ii promote tissue regeneration to prevent fibrosis, (iii reverse existing fibrosis, (iv prevent cardiomyopathy, megaoesophagus and megacolon and (v reduce or eliminate cardiac block and arrhythmia. All cases of the indeterminate chronic form of Chagas disease without contraindications due to other concomitant diseases or pregnancy should be treated and not only cases involving children or recently infected cases. Patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy grade II of the New York Heart Association classification should be treated with specific chemotherapy and grade III can be treated according to medical-patient decisions. We are proposing the following new strategies for chemotherapeutic treatment of the chronic phase of Chagas disease: (i repeated short-term treatments for 30 consecutive days and interval of 30-60 days for six months to one year and (ii combinations of drugs with different mechanisms of action, such as benznidazole + nifurtimox, benznidazole or nifurtimox + allopurinol or triazole antifungal agents, inhibition of sterol synthesis.

  19. Physiotherapy and low back pain - part iii: outcomes research utilising the biosychosocial model: psychosocial outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Bardin

    2003-02-01

    has evolved that necessitates the use of a biopsychosocial model, focusing on illness rather than disease and incorporating the biological, psychological and social aspects that are important to understand and to study LBP in its chronic form. Traditional outcome measures that measure elements within the biological component are limited to assess the spectrum of impacts caused by chronic low back pain (CLBP and the validity, reliability and sensitivity of some of these measures has been questioned.Few physiologic tests of spine function are clinically meaningful to patients, objective physical findings can be absent, and in CLBP disability and activity intolerance are often disproportional to the original injury. Biological outcomes should be complemented by outcomes of the psychosocial aspects of back pain that measure the considerable functional and emotional impact on the quality of life of patients experiencing low back dysfunction. Outcomes research is an analysis of clinical practice as it actually occurs and can  make a valuable contribution to understanding the multidimensional impact of LBP. Psychosocial aspects of the biopsychosocial model for outcomes research are discussed in part III: functional status/disability, psychological impairment, patient satisfaction, health related quality of life

  20. A Structural Molar Volume Model for Oxide Melts Part III: Fe Oxide-Containing Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Gheribi, Aimen E.; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-04-01

    As part III of this series, the model is extended to iron oxide-containing melts. All available experimental data in the FeO-Fe2O3-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system were critically evaluated based on the experimental condition. The variations of FeO and Fe2O3 in the melts were taken into account by using FactSage to calculate the Fe2+/Fe3+ distribution. The molar volume model with unary and binary model parameters can be used to predict the molar volume of the molten oxide of the Li2O-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system in the entire range of compositions, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures from Fe saturation to 1 atm pressure.

  1. Enfermedad de Chagas congenita en la Ciudad de Salta, Argentina Congenital Chagas' disease in Salta, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Zaidenberg

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la respuesta clínica y serológica a la infección chagásica de 937 embarazadas y sus 929 recién nacidos (RN vivos, grupo I; 4 RN de origen diverso, grupo II y 35 RN derivados de otros centros, grupo III. Las embarazadas se estudiaron con 3 reacciones serológicas; se definió infección cuando 2 o más reacciones eran positivas. En los RN el diagnóstico se confirmó por observación directa del T. cruzi en una muestra de sangre. Los RN con Chagas congénita (RN-ChC fueron tratados y seguidos con estudios clínicos y de laboratorio. Se detectaron 149 embarazadas chagásicas (15.9%, de las cuales se diagnosticaron 6 RN-ChC (4%. En el total de 968 RN estudiados se detectaron 12 RN infectados. El micro-hematócrito fue el método parasitológico de lectura rápida más efectivo para el diagnóstico de infección en nuestra serie. El par de reacciones serológicas específicas constituyó un criterio de mayor seguridad para el control y seguimiento de la infección congénita. Las expresiones clínicas más comunes de infección fueron hepatomegalia, esplenomegalia, ictericia, anemia y prematurez, con distintos grados de asociación. Se concluye que dadas las características clínicas de la enfermedad de Chagas congénita en nuestro medio, se impone como estrategia el diagnóstico serológico para la enfermedad de Chagas en todas las embarazadas y el control y seguimiento de sus RN hasta descartar o confirmar infección congénita.The immune response to Trypanosoma cruzi was studied in our hospital in 937 pregnant women (PW and their 929 newborns (NB, group I; 4 NB from this center not included in the first group, group II and 35 NB derived from other centers, group III. Two positive results among indirect hemagglutination (IHA, complement fixation (CF and indirect hemagglutination (IHA, complement fixation (CF and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF tests were considered as the criterion of previous infection with T. cruzi in PW. The

  2. Acuity and case management: a healthy dose of outcomes, part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Diane L; Craig, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This is the third of a 3-part series presenting 2 effective applications--acuity and dosage--that describe how the business case for case management (CM) can be made. In Part I, dosage and acuity concepts were explained as client need-severity, CM intervention-intensity, and CM activity-dose prescribed by amount, frequency, duration, and breadth of activities. Concepts were presented that related the practice of CM to the use of evidence-based practice (EBP), knowledge, and methods and the development of instruments that measure and score pivotal CM actions. Part I also featured a specific exemplar, the CM Acuity Tool, and described how to use acuity to identify and score the complexity of a CM case. Part II further explained dosage and 2 acuity instruments, the Acuity Tool and AccuDiff. Part III presents linkage to EBP and practical applications. The information contained in the 3-part series applies to all CM practice settings and contains ideas and recommendations useful to CM generalists, specialists, supervisors, and business and outcomes managers. The Acuity Tools Project was developed from frontline CM practice in one large, national telephonic CM company. Dosage: A literature search failed to find research into dosage of a behavioral intervention. The Huber-Hall model was developed and tested in a longitudinal study of CM models in substance abuse treatment and reported in the literature. Acuity: A structured literature search and needs assessment launched the development of the suite of acuity tools. A gap analysis identified that an instrument to assign and measure case acuity specific to CM activities was needed. Clinical experts, quality specialists, and business analysts (n = 7) monitored the development and testing of the tools, acuity concepts, scores, differentials, and their operating principles and evaluated the validity of the acuity tools' content related to CM activities. During the pilot phase of development, interrater reliability testing of

  3. Carlos Chagas Discoveries as a Drop Back to Scientific Construction of Chronic Chagas Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Restini, Carolina Baraldi A; Couto, Lucélio B

    2016-07-01

    The scientific construction of chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD) started in 1910 when Carlos Chagas highlighted the presence of cardiac arrhythmia during physical examination of patients with chronic Chagas disease, and described a case of heart failure associated with myocardial inflammation and nests of parasites at autopsy. He described sudden cardiac death associated with arrhythmias in 1911, and its association with complete AV block detected by Jacquet's polygraph as Chagas reported in 1912. Chagas showed the presence of myocardial fibrosis underlying the clinical picture of CCHD in 1916, he presented a full characterization of the clinical aspects of CCHD in 1922. In 1928, Chagas detected fibrosis of the conductive system, and pointed out the presence of marked cardiomegaly at the chest X-Ray associated with minimal symptomatology. The use of serological reaction to diagnose CCHD was put into clinical practice in 1936, after Chagas' death, which along with the 12-lead ECG, revealed the epidemiological importance of CCHD in 1945. In 1953, the long period between initial infection and appearance of CCHD was established, whereas the annual incidence of CCHD from patients with the indeterminate form of the disease was established in 1956. The use of heart catheterization in 1965, exercise stress testing in 1973, Holter monitoring in 1975, Electrophysiologic testing in 1973, echocardiography in 1975, endomyocardial biopsy in 1981, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 1995, added to the fundamental clinical aspects of CCHD as described by Carlos Chagas.

  4. Carlos Chagas Discoveries as a Drop Back to Scientific Construction of Chronic Chagas Heart Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B., E-mail: rbestetti44@gmail.com; Restini, Carolina Baraldi A.; Couto, Lucélio B. [Universidade de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-15

    The scientific construction of chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD) started in 1910 when Carlos Chagas highlighted the presence of cardiac arrhythmia during physical examination of patients with chronic Chagas disease, and described a case of heart failure associated with myocardial inflammation and nests of parasites at autopsy. He described sudden cardiac death associated with arrhythmias in 1911, and its association with complete AV block detected by Jacquet's polygraph as Chagas reported in 1912. Chagas showed the presence of myocardial fibrosis underlying the clinical picture of CCHD in 1916, he presented a full characterization of the clinical aspects of CCHD in 1922. In 1928, Chagas detected fibrosis of the conductive system, and pointed out the presence of marked cardiomegaly at the chest X-Ray associated with minimal symptomatology. The use of serological reaction to diagnose CCHD was put into clinical practice in 1936, after Chagas' death, which along with the 12-lead ECG, revealed the epidemiological importance of CCHD in 1945. In 1953, the long period between initial infection and appearance of CCHD was established, whereas the annual incidence of CCHD from patients with the indeterminate form of the disease was established in 1956. The use of heart catheterization in 1965, exercise stress testing in 1973, Holter monitoring in 1975, Electrophysiologic testing in 1973, echocardiography in 1975, endomyocardial biopsy in 1981, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 1995, added to the fundamental clinical aspects of CCHD as described by Carlos Chagas.

  5. Carlos Chagas Discoveries as a Drop Back to Scientific Construction of Chronic Chagas Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo B. Bestetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scientific construction of chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD started in 1910 when Carlos Chagas highlighted the presence of cardiac arrhythmia during physical examination of patients with chronic Chagas disease, and described a case of heart failure associated with myocardial inflammation and nests of parasites at autopsy. He described sudden cardiac death associated with arrhythmias in 1911, and its association with complete AV block detected by Jacquet's polygraph as Chagas reported in 1912. Chagas showed the presence of myocardial fibrosis underlying the clinical picture of CCHD in 1916, he presented a full characterization of the clinical aspects of CCHD in 1922. In 1928, Chagas detected fibrosis of the conductive system, and pointed out the presence of marked cardiomegaly at the chest X-Ray associated with minimal symptomatology. The use of serological reaction to diagnose CCHD was put into clinical practice in 1936, after Chagas' death, which along with the 12-lead ECG, revealed the epidemiological importance of CCHD in 1945. In 1953, the long period between initial infection and appearance of CCHD was established, whereas the annual incidence of CCHD from patients with the indeterminate form of the disease was established in 1956. The use of heart catheterization in 1965, exercise stress testing in 1973, Holter monitoring in 1975, Electrophysiologic testing in 1973, echocardiography in 1975, endomyocardial biopsy in 1981, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 1995, added to the fundamental clinical aspects of CCHD as described by Carlos Chagas.

  6. Honduras stands out in fight against chagas disease | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-25

    Jan 25, 2011 ... The model is based on community involvement to both treat and prevent Chagas. ... treat children with Chagas and educate the population on how to control ... parents, children, and community leaders—monitored homes and ...

  7. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Detailed FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I prevent infection? What is Chagas disease? Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , which is transmitted to animals and people by insect vectors that are found only in the Americas (mainly, ...

  8. Epidemiology of Chagas disease in Ecuador. A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar V H Marcelo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a complex public health problem that has been underestimated in Ecuador. Here we review the relevant published information, and present unpublished and new data that help to understand the current Chagas disease epidemiological situation and its evolution in the country. Three main characteristics have been identified: (i persistence of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in already known foci; (ii a marked endemicity in some urban areas of Guayaquil; and (iii the transformation of new Amazon foci into truly endemic areas. The situation in other suspect areas remains uncertain. Five Triatominae species have been implicated in the transmission of T. cruzi to people in Ecuador (Triatoma dimidiata, Rhodnius ecuadoriensis, R. pictipes, R. robustus and Panstrongylus geniculatus, but some others may also play a role in some areas (P. rufotuberculatus, P. howardi, T. carrioni and P. chinai. Other Triatominae reported seem to have little or no epidemiological relevance (T. venosa, T. dispar, Eratyrus mucronatus, E. cuspidatus, P. lignarius and Cavernicola pilosa. High frequency of acute cases and severe chronic disease has been observed. Although cardiomyopathy is more frequent, serious digestive disease is also present. It is estimated that around 120,000-200,000 people may be infected. 2.2 to 3.8 million people are estimated to live under transmission risk conditions.

  9. Behavioural alterations are independent of sickness behaviour in chronic experimental Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Ruivo, Leonardo Alexandre de Souza; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-12-01

    The existence of the nervous form of Chagas disease is a matter of discussion since Carlos Chagas described neurological disorders, learning and behavioural alterations in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals. In most patients, the clinical manifestations of the acute phase, including neurological abnormalities, resolve spontaneously without apparent consequence in the chronic phase of infection. However, chronic Chagas disease patients have behavioural changes such as psychomotor alterations, attention and memory deficits, and depression. In the present study, we tested whether or not behavioural alterations are reproducible in experimental models. We show that C57BL/6 mice chronically infected with the Colombian strain of T. cruzi (150 days post-infection) exhibit behavioural changes as (i) depression in the tail suspension and forced swim tests, (ii) anxiety analysed by elevated plus maze and open field test sand and (iii) motor coordination in the rotarod test. These alterations are neither associated with neuromuscular disorders assessed by the grip strength test nor with sickness behaviour analysed by temperature variation sand weight loss. Therefore, chronically T. cruzi-infected mice replicate behavioural alterations (depression and anxiety) detected in Chagas disease patients opening an opportunity to study the interconnection and the physiopathology of these two biological processes in an infectious scenario.

  10. Freqüência das infecções pelo HIV-1, rubéola, sífilis, toxoplasmose, citomegalovírus, herpes simples, hepatite B, hepatite C, doença de Chagas e HTLV I/II em gestantes, do Estado de Mato Grosso do Sul Frequency of HIV-1, rubella, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, simple herpes virus, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, Chagas’ disease and HTLV I/II infection in pregnant women of State of Mato Grosso do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Antonio Figueiró-Filho

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar a freqüência das infecções por sífilis, rubéola, hepatite B, hepatite C, toxoplasmose, doença de Chagas, HTLV I/II, herpes simples, HIV-1 e citomegalovírus em gestantes e relacionar a faixa etária das pacientes com a freqüência das infecções. Estudo transversal de 32.512 gestantes submetidas à triagem pré-natal no período de novembro de 2002 a outubro de 2003. As freqüências encontradas foram de 0,2% para infecção pelo vírus HIV-1, 0,03% para rubéola, 0,8% para sífilis, 0,4% para toxoplasmose, 0,05% para infecção aguda pelo citomegalovírus, 0,02% pelo vírus herpes simples, 0,3% para hepatite B (HBsAg, 0,1% para hepatite C, 0,1% para HTLV I/II e 0,1% para doença de Chagas. Houve associação significativa entre faixa etária e infecções por rubéola, citomegalovírus, doença de Chagas e herpes vírus. As freqüências de rubéola, sífilis, toxoplasmose, doença de Chagas e citomegalovírus nas gestantes encontram-se abaixo dos valores descritos na literatura.It was aimed to estimate the frequency of syphilis, rubella, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, toxoplasmosis, Chagas’ disease, HTLV I/II, simple herpes virus, HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus in pregnant women and to evaluate the relationship between age and the frequency of the infections studied. A transversal study of 32,512 pregnant women submitted to pre-natal sreening in the period of November 2002 to October 2003. The frequency of the tried infections among the pregnant women were 0.2% of HIV-1, 0.03% of rubella, 0.8% of syphilis, 0.4% of toxoplasmosis, 0.05% of cytomegalovirus, 0.02% of simple herpes virus, 0.3% of HBsAg, 0.1% of hepatitis C, 0.1% of HTLV and 0.1% of Chagas’ disease. There was significative statistical association between age and prenatal infection of rubella, cytomegalovirus, Chagas’ disease and herpes virus. The rates of frequency of rubella, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, Chagas’ disease and cytomegalovirus in pregnant women

  11. Enfermedad de Chagas en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Serpa Florez

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Generalidades.

    La tripanosomiasis americana o enfermedad de Chagas se halla ampliamente distribuida en Centro y Sur América. La Organización Mundial de la Salud considera que pueden haber doce millones de casos de esta dolencia en el continente (1, estudiados principalmente en Argentina, Brasil y Venezuela. Se calcula que en Colombia tendríamos una incidencia muy alta de casos, (Marinkelle (2 estima que 7.140/0 de la población podría estar infectada o sea cerca de dos millones de personas, distribuidos en las zonas rurales del nordeste del país (cuenca del Catatumbo Magdalena Medio y Llanos Orientales (Piedemonte, Macarena y Meta cercano (3 (4 (5 Y que seis millones de nuestros compatriotas -22.30/0 de la población total- (2 corren el riesgo de adquirir la enfermedad pues habitan en regiones donde se dan las condiciones para que ésta se propague.


    RESEÑA HISTORICA DE LA ENFERMEDAD EN COLOMBIA
    La existencia de casos de tripanosomiasis americana y de sus vectores fue comprobada en Colombia desde 1929 cuando César Uribe Piedrahita (6 encontró en Prado, Tolima, vectores del mal infectados con T.

    cruzi e Ignacio Moreno Pérez observó dicho hemoflagelado en sangre de seres humanos en Cali (4. En los años siguientes Hernando Ucrós, Benjamín Otálora, Hernando Groot, Santiago Renjifo, Hernando Osorno, Carlos Duarte Rangel, C.J. Marinkelle, Augusto Corredor, Ernesto Suescún y varios otros investigadores colomb iano s describieron diversos focos de la enfermedad en Colombia y estudiaron la distribución de sus vectores y huéspedes intermediarios. En 1947 1. Caicedo y C. Hernández publicaron su informe sobre los primeros casos crónicos de enfermedad de Chagas comprobados en nuestro país, procedentes de la región de Fusagasugá, Cundinamarca (7 en tanto que, en 1961, Marcos Duque inicia los estudios sobre cardiopatía chagásica (8 y Hernando Rocha, en 1971, comunica

  12. Aspectos neurológicos da moléstia de chagas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritz Köberle

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Chagas related in more than two 200 cases, what he called "nervous forms" of trypanosomiasis, that is neurological manifestations from central origin (idiotism, infantilism, pseudo-bulbar paralysis, aphasia, cerebellar ataxia, atetosis, espostic or paralytic diplegia, disbasia. At that time Chagas expressed his concepts as follows: "In relation to the frequency of trypanosomiasis nervous forms we have performed many observations which allow us to state that this disease is the one which causes the largest number of organic affections of the central nervous system, in human pathology". We are plenty convinced by Chagas's statement. By experiments on animals of laboratory we have very often noticed a rather varied neurological symptomatology, being worth point out identical syndromes to those observed by Chagas. Our autopsy material non-rarely include chronic Chagas cases presenting a most varied symtomatology. Among them we have named only three cases of discerebral nanism, a rather rare affection in other parts of the world and relatively frequent in our material. The fact which we have demonstrated, i.e., a relatively great decreasing of number of nervous cells in the peripheral system could happen in the central nervous system as well. Provided that there are only two quantitative works on neuron number diminishing in the central nervous system in mice and rats we decline to go into further details about central neuropathies in man. We emphasized the necessity to perform researches on this field by means of intimate collaboration between clinicians and pathologists, as the only way to confirm on scientific basis all that was observed by the panoramic and genial vision of Carlos Chagas.

  13. Chagas Disease Infection among Migrants at the Mexico/Guatemala Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Erin E; Ordoñez, Teresa López; Cordon-Rosales, Celia; Casanueva, Carmen Fernández; Miranda, Sonia Morales; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2017-10-01

    Chagas disease results in the largest burden, in terms of disability-adjusted-life-years, of any parasitic disease in the Americas. Monitoring Chagas disease among migrants is critical to controlling its spread and to serving the needs of the migrant community. Therefore, we determined the prevalence and correlates of Chagas disease in regional and international migrant populations at the Mexico/Guatemala border. Data were collected as part of a larger study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and migration. Participants were a sample of recent regional and international migrants who used an illicit substance or had recent problem drinking. Trypanosoma cruzi infection was classified as testing positive on two different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Interviewer-administered surveys captured sociodemographics, migration history, Chagas disease knowledge, and access to care. We enrolled 389 recent migrants, and the prevalence of Chagas disease was 3.1%. Only 19% of the participants reported having ever heard of the disease and less than 1% had been previously tested. Trypanosoma cruzi -positive participants were more likely to have been born in a rural area or town than a city (92% yes versus 59% no, P = 0.02) and have recently lived in a house with a makeshift roof (33% yes versus 8% no, P < 0.01), walls (42% yes versus 13% no, P < 0.01), or floor (50% yes versus 21% no, P < 0.02), or cinderblock walls (92% yes versus 63% no, P = 0.04). With migration rapidly changing the distribution of Chagas disease, more work needs to be done to create targeted surveillance programs and provide access to affordable treatment among Latin American migrants.

  14. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  15. Technical Reports (Part I). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information Systems of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center (WN-REC) funded by a Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant. These reports describe methods of interpreting the printouts from the Student Information System;…

  16. [Institutional insertion of Chagas' disease control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Antônio Carlos; Pimenta, Fabiano

    2011-01-01

    After the starting of the Center for studies and prophylaxis of Chagas disease in 1943, with the help of Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, in the city of Bambuí, state of Minas Gerais, technological and methodological basis for the extensive control of the disease were conceived. A main step to achieve success was the introduction of a new insecticide (gammexane, P 530) and the demonstration of its efficacy in the vector control. A consequence of these improvements was the official inauguration of the first prophylactic campaign for Chagas disease in Brazil, held in Uberaba in May, 1950. Even with the knowledge of how to control the vectorial transmission, financial resources were not available by this time, at a necessary degree to make it both regularly and in all the affected area. The institutional allocation of these activities is useful to understand the low priority given to them at that time. Several national services were created in 1941, for diseases as malaria, pest, smallpox, among others, but Chagas was included in a group of diseases with lower importance, inside a Division of Sanitary Organization. In 1956, the National Department of Rural endemies (DNERu) allocate all the major endemic diseases in a single institution, however this was not translated in an implementation program for the control of Chagas disease. After profound changes at the Ministry of Health, in 1970, the Superintendência de Campanhas de Saúde Pública (SUCAM) was in charge of all rural endemies including Chagas disease, which now could compete with other diseases transmitted by vectors, formerly priorities, included in the National Division. With this new status, more funds were available, as well as redistribution of personnel and expenses from the malaria program to the vectorial control of Chagas disease. In 1991 the Health National foundation was created to substitute SUCAM in the control of endemic diseases and it included all the units of the Ministry of Health related to

  17. A mathematical model of Chagas disease transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Dayat; Nugraha, Edwin Setiawan; Nuraini, Nuning

    2018-03-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection caused by protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi which is transmitted to human by insects of the subfamily Triatominae, including Rhodnius prolixus. This disease is a major problem in several countries of Latin America. A mathematical model of Chagas disease with separate vector reservoir and a neighboring human resident is constructed. The basic reproductive ratio is obtained and stability analysis of the equilibria is shown. We also performed sensitivity populations dynamics of infected humans and infected insects based on migration rate, carrying capacity, and infection rate parameters. Our findings showed that the dynamics of the infected human and insect is mostly affected by carrying capacity insect in the settlement.

  18. Fracture toughness of A533B Part III - variability of A533B fracture toughness as determined from Charpy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, S.G.; Eyre, B.L.

    1978-08-01

    This is the final part of a series of three reports examining the upper shelf fracture toughness of A533B Class 1 pressure vessel steel. Part I (AERE R 8968) critically reviews the current elasto plastic fracture mechanics methodologies employed to characterise toughness following extensive yielding and Part II (AERE R 8969) examines several sources of fracture mechanics data pertinent to A533B Class 1 in the longitudinal (RW) orientation. Part III is a review of the effects of (i) position and orientation within the plate (ii) welding processes and post weld heat treatment and (iii) neutron irradiation as measured by Charpy impact testing. It is concluded that the upper shelf factor energy is dependent on orientation and position and can be reduced by welding, extended post weld heat treatments and neutron irradiation. Neutron irradiation effects are known to be strongly dependent on composition and metallurgical conditions, but an explanation for the variability following extended post weld treatments has yet to be resolved. (author)

  19. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-01-01

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs.

  20. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs

  1. Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments, part III: Whole-body sensation and comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie [Center for the Built Environment, UC Berkeley (United States); Han, Taeyoung [General Motors Company (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A three-part series presents the development of models for predicting the local thermal sensation (Part I) and local thermal comfort (Part II) of different parts of the human body, and also the whole-body sensation and comfort (Part III) that result from combinations of local sensation and comfort. The models apply to sedentary activities in a range of environments: uniform and non-uniform, stable and transient. They are based on diverse findings from the literature and from body-part-specific human subject tests in a climate chamber. They were validated against a test of automobile passengers. The series is intended to present the models' rationale, structure, and coefficients, so that others can test them and develop them further as additional empirical data becomes available. A) The whole-body (overall) sensation model has two forms, depending on whether all of the body's segments have sensations effectively in the same direction (e.g warm or cool), or whether some segments have sensations opposite to those of the rest of the body. For each, individual body parts have different weights for warm versus cool sensations, and strong local sensations dominate the overall sensation. If all sensations are near neutral, the overall sensation is close to the average of all body sensations. B) The overall comfort model also has two forms. Under stable conditions, people evaluate their overall comfort by a complaint-driven process, meaning that when two body parts are strongly uncomfortable, no matter how comfortable the other body parts might be, the overall comfort will be near the discomfort level of the two most uncomfortable parts. When the environmental conditions are transient, or people have control over their environments, overall comfort is better than that of the two most uncomfortable body parts. This can be accounted for by adding the most comfortable vote to the two most uncomfortable ones. (author)

  2. PIO I-II tendencies. Part 2. Improving the pilot modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan URSU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study is conceived in two parts and aims to get some contributions to the problem ofPIO aircraft susceptibility analysis. Part I, previously published in this journal, highlighted the mainsteps of deriving a complex model of human pilot. The current Part II of the paper considers a properprocedure of the human pilot mathematical model synthesis in order to analyze PIO II typesusceptibility of a VTOL-type aircraft, related to the presence of position and rate-limited actuator.The mathematical tools are those of semi global stability theory developed in recent works.

  3. Active Control of Low-Speed Fan Tonal Noise Using Actuators Mounted in Stator Vanes: Part III Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Remington, Paul J.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    A test program to demonstrate simplification of Active Noise Control (ANC) systems relative to standard techniques was performed on the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan from May through September 2001. The target mode was the m = 2 circumferential mode generated by the rotor-stator interaction at 2BPF. Seven radials (combined inlet and exhaust) were present at this condition. Several different error-sensing strategies were implemented. Integration of the error-sensors with passive treatment was investigated. These were: (i) an in-duct linear axial array, (ii) an induct steering array, (iii) a pylon-mounted array, and (iv) a near-field boom array. The effect of incorporating passive treatment was investigated as well as reducing the actuator count. These simplified systems were compared to a fully ANC specified system. Modal data acquired using the Rotating Rake are presented for a range of corrected fan rpm. Simplified control has been demonstrated to be possible but requires a well-known and dominant mode signature. The documented results here in are part III of a three-part series of reports with the same base title. Part I and II document the control system and error-sensing design and implementation.

  4. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice ar...

  5. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Short Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presen...

  6. Chagas disease. A new pathophysiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redruello, M.; Masoli, O.; Hasson, I.; Cragnolino, D.; Traverso, S.; Perez Balino, N.; Sarmiento, R.; Lazzari, J.; Luluaga, E.

    2002-01-01

    Background: There is scarce information on myocardial perfusion abnormalities and on the coronary vasomotor condition in Chagas disease patients. Aims: To assess regional perfusion abnormalities and the coronary vasomotor response of patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease. Methods: With the use of 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT imaging and cold pressor test and intracoronary acetylcoline (ACH) perfusion, we studied 9 patients aged 42,6±12 years, 4 males, in the chronic stage of Chagas disease (5 with the indeterminate form and 4 with heart lesion) with normal coronary arteries. Vasomotor responses to intracoronary increasing doses of ACH and to a single dose of nitroglycerine (NTG) were assessed with digital quantitative angiography. Regional myocardial perfusion was evaluated at rest and after cold pressor test by a semi quantitative score analysis in an 18-segment model with 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT images. Results were expressed as mean ± 2SD. Differences between continuous variables were measured by two tails Student's t test for paired variables and the significance level was set at 5 %. Results: All patients had regional perfusion defects and abnormal vasomotor response. The diameter of the left anterior descending artery decreased 34% from a basal diameter of 3.66∫0.95 mm down to 2.42±0.74 mm after maximal response to ACH (p<0.002). NTG infusion augmented its diameter to 3.86±0.77 mm (p<0.0002) that is a 60% increase from post ACH diameter. Myocardial perfusion score was 1∫2.66 at rest and 6.22±3.6 after cold pressor test (p<0.0001). Conclusions: This group of patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease showed an abnormal vasoconstrictive response to intracoronary ACH and cold-induced perfusion defects suggesting that endothelial dysfunction plays a role in the pathophysiology of chronic Chagas heart disease

  7. Antibacterianos de acción sistémica: Parte III. Sulfonamidas y tetraciclinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cué Brugueras

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Se presenta la tercera parte de una revisión bibliográfica sobre los antibacterianos de elección, en la cual se abordan los grupos sulfonamidas y tetraciclinas; además, se incluye un cuadro resumen con los antibióticos tratados en las tres partes, así como sus vías de administración y nombres comerciales que se utilizan en Cuba. Se hacen algunas consideraciones sobre la manera de enfrentar la gran variedad de antibióticos y el costo de la antibióticoterapia por parte de los países en vías de desarrollo, tomando como referencia algunas recomendaciones hechas por la OPS/OMSSummary: The third part of a bibliographic review on the elective antibacterials in which the groups of sulfonamides and tetracyclines are approached is presented. It is also included a summary picture with the antibiotics dealt with in the three parts, the routes of administration, and the trade names used in Cuba. Some considerations are made on the way to face the wide range of antibiotics and the cost of antibiotic therapy in the developing countries, taking into account some recommendations made by the PAHO/WHO

  8. Transport properties of gaseous ions over a wide energy range. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, H.W.; Thackston, M.G.; McDaniel, E.W.; Mason, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper updates and extends in scope our two previous papers entitled ''Transport Properties of Gaseous Ions over a Wide Energy Range.'' The references to the earlier publications (referred to as ''Part I'' and ''Part II'') are I, H. W. Ellis, R. Y. Pai, E. W. McDonald, E. A. Mason, and L. A. Viehland, ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES 17, 177--210 (19876); and II, H. W. Ellis, E. W. McDaniel, D. L. Albritton, L. A. Veihland, S. L. Lin, and E. A. Mason, ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES 22, 179--217 (1978). Parts I and II contained compilations of experimental data on ionic mobilities and diffusion coefficients (both longitudinal and transverse) for ions in neutral gase (almost exclusively at room temperature) in an externally applied electric field

  9. Discrete typing units of Trypanosoma cruzi detected by real-time PCR in Chilean patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-San Martín, Catalina; Zulantay, Inés; Saavedra, Miguel; Fuentealba, Cristián; Muñoz, Gabriela; Apt, Werner

    2018-05-07

    Chagas disease is a major public health problem in Latin America and has spread to other countries due to immigration of infected persons. 10-30% of patients with chronic Chagas disease will develop cardiomyopathy. Chagas cardiomyopathy is the worst form of the disease, due to its high morbidity and mortality. Because of its prognostic value and adequate medical monitoring, it is very important to identify infected people who could develop Chagas cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to determine if discrete typing units (DTUs) of Trypanosoma cruzi are related to the presence of heart disease in patients with chronic Chagas disease. A total of 86 untreated patients, 41 with cardiomyopathy and 45 without heart involvement were submitted to clinical study. Electrocardiograms and echocardiograms were performed on the group of cardiopaths, in which all important known causes of cardiomyopathy were discarded. Sinus bradycardia and prolonged QTc interval were the most frequent electrocardiographic alterations and patients were classified in group I (46%) and group II (54%) of New York Hearth Association. In all cases real-time PCR genotyping assays were performed. In the group with cardiomyopathy, the most frequent DTU was TcI (56.1%), followed by TcII (19.5%). Mixed infections TcI + TcII were observed in 7.3% of the patients. In the group without cardiac pathologies, TcI and TcII were found at similar rates (28.9 and 31.1%, respectively) and mixed infections TcI + TcII in 17.8% of the cases. TcIII and TcIV were not detected in any sample. Taken together, our data indicate that chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in Chile can be caused by strains belonging to TcI and TcII. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the Chagas disease control program in Açucena Municipality, Rio Doce Valley, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Adriana dos; Letro, Rejane Balmant; Lemos do Bem, Vitor Antônio; Azeredo, Bernardino Vaz de Melo; Coelho, George Luiz Lins Machado; Diotaiuti, Liléia; Machado-de-Assis, Girley Francisco; de Lana, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Açucena Municipality, Rio Doce Valley, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil temporarily (2001-2005) interrupted epidemiological surveillance for Chagas disease. The objective of this work was to evaluate the Chagas Disease Control Program (CDCP) in Açucena and to offer suggestions for improving local epidemiological surveillance. This study was conducted in three phases: I) a serological investigation of schoolchildren aged 5 to 15 years using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test performed on blood collected on filter paper followed by ELISA, indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and indirect hemaglutination (IHA) on venous blood for borderline cases and those in the gray zone of reactivity; II) vector evaluation using the data obtained by local health agents during 2006-2010; and III) examination by ELISA, IIF and IHA of serum samples from the inhabitants of houses where infected Triatoma vitticeps was found and evaluation of their knowledge about Chagas disease. Five individuals had inconclusive results in the ELISA screening but were seronegative for Chagas disease. The triatomine evaluation revealed the presence of three species: Triatoma vitticeps, Panstrongylus megistus and Panstrongylus diasi. Triatoma vitticeps was the most prevalent and widespread, with a higher (67%) index of Trypanosoma cruzi flagellates and evidence of colonization. Most of the inhabitants of the infested houses recognized triatomines and had basic knowledge about Chagas disease. Although T. vitticeps is not clearly associated with Chagas disease transmission, these results highlight the importance of maintaining CDCP in endemic areas and the need for greater emphasis on epidemiological surveillance, especially in areas with important vectorial changes or that have been modified by human intervention.

  11. Evaluation of the Chagas Disease Control Program in Açucena Municipality, Rio Doce Valley, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana dos Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Açucena Municipality, Rio Doce Valley, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil temporarily (2001-2005 interrupted epidemiological surveillance for Chagas disease. The objective of this work was to evaluate the Chagas Disease Control Program (CDCP in Açucena and to offer suggestions for improving local epidemiological surveillance. Methods This study was conducted in three phases: I a serological investigation of schoolchildren aged 5 to 15 years using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA test performed on blood collected on filter paper followed by ELISA, indirect immunofluorescence (IIF and indirect hemaglutination (IHA on venous blood for borderline cases and those in the gray zone of reactivity; II vector evaluation using the data obtained by local health agents during 2006-2010; and III examination by ELISA, IIF and IHA of serum samples from the inhabitants of houses where infected Triatoma vitticeps was found and evaluation of their knowledge about Chagas disease. Results Five individuals had inconclusive results in the ELISA screening but were seronegative for Chagas disease. The triatomine evaluation revealed the presence of three species: Triatoma vitticeps, Panstrongylus megistus and Panstrongylus diasi. Triatoma vitticeps was the most prevalent and widespread, with a higher (67% index of Trypanosoma cruzi flagellates and evidence of colonization. Most of the inhabitants of the infested houses recognized triatomines and had basic knowledge about Chagas disease. Conclusions Although T. vitticeps is not clearly associated with Chagas disease transmission, these results highlight the importance of maintaining CDCP in endemic areas and the need for greater emphasis on epidemiological surveillance, especially in areas with important vectorial changes or that have been modified by human intervention.

  12. Serodiagnosis of chronic Chagas infection by using EIE-Recombinant-Chagas-Biomanguinhos kit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Yara M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A kit based on an enzyme immunoassay, EIE-Recombinant-Chagas-Biomanguinhos, developed by the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, was evaluated for the serodiagnosis of chronic Chagas disease. Evaluation was performed with 368 serum samples collected from individuals living in an endemic area for Chagas disease: 131 patients in the chronic phase with confirmed clinical, epidemiological, and serological diagnosis (indirect immunofluorescence, indirect hemagglutination or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and 237 nonchagasic seronegative individuals were considered negative control. The EIE-Recombinant-Chagas-Biomanguinhos kit showed high sensitivity, 100% (CI 95%: 96.4-100% and high specificity, 100% (CI 95%: 98-100%. The data obtained were in full agreement with clinical and conventional serology data. In addition, no cross-reaction was observed with sera from patients with cutaneous (n=14 and visceral (n=3 leishmaniasis. However, when these sera were tested by conventional serological assays for Chagas disease, cross-reactions were detected in 14.3% and 33.3% of the patients with cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, respectively. No cross-reactions were observed when sera from nonchagasic seronegative patients bearing other infectious disease (syphilis, n=8; HTLV, n=8; HCV, n=7 and HBV, n=12 were tested. In addition, sera of patients with inconclusive results for Chagas disease by conventional serology showed results in agreement with clinical evaluation, when tested by the kit. These results are relevant and indicate that the refered kit provides a safe immunodiagnosis of Chagas disease and could be used in blood bank screening.

  13. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase III), I-V, Part III, Reactor poisoning; Razrada metoda teorijske analize nuklearnih reaktora (III faza) I-IV, III Deo, Zatrovanje reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-01-15

    Report on calculation of poisoning in experimental and power reactor includes four parts. Part one describes the influence of poisoning on the physical parameters of a reactor. part two includes transformation of differential equations for iodine and xenon. It was needed for easier solution of of differential equation using the analog computer. This calculation was done for RA reactor operating at 5 MW power. The RA reactor was used an example of calculation by the proposed method. Part four shows the application of the method for calculating the Calder Hall power reactor.

  14. The energy balance experiment EBEX-2000. Part III: Behaviour and quality of the radiation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohsiek, W.; Liebethal, C.; Foken, T.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S.P.; Bernhofer, C.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    An important part of the Energy Balance Experiment (EBEX-2000) was the measurement of the net radiation and its components. Since the terrain, an irrigated cotton field, could not be considered homogeneous, radiation measurements were made at nine sites using a variety of radiation instruments,

  15. Broadcasting Stations of the World; Part III. Frequency Modulation Broadcasting Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Washington, DC.

    This third part of "Broadcasting Stations of the World", which lists all reported radio broadcasting and television stations, with the exception of those in the United States which broadcast on domestic channels, covers frequency modulation broadcasting stations. It contains two sections: one indexed alphabetically by country and city, and the…

  16. CBIOS Science Sessions - 2016 - Part I and III National Symposium on Nanoscience and Biomedical Nanotechnology - Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Monteiro Rodrigues, et al.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CBiOS Science Sessions - 2016 – Part 1 New methods to explore efficacy and safety of natural origin products; Stefânia Duz Delsin Effectiveness of Hypopressive Exercises in women with pelvic floor dysfunctions; Beatriz Navarro Brazález Indoor air quality in baby rooms: a study about VOC levels; Raquel Rodrigues dos Santos, Ana Sofia Fernandes e Liliana Mendes A medicinal chemistry approach for the development of novel anti-tumor agentes; Maria M. M. Santos Isolation, modelling and phytosome forms of antibacterial and anti-proliferative compounds from Plectranthus spp; Diogo Matias Intellectual Property – Patenting Propriedade Intelectual – Patenteamento Rui Gomes Biomarkers in wastewater; Álvaro Lopes A Contribution for a Better Comprehension of Donkey Dentistry: the Importance of Dental Care; João Brandão Rodrigues Characterization of Lusitano’s Pure Blood Pressure Centers using two pressure plates; Pequito M.; Gomes-Costa M.; Prazeres J.; Bragança M.; Roupa I.; Fonseca R.G.; Abrantes J. Application of photoplethysmography to monitor heart rate in dogs; Rui Assunção, Henrique Silva, João Requicha, Luis Lobo, Luis Monteiro Rodrigues Looking into the oscillatory properties of the laser Doppler flowmetry signal in human microcirculation; Henrique Silva, Hugo Ferreira, Marie-Ange Renault, Alain-Pierre Gadeau, Julia Buján, LM Rodrigues III Symposium of Nanoscience and Biomedical Nanotechnology – Proceedings April 15/04/2016 Lisboa - Universidade Lusófona Honor Commitee /Comissão de Honra Magnífico Reitor da Universidade Lusófona, Mário Moutinho Presidente do Conselho de Administração da Universidade Lusófona, Manuel de Almeida Damásio Sr. Bastonário da Ordem dos Engenheiros, Carlos Matias Ramos Sr. Bastonário da Ordem dos Médicos, José Silva Vice-presidente do Conselho de Enfermagem, Maria José Costa Dias Presidente da Associação Nacional de Farmácias, Paulo Cleto Duarte Presidente da Sociedade Portuguesa de Ci

  17. LHC Beam Dump Design Study - Part III : Off-normal operating conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, L; Ross, M; Sala, P

    2000-01-01

    The LHC beam dump design study has been preliminarily substantiated by energy deposition simulations (Part I) and heat transfer analyses (Part II). The present report is devoted to the abnormal operating conditions induced by a malfunction of the beam diluters. A general approach to the analysis of off-normal operation is presented, which is derived from standard design norms adopted in the nuclear industry. Attention is focused mainly on the carbon core, which is longitudinally split into segments of different density in order to better distribute the deposited energy. The maximum energy density it absorbs decreases by at least 33%, compared to a uniform standard density carbon core. This structure may sustain any partial sweep failure without major damage, up to the ultimate beam intensity and energy. To minimise the risks inherent in a fully unswept beam, a sacrificial graphite mandrel will be placed on the core axis, surrounded by a thick high strength carbon-carbon composite tube. With this arrangement, ...

  18. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-06-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the "elevator technique". All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the "Journal of Ultrasonography".

  19. Burnout in boiling heat transfer. Part III. High-quality forced-convection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergles, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    This is the final part of a review of burnout during boiling heat transfer. The status of burnout in high-quality forced-convection systems is reviewed, and recent developments are summarized in detail. A general guide to the considerable literature is given. Parametric effects and correlations for water in circular and noncircular ducts are presented. Other topics discussed include transients, steam-generator applications, correlations for other fluids, fouling, and augmentation

  20. PIO I-II tendencies case study. Part 1. Mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TOADER

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a study is performed from the perspective of giving a method to reduce the conservatism of the well known PIO (Pilot-Induced Oscillation criteria in predicting the susceptibility of an aircraft to this very harmful phenomenon. There are three interacting components of a PIO – the pilot, the vehicle, and the trigger (in fact, the hazard. The study, conceived in two parts, aims to underline the importance of human pilot model involved in analysis. In this first part, it is shown, following classical sources, how the LQG theory of control and estimation is used to obtain a complex model of human pilot. The approach is based on the argument, experimentally proved, that the human behaves “optimally” in some sense, subject to his inherent psychophysical limitations. The validation of such model is accomplished based on the experimental model of a VTOL-type aircraft. Then, the procedure of inserting typical saturation nonlinearities in the open loop transfer function is presented. A second part of the paper will illustrate PIO tendencies evaluation by means of a grapho-analytic method.

  1. Building Worlds and Learning Astronomy on Facebook Part III: Testing, Launch, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, J.; Hines, D.; Vidugiris, E.; Goldman, K. H.

    2015-11-01

    James Harold (SSI), Dean Hines (STScI/SSI) and a team at the National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute are developing Starchitect, an end-to-end stellar and planetary evolution game for the Facebook platform. Supported by NSF and NASA, and based in part on a prototype presented at ASP several years ago, Starchitect uses the “sporadic play” model of games such as Farmville, where players might only take actions a few times a day, but may continue playing for months. This paper is an update to a presentation at last year's ASP conference.

  2. National Energy Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. The format and organization of the document should be regarded as transitional. For the most part the document is organized to be consistent with the program structure approved for the National Energy Board. 16 figs

  3. National Energy Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. The format and organization of the document should be regarded as transitional. For the most part the document is organized to be consistent with the program structure approved for the National Energy Board. 16 figs.

  4. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part III. Renormalization equations and their solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actis, S.; Passarino, G.

    2006-12-01

    In part I and II of this series of papers all elements have been introduced to extend, to two loops, the set of renormalization procedures which are needed in describing the properties of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. In this paper, the final step is undertaken and finite renormalization is discussed. Two-loop renormalization equations are introduced and their solutions discussed within the context of the minimal standard model of fundamental interactions. These equations relate renormalized Lagrangian parameters (couplings and masses) to some input parameter set containing physical (pseudo-)observables. Complex poles for unstable gauge and Higgs bosons are used and a consistent setup is constructed for extending the predictivity of the theory from the Lep1 Z-boson scale (or the Lep2 WW scale) to regions of interest for LHC and ILC physics. (orig.)

  5. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part III. Renormalization equations and their solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Actis, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Passarino, G. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    In part I and II of this series of papers all elements have been introduced to extend, to two loops, the set of renormalization procedures which are needed in describing the properties of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. In this paper, the final step is undertaken and finite renormalization is discussed. Two-loop renormalization equations are introduced and their solutions discussed within the context of the minimal standard model of fundamental interactions. These equations relate renormalized Lagrangian parameters (couplings and masses) to some input parameter set containing physical (pseudo-)observables. Complex poles for unstable gauge and Higgs bosons are used and a consistent setup is constructed for extending the predictivity of the theory from the Lep1 Z-boson scale (or the Lep2 WW scale) to regions of interest for LHC and ILC physics. (orig.)

  6. Study of irradiated bone: Part III. /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate autoradiographic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.A.; Corriveau, O.; Casarett, G.W.; Weber, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    The macroautoradiographic and microautoradiographic localization of /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate (/sup 99m/TcPPi) was studied in x-irradiated bone of rabbits up to one year post-irradiation. In cortical bone, /sup 99m/TcPPi was concentrated on bone surfaces near vasculature. Both forming and resorbing bone surfaces were comparably labeled at 2 hrs post-injection. Uptake on the surface of sites of haversian bone remodeling was observed to be at least part of the increased /sup 99m/TcPPi observed in irradiated bone in camera images. In irradiated trabecular bone 12 months following irradiation, a patchy decrease in /sup 99m/TcPPi uptake was correlated with localized decreases in vasculature

  7. Atomic Energy Control Board 1991-92 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. 22 figs

  8. Atomic Energy Control Board 1991-92 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. 22 figs.

  9. Atomic Energy Control Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. 7 refs., 21 figs

  10. Atomic Energy Control Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. 7 refs., 21 figs.

  11. Notes on the Birds of Central Oaxaca, Part III: Hirundinidae to Fringillidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Forcey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Notas sobre las aves de Oaxaca central, parte II: Hirundinidae a Fringillidae Se reportan nuevos datos que amplían y clarifican nuestro conocimiento del estatus y distribución de 112 especies de aves en la región central del Estado de Oaxaca. Las observaciones se realizaron abarcando partes de los distritos de Centro, Etla, Ixtlan, Tlacolula, y Zaachila dentro de 35 km alrededor de la Ciudad de Oaxaca. El reporte se basa en observaciones tomadas durante 752 días, comprendidos entre diciembre 1996 y mayo 2002. Los principales hábitats del área son de pino-encino (incluyendo zonas pequeñas de pino-encino-oyamel y pino-encino mezclado con pastizales, matorral de encino, matorral subtropical, vegetación riparia, y vegetación secundaria, campos agrícolas y otros (incluyendo áreas urbanas, jardines, y parques. Las siguientes especies se reportan por primera vez en la zona: Progne sinaloae (registro nuevo en el estado de Oaxaca, Thryothorus felix, Hylocichla mustelina, Vermivora pinus, Vermivora chrysoptera, Dendroica pensylvanica, Dendroica magnolia, Dendroica fusca, Dendroica graciae, Oporornis philadelphia, Wilsonia canadensis, y Spiza americana.Además, las siguientes nueve especies se han reportado solamente en los Conteos Navideños o por registros únicos: Tachycineta bicolor, Dumetella carolinensis, Vermivora peregrina, Dendroica dominica, Dendroica discolor, y Piranga erythrocephala (en temporada de reproducción. Se reportan datos de la reproducción de 43 especies, 18 de los cuales no se habían registrado en estado reproductivo antes en esta zona. De estos 43, 39 se pueden agrupar como reproduciéndose en los meses de abril a julio.

  12. [Seroepidemiology of Chagas disease in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Castrejón, O; Valdespino, J L; Tapia-Conyer, R; Salvatierra, B; Guzmán-Bracho, C; Magos, C; Llausás, A; Gutiérrez, G; Sepúlveda, J

    1992-01-01

    The lack of information about Chagas disease in Mexico, as well as the controversy concerning its importance, was the basis for the seroprevalence study of Trypanosoma cruzi in the National Seroepidemiology Survey (NSS). This information was representative of the national situation with regard to disease prevalences and other factors related to the nation's health. Unfortunately the NSS was not a very good information source for the study of trypanosomiasis americana, because its coverage in the disperse rural areas was poor. Nevertheless, the results of the NSS indicated that Chagas disease has an irregular distribution in Mexico with seroprevalences of 1.6, 0.5 and 0.2 for the different dilution levels used in the evaluation. The survey data showed Chagas disease to be less important than that mentioned by other authors. The NSS data confirmed the areas of disease transmission already reported and identified some new ones in Hidalgo, Chiapas and Veracruz. The survey also detected migratory workers with Chagas antibodies in Baja California border cities, a situation which indicates a risk for blood transfusion in areas of the country presumed to be free of the disease. Three quarters (74.5%) of the seropositive population were less than 39 years old. Moreover, the fact that children of less than four years were infected suggests that natural transmission is still very important in some areas. Although the seroprevalences were greater in the lower socio-economic groups, some persons of the higher socio-economic level were also affected. This situation may be explained by the fact that many of these persons own vacation homes in tropical areas.

  13. Circuit modeling of the electrical impedance: part III. Disuse following bone fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiffman, C A

    2013-01-01

    Multifrequency measurements of the electrical impedance of muscle have been extended to the study of disuse following bone fracture, and analyzed using the five-element circuit model used earlier in the study of the effects of disease. Eighteen subjects recovering from simple fractures on upper or lower limbs were examined (ten males, eight females, aged 18–66). Muscles on uninjured contralateral limbs were used as comparison standards, and results are presented in terms of the ratios p(injured)/p(uninjured), where p stands for the circuit parameter r 1 , r 2 , r 3 , 1/c 1 or 1/c 2 . These are strikingly similar to the diseased-to-healthy ratios for patients with neuromuscular disease, reported in part I of this series. In particular, r 1 is virtually unaffected and the ratios for r 2 , r 3 , 1/c 1 and 1/c 2 can be as large as in serious disease. Furthermore, the same pattern of relationships between the parameters is found, suggesting that there is a common underlying mechanism for the impedance changes. Atrophy and fibrosis are examined as candidates for that mechanism, but it is argued that their effects are too small to explain the observed changes. Fundamental considerations aside, the sensitivity, reproducibility and technical simplicity of the technique recommend its use for in-flight assessments of muscles during orbital or interplanetary missions. (paper)

  14. The Systemic Theory of Living Systems and Relevance to CAM: the Theory (Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Olalde Rangel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Western medical science lacks a solid philosophical and theoretical approach to disease cognition and therapeutics. My first two articles provided a framework for a humane medicine based on Modern Biophysics. Its precepts encompass modern therapeutics and CAM. Modern Biophysics and its concepts are presently missing in medicine, whether orthodox or CAM, albeit they probably provide the long sought explanation that bridges the abyss between East and West. Key points that differentiate Systemic from other systems' approaches are ‘Intelligence’, ‘Energy’ and the objective ‘to survive’. The General System Theory (GST took a forward step by proposing a departure from the mechanistic biological concept—of analyzing parts and processes in isolation—and brought us towards an organismic model. GST examines the system's components and results of their interaction. However, GST still does not go far enough. GST assumes ‘Self-Organization’ as a spontaneous phenomenon, ignoring a causative entity or central controller to all systems: Intelligence. It also neglects ‘Survive’ as the directional motivation common to any living system, and scarcely assigns ‘Energy’ its true inherent value. These three parameters, Intelligence, Energy and Survive, are vital variables to be considered, in our human quest, if we are to achieve a unified theory of life.

  15. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part III: Stochastic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Massimo; Salizzoni, Pietro; Soulhac, Lionel; Cassiani, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the reliability of the Lagrangian stochastic micromixing method in predicting higher-order statistics of the passive scalar concentration induced by an elevated source (of varying diameter) placed in a turbulent boundary layer. To that purpose we analyze two different modelling approaches by testing their results against the wind-tunnel measurements discussed in Part I (Nironi et al., Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 2015, Vol. 156, 415-446). The first is a probability density function (PDF) micromixing model that simulates the effects of the molecular diffusivity on the concentration fluctuations by taking into account the background particles. The second is a new model, named VPΓ, conceived in order to minimize the computational costs. This is based on the volumetric particle approach providing estimates of the first two concentration moments with no need for the simulation of the background particles. In this second approach, higher-order moments are computed based on the estimates of these two moments and under the assumption that the concentration PDF is a Gamma distribution. The comparisons concern the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration and the evolution of the PDF along the plume centreline. The novelty of this work is twofold: (i) we perform a systematic comparison of the results of micro-mixing Lagrangian models against experiments providing profiles of the first four moments of the concentration within an inhomogeneous and anisotropic turbulent flow, and (ii) we show the reliability of the VPΓ model as an operational tool for the prediction of the PDF of the concentration.

  16. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part III: Stochastic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Massimo; Salizzoni, Pietro; Soulhac, Lionel; Cassiani, Massimo

    2018-06-01

    We analyze the reliability of the Lagrangian stochastic micromixing method in predicting higher-order statistics of the passive scalar concentration induced by an elevated source (of varying diameter) placed in a turbulent boundary layer. To that purpose we analyze two different modelling approaches by testing their results against the wind-tunnel measurements discussed in Part I (Nironi et al., Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 2015, Vol. 156, 415-446). The first is a probability density function (PDF) micromixing model that simulates the effects of the molecular diffusivity on the concentration fluctuations by taking into account the background particles. The second is a new model, named VPΓ, conceived in order to minimize the computational costs. This is based on the volumetric particle approach providing estimates of the first two concentration moments with no need for the simulation of the background particles. In this second approach, higher-order moments are computed based on the estimates of these two moments and under the assumption that the concentration PDF is a Gamma distribution. The comparisons concern the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration and the evolution of the PDF along the plume centreline. The novelty of this work is twofold: (i) we perform a systematic comparison of the results of micro-mixing Lagrangian models against experiments providing profiles of the first four moments of the concentration within an inhomogeneous and anisotropic turbulent flow, and (ii) we show the reliability of the VPΓ model as an operational tool for the prediction of the PDF of the concentration.

  17. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System-Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wichgersm Joel M.; Haynes, Brian; Roy, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present progress made in the studies and describe the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified as part of the study. NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project integrates solutions for a safe, efficient and high-capacity airspace system through joint research efforts and partnerships with other government agencies. The CTD Project is one of two within NASA's Airspace Systems Program and is managed by the NASA Ames Research Center. Research within the CTD Project is in support the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan Sub-Goal 4.1: Develop innovative solutions and advanced technologies, through a balanced research portfolio, to improve current and future air transportation. The focus of CTD is on developing capabilities in traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations and airport surface operations. Important to its research is the development of human/automation information requirements and decisionmaking guidelines for human-human and human-machine airportal decision-making. Airborne separation, oceanic intrail climb/descent and interval management applications depend on location and intent information of surrounding aircraft. ADS-B has been proposed to provide the information exchange, but other candidates such as satellite-based receivers, broadband or airborne internet, and cellular communications are possible candidate's.

  18. Ultrasound assessment of selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part III: Injuries and postoperative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The previous articles of the series devoted to ultrasound diagnostics of peripheral nerves concerned the most common nerve pathologies, i.e. entrapment neuropathies. The aim of the last part of the series is to present ultrasound possibilities in the postoperative control of the peripheral nerves as well as in the diagnostics of the second most common neuropathies of peripheral nerves, i.e. posttraumatic lesions. Early diagnostics of posttraumatic changes is of fundamental importance for the course of treatment and its long-term effects. It aids surgeons in making treatment decisions (whether surgical or conservative. When surgical treatment is necessary, the surgeon, based on US findings, is able to plan a given type of operative method. In certain cases, may even abandon the corrective or reconstructive surgery of the nerve trunk (when there are extensive defects of the nerve trunks and instead, proceed with muscle transfers. Medical literature proposes a range of divisions of the kinds of peripheral nerve injuries depending on, among others, the mechanism or degree of damage. However, the most important issue in the surgeon-diagnostician communication is a detailed description of stumps of the nerve trunks, their distance and location. In the postoperative period, ultrasound is used for monitoring the operative or conservative treatment effects including the determination of the causes of a persistent or recurrent neuropathy. It facilitates decision-making concerning a repeated surgical procedure or assuming a wait-and-see attitude. It is a difficult task for a diagnostician and it requires experience, close cooperation with a clinician and knowledge concerning surgical techniques. Apart from a static assessment, a dynamic assessment of possible adhesions constitutes a crucial element of postoperative examination. This feature distinguishes ultrasound scanning from other methods used in the diagnostics of peripheral neuropathies.

  19. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit F: Managing Human Resources. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-level colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit F focuses on proper management of human…

  20. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit A: Managing the Business. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit A focuses on the management process. It…

  1. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit B: Financial Management. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit B focuses on good financial management…

  2. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit H: Business Protection. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in part III is operating a business. Unit H focuses on business protection. It…

  3. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit G: Community Relations. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups of vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit G focuses on community relations. It…

  4. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit E: Successful Selling. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit E focuses on personal (face-to-face)…

  5. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit D: Marketing Management. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit D focuses on market management. It…

  6. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part III. Innovativeness, applications, economy, development scenarios, politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    important role of ET is combined with the existence in the society of an adequate infrastructure which recreates the full development cycle of high technology embracing: people, institutions, finances and logistics, in this also science, higher education, education, continuous training, dissemination and outreach, professional social environment, legal basis, political support and lobbying, innovation structures, applications, industry and economy. The digest of chosen development tendencies in ET was made here from the academic perspective, in a wider scale and on this background the national one, trying to situate this branch in the society, determine its changing role to build a new technical infrastructure of a society based on knowledge, a role of builder of many practical gadgets facilitating life, a role of a big future integrator of today's single bricks into certain more useful unity. This digest does not have a character of a systematic analysis of ET. It is a kind of an arbitrary utterance of the authors inside their field of competence. The aim of this paper is to take an active part in the discussion of the academic community in this country on the development strategy of ET, choice of priorities for cyclically rebuilding economy, in competitive environments. The review paper was initiated by the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunications of Polish Academy of Sciences and was published in Polish as introductory chapter of a dedicated expertise, printed in a book format. This version makes the included opinions available for a wider community.

  7. Molecular Epidemiologic Source Tracking of Orally Transmitted Chagas Disease, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Maikell; Martínez, Clara E.; Messenger, Louisa A.; Nessi, Anaibeth; Londoño, Juan C.; Espinosa, Raul; Martínez, Cinda; Alfredo, Mijares; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael; Lewis, Michael D.; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Miles, Michael A.; Llewellyn, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    Oral outbreaks of Chagas disease are increasingly reported in Latin America. The transitory presence of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites within contaminated foods, and the rapid consumption of those foods, precludes precise identification of outbreak origin. We report source attribution for 2 peri-urban oral outbreaks of Chagas disease in Venezuela via high resolution microsatellite typing. PMID:23768982

  8. Gas exchange during exercise in different evolutional stages of chronic Chagas' heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Palha de Oliveira

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare gas exchange at rest and during exercise in patients with chronic Chagas' heart disease grouped according to the Los Andes clinical/hemodynamic classification. METHODS: We studied 15 healthy volunteers and 52 patients grouped according to the Los Andes clinical/hemodynamic classification as follows: 17 patients in group IA (normal electrocardiogram/echocardiogram, 9 patients in group IB (normal electrocardiogram and abnormal echocardiogram, 14 patients in group II (abnormal electrocardiogram/echocardiogram, without congestive heart failure, and 12 patients in group III (abnormal electrocardiogram/echocardiogram with congestive heart failure. The following variables were analyzed: oxygen consumption (V O2, carbon dioxide production (V CO2, gas exchange rate (R, inspiratory current volume (V IC, expiratory current volume (V EC, respiratory frequency, minute volume (V E, heart rate (HR, maximum load, O2 pulse, and ventilatory anaerobic threshold (AT. RESULTS: When compared with the healthy group, patients in groups II and III showed significant changes in the following variables: V O2peak, V CO2peak, V ICpeak, V ECpeak, E, HR, and maximum load. Group IA showed significantly better results for these same variables as compared with group III. CONCLUSION: The functional capacity of patients in the initial phase of chronic Chagas' heart disease is higher than that of patients in an advanced phase and shows a decrease that follows the loss in cardiac-hemodynamic performance.

  9. Gas exchange during exercise in different evolutional stages of chronic Chagas' heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, F P; Pedrosa, R C; Giannella-Neto, A

    2000-12-01

    To compare gas exchange at rest and during exercise in patients with chronic Chagas' heart disease grouped according to the Los Andes clinical hemodynamic classification. We studied 15 healthy volunteers and 52 patients grouped according to the Los Andes clinical and hemodynamic classification as follows: 17 patients in group IA (normal electrocardiogram and echocardiogram), 9 patients in group IB (normal electrocardiogram and abnormal echocardiogram), 14 patients in group II (abnormal electrocardiogram and echocardiogram, without congestive heart failure), and 12 patients in group III (abnormal electrocardiogram and echocardiogram with congestive heart failure). The following variables were analyzed: oxygen consumption (V O2), carbon dioxide production (V CO2), gas exchange rate (R), inspiratory current volume (V IC), expiratory current volume (V EC), respiratory frequency, minute volume (V E), heart rate (HR), maximum load, O2 pulse, and ventilatory anaerobic threshold (AT). When compared with the healthy group, patients in groups II and III showed significant changes in the following variables: V O2 peak, V CO2 peak, V IC peak, V EC peak, E, HR, and maximum load. Group IA showed significantly better results for these same variables as compared with group III. The functional capacity of patients in the initial phase of chronic Chagas' heart disease is higher than that of patients in an advanced phase and shows a decrease that follows the loss in cardiac-hemodynamic performance.

  10. [Carlos Chagas Filho: an articulator of the history of sciences in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Heloisa Maria Bertol

    2012-06-01

    A letter sent in 1982 by a group of scientists to the president of Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico appealed for a policy of preservation of Brazilian scientific culture. The name of Carlos Chagas Filho topped the list of signatures thereby proving his commitment to that proposal, the ideological structure of which was part of his experience in scientific policy in Brazil and abroad. This document harks back to the practice of the history of the sciences in Brazil and the creation of places for the safeguard and organization of scientific memory, such as the Museu de Astronomia e Ciências Afins, Casa de Oswaldo Cruz and the Sociedade Brasileira de História da Ciência, of which Carlos Chagas Filho was an inaugural member of the board of directors.

  11. Workshop 95. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Out of 140 short communications presented in the proceedings, 13 have been inputted into INIS. The topics covered include lifetime control in semiconductor devices by ion irradiation, single crystal scintillation detectors, environmental monitoring, diffusion and sorption of radionuclides in soils, accelerator driven reactors, radioactive waste disposal, digital reactor control systems and research reactors. (Z.S.)

  12. Workshop 95. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Out of 140 short communications presented in the proceedings, 13 have been inputted into INIS. The topics covered include lifetime control in semiconductor devices by ion irradiation, single crystal scintillation detectors, environmental monitoring, diffusion and sorption of radionuclides in soils, accelerator driven reactors, radioactive waste disposal, digital reactor control systems and research reactors. (Z.S.).

  13. A doença de Chagas no Paraná Chagas disease in the state of Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. de Souza-Araujo

    1954-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent speech in Curitiba (May 22nd, 1954, Dr. Mario Pinotti, Director, Serviço Nacional da Malaria, informed that his personnel started on February, 1953, a survey upon chagas Disease in 23 counties of the State of Paraná, South Brazil. out of 895 places surveyed, 678, or 75.7%, were infected by Triatoma infestans klug 1834 and in 234 out of those 678, or 34.5%, this vector was infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. The general natural infection of the insects examined reached 18.86%. The serological survey (Machado-Guerreiro test was positive in 10.7% of the persons examined in jacarezinho and in 28.3% of those living in Bôa Vista. These data suggested the author to actualise the subject. During his control of severe outbreack of malaria in the North part of Paraná, from march to June 1917 he worked in 8 counties. March 1917 he photographed in Boa Vista four girls, severe cases of chronic malaria, two of which showed bi-palpebral oedema, later on considered by Dr. Pinho Simões (1943 as Romanã syndrome (created in 1935 and Prof. Salvador Mazza (1946 classified as typical cases of Chagas' Disease. now, being elapsed 36 years, the National Service of Malaria confirmed the discovery. The region surveyed was populated, in the beginning of this century, by immigrants from the State of Minas Gerais, from where the author believes that were imported the disease and its vectors. In April 1917 the A. discovered that the old town Jatahy was a big focus of Triatoma megista (now Panstrongylus megistus0. All its 43 houses were strongly infested by such hematophagus and amongst the 200 inhabitants seen many were suspicious cases of chronic cases of Chagas's Disease. In the Indians town (three tribes of S. Pedro D' Alcantara, situated in front of Jatahy, in the left side of the river Tibagy, there were no Triatomas nor suspicious cases of trypanosomiasis. In 1919 the author started the control of the endemics by destroying the foci of Triatomas and reforming

  14. Chagas disease, a risk factor for high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicco, Miguel Hernán; Rodeles, Luz; Yódice, Agustina; Marcipar, Iván

    2014-12-01

    Chagas disease is a parasite infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Its most common complications is chronic Chagas heart disease but impairments of the systemic vasculature also has been observed. Although the different mechanisms that regulate blood pressure are disrupted, to our knowledge data on the association of hypertension and chronic Chagas disease are scarce. In this regard we evaluate whether Chagas disease constitutes a high blood pressure risk factor. We recruited 200 individuals, half of them with positive serology for T. cruzi. They were subjected to a complete clinical examination. The mean age of sampled individuals was 46.7 ± 12.3, and the mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 124 ± 12 mmHg and 82 ± 10 mmHg, respectively. There were no between-group differences regarding age, sex distribution or body mass index. Chagas disease contributed significantly to high blood pressure (OR = 4, 95% CI 1.8323-7.0864, p = 0.0002). Our results reveal an important association between Chagas disease and high blood pressure, which should be contemplated by physicians in order to promote preventive cardiovascular actions in patients with Chagas disease.

  15. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part III: Experimental validation procedure and model extension to helical gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model's experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory globally, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure evolution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with the

  16. The impact of Chagas disease control in Latin America: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, J C P; Silveira, A C; Schofield, C J

    2002-07-01

    social care and improved productivity) is highly positive. Effective control of Chagas disease is now seen as an attainable goal that depends primarily on maintaining political will, so that the major constraints involve problems associated with the decentralisation of public health services and the progressive political disinterest in Chagas disease. Counterbalancing this are the political and technical cooperation strategies such as the "Southern Cone Initiative" launched in 1991. This international approach, coordinated by PAHO, has been highly successful, already reaching elimination of Chagas disease transmission in Uruguay, Chile, and large parts of Brazil and Argentina. The Southern Cone Initiative also helped to stimulate control campaigns in other countries of the region (Paraguay, Bolivia, Peru) which have also reached tangible regional successes. This model of international activity has been shown to be feasible and effective, with similar initiatives developed since 1997 in the Andean Region and in Central America. At present, Mexico and the Amazon Region remain as the next major challenges. With consolidation of operational programmes in all endemic countries, the future focus will be on epidemiological surveillance and care of those people already infected. In political terms, the control of Chagas disease in Latin America can be considered, so far, as a victory for international scientific cooperation, but will require continuing political commitment for sustained success.

  17. The impact of Chagas disease control in Latin America: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JCP Dias

    2002-07-01

    of medical and social care and improved productivity is highly positive. Effective control of Chagas disease is now seen as an attainable goal that depends primarily on maintaining political will, so that the major constraints involve problems associated with the decentralisation of public health services and the progressive political disinterest in Chagas disease. Counterbalancing this are the political and technical cooperation strategies such as the "Southern Cone Initiative" launched in 1991. This international approach, coordinated by PAHO, has been highly successful, already reaching elimination of Chagas disease transmission in Uruguay, Chile, and large parts of Brazil and Argentina. The Southern Cone Initiative also helped to stimulate control campaigns in other countries of the region (Paraguay, Bolivia, Peru which have also reached tangible regional successes. This model of international activity has been shown to be feasible and effective, with similar initiatives developed since 1997 in the Andean Region and in Central America. At present, Mexico and the Amazon Region remain as the next major challenges. With consolidation of operational programmes in all endemic countries, the future focus will be on epidemiological surveillance and care of those people already infected. In political terms, the control of Chagas disease in Latin America can be considered, so far, as a victory for international scientific cooperation, but will require continuing political commitment for sustained success.

  18. The Feasibility of Administering a Practical Clinical Examination in Podiatry at a College of Podiatric Medicine: Results of a Field Trial Under Simulated Part III Test Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Valletta, Michael

    1978-01-01

    The results of a practical clinical examination in podiatric medicine administered to fourth-year students are presented. The examination could become the prototype of a Part III practical clinical examination under the auspices of the National Board of Podiatry Examiners. Its feasibility is established and problems and issues are discussed.…

  19. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (83rd, Phoenix, Arizona, August 9-12, 2000). Miscellaneous, Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous, part III section of the proceedings contains the following 11 papers: "The Relationship between Health and Fitness Magazine Reading and Eating-Disordered Weight-Loss Methods among High School Girls" (Steven R. Thomsen, Michelle M. Weber, and Lora Beth Brown); "A Practical Exercise for Teaching Ethical Decision…

  20. A Multi-disciplinary Overview of Chagas in Periurban Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McCune

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available There are between 8 and 11 million cases of America Human Trypanosomiasis, commonly known as Chagas disease, in Latin America. Chagas is endemic in southern Peru, especially the Arequipa region, where it has expanded from poor, rural areas to periurban communities. This paper summarizes the findings of four studies in periurban Arequipa: on determinants of disease-vector infestation; on prevalence, spatial patterns, and risk factors of Chagas; on links between migration, settlement patterns, and disease-vector infestation; and on the relationship between discordant test results and spatially clustered transmission hotspots. These studies identified two risk factors associated with the disease: population dynamics and the urbanization of poverty. Understanding the disease within this new urban context will allow for improved public health prevention efforts and policy initiatives. Discovered in 1909 by Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, American Human Trypanosomiasis is a chronic and potentially life-threatening illness found throughout Latin America (Moncayo, 2003. Indeed, it is estimated that there are between 8 and 11 million cases in Mexico and Central and South America (Centers for Disease Control [CDC], 2009. Chagas disease, as it is most commonly known, is endemic in southern Peru, especially in the region of Arequipa. Once thought to be limited to poor, rural areas, the disease is now appearing in the periurban communities that surround Arequipa City, the capital of the region (Cornejo del Carpio, 2003. Understanding the urbanization of Chagas disease will allow public health and medical professionals to better combat the further transmission of the disease. After providing an overview of Chagas and introducing the scope of the disease in Latin America, this paper will summarize the findings of four recent studies conducted in periurban districts in Arequipa. Ultimately, this paper seeks to identify the risk factors associated with Chagas

  1. Air quality and climate change, Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia Phase III (MICS-Asia III) - Part 1: Overview and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meng; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Zirui; Li, Meng; Xin, Jinyuan; Tao, Zhining; Li, Jiawei; Kang, Jeong-Eon; Huang, Kan; Dong, Xinyi; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Shu; Ge, Baozhu; Wu, Qizhong; Cheng, Yafang; Wang, Yuesi; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Fu, Joshua S.; Wang, Tijian; Chin, Mian; Woo, Jung-Hun; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zifa; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2018-04-01

    Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) Phase III examines how online coupled air quality models perform in simulating high aerosol pollution in the North China Plain region during wintertime haze events and evaluates the importance of aerosol radiative and microphysical feedbacks. A comprehensive overview of the MICS-Asia III Topic 3 study design, including descriptions of participating models and model inputs, the experimental designs, and results of model evaluation, are presented. Six modeling groups from China, Korea and the United States submitted results from seven applications of online coupled chemistry-meteorology models. Results are compared to meteorology and air quality measurements, including data from the Campaign on Atmospheric Aerosol Research Network of China (CARE-China) and the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET). The correlation coefficients between the multi-model ensemble mean and the CARE-China observed near-surface air pollutants range from 0.51 to 0.94 (0.51 for ozone and 0.94 for PM2.5) for January 2010. However, large discrepancies exist between simulated aerosol chemical compositions from different models. The coefficient of variation (SD divided by the mean) can reach above 1.3 for sulfate in Beijing and above 1.6 for nitrate and organic aerosols in coastal regions, indicating that these compositions are less consistent from different models. During clean periods, simulated aerosol optical depths (AODs) from different models are similar, but peak values differ during severe haze events, which can be explained by the differences in simulated inorganic aerosol concentrations and the hygroscopic growth efficiency (affected by varied relative humidity). These differences in composition and AOD suggest that future models can be improved by including new heterogeneous or aqueous pathways for sulfate and nitrate formation under hazy conditions, a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemical

  2. Utilizing Chemical Genomics to Identify Cytochrome b as a Novel Drug Target for Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpi Khare

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unbiased phenotypic screens enable identification of small molecules that inhibit pathogen growth by unanticipated mechanisms. These small molecules can be used as starting points for drug discovery programs that target such mechanisms. A major challenge of the approach is the identification of the cellular targets. Here we report GNF7686, a small molecule inhibitor of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, and identification of cytochrome b as its target. Following discovery of GNF7686 in a parasite growth inhibition high throughput screen, we were able to evolve a GNF7686-resistant culture of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Clones from this culture bore a mutation coding for a substitution of leucine by phenylalanine at amino acid position 197 in cytochrome b. Cytochrome b is a component of complex III (cytochrome bc1 in the mitochondrial electron transport chain and catalyzes the transfer of electrons from ubiquinol to cytochrome c by a mechanism that utilizes two distinct catalytic sites, QN and QP. The L197F mutation is located in the QN site and confers resistance to GNF7686 in both parasite cell growth and biochemical cytochrome b assays. Additionally, the mutant cytochrome b confers resistance to antimycin A, another QN site inhibitor, but not to strobilurin or myxothiazol, which target the QP site. GNF7686 represents a promising starting point for Chagas disease drug discovery as it potently inhibits growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50 of 0.15 µM, and is highly specific for T. cruzi cytochrome b. No effect on the mammalian respiratory chain or mammalian cell proliferation was observed with up to 25 µM of GNF7686. Our approach, which combines T. cruzi chemical genetics with biochemical target validation, can be broadly applied to the discovery of additional novel drug targets and drug leads for Chagas disease.

  3. A Main Steam Safety Valve (MSSV) With Fixed Blowdown According to ASME Section III,Part NC-7512

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follmer, Bernhard; Schnettler, Armin

    2002-01-01

    In 1986, the NRC issued the Information Notice (IN) 86-05 'Main Steam Safety Valve test failures and ring setting adjustments'. Shortly after this IN was issued, the Code was revised to require that a full flow test has to be performed on each CL.2 MSSV by the manufacturer to verify that the valve was adjusted so that it would reach full lift and thus full relieving capacity and would re-close at a pressure as specified in the valve Design Specification. In response to the concern discussed in the IN, the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) performed extensive full flow testing on PWR MSSVs and found that each valve required a unique setting of a combination of two rings in order to achieve full lift at accumulation of 3% and re-closing at a blowdown of 5%. The Bopp and Reuther MSSV type SiZ 2507 has a 'fixed blowdown' i.e. without any adjusting rings to adjust the 'blowdown' so that the blowdown is 'fixed'. More than 1000 pieces of this type are successfully in nuclear power plants in operation. Many of them since about 25 years. Therefore it can be considered as a proven design. It is new that an optimization of this MSSV type SiZ 2507 fulfill the requirements of part NC-7512 of the ASME Section III although there are still no adjusting rings in the flow part. In 2000, for the Qinshan Candu unit 1 and 2 full flow tests were performed with 32 MSSV type SiZ 2507 size 8'' x 12'' at 51 bar saturated steam in only 6 days. In all tests the functional performance was very stable. It was demonstrated by recording the signals lift and system pressure that all valves had acceptable results to achieve full lift at accumulation of 3% and to re-close at blowdown of 5%. This is an advantage which gives a reduction in cost for flow tests and which gives more reliability after maintenance work during outage compared to the common MSSV design with an individual required setting of the combination of the two rings. The design of the type SiZ 2507 without any adjusting rings in the

  4. Congenital Chagas disease as an ecological model of interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi parasites, pregnant women, placenta and fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the main ecological interactions between the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and its hosts, the mother and the fetus, leading to the transmission and development of congenital Chagas disease. One or several infecting strains of T. cruzi (with specific features) interact with: (i) the immune system of a pregnant woman whom responses depend on genetic and environmental factors, (ii) the placenta harboring its own defenses, and, finally, (iii) the fetal immune system displaying responses also susceptible to be modulated by maternal and environmental factors, as well as his own genetic background which is different from her mother. The severity of congenital Chagas disease depends on the magnitude of such final responses. The paper is mainly based on human data, but integrates also complementary observations obtained in experimental infections. It also focuses on important gaps in our knowledge of this congenital infection, such as the role of parasite diversity vs host genetic factors, as well as that of the maternal and placental microbiomes and the microbiome acquisition by infant in the control of infection. Investigations on these topics are needed in order to improve the programs aiming to diagnose, manage and control congenital Chagas disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chagas Cardiomyopathy in New Orleans and the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Robert C; Burak, Joshua; Tiwari, Sumit; Chakraborti, Chayan; Sander, Gary E

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, affects 6-7 million people worldwide annually, primarily in Central and South America, and >300,000 people in the United States. CD consists of acute and chronic stages. Hallmarks of acute CD include fever, myalgia, diaphoresis, hepatosplenomegaly, and myocarditis. Symptoms of chronic CD include pathologic involvement of the heart, esophagus, and colon. Myocardial involvement is identifiable by electrocardiogram and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showing inflammation and left ventricular wall functional abnormalities. We present two cases of CD identified in a single hospital in the Southeastern United States. Case 1 presents a patient with symptoms of anginal chest pain and associated shortness of breath with myocardial involvement suggestive of ischemic infarction but normal coronary arteries. Case 2 describes a patient with no physical symptoms and echocardiogram with ejection fraction of 50% with posterolateral and anterolateral wall hypokinesis but normal coronary arteries. With a growing number of immigrants from Central and South America in the United States, it is imperative for clinicians to include CD as part of the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with heart disease who have a history of exposure to T. cruzi endemic areas.

  6. Carvedilol Enhances the Antioxidant Effect of Vitamins E and C in Chronic Chagas Heart Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budni, Patrícia; Pedrosa, Roberto Coury; Dalmarco, Eduardo Monguilhott; Dalmarco, Juliana Bastos; Frode, Tânia Sílvia; Wilhelm, Danilo Filho

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is still an important endemic disease in Brazil, and the cardiac involvement is its more severe manifestation. To verify whether the concomitant use of carvedilol will enhance the antioxidant effect of vitamins E and C in reducing the systemic oxidative stress in chronic Chagas heart disease. A total of 42 patients with Chagas heart disease were studied. They were divided into four groups according to the modified Los Andes classification: 10 patients in group IA (normal electrocardiogram and echocardiogram; no cardiac involvement); 20 patients in group IB (normal electrocardiogram and abnormal echocardiogram; mild cardiac involvement); eight patients in group II (abnormal electrocardiogram and echocardiogram; no heart failure; moderate cardiac involvement); and four patients in group III (abnormal electrocardiogram and echocardiogram with heart failure; severe cardiac involvement). Blood levels of markers of oxidative stress were determined before and after a six-month period of treatment with carvedilol, and six months after combined therapy of carvedilol with vitamins E and C. The markers analyzed were as follows: activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and reductase, myeloperoxidade and adenosine deaminase; and the levels of reduced glutathione, thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances, protein carbonyls, vitamin E, and nitric oxide. After treatment with carvedilol, all groups showed significant decrease in protein carbonyls and reduced glutathione levels, whereas nitric oxide levels and adenosine activity increased significantly only in the less severely affected group (IA). In addition, the activity of most of the antioxidant enzymes was decreased in the less severely affected groups (IA and IB). By combining the vitamins with carvedilol, a reduction in protein damage, in glutathione levels, and in the activity of most of the antioxidant enzymes were observed. The decrease in oxidative

  7. Carvedilol Enhances the Antioxidant Effect of Vitamins E and C in Chronic Chagas Heart Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budni, Patrícia, E-mail: budnip@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Pedrosa, Roberto Coury [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Dalmarco, Eduardo Monguilhott; Dalmarco, Juliana Bastos; Frode, Tânia Sílvia; Wilhelm, Danilo Filho [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    Chagas disease is still an important endemic disease in Brazil, and the cardiac involvement is its more severe manifestation. To verify whether the concomitant use of carvedilol will enhance the antioxidant effect of vitamins E and C in reducing the systemic oxidative stress in chronic Chagas heart disease. A total of 42 patients with Chagas heart disease were studied. They were divided into four groups according to the modified Los Andes classification: 10 patients in group IA (normal electrocardiogram and echocardiogram; no cardiac involvement); 20 patients in group IB (normal electrocardiogram and abnormal echocardiogram; mild cardiac involvement); eight patients in group II (abnormal electrocardiogram and echocardiogram; no heart failure; moderate cardiac involvement); and four patients in group III (abnormal electrocardiogram and echocardiogram with heart failure; severe cardiac involvement). Blood levels of markers of oxidative stress were determined before and after a six-month period of treatment with carvedilol, and six months after combined therapy of carvedilol with vitamins E and C. The markers analyzed were as follows: activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and reductase, myeloperoxidade and adenosine deaminase; and the levels of reduced glutathione, thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances, protein carbonyls, vitamin E, and nitric oxide. After treatment with carvedilol, all groups showed significant decrease in protein carbonyls and reduced glutathione levels, whereas nitric oxide levels and adenosine activity increased significantly only in the less severely affected group (IA). In addition, the activity of most of the antioxidant enzymes was decreased in the less severely affected groups (IA and IB). By combining the vitamins with carvedilol, a reduction in protein damage, in glutathione levels, and in the activity of most of the antioxidant enzymes were observed. The decrease in oxidative

  8. Acute Chagas disease in El Salvador 2000-2012 - Need for surveillance and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Sasagawa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several parasitological studies carried out in El Salvador between 2000-2012 showed a higher frequency of acute cases of Chagas disease than that in other Central American countries. There is an urgent need for improved Chagas disease surveillance and vector control programs in the provinces where acute Chagas disease occurs and throughout El Salvador as a whole.

  9. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column: Part III: Follow up data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-03-01

    In this third and final part, the Spine Study Group (AG WS) of the German Trauma Association (DGU) presents the follow-up (NU) data of its second, prospective, internet-based multicenter study (MCS II) for the treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries including 865 patients from 8 trauma centers. Part I described in detail the epidemiologic data of the patient collective and the subgroups, whereas part II analyzed the different methods of treatment and radiologic findings. The study period covered the years 2002 to 2006 including a 30-month follow-up period from 01.01.2004 until 31.05.2006. Follow-up data of 638 (74%) patients were collected with a new internet-based database system and analyzed. Results in part III will be presented on the basis of the same characteristic treatment subgroups (OP, KONS, PLASTIE) and surgical treatment subgroups (Dorsal, Ventral, Kombi) in consideration of the level of injury (thoracic spine, thoracolumbar junction, lumbar spine). After the initial treatment and discharge from hospital, the average duration of subsequent inpatient rehabilitation was 4 weeks, which lasted significantly longer in patients with persistent neurologic deficits (mean 10.9 weeks) or polytraumatized patients (mean 8.6 weeks). Following rehabilitation on an inpatient basis, subsequent outpatient rehabilitation lasted on average 4 months. Physical therapy was administered significantly longer to patients with neurologic deficits (mean 8.7 months) or type C injuries (mean 8.6 months). The level of injury had no influence of the duration of the inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. A total of 382 (72.2%) patients who were either operated from posterior approach only or in a combined postero-anterior approach had an implant removal after an average 12 months. During the follow-up period 56 (8.8%) patients with complications were registered and of these 18 (2.8%) had to have surgical revision. The most common complications reported were infection, loss

  10. Cardiomiopatía de Chagas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rosas A.

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available

    La cardiomiopatía de Chagas es la causa más frecuente de cardiomiopatía en América Latina. Se constituye en la cuarta enfermedad parasitaria del continente, y es uno de los mayores problemas de salud pública en Colombia estimándose que existen 1.200.000 personas infectadas y que de éstos proba-blemente 25% desarrollaran una miocardiopatia crónica.

    En nuestro país pocas series clínicas han sido descritas, generalmente asociadas a falla cardíaca secundaria a una cardiomiopatía dilatada. El propósito de este trabajo es presentar una reseña histórica de la enfermedad en la que se incluyen los primeros trabajos clínicos desarrollados en nuestro medio. Así mismo, algunos aspectos de la fisiopatología y de la evolución clínica. Finalmente presentaremos la reciente experiencia acumulada en nuestro país en este campo por diferentes investigadores.

    Reseña Histórica
    En el año 1909 fue publicado el artículo original del Dr. Carlos Chagas, titulado “Nueva Trypanosomiasis Humana: estudios sobre la morfología y el ciclo evolutivo del Schizotrypanum Cruzi, agente etiológico de una nueva entidad mórbida en el hombre” (1. En él se describe como el Dr. Chagas, fue encomendado en 1907, por el Dr. Oswaldo Cruz (Director del instituto que posteriormente llevó su nombre, para ejecutar una campaña antipalúdica en los servicios de construcción de ferrocarriles en el norte del estado de Minas Gerais.

    En esa zona conoció la existencia de una hematófago denominado por los campesinos como “Barbeiro”, llamado así por que su picadura se localizaba usualmente en el rostro y era poco sintomática. El insecto habitaba en domicilios humanos, atacaba al hombre en la noche (después de apagar las luces, se ocultaba durante el día en las paredes y en los techos de las casas construidas en bahareque y paja. El hematófago fue identificado como perteneciente a la familia Reduviidae. Algunos de los

  11. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  12. Training the Next Generation of Scientists: System Dynamics Modeling of Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, P.; Hulse, A.; Harder, H. R.; Pierce, L. A.; Rizzo, D.; Hanley, J.; Orantes, L.; Stevens, L.; Justi, S.; Monroy, C.

    2015-12-01

    A computational simulation has been designed as an investigative case study by high school students to introduce system dynamics modeling into high school curriculum. This case study approach leads users through the forensics necessary to diagnose an unknown disease in a Central American village. This disease, Chagas, is endemic to 21 Latin American countries. The CDC estimates that of the 110 million people living in areas with the disease, 8 million are infected, with as many as 300,000 US cases. Chagas is caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, and is spread via blood feeding insect (vectors), that feed on vertebrates and live in crevasses in the walls and roofs of adobe homes. One-third of the infected people will develop chronic Chagas who are asymptomatic for years before their heart or GI tract become enlarged resulting in death. The case study has three parts. Students play the role of WHO field investigators and work collaboratively to: 1) use genetics to identify the host(s) and vector of the disease 2) use a STELLA™ SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) system dynamics model to study Chagas at the village scale and 3) develop management strategies. The simulations identify mitigation strategies known as Ecohealth Interventions (e.g., home improvements using local materials) to help stakeholders test and compare multiple optima. High school students collaborated with researchers from the University of Vermont, Loyola University and Universidad de San Carlos, Guatemala, working in labs, interviewing researchers, and incorporating mulitple field data as part of a NSF-funded multiyear grant. The model displays stable equilibria of hosts, vectors, and disease-states. Sensitivity analyses show measures of household condition and presence of vertebrates were significant leverage points, supporting other findings by the University research team. The village-scale model explores multiple solutions to disease mitigation for the purpose of producing

  13. Highly Effective Serodiagnosis for Chagas' Disease ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Pilar; Heimann, Michael; Riera, Cristina; Solano, Marco; Santalla, José; Luquetti, Alejandro O.; Beck, Ewald

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, contain characteristic arrays of highly repetitive immunogenic amino acid motifs. Diagnostic tests using these motifs in monomeric or dimeric form have proven to provide markedly improved specificity compared to conventional tests based on crude parasite extracts. However, in many cases the available tests still suffer from limited sensitivity. In this study we produced stable synthetic genes with maximal codon variability for the four diagnostic antigens, B13, CRA, TcD, and TcE, each containing between three and nine identical amino acid repeats. These genes were combined by linker sequences encoding short proline-rich peptides, giving rise to a 24-kDa fusion protein which was used as a novel diagnostic antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay setup. Validation of the assay with a large number of well-characterized patient sera from Bolivia and Brazil revealed excellent diagnostic performance. The high sensitivity of the new test may allow future studies to use blood collected by finger prick and dried on filter paper, thus dramatically reducing the costs and effort for the detection of T. cruzi infection. PMID:20668136

  14. Behavioural biology of Chagas disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Claudio Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Lorenzo, Marcelo Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselves and even predate the insects that try to feed on them. Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods. These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases. In this review article, we analyse various aspects of the behaviour of triatomine bugs to illustrate how each behavioural trait represents a particular adaptation to their close association with their hosts, which may easily turn into predators. Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology.

  15. Behavioural biology of Chagas disease vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Ricardo Lazzari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselves and even predate the insects that try to feed on them. Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods. These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases. In this review article, we analyse various aspects of the behaviour of triatomine bugs to illustrate how each behavioural trait represents a particular adaptation to their close association with their hosts, which may easily turn into predators. Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology.

  16. Prevalence of Chagas' Disease in Mulungu do Morro Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque Aras

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE - The aim of this paper is to describe the prevalence of T. Cruzi infection in patients of from Mulungu do Morro, a rural tropical region of Northeastern Brazil. METHODS - A cross-sectional study was performed. After randomly selecting samples of the population, and obtaining their consents , patients completed pretested epidemiological and clinical questionnaires. Serum samples from all patients were collected and screened for the presence of T. cruzi antibodies. RESULTS - Of 694 patients examined, 174 patients (25.1% tested had a positive serology for Chagas' disease. Of the study population, 341 patients were male with 27% Chagas' disease prevalence, without a statistical difference. Illiteracy was the only variable related to T. cruzi infection in our population. CONCLUSION - In conclusion, our study points to the high prevalence of Chagas' disease among patients in Mulungu do Morro, suggesting that this region has a high frequency of infection and probably active vectorial transmission.

  17. Chagas disease: national survey of seroprevalence in children under five years of age conducted in 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russomando, Graciela; Cousiño, Blanca; Sanchez, Zunilda; Franco, Laura X; Nara, Eva M; Chena, Lilian; Martínez, Magaly; Galeano, María E; Benitez, Lucio

    2017-05-01

    Since the early 1990s, programs to control Chagas disease in South America have focused on eradicating domiciliary Triatoma infestans, the main vector. Seroprevalence studies of the chagasic infection are included as part of the vector control programs; they are essential to assess the impact of vector control measures and to monitor the prevention of vector transmission. To assess the interruption of domiciliary vector transmission of Chagas disease by T. infestans in Paraguay by evaluating the current state of transmission in rural areas. A survey of seroprevalence of Chagas disease was carried out in a representative sample group of Paraguayans aged one to five years living in rural areas of Paraguay in 2008. Blood samples collected on filter paper from 12,776 children were tested using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Children whose serology was positive or undetermined (n = 41) were recalled to donate a whole blood sample for retesting. Their homes were inspected for current triatomine infestation. Blood samples from their respective mothers were also collected and tested to check possible transmission of the disease by a congenital route. A seroprevalence rate of 0.24% for Trypanosoma cruzi infection was detected in children under five years of age among the country's rural population. Our findings indicate that T. cruzi was transmitted to these children vertically. The total number of infected children, aged one to five years living in these departments, was estimated at 1,691 cases with an annual incidence of congenital transmission of 338 cases per year. We determined the impact of vector control in the transmission of T. cruzi, following uninterrupted vector control measures employed since 1999 in contiguous T. infestans-endemic areas of Paraguay, and this allowed us to estimate the degree of risk of congenital transmission in the country.

  18. Chagas disease: national survey of seroprevalence in children under five years of age conducted in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Russomando

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Since the early 1990s, programs to control Chagas disease in South America have focused on eradicating domiciliary Triatoma infestans, the main vector. Seroprevalence studies of the chagasic infection are included as part of the vector control programs; they are essential to assess the impact of vector control measures and to monitor the prevention of vector transmission. OBJECTIVE To assess the interruption of domiciliary vector transmission of Chagas disease by T. infestans in Paraguay by evaluating the current state of transmission in rural areas. METHODS A survey of seroprevalence of Chagas disease was carried out in a representative sample group of Paraguayans aged one to five years living in rural areas of Paraguay in 2008. Blood samples collected on filter paper from 12,776 children were tested using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Children whose serology was positive or undetermined (n = 41 were recalled to donate a whole blood sample for retesting. Their homes were inspected for current triatomine infestation. Blood samples from their respective mothers were also collected and tested to check possible transmission of the disease by a congenital route. FINDINGS A seroprevalence rate of 0.24% for Trypanosoma cruzi infection was detected in children under five years of age among the country’s rural population. Our findings indicate that T. cruzi was transmitted to these children vertically. The total number of infected children, aged one to five years living in these departments, was estimated at 1,691 cases with an annual incidence of congenital transmission of 338 cases per year. MAIN CONCLUSION We determined the impact of vector control in the transmission of T. cruzi, following uninterrupted vector control measures employed since 1999 in contiguous T. infestans-endemic areas of Paraguay, and this allowed us to estimate the degree of risk of congenital transmission in the country.

  19. The costs of preventing and treating chagas disease in Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela Castillo-Riquelme

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to report the costs of Chagas disease in Colombia, in terms of vector disease control programmes and the costs of providing care to chronic Chagas disease patients with cardiomyopathy.Data were collected from Colombia in 2004. A retrospective review of costs for vector control programmes carried out in rural areas included 3,084 houses surveyed for infestation with triatomine bugs and 3,305 houses sprayed with insecticide. A total of 63 patient records from 3 different hospitals were selected for a retrospective review of resource use. Consensus methodology with local experts was used to estimate care seeking behaviour and to complement observed data on utilisation.The mean cost per house per entomological survey was $4.4 (in US$ of 2004, whereas the mean cost of spraying a house with insecticide was $27. The main cost driver of spraying was the price of the insecticide, which varied greatly. Treatment of a chronic Chagas disease patient costs between $46.4 and $7,981 per year in Colombia, depending on severity and the level of care used. Combining cost and utilisation estimates the expected cost of treatment per patient-year is $1,028, whereas lifetime costs averaged $11,619 per patient. Chronic Chagas disease patients have limited access to healthcare, with an estimated 22% of patients never seeking care.Chagas disease is a preventable condition that affects mostly poor populations living in rural areas. The mean costs of surveying houses for infestation and spraying infested houses were low in comparison to other studies and in line with treatment costs. Care seeking behaviour and the type of insurance affiliation seem to play a role in the facilities and type of care that patients use, thus raising concerns about equitable access to care. Preventing Chagas disease in Colombia would be cost-effective and could contribute to prevent inequalities in health and healthcare.

  20. A doença de Chagas em Minas Gerais: esbôco crítico dos trabalhos publicados até 1951 Chagas' disease in Minas Geraes: a critical sudy of the papers published up to 1951

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pellegrino

    1953-12-01

    Full Text Available O grande impulso que têm tornado, nestes últimos anos, as investigações sôbre a doença de Chagas, não sòmente em Minas Gerais, como também em outros Estados do Brasil e países do novo continente atingidos pela endemia; o interêsse cada vez mais crescente por parte dos médicos em geral e a facilidade com que vêm sendo por êles assimiladas as recentes contribuições ao estudo desta entidade mórbida; a importância médico-social e a repercussão econômica que tem sido atribuída à esquizotripanose como fator de letalidade e de incapacidade relativa ou total para o trabalho, depois de conhecidos os resultados de inquéritos clínico-epidemiológicos realizados em zonas infestadas por triatomíneos; a recente adoção, por parte das autoridades responsáveis pela saúde publica, de medidas concretas de contrôle da doença pelo combate aos seus transmissores domiciliares, por meio de inseticidas de ação residual aplicados em larga escala; e, principalmente, a escassez de trabalhos de conjunto e de fácil acesso, com referencias bibliográficas adequadas e extensas, que facilitassem aos não especializados no assunto, o conhecimento e a consulta das investigações já realizadas sôbre êste importante problema de medicina tropical; tais são os principais motivos que sugeriram a elaboração de um esbôço crítico do desenvolvimento dos trabalhos até agora publicados sôbre a esquizotripanose em Minas Gerais. De fato, foi aí descoberta a nova entidade mórbida do homem, foram aí estudados e esclarecidos problemas relativos à etiologia, epidemiologia, aspectos clínicos e anatomo-patológicos da esquizotripanose, foram aí realizadas investigações experimentais e desenvolvidos métodos de profilaxia, constituindo, em conjunto, os trabalhos realizados sôbre a esquizotripanose em Minas Gerais, fundamentados nos alicerces sólidos legados pelo seu grande descobridor, uma obra verdadeiramente monumental, que tanto orgulha e

  1. Chagas disease among the Latin American adult population attending in a primary care center in Barcelona, Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carme Roca

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of Chagas disease, until recently confined to areas of continental Latin America, has undergone considerable changes in recent decades due to migration to other parts of the world, including Spain. We studied the prevalence of Chagas disease in Latin American patients treated at a health center in Barcelona and evaluated its clinical phase. We make some recommendations for screening for the disease.We performed an observational, cross-sectional prevalence study by means of an immunochromatographic test screening of all continental Latin American patients over the age of 14 years visiting the health centre from October 2007 to October 2009. The diagnosis was confirmed by serological methods: conventional in-house ELISA (cELISA, a commercial kit (rELISA and ELISA using T cruzi lysate (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics (oELISA. Of 766 patients studied, 22 were diagnosed with T. cruzi infection, showing a prevalence of 2.87% (95% CI, 1.6-4.12%. Of the infected patients, 45.45% men and 54.55% women, 21 were from Bolivia, showing a prevalence in the Bolivian subgroup (n=127 of 16.53% (95% CI, 9.6-23.39%. ALL THE INFECTED PATIENTS WERE IN A CHRONIC PHASE OF CHAGAS DISEASE: 81% with the indeterminate form, 9.5% with the cardiac form and 9.5% with the cardiodigestive form. All patients infected with T. cruzi had heard of Chagas disease in their country of origin, 82% knew someone affected, and 77% had a significant history of living in adobe houses in rural areas.We found a high prevalence of T. cruzi infection in immigrants from Bolivia. Detection of T. cruzi-infected persons by screening programs in non-endemic countries would control non-vectorial transmission and would benefit the persons affected, public health and national health systems.

  2. Doença de Chagas no Brasil Chagas disease in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio C. Vinhaes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Sumariam-se os dados da Fundação Nacional de Saúde (FNS sobre o estado atual dos vetores da doença de Chagas no Brasil, verificando-se que após vinte anos de controle químico continuado houve franca redução dos índices triatomínico-tripanosômicos, particularmente para esp��cies como Triatoma infestans e Panstrongylus megistus. Em paralelo, dados de sorologia escolar, de internações e de mortalidade pela doença indicam descenso nas taxas de incidência e impacto médico social da protozoose, restando áreas mais preocupantes, como o Nordeste e resíduos de T. infestans. Impõe-se urgente uma vigilância epidemiológica efetiva, a ser realizada por estados e municípios ante o processo de descentralização da FNS.This article presents the current situation for Chagas disease vectors in Brazil, based on data from the Brazilian National Health Foundation (FNS. Over the course of the last 20 years, continuous chemical control has resulted in a clear reduction of triatomine densities and Trypanosoma cruzi in Brazilian dwellings. Results have been particularly promising in relation to Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus, considered the most important species in the past. In parallel, data from school serological surveys, hospitalized patients, and mortality records show an important decrease in the disease. Nevertheless, some areas of the Brazilian Northeast and some residual foci of Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus remain as major challenges for public health authorities, requiring effective epidemiological surveillance. States and municipalities are required to assume this task at present, as the traditional Brazilian National Health Foundation is undergoing decentralization.

  3. Chagas Parasite Detection in Blood Images Using AdaBoost

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    Víctor Uc-Cetina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chagas disease is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Visual detection of such parasite through microscopic inspection is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper, we provide an AdaBoost learning solution to the task of Chagas parasite detection in blood images. We give details of the algorithm and our experimental setup. With this method, we get 100% and 93.25% of sensitivity and specificity, respectively. A ROC comparison with the method most commonly used for the detection of malaria parasites based on support vector machines (SVM is also provided. Our experimental work shows mainly two things: (1 Chagas parasites can be detected automatically using machine learning methods with high accuracy and (2 AdaBoost + SVM provides better overall detection performance than AdaBoost or SVMs alone. Such results are the best ones known so far for the problem of automatic detection of Chagas parasites through the use of machine learning, computer vision, and image processing methods.

  4. Experimental Vaccines against Chagas Disease: A Journey through History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Monteón-Padilla, Víctor; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; Rios-Castro, Martha; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, which is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is primarily a vector disease endemic in 21 Latin American countries, including Mexico. Although many vector control programs have been implemented, T. cruzi has not been eradicated. The development of an anti-T. cruzi vaccine for prophylactic and therapeutic purposes may significantly contribute to the transmission control of Chagas disease. Immune protection against experimental infection with T. cruzi has been studied since the second decade of the last century, and many types of immunogens have been used subsequently, such as killed or attenuated parasites and new DNA vaccines. This primary prevention strategy appears feasible, effective, safe, and inexpensive, although problems remain. The objective of this review is to summarize the research efforts about the development of vaccines against Chagas disease worldwide. A thorough literature review was conducted by searching PubMed with the terms "Chagas disease" and "American trypanosomiasis" together with "vaccines" or "immunization". In addition, reports and journals not cited in PubMed were identified. Publications in English, Spanish, and Portuguese were reviewed.

  5. RA reactor safety analysis, Part II - Accident analysis; Analiza sigurnosti rada Reaktora RA I-III, Deo II - Analiza akcidenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N; Radanovic, Lj; Milovanovic, M; Afgan, N; Kulundzic, P [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    This part of the RA reactor safety analysis includes analysis of possible accidents caused by failures of the reactor devices and errors during reactor operation. Two types of accidents are analyzed: accidents resulting from uncontrolled reactivity increase, and accidents caused by interruption of cooling.

  6. A inserção institucional do controle da doença de Chagas

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    Antônio Carlos Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Em 1943, a partir da criação do "Centro de Estudos e Profilaxia da Moléstia de Chagas" da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz de Bambuí em Minas Gerais, são concebidas as bases tecnológicas e metodológicas para o controle extensivo da enfermidade. Para isso foi decisivo o advento de um novo inseticida (o gammexane, P 530 e a demonstração de sua eficácia no controle dos vetores da doença de Chagas. Como resultado prático desses acontecimentos em "maio de 1950 foi oficialmente inaugurada, em Uberaba, a primeira campanha de profilaxia da doença de Chagas, no Brasil". Mesmo que se dispusesse desde então de meios para fazer o controle da transmissão vetorial da endemia chagásica, não se dispunha dos recursos financeiros exigidos para fazê-lo de forma abrangente e regular. O baixo nível de prioridade conferida a essa atividade se expressava em sua inserção institucional. Em 1941, foram criados os Serviços Nacionais, de malária, peste, varíola, entre outros, enquanto a doença de Chagas fazia parte da Divisão de Organização Sanitária (DOS, que reunia enfermidades consideradas de menor importância. Em 1956 o Departamento Nacional de Endemias Rurais (DNERu incorporou todas as chamadas grandes endemias em uma única instituição, mas na prática isso não significou a implementação das ações de controle da doença de Chagas. Com a reestruturação do Ministério da Saúde em 1970, a Superintendência de Campanhas de Saúde Pública (SUCAM abarcou todas as endemias rurais, e a doença de Chagas passou a ter o status de Divisão Nacional, na mesma posição hierárquica daquelas outras doenças transmitidas por vetores antes consideradas prioritárias. Essa condição determinou a possibilidade de uma repartição de recursos mais equilibrada, o que efetivamente ocorreu, com a realocação de pessoal e insumos do programa de malária para o controle vetorial da doença de Chagas. Em 1991, a Fundação Nacional de Saúde sucedeu a SUCAM

  7. [Blood-brain barrier part III: therapeutic approaches to cross the blood-brain barrier and target the brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N; Miller, F; Cazaubon, S; Couraud, P-O

    2010-03-01

    Over the last few years, the blood-brain barrier has come to be considered as the main limitation for the treatment of neurological diseases caused by inflammatory, tumor or neurodegenerative disorders. In the blood-brain barrier, the close intercellular contact between cerebral endothelial cells due to tight junctions prevents the passive diffusion of hydrophilic components from the bloodstream into the brain. Several specific transport systems (via transporters expressed on cerebral endothelial cells) are implicated in the delivery of nutriments, ions and vitamins to the brain; other transporters expressed on cerebral endothelial cells extrude endogenous substances or xenobiotics, which have crossed the cerebral endothelium, out of the brain and into the bloodstream. Recently, several strategies have been proposed to target the brain, (i) by by-passing the blood-brain barrier by central drug administration, (ii) by increasing permeability of the blood-brain barrier, (iii) by modulating the expression and/or the activity of efflux transporters, (iv) by using the physiological receptor-dependent blood-brain barrier transport, and (v) by creating new viral or chemical vectors to cross the blood-brain barrier. This review focuses on the illustration of these different approaches. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of Ageratum fastigiatum extract on Rhodnius nasutus, vector of Chagas disease

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    Bethânia A. Avelar-Freitas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Control of Chagas disease is based on insecticide spraying in domiciles in order to exterminate triatomine populations. However, since the vectors differ in susceptibility to currently used insecticides, the screening of the toxic potential of Brazilian flora may identify new molecules lethal to triatomines. This study evaluated the toxicity of ethanolic extract of Ageratum fastigiatum (Gardner R.M. King & H. Rob., Asteraceae, on Rhodnius nasutus, a known vector of Chagas disease. Ethanolic extracts of the aerial parts of A. fastigiatum were prepared at 25 and 50 mg/mL concentrations, and 5 µL was applied to fifth-instar nymphs of R. nasutus (n=30. Controls included nymphs that were treated with 5 µL ethanol (n=30 or left untreated (n=30. The percentage of dead insects in each group was observed at 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h after application. The extracts of A. fastigiatum showed a mortality rate of about 37% and 77% after 120 h, at concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/mL, respectively. In control groups, the mortality rate remained under 7%. The extract of A. fastigiatum contains a coumarin, a molecule with recognized toxicity in insects, and which may be responsible for killing the triatomines.

  9. A doença de Chagas e seu controle na América Latina: uma análise de possibilidades Chagas' disease and its control in Latin America: an analysis of possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos P. Dias

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Chagas segue como importante agravo à saúde na maior parte da América Latina, afetando 16 milhões de pessoas e colocando sob risco outras dezenas de milhões de indivíduos, geralmente de origem rural, pobres e socialmente marginalizados. As estratégias e insumos ao controle da endemia concentram-se no controle do vetor e da transmissão transfusional, mostrando-se eficientes e estando disponíveis há pelo menos duas décadas. Sua implementação depende basicamente de vontade política e de disponibilidade técnica e orçamentária, como demonstrado no exemplo brasileiro. São discutidos aspectos epidemiológicos e operacionais da luta antichagásica, o que envolve um horizonte de reformulação e aprimoramento dos próprios sistemas de saúde dos países endêmicos. O controle da doença é viável, constituindo-se num desafio às autoridades sanitárias e à opção dos países pela esfera social. Em particular, a superação da doença de Chagas pode ser um importante fator de catálise para a almejada unidade latino-americana.Chagas' disease is still a major public health problem in Latin America, affecting about 15 million individuals and leaving tens of millions of others at risk, most of whom are from rural areas and are socially marginalized. The main strategies and tools for the control of the disease are related to the vectorial and transfusional transmission of the parasite. Regular programs have proven effective, as in Brazil, and they depend basically on political will and basic technical and financial conditions. Epidemiologic and operational aspects of Chagas' disease control are discussed in this study, involving the reformulation and improvement of the health systems in affected countries. The fact that control can be attained is emphasized as a challenge to Latin American governments and public health officials. Control of Chagas' disease may be an additional part of the dream of Latin American unity.

  10. Representaciones sociales sobre la problemática de Chagas en un servicio de salud comunitaria del Gran La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartino, Mariana; Amieva, Carolina; Medone, Y Paula

    2017-03-01

    Hablar de Chagas es hablar de una problemática compleja, definida por elementos de carácter biomédico, epidemiológico, sociocultural y político, que se conjugan dinámicamente. En este trabajo buscamos identificar y analizar las representaciones sobre Chagas de los integrantes del equipo de salud de un centro de atención periurbano de la ciudad de La Plata, Argentina. Mediante un abordaje cualitativo, se realizaron entrevistas semiestructuradas y se analizaron las respuestas con la técnica del análisis de contenido. Los resultados mostraron que la mayor parte de las personas entrevistadas no contempla al Chagas como una problemática en su contexto laboral cotidiano y manifiestan un fuerte sesgo biologicista en su formación profesional. Con este trabajo señalamos la urgente necesidad de reflexionar críticamente en torno a la formación de los profesionales de la salud en relación a problemáticas socioambientales complejas de importancia regional, como lo es el Chagas.

  11. Schinus terebinthifolius countercurrent chromatography (Part III): Method transfer from small countercurrent chromatography column to preparative centrifugal partition chromatography ones as a part of method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves Costa, Fernanda; Hubert, Jane; Borie, Nicolas; Kotland, Alexis; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2017-03-03

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) and centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) are support free liquid-liquid chromatography techniques sharing the same basic principles and features. Method transfer has previously been demonstrated for both techniques but never from one to another. This study aimed to show such a feasibility using fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius berries dichloromethane extract as a case study. Heptane - ethyl acetate - methanol -water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was used as solvent system with masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids as target compounds. The optimized separation methodology previously described in Part I and II, was scaled up from an analytical hydrodynamic CCC column (17.4mL) to preparative hydrostatic CPC instruments (250mL and 303mL) as a part of method development. Flow-rate and sample loading were further optimized on CPC. Mobile phase linear velocity is suggested as a transfer invariant parameter if the CPC column contains sufficient number of partition cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A ciência como profissão: entrevista com Carlos Chagas Filho Science as a profession: an interview with Carlos Chagas Filho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Azevedo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A edição desta entrevista privilegia aspectos da extensa trajetória profissional de Carlos Chagas Filho, fundador do Instituto de Biofísica da Universidade do Brasil, atual Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Evidencia seu papel científico e político na ciência brasileira e no cenário internacional. As memórias de Chagas Filho abrangem a vivência no Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, onde iniciou seu treinamento científico; os esforços para estruturar o Laboratório de Física Biológica, sucedido pelo Instituto de Biofísica; a atuação no Conselho Nacional de Pesquisas e na Academia Brasileira de Ciências; a participação na Organização das Nações Unidas para a Educação, a Ciência e a Cultura; a presidência da Academia Pontifícia do Vaticano, que o leva a tecer considerações sobre a relação entre ciência e religião.The editing of this interview focuses on aspects of the extensive professional career of Carlos Chagas Filho, who was the founder of the Instituto de Biofísica of the Universidade do Brasil, currently the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. It highlights the scientific and political role he played in Brazilian science and on the international scene. His memoirs include his experience at the Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, where he began his scientific training; the efforts to create the Laboratório de Física Biológica, succeeded by the Instituto de Biofísica; his work on the Conselho Nacional de Pesquisas and the Academia Brasileira de Ciências; the part he played at the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization; his time as president of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences of the Vatican, which led him to ponder questions about the relationship between science and religion.

  13. Chagas disease: 100 years after its discovery. A systemic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coura, José Rodrigues; Borges-Pereira, José

    2010-01-01

    Although Chagas disease was only discovered in 1909, it began millions of years ago as an enzootic disease among wild animals. Its transmission to man began accidentally as an anthropozoonosis when mankind invaded wild ecotopes. Endemic Chagas disease became established as a zoonosis over the last 200-300 years through deforestation for agriculture and livestock rearing and adaptation of triatomines to dwellings and to humans and domestic animals as food sources. When T. cruzi is transmitted to man, it invades the bloodstream and lymphatic system and lodges in muscle and heart tissue, the digestive system and phagocytic cells. Through this, it causes inflammatory lesions and an immune response, particularly mediated by CD4(+), CD8(+), IL2 and IL4, with cell and neuron destruction and fibrosis. These processes lead to blockage of the heart's conductive system, arrhythmias, heart failure, aperistalsis and dilatation of hollow viscera, especially the esophagus and colons. Chagas disease is characterized by an acute phase with or without symptoms, with (or more often without) T. cruzi penetration signs (inoculation chagoma or Romaña's sign), fever, adenomegaly, hepatosplenomegaly and patent parasitemia; and a chronic phase: indeterminate (asymptomatic, with normal electrocardiogram and heart, esophagus and colon X-rays) or cardiac, digestive or cardiac/digestive forms. There is great regional variation in the morbidity caused by Chagas disease: severe cardiac or digestive forms may occur in 10-50%, and indeterminate forms in the remaining, asymptomatic cases. The epidemiological and control characteristics of Chagas disease vary according to each country's ecological conditions and health policies. 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the “elevator technique”. All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the “Journal of Ultrasonography”.

  15. Organizational Infrastructure in the Collegiate Athletic Training Setting, Part III: Benefits of and Barriers in the Medical and Academic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Christianne M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Goodman, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Context: Academic and medical models are emerging as alternatives to the athletics model, which is the more predominant model in the collegiate athletic training setting. Little is known about athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of these models. Objective: To investigate the perceived benefits of and barriers in the medical and academic models. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 16 full-time ATs (10 men, 6 women; age = 32 ± 6 years, experience = 10 ± 6 years) working in the medical (n = 8) or academic (n = 8) models. Data Collection and Analysis: We conducted semistructured telephone interviews and evaluated the qualitative data using a general inductive approach. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were completed to satisfy data credibility. Results: In the medical model, role congruency and work-life balance emerged as benefits, whereas role conflict, specifically intersender conflict with coaches, was a barrier. In the academic model, role congruency emerged as a benefit, and barriers were role strain and work-life conflict. Subscales of role strain included role conflict and role ambiguity for new employees. Role conflict stemmed from intersender conflict with coaches and athletics administrative personnel and interrole conflict with fulfilling multiple overlapping roles (academic, clinical, administrative). Conclusions: The infrastructure in which ATs provide medical care needs to be evaluated. We found that the medical model can support better alignment for both patient care and the wellbeing of ATs. Whereas the academic model has perceived benefits, role incongruence exists, mostly because of the role complexity associated with balancing teaching, patient-care, and administrative duties. PMID:27977302

  16. Organizational Infrastructure in the Collegiate Athletic Training Setting, Part III: Benefits of and Barriers in the Medical and Academic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Christianne M; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

    2017-01-01

     Academic and medical models are emerging as alternatives to the athletics model, which is the more predominant model in the collegiate athletic training setting. Little is known about athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of these models.  To investigate the perceived benefits of and barriers in the medical and academic models.  Qualitative study.  National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III.  A total of 16 full-time ATs (10 men, 6 women; age = 32 ± 6 years, experience = 10 ± 6 years) working in the medical (n = 8) or academic (n = 8) models.  We conducted semistructured telephone interviews and evaluated the qualitative data using a general inductive approach. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were completed to satisfy data credibility.  In the medical model, role congruency and work-life balance emerged as benefits, whereas role conflict, specifically intersender conflict with coaches, was a barrier. In the academic model, role congruency emerged as a benefit, and barriers were role strain and work-life conflict. Subscales of role strain included role conflict and role ambiguity for new employees. Role conflict stemmed from intersender conflict with coaches and athletics administrative personnel and interrole conflict with fulfilling multiple overlapping roles (academic, clinical, administrative).  The infrastructure in which ATs provide medical care needs to be evaluated. We found that the medical model can support better alignment for both patient care and the wellbeing of ATs. Whereas the academic model has perceived benefits, role incongruence exists, mostly because of the role complexity associated with balancing teaching, patient-care, and administrative duties.

  17. New 20-cm radio-continuum study of the small Magellanic cloud - part III: Compact Hii regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present and discuss a new catalogue of 48 compact Hii regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC and a newly created deep 1420 MHz (λ=20 cm radio-continuum image of the N19 region located in the southwestern part of the SMC. The new images were created by merging 1420 MHz radiocontinuum archival data from the Australian Telescope Compact Array. The majority of these detected radio compact Hii regions have rather flat spectral indices which indicates, as expected, that the dominant emission mechanism is of thermal nature.

  18. Mammalian Toxicity of Munition Compounds. Phase II. Effects of Multiple Doses. Part III. 2,6-Dinitrotoluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-01

    and the neuromuscular effects in these dogs were not due to hypocalcemia . The lowest serum calcium concen- tration in these dogs was 4.2 meq/liter...motor end plate might produce a local hypocalcemia . Such a mechanism is purely speculative. Qualitatively and quantitavely, most of the effects of 2,6...I ýNw,- -MIM I/ MIDWEST RESEARCH INS14ITUTE H0q .3L I LU -_ MAMMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITIONS COMPOUlNDSPHASE II: EFFECTS OF MiULTIPLE DOSES C* •PART

  19. Fungi & Health: can polysaccharides from the fungus inonotus obliquus (CHAGA) inhibit tumor growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wold, C. W.; Corthay, A.; Kjeldsen, Christian

    Inonotus obliquus (Chaga) – a white rot fungus found on birch trees in the northern hemisphere –has been used in traditional medicine in Europe and Asia for centuries. Native peoples have made use of Chaga by brewing it as a tea to treat gastro-intestinal problems, to heal wounds and even to treat...... cancer. The last few decades, studies have found Chaga to contain biologically active substances such as polysaccharides, triterpenoids, polyphenols and melanin. In vivo effects such as tumor growth inhibition have been observed in mice receiving various Chaga extracts. The main hypothesis behind...... the tumor inhibiting effect is two-fold: i) fungal polysaccharides may inhibit tumor growth indirectly by activating certain immune cells such as macrophages and ii) triterpenoids and other steroids from Chaga may give a direct cytotoxic effect against cancer cells. While triterpenoids from Chaga have been...

  20. A Highly Sensitive Rapid Diagnostic Test for Chagas Disease That Utilizes a Recombinant Trypanosoma cruzi Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, C. A.; Barney, R. S.; Crudder, C. H.; Wilmoth, J. L.; Stevens, D. S.; Mora-Garcia, S.; Yanovsky, M. J.; Weigl, B. H.; Yanovsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Improved diagnostic tests for Chagas disease are urgently needed. A new lateral flow rapid test for Chagas disease is under development at PATH, in collaboration with Laboratorio Lemos of Argentina, which utilizes a recombinant antigen for detection of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. To evaluate the performance of this test, 375 earlier characterized serum specimens from a region where Chagas is endemic were tested using a reference test (the Ortho T. cruzi ELISA, Johnson & Johnson), a commercially available rapid test (Chagas STAT-PAK, Chembio), and the PATH–Lemos rapid test. Compared to the composite reference tests, the PATH–Lemos rapid test demonstrated an optimal sensitivity of 99.5% and specificity of 96.8%, while the Chagas STAT-PAK demonstrated a sensitivity of 95.3% and specificity of 99.5%. These results indicate that the PATH–Lemos rapid test shows promise as an improved and reliable tool for screening and diagnosis of Chagas disease. PMID:21342808

  1. O gênero Schizotrypanum Chagas, 1909

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Dias

    1939-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho, em que foram analisados os caractéres de Schizotrypanum e consideradas suas relações com os de outros flagelados digenéticos, acreditamos ter ficado bem demonstrado que este gênero encontra sólidos fundamentos em que se baseie. Schizotrypanum possue caractéres morfológicos peculiares, que o aproximam de Leishmania no periodo de multiplicação e de Trypanosoma na fase sanguinea. Os flagelados pertencentes a esse gênero caracterisam-se não só pela morfologia da fórma de tripanosoma, como pela evolução no organismo do vertebrado. No S. cruzi, como no S. vespertilionis, a multiplicação se processa nos tecidos, constando da divisão binaria das formas intracelulares de leishmania; os tripanosomas sanguicolas não se multiplicam. Nenhum Trypanosoma apresenta no mamífero uma evolução morfológicamente e ecológicamente identica á de Schizotrypanum. S. cruzi aproxima-se dos tripanosomas patogenicos pela morfologia da fórma sanguicola e pela virulencia ás vezes mortal para o homem e diversos animais; deles se afasta entretanto pela evolução no inséto, modo de transmissão e facil cultivabilidade, caractéres biológicos estes que são comuns aos tripanosomas não patogenicos. Em nenhum dos grupos de tripanosomas póde o S. cruzi ser rigorosamente incluido, deles se distinguindo facilmente seja por sua morfologia, seja por sua biologia. O conjunto de caractéres próprios fundamenta perfeitamente a manutenção do gênero de Chagas, indicando-lhe como situação mais adequada, na classificação dos tripanosomídeos de mamíferos, o logar intermediario entre Leishmania e Trypanosoma. A separação do gênero Schizotrypanum é o melhor caso, quiça o unico justificado, dentre as numerosas tentativas para o desmembramento de Trypanosoma. Ela se impõe como medida compreensiva e util para a coordenação dos membros da complexa familia dos tripanosomideos e se justifica á luz dos mais exigentes crit

  2. Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography Safety in Chagas Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Furtado, Rogerio Gomes; Turco, Fabio de Paula; Melato, Luciano Henrique; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Nunes, Colandy Godoy de Oliveira; Rassi, Luiz; Rassi, Salvador

    2017-02-01

    A few decades ago, patients with Chagas disease were predominantly rural workers, with a low risk profile for obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). As urbanization has increased, they became exposed to the same risk factors for CAD of uninfected individuals. Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) has proven to be an important tool in CAD diagnosis. Despite being a potentially arrhythmogenic method, it is safe for coronary patients without Chagas disease. For Chagas disease patients, however, the indication of DSE in clinical practice is uncertain, because of the arrhythmogenic potential of that heart disease. To assess DSE safety in Chagas disease patients with clinical suspicion of CAD, as well as the incidence of arrhythmias and adverse events during the exam. Retrospective analysis of a database of patients referred for DSE from May/2012 to February/2015. This study assessed 205 consecutive patients with Chagas disease suspected of having CAD. All of them had their serology for Chagas disease confirmed. Their mean age was 64±10 years and most patients were females (65.4%). No patient had significant adverse events, such as acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, asystole, stroke, cardiac rupture and death. Regarding arrhythmias, ventricular extrasystoles occurred in 48% of patients, and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 7.3%. DSE proved to be safe in this population of Chagas disease patients, in which no potentially life-threatening outcome was found. Até poucas décadas atrás, os pacientes chagásicos eram predominantemente trabalhadores rurais, com baixo perfil de risco para doença obstrutiva coronária. Com a crescente urbanização, passaram a ter os mesmos fatores de risco para doença aterosclerótica que indivíduos não infectados. O ecocardiograma sob estresse com dobutamina (EED) é uma importante ferramenta no diagnóstico de coronariopatia. É referido, porém, como um método potencialmente arritmogênico, mas

  3. Present situation and new strategies for Chagas disease chemotherapy: a proposal

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    José Rodrigues Coura

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatments for Chagas disease have been administered since the first attempts by Mayer & Rocha Lima (1912, 1914 and up to the drugs currently in use (nifurtimox and benznidazole, along with potential drugs such as allopurinol and first, second and third-generation antifungal agents (imidazoles and triazoles, in separate form. Several diseases such as tuberculosis, leprosy and AIDS only came under control after they were treated with associations of drugs with different mechanisms of action. This not only boosts the action of the different compounds, but also may avoid the development of parasite resistance .To this end, over the short term, we propose experimental studies on laboratory animals and clinical trials with the following associations: (i nifurtimox (8 mg/kg/day + benznidazole (5 mg/kg/day x 60 consecutive days; (ii nifurtimox (8 mg/kg/day or benznidazole (5 mg/kg/day + allopurinol (8-10 mg/kg/day x 60 days and (iii nifurtimox (8 mg/kg/day or benznidazole (5 mg/kg/day + ketoconazole, fluconazole or itraconazole (5-6 mg/kg/day x 60 consecutive days. The doses of the drugs and the treatment schedules for the clinical trials must be adapted according to the side effects. From these, other double or triple associations could be made, using drugs with different mechanisms of action. This proposal does not exclude investigations on new drugs over the median and long terms, targeting other aspects of the metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi. Until such time as the ideal drug for specific treatment of Chagas disease might be discovered, we need to develop new strategies for achieving greater efficacy with the old drugs in associations and to develop rational experimentation with new drugs.

  4. A-Part Gel, an adhesion prophylaxis for abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled phase I-II safety study [NCT00646412].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Reinhold; Baumann, Petra; Schmoor, Claudia; Odermatt, Erich K; Wente, Moritz N; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal surgical intervention can cause the development of intra-peritoneal adhesions. To reduce this problem, different agents have been tested to minimize abdominal adhesions; however, the optimal adhesion prophylaxis has not been found so far. Therefore, the A-Part(®) Gel was developed as a barrier to diminish postsurgical adhesions; the aim of this randomized controlled study was a first evaluation of its safety and efficacy. In this prospective, controlled, randomized, patient-blinded, monocenter phase I-II study, 62 patients received either the hydrogel A-Part-Gel(®) as an anti-adhesive barrier or were untreated after primary elective median laparotomy. Primary endpoint was the occurrence of peritonitis and/or wound healing impairment 28 ± 10 days postoperatively. As secondary endpoints anastomotic leakage until 28 days after surgery, adverse events and adhesions were assessed until 3 months postoperatively. A lower rate of wound healing impairment and/or peritonitis was observed in the A-Part Gel(®) group compared to the control group: (6.5 vs. 13.8 %). The difference between the two groups was -7.3%, 90 % confidence interval [-20.1, 5.4 %]. Both treatment groups showed similar frequency of anastomotic leakage but incidence of adverse events and serious adverse events were slightly lower in the A-Part Gel(®) group compared to the control. Adhesion rates were comparable in both groups. A-Part Gel(®) is safe as an adhesion prophylaxis after abdominal wall surgery but no reduction of postoperative peritoneal adhesion could be found in comparison to the control group. This may at least in part be due to the small sample size as well as to the incomplete coverage of the incision due to the used application. NCT00646412.

  5. Dental compensation for skeletal Class III malocclusion by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth. Part 1: Occlusal situation 12 years after completion of active treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Bernd; Schenk-Kazan, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to statistically evaluate the outcomes achieved by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth (second premolars or first molars) for Class III compensation. Part A of the study dealt with the quality of outcomes at the end of active treatment, using weighted Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores determined on the basis of casts for 25 (14 female and 11 male) consecutive patients aged 16 ± 1.7 years at the time of debonding. These results were compared to the scores in a randomly selected control group of 25 (14 female and 11 male) patients who were 14.7 ± 1.9 years old at debonding. Part B evaluated the long-term stability of the outcomes based on 12 (all of them female) patients available for examination after a mean of 11.8 years. The mean weighted PAR scores obtained in both study parts were analyzed for statistical differences using a two-tailed paired Student's t-test at a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Mean weighted PAR scores of 4.76 ± 3.94 and 3.92 ± 3.44 were obtained in the Class III extraction group and the control group, respectively, at the end of active treatment. This difference was not significant (p = 0.49). Among the 12 longitudinal patients, the mean score increased from 4 ± 3.46 at debonding to 6.25 ± 3.67 by the end of the 11.8-year follow-up period. This difference was significant (p = 0.0008). Treatment of Class III anomalies by isolated extraction of lower premolars or molars can yield PAR scores similar to those achieved by standard therapies. These scores, while increasing significantly, remained at a clinically acceptable level over 11.8 years. Hence this treatment modality--intended for cases that border on requiring orthognathic surgery--may also be recommended from a long-term point of view.

  6. Chagas disease, migration and community settlement patterns in Arequipa, Peru.

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    Angela M Bayer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is one of the most important neglected tropical diseases in the Americas. Vectorborne transmission of Chagas disease has been historically rare in urban settings. However, in marginal communities near the city of Arequipa, Peru, urban transmission cycles have become established. We examined the history of migration and settlement patterns in these communities, and their connections to Chagas disease transmission.This was a qualitative study that employed focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. Five focus groups and 50 in-depth interviews were carried out with 94 community members from three shantytowns and two traditional towns near Arequipa, Peru. Focus groups utilized participatory methodologies to explore the community's mobility patterns and the historical and current presence of triatomine vectors. In-depth interviews based on event history calendars explored participants' migration patterns and experience with Chagas disease and vectors. Focus group data were analyzed using participatory analysis methodologies, and interview data were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Entomologic data were provided by an ongoing vector control campaign. We found that migrants to shantytowns in Arequipa were unlikely to have brought triatomines to the city upon arrival. Frequent seasonal moves, however, took shantytown residents to valleys surrounding Arequipa where vectors are prevalent. In addition, the pattern of settlement of shantytowns and the practice of raising domestic animals by residents creates a favorable environment for vector proliferation and dispersal. Finally, we uncovered a phenomenon of population loss and replacement by low-income migrants in one traditional town, which created the human settlement pattern of a new shantytown within this traditional community.The pattern of human migration is therefore an important underlying determinant of Chagas disease risk in and around Arequipa. Frequent

  7. Use of rumination and activity monitoring for the identification of dairy cows with health disorders: Part III. Metritis.

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    Stangaferro, M L; Wijma, R; Caixeta, L S; Al-Abri, M A; Giordano, J O

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate (1) the performance of an automated health-monitoring system (AHMS) to identify cows with metritis based on an alert system (health index score, HIS) that combines rumination time and physical activity; (2) the number of days between the first HIS alert and clinical diagnosis (CD) of metritis by farm personnel; and (3) the daily rumination time, physical activity, and HIS patterns around CD. In this manuscript, the overall performance of HIS to detect cows with all disorders of interest in this study [ketosis, displaced abomasum, indigestion (companion paper, part I), mastitis (companion paper, part II), and metritis] is also reported. Holstein cattle (n=1,121; 451 nulliparous and 670 multiparous) were fitted with a neck-mounted electronic rumination and activity monitoring tag (HR Tags, SCR Dairy, Netanya, Israel) from at least -21 to 80 d in milk (DIM). Raw data collected in 2-h periods were summarized per 24 h as daily rumination and activity. An HIS (0 to 100 arbitrary units) was calculated daily for individual cows with an algorithm that used rumination and activity. A positive HIS outcome was defined as an HIS of cows (n=459) at -11±3, -4±3, 0, 3±1, 7±1, 14±1, and 28±1 DIM. The overall sensitivity of HIS was 55% for all cases of metritis (n=349), but it was greater for cows with metritis and another disorder (78%) than for cows with metritis only (53%). Cows diagnosed with metritis and flagged based on HIS had substantial alterations in their rumination, activity, and HIS patterns around CD, alterations of blood markers of metabolic and health status around calving, reduced milk production, and were more likely to exit the herd than cows not flagged based on the HIS and cows without disease, suggesting that cows flagged based on the HIS had a more severe episode of metritis. Including all disorders of interest for this study, the overall sensitivity was 59%, specificity was 98%, positive predictive value was

  8. Controlled production of camembert-type cheeses: part III role of the ripening microflora on free fatty acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq-Perlat, Marie-Noëlle; Corrieu, Georges; Spinnler, Henry-Eric

    2007-05-01

    Phenomena generating FFAs, important flavour precursors, are significant in cheese ripening. In Camembert-like cheeses, it was intended to establish the relationships between the dynamics of FFA concentrations changes and the succession of ripening microflora during ripening. Experimental Camembert-type cheeses were prepared in duplicate from pasteurised milk inoculated with Kluyveromyces lactis, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium camemberti, and Brevibacterium aurantiacum under aseptic conditions. For each cheese and each cheesy medium, concentrations of FFAs with odd-numbered carbons, except for 9:0 and 13:0, did not change over time. For long-chain FFAs, concentrations varied with the given cheese part (rind or core). K. lactis produced only short or medium-chain FFAs during its growth and had a minor influence on caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids in comparison with G. candidum, the most lipolytic of the strains used here. It generated all short or medium-chain FFAs (4:0-12:0) during its exponential and slowdown growth periods and only long-chain ones (14:0-18:0) during its stationary phase. Pen. camemberti produced more long-chain FFAs (14:0-18:0) during its sporulation. Brev. aurantiacum did not generate any FFAs. The evidence of links between specific FFAs and the growth of a given microorganism is shown.

  9. A case of megacolon in Rio Grande Valley as a possible case of Chagas disease

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    Karl Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We have been searching for evidence of Chagas disease in mummified human remains. Specifically, we have looked for evidence of alteration of intestinal or fecal morphology consistent with megacolon, a condition associated with Chagas disease. One prehistoric individual recovered from the Chihuahuan Desert near the Rio Grande exhibits such pathology. We present documentation of this case. We are certain that this individual presents a profoundly altered large intestinal tract and we suggest that further research should focus on confirmation of a diagnosis of Chagas disease. We propose that the prehistoric activity and dietary patterns in Chihuahua Desert hunter/gatherers promoted the pathoecology of Chagas disease.

  10. Modeling horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the gut of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius prolixus

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    Durvasula Ravi V

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paratransgenesis is an approach to reducing arthropod vector competence using genetically modified symbionts. When applied to control of Chagas disease, the symbiont bacterium Rhodococcus rhodnii, resident in the gut lumen of the triatomine vector Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae, is transformed to export cecropin A, an insect immune peptide. Cecropin A is active against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. While proof of concept has been achieved in laboratory studies, a rigorous and comprehensive risk assessment is required prior to consideration of field release. An important part of this assessment involves estimating probability of transgene horizontal transfer to environmental organisms (HGT. This article presents a two-part risk assessment methodology: a theoretical model predicting HGT in the gut of R. prolixus from the genetically transformed symbiont R. rhodnii to a closely related non-target bacterium, Gordona rubropertinctus, in the absence of selection pressure, and a series of laboratory trials designed to test the model. Results The model predicted an HGT frequency of less than 1.14 × 10-16 per 100,000 generations at the 99% certainty level. The model was iterated twenty times, with the mean of the ten highest outputs evaluated at the 99% certainty level. Laboratory trials indicated no horizontal gene transfer, supporting the conclusions of the model. Conclusions The model treats HGT as a composite event, the probability of which is determined by the joint probability of three independent events: gene transfer through the modalities of transformation, transduction, and conjugation. Genes are represented in matrices and Monte Carlo method and Markov chain analysis are used to simulate and evaluate environmental conditions. The model is intended as a risk assessment instrument and predicts HGT frequency of less than 1.14 × 10-16 per 100,000 generations. With laboratory studies that

  11. Interactive Media on Chagas Disease: Development and Content

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    Claudinei Caetano de Souza

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An interactive media on Chagas disease was developed as an educational tool, on the context of the scientific research and dissemination actions of the National Institute of Structural Biotechnology and Medicinal Chemistry in Infectious Diseases (INBEQMeDI. Different computational resources were used either in terms of hardware and software. The media contains 13 videos that range from 30 seconds to 4 minutes, all with information about Chagas disease, showing the social and economic aspects; the research made by the INBEQMeDI group; different aspects of the disease illustrated by slides arranged in a mobile carousel, and radio programs, with funny skits. The target audience for use of this feature is students aged 10 to 17 years. Teachers of areas of science and biology, through a partnership with the Agency of Education of the State of São Paulo, will be invited to plan a strategy for media use with their students.

  12. Homenaje de los Institutos de Derecho Constitucional y Derechos Humanos a Justino Jiménez de Aréchaga en el centenario de su nacimiento

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    Alberto Pérez Pérez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nació hace cien años, pero su pensamiento sigue plenamente vigente.Su gran obra – verdadero tratado de Derecho Constitucional Uruguayo aunque él no le haya dado ese nombre –terminó de publicarse hace casi seis décadas, pero sigue siendo imprescindible obra de consulta para todos los juristas de nuestro país.Falleció en 1980, pero aún hoy – y sin duda por mucho tiempo más – no hay estudio serio de su especialidad que no comience por indagar lo que él pensaba al respecto.Ése es Justino Jiménez de Aréchaga, la grande, inmensa personalidad uruguaya de cuyo nacimiento se cumplen hoy cien años.Los Institutos de Derecho Constitucional y Derechos Humanos, que me honro en dirigir, le rinden hoy un merecidísimo homenaje, que podemos sintetizar en cuatro afirmaciones:I.Justino Jiménez de Aréchaga hizo una obra maestraII.Fue un Maestro del Derecho y de la vida en democraciaIII.Como verdadero Maestro, también nos enseñó/incitó a tratar de continuar su obraIV.El homenaje que le debemos al Maestro Aréchaga consiste, precisamente, no en palabras sino en obras que lo honren.

  13. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part III. Investigation of European standard methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Larry A; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Lee et al. (Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2014a;58:60-73) introduced an approach to measure pump pulsation (PP) using a real-world sampling train, while the European Standards (EN) (EN 1232-1997 and EN 12919-1999) suggest measuring PP using a resistor in place of the sampler. The goal of this study is to characterize PP according to both EN methods and to determine the relationship of PP between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods. Additional test parameters were investigated to determine whether the test conditions suggested by the EN methods were appropriate for measuring pulsations. Experiments were conducted using a factorial combination of personal sampling pumps (six medium- and two high-volumetric flow rate pumps), back pressures (six medium- and seven high-flow rate pumps), resistors (two types), tubing lengths between a pump and resistor (60 and 90 cm), and different flow rates (2 and 2.5 l min(-1) for the medium- and 4.4, 10, and 11.2 l min(-1) for the high-flow rate pumps). The selection of sampling pumps and the ranges of back pressure were based on measurements obtained in the previous study (Lee et al., 2014a). Among six medium-flow rate pumps, only the Gilian5000 and the Apex IS conformed to the 10% criterion specified in EN 1232-1997. Although the AirChek XR5000 exceeded the 10% limit, the average PP (10.9%) was close to the criterion. One high-flow rate pump, the Legacy (PP=8.1%), conformed to the 10% criterion in EN 12919-1999, while the Elite12 did not (PP=18.3%). Conducting supplemental tests with additional test parameters beyond those used in the two subject EN standards did not strengthen the characterization of PPs. For the selected test conditions, a linear regression model [PPEN=0.014+0.375×PPNIOSH (adjusted R2=0.871)] was developed to determine the PP relationship between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods

  14. [Pancreatic neuronal loss in chronic Chagas' disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, A; de Oliveira, L C; Alves, R S; Lopes, E R

    1998-01-01

    We have not found any anatomical studies about the intrapancreatic ganglia in the chronic Chagas' disease. The lesions in these structures could explain at least in part the functional disturbances in the exocrine and endocrine pancreas described in this form of the disease. Thus we decided to morphologically analyze these ganglia. For this analysis, we studied transversal segments of the head, body and tail of the pancreas of twelve chronic chagasics whose mean age were 46.5 +/- 9.1 years and fourteen controls, mean age 41.2 +/- 11.0 years. These segments were histologically processed and cut into sections in a serial form up to the end and one cut of each seven was analyzed. For statistical analysis we used the non-parametric test of Mann-Whitney. In the head of the pancreas, the mean count of neurons was 57.3 +/- 50.8 in the chagasic group and 117.5 +/- 99.0 for the control group (p < 0.05); in the body 25.9 +/- 19.4 for the chagasic group and 54.7 +/- 47.8 for the control group (p < 0.05); in the tail 23.4 +/- 16.3 for the chagasic group and 54.1 +/- 29.2 for the control group (p < 0.01), the total count being 106.6 +/- 71.1 for the chagasic group and 226.3 +/- 156.5 for the controls (p < 0.01). Our data permitted us to conclude that: a) there was a statistically significant neuronal depopulation in the chagasic group, as compared to the control group, in each pancreatic segment that was analyzed, as well as in the organ as a whole; b) 50% of the chagasics had the total number of neurons smaller than the lowest number observed in the controls (80); c) 75% and 91.6% of the chagasics had the number of neurons smaller than, respectively, the median (171) and the mean (226) of the control group; d) therefore, the pancreatic neuronal depopulation was common, but not constant; e) the variable age was apparently not responsible for the neuronal depopulation of the chagasics.

  15. Antioxidant effect of Morus nigra on Chagas disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenote, Michelly Cristina; Wajsman, Vithor Zuccaro; Konno, Yoichi Takaki; Ferreira, Paulo César; Silva, Regildo Márcio Gonçalves; Therezo, Altino Luiz Silva; Silva, Luciana Pereira; Martins, Luciamáre Perinetti Alves

    2017-11-06

    Considering the widespread popular use of Morus nigra and the amount of scientific information on its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, the effectiveness of this phytotherapeutic compound in the parasitemia progression during the acute phase of Chagas disease and its role in the development of the inflammatory process as well as its effects on the oxidative damage in the chronic phase of infection were evaluated. Thus, 96 male Swiss mice were randomly divided into eight groups, four groups were uninfected controls, and four groups were intraperitoneally infected with 5.0 x 104 blood trypomastigotes forms of T. cruzi QM2 strain. Four batches composed of one uninfected and one infected group were respectively treated with 70% alcohol solution and 25 μL, 50 μL and 75 μL of the phytotherapeutic compound. Levels of antioxidant elements (TBARS, FRAP, GSH and Sulfhydryl groups) were measured in plasma samples. The phytotherapeutic compound's antioxidant activity was measured by polyphenol and total flavonoid quantification, DPPH, NO, and FRAP method. Our results showed that the vehicle influenced some of the results that may have physiological relevance in Chagas disease. However, an important action of M. nigra tincture was observed in the progression of Chagas disease, since our results demonstrated a reduction in parasitemia of treated groups when compared to controls, especially in the group receiving 25 µL. However, in the chronic phase, the 50-µL dosage presented a better activity on some antioxidant defenses and minimized the tissue inflammatory process. Results indicated an important action of M. nigra tincture on the Chagas disease progression.

  16. Scrutinizing the Biomarkers for the Neglected Chagas Disease: How Remarkable!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Rosa T; Waghabi, Mariana C; Cardillo, Fabíola; Mengel, José; Antas, Paulo R Z

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers or biosignature profiles have become accessible over time in population-based studies for Chagas disease. Thus, the identification of consistent and reliable indicators of the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with heart failure might facilitate the prioritization of therapeutic management to those with the highest chance of contracting this disease. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent state and the upcoming trends in biomarkers for human Chagas disease. As an emerging concept, we propose a classification of biomarkers based on plasmatic-, phenotype-, antigenic-, genetic-, and management-related candidates. The available data revisited here reveal the lessons learned thus far and the existing challenges that still lie ahead to enable biomarkers to be employed consistently in risk evaluation for this disease. There is a strong need for biomarker validation, particularly for biomarkers that are specific to the clinical forms of Chagas disease. The current failure to achieve the eradication of the transmission of this disease has produced determination to solve this validation issue. Finally, it would be strategic to develop a wide variety of biomarkers and to test them in both preclinical and clinical trials.

  17. Opportunity cost for early treatment of Chagas disease in Mexico.

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    Janine M Ramsey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely clinical attention of infected populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A Markov decision model was constructed to simulate the natural history of a Chagas disease cohort in Mexico and to project the associated short and long-term clinical outcomes and corresponding costs. The lifetime cost for a timely diagnosed and treated Chagas disease patient is US$ 10,160, while the cost for an undiagnosed individual is US$ 11,877. The cost of a diagnosed and treated case increases 24-fold from early acute to indeterminate stage. The major cost component for lifetime cost was working days lost, between 44% and 75%, depending on the program scenario for timely diagnosis and treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the long term, it is cheaper to diagnose and treat chagasic patients early, instead of doing nothing. This finding by itself argues for the need to shift current policy, in order to prioritize and attend this neglected disease for the benefit of social and economic development, which implies including treatment drugs in the national formularies. Present results are even more relevant, if one considers that timely diagnosis and treatment can arrest clinical progression and enhance a chronic patient's quality of life.

  18. Opportunity cost for early treatment of Chagas disease in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Janine M; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Sanchez-González, Gilberto; Peña-Nieves, Adriana; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro

    2014-04-01

    Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely clinical attention of infected populations. A Markov decision model was constructed to simulate the natural history of a Chagas disease cohort in Mexico and to project the associated short and long-term clinical outcomes and corresponding costs. The lifetime cost for a timely diagnosed and treated Chagas disease patient is US$ 10,160, while the cost for an undiagnosed individual is US$ 11,877. The cost of a diagnosed and treated case increases 24-fold from early acute to indeterminate stage. The major cost component for lifetime cost was working days lost, between 44% and 75%, depending on the program scenario for timely diagnosis and treatment. In the long term, it is cheaper to diagnose and treat chagasic patients early, instead of doing nothing. This finding by itself argues for the need to shift current policy, in order to prioritize and attend this neglected disease for the benefit of social and economic development, which implies including treatment drugs in the national formularies. Present results are even more relevant, if one considers that timely diagnosis and treatment can arrest clinical progression and enhance a chronic patient's quality of life.

  19. La enfermedad de Chagas en la zona central de Honduras: conocimientos, creencias y prácticas Knowledge, beliefs and practices about Chagas' disease in central Honduras

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    Gustavo Ávila Montes

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available En el período de noviembre a diciembre de 1991 y en marzo de 1993 se realizó una encuesta en 17 comunidades rurales de la parte central de Honduras. Las comunidades correspondían a dos zonas en las que la enfermedad de Chagas es endémica. En una de las zonas habían tenido lugar actividades de control de la enfermedad. Fueron entrevistados 849 adultos, uno en cada uno de otros tantos hogares familiares. El objetivo de la encuesta fue investigar y comparar en ambas zonas los conocimientos sobre la enfermedad de Chagas y sus mecanismos de transmisión, las prácticas para evitar la presencia de triatómidos en las viviendas, las creencias acerca de los triatómidos y su control, y las fuentes a partir de las cuales la población obtiene información sobre la enfermedad. Se utilizó un cuestionario de 23 preguntas validado y precodificado. Casi 100% de los entrevistados pudieron reconocer el vector y conocían sus hábitos, pero solo 30,1% sabían que el Triatoma es vector transmisor de la enfermedad y apenas 6% pudieron mencionar su relación con una afección cardíaca crónica. El 47,9% de los entrevistados indicó que la responsabilidad de eliminar los triatómidos de la vivienda es personal, aunque 78% consideraron como medida de control la aplicación institucional de insecticidas. El contacto personal entre el funcionario institucional y los miembros de la comunidad fue la principal fuente de información entre los que mencionaron haber oído de la enfermedad de Chagas (41,0%. Los resultados sugieren que al planificar medidas de control se debe incluir el componente de educación sanitaria. Ha de ponerse énfasis en el papel que desempeñan los triatómidos en la transmisión, así como en la importancia de mejorar la vivienda como medida eficaz y sostenible mediante la participación de la comunidad. Este componente deberá ser desarrollado por canales de comunicación interpersonales para obtener un mayor impacto.From November to

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Trypanosoma cruzi: the role of Serratia marcescens prodigiosin in the alternative treatment of Chagas disease

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    Triana Omar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chagas disease is a health threat for many people, mostly those living in Latin America. One of the most important problems in treatment is the limitation of existing drugs. Prodigiosin, produced by Serratia marcescens (Rhodnius prolixus endosymbiont, belongs to the red-pigmented bacterial prodiginine family, which displays numerous biological activities, including antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antimalarial, immunosuppressive, and anticancer properties. Here we describe its effects on Trypanosoma cruzi mitochondria belonging to Tc I and Tc II. Results Parasites exposed to prodigiosin altered the mitochondrial function and oxidative phosphorylation could not have a normal course, probably by inhibition of complex III. Prodigiosin did not produce cytotoxic effects in lymphocytes and Vero cells and has better effects than benznidazole. Our data suggest that the action of prodigiosin on the parasites is mediated by mitochondrial structural and functional disruptions that could lead the parasites to an apoptotic-like cell death process. Conclusions Here, we propose a potentially useful trypanocidal agent derived from knowledge of an important aspect of the natural life cycle of the parasite: the vector-parasite interaction. Our results indicate that prodigiosin could be a good candidate for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  1. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends.

  2. Extracción de cromo con disolventes orgánicos. III parte. Aplicación al tratamiento de residuos polimetálicos industriales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Juan, D.

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of Primene 81R as extraction agent of chromium present in solid wastes containing nickel, iron and copper has been studied. The waste was leached with a sulphuric acid solution up to pH 3 and oxidation of Cr(III to Cr(VI with Caro acid was also studied. Because of the negative result of oxidation, the treatment was applied on Cr(III directly. Extraction/scrubbing/stripping process was studied in the leach. The composition of organic phase used in the extraction step was 10 % v/v Primene 81R, 10 % isodecanol and kerosene. All the iron, 91 % Cr, 10 % Ni and large part of the copper contained in the initial leach solution are recovered in the organic phase. In the scrubbing stage (with a sulphuric acid solution at pH 1,4, all the copper and nickel and 30 % Cr go to the washing liquor, while all the iron and 70 % Cr remained in the organic phase. In the stripping stage (with a 2N NH4OH or 2N NaOH solution all the iron and chromium are recovered as a precipitate of highly absorbent hydroxides. After the treatment mentioned, 63 % Cr and 100 % Fe are recovered as a mixture of hydroxides, and 28 % of the initial chromium, all the nickel and the copper are found in the washing liquor.

    Se estudia la aplicación del Primene 81R como agente de extracción del cromo presente en residuos sólidos que poseen níquel, hierro y cobre. El residuo se lixivió con disolución de ácido sulfúrico hasta pH 3 y se investigó la oxidación del Cr(III a Cr(VI con ácido de Caro. Ante el nulo resultado en la oxidación, se actuó directamente sobre el Cr(III. Se estudió el proceso de extracción/lavado/reextracción sobre la lejía de lixiviación. La fase orgánica empleada en la extracción estaba constituida por 10 % v/v de Primene 81R, 10 % de isodecanol y queroseno. En la fase orgánica se recupera todo el hierro, el 91 % Cr, el 10 % Ni y gran parte del cobre contenidos en la lejía de partida. En la etapa de lavado (con disolución de

  3. Milliped Miscellany — Part III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeekel, C.A.W.

    1956-01-01

    MATERIAL: Eritrea: Gula (15° 36’ N., 38° 21’ E.), 500 m., 19 July 1953, Coll. W. J. STOWER, 1 ♂ (holotype). COLOUR : Head, except the lower portion of the clypeus and a sharply demarcated spot at the medio-posterior side of the antennal sockets which are yellowish, very dark brown. Antennae and legs

  4. Tarski Geometry Axioms. Part III

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    Coghetto Roland

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we continue the formalization of the work devoted to Tarski’s geometry - the book “Metamathematische Methoden in der Geometrie” by W. Schwabhäuser, W. Szmielew, and A. Tarski. After we prepared some introductory formal framework in our two previous Mizar articles, we focus on the regular translation of underlying items faithfully following the abovementioned book (our encoding covers first seven chapters. Our development utilizes also other formalization efforts of the same topic, e.g. Isabelle/HOL by Makarios, Metamath or even proof objects obtained directly from Prover9. In addition, using the native Mizar constructions (cluster registrations the propositions (“Satz” are reformulated under weaker conditions, i.e. by using fewer axioms or by proposing an alternative version that uses just another axioms (ex. Satz 2.1 or Satz 2.2.

  5. Workshop 97. Part III. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This volume of the Proceedings covers the following branches of science and technology: power systems and electrical engineering, electronics and measuring and communication engineering, optics, quantum electronics and photonics, microelectronics, and biomedical engineering. Out of the contributions, 2 have been input to INIS. (P.A.)

  6. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  7. MicroVent (part III)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreau, Jerome Le; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    This study aims at using the InVentilate unit in the cooling case, without heat recovery. It results in a relatively low inlet air temperature. Different solutions have been tested to decrease the risk of draught in the occupied zone: ‐ Using a mixer (2 designs) ‐ Using an inlet grille ‐ Using...

  8. Survey of Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society Members About Congenital Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Morven S; Abanyie, Francisca A; Montgomery, Susan P

    2018-01-01

    Participants in a survey about congenital Chagas disease, distributed electronically to Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society members, perceived having limited knowledge about congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Most rarely or never consider the diagnosis in infants born to parents from Latin America. Improved awareness of congenital Chagas disease and assessment of at-risk infants is needed.

  9. Prevention of congenital Chagas disease by Benznidazole treatment in reproductive-age women. An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, María G; Vigliano, Carlos; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela; Viotti, Rodolfo

    2017-10-01

    Since the decline in new cases of infection by insect/vector, congenital Chagas disease has become more relevant in the transmission of Chagas disease. Treatment with benznidazole significantly reduces the parasitemia, which constitutes an important factor linked to vertical transmission. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether treatment with benznidazole previously administered to women of childbearing age can prevent or reduce the incidence of new cases of congenital Chagas disease. An historical cohort study that included all women in reproductive age (15-45 years) assisted in our center was designed. We included 67 mothers with chronic Chagas disease; 35 women had not been treated prior to pregnancy, 15 had been treated prior to pregnancy and 17 gave birth prior and after treatment with benznidazole. Eight mothers gave birth to 16 children with congenital Chagas disease (8/67, 12%). The prevalence of congenital Chagas was 16/114 (14%) children born to untreated mothers and 0/42 (0%) children born to benznidazole- treated mothers, p=0.01. No significant differences were observed in clinical, serologic, epidemiological or socioeconomic baseline variables between mothers with and without children born with congenital Chagas. A 32% conversion rate to negative serology was observed in benznidazole-treated women after long-term follow up. Antiparasitic treatment administered to women in reproductive age can prevent the occurrence of congenital Chagas disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Challenges in the management of Chagas disease in Latin-American migrants in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Maillo, B; López-Vélez, R

    2017-05-01

    Chagas disease is endemic in Latin America. Due to migration the infection has crossed borders and it is estimated that 68,000-120,000 people with Chagas disease are currently living in Europe and 30% of them may develop visceral involvement. However, up to 90% of Chagas disease cases in Europe remain undiagnosed. The challenges which have to be overcome in Chagas disease in non-endemic countries are focused on related downing barriers to health care access, and related to screening, diagnostic tools and therapeutic management. The aim of this review is to highlight how healthcare management for Latin American migrants with Chagas disease in Europe may be improved. Medical literature was searched using PubMed. No limits were placed with respect to the language or date of publication although most of the articles selected were articles published in the last five years. Chosen search terms were "Chagas disease" AND ("migrants" OR "screening" OR "transmission" OR "treatment"; OR "knowledge" OR "non-endemic countries"); migrants AND ("Public health" OR "Health Service Accessibility" OR "Delivery of Health care"); and "Congenital Chagas disease". Healthcare management of migrant populations with Chagas disease in Europe has to be improved: -Surveillance programmes are needed to measure the burden of the disease; -screening programmes are needed; -administrative and cultural barriers in the access to health care for migrants should be reduced; -education programmes on Chagas disease should be performed -research on new diagnostic tools and therapeutic options are required. This review highlights the needs of profound changes in the health care of Latin American migrants with Chagas disease in Europe. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chagas Disease: Challenges in Developing New Trypanocidal Lead Compounds [Doença de Chagas: Desafios no Desenvolvimento de Novas Substâncias Líderes Tripanomicidas

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando de C. da Silva; Sabrina B. Ferreira; David R. da Rocha; Vitor F. Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease cycle was fully elucidated by Carlos Chagas in 1909, when he reported his discovery to the scientific community in two seminal papers. Today remains innumerous factors that limit its therapeutic treatment. One of them is the lack of new drugs in the market since is well known that the existing drugs are poorly active with low efficacy and considerable side effects. Nowadays, many efforts have been done in combinatorial chemistry and synthesis of new compounds searching for new ...

  12. Reflecting Equity and Diversity. Part I: Guidelines and Procedure for Evaluating Bias in Instructional Materials. Part II: Bias Awareness Training Worksheets. Part III: Bias Awareness and Procedure Training Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebermeyer, Jim; Edmond, Mary, Ed.

    Reflecting a need to prepare students for working in diverse organizations, this document was developed to increase school officials' awareness of bias in instructional materials and help them select bias-free materials. A number of the examples illustrate situations dealing with diversity in the workplace. The guide is divided into three parts:…

  13. Increased osmotic sensitivity for antidiuretic response in chronic chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Paulo Russomano Veiga

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available The osmotic threshold for attaining the antidiuretic response to hypertonic saline infusion and Progressive dehydration was studied in 31 patients with the chronic form of Chagas' disease and 16 control patients. The chagasic patients exhibited enhanced osmoticsensitivity to the antidiuretic response. This was demonstrated by lower values of the increments in plasma osmolarity sufficient to induce a significant fall in water clearance, without alterations in the osmolar clearance or creatinine excretion. The time needed to attain the antidiuretic response was shorterfor chagasics in relation to normal subjects. The results suggest the existence of a disturbance in the fine control of osmoregulation in the chagasic patients. They are interpreted to be a consequence of the denervation in hypothalamic or extrahypothalamic areas that regulate the secretion of vasopressin in chronic Chagas' disease.O limiar de sensibilidade osmótíca para obtenção de resposta antídiurética foi avaliado em 31 pacientes com a forma crônica da moléstia de Chagas, através de infusão de salina hipertônica ou desidratação. Os resultados, quando comparados com os obtidos em 16 pacientes-controle, mostram uma sensibilidade osmótíca aumentada para os chagásicos, dados os menores valores do incremento na osmolaridade plasmática, suficiente para induzir uma queda significativa na depuração de água livre, sem alterações na depuração osmolar ou na excreção de creatínina. Também, o tempo necessário para atingir a antídiurese foi mais curto para os chagásicos do que para os controles. Os resultados sugerem a existência de um distúrbio na osmorregulação, nos pacientes chagásicos, caracterizado por uma sensibilidade osmótíca aumentada dos osmorreceptores para liberação da vasopressina. Estes dados interpretam-se como conseqüente à desnervação em áreas hipotalâmicas ou extra-hipotalâmicas, relacionadas com a secreção do horm

  14. New Scenarios of Chagas Disease Transmission in Northern Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Tovar Acero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD is a systemic parasitic infection caused by the flagellated form of Trypanosoma cruzi. Córdoba department, located in the Colombian Caribbean Coast, was not considered as a region at risk of T. cruzi transmission. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case in Salitral village in Sahagún, Córdoba, confirmed by microscopy and serological tests. Our results draw attention to a new scenario of transmission of acute CD in nonendemic areas of Colombia and highlight the need to include CD in the differential diagnosis of febrile syndromes in this region.

  15. Cardiac beta-receptors in experimental Chagas' disease Receptores beta cardíacos na doença de Chagas experimental

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    Julio E. Enders

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Chagas' disease (45 to 90 days post-infection showed serious cardiac alterations in the contractility and in the pharmacological response to beta adrenergic receptors in normal and T. cruzi infected mice (post-acute phase. Chagasic infection did not change the beta receptors density (78.591 ± 3.125 fmol/mg protein and 73.647 ± 2.194 fmol/mg protein for controls but their affinity was significantly diminished (Kd = 7.299 ± 0.426 nM and Kd = 3.759 ± 0.212 nM for the control p Estudaram-se os receptores beta cardíacos de camundongos infectados pelo Trypanosoma cruzi na fase pós-aguda da doença de Chagas para estabelecer em que medida os mesmos contribuem a gerar respostas anômalas às catecolaminas observadas nestes miocardios. Utilizara-se 3-H/DHA para a marcação dos receptores beta cardíacos dos camundongos normais e dos infectados na fase pós-aguda (45 a 90 dias pós-infecção. O número dos sítios de fixação foi similar nos dois grupos, 78.591 ± 3.125 fmol/mg. Proteína nos chagásicos e 73.647 ± 2.194 fmol/mg. Proteína no grupo controle. Em vez disso, a afinidade verificou-se significativamente diminuida no grupo chagásico (Kd = 7.299 ± 0.426 nM respeito do controle (Kd = 3.759 ± 0.212 nM p < 0.001. Os resultados obtidos demonstram que as modificações observadas na estimulação adrenérgica do miocárdio chagásico se correlacionam com a menor afinidade dos receptores beta cardíacos e que estas alterações exerceriam uma parte determinante para as consequências funcionais que são detectadas na fase crônica.

  16. The potential influence of atherogenic dyslipidemia on the severity of chronic Chagas heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Peverengo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction: chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD is the most common manifestation of American Trypanosomiasis, causing about 50,000 deaths annually. Several factors bear correlation with the severity of CCHD. However, to our knowledge, the assessment on the contribution of major cardiovascular risk factors (CRF, such as hypertension and atherogenic dyslipidemia (AD to CCHD severity is scarce, despite their well-established role in coronary artery disease, heart failure and stroke. Objective: to explore the potential relationship of blood pressure and AD with the clinical profile of patients with CCHD. Methods: we performed a cross-sectional study in T. cruziseropositive patients categorized according to a standard CCHD classification. All individuals were subjected to complete clinical examination. Autoantibodies induced by T. cruzi were assessed by ELISA. Results: we observed that Atherogenic index (AI levels rose significantly in relation to the severity of the CCHD stage, with CCHD III cases showing the highest values of AI. Furthermore, those patients with globally dilated cardiomyopathy with reduced ejection fraction showed higher levels of AI. In regard to autoantibodies, anti-B13 also showed relation with the severity of the disease. Conclusion: we observed that AI correlated with CCHD stages and contributed, in association with anti-B13 antibodies and age, to the prediction of systolic heart failure.

  17. Evaluating Chagas disease progression and cure through blood-derived biomarkers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena-Méndez, Ana; López, Manuel Carlos; Angheben, Andrea; Izquierdo, Luis; Ribeiro, Isabela; Pinazo, Maria-Jesús; Gascon, Joaquim; Muñoz, José

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the usefulness of various types of blood-derived biomarkers that are currently being studied to predict the progression of Chagas disease in patients with the indeterminate form, to assess the efficacy of antiparasitic drugs and to identify early cardiac and gastrointestinal damage. The authors used a search strategy based on MEDLINE, Cochrane Library Register for systematic review, EmBase, Global Health and LILACS databases. Out of 1716 screened articles, only 166 articles were eligible for final inclusion. The authors classified the biomarkers according to their biochemical structure and primary biological activity in four groups: i) markers of inflammation and cellular injury, ii) metabolic biomakers, iii) prothrombotic biomarkers and iv) markers derived from specific antigens of the parasite. Several potential biomarkers might have clinical potential for the detection of early cardiopathy. Such capacity is imperative in order to detect high-risk patients who require intensive monitoring and earlier therapy. Prospective studies with longer follow-ups are needed for the appraisal of biomarkers assessing clinical or microbiological cure after therapy. At the same time, studies evaluating more than one biomarker are useful to compare the efficacy among them given the lack of a recognized gold standard.

  18. Desbravamento, agricultura e doença: a doença de Chagas no Estado de São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Jacintho da Silva

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Faz-se uma reconstrução do processo de surgimento, disseminação e desaparecimento da endemia chagásica no Estado de São Paulo, interpretando-se as informações epidemiológicas existentes, dentro de uma perspectiva histórico-materialista. Parte-se dos conceitos clássicos que procuram explicar a distribuição da doença, demonstrando sua insuficiência. Com a incorporação de conceitos e métodos de análise utilizados em Geografia, chega-se a uma compreensão do que foi o processo de evolução da doença em São Paulo, e quais os seus determinantes, mostrando que se tratou de um processo peculiar ao Centro-Sul brasileiro, num período histórico bem determinado. A doença de Chagas, ainda que uma endemia de expressão nacional, não pode ser vista como um todo indistinto, existindo diferentes padrões epidemiológicos em períodos históricos diferentes.A reconstruction of the emergence, distribution and disappearence of Chagas' disease in the State of São Paulo (Brazil is undertaken by interpretating existing epidemiological data through historical-materialism. Classical concepts concerning the distribution of the disease are shown inadequate to explain the epidemiology of Chagas'disease in São Paulo. By incorporating an analitical methodology and concepts used in geographical studies, an understanding of the evolution of the disease is achieved. The process is demonstrated peculiar to Central-South Brazil in a particular historical period. Chagas'disease, inasmuch as parasitosis of national expression, must be seen as having distinct epidemiological patterns occuring in differente historical periods.

  19. New evidence of spontaneous cure in human Chagas' disease Novas evidências da cura espontânea da doença de Chagas humana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia S. Francolino

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A new case of spontaneous cure of human Chagas' disease is described in Uruguay. An 87-year-old man who had a typical acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 1947 and never received specific treatment against the disease, when examined in 1998 revealed several completely negative parasitological and serological tests, including traditional serology, PCR and flow cytometry. As a whole, such findings fulfill the current criteria to define the cure of Chagas' disease. Clinical data suggest the possibility of a benign evolution of Chagas' disease in this case, but the basic findings (slight cardiac and esophageal impairment could also be due to the advanced age of the patient.Um novo caso de cura espontânea da doença de Chagas humana é descrito no Uruguai. Um homem de 87 anos de idade que teve um quadro típico de doença de Chagas aguda em 1947 e nunca recebeu tratamento específico, revelou-se em 1998 completamente negativo para exames sorológicos e parasitológicos, inclusive por PCR e citometria de fluxo. Estes achados, no conjunto, preenchem os critérios correntes para a definição de cura da doença de Chagas. O quadro clínico atual sugere a possiblidade de uma evolução benigna da doença de Chagas, mas os achados principais (comprometimento leve do coração e do esôfago poderiam também dever-se à avançada idade do paciente.

  20. Tendência da mortalidade relacionada à doença de Chagas, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, 1985 a 2006: estudo usando causas múltiplas de morte Chagas disease-related mortality trends, state of São Paulo, Brazil, 1985 to 2006: a study using multiple causes of death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Hasiak Santo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a tendência da mortalidade relacionada à doença de Chagas informada em qualquer linha ou parte do atestado médico da declaração de óbito. MÉTODOS: Os dados provieram dos bancos de causas múltiplas de morte da Fundação Sistema Estadual de Análise de Dados de São Paulo (SEADE entre 1985 e 2006. As causas de morte foram caracterizadas como básicas, associadas (não-básicas e total de suas menções. RESULTADOS: No período de 22 anos, ocorreram 40 002 óbitos relacionados à doença de Chagas, dos quais 34 917 (87,29% como causa básica e 5 085 (12,71% como causa associada. Foi observado um declínio de 56,07% do coeficiente de mortalidade pela causa básica e estabilidade pela causa associada. O número de óbitos foi 44,5% maior entre os homens em relação às mulheres. O fato de 83,5% dos óbitos terem ocorrido a partir dos 45 anos de idade revela um efeito de coorte. As principais causas associadas da doença de Chagas como causa básica foram as complicações diretas do comprometimento cardíaco, como transtornos da condução, arritmias e insuficiência cardíaca. Para a doença de Chagas como causa associada, foram identificadas como causas básicas as doenças isquêmicas do coração, as doenças cerebrovasculares e as neoplasias. CONCLUSÕES: Para o total de suas menções, verificou-se uma queda do coeficiente de mortalidade de 51,34%, ao passo que a queda no número de óbitos foi de apenas 5,91%, tendo sido menor entre as mulheres, com um deslocamento das mortes para as idades mais avançadas. A metodologia das causas múltiplas de morte contribuiu para ampliar o conhecimento da história natural da doença de Chagas.OBJECTIVES: To study mortality trends related to Chagas disease taking into account all mentions of this cause listed on any line or part of the death certificate. METHODS: Mortality data for 1985-2006 were obtained from the multiple cause-of-death database maintained by the São Paulo

  1. Chagas Disease in Dogs from Endemic Areas of Costa Rica

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    Montenegro Victor M

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dogs with the presumptive diagnosis of Chagas disease are commonly sent to our School of Veterinary Medicine by independent veterinarians. This prompted us to evaluate the prevalence of canine trypanosomiasis in some villages of the Central Valley of Costa Rica. A total of 54 dogs (21 males and 33 females from five rural villages, with ages between 3 months and 10 years old, were bled and submitted to three serological tests: indirect immunofluorescence, indirect hemagglutination and ELISA. Among all animals, 15 (27.7% revealed antibodies (6 pure bred and 9 mongrels and in 3 of them the parasite was also demonstrated by xenodiagnosis. All positive animals except 1, and 9 negative animals (control group were examined by X-rays and electrocardiography, revealing different degrees of cardiomegaly and ECG alteration, consistent with Chagas disease pathology in one dog (SA-11 of the infected ones. Examination of 50 inhabitants living in the houses where dogs and Triatoma dimidiata were found, yielded negative serological reactions. This was assumed to support the hypothesis that dogs are commonly infected by the oral route, a more effective means of infection compared with the vector transmission mechanism that occurs in humans.

  2. A Multi-species Bait for Chagas Disease Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Theo; Vitta, Ana C. R.; Lorenzo-Figueiras, Alicia N.; Barezani, Carla P.; Zani, Carlos L.; Lazzari, Claudio R.; Diotaiuti, Liléia; Jeffares, Lynne; Bohman, Björn; Lorenzo, Marcelo G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Triatomine bugs are the insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. These insects are known to aggregate inside shelters during daylight hours and it has been demonstrated that within shelters, the aggregation is induced by volatiles emitted from bug feces. These signals promote inter-species aggregation among most species studied, but the chemical composition is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present work, feces from larvae of the three species were obtained and volatile compounds were identified by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS). We identified five compounds, all present in feces of all of the three species: Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus and Triatoma brasiliensis. These substances were tested for attractivity and ability to recruit insects into shelters. Behaviorally active doses of the five substances were obtained for all three triatomine species. The bugs were significantly attracted to shelters baited with blends of 160 ng or 1.6 µg of each substance. Conclusions/Significance Common compounds were found in the feces of vectors of Chagas disease that actively recruited insects into shelters, which suggests that this blend of compounds could be used for the development of baits for early detection of reinfestation with triatomine bugs. PMID:24587457

  3. Research priorities for Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a review and analysis of the research landscape for three diseases - Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis - that disproportionately afflict poor and remote populations with limited access to health services. It represents the work of the disease reference group on Chagas Disease, Human African Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis (DRG3) which was established to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholders' consultations. The diseases, which are caused by related protozoan parasites, are described in terms of their epidemiology and diseases burden, clinical forms and pathogenesis, HIV coinfection, diagnosis, drugs and drug resistance, vaccines, vector control, and health-care interventions. Priority areas for research are identified based on criteria such as public health relevance, benefit and impact on poor populations and equity, and feasibility. The priorities are found in the areas of diagnostics, drugs, vector control, asymptomatic infection, economic analysis of treatment and vector control methods, and in some specific issues such as surveillance methods or transmission-blocking vaccines for particular diseases. This report will be useful to researchers, policy and decision-makers, funding bodies, implementation organizations, and civil society. This is one of ten disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report for Research on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at: www.who.int/tdr/stewardship/global_report/en/index.html.

  4. Chagas disease transmission by consumption of game meat: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangenis, Luiz Henrique Conde; Nielebock, Marco Antonio Prates; Santos, Ceumara da Silva; Silva, Mateus Curty Carriello da; Bento, Glauber Motta Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of game meat consumption in Chagas disease (CD) transmission, the conditions under which it occurs and the frequency of reports in the literature. Through systematic review, databases PubMed, LILACS, MEDLINE, and SciELO were consulted, and articles written in Portuguese, English, and Spanish were included, with no limitation over publication date. We used the following descriptors: oral, transmission, meat, wild animals, hunt, carnivory, and Chagas disease. Articles that mentioned consumption of animal meat as a form of human transmission of CD were included. We used epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory evidence criteria to confirm cases. Among the 298 articles identified, only six met the eligibility criteria. Only five episodes of oral transmission through wild animal meat or blood consumption were identified. However, in two of them, the possibility of vectorial transmission could not be ruled out. Most reports met the epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory evidence criteria established to support the transmission. Though CD transmission is uncommon, hunting and consumption of wild mammals that serve as Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs should be discouraged in endemic countries in light of the risks inherent to these practices.

  5. Urban transmission of Chagas disease in Cochabamba, Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Medrano-Mercado

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a major public health problem in Bolivia. In the city of Cochabamba, 58% of the population lives in peripheral urban districts ("popular zones" where the infection prevalence is extremely high. From 1995 to 1999, we studied the demographics of Chagas infections in children from five to 13 years old (n = 2218 from the South zone (SZ and North zone (NZ districts, which differ in social, environmental, and agricultural conditions. Information gathered from these districts demonstrates qualitative and quantitative evidence for the active transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in urban Cochabamba. Seropositivity was high in both zones (25% in SZ and 19% in NZ. We observed a high risk of infection in children from five to nine years old in SZ, but in NZ, a higher risk occurred in children aged 10-13, with odds ratio for infection three times higher in NZ than in SZ. This difference was not due to triatomine density, since more than 1,000 Triatoma infestans were captured in both zones, but was possibly secondary to the vector infection rate (79% in SZ and 37% in NZ. Electrocardiogram abnormalities were found to be prevalent in children and pre-adolescents (SZ = 40%, NZ = 17%, indicating that under continuous exposure to infection and re-infection, a severe form of the disease may develop early in life. This work demonstrates that T. cruzi infection should also be considered an urban health problem and is not restricted to the rural areas and small villages of Bolivia.

  6. Modeling the spatial distribution of Chagas disease vectors using environmental variables and people´s knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Jaime; Núñez, Ignacia; Bacigalupo, Antonella; Cattan, Pedro E

    2013-05-31

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to mammal hosts by triatomine insect vectors. The goal of this study was to model the spatial distribution of triatomine species in an endemic area. Vector's locations were obtained with a rural householders' survey. This information was combined with environmental data obtained from remote sensors, land use maps and topographic SRTM data, using the machine learning algorithm Random Forests to model species distribution. We analysed the combination of variables on three scales: 10 km, 5 km and 2.5 km cell size grids. The best estimation, explaining 46.2% of the triatomines spatial distribution, was obtained for 5 km of spatial resolution. Presence probability distribution increases from central Chile towards the north, tending to cover the central-coastal region and avoiding areas of the Andes range. The methodology presented here was useful to model the distribution of triatomines in an endemic area; it is best explained using 5 km of spatial resolution, and their presence increases in the northern part of the study area. This study's methodology can be replicated in other countries with Chagas disease or other vectorial transmitted diseases, and be used to locate high risk areas and to optimize resource allocation, for prevention and control of vectorial diseases.

  7. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase II), I-V, Part III, Reactor poisoning; Razrada metoda teorijske analize nuklearnih reaktora (II faza) I-V, III Deo, Zatrovanje reaktora, II faza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-10-15

    This phase is dealing with influence of all the fission products except Xe{sup 135} on the reactivity of a reactor, usually named as reactor poisoning. The first part of the report is a review of methods for calculation of reactor poisoning. The second part shows the most frequently used method for calculation of cross sections and yields of pseudo products (for thermal neutrons). The system of equations was adopted dependent on the conditions of the available computer system. It is described in part three. Detailed method for their application is described in part four and results obtained are presented in part five.

  8. Inhibition of Autoimmune Chagas-Like Heart Disease by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guimaro, M.C.; Alves, R. J. V.; Rose, E.; Sousa, A.O.; Rosa, A.D.; Hecht, M.M.; Sousa, M.V.; Andrade, R.R.; Vital, T.; Plachý, Jiří; Nitz, N.; Hejnar, Jiří; Gomes, C.C.; Teixeira, A.R.L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 12 (2014) ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Chagas disease * inbred chicken * adoptive transfer of immunity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.446, year: 2014

  9. Mapping of Chagas disease research: analysis of publications in the period between 1940 and 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Ramos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Publications are often used as a measure of success in research work. Chagas disease occurs in Central and Southern America. However, during the past years, the disease has been occurring outside Latin America due to migration from endemic zones. This article describes a bibliometric review of the literature on Chagas disease research indexed in PubMed during a 70-year period. METHODS: Medline was used via the PubMed online service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine from 1940 to 2009. The search strategy was: Chagas disease [MeSH] OR Trypanosoma cruzi [MeSH]. RESULTS: A total of 13,989 references were retrieved. The number of publications increased steadily over time from 1,361 (1940-1969 to 5,430 (2000-2009 (coefficient of determination for linear fit, R²=0.910. Eight journals contained 25% of the Chagas disease literature. Of the publications, 64.2% came from endemic countries. Brazil was the predominant country (37%, followed by the United States (17.6% and Argentina (14%. The ranking in production changed when the number of publications was normalized by estimated cases of Chagas disease (Panama and Uruguay, population (Argentina and Uruguay, and gross domestic product (Bolivia and Brazil. CONCLUSIONS: Several Latin American countries, where the prevalence of T. cruzi infection was not very high, were the main producers of the Chagas disease literature, after adjusting for economic and population indexes. The countries with more estimated cases of Chagas disease produced less research on Chagas disease than some developed countries.

  10. Follow up Evaluation of Air Force Blood Donors Screening Positive for Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-05

    59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 31 JULY2017 Your paper, entitled Follow-up Evaluation of Air Force Blood Donors Screening...PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Follow-up Evaluation of Air Force Blood Donors Screening Positive for Chagas Disease 7. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS STUDY? 0...PREVIOUS EDITIONS ARE OBSOLETE 50. DATE Page 3 of 3 Pages Follow-up Evaluation of Air Force Blood Donors Screening Positive for Chagas Disease

  11. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part IV: Chromium(III)/H+ /Lewatit SP112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    This investigation presented results on the removal of chromium(III), from aqueous solution in the 0-5 pH range, using Lewatit SP112 cationic exchange resin. Several aspects affecting the ion exchange process were evaluated, including: the influence of the stirring speed, temperature, pH of the solution, resin dosage and aqueous ionic strength. The selectivity of the system was tested against the presence of other metals in the aqueous solution, whereas the removal of chromium(III) from solutions was compared with results obtained using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents. From the batch experimental data, best fit of the results is obtained with the Langmuir model, whereas the ion exchange process is best explained by the pseudo-second order model, moreover, experimental data responded well to the film-diffusion controlled model. Elution of the chromium(III) loaded into the resin is well accomplished by the use of sodium hydroxide solutions. [es

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi IV causing outbreaks of acute Chagas disease and infections by different haplotypes in the Western Brazilian Amazonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuelton Marcelo Monteiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease is an emergent tropical disease in the Brazilian Amazon Region, with an increasing number of cases in recent decades. In this region, the sylvatic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission, which constitutes a reservoir of parasites that might be associated with specific molecular, epidemiological and clinical traits, has been little explored. The objective of this work is to genetically characterize stocks of T. cruzi from human cases, triatomines and reservoir mammals in the State of Amazonas, in the Western Brazilian Amazon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed 96 T. cruzi samples from four municipalities in distant locations of the State of Amazonas. Molecular characterization of isolated parasites from cultures in LIT medium or directly from vectors or whole human blood was performed by PCR of the non-transcribed spacer of the mini-exon and of the 24 S alfa ribosomal RNA gene, RFLP and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII gene, and by sequencing of the glucose-phosphate isomerase gene. The T. cruzi parasites from two outbreaks of acute disease were all typed as TcIV. One of the outbreaks was triggered by several haplotypes of the same DTU. TcIV also occurred in isolated cases and in Rhodnius robustus. Incongruence between mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenies is likely to be indicative of historical genetic exchange events resulting in mitochondrial introgression between TcIII and TcIV DTUs from Western Brazilian Amazon. TcI predominated among triatomines and was the unique DTU infecting marsupials. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: DTU TcIV, rarely associated with human Chagas disease in other areas of the Amazon basin, is the major strain responsible for the human infections in the Western Brazilian Amazon, occurring in outbreaks as single or mixed infections by different haplotypes.

  13. Extracción de cromo con disolventes orgánicos. III parte. Aplicación al tratamiento de residuos polimetálicos industriales

    OpenAIRE

    de Juan, D.; Meseguer, V.; Lozano, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of Primene 81R as extraction agent of chromium present in solid wastes containing nickel, iron and copper has been studied. The waste was leached with a sulphuric acid solution up to pH 3 and oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) with Caro acid was also studied. Because of the negative result of oxidation, the treatment was applied on Cr(III) directly. Extraction/scrubbing/stripping process was studied in the leach. The composition of organic phase used in the extraction step was 10 % v/v Pr...

  14. Risk factors for Chagas disease among pregnant women in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasagawa, Emi; Aiga, Hirotsugu; Corado, Edith Y; Cuyuch, Blanca L; Hernández, Marta A; Guevara, Ana V; Romero, José E; Ramos, Hector M; Cedillos, Rafael A; Misago, Chizuru; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2015-03-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of Chagas disease among pregnant women and estimate the risk factors for Chagas disease during pregnancies. Community-based serological tests on Trypanosoma cruzi and structured interviews on socio-demographic and socio-economic status were conducted with pregnant women registered at three health centres in Sonsonate province, El Salvador. Of 797 pregnant women participating in the study, 29 (3.6%) were infected with Chagas disease. None had clinical symptoms. The results of bivariate analyses showed the significant association between seropositivity and maternal age ≥35 years, anaemia, illiteracy, having no formal school education and having knowledge on Chagas disease (P < 0.05). The results of multivariate analysis indicate that age ≥35 years and anaemia were significantly associated with being infected with Chagas disease among pregnant women (OR = 3.541 and 5.197, respectively). We recommend that the national Chagas disease control programme be better coordinated with the national maternal and child health programme to introduce blood screening for T. cruzi during antenatal visits. If financial constraint allows systematic blood screening to be only partially implemented, resources should be focused on pregnant women ≥35 years and women who have anaemia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. RA Reactor operation and maintenance (I-IX), Part III, Task 3.08/04-02 Refurbishment of the electrical equipment; Pogon i odrzavanje reaktora RA (I-IX), III Deo, Zadatak 3.08/04-02 Remont elektro opreme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecevic, V; Nikolic, M; Poznanovic, B; Rajic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Reaktor RA, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-12-15

    This volume contains detailed action plan for repair of electrical equipment of the RA reactor, the list of electrical equipment parts which were either repaired or exchanged for improvement of their performance. Detailed work describing the repair and maintenance work done of the listed equipment is part of this report. Equipment related to dosimetry and control systems are included as well.

  16. Agrochemicals against malaria, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis and Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witschel, Matthias; Rottmann, Matthias; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto

    2012-01-01

    In tropical regions, protozoan parasites can cause severe diseases with malaria, leishmaniasis, sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease standing in the forefront. Many of the drugs currently being used to treat these diseases have been developed more than 50 years ago and can cause severe adverse effects. Above all, resistance to existing drugs is widespread and has become a serious problem threatening the success of control measures. In order to identify new antiprotozoal agents, more than 600 commercial agrochemicals have been tested on the pathogens causing the above mentioned diseases. For all of the pathogens, compounds were identified with similar or even higher activities than the currently used drugs in applied in vitro assays. Furthermore, in vivo activity was observed for the fungicide/oomyceticide azoxystrobin, and the insecticide hydramethylnon in the Plasmodium berghei mouse model, and for the oomyceticide zoxamide in the Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense STIB900 mouse model, respectively.

  17. Helietta apiculata: a tropical weapon against Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena Ferreira, Maria; Rojas de Arias, Antonieta; Yaluff, Gloria; Vera de Bilbao, Ninfa; Nakayama, Hector; Torres, Susana; Schinini, Alicia; Torres, Susana; Serna, Elva; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Fournet, Alain; Cebrián-Torrejón, Gerardo

    2018-05-10

    The present study pretends to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of the crude chloroform bark extract of Helietta apiculata, then the activity will be compared with the reference drug, benznidazole, in acute Trypanosoma cruzi infected mice when administered by oral route. The chloroformic extract of Helieta apiculata was administered by oral route at 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg daily for two weeks. This study has shown a moderate efficacy of the H. apiculata bark extract in reducing T. cruzi parasitaemia in 42 to 54% after a monitoring of 60 days post-infection and when compared with control groups. Concerning mice mortality, only two only two mice died, one from the control group and the other one from the group threated with 10 mg of the chlorofom extract of H. apiculata, suggesting the potential of H. apiculta extracts as a safe and inexpensive treatment of Chagas disease.

  18. Chagas disease study using satellite image processing: A Bolivian case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Cuentas, Natalia I.; Roman-Gonzalez, Avid; Mantari, Alicia Alva; Muñoz, Luis AnthonyAucapuma

    2018-03-01

    Remote sensing is the technology that has enabled us to obtain information about the Earth's surface without directly contacting it. For this reason, currently, the Bolivian state has considered a list of interesting applications of remote sensing in the country, including the following: biodiversity and environment monitoring, mining and geology, epidemiology, agriculture, water resources and land use planning. The use of satellite images has become a great tool for epidemiology because with this technological advance we can determine the environment in which transmission occurs, the distribution of the disease and its evolution over time. In that context, one of the important diseases related to public health in Bolivia is Chagas disease, also known as South American Trypanosomiasis. Chagas is caused by a blood-sucking bug or Vinchuca, which causes serious intestinal and heart long term problems and affects 33.4% of the Bolivian population. This disease affects mostly humble people, so the Bolivian state invests millions of dollars to acquire medicine and distribute it for free. Due to the above reasons, the present research aims to analyze some areas of Bolivia using satellite images for developing an epidemiology study. The primary objective is to understand the environment in which the transmission of the disease happens, and the climatic conditions under which occurs, observe the behavior of the blood-sucking bug, identify in which months occur higher outbreaks, in which months the bug leaves its eggs, and under which weather conditions this happens. All this information would be contrasted with information extracted from the satellite images and data from the Ministry of Health, and the Institute of Meteorology in Bolivia. All this data will allow us to have a more integrated understanding of this disease and promote new possibilities to prevent and control it.

  19. Enfermedad de Chagas y Colonización en el Alto Catatumbo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Guhr

    1992-03-01

    naturales y provocó desequilibrios ecológicos, forzó a los triatomíneos infectados a ocupar las viviendas humanas, llevándose a cabo el proceso de domiciliación ya que no solamente encuentran refugio sino también suficiente alimento de sangre humana y de animales mamíferos (3.

    De esta manera entra el hombre a formar parte activa en la cadena epidemiológica de la enfermedad de Chagas (figura 1.

    Hoy en día diseminada por todos los países Latinoamericanos, esta enfermedad representa sin duda un importantísimo y grave problema de salud pública, no solamente por los elevados índices de prevalencia como por los daños que causa a la población en términos de morbilidad y mortalidad.

    Teniendo en cuenta que la domiciliación de los vectores se lleva a cabo principalmente en los procesos de colonización en {¡reas selváticas, la enfermedad de Chagas se sitúa entre las entidades vinculadas al subdesarrollo sociocultural y sus causas se correlacionan estrechamente a las paupérrimas condiciones de vivienda, al subempleo, a la falta de tierra y de bienes de producción.

    Así pues, en la enfermedad de Chagas se presentan ciclos silvestres sin la participación del hombre y ciclos domiciliarios con su participación los cuales son integrados e interdependientes.

    Otro tipo de transmisión que ha sido involucrado a los ciclos anteriores se debe al proceso de urbanización por la inmigración de enfermos a las grandes ciudades y la transmisión del parásito por vía transfusional.

    Incluso en ciudades donde no hay transmisión vectorial como es el caso de Santa Fe de Bogotá, se ha demostrado incidencias cercanas a13% en donantes de diferentes bancos de sangre de la ciudad (4. Un estudio recientemente finalizado en nuestro laboratorio (Guhl et al datos no publicados demostraron una prevalencia del 2.6% sobre un total de 1564 donantes del banco de sangre del hospital de la Samaritana en la ciudad de Santa Fe de Bogotá. Otros estudios han

  20. Geology of quadrangles H-12, H-13, and parts of I-12 and I-13, (zone III) in northeastern Santander Department, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dwight Edward; Goldsmith, Richard; Cruz, Jaime B.; Restrepo, Hernan A.

    1974-01-01

    A program of geologic mapping and mineral investigation in Colombia was undertaken cooperatively by the Colombian Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Geologico-Mineras (formerly known as the Inventario Minero Nacional), and the U. S. Geological Survey; by the Government of Colombia and the Agency for International Development, U. S. Department of State. The purpose was to study, and evaluate mineral resources (excluding of petroleum, coal, emeralds, and alluvial gold) of four selected areas, designated Zones I to IV, that total about 70,000 km2. The work in Zone III, in the Cordillera Oriental, was done from 1965 to 1968. The northeast trend of the Cordillera Oriental of Colombia swings abruptly to north-northwest in the area of this report, and divides around the southern end of the Maracaibo Basin. This section of the Cordillera Oriental is referred to as the Santander Massif. Radiometric age determinations indicate that the oldest rocks of the Santander massif are Precambrian and include high-grade gneiss, schist, and migmatite of the Bucaramanga Formation. These rocks were probably part of the Precambrian Guayana Shield. Low- to medium-grade metamorphic rocks of late Precambrian to Ordovician age .include phyllite, schist, metasiltstone, metasandstone, and marble of the Silgara Formation, a geosynclinal series of considerable extent in the Cordillera Oriental and possibly the Cordillera de Merida of Venezuela. Orthogneiss ranging from granite to tonalite is widely distributed in the high- and medium-grade metamorphic rocks of the central core of the massif and probably represents rocks of two ages, Precambrian and Ordovician to Early Devonian. Younger orthogneiss and the Silgara are overlain by Middle Devonian beds of the Floresta Formation which show a generally low but varying degree of metamorphism. Phyllite and argillite are common, and infrequent marble and other calcareous beds are fossiliferous. Except for recrystallization in limestones of !the

  1. Chagas disease and globalization of the Amazon La enfermedad de Chagas y la globalización de la Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Briceño-León

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of autochthonous cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon since the 1970s has led to fear that the disease may become a new public health problem in the region. This transformation in the disease's epidemiological pattern in the Amazon can be explained by environmental and social changes in the last 30 years. The current article draws on the sociological theory of perverse effects to explain these changes as the unwanted result of the shift from the "inward" development model prevailing until the 1970s to the "outward" model that we know as globalization, oriented by industrial forces and international trade. The current article highlights the implementation of five new patterns in agriculture, cattle-raising, mining, lumbering, and urban occupation that have generated changes in the environment and the traditional indigenous habitat and have led to migratory flows, deforestation, sedentary living, the presence of domestic animals, and changes in the habitat that facilitate colonization of human dwellings by vectors and the domestic and work-related transmission of the disease. The expansion of Chagas disease is thus a perverse effect of the globalization process in the Amazon.El incremento de casos autóctonos de la enfermedad de Chagas en la Amazonia a partir de los años setenta hace temer que pueda convertirse en un novedoso problema de salud pública en la región. Este cambio del patrón epidemiológico de la enfermedad en la región amazónica debe ser explicado por las transformaciones ambientales y sociales que han ocurrido en los pasados treinta años. Este artículo utiliza la teoría sociológica de los efectos perversos para explicar esos cambios como el resultado indeseado del cambio de modelo de desarrollo "hacia adentro", que había existido hasta los años setenta, por otro "hacia fuera" que está orientado por las fuerzas de la producción y el comercio internacional que conocemos como globalización. El art

  2. Intrusive versus domiciliated triatomines and the challenge of adapting vector control practices against Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Waleckx

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease prevention remains mostly based on triatomine vector control to reduce or eliminate house infestation with these bugs. The level of adaptation of triatomines to human housing is a key part of vector competence and needs to be precisely evaluated to allow for the design of effective vector control strategies. In this review, we examine how the domiciliation/intrusion level of different triatomine species/populations has been defined and measured and discuss how these concepts may be improved for a better understanding of their ecology and evolution, as well as for the design of more effective control strategies against a large variety of triatomine species. We suggest that a major limitation of current criteria for classifying triatomines into sylvatic, intrusive, domiciliary and domestic species is that these are essentially qualitative and do not rely on quantitative variables measuring population sustainability and fitness in their different habitats. However, such assessments may be derived from further analysis and modelling of field data. Such approaches can shed new light on the domiciliation process of triatomines and may represent a key tool for decision-making and the design of vector control interventions.

  3. In vitro and in vivo trypanocidal activity of flavonoids from Delphinium staphisagria against Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Clotilde; Ramírez-Macías, Inmaculada; López-Céspedes, Angeles; Olmo, Francisco; Villegas, Noelia; Díaz, Jesús G; Rosales, María José; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Ramón; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel

    2011-04-25

    The in vitro and in vivo trypanocidal activities of nine flavonoids (1-9) isolated from the aerial parts of Delphinium staphisagria have been studied in both the acute and chronic phases of Chagas disease. The antiproliferative activity of these substances against Trypanosoma cruzi (epimastigote, amastigote, and trypomastigote forms) in some cases exhibited more potent antitrypanosomatid activity and lower toxicity than the reference drug, benznidazole. Studies in vitro using ultrastructural analysis together with metabolism-excretion studies were also performed in order to identify the possible action mechanism of the compounds tested. Alterations mainly at the level of the mitochondria may explain metabolic changes in succinate and acetate production, perhaps due to the disturbance of the enzymes involved in sugar metabolism within the mitochondrion. In vivo studies provided results consistent with those observed in vitro. No signs of toxicity were detected in mice treated with the flavonoids tested, and the parasitic charge was significantly lower than in the control assay with benznidazole. The effects of these compounds were also demonstrated with the change in the anti-T. cruzi antibody levels during the chronic stage.

  4. [Brazilian scientists visit the Amazon: The scientific journeys of Oswaldo Cruz and Carlos Chagas (1910-13)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweickardt, Júlio César; Lima, Nísia Trindade

    2007-12-01

    The article analyzes reports from two scientific journeys into the Amazon conducted by the Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, in 1910 and 1913, under the leadership of Oswaldo Cruz and Carlos Chagas, respectively. These reports contributed to the construction of representations and images of the region. Field observations not only provided data for the study and control of tropical diseases but also had a hand in the movement to denounce the serious sanitation conditions under which rubber workers labored. Journeys through the Amazon valley put the scientists in direct contact with the environment and with sick populations; these travels also made them face the huge challenges of learning about malaria and trying to control it. Analyses of these reports are part of studies on 'portraits of Brazil', which raise issues within the history of public health policies. In this endeavor to reveal the process by which scientific records are constructed, we worked with primary sources,from manuscripts to official texts.

  5. [Costs of Chagas' disease screening test in blood donors in two Colombian blood banks, 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis, Nelson José; Díaz, Diana Patricia; Castillo, Liliana; Alvis, Nelson Rafael; Bermúdez, María Isabel; Berrío, Olga Maritza; Beltrán, Mauricio; Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos Andrés

    2018-03-15

    Transfusion is a mechanism of transmission of Chagas' disease. There are no studies on the costs of the screening test in Colombian blood banks. To estimate the costs of the screening test for Chagas' disease among blood donors in two Colombian blood banks, 2015. We conducted a micro-costing study from the perspective of the health care provider to estimate the cost of Chagas' disease testing in two blood banks, Banco de Sangre de la Cruz Roja, Seccional Bolívar, and Banco de Sangre del Hospital de Yopal, Casanare, taking into account four cost categories: 1) Administrative costs: public services and insurance costs were calculated based on the blood bank area in square meters; 2) capital costs: building and equipment costs that were annualized using a 3% discount rate and a lifespan of 20 years for building and five for equipment; 3) costs of Chagas' disease test materials and reagents adjusted by blood bank production level, and 4) costs of staff in charge of Chagas' disease test processing. The costs of transfusion bagsand immunohematology tests are also reported. The cost of Chagas' disease test in the blood bank of Seccional Bolívar was COP$ 37,804 (USD$ 12), and the blood bag and immunohematology test costs were COP$ 25,941 (USD$ 8.2) and COP$ 6,800 (USD$ 2.2), respectively. In the blood bank of Yopal, Casanare, the costs were COP$ 77,384 (USD$ 24.6), COP$ 30,141 (USD$ 9.6) and COP$ 12,627 (USD$ 4), respectively. Personnel cost accounted for the highest percentage of the total cost for both blood banks (47.5% in Seccional Bolívar, and 55.7% in Yopal, Casanare). Our results are an important input for the planning of services and cost-effectiveness studies for screening tests for Chagas' disease in Colombian blood banks.

  6. Air quality and climate change, Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia Phase III (MICS-Asia IIIPart 1: Overview and model evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia Phase III examines how online coupled air quality models perform in simulating high aerosol pollution in the North China Plain region during wintertime haze events and evaluates the importance of aerosol radiative and microphysical feedbacks. A comprehensive overview of the MICS-Asia III Topic 3 study design, including descriptions of participating models and model inputs, the experimental designs, and results of model evaluation, are presented. Six modeling groups from China, Korea and the United States submitted results from seven applications of online coupled chemistry–meteorology models. Results are compared to meteorology and air quality measurements, including data from the Campaign on Atmospheric Aerosol Research Network of China (CARE-China and the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET. The correlation coefficients between the multi-model ensemble mean and the CARE-China observed near-surface air pollutants range from 0.51 to 0.94 (0.51 for ozone and 0.94 for PM2.5 for January 2010. However, large discrepancies exist between simulated aerosol chemical compositions from different models. The coefficient of variation (SD divided by the mean can reach above 1.3 for sulfate in Beijing and above 1.6 for nitrate and organic aerosols in coastal regions, indicating that these compositions are less consistent from different models. During clean periods, simulated aerosol optical depths (AODs from different models are similar, but peak values differ during severe haze events, which can be explained by the differences in simulated inorganic aerosol concentrations and the hygroscopic growth efficiency (affected by varied relative humidity. These differences in composition and AOD suggest that future models can be improved by including new heterogeneous or aqueous pathways for sulfate and nitrate formation under hazy conditions, a secondary organic aerosol (SOA

  7. Representações, mitos e comportamentos do paciente submetido ao implante de marcapasso na doença de Chagas Representations, myths, and behaviors among Chagas disease patients with pacemakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Magnani

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Estudo antropológico sobre o modo de incorporação e as repercussões do implante do marcapasso na vida do indivíduo portador da doença de Chagas. Foi realizada uma pesquisa etnográfica baseada no instrumento de entrevista aberta, buscando identificar a percepção do estado de saúde de um grupo de 15 pacientes portadores de cardiopatia Chagásica crônica que necessitaram de implante de marcapasso, atendidos no Ambulatório de Marcapasso do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, em Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Utilizou-se o referencial da qualidade de vida para observar os recursos culturais, físicos e psicológicos que os pacientes utilizam para enfrentar, explicar e aceitar o processo de adoecimento, incluindo as representações mentais que constroem o sentido cultural da doença e definem as relações sociais. O estudo pretende contribuir para que os profissionais de saúde atendam seus pacientes em sua integralidade. A orientação decodificada e integrada no âmbito cultural assume um papel importante para evitar que a desinformação perpetue a difusão de mitos populares, que, por vezes, se tornam preconceitos e elementos sociais ativos de estigma do indivíduo portador de cardiopatia.This anthropological study aimed to evaluate the incorporation of pacemakers into the lives of individuals with Chagas disease. An ethnographic methodology was used, based on an open interview focusing on the personal perceptions of 15 patients with chronic Chagas cardiopathy who had required pacemaker implants at the Federal University Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. As part of a broader quality of life analysis, the study investigated the cultural, physical, and psychological resources used by patients to confront, explain, and accept the disease process, including mental representations on the cultural perception of the illness and definition of social relations. The study was intended to

  8. Chagas' disease in the Amazon Basin: V. Periurban palms as habitats of Rhodnius robustus and Rhodnius pictipes - triatomine vectors of Chagas' disease

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    M. A. Miles

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi infected Rhodnius robustus and/or Rhodnius pictipes were commonly found, in large numbers, in the Brazilian Amazonian palms Maximiliana regia ("inajá", Acrocomia sclerocarpa ("mucajá" and Orbignya speciosa ("babaçu". The common opossum, Didelphis marsupialis, was the animal most frequently associated with triatomine infested palms. R. pictipes, frequently light-attracted into houses from palm trees, was the probable source of an acute case of Chagas' disease in the vicinity of Belém. It is considered that triatomine infested palms are likely to cause some cases of acute Chagas' disease in the States of Amazonas and Rondônia. Possible control methods are suggested.Rhodnius robustus e/ou Rhodnius pictipes, infectados com Trypanosoma cruzi foram comumente encontrados, em grande numero, nas palmeiras Maximiliana regia (inaja, Acrocomia sclerocarpa (mucaja e Orbignya speciosa (babacu na Amazonia brasileira. O marsupial Didelphis marsupialis foi o animal encontrado mais frequentemente nas palmeiras associadas a alta prevalencia de triatomineos. R. pictipes que e atraido pela luz nas residencias de palmeiras vizinhas, provavelmente e a fonte de um caso agudo de doenca de Chagas nas vizinhancas de Belem. Sugere-se que as palmeiras albergando triatomineos poderiam ser relacionadas com infeccoes humanas de doenca de Chagas nos Estados de Amazonas e Rondonia. Sugere-se, tambem, possiveis metodos de controle.

  9. La enfermedad de Chagas en las Américas: una perspectiva de ecosalud Chagas disease in the Americas: an ecohealth perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Briceño-León

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El proceso de transmisión de la enfermedad de Chagas ha estado históricamente relacionado con los patrones de ocupación territorial de los asentamientos humanos. En las áreas rurales puede ocurrir más fácilmente el encuentro del vector, los agentes patógenos y los seres humanos, por las condiciones de la vivienda y la pobreza existente en estas zonas. Los procesos migratorios permanentes o estacionales han jugado un papel igualmente importante en el transporte de los vectores y en la infección de la población en las zonas urbanas. Las nuevas fronteras agrícolas del Amazonas se han establecido nuevas áreas de transmisión de la enfermedad. La atención dada a los bancos de sangre ha permitido disminuir la transmisión transfusional, pero la inmigración internacional ha cambiado la situación epidemiológica, pues en Estados Unidos y España viven miles de enfermos que habían sido infectados décadas antes y no encuentran adecuada atención. Los avances en el conocimiento y el control de la enfermedad son mostrados en el artículo, señalando las limitaciones existentes en cuanto al mejoramiento de las condiciones ambientales y de vivienda de los pobres.The historical processes involved in Chagas disease transmission relate to the patterns and conditions of human settlements, especially in rural areas, due to proximity to forest areas, where both vectors and Trypanosoma cruzi can occur, combined with precarious housing conditions and underlying poverty. However, seasonal and permanent rural-urban migration has played a major role in re-mobilizing vectors, T. cruzi, and Chagas-infected individuals. A new agricultural frontier in the Amazon has led to a new transmission pattern, especially with palm trees located close to houses. Improved blood bank surveillance has decreased transmission by blood transfusions. International migration also plays a role in Chagas disease epidemiology. The United States and Spain, where specific health

  10. La enfermedad de Chagas en la zona central de Honduras: conocimientos, creencias y prácticas

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    Gustavo Ávila Montes

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available En el período de noviembre a diciembre de 1991 y en marzo de 1993 se realizó una encuesta en 17 comunidades rurales de la parte central de Honduras. Las comunidades correspondían a dos zonas en las que la enfermedad de Chagas es endémica. En una de las zonas habían tenido lugar actividades de control de la enfermedad. Fueron entrevistados 849 adultos, uno en cada uno de otros tantos hogares familiares. El objetivo de la encuesta fue investigar y comparar en ambas zonas los conocimientos sobre la enfermedad de Chagas y sus mecanismos de transmisión, las prácticas para evitar la presencia de triatómidos en las viviendas, las creencias acerca de los triatómidos y su control, y las fuentes a partir de las cuales la población obtiene información sobre la enfermedad. Se utilizó un cuestionario de 23 preguntas validado y precodificado. Casi 100% de los entrevistados pudieron reconocer el vector y conocían sus hábitos, pero solo 30,1% sabían que el Triatoma es vector transmisor de la enfermedad y apenas 6% pudieron mencionar su relación con una afección cardíaca crónica. El 47,9% de los entrevistados indicó que la responsabilidad de eliminar los triatómidos de la vivienda es personal, aunque 78% consideraron como medida de control la aplicación institucional de insecticidas. El contacto personal entre el funcionario institucional y los miembros de la comunidad fue la principal fuente de información entre los que mencionaron haber oído de la enfermedad de Chagas (41,0%. Los resultados sugieren que al planificar medidas de control se debe incluir el componente de educación sanitaria. Ha de ponerse énfasis en el papel que desempeñan los triatómidos en la transmisión, así como en la importancia de mejorar la vivienda como medida eficaz y sostenible mediante la participación de la comunidad. Este componente deberá ser desarrollado por canales de comunicación interpersonales para obtener un mayor impacto.

  11. O falso dilema sobre a luta antivetorial e as perspectivas de controle da doença de Chagas no Brasil: BHC ou BNH? The false dilemma about antivectorial strategies and possibilities for controlling Chagas' disease in Brazil: BHC or BNH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. Coura

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available As bases técnicas para o controle da doença de Chagas no Brasil foram estabelecidas com a criação do posto avançado de pesquisa do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz em Bambuí, no oeste de Minas Gerais, no começo da década de 40, sob a liderança de Emmanuel Dias. Entretanto, somente com a criação do Departamento Nacional de Endemias Rurais (DNERu, em março de 1956, sob a direção de Mario Pinotti, no governo de Juscelino Kubitschek, as medidas de controle foram implementadas. Das "campanhas" de controle das 12 endemias rurais estabelecidas pelo DNERu, a malária, pelo seu caráter de doença aguda e explosiva, sempre teve a maior parte orçamentária. A doença de Chagas e as outras endemias foram sempre relegadas a um plano secundário de prioridade. Por outro lado, a partir da década de 60, os "novos ecologistas" passaram a criticar o uso de inseticidas, com o slogan de que para controlar a doença de Chagas era necessário o BNH (construção de casas, e não o BHC (uso de inseticidas. Esta opinião, embora equivocada para o controle a curto prazo, teve uma enorme influência negativa sobre o controle dos vetores domiciliados. Apesar disso, algum progresso foi feito neste sentido. Na década de 70, a epidemia de meningite meningocócica e a priorização do Programa Especial de Controle da Esquistossomose (PECE, pelo Ministro Almeida Machado, com deslocamento de verbas e de pessoal da Superintendência de Campanhas (Sucam para esses programas, atrasaram ainda mais o controle da doença de Chagas. Somente na década de 80, com a decisão política do Banco Nacional de Desenvolvimento Econômico e Social (BNDES de alocar 10 bilhões de cruzeiros do Finsocial, o programa de controle da doença de Chagas teve um importante desenvolvimento em 2.000 municípios de 19 Estados brasileiros. Mais uma vez o programa sofre um atraso nesta década, com o deslocamento do pessoal da Sucam para a campanha contra a epidemia da dangue. Finalmente, conclu

  12. Triatominae Biochemistry Goes to School: Evaluation of a Novel Tool for Teaching Basic Biochemical Concepts of Chagas Disease Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Leonardo Rodrigues; de Oliveria Cudischevitch, Cecília; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Macedo, Gustavo Bartholomeu; Lannes, Denise; da Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new approach to teaching the basic biochemistry mechanisms that regulate the biology of Triatominae, major vectors of "Trypanosoma cruzi," the causative agent of Chagas disease. We have designed and used a comic book, "Carlos Chagas: 100 years after a hero's discovery" containing scientific information obtained by…

  13. Epilepsia e doença de chagas cronica

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    Edymar Jardim

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome epiléptica em chagásicos crônicos, foi referida raramente na literatura especializazda, não tendo sido feito até o momento, um estudo detalhado das suas manifestações. Partindo-se da premissa de que a moléstia de Chagas tem por substrato anatômico uma destruição neuronal, procurou-se comparar dois grupos de epilépticos, um dos quais com moléstia de Chagas crônica. Foram estudados 167 pacientes epilépticos, dos quais 44 eram comprovadamente chagásicos. O estudo permitiu coletar dados referentes à procedência dos pacientes, resultado soro-lógico, sexo, idade, época de incidência das manifestações epilépticas, elementos dos exames neurológicos, do líquido cefalorraqueano, eletrencefalográfico e os resultados da terapêutica anticonvulsivante. Como resultados principais destacamos o início tardio da epilepsia nos chagásicos, e o predomínio acentuado das crises parciais com sintomatologia elementar de tipo autonômico. O exame neurológico e o do líquido cefalorraqueano, apesar de apresentarem percentualmente nos seus resultados, taxas moderadamente mais elevadas na incidência de alterações, não caracterizaram síndromes neurológicas bem definidas. O exame eletrencefalográfico, revelou alterações sugestivas de comprometimento orgânico cerebral difuso. A terapêutica anticonvulsivante, baseada na utilização de hidantoinatos, barbitúricos, primidona e benzodiazepínicos, mostrou que o controle das crises foi mais difícil nos chagásicos, exigindo maiores quantidades de medicação, com resultados menos satisfatórios.

  14. Scintigraphy for the detection of myocardial damage in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso, Enio Roberto Pietra; Rezende, Nilton Alves de

    2010-01-01

    Background: non-invasive cardiological methods have been used for the identification of myocardial damage in Chagas disease. Objective: to verify whether the rest/stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is able to identify early myocardial damage in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease. Methods: eighteen patients with the indeterminate form of Chagas Disease and the same number of normal controls, paired by sex and age, underwent rest/stress myocardial scintigraphy using sestamibi-99mTc, aiming at detecting early cardiac damage. Results: the results did not show perfusion or ventricular function defects in patients at the indeterminate phase of Chagas disease and in the normal controls, except for a patient who presented signs of ventricular dysfunction in the myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with electrocardiographic gating. Conclusion: the results of this study, considering the small sample size, showed that the rest/stress myocardial scintigraphy using sestamibi-99mTc is not an effective method to detect early myocardial alterations in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease (author)

  15. Scintigraphy for the detection of myocardial damage in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroso, Enio Roberto Pietra; Rezende, Nilton Alves de, E-mail: narezende@terra.com.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Abuhid, Ivana Moura [Instituto de Medicina Nuclear e Diagnostico Molecular, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-15

    Background: non-invasive cardiological methods have been used for the identification of myocardial damage in Chagas disease. Objective: to verify whether the rest/stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is able to identify early myocardial damage in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease. Methods: eighteen patients with the indeterminate form of Chagas Disease and the same number of normal controls, paired by sex and age, underwent rest/stress myocardial scintigraphy using sestamibi-99mTc, aiming at detecting early cardiac damage. Results: the results did not show perfusion or ventricular function defects in patients at the indeterminate phase of Chagas disease and in the normal controls, except for a patient who presented signs of ventricular dysfunction in the myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with electrocardiographic gating. Conclusion: the results of this study, considering the small sample size, showed that the rest/stress myocardial scintigraphy using sestamibi-99mTc is not an effective method to detect early myocardial alterations in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease (author)

  16. Controlled but not cured: Structural processes and explanatory models of Chagas disease in tropical Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Colin

    2015-11-01

    Dressler (2001:456) characterizes medical anthropology as divided between two poles: the constructivist, which focuses on the "meaning and significance that events have for people," and the structuralist, which emphasizes socioeconomic processes and relationships. This study synthesizes structuralist and constructivist perspectives by investigating how structural processes impact explanatory models of Chagas disease in a highly endemic area. The research took place from March-June 2013 through the Centro Medico Humberto Parra, a non-profit clinic servicing low income populations in Palacios, Bolivia and surrounding communities. Semistructured interviews (n = 68) and consensus analysis questionnaires (n = 48) were administered to people dealing with Chagas disease. In the interview narratives, respondents link Chagas disease with experiences of marginalization and rural poverty, and describe multilayered impediments to accessing treatment. They often view the disease as incurable, but this reflects inconsistent messages from the biomedical system. The consensus analysis results show strong agreement on knowledge of the vector, ethnomedical treatment, and structural factors related to Chagas disease. In interpreting Chagas disease, respondents account for the structural factors which place them at risk and impede access to care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chagas Disease Knowledge and Risk Behaviors of the Homeless Population in Houston, TX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Alexandra; Garcia, Melissa N; Leon, Juan; Murray, Kristy O

    2018-04-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, endemic in Latin America. Sylvatic T. cruzi-infected triatomine vectors are present in rural and urban areas in the southern USA and may transmit T. cruzi infection to at-risk populations, such as homeless individuals. Our study aimed to evaluate Chagas disease knowledge and behaviors potentially associated with transmission risk of Chagas disease among Houston, Texas' homeless population by performing interviews with 212 homeless individuals. The majority of the 212 surveyed homeless individuals were male (79%), African-American (43%), American-born individuals (96%). About 30% of the individuals reported having seen triatomines in Houston, and 25% had evidence of blood-borne transmission risk (IV drug use and/or unregulated tattoos). The median total time homeless was significantly associated with recognition of the triatomine vector. Our survey responses indicate that the homeless populations may exhibit potential risks for Chagas disease, due to increased vector exposure, and participation in blood-borne pathogen risk behaviors. Our findings warrant additional research to quantify the prevalence of Chagas disease among homeless populations.

  18. Phylogeographic pattern and extensive mitochondrial DNA divergence disclose a species complex within the Chagas disease vector Triatoma dimidiata.

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    Fernando A Monteiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Triatoma dimidiata is among the main vectors of Chagas disease in Latin America. However, and despite important advances, there is no consensus about the taxonomic status of phenotypically divergent T. dimidiata populations, which in most recent papers are regarded as subspecies. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: A total of 126 cyt b sequences (621 bp long were produced for specimens from across the species range. Forty-seven selected specimens representing the main cyt b clades observed (after a preliminary phylogenetic analysis were also sequenced for an ND4 fragment (554 bp long and concatenated with their respective cyt b sequences to produce a combined data set totalling 1175 bp/individual. Bayesian and Maximum-Likelihood phylogenetic analyses of both data sets (cyt b, and cyt b+ND4 disclosed four strongly divergent (all pairwise Kimura 2-parameter distances >0.08, monophyletic groups: Group I occurs from Southern Mexico through Central America into Colombia, with Ecuadorian specimens resembling Nicaraguan material; Group II includes samples from Western-Southwestern Mexico; Group III comprises specimens from the Yucatán peninsula; and Group IV consists of sylvatic samples from Belize. The closely-related, yet formally recognized species T. hegneri from the island of Cozumel falls within the divergence range of the T. dimidiata populations studied. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that Groups I-IV, as well as T. hegneri, should be regarded as separate species. In the Petén of Guatemala, representatives of Groups I, II, and III occur in sympatry; the absence of haplotypes with intermediate genetic distances, as shown by multimodal mismatch distribution plots, clearly indicates that reproductive barriers actively promote within-group cohesion. Some sylvatic specimens from Belize belong to a different species - likely the basal lineage of the T. dimidiata complex, originated ~8.25 Mya. The evidence presented here strongly supports the proposition

  19. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit C: Keeping the Business Records. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part II is operating a business. Unit C focuses on record keeping. It introduces…

  20. Peatlands as Filters for Polluted Mine Water?—A Case Study from an Uranium-Contaminated Karst System in South Africa—Part III: Quantifying the Hydraulic Filter Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Winde

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As Part III of a four-part series on the filter function of peat for uranium (U, this paper focuses on the hydraulic component of a conceptual filter model introduced in Part II. This includes the quantification of water flow through the wetland as a whole, which was largely unknown and found to be significantly higher that anticipated. Apart from subaquatic artesian springs associated with the underlying karst aquifer the higher flow volumes were also caused by plumes of polluted groundwater moving laterally into the wetland. Real-time, quasi-continuous in situ measurements of porewater in peat and non-peat sediments indicate that rising stream levels (e.g., during flood conditions lead to the infiltration of stream water into adjacent peat deposits and thus allow for a certain proportion of flood water to be filtered. However, changes in porewater quality triggered by spring rains may promote the remobilization of possibly sorbed U.

  1. The Effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for Class III correction: part I--jaw-motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the mandibular range of motion in Class III patients with and without early physiotherapy after orthognathic surgery (OGS). This study consisted of 63 Class III patients who underwent 2-jaw OGS. The experimental group comprised 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation. The control group consisted of 32 patients who did not have physical rehabilitation. Twelve variables of 3-dimensional (3D) jaw-motion analysis (JMA) were recorded before surgery (T1) and 6 weeks (T2) and 6 months (T3) after surgery. A 2-sample t test was conducted to compare the JMA results between the two groups at different time points. At T2, the JMA data were measured to be 77.5%-145.7% of presurgical values in the experimental group, and 60.3%-90.6% in the control group. At T3, the measurements were 112.2%-179.2% of presurgical values in the experimental group, and 77.6%-157.2% in the control group. The patients in the experimental group exhibited more favorable recovery than did those in the control group, from T1 to T2 and T1 to T3. However, after termination of physiotherapy, no significant difference in the extent of recovery was observed between groups up to 6 months after OGS. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Superfund TIO videos. Set A. Regulatory overview - CERCLA's relationship to other programs: RCRA, Title III, UST, CWA, SDWA. Part 1. Audio-Visual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The videotape is divided into five sections. Section 1 provides definitions and historical information on both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The four types of RCRA regulatory programs - Subtitles C, D, I, and J - are described. Treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) and recycling facilities are also discussed. Section 2 discusses the history behind the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III). The four major provisions of Title III, which are emergency planning, emergency release notification, community right-to-know reporting, and the toxic chemical release inventory are covered. Section 3 outlines the UST program covering notification, record keeping, and the UST Trust Fund. Section 4 outlines the six major provisions of the Clean Water Act (CWA): water quality, pretreatment, prevention of oil and hazardous substance discharges, responses to oil and hazardous substance discharges, discharges of hazardous substances into the ocean, and dredge and fill. Section 5 explains the purpose, regulations, and standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Specific issues such as underground injection, sole source aquifers, and lead contamination are discussed

  3. Determinants of Health Service Responsiveness in Community-Based Vector Surveillance for Chagas Disease in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Ken; Zúniga, Concepción; Romero, Eduardo; Morales, Zoraida; Maguire, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Central American countries face a major challenge in the control of Triatoma dimidiata, a widespread vector of Chagas disease that cannot be eliminated. The key to maintaining the risk of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi at lowest levels is to sustain surveillance throughout endemic areas. Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras integrated community-based vector surveillance into local health systems. Community participation was effective in detection of the vector, but some health services had difficulty sustaining their response to reports of vectors from the population. To date, no research has investigated how best to maintain and reinforce health service responsiveness, especially in resource-limited settings. Methodology/Principal Findings We reviewed surveillance and response records of 12 health centers in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras from 2008 to 2012 and analyzed the data in relation to the volume of reports of vector infestation, local geography, demography, human resources, managerial approach, and results of interviews with health workers. Health service responsiveness was defined as the percentage of households that reported vector infestation for which the local health service provided indoor residual spraying of insecticide or educational advice. Eight potential determinants of responsiveness were evaluated by linear and mixed-effects multi-linear regression. Health service responsiveness (overall 77.4%) was significantly associated with quarterly monitoring by departmental health offices. Other potential determinants of responsiveness were not found to be significant, partly because of short- and long-term strategies, such as temporary adjustments in manpower and redistribution of tasks among local participants in the effort. Conclusions/Significance Consistent monitoring within the local health system contributes to sustainability of health service responsiveness in community-based vector surveillance of Chagas disease. Even with

  4. Determinants of Health Service Responsiveness in Community-Based Vector Surveillance for Chagas Disease in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Ken; Zúniga, Concepción; Romero, Eduardo; Morales, Zoraida; Maguire, James H

    2015-01-01

    Central American countries face a major challenge in the control of Triatoma dimidiata, a widespread vector of Chagas disease that cannot be eliminated. The key to maintaining the risk of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi at lowest levels is to sustain surveillance throughout endemic areas. Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras integrated community-based vector surveillance into local health systems. Community participation was effective in detection of the vector, but some health services had difficulty sustaining their response to reports of vectors from the population. To date, no research has investigated how best to maintain and reinforce health service responsiveness, especially in resource-limited settings. We reviewed surveillance and response records of 12 health centers in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras from 2008 to 2012 and analyzed the data in relation to the volume of reports of vector infestation, local geography, demography, human resources, managerial approach, and results of interviews with health workers. Health service responsiveness was defined as the percentage of households that reported vector infestation for which the local health service provided indoor residual spraying of insecticide or educational advice. Eight potential determinants of responsiveness were evaluated by linear and mixed-effects multi-linear regression. Health service responsiveness (overall 77.4%) was significantly associated with quarterly monitoring by departmental health offices. Other potential determinants of responsiveness were not found to be significant, partly because of short- and long-term strategies, such as temporary adjustments in manpower and redistribution of tasks among local participants in the effort. Consistent monitoring within the local health system contributes to sustainability of health service responsiveness in community-based vector surveillance of Chagas disease. Even with limited resources, countries can improve health service

  5. An in-silico investigation of anti-Chagas phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulley, Stephanie F; Setzer, William N

    2014-01-01

    Over 18 million people in tropical and subtropical America are afflicted by American trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease. In humans, symptoms of the disease include fever, swelling, and heart and brain damage, usually leading to death. There is currently no effective treatment for this disease. Plant products continue to be rich sources of clinically useful drugs, and the biodiversity of the Neotropics suggests great phytomedicinal potential. Screening programs have revealed numerous plant species and phytochemical agents that have shown in-vitro or in-vivo antitrypanosomal activity, but the biochemical targets of these phytochemicals are not known. In this work, we present a molecular docking analysis of Neotropical phytochemicals, which have already demonstrated antiparasitic activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, with potential druggable protein targets of the parasite. Several protein targets showed in-silico selectivity for trypanocidal phytochemicals, including trypanothione reductase, pteridine reductase 2, lipoamide dehydrogenase, glucokinase, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, cruzain, dihydrofolate-reductase/thymidylate-synthase, and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Some of the phytochemical ligands showed notable docking preference for trypanothione reductase, including flavonoids, fatty-acid-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons, geranylgeraniol and the lignans ganschisandrine and eupomatenoid-6.

  6. Biosensors to Diagnose Chagas Disease: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Gaso, María-Isabel; Villarreal-Gómez, Luis-Jesús; Beyssen, Denis; Sarry, Frédéric; Reyna, Marco-Antonio; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos-Napoleón

    2017-11-15

    Chagas disease (CD), which mostly affects those living in deprived areas, has become one of Latin America's main public health problems. Effective prevention of the disease requires early diagnosis, initiation of therapy, and regular blood monitoring of the infected individual. However, the majority of the Trypanosoma cruzi infections go undiagnosed because of mild symptoms, limited access to medical attention and to a high variability in the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests. Consequently, more affordable and accessible detection technologies capable of providing early diagnosis and T. cruzi load measurements in settings where CD is most prevalent are needed to enable enhanced intervention strategies. This work analyzes the potential contribution of biosensing technologies, reviewing examples that have been tested and contrasted with traditional methods, both serological and parasitological (i.e., molecular detection by PCR), and discusses some emerging biosensing technologies that have been applied for this public health issue. Even if biosensing technologies still require further research efforts to develop portable systems, we arrive at the conclusion that biosensors could improve the accuracy of CD diagnosis and the follow-up of patients' treatments in terms of the rapidity of results, small sample volume, high integration, ease of use, real-time and low cost detection when compared with current conventional technologies.

  7. Chagas Disease Vector Control in Tupiza, Southern Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Guillen

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy domestic and peridomestic infestations of Triatoma infestans were controlled in two villages in southern Bolivia by the application of deltamethrin SC25 (2.5% suspension concentrate at a target dose of 25 mg a.i./m². Actual applied dose was monitored by HPLC analysis of filter papers placed at various heights on the house walls, and was shown to range from 0 to 59.6 about a mean of 28.5 mg a.i./m². Wall bioassays showed high mortality of T. infestans during the first month after the application of deltamethrin. Mortality declined to zero as summer temperatures increased, but reappeared with the onset of the following winter. In contrast, knockdown was apparent throughout the trial, showing no discernible temperature dependence. House infestation rates, measured by manual sampling and use of paper sheets to collect bug faeces, declined from 79% at the beginning of the trial to zero at the 6 month evaluation. All but one of the houses were still free of T. infestans at the final evaluation 12 months after spraying, although a small number of bugs were found at this time in 5 of 355 peridomestic dependencies. Comparative cost studies endorse the recommendation of large-scale application of deltamethrin, or pyrethroid of similar cost-effectiveness, as a means to eliminate domestic T. infestans populations in order to interrupt transmission of Chagas disease

  8. Urbanization, land tenure security and vector-borne Chagas disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael Z.; Barbu, Corentin M.; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R.; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Escalante-Mejia, Patricia; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Niemierko, Malwina; Mabud, Tarub S.; Behrman, Jere R.; Naquira-Velarde, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Modern cities represent one of the fastest growing ecosystems on the planet. Urbanization occurs in stages; each stage characterized by a distinct habitat that may be more or less susceptible to the establishment of disease vector populations and the transmission of vector-borne pathogens. We performed longitudinal entomological and epidemiological surveys in households along a 1900 × 125 m transect of Arequipa, Peru, a major city of nearly one million inhabitants, in which the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, by the insect vector Triatoma infestans, is an ongoing problem. The transect spans a cline of urban development from established communities to land invasions. We find that the vector is tracking the development of the city, and the parasite, in turn, is tracking the dispersal of the vector. New urbanizations are free of vector infestation for decades. T. cruzi transmission is very recent and concentrated in more established communities. The increase in land tenure security during the course of urbanization, if not accompanied by reasonable and enforceable zoning codes, initiates an influx of construction materials, people and animals that creates fertile conditions for epidemics of some vector-borne diseases. PMID:24990681

  9. Study of the hypothalamic - hypophyseal - thyroid axis by the administration of TRH to Chagas' disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelin, N.M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The TSH and T 3 response to synthetic TRH was evaluated in two groups of patients: normal and with Chagas' disease, from the urban area of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Plasma T 4 , PBI and TSH values were within the normal range, when compared with those found in the controls: So were the thyroid uptakes of 2 and 24 hours; the basal levels of T 3 where within the normal range except in three subjects whose values were higher than normal. After TRH administration the amount of TSH secretion in patients with Chagas' disease was increased when compared to normal ones, while T 3 secretion was unaltered. It is suggested that in the Chagas' disease there is an increase in the pituitary TSH, while the thyroid reserve is preserved. This increase could be due to a difference in the regulation rate of TRH, which is determined by the neuronal degeneration caused by the disease itself. (author) [pt

  10. [What is not searched, it is difficult to find: Chagas' disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceno, Luis; Mosca, Walter

    2016-05-01

    A conservative estimation indicates that more than 400 000 Latin American immigrants are living in Italy. Several studies have shown that among these, the prevalence of Chagas disease is between 3.9% and 17%, so it is not unlikely to find a patient with this disease during a cardiology visit. How many patients from Latin America are diagnosed with heart failure in Italy and no one has ever thought about a possible Chagas disease? This brief review describes the situation of the disease in Italy, its characteristics, the etiology of this disease and its treatment. The latter aspect will be discussed considering the recent published results of the BENEFIT study, where it was found that treatment with benznidazole in patients with Chagas' cardiomyopathy is able to reduce significantly the detection of parasites in the blood, but it is not able to prevent clinical deterioration during 5 years of follow-up. The possible implications of these results will be discussed.

  11. [Control of Chagas disease in pregnant Latin-American women and her children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Francisco J; Martínez-Ruiz, Rocío; Olabarrieta, Iciar; Merino, Paloma; García-Bujalance, Silvia; Gastañaga, Teresa; Flores-Chavez, María

    2013-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic and systemic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. According to estimates from WHO, 10 million people are affected by this parasite. In the last years, birthrate among the immigrant women from Latin America settled in the Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid has been increasing, and as T. cruzi can be transmitted from mother to child, in fact 11 cases of congenital Chagas disease have been confirmed. Therefore, the aim of this paper is encouraging improvements in the coverage of the anti-T. cruzi antibodies detection in pregnant women from endemic areas. By this strategy, an active search for infected pregnant women and early detection of her infected newborns could be conducted, and then an early specific treatment could be administrated. Thus, there could be an important contribution to the control of Chagas disease in non-endemic area.

  12. Presentation of safety after closure of the repository for spent nuclear fuel. Main report of the project SR-Site. Part III; Redovisning av saekerhet efter foerslutning av slutfoervaret foer anvaent kaernbraensle. Huvudrapport fraan projekt SR-Site. Del III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of the safety assessment SR-Site is to investigate whether a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel by KBS-3 type can be constructed at Forsmark in Oesthammar in Sweden. The location of the Forsmark has been selected based on results of several surveys from surface conditions at depth in Forsmark and in Laxemar in Oskarshamn. The choice of location is not justified in SR-Site Report, but in other attachments to SKB's permit applications. SR-Site Report is an important part of SKB's permit applications to construct and operate a repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in Oesthammar. The purpose of the report in the applications is to show that a repository at Forsmark is safe after closure

  13. Safety analysis of RA reactor operation, I-II, Part I - RA reactor technical and operation characteristics; Analiza sigurnosti rada reaktora RA - I-III, I deo - Tehnicke i pogonske karakteristike reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    RA research reactor is a thermal, heavy water moderated system with graphite reflector having nominal power 6.5 MW. The 2% enriched metal uranium fuel in the reactor core produces mean thermal neutron flux of 2.9 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} s, and maximum neutron flux 5.5 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} s. main components of the reactor described in this report are: rector core, reflector, biological shield, heavy water cooling system, ordinary water cooling system, helium system, reactor control system, reactor safety system, dosimetry system, power supply system, and fuel transport system. Detailed reactor properties and engineering drawings of all the system are part of this volume.

  14. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  15. Evolution of the clinical and epidemiological knowledge about Chagas disease 90 years after its discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prata Aluízio

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three different periods may be considered in the evolution of knowledge about the clinical and epidemiological aspects of Chagas disease since its discovery: (a early period concerning the studies carried out by Carlos Chagas in Lassance with the collaboration of other investigators of the Manguinhos School. At that time the disease was described and the parasite, transmitters and reservoirs were studied. The coexistence of endemic goiter in the same region generated some confusion about the clinical forms of the disease; (b second period involving uncertainty and the description of isolated cases, which lasted until the 1940 decade. Many acute cases were described during this period and the disease was recognized in many Latin American countries. Particularly important were the studies of the Argentine Mission of Regional Pathology Studies, which culminated with the description of the Romaña sign in the 1930 decade, facilitating the diagnosis of the early phase of the disease. However, the chronic phase, which was the most important, continued to be difficult to recognize; (c period of consolidation of knowledge and recognition of the importance of Chagas disease. Studies conducted by Laranja, Dias and Nóbrega in Bambuí updated the description of Chagas heart disease made by Carlos Chagas and Eurico Villela. From then on, the disease was more easily recognized, especially with the emphasis on the use of a serologic diagnosis; (d period of enlargement of knowledges on the disease. The studies on denervation conducted in Ribeirão Preto by Fritz Köberle starting in the 1950 decade led to a better understanding of the relations between Chagas disease and megaesophagus and other visceral megas detected in endemic areas.

  16. Rise, fall and resurrection of chromosome territories: a historical perspective Part II. Fall and resurrection of chromosome territories during the 1950s to 1980s. Part III. Chromosome territories and the functional nuclear architecture: experiments and m

    OpenAIRE

    T Cremer; C Cremer

    2009-01-01

    Part II of this historical review on the progress of nuclear architecture studies points out why the original hypothesis of chromosome territories from Carl Rabl and Theodor Boveri (described in part I) was abandoned during the 1950s and finally proven by compelling evidence forwarded by laser-uvmicrobeam studies and in situ hybridization experiments. Part II also includes a section on the development of advanced light microscopic techniques breaking the classical Abbe limit written for reade...

  17. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography - Part III: 2,5-Dimethylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, Casimir; Tran, Luc-Sy; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    This work is the third part of a study focusing on the combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan and selected alkylated derivatives, i.e. furan in Part I, 2-methylfuran (MF) in Part II, and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) in the present work. Two premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of DMF were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) under two equivalence ratios (φ=1.0 and 1.7). Mole fractions of reactants, products, and stable and radical intermediates were measured as a function of the distance to the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a reaction mechanism that was further developed in the present series, including Part I and Part II. A reasonable agreement between the present experimental results and the simulation is observed. The main reaction pathways of DMF consumption were derived from a reaction flow analysis. Also, a comparison of the key features for the three flames is presented, as well as a comparison between these flames of furanic compounds and those of other fuels. An a priori surprising ability of DMF to form soot precursors (e.g. 1,3-cyclopentadiene or benzene) compared to less substituted furans and to other fuels has been experimentally observed and is well explained in the model.

  18. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography – Part III: 2,5-Dimethylfuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, Casimir; Tran, Luc-Sy; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    This work is the third part of a study focusing on the combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan and selected alkylated derivatives, i.e. furan in Part I, 2-methylfuran (MF) in Part II, and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) in the present work. Two premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of DMF were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) under two equivalence ratios (φ=1.0 and 1.7). Mole fractions of reactants, products, and stable and radical intermediates were measured as a function of the distance to the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a reaction mechanism that was further developed in the present series, including Part I and Part II. A reasonable agreement between the present experimental results and the simulation is observed. The main reaction pathways of DMF consumption were derived from a reaction flow analysis. Also, a comparison of the key features for the three flames is presented, as well as a comparison between these flames of furanic compounds and those of other fuels. An a priori surprising ability of DMF to form soot precursors (e.g. 1,3-cyclopentadiene or benzene) compared to less substituted furans and to other fuels has been experimentally observed and is well explained in the model. PMID:24518851

  19. Necroscopic study of a Chagas' disease chronic case with normal electrocardiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, E.R.; Rocha, A.; Adad, S.J.; Fernandes, E.L.; Chapadeiro, E.

    1988-01-01

    The morphological changes in the postmortem study of a man probably with the indeterminate form of Chagas' disease are described. The heart exhibited lesions of the epicardium, myocardium and endocardium, as well as of the conduction system, primarily small inflammatory foci. There was mild fibrosis of the myocardium, atrioventricular node, and left bundle branch (at its origin). These alterations, although mild, were similar, in quality, to those described in the other chronic forms of Chagas' disease, and suggest active lesions, with a potential for further development. In the esophagus, among other features, a striking reduction of the number of neurons was observed. (author)

  20. Urban outbreak of acute orally acquired Chagas disease in Táchira, Venezuela

    OpenAIRE

    Benítez, Jesús A.; Araujo, Benjamín; Contreras, Krisell; Rivas, Marianela; Ramírez, Pedro; Guerra, Watermo; Calderón, Noél; Terren, Carlo Ascaso; Barrera, Reggie; Rodríguez Morales, Alfonso Javier

    2013-01-01

    Aguda por vía oral adquirió la enfermedad de Chagas (AOACD) se ha convertido en una amenaza importante en algunos países de América del Sur [1,2]. Hasta marzo de 2013, al menos cuatro han reportado brotes de la enfermedad de Chagas aguda adquirida por vía oral, en concreto Brasil [3], Venezuela [4], Colombia [5] y Bolivia [6]. Los brotes también se están produciendo probablemente en Argentina y Ecuador, según algunos informes antiguos [2]. En Venezuela, ha habido por lo menos tres informes ep...

  1. Drug discovery for Chagas disease should consider Trypanosoma cruzi strain diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Zingales

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This opinion piece presents an approach to standardisation of an important aspect of Chagas disease drug discovery and development: selecting Trypanosoma cruzi strains for in vitro screening. We discuss the rationale for strain selection representing T. cruzi diversity and provide recommendations on the preferred parasite stage for drug discovery, T. cruzi discrete typing units to include in the panel of strains and the number of strains/clones for primary screens and lead compounds. We also consider experimental approaches for in vitro drug assays. The Figure illustrates the current Chagas disease drug-discovery and development landscape.

  2. Histopathologic identification of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' encephalitis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimath Alyemni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' encephalitis is an uncommon manifestation of T. cruzi infection, typically seen in immunocompromised patients. Encephalitis results from the reactivation of chronic infection predominately in individuals from endemic areas. Increased awareness of this complication is essential especially with increased migration of patients from endemic areas with concomitant HIV infection. Here we report a case of Chagas' encephalitis in an AIDS patient from Mexico in which there was no evidence of acute serologic, CSF, or blood infection by T. cruzi trypomastigotes.

  3. [Chagas's disease and deep ecology: the anti-vectorial fight in question].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Gomes, Andréia Patrícia; Rôças, Giselle; Cotta, Rosângela Minardi Mitre; Rubião, Eduardo Cárdenas Nogueira; Pissinatti, Alcides

    2011-02-01

    The inter-relations between man and the environment are among the main themes currently debated by the Brazilian public health. On such horizon, the questions concerning Chagas's disease are found to remain specially in the scope of the directed actions of control to the triatomine, the anti-vectorial fight , though already a century since its first description by Carlos Chagas, a major epidemiological problem in Latin America. Based on these considerations the present article will seek to discuss the main ecological aspects related to the American trypanosomiasis, emphasizing the control of the vectorial transmission in the context of the deep ecology.

  4. Standing on shaky ground- US patent-eligibility of isolated DNA and genetic diagnostics after AMP v. USPTO - Part III (unsolved questions & subsequent case law)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Nilsson, David

    2012-01-01

    invigorated U.S. debate on patent eligibility, referring inter alia to the 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Bilski v. Kappos and the pending certiorari in Prometheus v. Mayo (1). Before this background, Part I recited the complex procedural history of AMP v. USPTO (2) and summarized the underpinnings...... of the outcome, i.e. the three different opinions of the Federal Circuit judges Lourie, Moore & Bryson who comprised the panel (3). Part II continued the tale with a detailed analysis of the decision's practical implications (4), which is followed by a closer look on the chances for an ultimate Supreme Court...... decision in Prometheus v. Mayo. Part IV, which is to be published in issue 4, will finally offer a broader discussion of the recent US patent-eligibility developments from an innovation policy perspective including brief references to recent European developments (7). This will provide the basis...

  5. A complex study on the reliability assessment of the containment of a PWR. Part III.- Structural reliability assessment under internal and external loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J.; Schueller, G.I.

    1977-01-01

    The first part of the analysis is concerned with the determination of the failure probability of the steel hull under internal load conditions. Two independent failure criteria are the basis for this calculation; the first one being the ultimate yield which is actually an instability condition and the second one being the fracture condition as described in Part II of the paper. Both the global and the local failure probabilities are investigated. The second part of the analysis is concerned with the external load case of earthquake. As it has already been described in Part I the probability of occurrence of a LOCA, given an earthquake has been considered in connection with the probable damage which the steel hull might experience during the earthquake. In other words the survival probability of the hull with deteriorated resistance is calculated, taking into account the frequencies of occurrence of the various events. The third part of the analysis is concerned with the reliability determination of the reinforced concrete dome structure, which is supposed to protect, the steel hull against external load conditions such as airplane crash and external pressure waves (the latter covering the load case of tornado occurrence). The reliability analysis of the reinforced concrete structure under earthquake loading is performed by utilizing the time-history method. Some aspects of the drawbacks of the response spectra method -when used in a risk analysis- are pointed out. The probability distribution of the concrete strength as determined under intermediate strain rate as described in Part II is utilized in the analysis. Finally the remaining two external load cases are discussed in light of their use in a reliability analysis and with respect to their frequency of occurrence and the probability distribution of their load intensities. The reliability demonstration is performed using the containment structure of the PWR-plant 'Biblis B' which is locate

  6. PARDISEKO III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, H.; Sack, C.

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the latest version of the PARDISEKO code, PARDISEKO III, with particular emphasis on the numerical and programming methods employed. The physical model and its relation to nuclear safety as well as a description and the results of confirming experiments are treated in detail in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre report KFK-1989. (orig.) [de

  7. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear of the Science and Technology part III : Radioactive Waste Management and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamsul Abraha; Yateman Arryanto; Sri Jauhari S; Agus Taftazani; Kris Tri Basuki; Djoko Sardjono, Ign.; Sukarsono, R.; Samin; Syarip; Suryadi, MS; Sardjono, Y.; Tri Mardji Atmono; Dwiretnani Sudjoko; Tjipto Sujitno, BA.

    2007-08-01

    The Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Science and Technology is a routine activity held by Centre for Accelerator Technology and Material Process, National Nuclear Energy Agency, for monitoring the research activity which achieved in National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Meeting was held in Yogyakarta on July 10, 2007. The proceedings contains papers presented on the meeting about Radioactive Waste Management and Environment and there are 25 papers which have separated index. The proceedings is the third part of the three parts which published in series. (PPIN)

  8. O falso dilema sobre a luta antivetorial e as perspectivas de controle da doença de Chagas no Brasil: BHC ou BNH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. Coura

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available As bases técnicas para o controle da doença de Chagas no Brasil foram estabelecidas com a criação do posto avançado de pesquisa do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz em Bambuí, no oeste de Minas Gerais, no começo da década de 40, sob a liderança de Emmanuel Dias. Entretanto, somente com a criação do Departamento Nacional de Endemias Rurais (DNERu, em março de 1956, sob a direção de Mario Pinotti, no governo de Juscelino Kubitschek, as medidas de controle foram implementadas. Das "campanhas" de controle das 12 endemias rurais estabelecidas pelo DNERu, a malária, pelo seu caráter de doença aguda e explosiva, sempre teve a maior parte orçamentária. A doença de Chagas e as outras endemias foram sempre relegadas a um plano secundário de prioridade. Por outro lado, a partir da década de 60, os "novos ecologistas" passaram a criticar o uso de inseticidas, com o slogan de que para controlar a doença de Chagas era necessário o BNH (construção de casas, e não o BHC (uso de inseticidas. Esta opinião, embora equivocada para o controle a curto prazo, teve uma enorme influência negativa sobre o controle dos vetores domiciliados. Apesar disso, algum progresso foi feito neste sentido. Na década de 70, a epidemia de meningite meningocócica e a priorização do Programa Especial de Controle da Esquistossomose (PECE, pelo Ministro Almeida Machado, com deslocamento de verbas e de pessoal da Superintendência de Campanhas (Sucam para esses programas, atrasaram ainda mais o controle da doença de Chagas. Somente na década de 80, com a decisão política do Banco Nacional de Desenvolvimento Econômico e Social (BNDES de alocar 10 bilhões de cruzeiros do Finsocial, o programa de controle da doença de Chagas teve um importante desenvolvimento em 2.000 municípios de 19 Estados brasileiros. Mais uma vez o programa sofre um atraso nesta década, com o deslocamento do pessoal da Sucam para a campanha contra a epidemia da dangue. Finalmente, conclu

  9. Children Who Desperately Want To Read, but Are Not Working at Grade Level: Use Movement Patterns as "Windows" To Discover Why. Part III: The Frontal Midline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Marjorie

    A longitudinal research study observed 30 children between the ages of infancy and elementary age to determine if using large muscle motor patterns to master the three identified midlines that concur with the body planes used in anatomy is reflected in academic classroom learning levels. This third part of the study focused on the frontal midline.…

  10. A simple, fast, and accurate thermodynamic-based approach for transfer and prediction of gas chromatography retention times between columns and instruments Part III: Retention time prediction on target column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Siyuan; Stevenson, Keisean A J M; Harynuk, James J

    2018-03-27

    This is the third part of a three-part series of papers. In Part I, we presented a method for determining the actual effective geometry of a reference column as well as the thermodynamic-based parameters of a set of probe compounds in an in-house mixture. Part II introduced an approach for estimating the actual effective geometry of a target column by collecting retention data of the same mixture of probe compounds on the target column and using their thermodynamic parameters, acquired on the reference column, as a bridge between both systems. Part III, presented here, demonstrates the retention time transfer and prediction from the reference column to the target column using experimental data for a separate mixture of compounds. To predict the retention time of a new compound, we first estimate its thermodynamic-based parameters on the reference column (using geometric parameters determined previously). The compound's retention time on a second column (of previously determined geometry) is then predicted. The models and the associated optimization algorithms were tested using simulated and experimental data. The accuracy of predicted retention times shows that the proposed approach is simple, fast, and accurate for retention time transfer and prediction between gas chromatography columns. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Diet Quality of patients with chronic Chagas disease in a tertiary hospital: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Pereira de Castilhos

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Nutritional status has been implicated in the modulation of the immune response, possibly augmenting the pathogenesis of Chagas disease (Cd. We evaluated diet quality and nutritional status in adults and elderly patients with chronic Cd in a tertiary hospital. METHODS: A case-control study of Cd patients was conducted, paired for gender, age, and co-morbidities with non-Cd patients. Anthropometric measurements and food frequency questionnaire was used, and diet quality was assessed by the Brazilian Healthy Eating Index-Revised (BHEI-R. The Estimated Average Requirement cut-off points were used to determine the dietary micronutrient adequacy. The Cd group was further grouped according to Los Andes classification. RESULTS: The study participants were 67 ± 10 years old, 73.6% elderly and 63% female. The prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal fat was high in both groups; however, Cd group showed a lower prevalence of obesity and increased risk of disease according to waist circumference classification. There was no difference in BHEI-R score between groups (p=0.145. The Cd group had sodium and saturated fat intake above recommendations and low intake of unsaturated fat, vitamin D, E, selenium, magnesium, and dairy products; but higher intake of iron. According to Los Andes classification, group III presented lower intake of whole fruit and dietary fiber. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with Cd were overweight and the quality of their diet was unsatisfactory based on the recommended diet components for age and sex.

  12. Simulación de la fluencia en caliente de un acero microaleado con un contenido medio de carbono. III parte. Ecuaciones constitutivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera, J. M.

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the part 1 of this work the constitutive equations of the hot flow behaviour of a commercial microalloyed steel have been obtained. For this purpose, the uniaxial hot compression tests described in the part 2 were employed. Tests were carried out over a range of 5 orders of magnitude in strain rate and 300 °C of temperature. Experimental results are compared with the theoretical model introduced in the first part of this study. It is concluded that deviations between experimental and theoretical curves are lower than 10 %. It is shown that the classical hiperbolic sine constitutive equation described accurately the experimental behaviour provided that stresses are normalized by the Young's modulus and strain rates by the self-diffusion coefficient. An internal stress must also be introduced in the latter equation when the initial grain size is fine enough.

    Siguiendo el planteamiento teórico efectuado en la I parte de este trabajo, se determinaron las ecuaciones constitutivas del comportamiento a la deformación en caliente de un acero comercial microaleado con un contenido medio de carbono. Para este objetivo se emplearon los ensayos de compresión uniaxial en caliente ya descritos en la II parte, los cuales se efectuaron en un rango de cinco órdenes de magnitud en velocidad de deformación y 300 °C de temperatura. Se comparan los resultados experimentales con el modelo teórico introducido en la I parte y se verifica que el error es inferior al 10 %. Se comprobó que la clásica ecuación del seno hiperbólico podía describir con precisión el comportamiento observado siempre y cuando las tensiones se normalicen por el módulo de Young, las velocidades de deformación por el coeficiente de autodifusión de la austenita, y se considere un efecto adicional sobre la tensión cuando el tamaño de grano inicial sea suficientemente fino.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of three TYK2 gene variants in the susceptibility to Chagas disease infection and cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, F. David; Dolade, Nuria; Vargas, Sofia; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2018-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) is a member of the Janus kinases family implicated in the signal transduction of type I interferons and several interleukins. It has been described that genetic mutations within TYK2 lead to multiple deleterious effects in the immune response. In this work, we have analyzed three functional independent variants from the frequency spectrum on the TYK2 gene (common and low-frequency variants) suggested to reduce the function of the gene in mediating cytokine signaling and the susceptibility to infections by Trypanosoma cruzi and/or the development of Chagas cardiomyopathy in the Colombian population. A total of 1,323 individuals from a Colombian endemic region for Chagas disease were enrolled in the study. They were classified as seronegative (n = 445), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 336), and chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy subjects (n = 542). DNA samples were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Our results showed no statistically significant differences between the allelic frequencies of the three analyzed variants when seropositive and seronegative individuals were compared, therefore these variants were not associated with susceptibility to Chagas disease. Moreover, when Chagas cardiomyopathy patients were compared to asymptomatic patients, no significant associations were found. Previous reports highlighted the association of this gene in immune-related disorders under an autoimmunity context, but not predisposing patients to infectious diseases, which is consistent with our findings. Therefore, according to our results, TYK2 gene variants do not seem to play an important role in Chagas disease susceptibility and/or chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. PMID:29304122

  14. Técnica do xenodiagnostico na molestia de Chagas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Dias

    1940-01-01

    Full Text Available O xenodiagnostico é um processo muito valioso para o diagnostico etiologico da moléstia de Chagas. Consiste em alimentar-se barbeiros normais em supótos portadores da infecção e determinar-se, depois, si eles adquirem ou não o parasitismo. Em cada região deve ser empregada, de preferência, o transmissor local mais importante. Três a seis ninfas famintas são geralmente empregadas em cada prova, devendo ficar em contacto com o doador até encherem-se completamente (15-30 minutos. Si o exame de fezes – espontaneamente eliminadas ou obtidas por punção anal – não revelar a presença de flagelados, os insetos devem ser dissecados 40 a 60 dias depois da sucção, para exame do conteúdo duodenal.Xenodiagnosis is a very valuable method for the etiological diagnosis of Chagas’s disease. It consists in allowing the clean insect transmitter to feed upon the suspected carrier, and in ascertaining whether the bugs become infected. The principal local vector is the most suitable species to be used in a given region. Three to six hungry nymphs are usually employed in each test and must feed until repletion (15-30 minutes. It flagellates are not detected in the faeces or in the rectal contents, obtained by anal puncture, insects are dissected 40-60 days after the and the duodenal contents is examined.

  15. Environmental Changes Can Produce Shifts in Chagas Disease Infection Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Cordovez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological network contains all the organisms involved (types in the transmission of a parasite. The nodes of the network represent reservoirs, hosts, and vectors, while the links between the nodes represent the strength and direction of parasite movement. Networks that contain humans are of special interest because they are of concern to public health authorities. Under these circumstances, it is possible, in principle, to identify cycles (closed paths in the network that include humans and select the ones that carry the maximum probability of human infection. The basic reproduction number R 0 in such a network gives the average number of new infections of any type after the introduction of one individual infected by any type. To obtain R 0 for complex networks, one can use the next-generation matrix (NGM approach. Every entry in NGM will average the contribution of each link that connects two types. To tease the contribution of every cycle apart, we define the virulence as the geometric mean of the NGM entries corresponding to the links therein. This approach allows for the quantification of specific cycles of interest while it also makes the computation of the sensitivity and elasticity of the parameters easier. In this work, we compute the virulence for the transmission dynamics of Chagas disease for a typical rural area in Colombia incorporating the effect of environmental changes on the vector population size. We concluded that the highest contribution to human infection comes from humans themselves, which is a surprising and interesting result. In addition, sensitivity analysis revealed that increasing vector population size increases the risk of human infection.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of human oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David Ramírez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, displays significant genetic variability revealed by six Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI. In this pathology, oral transmission represents an emerging epidemiological scenario where different outbreaks associated to food/beverages consumption have been reported in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela. In Colombia, six human oral outbreaks have been reported corroborating the importance of this transmission route. Molecular epidemiology of oral outbreaks is barely known observing the incrimination of TcI, TcII, TcIV and TcV genotypes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: High-throughput molecular characterization was conducted performing MLMT (Multilocus Microsatellite Typing and mtMLST (mitochondrial Multilocus Sequence Typing strategies on 50 clones from ten isolates. Results allowed observing the occurrence of TcI, TcIV and mixed infection of distinct TcI genotypes. Thus, a majority of specific mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the sylvatic cycle of transmission were detected in the dataset with the foreseen presence of mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the domestic cycle of transmission. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest the incrimination of sylvatic genotypes in the oral outbreaks occurred in Colombia. We observed patterns of super-infection and/or co-infection with a tailored association with the severe forms of myocarditis in the acute phase of the disease. The transmission dynamics of this infection route based on molecular epidemiology evidence was unraveled and the clinical and biological implications are discussed.

  17. Barriers to treatment access for Chagas disease in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Jennifer M; Snively, Callae S; Ramsey, Janine M; Salgado, Marco Ocampo; Bärnighausen, Till; Reich, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    According to World Health Organization (WHO) prevalence estimates, 1.1 million people in Mexico are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease (CD). However, limited information is available about access to antitrypanosomal treatment. This study assesses the extent of access in Mexico, analyzes the barriers to access, and suggests strategies to overcome them. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 key informants and policymakers at the national level in Mexico. Data on CD cases, relevant policy documents and interview data were analyzed using the Flagship Framework for Pharmaceutical Policy Reform policy interventions: regulation, financing, payment, organization, and persuasion. Data showed that 3,013 cases were registered nationally from 2007-2011, representing 0.41% of total expected cases based on Mexico's national prevalence estimate. In four of five years, new registered cases were below national targets by 11-36%. Of 1,329 cases registered nationally in 2010-2011, 834 received treatment, 120 were pending treatment as of January 2012, and the treatment status of 375 was unknown. The analysis revealed that the national program mainly coordinated donation of nifurtimox and that important obstacles to access include the exclusion of antitrypanosomal medicines from the national formulary (regulation), historical exclusion of CD from the social insurance package (organization), absence of national clinical guidelines (organization), and limited provider awareness (persuasion). Efforts to treat CD in Mexico indicate an increased commitment to addressing this disease. Access to treatment could be advanced by improving the importation process for antitrypanosomal medicines and adding them to the national formulary, increasing education for healthcare providers, and strengthening clinical guidelines. These recommendations have important implications for other countries in the region with similar problems in access to

  18. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  19. The effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for class III correction. Part II: electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of early physical rehabilitation by comparing the differences of surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles after surgical correction of skeletal class III malocclusion. The prospective study included 63 patients; the experimental groups contained 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation; the control group (32 patients) did not receive physiotherapy. The amplitude of sEMG in the masticatory muscles reached 72.6-121.3% and 37.5-64.6% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively at 6 weeks after orthognathic surgery (OGS). At 6 months after OGS, the sEMG reached 135.1-233.4% and 89.6-122.5% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively. Most variables in the sEMG examination indicated that recovery of the masticatory muscles in the experimental group was better than the control group as estimated in the early phase (T1 to T2) and the total phase (T1 to T3); there were no significant differences between the mean recovery percentages in the later phase (T2 to T3). Early physical rehabilitative therapy is helpful for early recovery of muscle activity in masticatory muscles after OGS. After termination of physical therapy, no significant difference in recovery was indicated in patients with or without early physiotherapy. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part IV: Chromium(III)/H+ /Lewatit SP112; La eliminación de metales tóxicos presentes en efluentes líquidos mediante resinas de cambio iónico. Parte IV: cromo(III)/H+/Lewatit SP112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    2017-09-01

    This investigation presented results on the removal of chromium(III), from aqueous solution in the 0-5 pH range, using Lewatit SP112 cationic exchange resin. Several aspects affecting the ion exchange process were evaluated, including: the influence of the stirring speed, temperature, pH of the solution, resin dosage and aqueous ionic strength. The selectivity of the system was tested against the presence of other metals in the aqueous solution, whereas the removal of chromium(III) from solutions was compared with results obtained using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents. From the batch experimental data, best fit of the results is obtained with the Langmuir model, whereas the ion exchange process is best explained by the pseudo-second order model, moreover, experimental data responded well to the film-diffusion controlled model. Elution of the chromium(III) loaded into the resin is well accomplished by the use of sodium hydroxide solutions. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la eliminación de cromo(III) de disoluciones acuosas (pH 0-5) mediante la resina de intercambio catiónico Lewatit SP112. Se han investigado algunas variables que pueden afectar al sistema: influencia de la agitación, temperatura, pH y fuerza iónica del medio acuoso y cantidad de resina; también se ha investigado acerca de la selectividad del sistema cuando otros metales están presentes en el medio acuoso, comparándose los resultados de la eliminación del cromo(III) usando la resina con los resultados obtenidos cuando se emplea otro adsorbente como son los nanotubos de carbono de pared múltiple. Los resultados experimentales indican que la carga del cromo(III) en la resina responde mejor al modelo de Langmuir, mientras que los modelos cinéticos indican que la carga del metal en la resina responde al modelo de pseudo-segundo orden y difusión en la capa límite. La elución del cromo(III) se realiza con disoluciones de hidróxid.

  1. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  2. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  3. Further genetic characterization of the two Trypanosoma cruzi Berenice strains (Be-62 and Be-78) isolated from the first human case of Chagas disease (Chagas, 1909).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, R E; Macedo, A M; Barnabé, C; Freitas, J M; Chiari, E; Veloso, V M; Carneiro, C M; Bahia, M T; Tafuri, Washington L; Lana, M

    2006-03-01

    We describe here an extension of a previous genetic characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi strains (Be-62 and Be-78) isolated from the patient Berenice, the first human case of Chagas disease [Chagas, C., 1909. Nova Tripanomíase humana. Estudos sobre morfologia e o ciclo evolutivo do Schizotrypanum cruzi, n. gen., n. sp., agente etiolójico da nova entidade morbida do homem. Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz 1, 159-218]. We wanted to verify the composition of T. cruzi populations originated from these two isolates. In the present work, 22 enzymatic loci (MLEE), nine RAPD primers and 7 microsatellite loci were analyzed. Clones from both strains were also characterized to verify whether these strains are mono or polyclonal. Be-62 and Be-78 strains were different in 3 out of 22 enzymatic systems, in 3 out of 9 RAPD primers tested and in all microsatellite loci investigated. However, our data suggests that both strains are phylogenetically closely related, belonging to genetic group 32 from Tibayrenc and Ayala [Tibayrenc, M., Ayala, F.J., 1988. Isoenzime variability in Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease: genetical, taxonomical, and epidemiological significance. Evolution 42, 277-292], equivalent to zymodeme 2 and T. cruzi II major lineage which, in Brazil, comprises parasites from the domestic cycle of the disease. Microsatellite analyses showed differences between the parental strains but suggested that both populations are monoclonal since each strain and their respective clones showed the same amplification products.

  4. Post-mortem diagnosis of chronic Chagas's disease comparative evaluation of three serological tests on pericardial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, E R; Chapadeiro, E; Batista, S M; Cunha, J G; Rocha, A; Miziara, L; Ribeiro, J U; Patto, R J

    1978-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the post-mortem diagnosis of Chagas's disease the authors performed haemagglutination tests (HAT), fluorescent Trypanosoma cruzi antibody tests (FAT), and complement fixation tests (CFT) on the pericardial fluid obtained at autopsy of 50 individuals with Chagas's heart disease, and 93 patients in whom this disease was not thought to be present. The results demonstrate that all three tests are efficient for the post-mortem diagnosis of Chagas's disease but suggest that their combined use would detect more cases than would one isolated reaction only.

  5. Mode of death on Chagas heart disease: comparison with other etiologies. a subanalysis of the REMADHE prospective trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia M Ayub-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Sudden death has been considered the main cause of death in patients with Chagas heart disease. Nevertheless, this information comes from a period before the introduction of drugs that changed the natural history of heart failure. We sought to study the mode of death of patients with heart failure caused by Chagas heart disease, comparing with non-Chagas cardiomyopathy.We examined the REMADHE trial and grouped patients according to etiology (Chagas vs non-Chagas and mode of death. The primary end-point was all-cause, heart failure and sudden death mortality; 342 patients were analyzed and 185 (54.1% died. Death occurred in 56.4% Chagas patients and 53.7% non-Chagas patients. The cumulative incidence of all-cause mortality and heart failure mortality was significantly higher in Chagas patients compared to non-Chagas. There was no difference in the cumulative incidence of sudden death mortality between the two groups. In the Cox regression model, Chagas etiology (HR 2.76; CI 1.34-5.69; p = 0.006, LVEDD (left ventricular end diastolic diameter (HR 1.07; CI 1.04-1.10; p<0.001, creatinine clearance (HR 0.98; CI 0.97-0.99; p = 0.006 and use of amiodarone (HR 3.05; CI 1.47-6.34; p = 0.003 were independently associated with heart failure mortality. LVEDD (HR 1.04; CI 1.01-1.07; p = 0.005 and use of beta-blocker (HR 0.52; CI 0.34-0.94; p = 0.014 were independently associated with sudden death mortality.In severe Chagas heart disease, progressive heart failure is the most important mode of death. These data challenge the current understanding of Chagas heart disease and may have implications in the selection of treatment choices, considering the mode of death.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00505050 (REMADHE.

  6. Experimental Chagas disease-induced perturbations of the fecal microbiome and metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Laura-Isobel; Tripathi, Anupriya; Vargas, Fernando; Knight, Rob; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Siqueira-Neto, Jair L

    2018-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi parasites are the causative agents of Chagas disease. These parasites infect cardiac and gastrointestinal tissues, leading to local inflammation and tissue damage. Digestive Chagas disease is associated with perturbations in food absorption, intestinal traffic and defecation. However, the impact of T. cruzi infection on the gut microbiota and metabolome have yet to be characterized. In this study, we applied mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and 16S rRNA sequencing to profile infection-associated alterations in fecal bacterial composition and fecal metabolome through the acute-stage and into the chronic stage of infection, in a murine model of Chagas disease. We observed joint microbial and chemical perturbations associated with T. cruzi infection. These included alterations in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) derivatives and in specific members of families Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae, as well as alterations in secondary bile acids and members of order Clostridiales. These results highlight the importance of multi-'omics' and poly-microbial studies in understanding parasitic diseases in general, and Chagas disease in particular.

  7. Accelerating the development of a therapeutic vaccine for human Chagas disease: rationale and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, Eric; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Zhan, Bin; Heffernan, Michael J; Jones, Kathryn; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ortega, Jaime; de Leon Rosales, Samuel Ponce; Lee, Bruce Y; Bacon, Kristina M; Fleischer, Bernhard; Slingsby, B T; Cravioto, Miguel Betancourt; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Hotez, Peter J

    2012-09-01

    Chagas disease is a leading cause of heart disease affecting approximately 10 million people in Latin America and elsewhere worldwide. The two major drugs available for the treatment of Chagas disease have limited efficacy in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected adults with indeterminate (patients who have seroconverted but do not yet show signs or symptoms) and determinate (patients who have both seroconverted and have clinical disease) status; they require prolonged treatment courses and are poorly tolerated and expensive. As an alternative to chemotherapy, an injectable therapeutic Chagas disease vaccine is under development to prevent or delay Chagasic cardiomyopathy in patients with indeterminate or determinate status. The bivalent vaccine will be comprised of two recombinant T. cruzi antigens, Tc24 and TSA-1, formulated on alum together with the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, E6020. Proof-of-concept for the efficacy of these antigens was obtained in preclinical testing at the Autonomous University of Yucatan. Here the authors discuss the potential for a therapeutic Chagas vaccine as well as the progress made towards such a vaccine, and the authors articulate a roadmap for the development of the vaccine as planned by the nonprofit Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership and Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development in collaboration with an international consortium of academic and industrial partners in Mexico, Germany, Japan, and the USA.

  8. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elba Gonzalez-Mejia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO, has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of Chagas disease using endemic T. cruzi RyCH1 in BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups: infected non-treated (Inf, infected N-monomethyl-L-arginine treated (Inf L-NAME, non-infected L-NAME treated and non-infected vehicle-treated. We determined blood parasitaemia and NO levels, the extent of parasite nests in tissues and liver MT-I expression levels. It was observed that NO levels were increasing in Inf mice in a time-dependent manner. Inf L-NAME mice had fewer T. cruzi nests in cardiac and skeletal muscle with decreased blood NO levels at day 135 post infection. This affect was negatively correlated with an increase of MT-I expression (r = -0.8462, p < 0.0001. In conclusion, we determined that in Chagas disease, an unknown inhibitory mechanism reduces MT-I expression, allowing augmented NO levels.

  9. Antagonistic Effect of Atorvastatin on High Fat Diet Induced Survival during Acute Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dazhi; Lizardo, Kezia; Cui, Min Hui; Ambadipudi, Kamalakar; Lora, Jose; Jelicks, Linda A; Nagajyothi, Jyothi F

    2016-01-01

    Chagasic cardiomyopathy, which is seen in Chagas Disease, is the most severe and life-threatening manifestation of infection by the kinetoplastid Trypanosoma cruzi. Adipose tissue and diet play a major role in maintaining lipid homeostasis and regulating cardiac pathogenesis during the development of Chagas cardiomyopathy. We have previously reported that T. cruzi has a high affinity for lipoproteins and that the invasion rate of this parasite increases in the presence of cholesterol, suggesting that drugs that inhibit cholesterol synthesis, such as statins, could affect infection and the development of Chagasic cardiomyopathy. The dual epidemic of diabetes and obesity in Latin America, the endemic regions for Chagas Disease, has led to many patients in the endemic region of infection having hyperlipidemia that is being treated with statins such as atorvastatin. The current study was performed to examine using mice fed on either regular or high fat diet the effect of atorvastatin on T. cruzi infection-induced myocarditis and to evaluate the effect of this treatment during infection on adipose tissue physiology and cardiac pathology. Atorvastatin was found to regulate lipolysis and cardiac lipidopathy during acute T. cruzi infection in mice and to enhance tissue parasite load, cardiac LDL levels, inflammation, and mortality in during acute infection. Overall, these data suggest that statins, such as atorvastatin, have deleterious effects during acute Chagas disease. PMID:27416748

  10. A Deep Insight Into the Sialotranscriptome of the Chagas Disease Vector, Panstrongylus megistus (Hemiptera: Heteroptera)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ribeiro, J.M.C.; Schwarz, Alexandra; Francischetti, I.M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2015), s. 351-358 ISSN 0022-2585 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12002; GA ČR GPP302/11/P798 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Chagas disease * vector biology * salivary gland * transcriptome * medical entomology Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 1.712, year: 2015

  11. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Mauriello, Luciano; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Noya, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas) with 249 cases (73.5% children) and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana’s signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission. PMID:25946155

  12. Is endothelial microvascular function equally impaired among patients with chronic Chagas and ischemic cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Juliana Pereira; Mendes, Fernanda de Souza Nogueira Sardinha; Lopes, Gabriella de Oliveira; Sousa, Andréa Silvestre de; Mediano, Mauro Felippe Felix; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2018-08-15

    Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) and cardiomyopathies due to other etiologies involve differences in pathophysiological pathways that are still unclear. Systemic microvascular abnormalities are associated with the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease. However, systemic microvascular endothelial function in CCC remains to be elucidated. Thus, we compared the microvascular endothelial function of patients presenting with CCC to those with ischemic cardiomyopathy disease. Microvascular reactivity was assessed in 21 patients with cardiomyopathy secondary to Chagas disease, 21 patients with cardiomyopathy secondary to ischemic disease and 21 healthy controls. Microvascular blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with iontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh). Peak increase in forearm blood flow with ACh iontophoresis in relation to baseline was greater in healthy controls than in patients with heart disease (controls: 162.7 ± 58.4% vs. ischemic heart disease: 74.1 ± 48.3% and Chagas: 85.1 ± 68.1%; p < 0.0001). Patients with Chagas and ischemic cardiomyopathy presented similar ACh-induced changes from baseline in skin blood flow (p = 0.55). Endothelial microvascular function was equally impaired among patients with CCC and ischemic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Integrated control of Chagas disease for its elimination as public health problem--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis is, together with geohelminths, the neglected disease that causes more loss of years of healthy life due to disability in Latin America. Chagas disease, as determined by the factors and determinants, shows that different contexts require different actions, preventing new cases or reducing the burden of disease. Control strategies must combine two general courses of action including prevention of transmission to prevent the occurrence of new cases (these measures are cost effective), as well as opportune diagnosis and treatment of infected individuals in order to prevent the clinical evolution of the disease and to allow them to recuperate their health. All actions should be implemented as fully as possible and with an integrated way, to maximise the impact. Chagas disease cannot be eradicated due because of the demonstrated existence of infected wild triatomines in permanent contact with domestic cycles and it contributes to the occurrence of at least few new cases. However, it is possible to interrupt the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in a large territory and to eliminate Chagas disease as a public health problem with a dramatic reduction of burden of the disease.

  14. Lutte contre la maladie de Chagas en Amérique centrale | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Guatemala,. En Amérique centrale, les insectes qui transmettent la maladie de Chagas sont nombreux. Les équipes de chercheurs mettent la démarche écosanté à l'épreuve dans 15 emplacements différents se trouvant dans les ...

  15. Towards Chagas disease elimination: Neonatal screening for congenital transmission in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Pamela Marie; Juárez, José Guillermo; Arrivillaga, Margarita Rivera; De Urioste-Stone, Sandra María; Doktor, Katherine; Bryan, Joe P; Escobar, Clara Yaseli; Cordón-Rosales, Celia

    2017-09-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease that continues to affect populations living in extreme poverty in Latin America. After successful vector control programs, congenital transmission remains as a challenge to disease elimination. We used the PRECEDE-PROCEED planning model to develop strategies for neonatal screening of congenital Chagas disease in rural communities of Guatemala. These communities have persistent high triatomine infestations and low access to healthcare. We used mixed methods with multiple stakeholders to identify and address maternal-infant health behaviors through semi-structured interviews, participatory group meetings, archival reviews and a cross-sectional survey in high risk communities. From December 2015 to April 2016, we jointly developed a strategy to illustratively advertise newborn screening at the Health Center. The strategy included socioculturally appropriate promotional and educational material, in collaboration with midwives, nurses and nongovernmental organizations. By March 2016, eight of 228 (3.9%) pregnant women had been diagnosed with T. cruzi at the Health Center. Up to this date, no neonatal screening had been performed. By August 2016, seven of eight newborns born to Chagas seropositive women had been parasitologically screened at the Health Center, according to international standards. Thus, we implemented a successful community-based neonatal screening strategy to promote congenital Chagas disease healthcare in a rural setting. The success of the health promotion strategies developed will depend on local access to maternal-infant services, integration with detection of other congenital diseases and reliance on community participation in problem and solution definition.

  16. Towards Chagas disease elimination: Neonatal screening for congenital transmission in rural communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Marie Pennington

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease that continues to affect populations living in extreme poverty in Latin America. After successful vector control programs, congenital transmission remains as a challenge to disease elimination. We used the PRECEDE-PROCEED planning model to develop strategies for neonatal screening of congenital Chagas disease in rural communities of Guatemala. These communities have persistent high triatomine infestations and low access to healthcare. We used mixed methods with multiple stakeholders to identify and address maternal-infant health behaviors through semi-structured interviews, participatory group meetings, archival reviews and a cross-sectional survey in high risk communities. From December 2015 to April 2016, we jointly developed a strategy to illustratively advertise newborn screening at the Health Center. The strategy included socioculturally appropriate promotional and educational material, in collaboration with midwives, nurses and nongovernmental organizations. By March 2016, eight of 228 (3.9% pregnant women had been diagnosed with T. cruzi at the Health Center. Up to this date, no neonatal screening had been performed. By August 2016, seven of eight newborns born to Chagas seropositive women had been parasitologically screened at the Health Center, according to international standards. Thus, we implemented a successful community-based neonatal screening strategy to promote congenital Chagas disease healthcare in a rural setting. The success of the health promotion strategies developed will depend on local access to maternal-infant services, integration with detection of other congenital diseases and reliance on community participation in problem and solution definition.

  17. La enfermedad de Chagas ya no es tan exótica

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Este podcast tiene el propósito de informar a los profesionales de la salud sobre la enfermedad de Chagas, su diagnóstico y tratamiento, así como orientar en la identificación de pacientes infectados.

  18. Probable brote de transmisión oral de enfermedad de Chagas en Turbo, Antioquia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fernando Ríos

    2011-03-01

    Conclusión. Se identificó un probable brote agudo de enfermedad de Chagas en Antioquia y se plantea como hipótesis la transmisión por vía oral, mediante la ingestión de T. cruzi en alimentos contaminados con restos de triatominos o excrementos de marsupiales.

  19. Challenges and opportunities for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of Chagas' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassi, A; Dias, J C P; Marin-Neto, J A; Rassi, A

    2009-04-01

    A century after its discovery, Chagas' disease still represents a major public health challenge in Latin America. Moreover, because of growing population movements, an increasing number of cases of imported Chagas' disease have now been detected in non-endemic areas, such as North America and some European countries. This parasitic zoonosis, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is transmitted to humans by infected Triatominae insects, or occasionally by non-vectorial mechanisms, such as blood transfusion, mother to fetus, or oral ingestion of materials contaminated with parasites. Following the acute phase of the infection, untreated individuals enter a chronic phase that is initially asymptomatic or clinically unapparent. Usually, a few decades later, 40-50% of patients develop progressive cardiomyopathy and/or motility disturbances of the oesophagus and colon. In the last decades several interventions targeting primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of Chagas' disease have been attempted. While control of both vectorial and blood transfusion transmission of T cruzi (primary prevention) has been successful in many regions of Latin America, early detection and aetiological treatment of asymptomatic subjects with Chagas' disease (secondary prevention) have been largely underutilised. At the same time, in patients with established chronic disease, several pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions are currently available and have been increasingly used with the intention of preventing or delaying complications of the disease (tertiary prevention). In this review we discuss in detail each of these issues.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi in the chicken model: Chagas-like heart disease in the absence of parasitism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teixeira, A.R.L.; Gomes, C.; Nitz, N.; Sousa, A.O.; Alvez, R.M.; Guimaro, M.C.; Cordeiro, C.; Bernal, F.M.; Rosa, A.C.; Hejnar, Jiří; Leonardecz, E.; Hecht, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2011), e1000 ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Chagas disease * Trypanosoma cruzi * kDNA minicircles * inbred chicken Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  1. Technological innovation strategies for the specific treatment of Chagas disease based on Benznidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Leslie Raphael de Moura; Alves, Alinne Élida Gonçalves; Nascimento, Débora Dolores Souza da Silva; Amariz, Isabela Araújo E; Ferreira, Aline Silva; Costa, Salvana Priscylla Manso; Rolim, Larissa Araújo; Lima, Ádley Antonini Neves de; Rolim Neto, Pedro José

    2018-02-13

    Caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, Chagas disease is responsible for public health problems greater in magnitude than those attributed to malaria, schistosomiasis, or leishmaniasis. A factor in the socioeconomic development of poor countries, Chagas disease can cause death due to a high parasitic burden during its acute phase due and irreversible damage in organs such as the heart, esophagus, and colon during its chronic phase, even when the number of parasites is minimal. For treating Chagas disease, benznidazole (BNZ) remains the drug of choice and, in Latin America, the only drug on the market for treating the disease. However, BNZ has exhibited insufficient activity in the chronic phase of Chagas disease, required administration in large doses, prolonged treatment, and shown a high incidence of adverse reactions (vomiting, rash, peripheral neuropathy, and spinal cord depression), toxicity, and low solubility in water. As an antidote, pharmaceutical technologies have been introduced that can improve BNZ's solubility and dissolution, as well as reduce side effects in light of its bioavailability, all of which can enhance therapy for Chagas disease. In response to that trend, by conducting a literature review, we sought to identify current pharmaceutical technologies used in tandem with BNZ to improve therapy for Chagas disease. Documented techniques include emulsion and microemulsion formation, solutions, parenteral formulas, micronization, and drug delivery systems supported by the development of nanoparticles and cyclodextrins, solid dispersions, and the use of metal-organic frameworks as innovative excipients. Such technologies increase the water solubility of BNZ by 4-25-fold on dissolution and an 85% release with efficacy in only a few minutes, as recorded during a viability experiment with nanoparticle suspensions. That experiment demonstrated the need for a lower concentration of BNZ to kill 50% of trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi, described in terms of the

  2. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Composites. Part III; Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Ramsey, Jack; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the third part of a three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce ceramic matrix composite materials and aircraft engine components by the binder jet process. Different SiC powders with median sizes ranging from 9.3 to 53.0 microns were investigated solely and in powder blends in order to maximize powder packing. Various infiltration approaches were investigated to include polycarbosilane (SMP-10), phenolic, and liquid silicon. Single infiltrations of SMP-10 and phenolic only slightly filled in the interior. When the SMP-10 was loaded with sub-micron sized SiC powders, the infiltrant gave a much better result of filling in the interior. Silicon carbide fibers were added to the powder bed to make ceramic matrix composite materials. Microscopy showed that the fibers were well distributed with no preferred orientation on the horizontal plane and fibers in the vertical plane were at angles as much as 45deg. Secondary infiltration steps were necessary to further densify the material. Two to three extra infiltration steps of SMP-10 increased the density by 0.20 to 0.55 g/cc. However, the highest densities achieved were 2.10 to 2.15 g/cc. Mechanical tests consisting of 4 point bend tests were conducted. Samples from the two CMC panels had higher strengths and strains to failure than the samples from the two nonfiber reinforced panels. The highest strengths were from Set N with 65 vol% fiber loading which had an average strength of 66 MPa. Analysis of the fracture surfaces did not reveal pullout of the reinforcing fibers. Blunt fiber failure suggested that there was not composite behavior. The binder jet additive manufacturing method was used to also demonstrate the fabrication of turbine engine vane components of two different designs and sizes. The

  3. Presentation of safety after closure of the repository for spent nuclear fuel. Main report of the project SR-Site. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the safety assessment SR-Site is to investigate whether a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel by KBS-3 type can be constructed at Forsmark in Oesthammar in Sweden. The location of the Forsmark has been selected based on results of several surveys from surface conditions at depth in Forsmark and in Laxemar in Oskarshamn. The choice of location is not justified in SR-Site Report, but in other attachments to SKB's permit applications. SR-Site Report is an important part of SKB's permit applications to construct and operate a repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in Oesthammar. The purpose of the report in the applications is to show that a repository at Forsmark is safe after closure

  4. Stochastic foundations of undulatory transport phenomena: generalized Poisson-Kac processes—part III extensions and applications to kinetic theory and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Brasiello, Antonio; Crescitelli, Silvestro

    2017-08-01

    This third part extends the theory of Generalized Poisson-Kac (GPK) processes to nonlinear stochastic models and to a continuum of states. Nonlinearity is treated in two ways: (i) as a dependence of the parameters (intensity of the stochastic velocity, transition rates) of the stochastic perturbation on the state variable, similarly to the case of nonlinear Langevin equations, and (ii) as the dependence of the stochastic microdynamic equations of motion on the statistical description of the process itself (nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Kac models). Several numerical and physical examples illustrate the theory. Gathering nonlinearity and a continuum of states, GPK theory provides a stochastic derivation of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation, furnishing a positive answer to the Kac’s program in kinetic theory. The transition from stochastic microdynamics to transport theory within the framework of the GPK paradigm is also addressed.

  5. Stochastic foundations of undulatory transport phenomena: generalized Poisson–Kac processes—part III extensions and applications to kinetic theory and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Brasiello, Antonio; Crescitelli, Silvestro

    2017-01-01

    This third part extends the theory of Generalized Poisson–Kac (GPK) processes to nonlinear stochastic models and to a continuum of states. Nonlinearity is treated in two ways: (i) as a dependence of the parameters (intensity of the stochastic velocity, transition rates) of the stochastic perturbation on the state variable, similarly to the case of nonlinear Langevin equations, and (ii) as the dependence of the stochastic microdynamic equations of motion on the statistical description of the process itself (nonlinear Fokker–Planck–Kac models). Several numerical and physical examples illustrate the theory. Gathering nonlinearity and a continuum of states, GPK theory provides a stochastic derivation of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation, furnishing a positive answer to the Kac’s program in kinetic theory. The transition from stochastic microdynamics to transport theory within the framework of the GPK paradigm is also addressed. (paper)

  6. Esophageal striated muscle contractions in patients with Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.O. Dantas

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease causes degeneration and reduction of the number of intrinsic neurons of the esophageal myenteric plexus, with consequent absent or partial lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and loss of peristalsis in the esophageal body. The impairment of esophageal motility is seen mainly in the distal smooth muscle region. There is no study about esophageal striated muscle contractions in the disease. In 81 patients with heartburn (44 with esophagitis taken as controls, 51 patients with Chagas' disease (21 with esophageal dilatation and 18 patients with idiopathic achalasia (11 with esophageal dilatation we studied the amplitude, duration and area under the curve of esophageal proximal contractions. Using the manometric method and a continuous perfusion system we measured the esophageal striated muscle contractions 2 to 3 cm below the upper esophageal sphincter after swallows of a 5-ml bolus of water. There was no significant difference in striated muscle contractions between patients with heartburn and esophagitis and patients with heartburn without esophagitis. There was also no significant difference between patients with heartburn younger or older than 50 years or between men and women or in esophageal striated muscle contractions between patients with heartburn and Chagas' disease. The esophageal proximal amplitude of contractions was lower in patients with idiopathic achalasia than in patients with heartburn. In patients with Chagas' disease there was no significant difference between patients with esophageal dilatation and patients with normal esophageal diameter. Esophageal striated muscle contractions in patients with Chagas' disease have the same amplitude and duration as seen in patients with heartburn. Patients with idiopathic achalasia have a lower amplitude of contraction than patients with heartburn.

  7. Morphologic and morphometric evaluation of pancreatic islets in chronic Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saldanha João Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Hyperglycemia and abnormal glucose tolerance tests observed in some patients with chronic Chagas' disease suggest the possibility of morphological changes in pancreatic islets and/or denervation. The purpose of this study was to describe the morphology and morphometry of pancreatic islets in chronic Chagas' disease. METHODS: Morphologic and computerized morphometric studies were performed in fragments of the head, body, and tail regions of the pancreas obtained at necropsies of 8 normal controls and 17 patients with chronic Chagas' disease: 8 with the digestive form (Megas and 9 with the congestive heart failure form. RESULTS: The Megas group had a larger (p < 0.05 pancreatic islet area in the tail of the pancreas (10649.3 ± 4408.8 µm² than the normal control (9481.8 ± 3242.4 µm² and congestive heart failure (9475.1 ± 2104.9 µm² groups; likewise, the density of the pancreatic islets (PI was greater (1.2 ± 0.7 vs. 0.9 ± 0.6 vs. 1.9 ± 1.0 PI/mm², respectively. In the tail region of the pancreas of patients with the Megas form, there was a significant and positive correlation (r = +0.73 between the area and density of pancreatic islets. Discrete fibrosis and leukocytic infiltrates were found in pancreatic ganglia and pancreatic islets of the patients with Chagas' disease. Trypanosoma cruzi nests were not observed in the examined sections. Individuals with the Megas form of Chagas' disease showed increased area and density of pancreatic islets in the tail of the pancreas. CONCLUSION: The observed morphometric and morphologic alterations are consistent with functional changes in the pancreas, including glycemia and insulin disturbances.

  8. Omega-3 supplementation on inflammatory markers in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy: a randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paula Simplício da; Mediano, Mauro Felippe Felix; Silva, Gilberto Marcelo Sperandio da; Brito, Patricia Dias de; Cardoso, Claudia Santos de Aguiar; Almeida, Cristiane Fonseca de; Sangenis, Luiz Henrique Conde; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Brasil, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano do; Sousa, Andrea Silvestre de

    2017-06-09

    Several studies have been focusing on the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on modulation of inflammatory markers in several cardiopathies. Although immunoregulatory dysfunction has been associated to the chronic cardiac involvement in Chagas disease, there is no study examining the effects of omega-3 supplementation in these patients. We investigated the effects of omega-3 PUFAs on markers of inflammation and lipid profile in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy patients. The present study was a single-center double-blind clinical trial including patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. Patients were randomly assigned to receive omega-3 PUFAs capsules (1.8g EPA and 1.2g DHA) or placebo (corn oil) during an 8-week period. Cytokines, fasting glucose, lipid, and anthropometric profiles were evaluated. Forty-two patients (23 women and 19 men) were included in the study and there were only two losses to follow-up during the 8-week period. Most of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were similar between the groups at baseline, except for the cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17α, and IFNγ. The omega-3 PUFAs group demonstrated greater improvements in serum triglycerides (-21.1 vs. -4.1; p = 0.05) and IL-10 levels (-10.6 vs. -35.7; p = 0.01) in comparison to controls after 8 weeks of intervention. No further differences were observed between groups. Omega-3 PUFAs supplementation may favorably affect lipid and inflammatory profile in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, demonstrated by a decrease in triglycerides and improvements on IL-10 concentration. Further studies examining the clinical effects of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy are necessary. NCT01863576.

  9. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part III - Electronic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lolic, B.; Jovanovic, S.

    1961-12-01

    This report describes functioning of the reactor oscillator electronic system. Two methods of oscillator operation were discussed. The first method is so called method of amplitude modulation of the reactor power, and the second newer method is phase method. Both methods are planned for the present reactor oscillator

  10. RECUERDO DEL DESCUBRIMIENTO DE LA ENFERMEDAD DE CHAGAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Groot Liévano

    2016-12-01

    momentos, al rememorar a Carlos Chagas, se haga un breve recuento de aquellas condiciones en las cuales se descubrió esta enfermedad y cómo se movieron los mecanismos de su prodigiosa inteligencia y de su instinto clínico para descubrir tal dolencia. Recordemos por un momento la verdadera ebullición científica que había a principios del siglo una vez se conocieron los descubrimientos de Pasteur, luego los de Koch sobre la tuberculosis, y los de Yersin sobre la peste, así como los de Ross y Grassi al descubrir el modo de transmisión del paludismo para no citar sino unos ejemplos de los formidables avances de la medicina entonces.

    Nuestros jóvenes en América, entusiasmados con tantos progresos ansiaban ir a Europa para beber en París la ciencia nueva que abría perspectivas magníficas para la solución de muchos problemas. Aquí, hace unos pocos días recordábamos como, por ejemplo, Luis Zea Uribe se desplaza a Europa y al tornar trae las ideas de establecer un sistema de diagnóstico adecuado para las enfermedades tropicales que se inicia con el de la fiebre tifoidea; y si pasamos a Venezuela, allá José Gregario Hernández y Luis Razetti, con ideas similares, abren en Caracas un laboratorio para tales fines, mucho más precozmente que nosotros, y Carlos Mabran, en Buenos Aires, hace otro tanto.

    El Brasil no se queda atrás, muchas gentes retornan de Europa con un entusiasmo extraordinario; entre ellas se destaca Oswaldo Goncalves Cruz, quien al llegar a Río recibe la noticia de que una enfermedad muy seria está matando la gente en Santos. El Gobierno le encarga el estudio de la situación y es precisamente hace hoy un siglo, el 23 de octubre de 1899, cuando se encuentra con el primer enfermo y le diagnostica clínica y bacteriológicamente peste bubónica. Esta enfermedad, que estaba cobrando muchas víctimas, hace que el Gobierno de Brasil decida establecer un laboratorio para producir suero y vacuna contra el terrible mal transmitido por las

  11. Importance of characteristics and modalities of physical activity and exercise in the management of cardiovascular health in individuals with cardiovascular disease (Part III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhees, L; Rauch, B; Piepoli, M; van Buuren, F; Takken, T; Börjesson, M; Bjarnason-Wehrens, B; Doherty, P; Dugmore, D; Halle, M

    2012-12-01

    The beneficial effect of exercise training and exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on symptom-free exercise capacity,cardiovascular and skeletal muscle function, quality of life, general healthy lifestyle, and reduction of depressive symptoms and psychosocial stress is nowadays well recognized. However, it remains largely obscure, which characteristics of physical activity (PA) and exercise training--frequency, intensity, time (duration), type (mode), and volume (dose: intensity x duration) of exercise--are the most effective. The present paper, therefore, will deal with these exercise characteristics in the management of individuals with cardiovascular disease, i.e. coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure patients, but also in patients with congenital or valvular heart disease. Based on the current literature, and if sufficient evidence is available, recommendations from the European Association on Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation are formulated regarding frequency, intensity, time and type of PA, and safety aspects during exercise inpatients with cardiovascular disease. This paper is the third in a series of three papers, all devoted to the same theme: the importance of the exercise characteristics in the management of cardiovascular health. Part I is directed to the general population and Part II to individuals with cardiovascular risk factors. In general, PA recommendations and exercise training programmes for patients with coronary artery disease or chronic heart failure need to be tailored to the individual's exercise capacity and risk profile, with the aim to reach and maintain the individually highest fitness level possible and to perform endurance exercise training 30–60 min daily (3–5 days per week) in combination with resistance training 2–3 times a week. Because of the frequently reported dose–response relationship between training effect and exercise intensity, one should seek sufficiently high training intensities

  12. The classification of the finite simple groups, number 7 part III, chapters 7-11 the generic case, stages 3b and 4a

    CERN Document Server

    Gorenstein, Daniel; Solomon, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    The classification of finite simple groups is a landmark result of modern mathematics. The multipart series of monographs which is being published by the AMS (Volume 40.1-40.7 and future volumes) represents the culmination of a century-long project involving the efforts of scores of mathematicians published in hundreds of journal articles, books, and doctoral theses, totaling an estimated 15,000 pages. This part 7 of the series is the middle of a trilogy (Volume 40.5, Volume 40.7, and forthcoming Volume 40.8) treating the Generic Case, i.e., the identification of the alternating groups of degree at least 13 and most of the finite simple groups of Lie type and Lie rank at least 4. Moreover, Volumes 40.4-40.8 of this series will provide a complete treatment of the simple groups of odd type, i.e., the alternating groups (with two exceptions) and the groups of Lie type defined over a finite field of odd order, as well as some of the sporadic simple groups. In particular, this volume completes the construction, be...

  13. Differences between easy- and difficult-to-mill chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes. Part III: free sugar and non-starch polysaccharide composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jennifer A; Knights, Edmund J; Campbell, Grant M; Choct, Mingan

    2014-05-01

    Parts I and II of this series of papers identified several associations between the ease of milling and the chemical compositions of different chickpea seed fractions. Non-starch polysaccharides were implicated; hence, this study examines the free sugars and sugar residues. Difficult milling is associated with: (1) lower glucose and xylose residues (less cellulose and xyloglucans) and more arabinose, rhamnose and uronic acid in the seed coat, suggesting a more flexible seed coat that resists cracking and decortication; (2) a higher content of soluble and insoluble non-starch polysaccharide fractions in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a pectic polysaccharide mechanism comprising arabinogalacturonan, homogalacturonan, rhamnogalalcturonan, and glucuronan backbone structures; (3) higher glucose and mannose residues in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a lectin-mediated mechanism of adhesion; and (4) higher arabinose and glucose residues in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a mechanism involving arabinogalactan-proteins. This series has shown that the chemical composition of chickpea does vary in ways that are consistent with physical explanations of how seed structure and properties relate to milling behaviour. Seed coat strength and flexibility, pectic polysaccharide binding, lectins and arabinogalactan-proteins have been implicated. Increased understanding in these mechanisms will allow breeding programmes to optimise milling performance in new cultivars. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Winter ecology of the Porcupine caribou herd, Yukon: Part III, Role of day length in determining activity pattern and estimating percent lying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Russell

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Data on the activity pattern, proportion of time spent lying and the length of active and lying periods in winter are presented from a 3 year study on the Porcupine caribou herd. Animals were most active at sunrise and sunset resulting in from one (late fall, early and mid winter to two (early fall and late winter to three (spring intervening lying periods. Mean active/lying cycle length decreased from late fall (298 mm to early winter (238 min, increased to a peak in mid winter (340 min then declined in late winter (305 min and again in spring (240 min. Mean length of the lying period increased throughout the 3 winter months from 56 min m early winter to 114 min in mid winter and 153 min in late winter. The percent of the day animals spent lying decreased from fall to early winter, increased throughout the winter and declined in spring. This pattern was related, in part, to day length and was used to compare percent lying among herds. The relationship is suggested to be a means of comparing quality of winter ranges.

  15. Acid-base titrations by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant with special reference to automatic titrations-III Presentation of a fully automatic titration apparatus and of results supporting the theories given in the preceding parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrsson, L; Ingman, F

    1977-02-01

    This paper forms Part III of a series in which the first two parts describe methods for evaluating titrations performed by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant. The great advantage of these methods is that they do not require an accurate calibration of the electrode system. This property makes the methods very suitable for routine work. e.g., in automatic analysis. An apparatus for performing such titrations automatically is presented. Further, results of titrations of monoprotic acids, a diprotic acid, an ampholyte, a mixture of an acid with its conjugate base, and mixtures of two acids with a small difference between the stability constants are given. Most of these titrations cannot be evaluated by the Gran or Hofstee methods but yield results having errors of the order of 0.1% if the methods proposed in Parts I and II of this series are employed. The advantages of the method of stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant combined with the proposed evaluation methods, in comparison with common methods such as titration to a preset pH, are that all the data are used in the evaluation, permitting a statistical treatment and giving better possibilities for tracing systematic errors.

  16. Brain Chagas'disease: increasing differential diagnosis of brain mass in immunosuppressed patients - a case report and literature revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Laercio Leitao; centola, Crescencio A.P.; Kakudate, Milton Y.

    1995-01-01

    The authors present a case of Chagas'disease as tumor-like lesion of the brain, in a patient with Aids, simulating the lesions most frequently found in these patients, as toxoplasmosis, lymphoma and cryptococcosis. Furthermore, the case reported have peculiarity to be the only with lesion documented in cerebellum, and unusual due to be secondary by reactivation of chronic Chagas disease. Moreover, emphasize analysis of cerebrospinal fluid with realization of sorologic tests to Chagas's disease, as simple as effective method, to make use of biopsy with stereotaxia in unfinished cases and bad evolution. Finally, after a wide world literature review about Chagas'disease as a tumor-like lesion of the brain, emphasizing this publication as the first written in a radiology journal of specialty. (author). 40 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Role of T. cruzi exposure in the pattern of T cell cytokines among chronically infected HIV and Chagas disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Regina Tozetto-Mendoza

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The impact of Chagas disease (CD in HIV-infected patients is relevant throughout the world. In fact, the characterization of the adaptive immune response in the context of co-infection is important for predicting the need for interventions in areas in which HIV and Chagas disease co-exist. METHODS: We described and compared the frequency of cytokine-producing T cells stimulated with soluble antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi using a cytometric assay for the following groups: individuals with chronic Chagas disease (CHR, n=10, those with Chagas disease and HIV infection (CO, n=11, those with only HIV (HIV, n=14 and healthy individuals (C, n=15. RESULTS: We found 1 a constitutively lower frequency of IL-2+ and IFN-γ+ T cells in the CHR group compared with the HIV, CO and healthy groups; 2 a suppressive activity of soluble T. cruzi antigen, which down-regulated IL-2+CD4+ and IFN-γ+CD4+ phenotypes, notably in the healthy group; 3 a down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines on CD8+ T cells in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease; and 4 a significant increase in IL-10+CD8+ cells distinguishing the indeterminate form from the cardiac/digestive form of Chagas disease, even in the presence of HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our data suggest the presence of an immunoregulatory response in chronic Chagas disease, which seems to be driven by T. cruzi antigens. Our findings provide new insights into immunotherapeutic strategies for people living with HIV/AIDS and Chagas disease.

  18. Chronic Chagas disease: PCR-xenodiagnosis without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool to detect viable Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Saavedra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the elimination of the microscopic stage of conventional xenodiagnosis (XD to optimize the parasitological diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi in chronic Chagas disease. To this purpose we applied under informed consent two XD cages to 150 Chilean chronic chagasic patients. The fecal samples (FS of the triatomines at 30, 60 and 90 days post feeding were divided into two parts: in one a microscopic search for mobile trypomastigote and/or epimastigote forms was performed. In the other part, DNA extraction-purification for PCR directed to the conserved region of kDNA minicircles of trypanosomes (PCR-XD, without previous microscopic observation was done. An XD was considered positive when at least one mobile T. cruzi parasite in any one of three periods of incubation was observed, whereas PCR-XD was considered positive when the 330 bp band specific for T. cruzi was detected. 25 of 26 cases with positive conventional XD were PCR-XD positive (concordance 96.2%, whereas 85 of 124 cases with negative conventional XD were positive by PCR-XD (68.5%. Human chromosome 12 detected by Real-time PCR used as exogenous internal control of PCR-XD reaction allowed to discounting of PCR inhibition and false negative in 40 cases with negative PCR-XD. Conclusion: PCR-XD performed without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool for detection of viable parasites with higher efficiency then conventional XD.

  19. Chronic Chagas disease: PCR-xenodiagnosis without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool to detect viable Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Miguel; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Martínez, Gabriela; Rojas, Antonio; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the elimination of the microscopic stage of conventional xenodiagnosis (XD) to optimize the parasitological diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi in chronic Chagas disease. To this purpose we applied under informed consent two XD cages to 150 Chilean chronic chagasic patients. The fecal samples (FS) of the triatomines at 30, 60 and 90 days post feeding were divided into two parts: in one a microscopic search for mobile trypomastigote and/or epimastigote forms was performed. In the other part, DNA extraction-purification for PCR directed to the conserved region of kDNA minicircles of trypanosomes (PCR-XD), without previous microscopic observation was done. An XD was considered positive when at least one mobile T. cruzi parasite in any one of three periods of incubation was observed, whereas PCR-XD was considered positive when the 330 bp band specific for T. cruzi was detected. 25 of 26 cases with positive conventional XD were PCR-XD positive (concordance 96.2%), whereas 85 of 124 cases with negative conventional XD were positive by PCR-XD (68.5%). Human chromosome 12 detected by Real-time PCR used as exogenous internal control of PCR-XD reaction allowed to discounting of PCR inhibition and false negative in 40 cases with negative PCR-XD. PCR-XD performed without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool for detection of viable parasites with higher efficiency then conventional XD.

  20. Pacemaker Implants in Children and Adolescents with Chagas Disease in Brazil: 18-Year Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizzaci, Carolina Christianini; Souza, Thiago Gonçalves Schroder E; Targueta, Gabriel Pelegrineti; Tótora, Ana Paula Frederico; Mateos, Juan Carlos Pachón; Mateos, José Carlos Pachon

    2017-06-01

    Chagas disease continues to be a serious public health problem, and accounts for 25-30% of the indications for cardiac stimulation in Brazil. To assess clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with Chagas disease, younger than 18 years, who had undergone pacemaker implantation in Brazil between 1994 and 2011, and its temporal trend. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Brazilian Pacemaker Registry database. The following variables were analyzed: year when pacemaker was implanted, location, age, sex, ethnic group, functional class and the main electrocardiographic findings at baseline. In a total of 183,123 implants performed between 1994 and 2011, 214 implants of cardiac stimulation device in Chagas disease patients aged younger than 18 years were identified. Mean age at implantation was 5.6 ± 6.2 years. Second- and third-degree atrioventricular blocks corresponded to 71% of indications for pacemaker implantation. Fifty-six percent of the procedures were performed in the southeast region. Regarding the total number of pacemaker implants per year, there was a remarkable increase in the implants for all causes. However, time series analysis of the implants in Chagas disease patients younger than 18 years revealed a significant reduction in the annual number of implants. There has been an important reduction in the number of pacemaker implantations among children and adolescents with Chagas disease, suggesting a reduction in the vertical transmission of the parasite. A doença de Chagas mantém-se como sério problema de saúde pública e tem sido responsável por aproximadamente 25% a 30% das indicações de estimulação cardíaca no Brasil. Estudar as características clínicas e epidemiológicas dos pacientes menores de 18 anos portadores de doença de Chagas submetidos a implante de marca-passo no território brasileiro entre 1994 e 2011, e sua tendência temporal. Trata-se de um estudo retrospectivo que utilizou informa

  1. Evaluation of the Chagas Stat-Paktm Assay for Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi Antibodies in Wildlife Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabsley, Michael J.; Brown, Emily L.; Roellig, Dawn M.

    2010-01-01

    An immunochromatographic assay (Chagas Stat-Pak™) was evaluated for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in 4 species of wildlife reservoirs. Antibodies to T. cruzi were detected in raccoons (Procyon lotor) (naturally and experimentally infected) and degus (Octodon degu) (experimentally-infected) using the Chagas Stat-Pak. In naturally exposed wild raccoons, the Chagas Stat-Pak had a sensitivity and specificity of 66.7–80.0% and 96.3%, respectively. Compared with indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay results, serocon-version as determined by Chagas Stat-Pak was delayed for experimentally infected raccoons, but occurred sooner in experimentally infected degus. The Chagas Stat-Pak did not detect antibodies in naturally or experimentally infected Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) or in experimentally infected short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica). These data suggest that the Chagas Stat-Pak might be useful in field studies of raccoons and degus when samples would not be available for more-conventional serologic assays. Because this assay did not work on either species of marsupial, the applicability of the assay should be examined before it is used in other wild species. PMID:19016578

  2. Assessment and epidemiology of Chagas' disease in patients treated in Araguaina - Tocantins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Valeria Rita

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease (AD) was described by Carlos Chagas in 1909. It is caused by a parasite T. cruzi, transmitted by bugs, by blood transfusion, vertical and orally. The DC has two phases: acute and chronic. The evolution to the cardiac form occurs in about 30% of chronic cases and is the largest cause of mortality in chronic Chagas disease. The aim of this study was to Chagas' disease in patients of Tocantins, compared with other heart patients and asymptomatic from the standpoint of non-invasive exams using radiant energies such as echocardiography and ECG and RX. The descriptive study included 80 patients, 20 chronic form of Chagas disease, 20 indeterminate, 20 with other heart diseases, and 20 controls. There was a prevalence of 9.5% of chagasic patients treated in outpatient cardiology at Araguaina Tocantins, and 7.3% in chronic and 2.21% in the indeterminate. Of the chronic patients in the study 50% had mega esophagus and megacolon 4 (20%). Most patients had no family history of AD, nor was a smoker or drinker. Major electrocardiographic abnormalities found refer to driving. The evaluation of ICT, the chronic chagasic showed that increased by 40% of patients, 40% had esophageal changes and 20% of patients had megacolon s. The echocardiogram was abnormal in 42%). 27% of patients had EF below 55% changed. Changes in segmental contractility and Asynchrony septum were found in 80% of chronic Chagas disease. In 80% of the patients was observed diastolic dysfunction. The valvular changes occurred in 75%. Electrocardiographic abnormalities occurred in 80% of patients with CCC, while the other heart had ECG changes. Arterial hypertension had an incidence of 45% in patients with CCC and 40% in FCI. The systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction was more prevalent in groups that had an abnormal ECG and arrhythmia. Observed that the group of chagasic decreased ejection fraction is correlated to a higher incidence of arrhythmias besides diastolic dysfunction and related

  3. Chagas disease as a cause of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias in patients long removed from endemic areas: an emerging problem in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Vieri; Tomberli, Benedetta; Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Fornaro, Alessandra; Castelli, Gabriele; Pieralli, Filippo; Berni, Andrea; Yacoub, Sophie; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2015-12-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. In endemic areas (South and Central America), Chagas disease represents a relevant public health issue, and is the most frequent cause of cardiomyopathy. In nonendemic areas, such as Europe, Chagas disease represents an emerging problem following the establishment of sizeable communities from Brazil and Bolivia. Chagas cardiomyopathy represents the most frequent and serious complication of chronic Chagas disease, affecting about 20-30% of patients, potentially leading to heart failure, arrhythmias, thromboembolism, stroke and sudden death. Because late complications of Chagas disease may develop several years or even decades after the acute infection, it may be extremely challenging to reach the correct diagnosis in patients long removed from the countries of origin. We report two examples of Chagas cardiomyopathy in South American women permanently residing in Italy for more than 20 years, presenting with cardiac manifestations ranging from left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure to isolated ventricular arrhythmias. The present review emphasizes that Chagas disease should be considered as a potential diagnosis in patients from endemic areas presenting with 'idiopathic' cardiac manifestations, even when long removed from their country of origin, with potential implications for treatment and control of Chagas disease transmission.

  4. Evolução tardia do transplante cardíaco na doença de Chagas: long-term evolution in cardiac transplantation Chagas' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo I Fiorelli

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available Nas formas cardíacas da doença de Chagas que evoluem com insuficiência cardíaca refratária ao tratamento clínico, o transplante é a única alternativa, ao lado da cardiomioplastia. Os autores apresentam a evolução tardia de seis pacientes com miocardiopatia chagásica terminal submetidos a transplante cardíaco ortotópico. O período médio de observação foi de 25,2 meses. O diagnóstico de reativação da doença de Chagas apoiou-se na observação clínica, na investigação laboratorial do parasita, nas biópsias endomiocárdicas e dos nódulos de subcutâneo. A análise dos resultados demonstra que: 1 os testes laboratoriais mostraram-se ineficazes no diagnóstico da reativação da doença, sendo que as biópsias mostraram maior índice de positividade; 2 a pulsoterapia com corticóide predispõe à reativação; 3 a doença linfoproliferativa apresenta alta incidência na doença de Chagas, sendo a principal complicação tardia. Possivelmente, o benzonidazol apresente seu efeito oncogênico potencializado. Tendo em vista o caráter endêmico da doença e a falta de alternativa terapêutica, tornou-se obrigatória a analise do esquema imunossupressor, do tratamento da reativação e a maior experiência clínica, para posições mais definidas.In the cardiac forms of Chagas' Disease that develop with refractory cardiac failure under clinical treatment, the transplant is the only alternative along with the cardiomyoplasty. The authors present the six patient late evolution with terminal chagasic myocardiopathy submitted under on orthopic heart transplantation. The average period of observation was of 25.2 months. The diagnosis of Chagas' Disease reativation relies on the clinical observation, laboratory investigation of parasito, endomyocardial biopsy and subcutaneous nodules. The analyses of the results show that: 1 the laboratory exams were useless in the diagnosis of the disease reativation, but the biopsy presented hight

  5. Usefulness of FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1 as confirmatory assay for non-negative results in blood bank screening of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fernanda Magalhães Freire; Repoles, Laura Cotta; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Xavier, Marcelo Antônio Pascoal; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; de Freitas Carneiro Proietti, Anna Bárbara; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira

    2018-04-01

    A relevant issue in Chagas disease serological diagnosis regards the requirement of using several confirmatory methods to elucidate the status of non-negative results from blood bank screening. The development of a single reliable method may potentially contribute to distinguish true and false positive results. Our aim was to evaluate the performance of the multiplexed flow-cytometry anti-T. cruzi/Leishmania IgG1 serology/(FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1) with three conventional confirmatory criteria (ELISA-EIA, Immunofluorescence assay-IIF and EIA/IIF consensus criterion) to define the final status of samples with actual/previous non-negative results during anti-T. cruzi ELISA-screening in blood banks. Apart from inconclusive results, the FC-TRIPLEX presented a weak agreement index with EIA, while a strong agreement was observed when either IIF or EIA/IIF consensus criteria were applied. Discriminant analysis and Spearman's correlation further corroborates the agreement scores. ROC curve analysis showed that FC-TRIPLEX performance indexes were higher when IIF and EIA/IIF consensus were used as a confirmatory criterion. Logistic regression analysis further demonstrated that the probability of FC-TRIPLEX to yield positive results was higher for inconclusive results from IIF and EIA/IIF consensus. Machine learning tools illustrated the high level of categorical agreement between FC-TRIPLEX versus IIF or EIA/IIF consensus. Together, these findings demonstrated the usefulness of FC-TRIPLEX as a tool to elucidate the status of non-negative results in blood bank screening of Chagas disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Mortalidad por enfermedad de Chagas: A propósito de los brotes de Chagas agudo como enfermedad reemergente de transmisión alimentaria

    OpenAIRE

    Rísquez, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Tras la ocurrencia de los primeros brotes de Chagas agudos en la capital (diciembre 2007) y Estado Vargas (marzo 2009) por trasmisión oral, se procedió a una revisión de la mortalidad por la enfermedad registrada entre 1997 y 2006, cuyos datos se analizaron de acuerdo a la edad, sexo y forma de presentación. El número absoluto de muertes sigue siendo elevado con promedio de 796 muertes anuales, de predominio en el sexo masculino, la mayoría en después de los 60 años de edad. Llama la atención...

  7. Chagas disease vector control in a hyperendemic setting: the first 11 years of intervention in Cochabamba, Bolivia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalisisy Espinoza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease has historically been hyperendemic in the Bolivian Department of Cochabamba. In the early 2000s, an extensive vector control program was implemented; 1.34 million dwelling inspections were conducted to ascertain infestation (2000-2001/2003-2011, with blanket insecticide spraying in 2003-2005 and subsequent survey-spraying cycles targeting residual infestation foci. Here, we assess the effects of this program on dwelling infestation rates (DIRs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Program records were used to calculate annual, municipality-level aggregate DIRs (39 municipalities; very high values in 2000-2001 (median: 0.77-0.69 dropped to ∼0.03 from 2004 on. A linear mixed model (with municipality as a random factor suggested that infestation odds decreased, on average, by ∼28% (95% confidence interval [CI95] 6-44% with each 10-fold increase in control effort. A second, better-fitting mixed model including year as an ordinal predictor disclosed large DIR reductions in 2001-2003 (odds ratio [OR] 0.11, CI95 0.06-0.19 and 2003-2004 (OR 0.22, CI95 0.14-0.34. Except for a moderate decrease in 2005-2006, no significant changes were detected afterwards. In both models, municipality-level DIRs correlated positively with previous-year DIRs and with the extent of municipal territory originally covered by montane dry forests. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Insecticide-spraying campaigns had very strong, long-lasting effects on DIRs in Cochabamba. However, post-intervention surveys consistently detected infestation in ∼3% of dwellings, underscoring the need for continuous surveillance; higher DIRs were recorded in the capital city and, more generally, in municipalities dominated by montane dry forest--an eco-region where wild Triatoma infestans are widespread. Traditional strategies combining insecticide spraying and longitudinal surveillance are thus confirmed as very effective means for area-wide Chagas disease vector control; they

  8. Sperm Morphological Features Associated with Chronic Chagas Disease in the Semen of Experimentally Infected Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Pedro-Martínez, Elvia; Hernández-Pichardo, José Ernesto; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Graullera-Rivera, Verónica; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2014-01-01

    The presence of trypanosomatids in the reproductive systems of different mammals (causing genital lesions in the acute stage of the disease) may predispose the animals to low semen quality. However, there are no studies examining the alterations in the sperm morphological features in the chronic stage of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Knowledge of these aspects is important to understand the other ways of transmission of the Chagas disease. Progressive motility, mass motility, concentration, and sperm morphology of 84 ejaculates of dogs that were chronically infected with T. cruzi were evaluated. Most of the findings were consistent with the reference values and with those obtained from healthy control dogs. The scrotal circumference was not correlated with spermatozoa concentration in the infected animals. In conclusion, the T. cruzi Ninoa (MHOM/MX/1994/Ninoa) strain does not cause significant alterations in the semen quality of dogs experiencing chronic Chagas disease (at concentrations of 5 × 104 to 1 × 106 parasites per animal). PMID:25114010

  9. Population differentiation of the Chagas disease vector Triatoma maculata (Erichson, 1848) from Colombia and Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve, Yoman; Panzera, Francisco; Herrera, Leidi; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    The emerging vector of Chagas disease, Triatoma maculata (Hemiptera, Reduviidae), is one of the most widely distributed Triatoma species in northern South America. Despite its increasing relevance as a vector, no consistent picture of the magnitude of genetic and phenetic diversity has yet been developed. Here, several populations of T. maculata from eleven Colombia and Venezuela localities were analyzed based on the morphometry of wings and the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene sequences. Our results showed clear morphometric and genetic differences among Colombian and Venezuelan populations, indicating high intraspecific diversity. Inter-population divergence is suggested related to East Cordillera in Colombia. Analyses of other populations from Colombia, Venezuela, and Brazil from distinct eco-geographic regions are still needed to understand its systematics and phylogeography as well as its actual role as a vector of Chagas disease. © 2016 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  10. Community resilience and Chagas disease in a rural region of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, José Antonio Santana; Monreal, Luz Arenas; Ramsey, Janine M

    2016-08-04

    To explore the pillars of community resilience in a region where Chagas disease is endemic, with the aim of promoting participatory processes to deal with this condition from the resilience of the population. Qualitative study using ethnographic record and six interviews of focus groups with young people, women and men. The research was carried out in a rural area of the state of Morelos, Mexico, between 2006 and 2007. We carried out educational sessions with the population in general, so that residents could identify the relationship between the vector Triatoma pallidipennis, the parasite (Trypanosoma cruzi), symptoms, and preventive actions for Chagas disease. The ethnographic record and groups were analyzed based on Taylor and Bogdan's modification, and the focus was to understand the socio-cultural meanings that guide the speeches and activities of residents in relation to the pillars of community resilience. The population felt proud of belonging to that location and three pillars of community resilience were clearly identified: collective self-esteem, cultural identity, and social honesty. Having these pillars as bases, we promoted the participation of the population concerning Chagas disease, and a Community Action Group was formed with young people, adult men and women, and social leaders. This Group initiated actions of epidemiological and entomological surveillance in the community to deal with this problem. It is necessary to create more experiences that deepen the understanding of the pillars of community resilience, and how they contribute to enhance participation in health to deal with Chagas disease. Explorar los pilares de la resiliencia comunitaria en una región en la que la enfermedad de Chagas es endémica, con la finalidad de partir de la resiliencia de la población para impulsar procesos participativos para enfrentar este padecimiento. Estudio cualitativo que utilizó registro etnográfico y seis entrevistas de grupos focales con j

  11. Prova do esforço na forma indeterminada da doença de Chagas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanize Macedo

    1973-10-01

    Full Text Available Os autores realizaram a prova do esforço sub-máximo em 30 portadores da forma indeterminada da doença de Chagas e em 30 normais, a fim de avaliar a capacidade física e a função miocárdica. Os resultados não mostraram diferenciação do grupo positivo e do controle negativo, quanto a queixas, freqüência cardíaca ou respiratória, tensão arterial, consumo de oxigênio e alterações eletrocardiográficas.To evaluate the physical capacity and the myoeardial function in 30 patientes with latent Chagas' disease, the effort test was performed. 30 Controls mere used. According to complains, cardiac and respiratory rate, maximum oxigen consumption and eletrocardiographic changes there was no difference between both groups.

  12. [Management of Chagas disease in Europe. Experiences and challenges in Spain, Switzerland and Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Y; Angheben, A; Carrilero Fernandez, B; Jansa i Lopez del Vallado, J M; Jannin, J G; Albajar-Viñas, P

    2009-12-01

    The intention of this article is not to describe the illness or evaluate the number of cases diagnosed in Spain, Switzerland and Italy, nor to analyse the protocols followed in various centres. The authors rather seek to examine the main technical, local and national challenges involved in the care of patients with Chagas disease. To this end, they review concisely a number of themes which are common to the three countries. These are: the detection of disease; confirmation of the diagnosis; treatment; response to treatment; follow-up; the risk of transmission by transfusion, by organ donation and from mother to child; the psychosocial and socio-economic aspects of Chagas disease outside endemic areas; and what progress needs to be made in improving information about the condition.

  13. [Urbanization of Chagas disease in Peru: experiences in prevention and control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Náquira, César

    2014-04-01

    In Peru, Chagas disease has an epidemiological significance in three macro-regions, one of them is the southern macro-region formed by the departments of Arequipa, Moquegua and Tacna. In 1965 a successful control was performed by house spraying insecticides, however, the persistence of the vector made it necessary for a second control plan that was implemented in 2000 and followed the guidelines of CONAL Plan, based on the elimination of Triatoma infestans and screening in blood banks.This plan was successful in Tacna and Moquegua, therefore these departments were considered free of vectorial transmission by the Pan American Health Organization. A ssimilar situation has not been achieved in the department of Arequipa because of the presence, among other factors, of rural migration to the city, in this way the urbanization of Chagas disease is a new epidemiological scenario of which we need to know more.

  14. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Part III. Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of the FT-IR spectrometer in analyses that were previously avoided. Examines some of the applications of this spectroscopy with aqueous solutions, circular internal reflection, samples with low transmission, diffuse reflectance, infrared emission, and the infrared microscope. (TW)

  15. [Medicine in notafilia--Part III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Rade R; Babić, Gordana Stanković

    2013-01-01

    Notafilia is the study of paper money. Only a few countries in the world have issued banknotes with portraits of well-known scientists who brought international fame to their own people and medicine. PORTRAITS OF SCIENTISTS ON THE BANKNOTES OF YUGOSLAVIA, SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO AND SERBIA. Nikola Tesla and Mihailo Pupin Idvorski were the ingenious inventors and scientists of our time who made special contributions to radiology. Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) pioneered the use of X-rays for medical purposes, thus effectively laying the foundations of radiology and radiography, and revealed the existence of harmful effects of X-rays on the human body. Mihailo Pupin Idvorski (1854-1935) was worldwide famous for applying physics in practice, as well as in the basis of telephone and telegraph transmissions. He also studied the nature of X-rays and contributed to establishing of radiology. PORTRAITS OF SCIENTISTS ON THE BANKNOTES OF THE WORLD: Maria Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934) was the first woman to gain the academic title of the Academy of Medicine, Paris. Together with her husband Pierre Curie (1859-1906) she gave an outstanding contribution to science and medicine. The discovery of the radioactive elements introduced the concept of "radioactivity" into physics and "radiotherapy" as a new discipline in medicine, thus creating the conditions for the development of nuclear medicine, oncology, and mobile diagnostic radiology. This paper presents the banknotes featuring the portraits of Nikola Tesla, Mihailo Pupin Idvorski, Maria Sklodowska Curie and Pierre Curie, the world renowned scientists, who made enormous contributions to medicine and laid the foundation for radiology.

  16. 'Riesenrad' ion gantry for hadrontherapy: Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedikt, M.; Bryant, P.; Holy, P.; Pullia, M.

    1999-01-01

    When using accelerator beams for cancer therapy, the three-dimensional freedom afforded by a gantry helps the treatment planner to spread out surface doses, avoid directions that intercept vital organs and irradiate a volume that is conformal with the tumour. The general preference is for an iso-centric gantry turning 360 deg. in the vertical plane around the patient bed with sufficient space to be able to orientate the patient through 360 deg. in the horizontal plane. For hadrontherapy, gantries are impressive structures of the order of 10 m in diameter and 100 ton in weight and to date only proton gantries have been demonstrated to operate satisfactorily. The increased magnetic rigidity of say carbon ions will make ion gantries more difficult and costly to build. For this reason, exo-centric gantries and, in particular the so-called 'Riesenrad' gantry with a single 90 deg. bending magnet, merit further attention. The power consumption is reduced and the heavy magnets with their counterbalance weight are reduced and are kept close to the axis. The treatment room, which is lighter, is positioned at a larger radius, but only the patient bed requires careful alignment. An optics module called a 'rotator' is needed to match an incoming dispersion vector to the gantry in order to have an achromatic beam at the patient. A practical design is described that assumes the beam is derived from a slow-extraction scheme in a synchrotron and that the beam sizes are controlled by modules in the transfer line. Magnetic scanning is integrated into the gantry optics for both transverse directions

  17. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lolic, B.

    1961-12-01

    Project 'Reactor oscillator' covers the following activities: designing reactor oscillators for reactors RA and RB with detailed engineering drawings; constructing and mounting of the oscillator; designing and constructing the appropriate electronic equipment for the oscillator; measurements at the RA and RB reactors needed for completing the oscillator construction

  18. `Riesenrad' ion gantry for hadrontherapy: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, M.; Bryant, P.; Holy, P.; Pullia, M.

    1999-07-01

    When using accelerator beams for cancer therapy, the three-dimensional freedom afforded by a gantry helps the treatment planner to spread out surface doses, avoid directions that intercept vital organs and irradiate a volume that is conformal with the tumour. The general preference is for an iso-centric gantry turning 360° in the vertical plane around the patient bed with sufficient space to be able to orientate the patient through 360° in the horizontal plane. For hadrontherapy, gantries are impressive structures of the order of 10 m in diameter and 100 ton in weight and to date only proton gantries have been demonstrated to operate satisfactorily. The increased magnetic rigidity of say carbon ions will make ion gantries more difficult and costly to build. For this reason, exo-centric gantries and, in particular the so-called `Riesenrad' gantry with a single 90° bending magnet, merit further attention. The power consumption is reduced and the heavy magnets with their counterbalance weight are reduced and are kept close to the axis. The treatment room, which is lighter, is positioned at a larger radius, but only the patient bed requires careful alignment. An optics module called a `rotator' is needed to match an incoming dispersion vector to the gantry in order to have an achromatic beam at the patient. A practical design is described that assumes the beam is derived from a slow-extraction scheme in a synchrotron and that the beam sizes are controlled by modules in the transfer line. Magnetic scanning is integrated into the gantry optics for both transverse directions.

  19. Topics in Finance Part III--Leverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates operating and financial leverage from the perspective of the financial manager, accenting the relationships to stockholder wealth maximization (SWM), risk and return, and potential agency problems. It also covers some of the pertinent literature related specifically to the implications of operating and financial risk and…

  20. Multibarrier waste forms. Part III: Process considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1979-10-01

    The multibarrier concept for the solidification and storage of radioactive waste utilizes up to three barriers to isolate radionuclides from the environment: a solidified waste inner core, an impervious coating, and a metal matrix. The coating and metal matrix give the composite waste form enhanced inertness with improvements in thermal stability, mechanical strength, and leach resistance. Preliminary process flow rates and material costs were evaluated for four multibarrier waste forms with the process complexity increasing thusly: glass marbles, uncoated supercalcine, glass-coated supercalcine, and PyC/Al 2 O 3 -coated supercalcine. This report discusses the process variables and their effect on optimization of product quality, processing simplicity, and material cost. 11 figures, 2 tables

  1. The Prevalence of Chagas Heart Disease in a Central Bolivian Community Endemic for Trypanosoma Cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Jessica E.; Lozano Beltran, Daniel F.; Torrico, Faustino; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Though the incidence of new Trypanosoma cruzi infections has decreased significantly in endemic regions in the Americas, medical professionals continue to encounter a high burden of resulting Chagas disease among infected adults. The current prevalence of Chagas heart disease in a community setting is not known; nor is it known how recent insecticide vector control measures may have impacted the progression of cardiac disease in an infected population. Objectives and Methods Nested within a community serosurvey in rural and periurban communities in central Bolivia, we performed a cross-sectional cardiac substudy to evaluate adults for historical, clinical, and electrocardiographic evidence of cardiac disease. All adults between the ages of 20 and 60 years old with T. cruzi infection and those with a clinical history, physical exam, or ECG consistent with cardiac abnormalities were also scheduled for echocardiography. Results and conclusions Of the 604 cardiac substudy participants with definitive serology results, 183 were seropositive for infection with T. cruzi (30.3%). Participants who were seropositive for T. cruzi infection were more likely to have conduction system defects (1.6% versus 0 for complete right bundle branch block and 10.4% versus 1.9% for any bundle branch block; p=0.008 and p<0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of bradycardia among seropositive versus seronegative participants. Echocardiogram findings were not consistent with a high burden of Chagas cardiomyopathy: valvulopathies were the most common abnormality, and few participants were found to have low ejection fraction or left ventricular dilatation. No participants had significant heart failure. Though almost one third of adults in the community were seropositive for T. cruzi infection, few had evidence of Chagas heart disease. PMID:26407509

  2. A scientometric evaluation of the Chagas disease implementation research programme of the PAHO and TDR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Carbajal-de-la-Fuente

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR is an independent global programme of scientific collaboration cosponsored by the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Program, the World Bank, and the World Health Organization. TDR's strategy is based on stewardship for research on infectious diseases of poverty, empowerment of endemic countries, research on neglected priority needs, and the promotion of scientific collaboration influencing global efforts to combat major tropical diseases. In 2001, in view of the achievements obtained in the reduction of transmission of Chagas disease through the Southern Cone Initiative and the improvement in Chagas disease control activities in some countries of the Andean and the Central American Initiatives, TDR transferred the Chagas Disease Implementation Research Programme (CIRP to the Communicable Diseases Unit of the Pan American Health Organization (CD/PAHO. This paper presents a scientometric evaluation of the 73 projects from 18 Latin American and European countries that were granted by CIRP/PAHO/TDR between 1997 and 2007. We analyzed all final reports of the funded projects and scientific publications, technical reports, and human resource training activities derived from them. Results about the number of projects funded, countries and institutions involved, gender analysis, number of published papers in indexed scientific journals, main topics funded, patents inscribed, and triatomine species studied are presented and discussed. The results indicate that CIRP/PAHO/TDR initiative has contributed significantly, over the 1997-2007 period, to Chagas disease knowledge as well as to the individual and institutional-building capacity.

  3. La enfermedad de Chagas ya no es tan exótica

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-03

    Este podcast tiene el propósito de informar a los profesionales de la salud sobre la enfermedad de Chagas, su diagnóstico y tratamiento, así como orientar en la identificación de pacientes infectados.  Created: 4/3/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 4/9/2008.

  4. La migrazione del chagas: Costruzione bio-medica e socio-politica delle malattie tropicali dimenticate

    OpenAIRE

    Ciannameo, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Questo studio propone un'esplorazione dei nessi tra processi migratori ed esperienze di salute e malattia a partire da un'indagine sulle migrazioni provenienti dall'America latina in Emilia-Romagna. Contemporaneamente indaga i termini del dibattito sulla diffusione della Malattia di Chagas, “infezione tropicale dimenticata” endemica in America centro-meridionale che, grazie all'incremento dei flussi migratori transnazionali, viene oggi riconfigurata come 'emergente' in alcuni contesti di imm...

  5. Population structure of the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, at the urban-rural interface

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Erica A.; Khatchikian, Camilo E.; Hwang, Josephine; Ancca-Juárez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Quıspe-Machaca, Victor R.; Levy, Michael Z.; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The increasing rate of biological invasions resulting from human transport or human-mediated changes to the environment have had devastating ecologic and public health consequences. The kissing bug, Triatoma infestans, has dispersed through the Peruvian city of Arequipa. The biological invasion of this insect has resulted in a public health crisis, putting thousands of residents of this city at risk of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and subsequent development of Chagas disease. Here we show t...

  6. Human Chagas Disease and Migration in the Context of Globalization: Some Particular Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Pinto Dias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Chagas disease originated in Latin America, being spread around the world in relation with multiple bioecological, sociocultural, and political factors. The process of the disease production and dispersion is discussed, emphasizing the human migration and correlated aspects, in the context of globalization. Positive and negative consequences concern the future of this trypanosomiasis, mainly in terms of the ecologic and sociopolitical characteristics of the endemic and nonendemic countries.

  7. High Resolution Esophageal Manometry in Patients with Chagas Disease: A Cross-Sectional Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Sánchez-Montalvá

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal involvement affects 30-40% of the patients with chronic Chagas disease. Esophageal symptoms appear once the structural damage is established. Little is known about the usefulness of high resolution manometry to early identification of esophageal involvement.We performed a cross-sectional study at the Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain between May 2011 and April 2012. Consecutive patients diagnosed with Chagas disease in the chronic phase were offered to participate. All patients underwent a structured questionnaire about digestive symptoms, a barium esophagogram (Rezende classification and an esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM. A control group of patients with heartburn who underwent an esophageal HRM in our hospital was selected.62 out of 73 patients that were included in the study fulfilled the study protocol. The median age of the Chagas disease group (CG was 37 (IQR 32-45 years, and 42 (67.7% patients were female. Twenty-seven (43.5% patients had esophageal symptoms, heartburn being the most frequent. Esophagogram was abnormal in 5 (8.77%. The esophageal HRM in the CG showed a pathological motility pattern in 14 patients (22.6%. All of them had minor disorders of the peristalsis (13 with ineffective esophageal motility and 1 with fragmented peristalsis. Hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter was found more frequently in the CG than in the control group (21% vs 3.3%; p<0.01. Upper esophageal sphincter was hypertonic in 22 (35.5% and hypotonic in 1 patient. When comparing specific manometric parameters or patterns in the CG according to the presence of symptoms or esophagogram no statistically significant association were seen, except for distal latency.The esophageal involvement measured by HRM in patients with chronic Chagas disease in our cohort is 22.6%. All the patients with esophageal alterations had minor disorders of the peristalsis. Symptoms and esophagogram results did not correlate with the HRM

  8. Follow-up Evaluation of Air Force Blood Donors Screening Positive for Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-27

    Blood Donors Screening Positive for Cbagas Disease presented at/published to Military Health System Research Symposium (Florida, 27-30 Aug 2017) in...disease upon blood donation at JBSA -Lackland 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Follow-up evaluation of Air Force blood donors ...Designated Exempt Reviewer Follow-up evaluation of Air Force blood donors screening positive for Chagas disease Joseph Marcus1, Bryant Webber2, Leo Cropper2

  9. Evaluation of oral mucosal transudate for immunodiagnosis of Chagas´ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARROS Maria das Neves D. S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticorpos anti-Trypanosoma cruzi (isotipo IgG foram detectados no transudato da mucosa oral (TMO através de um ensaio imunoenzimático. Foram estudados 21 indivíduos com doença de Chagas crônica comprovada através de diagnóstico clínico, eletrocardiográfico, epidemiológico e sorológico: 10 com forma cardíaca, 2 com forma digestiva, 6 com forma mista e 3 com forma assintomática. Sete indivíduos de área endêmica, com sorologia negativa, constituiram o grupo controle. O soro destes grupos foi armazenado a -20 oC. A coleta de TMO de ambos os grupos foi realizada com o dispositivo OraSureâ seguindo orientação do fabricante (OraSureâ , Epitope Inc., Beaverton, OR, USA. As amostras de TMO foram diluídas (1:2 e testadas em duplicata através de um ensaio imunoenzimático da Abbott Laboratories para detectar anticorpos IgG contra doença de Chagas. Vinte dos vinte e um pacientes chagásicos apresentaram densidade óptica acima do limiar de reatividade e foram considerados positivos para doença de Chagas. Nenhuma das amostras provenientes de indivíduos soronegativos foi positiva. A sensibilidade e especificidade foram de 95% e 100%, respectivamente. Estes resultados indicam que TMO poderá ser utilizado como um fluido biológico alternativo para o diagnóstico da doença de Chagas. Nós estamos aumentando o número de indivíduos para validar estes resultados incluindo a análise comparativa entre amostras de TMO e soro.

  10. [Possible oral transmission of Chagas disease among hydrocarbons sector workers in Casanare, Colombia, 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuleta-Dueñas, Liliana Patricia; López-Quiroga, Ángela Johana; Torres-Torres, Fernando; Castañeda-Porras, Oneida

    2017-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent for Chagas disease, can be transmitted by oral intake of contaminated food or drinks. During epidemiological week 14 of 2014, two cases of acute Chagas disease were notified among hydrocarbons sector workers in Paz de Ariporo, Casanare. To characterize the affected population, to establish control and prevention measures and to confirm the outbreak. We conducted an outbreak investigation that included the following components: a) Search for symptomatic people compatible with Chagas disease according to the case definition for their referral to medical services; b) entomological survey (192/197 houses); c) sanitary inspection and microbiological analysis of food samples; and d) study of reservoirs. Data management and analysis were done with Epi-Info 7.1.5 using descriptive statistics. We also calculated intradomicile and peridomicile triatomine infestation indexes. We detected 552 exposed people; 40 had the disease (7.2%), of whom seven were women (17,5%) and 33, men (82.5%), i.e., a male-female ratio of 5:1. The mean age was 39.1 ± 10.8 years; the attack rate was 7.2% and lethality, 5% (2/40). Symptoms included fever (100% of cases), headache (80%), myalgia and arthralgia (65%), facial edema (55%), and abdominal pain (37.5%). The mean incubation time was 17 days (range: 3-21). Rhodnius prolixus domiciliary infestation index was 3.3 % and 2.2% in the peridomicile. In the five restaurants inspected sanitary conditions were deficient and food samples were microbiologically non-conforming. We found a dog and two opossums positive for IgG antibodies by ELISA. Environmental, sanitary and epidemiological conditions at the place confirmed an outbreak of Chagas diseases related to occupational exposure, possibly by oral transmission, which may be the largest to date in Colombia.

  11. Community resilience and Chagas disease in a rural region of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Santana Rangel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore the pillars of community resilience in a region where Chagas disease is endemic, with the aim of promoting participatory processes to deal with this condition from the resilience of the population. METHODS Qualitative study using ethnographic record and six interviews of focus groups with young people, women and men. The research was carried out in a rural area of the state of Morelos, Mexico, between 2006 and 2007. We carried out educational sessions with the population in general, so that residents could identify the relationship between the vector Triatoma pallidipennis, the parasite (Trypanosoma cruzi, symptoms, and preventive actions for Chagas disease. The ethnographic record and groups were analyzed based on Taylor and Bogdan’s modification, and the focus was to understand the socio-cultural meanings that guide the speeches and activities of residents in relation to the pillars of community resilience. RESULTS The population felt proud of belonging to that location and three pillars of community resilience were clearly identified: collective self-esteem, cultural identity, and social honesty. Having these pillars as bases, we promoted the participation of the population concerning Chagas disease, and a Community Action Group was formed with young people, adult men and women, and social leaders. This Group initiated actions of epidemiological and entomological surveillance in the community to deal with this problem. CONCLUSIONS It is necessary to create more experiences that deepen the understanding of the pillars of community resilience, and how they contribute to enhance participation in health to deal with Chagas disease.

  12. Le Honduras se démarque dans la lutte contre la maladie de Chagas

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    25 janv. 2011 ... ... en partenariat avec la fondation nationale du logement, ont grandement contribué à la lutte contre la transmission de la maladie de Chagas. À ce jour, 45 % des habitants du comté vivent dans de nouvelles maisons faites de matériaux − murs d'adobe, planchers de ciment, toits de zinc − qui n'attirent pas ...

  13. Upscale or downscale: applications of fine scale remotely sensed data to Chagas disease in Argentina and schistosomiasis in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitron, Uriel; Clennon, Julie A; Cecere, M Carla; Gürtler, Ricardo E; King, Charles H; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo

    2006-11-01

    Depending on the research question or the public health application, the appropriate resolution of the data varies temporally, spatially, and, for satellite data, spectrally and radiometrically. Regardless of the scale used to address a research or public health question, the temptation is always there to extrapolate from fine-resolution data or to interpolate from coarse resolution studies. In both cases, the relevance of data and analyses conducted on one spatial level to other levels cannot be taken for granted. Spatial heterogeneity on the micro-scale may not be detected using coarse spatial resolution, and conversely, general patterns on the macro-scale may not be detected using fine spatial resolution. Two studies are described where the transmission dynamics and risk of infection was assessed on the micro-scale starting with household level studies in one community, and the study area was extended gradually to consider several communities and sources for vectors or intermediate hosts. In a study of Chagas disease in northwest Argentina, the reinfestation process of communities by the main domestic vector was analyzed using spatial statistics; sources within and outside communities as well as the distance of reinfestation were identified. In a study of urinary schistosomiasis in coastal Kenya, age dependent and directional focal clustering of infections was detected around some aquatic habitats, and a hydrological model was developed to detect least cost dispersal routes that allow snails to reinfest dried-up habitats. Some general aspects of focal statistics are discussed. Several general questions need to be considered in geospatial health studies, including the following: (i) what are the best criteria for selecting the spatial (and temporal) unit of intervention and analysis? (ii) how do the key measures of risk and transmission dynamics vary with scale? (iii) how do we integrate processes occurring at diverse spatial and temporal scales? All of these

  14. [Knowledge of vector-borne diseases (dengue, rickettsiosis and Chagas disease) in physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Caballero, César I; Dzul-Rosado, Karla; Dzul-Tut, Irving; Balam-May, Ángel; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    The ecological conditions of Yucatan made it a suitable region for the acquisition of vector-borne diseases such as dengue, rickettsiosis, and Chagas disease. As the epidemiological burden of these diseases shows an alarming increase of severe cases, the early establishment of diagnosis and therapeutics by first-contact physicians is a critical step that is not being fulfilled due to several reasons, including poor knowledge. To determine the level of knowledge related to dengue, Chagas disease, and rickettsiosis among rural first-contact physicians of Yucatan. A survey was applied to 90 first-contact physicians from rural clinics of Yucatan, which included 32 items related to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of dengue, rickettsiosis, and Chagas disease. Answers were analyzed by central tendency statistics. Differences were observed among every category, however; diagnosis and therapeutics showed the lower values. Globally, 62.5% of respondents showed moderate knowledge, 37.5% poor knowledge, and 0% adequate knowledge. Results suggest that a strong campaign for a continuous diffusion of knowledge regarding these diseases is needed. In regions with high prevalence of these kinds of diseases, like Yucatan, the impact of these results on the epidemiological burden of these diseases must be evaluated.

  15. Current and developing therapeutic agents in the treatment of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Apt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Werner AptUniversity of Chile, Faculty of Medicine, Santiago, ChileAbstract: Chagas disease must be treated in all its stages: acute, indeterminate, chronic, and initial and middle determinant chronic, due to the fact that DNA of the parasite can be demonstrated by PCR in chronic cases, where optical microscopy does not detect parasites. Nifurtimox (NF and benznidazole (BNZ are the drugs accepted to treat humans based upon ethical considerations and efficiency. However, both the drugs produce secondary effects in 30% of the cases, and the treatment must be given for at least 30–60 days. Other useful drugs are itraconazole and posaconazole. The latter may be the drug to treat Chagas disease in the future when all the investigations related to it are finished. At present, there is no criterion of cure for chronic cases since in the majority, the serology remains positive, although it may decrease. In acute cases, 70% cure with NF and 75% with BNZ is achieved. In congenital cases, 100% cure is obtained if the treatment is performed during the first year of life. In chronic acquired cases, 20% cure and 50% improvement of the electrocardiographic changes are obtained with itraconazole.Keywords: Chagas disease, treatment, nifurtimox, benznidazole, allopurinol, itraconazole, posaconazole

  16. Access to benznidazole for Chagas disease in the United States-Cautious optimism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Alpern

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Drugs for neglected tropical diseases (NTD are being excessively priced in the United States. Benznidazole, the first-line drug for Chagas disease, may become approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA and manufactured by a private company in the US, thus placing it at risk of similar pricing. Chagas disease is an NTD caused by Trypanosoma cruzi; it is endemic to Latin America, infecting 8 million individuals. Human migration has changed the epidemiology causing nonendemic countries to face increased challenges in diagnosing and managing patients with Chagas disease. Only 2 drugs exist with proven efficacy: benznidazole and nifurtimox. Benznidazole has historically faced supply problems and drug shortages, limiting accessibility. In the US, it is currently only available under an investigational new drug (IND protocol from the CDC and is provided free of charge to patients. However, 2 companies have stated that they intend to submit a New Drug Application (NDA for FDA approval. Based on recent history of companies acquiring licensing rights for NTD drugs in the US with limited availability, it is likely that benznidazole will become excessively priced by the manufacturer-paradoxically making it less accessible. However, if the companies can be taken at their word, there may be reason for optimism.

  17. Access to benznidazole for Chagas disease in the United States-Cautious optimism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpern, Jonathan D; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; Stauffer, William M

    2017-09-01

    Drugs for neglected tropical diseases (NTD) are being excessively priced in the United States. Benznidazole, the first-line drug for Chagas disease, may become approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and manufactured by a private company in the US, thus placing it at risk of similar pricing. Chagas disease is an NTD caused by Trypanosoma cruzi; it is endemic to Latin America, infecting 8 million individuals. Human migration has changed the epidemiology causing nonendemic countries to face increased challenges in diagnosing and managing patients with Chagas disease. Only 2 drugs exist with proven efficacy: benznidazole and nifurtimox. Benznidazole has historically faced supply problems and drug shortages, limiting accessibility. In the US, it is currently only available under an investigational new drug (IND) protocol from the CDC and is provided free of charge to patients. However, 2 companies have stated that they intend to submit a New Drug Application (NDA) for FDA approval. Based on recent history of companies acquiring licensing rights for NTD drugs in the US with limited availability, it is likely that benznidazole will become excessively priced by the manufacturer-paradoxically making it less accessible. However, if the companies can be taken at their word, there may be reason for optimism.

  18. Value of the radiological study of the thorax for diagnosing left ventricular dysfunction in Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Amanda Arantes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the value of the radiological study of the thorax for diagnosing left ventricular dilation and left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with Chagas' disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 166 consecutive patients with Chagas' disease and no other associated diseases. The patients underwent cardiac assessment with chest radiography and Doppler echocardiography. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of chest radiography were calculated to detect left ventricular dysfunction and the accuracy of the cardiothoracic ratio in the diagnosis of left ventricular dysfunction with the area below the ROC curve. The cardiothoracic ratio was correlated with the left ventricular ejection fraction and the left ventricular diastolic diameter. RESULTS: The abnormal chest radiogram had a sensitivity of 50%, specificity of 80.5%, and positive and negative predictive values of 51.2% and 79.8%, respectively, in the diagnosis of left ventricular dysfunction. The cardiothoracic ratio showed a weak correlation with left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.23 and left ventricular diastolic diameter (r=0.30. The area calculated under the ROC curve was 0.734. CONCLUSION: The radiological study of the thorax is not an accurate indicator of left ventricular dysfunction; its use as a screening method to initially approach the patient with Chagas' disease should be reevaluated.

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Chagas Disease in Pregnant Women in Casanare, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucunubá, Zulma M.; Flórez, Astrid C.; Cárdenas, Ángela; Pavía, Paula; Montilla, Marleny; Aldana, Rodrigo; Villamizar, Katherine; Ríos, Lyda C.; Nicholls, Rubén S.; Puerta, Concepción J.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the prevalence and risk factors associated with maternal infection is the first step to develop a surveillance system for congenital transmission of Chagas disease. We conducted a cross-sectional study in Casanare, a disease-endemic area in Colombia. A total of 982 patients were enrolled in the study. A global prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection of 4.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8–5.3%) was found. Multivariate analysis showed that the most important risk-associated factors were age > 29 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.4, 95% CI = 0.9–12.4), rural residency (aOR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.0–4.6), low education level (aOR = 10.2, 95% CI = 1.6–82.7), and previous knowledge of the vector (aOR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.0–4.9). Relatives and siblings of infected mothers showed a prevalence of 9.3%. These findings may help physicians to investigate congenital cases, screen Chagas disease in siblings and relatives, and provide early treatment to prevent the chronic complications of Chagas disease. PMID:23033397

  20. Positive deviance study to inform a Chagas disease control program in southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Sanchez, Claudia; Baus, Esteban G; Guerrero, Darwin; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by the faeces of triatomine insects that find favourable environments in poorly constructed houses. Previous studies have documented persistent triatomine infestation in houses in the province of Loja in southern Ecuador despite repeated insecticide and educational interventions. We aim to develop a sustainable strategy for the interruption of Chagas disease transmission by promoting living environments that are designed to prevent colonisation of rural houses by triatomines. This study used positive deviance to inform the design of an anti-triatomine prototype house by identifying knowledge, attitudes and practices used by families that have remained triatomine-free (2010-2012). Positive deviants reported practices that included maintenance of structural elements of the house, fumigation of dwellings and animal shelters, sweeping with "insect repellent" plants and relocation of domestic animals away from the house, among others. Participants favoured construction materials that do not drastically differ from those currently used (adobe walls and tile roofs). They also expressed their belief in a clear connection between a clean house and health. The family's economic dynamics affect space use and must be considered in the prototype's design. Overall, the results indicate a positive climate for the introduction of housing improvements as a protective measure against Chagas disease in this region.

  1. Positive deviance study to inform a Chagas disease control program in southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Nieto-Sanchez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by the faeces of triatomine insects that find favourable environments in poorly constructed houses. Previous studies have documented persistent triatomine infestation in houses in the province of Loja in southern Ecuador despite repeated insecticide and educational interventions. We aim to develop a sustainable strategy for the interruption of Chagas disease transmission by promoting living environments that are designed to prevent colonisation of rural houses by triatomines. This study used positive deviance to inform the design of an anti-triatomine prototype house by identifying knowledge, attitudes and practices used by families that have remained triatomine-free (2010-2012. Positive deviants reported practices that included maintenance of structural elements of the house, fumigation of dwellings and animal shelters, sweeping with "insect repellent" plants and relocation of domestic animals away from the house, among others. Participants favoured construction materials that do not drastically differ from those currently used (adobe walls and tile roofs. They also expressed their belief in a clear connection between a clean house and health. The family's economic dynamics affect space use and must be considered in the prototype's design. Overall, the results indicate a positive climate for the introduction of housing improvements as a protective measure against Chagas disease in this region.

  2. The current screening programme for congenital transmission of Chagas disease in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, L; Oliveira, I; Ciruela, P; Plasencia, A

    2011-09-22

    Due to considerable numbers of migrants from Chagas disease-endemic countries living in Catalonia, the Catalonian Health Department has recently implemented a screening programme for preventing congenital transmission, targeting Latin American pregnant women who attend antenatal consultations. Diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in women is based on two positive serological tests. Screening of newborns from mothers with positive serology is based on a parasitological test during the first 48 hours of life and/or conventional serological analysis at the age of nine months. If either of these tests is positive, treatment with benznidazole is started following the World Health Organization's recommendations. The epidemiological surveillance of the programme is based on the Microbiological Reporting System of Catalonia, a well established network of laboratories. Once a positive case is reported, the responsible physician is asked to complete a structured epidemiological questionnaire. Clinical and demographic data are registered in the Voluntary Case Registry of Chagas Disease, a database administered by the Catalonian Health Department. It is expected that this programme will improve the understanding of the real burden of Chagas disease in the region. Furthermore, this initiative could encourage the implementation of similar programmes in other regions of Spain and even in other European countries.

  3. Seroprevalencia de la enfermedad de Chagas en el cantón Aguarico, Amazonía ecuatoriana Seroprevalence of Chagas disease in Aguarico canton in the Ecuadorian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Amunárriz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar el estado actual de la seroprevalencia de la enfermedad de Chagas en la población del cantón Aguarico, y comparar los resultados obtenidos con datos provenientes de otros estudios epidemiológicos. MÉTODOS: Desde septiembre de 2008 hasta octubre de 2009 se recogieron 2 033 sueros correspondientes a 36,6% de la población total del cantón Aguarico. Se empleó la técnica CHAGATEST/ELISA recombinante v.3.0 para determinar positividad a la enfermedad de Chagas. Los casos positivos se confirmaron con pruebas de hemoaglutinación indirecta y ELISA. RESULTADOS: De las 2 033 muestras de suero obtenidas, 73 fueron positivas para Chagas (3,6%. El rango de variación de seroprevalencia en las comunidades con casos positivos osciló entre 1,4% y 13,3%. Un 60,3% de los casos positivos se encontraron en el sexo femenino. Estos hallazgos son similares a los de estudios previos de comparación realizados en 1990. CONCLUSIONES: Los datos obtenidos confirman la existencia de un foco autóctono de la enfermedad de Chagas en la Amazonía ecuatoriana, con un porcentaje superior a la media de la región amazónica. No se detectaron cuadros clínicos agudos ni patologías crónicas. Es perentorio implementar un programa de control de la enfermedad culturalmente adaptado a la región.OBJECTIVE: Determine the current seroprevalence of Chagas disease in the population of Aguarico canton, and compare the findings with data from other epidemiological studies. METHODS: From September 2008 to October 2009, 2 033 serum samples were collected from 36.6% of the total population in Aguarico canton. The Chagatest recombinant ELISA v.3.0 was used to determine positivity to Chagas disease. Cases that tested positive were confirmed by indirect hemagglutination and ELISA. RESULTS: Of the 2 033 serum samples obtained, 73 tested positive for Chagas disease (3.6%. Seroprevalence in communities with positive cases ranged from 1.4% to 13.3%, with 60.3% of the

  4. Rise, fall and resurrection of chromosome territories: a historical perspective. Part II. Fall and resurrection of chromosome territories during the 1950s to 1980s. Part III. Chromosome territories and the functional nuclear architecture: experiments and models from the 1990s to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, T; Cremer, C

    2006-01-01

    Part II of this historical review on the progress of nuclear architecture studies points out why the original hypothesis of chromosome territories from Carl Rabl and Theodor Boveri (described in part I) was abandoned during the 1950s and finally proven by compelling evidence forwarded by laser-uv-microbeam studies and in situ hybridization experiments. Part II also includes a section on the development of advanced light microscopic techniques breaking the classical Abbe limit written for readers with little knowledge about the present state of the theory of light microscopic resolution. These developments have made it possible to perform 3D distance measurements between genes or other specifically stained, nuclear structures with high precision at the nanometer scale. Moreover, it has become possible to record full images from fluorescent structures and perform quantitative measurements of their shapes and volumes at a level of resolution that until recently could only be achieved by electron microscopy. In part III we review the development of experiments and models of nuclear architecture since the 1990s. Emphasis is laid on the still strongly conflicting views about the basic principles of higher order chromatin organization. A concluding section explains what needs to be done to resolve these conflicts and to come closer to the final goal of all studies of the nuclear architecture, namely to understand the implications of nuclear architecture for nuclear functions.

  5. Enfermedad de Chagas en poblaciones prehistóricas del norte de Chile Chagas disease in prehistoric populations of northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NANCY ORELLANA-HALKYER

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Chagas es producida por el parásito Trypanosoma cruzi, el cual afecta tanto a seres humanos como a animales, en particular mamíferos marsupiales y placentarios. Las vías de transmisión son diversas, siendo una de las más importantes la vía vectorial, en la que participan insectos infectados con este parásito, animales y humanos. En este artículo de revisión discutimos los postulados sobre la vía de transmisión oral, los hallazgos de T. cruzi en momias de América y especialmente en las del norte de Chile. Presentamos además información que apunta a que la enfermedad de Chagas estuvo presente mucho antes de la conquista europea y de la construcción de viviendas de adobe. Comentamos las hipótesis sobre el vector domiciliado más importante de Sudamérica, Triatoma infestans, su antigüedad en la costa de Arica y los reportes más recientes de otros vectores silvestres. También se discute la información relacionada a la participación en el ciclo de T. cruzi de distintos mamíferos silvestres de Chile y asimismo proponemos el estudio paleoparasitológico en restos zooarqueológicos para conocer las especies de mamíferos reservónos de T. cruzi en la antigüedad.Chagas diseases is produced by a parasite named Trypanosoma cruzi, that affects humans and other marsupial and placental mammals. Transmission routes are diverse, but the most important transmission is the vector route, which involves the triatomine insects, wild and domestic infected animáis, and humans. Here we review the data about oral transmission route and the evidences of the etiological agent (Trypanosoma cruzi of Chagas disease in pre-Columbian American mummies, making a critical review of the infection in northern Chile. Moreover, we comment on the hypotheses suggested in relation to the most important vector of the infection in South América Triatoma infestans, its antiquity in the Arica coast, and the recent reports about other wild infected

  6. Estudo longitudinal do eletrocardiograma na doença de Chagas desde a fase aguda

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    Roberto C. Pedrosa

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Vários trabalhos com eletrocardiograma na doença de Chagas têm sido feitos. Alguns referindo-se a grupos selecionados de casos, outros a estudos longitudinais, relatam as características da mortalidade nas diversas fases da doença. Com o objetivo de avaliar o valor do eletrocardiograma como índice de avaliação terapêutica e de seu comportamento na doença de Chagas desde a fase aguda, no presente trabalho, analisou-se evolutivamente o eletrocardiograma de 42 pacientes (18 mulheres e 24 homens procedentes da zona rural do Norte de Minas Gerais; predomínio etário foi nas duas primeiras décadas; todos com comprometimento cardíaco; todos receberam tratamento específico. O acompanhamento dos 42 pacientes foi de 9 anos dos quais 3 pacientes tiveram seguimento de 20 anos. Foram analisados 270 eletrocardiogramas. Nós utilizamos os seguintes critérios para a análise do ECG: código de Minnesota modificado para doença de Chagas; WHO/I. S. F. C. TASK FORCE para condução intraventricular e critérios de Pieretti para área eletricamente inativa. Concluímos que as alterações eletrocardiográficas agravam com a evolução da doença e que o eletrocardiograma não serve de índice de avaliação terapêutica.Several studies have been done to analyse the relationship between the characteristics of the electrocardiogram (ECG and mortality in the several stages of the disease, using different methods like multiple case and longitudinal studies. We anatysed the ECGfrom the acute stage up to twenty years of follow-up (±9 years in 42 patients with Chagas ' disease to determine their evolution and it 's value like an indexfor therapeutic evaluation. The 42 patients (18 female, 24 males were originalty from the North of the State of Minas Gerais (Brazil and the initial stage was mainly in the first two decades of age. All bad cardiac involvementand received fiill specific treatment. We utilized the following criteria for the ECG analyses

  7. Chagas disease: what is known and what is needed - A background article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease began millions of years ago as an enzootic disease of wild animals and started to be transmitted to man accidentally in the form of an anthropozoonosis when man invaded wild ecotopes. Endemic Chagas disease became established as a zoonosis over the last 200-300 years through forest clearance for agriculture and livestock rearing and adaptation of triatomines to domestic environments and to man and domestic animals as a food source. It is estimated that 15 to 16 million people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi in Latin America and 75 to 90 million people are exposed to infection. When T. cruzi is transmitted to man through the feces of triatomines, at bite sites or in mucosa, through blood transfusion or orally through contaminated food, it invades the bloodstream and lymphatic system and becomes established in the muscle and cardiac tissue, the digestive system and phagocytic cells. This causes inflammatory lesions and immune responses, particularly mediated by CD4+, CD8+, interleukin-2 (IL and IL-4, with cell and neuron destruction and fibrosis, and leads to blockage of the cardiac conduction system, arrhythmia, cardiac insufficiency, aperistalsis, and dilatation of hollow viscera, particularly the esophagus and colon. T. cruzi may also be transmitted from mother to child across the placenta and through the birth canal, thus causing abortion, prematurity, and organic lesions in the fetus. In immunosuppressed individuals, T. cruzi infection may become reactivated such that it spreads as a severe disease causing diffuse myocarditis and lesions of the central nervous system. Chagas disease is characterized by an acute phase with or without symptoms, and with entry point signs (inoculation chagoma or Romaña's sign, fever, adenomegaly, hepatosplenomegaly, and evident parasitemia, and an indeterminate chronic phase (asymptomatic, with normal results from electrocardiogram and x-ray of the heart, esophagus, and colon or with a

  8. Chagas' disease: an algorithm for donor screening and positive donor counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Hamerschlak

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Classical serological screening assays for Chagas' disease are time consuming and subjective. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the enzyme immuno-assay (ELISA methodology and to propose an algorithm for blood banks to be applied to Chagas' disease. Seven thousand, nine hundred and ninety nine blood donor samples were screened by both reverse passive hemagglutination (RPHA and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA. Samples reactive on RPHA and/or IFA were submitted to supplementary RPHA, IFA and complement fixation (CFA tests. This strategy allowed us to create a panel of 60 samples to evaluate the ELISA methodology from 3 different manufacturers. The sensitivity of the screening by IFA and the 3 different ELISA's was 100%. The specificity was better on ELISA methodology. For Chagas disease, ELISA seems to be the best test for blood donor screening, because it showed high sensitivity and specificity, it is not subjective and can be automated. Therefore, it was possible to propose an algorithm to screen samples and confirm donor results at the blood bank.Os testes sorológicos clássicos utilizados na triagem de doadores de sangue são trabalhosos e subjetivos. O objetivo do presente trabalho é o de avaliar a metodologia imuno-enzimática (ELISA e propor um algorítmo para doença de Chagas em bancos de sangue. Foram estudados 7999 doadores de sangue e/ou componentes cujas amostras foram testadas com o objetivo de tria-las sorologicamente para doença de Chagas utilizando hemaglutinação passiva reversa (RPHA e imunofluorescência indireta (IFA. As amostras reativas em pelo menos uma destas metodologias, foram retestadas com reativos diferentes por RPHA, IFA e fixação de complemento (CFA. Esta estratégia nos permitiu criar um painel de 60 amostras com as quais tornou-se possível a avaliação do método imunoenzimático (ELISA. A sensibilidade da triagem dos doadores pelos métodos ELISA e IFA foi de 100%. A especificidade

  9. Chagas disease vector blood meal sources identified by protein mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith I Keller

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a complex vector borne parasitic disease involving blood feeding Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae insects, also known as kissing bugs, and the vertebrates they feed on. This disease has tremendous impacts on millions of people and is a global health problem. The etiological agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastea: Trypanosomatida: Trypanosomatidae, is deposited on the mammalian host in the insect's feces during a blood meal, and enters the host's blood stream through mucous membranes or a break in the skin. Identifying the blood meal sources of triatomine vectors is critical in understanding Chagas disease transmission dynamics, can lead to identification of other vertebrates important in the transmission cycle, and aids management decisions. The latter is particularly important as there is little in the way of effective therapeutics for Chagas disease. Several techniques, mostly DNA-based, are available for blood meal identification. However, further methods are needed, particularly when sample conditions lead to low-quality DNA or to assess the risk of human cross-contamination. We demonstrate a proteomics-based approach, using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS to identify host-specific hemoglobin peptides for blood meal identification in mouse blood control samples and apply LC-MS/MS for the first time to Triatoma dimidiata insect vectors, tracing blood sources to species. In contrast to most proteins, hemoglobin, stabilized by iron, is incredibly stable even being preserved through geologic time. We compared blood stored with and without an anticoagulant and examined field-collected insect specimens stored in suboptimal conditions such as at room temperature for long periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first study using LC-MS/MS on field-collected arthropod disease vectors to identify blood meal composition, and where blood meal identification was confirmed with more

  10. Recuerdo del descubrimiento de la enfermedad de Chagas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Groot Liévano

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available

    A través de mis largos años he vivido en el trópico y he visto el sufrimiento de nuestros campesinos por esta grave dolencia y, a la par que he sido testigo de tal situación, he presenciado también los esfuerzos extraordinarios realizados en Colombia para su estudio y para su control, que a todos nos deben enorgullecer; estos fueron hechos en épocas recientes por personas como Augusto Corredor, Felipe Guhl y muchos otros investigadores que sería muy dispendioso enumerar.

    Años atrás los nombres de Benjamín Otálora, Hernando Ucrós y especialmente Santiago Renjifo y César Uribe Piedrahíta, tienen que venir a nuestra mente. Santiago Renjifo, investigador infatiga-ble de la enfermedad, fue además creador del Instituto “Roberto Franco” de Villavicencio y uno de los artífices más importantes de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad del Valle. A César Uribe Piedrahíta se debe, el haber iniciado el interés en Colombia por el estudio de esta parasitosis; fue él quien identificó por primera vez el agente causal en nuestro país. Así mismo formó un sinnúmero de investigadores que, con sus estudios, han dado luz sobre la dolencia y han sido lustre para la ciencia en América Latina.

    César Uribe Piedrahíta, mi profesor y luego mi amigo, es una de las personas de la medicina nacional que se debe exaltar con más vehemencia porque era el individuo que no solamente dominaba el campo médico sino que, como un Pico de la Mirán-dola del siglo XX, era experto en antropología, en arqueología, en botánica, habilísimo pintor y tallista, propulsor de las investigaciones sobre las bondades de las plantas, así como escritor de primera línea y dotado de excepcionales cualidades docentes para inculcar en sus estudiantes la disciplina por el estudio y la necesidad de trabajar cada vez más por este país.

    Parece oportuno que en estos momentos al rememorar a Carlos Chagas se haga un breve recuento de aquellas

  11. A prospective, randomised, controlled, double-blind phase I-II clinical trial on the safety of A-Part® Gel as adhesion prophylaxis after major abdominal surgery versus non-treated group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative adhesions occur when fibrous strands of internal scar tissue bind anatomical structures to one another. The most common cause of intra-abdominal adhesions is previous intra-abdominal surgical intervention. Up to 74% of intestinal obstructions are caused by post surgical adhesions. Although a variety of methods and agents have been investigated to prevent post surgical adhesions, the problem of peritoneal adhesions remains largely unsolved. Materials serving as an adhesion barrier are much needed. Methods/Design This is a prospective, randomised, controlled, patient blinded and observer blinded, single centre phase I-II trial, which evaluates the safety of A-Part® Gel as an adhesion prophylaxis after major abdominal wall surgery, in comparison to an untreated control group. 60 patients undergoing an elective median laparotomy without prior abdominal surgery are randomly allocated into two groups of a 1:1- ratio. Safety parameter and primary endpoint of the study is the occurrence of wound healing impairment or peritonitis within 28 (+10 days after surgery. The frequency of anastomotic leakage within 28 days after operation, occurrence of adverse and serious adverse events during hospital stay up to 3 months and the rate of adhesions along the scar within 3 months are defined as secondary endpoints. After hospital discharge the investigator will examine the enrolled patients at 28 (+10 days and 3 months (±14 days after surgery. Discussion This trial aims to assess, whether the intra-peritoneal application of A-Part® Gel is safe and efficacious in the prevention of post-surgical adhesions after median laparotomy, in comparison to untreated controls. Trial registration NCT00646412

  12. Cetuximab in combination with irinotecan/5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (FOLFIRI) in the initial treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a multicentre two-part phase I/II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoul, Jean-Luc; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Peeters, Marc; Brezault, Catherine; Husseini, Fares; Cals, Laurent; Nippgen, Johannes; Loos, Anja-Helena; Rougier, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy and safety of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab combined with irinotecan, folinic acid (FA) and two different doses of infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the first-line treatment of EGFR-detectable metastatic colorectal cancer. The 5-FU dose was selected on the basis of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) during part I of the study. Patients received cetuximab (400 mg/m 2 initial dose and 250 mg/m 2 /week thereafter) and every 2 weeks irinotecan (180 mg/m 2 ), FA (400 mg/m 2 ) and 5-FU (either low dose [LD], 300 mg/m 2 bolus plus 2,000 mg/m 2 46-hour infusion, n = 7; or, high-dose [HD], 400 mg/m 2 bolus plus 2,400 mg/m 2 ; n = 45). Only two DLTs occurred in the HD group, and HD 5-FU was selected for use in part II. Apart from rash, commonly observed grade 3/4 adverse events such as leucopenia, diarrhoea, vomiting and asthenia occurred within the expected range for FOLFIRI. Among 52 patients, the overall response rate was 48%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8.6 months (counting all reported progressions) and the median overall survival was 22.4 months. Treatment facilitated the resection of initially unresectable metastases in fourteen patients (27%): of these, 10 patients (71%) had no residual tumour after surgery, and these resections hindered the estimation of PFS. The combination of cetuximab and FOLFIRI was active and well tolerated in this setting. Initially unresectable metastases became resectable in one-quarter of patients, with a high number of complete resections, and these promising results formed the basis for the investigation of FOLFIRI with and without cetuximab in the phase III CRYSTAL trial

  13. Cetuximab in combination with irinotecan/5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (FOLFIRI in the initial treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a multicentre two-part phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cals Laurent

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to investigate the efficacy and safety of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitor cetuximab combined with irinotecan, folinic acid (FA and two different doses of infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU in the first-line treatment of EGFR-detectable metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods The 5-FU dose was selected on the basis of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs during part I of the study. Patients received cetuximab (400 mg/m2 initial dose and 250 mg/m2/week thereafter and every 2 weeks irinotecan (180 mg/m2, FA (400 mg/m2 and 5-FU (either low dose [LD], 300 mg/m2 bolus plus 2,000 mg/m2 46-hour infusion, n = 7; or, high-dose [HD], 400 mg/m2 bolus plus 2,400 mg/m2; n = 45. Results Only two DLTs occurred in the HD group, and HD 5-FU was selected for use in part II. Apart from rash, commonly observed grade 3/4 adverse events such as leucopenia, diarrhoea, vomiting and asthenia occurred within the expected range for FOLFIRI. Among 52 patients, the overall response rate was 48%. Median progression-free survival (PFS was 8.6 months (counting all reported progressions and the median overall survival was 22.4 months. Treatment facilitated the resection of initially unresectable metastases in fourteen patients (27%: of these, 10 patients (71% had no residual tumour after surgery, and these resections hindered the estimation of PFS. Conclusion The combination of cetuximab and FOLFIRI was active and well tolerated in this setting. Initially unresectable metastases became resectable in one-quarter of patients, with a high number of complete resections, and these promising results formed the basis for the investigation of FOLFIRI with and without cetuximab in the phase III CRYSTAL trial.

  14. Aspectos da Reologia e da Estabilidade de Suspensões Cerâmicas. Parte III: Mecanismo de Estabilização Eletroestérica de Suspensões com Alumina Aspects of Rheology and Stability of Ceramic Suspensions. Part III: Electrosteric Stabilization Mechanism of Alumina Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Ortega

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Esta terceira e última parte da revisão sobre os aspectos reológicos e de estabilização de suspensões com pós cerâmicos vem reunir a aplicação dos conhecimentos adquiridos nas primeiras duas partes publicadas anteriormente. Aqui, os fenômenos eletrostático devido à dupla camada elétrica, e estérico, relacionado à adsorção de moléculas poliméricas, são combinados para explicar o mecanismo eletroestérico de estabilização de suspensões cerâmicas. Os defloculantes que atuam através desse mecanismo abrangem uma classe específica de polímero denominada polieletrólitos, a qual é constituída por macromoléculas ionizáveis quando em solução. O estudo da forma com que os polieletrólitos atuam justifica-se devido à larga utilização desta classe de polímeros na indústria cerâmica. Os ácidos poliacrílico (PAA e polimetacrílico (PMAA são exemplos de polieletrólitos amplamente utilizados no processo de materiais à base de alumina. Dá-se destaque à influência do pH do meio e da presença de íons, sendo novamente aqui importante o conceito de força iônica da suspensão. Como aplicação prática, apresenta-se a estabilidade do sistema alumina-PMAA, reportando-se sobre o comportamento da viscosidade e da efetiva defloculação da suspensão. Este estudo é concluído apresentando resultados do efeito do peso molecular sobre a viscosidade, chamando atenção para o fato de que não basta definir apenas a classe de polímero a ser usada, sendo também fundamental especificar o peso molecular médio do polímero selecionado.The third and last part of this review about stabilization and rheological aspects of ceramic suspension gathers the knowledge in the two parts previously published. Here, the electrostatic and steric phenomena, related to the electrical double layer and polymeric molecules adsorption, respectively, are combined to explain the electrosteric stabilization mechanism of ceramic suspensions. The

  15. Area-wide control of Chagas disease vectors in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) is now ranked by the World Bank as the most serious parasitic disease of the Americas, with a medical and economic impact far outranking even the combined effects of other parasitic diseases such as malaria and schistosomiasis (World Bank 1993). The infection is virtually impossible to cure and the disease is difficult and costly to treat. In contrast, transmission can be halted by eliminating the domestic insect vectors - large blood sucking reduviids of the subfamily Triatominae - and by improved screening of blood donors to minimise the risk of transfusional transmission (WHO 1991). Improved screening of blood banks requires appropriate legislation backed by a well-developed system of reference laboratories and standardised procedures, although to a large extent, this can be implemented in a progressive way from local to national levels (Schmunis 1991). By contrast, the key to success in Chagas disease vector control lies in the implementation of large-scale regional or international programmes coupled with long-term community-based vigilance. This is a classic intervention model beginning with a vertical intervention, the attack phase, in which all infested houses are sprayed by trained professionals, progressively backed by a more horizontal community-based system where householders themselves can report the presence of any residual infestations for retreatment where necessary. Elimination of domestic vectors of Chagas disease is facilitated by their slow reproductive rates and limited genetic variability, but is hampered by the ease of passive transport of the insects from one house to another, even across state and international boundaries (Schofield 1994). For this reason, international collaboration is particularly important in Chagas disease vector control. Since early trials in the 1940s, there have been many local and regional campaigns designed to control domestic populations of Triatominae, especially in

  16. Programas en la eliminación de la transmisión de la enfermedad de Chagas en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Guhl

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available

    La enfermedad de Chagas o tripanosomiasis americana está considerada como la cuarta causa de mortalidad en América Latina, provocando 43.000 muertes por año, principalmente debidas a la cardiopatía ocasionada por el parásito Trypanosoma cruzi cuando se anida en las fibras cardíacas. La existencia de la enfermedad de Chagas en seres humanos es un hecho puramente accidental. En la medida en que el hombre fue entrando en contacto con los focos naturales y provocó desequilibrios ecológicos, forzó a los triatomíneos infectados a ocupar viviendas humanas, llevándose a cabo el proceso de domiciliación, ya que no solamente encuentran refugio sino también suficiente alimento en la sangre humana y de animales domésticos. De esta manera, entró el hombre a formar parte activa de la cadena epidemiológica de la enfermedad de Chagas.

    Así pues, en esta patología se presentan ciclos silvestres sin participación del hombre y ciclos domiciliarios con su participación, los cuales son integrados e interdependientes. En el proceso de la dispersión geográfica y biológica el parásito ha evolucionado hasta el punto que existen una gran diversidad de subpoblaciones o cepas, las cuales una vez aisladas de los diversos huéspedes y estudiadas en el laboratorio exhiben características bien diferenciadas.

    La enfermedad asociada a la pobreza y a las malas condiciones de vivienda se transmite además de los insectos triatomíneos, a través de transfusiones de sangre contaminadas por el parásito y también congénitamente de madre infectada a hijo.

    Se han adelantado acciones de prevención y control en diversos países latinoamericanos promovidas por la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS y la Organización Panamericana de la Salud (OPS conjuntamente con los Ministerios de Salud de los países respectivos. En 1991 nace, por ejemplo, la así llamada Iniciativa de los Países del Cono Sur, la cual tuvo como objetivo central

  17. Next-generation ELISA diagnostic assay for Chagas Disease based on the combination of short peptidic epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mucci, Juan; Carmona, Santiago J.; Volcovich, Romina

    2017-01-01

    Chagas Disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major health and economic problem in Latin America for which no vaccine or appropriate drugs for large-scale public health interventions are yet available. Accurate diagnosis is essential for the early identification and follow up....... cruzi linear B-cell epitopes using high-density peptide chips, leading to the identification of several hundred novel sequence signatures associated to chronic Chagas Disease. Here, we performed a serological assessment of 27 selected epitopes and of their use in a novel multipeptide-based diagnostic...... method. A combination of 7 of these peptides were finally evaluated in ELISA format against a panel of 199 sera samples (Chagas-positive and negative, including sera from Leishmaniasis-positive subjects). The multipeptide formulation displayed a high diagnostic performance, with a sensitivity of 96...

  18. Seroprevalence and sociocultural conditionants of Chagas disease in school aged children of marginal zones of Asunción

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Ninfa I.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is becoming a public health problem in Latin America due to the wide distribution, the high prevalence, the magnitude of the damage caused and the difficulties to control it. In Paraguay, the disease is mainly distributed in the departments of Paraguari, Cordillera and Central. Prevalence in marginal zones, where migrations from rural populations and endemic areas make possible the urbanization of the disease, has no been studied yet. This is a descriptive study with a cross-sectional sampling and a probabilistic system recruitment carried out in school aged children from marginal zones of Asuncion to determine the prevalence of Chagas' disease. Serological methods, parasite isolation and questionnaires were used to achieve the goals. Nine hundred and fifty three children were studied to determine the prevalence of Chagas' disease in marginal zones which was 1.4%.

  19. Comparison of parasite loads in serum and blood samples from patients in acute and chronic phases of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Carolina; Teherán, Aníbal; Flórez, Carolina; Ramírez, Juan David

    2018-04-17

    Molecular methods have been developed for the detection and quantification of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in blood samples from patients with Chagas disease. However, aspects of sample processing necessary for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), such as the addition of guanidine hydrochloride to whole blood samples, may limit timely access to molecular diagnosis. We analysed 169 samples from serum and guanidine-EDTA blood (GEB) obtained from patients in acute and chronic phases of Chagas disease. We applied qPCR targeted to the satellite DNA region. Finally, we compared the parasite loads and cycle of threshold values of the qPCR. The results confirmed the usefulness of serum samples for the detection and quantification of parasite DNA in patients with Chagas disease, especially in the acute phase. However, the parasite loads detected in serum samples from patients in the chronic phase were lower than those detected in GEB samples. The epidemiological implications of the findings are herein discussed.

  20. How universal is coverage and access to diagnosis and treatment for Chagas disease in Colombia? A health systems analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucunubá, Zulma M; Manne-Goehler, Jennifer M; Díaz, Diana; Nouvellet, Pierre; Bernal, Oscar; Marchiol, Andrea; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Conteh, Lesong

    2017-02-01

    Limited access to Chagas disease diagnosis and treatment is a major obstacle to reaching the 2020 World Health Organization milestones of delivering care to all infected and ill patients. Colombia has been identified as a health system in transition, reporting one of the highest levels of health insurance coverage in Latin America. We explore if and how this high level of coverage extends to those with Chagas disease, a traditionally marginalised population. Using a mixed methods approach, we calculate coverage for screening, diagnosis and treatment of Chagas. We then identify supply-side constraints both quantitatively and qualitatively. A review of official registries of tests and treatments for Chagas disease delivered between 2008 and 2014 is compared to estimates of infected people. Using the Flagship Framework, we explore barriers limiting access to care. Screening coverage is estimated at 1.2% of the population at risk. Aetiological treatment with either benznidazol or nifurtimox covered 0.3-0.4% of the infected population. Barriers to accessing screening, diagnosis and treatment are identified for each of the Flagship Framework's five dimensions of interest: financing, payment, regulation, organization and persuasion. The main challenges identified were: a lack of clarity in terms of financial responsibilities in a segmented health system, claims of limited resources for undertaking activities particularly in primary care, non-inclusion of confirmatory test(s) in the basic package of diagnosis and care, poor logistics in the distribution and supply chain of medicines, and lack of awareness of medical personnel. Very low screening coverage emerges as a key obstacle hindering access to care for Chagas disease. Findings suggest serious shortcomings in this health system for Chagas disease, despite the success of universal health insurance scale-up in Colombia. Whether these shortcomings exist in relation to other neglected tropical diseases needs investigating

  1. Protective human leucocyte antigen haplotype, HLA-DRB1*01-B*14, against chronic Chagas disease in Bolivia.

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    Florencia del Puerto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease, caused by the flagellate parasite Trypanosoma cruzi affects 8-10 million people in Latin America. The mechanisms that underlie the development of complications of chronic Chagas disease, characterized primarily by pathology of the heart and digestive system, are not currently understood. To identify possible host genetic factors that may influence the clinical course of Chagas disease, Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA regional gene polymorphism was analyzed in patients presenting with differing clinical symptoms. METHODOLOGY: Two hundred and twenty nine chronic Chagas disease patients in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, were examined by serological tests, electrocardiogram (ECG, and Barium enema colon X-ray. 31.4% of the examinees showed ECG alterations, 15.7% megacolon and 58.1% showed neither of them. A further 62 seropositive megacolon patients who had undergone colonectomy due to acute abdomen were recruited. We analyzed their HLA genetic polymorphisms (HLA-A, HLA-B, MICA, MICB, DRB1 and TNF-alpha promoter region mainly through Sequence based and LABType SSO typing test using LUMINEX Technology. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The frequencies of HLA-DRB1*01 and HLA-B*14:02 were significantly lower in patients suffering from megacolon as well as in those with ECG alteration and/or megacolon compared with a group of patients with indeterminate symptoms. The DRB1*0102, B*1402 and MICA*011 alleles were in strong Linkage Disequilibrium (LD, and the HLA-DRB1*01-B*14-MICA*011 haplotype was associated with resistance against chronic Chagas disease. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of HLA haplotype association with resistance to chronic Chagas disease.

  2. Impact of Helminth Infection on the Clinical and Microbiological Presentation of Chagas Diseases in Chronically Infected Patients.

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    Fernando Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are highly prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries, coexisting in Chagas disease endemic areas. Helminth infections in humans may modulate the host immune system, changing the Th1/Th2 polarization. This immunological disturbance could modify the immune response to other infections. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between clinical, microbiological and epidemiological characteristics of Chagas disease patients, with the presence of helminth infection.A prospective observational study was conducted at Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain. Inclusion criteria were: age over 18 years, diagnosis of Chagas disease, and not having received specific treatment for Chagas disease previously to the inclusion. The study protocol included Chagas disease assessment (cardiac and digestive evaluation, detection of T. cruzi DNA measured by PCR in peripheral blood, and helminth infection diagnosis (detection of IgG anti-Strongyloides stercoralis by ELISA, microscopic examination of stool samples from three different days, and specific faecal culture for S. stercoralis larvae.Overall, 65 patients were included, median age was 38 years, 75.4% were women and most of them came from Bolivia. Cardiac and digestive involvement was present in 18.5% and 27.7% of patients respectively. T. cruzi PCR was positive in 28 (43.1% patients. Helminth infection was diagnosed in 12 (18.5% patients. No differences were observed in clinical and epidemiological characteristics between patients with and without helminth infection. Nevertheless, the proportion of patients with positive T. cruzi PCR was higher among patients with helminth infection compared with patients without helminth infection (75% vs 35.8%, p = 0.021.We observed a high prevalence of S. stercoralis infection among chronic Chagas disease patients attended in our tropical medicine unit. Strongyloidiasis was associated with significantly higher proportion of

  3. Doença de Chagas: Desafios no Desenvolvimento de Novas Substâncias Líderes Tripanomicidas

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando de C. da Silva; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Sabrina B. Ferreira; Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; David R. da Rocha; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Vitor F. Ferreira; Universidade Federal Fluminense

    2012-01-01

    A doença de Chagas teve seu ciclo completamente elucidado em 1909 por Carlos Chagas, quando ele relatou sua descoberta para a comunidade científica em dois artigos seminais. Hoje ainda existem inúmeros fatores que limitam o seu tratamento terapêutico. Um deles é a falta de novas drogas no mercado, pois é bem conhecido que as drogas existentes são fracamente ativas e tem baixa eficácia e consideráveis efeitos colaterais. Atualmente muitos esforços têm sido feito em química combinatória e sínte...

  4. Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry in Chagas' Disease: Compounds at The Final Stage of "Hit-To-Lead" Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2010-03-25

    Chagas' disease, or American trypanosomosiasis, has been the most relevant illness produced by protozoa in Latin America. Synthetic medicinal chemistry efforts have provided an extensive number of chemodiverse hits at the "active-to-hit" stage. However, only a more limited number of these have been studied in vivo in models of Chagas' disease. Herein, we survey some of the cantidates able to surpass the "hit-to-lead" stage discussing their limitations or merit to enter in clinical trials in the short term.

  5. Oral Assessment Kit, Levels II & III. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrelo-Gonzalez, Maria; And Others

    The assessment packet includes a series of oral tests to help develop speaking as an integral part of second language instruction at levels II and III. It contains: 8 mini-tests for use at level II; 9 mini-tests for use at level III; a rating scale and score sheet masters for evaluating performance on these tests; and a collection of suggested…

  6. Cultivation-independent methods reveal differences among bacterial gut microbiota in triatomine vectors of Chagas disease.

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    Fabio Faria da Mota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease is a trypanosomiasis whose agent is the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to humans by hematophagous bugs known as triatomines. Even though insecticide treatments allow effective control of these bugs in most Latin American countries where Chagas disease is endemic, the disease still affects a large proportion of the population of South America. The features of the disease in humans have been extensively studied, and the genome of the parasite has been sequenced, but no effective drug is yet available to treat Chagas disease. The digestive tract of the insect vectors in which T. cruzi develops has been much less well investigated than blood from its human hosts and constitutes a dynamic environment with very different conditions. Thus, we investigated the composition of the predominant bacterial species of the microbiota in insect vectors from Rhodnius, Triatoma, Panstrongylus and Dipetalogaster genera. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Microbiota of triatomine guts were investigated using cultivation-independent methods, i.e., phylogenetic analysis of 16s rDNA using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and cloned-based sequencing. The Chao index showed that the diversity of bacterial species in triatomine guts is low, comprising fewer than 20 predominant species, and that these species vary between insect species. The analyses showed that Serratia predominates in Rhodnius, Arsenophonus predominates in Triatoma and Panstrongylus, while Candidatus Rohrkolberia predominates in Dipetalogaster. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The microbiota of triatomine guts represents one of the factors that may interfere with T. cruzi transmission and virulence in humans. The knowledge of its composition according to insect species is important for designing measures of biological control for T. cruzi. We found that the predominant species of the bacterial microbiota in triatomines form a group of low

  7. Suicide risk and alcohol and drug abuse in outpatients with HIV infection and Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Patrícia M; Passos, Sonia R; Calvet, Guilherme A; Hökerberg, Yara H; Lessa, José L; Andrade, Carlos A de

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate psychiatric comorbidities in outpatients receiving care for HIV and Chagas disease at Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas (IPEC), Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 125 patients referred to an outpatient psychiatric clinic from February to December 2010. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used. Factors associated with more frequent mental disorders were estimated by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) by multiple logistic regression. Seventy-six (60.8%) patients with HIV, 40 (32%) patients with Chagas disease, and nine (7.2%) patients with human T-lymphotropic virus were interviewed. The majority were women (64%), with up to 8 years of formal education (56%), and unemployed (81.6%). The median age was 49 years. Suicide risk (n=71) (56%), agoraphobia (n=65) (52%), major depressive episode (n=56) (44.8%), and alcohol/drug abuse (n=43) (34.4%) predominated, the latter being directly associated with lower family income (OR = 2.64; 95%CI 1.03-6.75) and HIV infection (OR = 5.24; 95%CI 1.56-17.61). Suicide risk was associated with non-white skin color (OR = 2.21; 95%CI 1.03-4.75), unemployment (OR = 2.72; 95%CI 1.01-7.34), and diagnosis of major depression (OR = 3.34; 95%CI 1.54-7.44). Measures targeting adverse socioeconomic conditions and psychiatric and psychological monitoring and care should be encouraged in this population, considering the association with abuse of alcohol/other psychoactive drugs and suicide risk.

  8. Suicide risk and alcohol and drug abuse in outpatients with HIV infection and Chagas disease

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    Patrícia M. Guimarães

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate psychiatric comorbidities in outpatients receiving care for HIV and Chagas disease at Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas (IPEC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 125 patients referred to an outpatient psychiatric clinic from February to December 2010. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI was used. Factors associated with more frequent mental disorders were estimated by odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI by multiple logistic regression. Results: Seventy-six (60.8% patients with HIV, 40 (32% patients with Chagas disease, and nine (7.2% patients with human T-lymphotropic virus were interviewed. The majority were women (64%, with up to 8 years of formal education (56%, and unemployed (81.6%. The median age was 49 years. Suicide risk (n=71 (56%, agoraphobia (n=65 (52%, major depressive episode (n=56 (44.8%, and alcohol/drug abuse (n=43 (34.4% predominated, the latter being directly associated with lower family income (OR = 2.64; 95%CI 1.03-6.75 and HIV infection (OR = 5.24; 95%CI 1.56-17.61. Suicide risk was associated with non-white skin color (OR = 2.21; 95%CI 1.03-4.75, unemployment (OR = 2.72; 95%CI 1.01-7.34, and diagnosis of major depression (OR = 3.34; 95%CI 1.54-7.44. Conclusion: Measures targeting adverse socioeconomic conditions and psychiatric and psychological monitoring and care should be encouraged in this population, considering the association with abuse of alcohol/other psychoactive drugs and suicide risk.

  9. II Consenso Brasileiro em Doença de Chagas, 2015

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    João Carlos Pinto Dias

    Full Text Available RESUMO A doença de Chagas é uma condição crônica negligenciada com elevada carga de morbimortalidade e impacto dos pontos de vista psicológico, social e econômico. Representa um importante problema de saúde pública no Brasil, com diferentes cenários regionais. Este documento traduz a sistematização das evidências que compõe o Consenso Brasileiro de Doença de Chagas. O objetivo foi sistematizar estratégias de diagnóstico, tratamento, prevenção e controle da doença de Chagas no país, de modo a refletir as evidências científicas disponíveis. Sua construção fundamentou-se na articulação e contribuição estratégica de especialistas brasileiros com conhecimento, experiência e atualização sobre diferentes aspectos da doença. Representa o resultado da estreita colaboração entre a Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical e o Ministério da Saúde. Espera-se com este documento fortalecer o desenvolvimento de ações integradas para enfrentamento da doença no país com foco em epidemiologia, gestão, atenção integral (incluindo famílias e comunidades, comunicação, informação, educação e pesquisas.

  10. Relationship between Fibrosis and Ventricular Arrhythmias in Chagas Heart Disease Without Ventricular Dysfunction

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    Tassi, Eduardo Marinho, E-mail: etassi@ibest.com.br [Instituto de Cardiologia Edson Saad - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Continentino, Marcelo Abramoff [Hospital Frei Galvão, Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil); Nascimento, Emília Matos do; Pereira, Basílio de Bragança [Instituto de Cardiologia Edson Saad - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Coppe - Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pós-Graduação e Pesquisa de Engenharia - UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pedrosa, Roberto Coury [Instituto de Cardiologia Edson Saad - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    Patients with Chagas disease and segmental wall motion abnormality (SWMA) have worse prognosis independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is currently the best method to detect SWMA and to assess fibrosis. To quantify fibrosis by using late gadolinium enhancement CMR in patients with Chagas disease and preserved or minimally impaired ventricular function (> 45%), and to detect patterns of dependence between fibrosis, SWMA and LVEF in the presence of ventricular arrhythmia. Electrocardiogram, treadmill exercise test, Holter and CMR were carried out in 61 patients, who were divided into three groups as follows: (1) normal electrocardiogram and CMR without SWMA; (2) abnormal electrocardiogram and CMR without SWMA; (3) CMR with SWMA independently of electrocardiogram. The number of patients with ventricular arrhythmia in relation to the total of patients, the percentage of fibrosis, and the LVEF were, respectively: Group 1, 4/26, 0.74% and 74.34%; Group 2, 4/16, 3.96% and 68.5%; and Group 3, 11/19, 14.07% and 55.59%. Ventricular arrhythmia was found in 31.1% of the patients. Those with and without ventricular arrhythmia had mean LVEF of 59.87% and 70.18%, respectively, and fibrosis percentage of 11.03% and 3.01%, respectively. Of the variables SWMA, groups, age, LVEF and fibrosis, only the latter was significant for the presence of ventricular arrhythmia, with a cutoff point of 11.78% for fibrosis mass (p < 0.001). Even in patients with Chagas disease and preserved or minimally impaired ventricular function, electrical instability can be present. Regarding the presence of ventricular arrhythmia, fibrosis is the most important variable, its amount being proportional to the complexity of the groups.

  11. Relationship between Fibrosis and Ventricular Arrhythmias in Chagas Heart Disease Without Ventricular Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassi, Eduardo Marinho; Continentino, Marcelo Abramoff; Nascimento, Emília Matos do; Pereira, Basílio de Bragança; Pedrosa, Roberto Coury

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Chagas disease and segmental wall motion abnormality (SWMA) have worse prognosis independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is currently the best method to detect SWMA and to assess fibrosis. To quantify fibrosis by using late gadolinium enhancement CMR in patients with Chagas disease and preserved or minimally impaired ventricular function (> 45%), and to detect patterns of dependence between fibrosis, SWMA and LVEF in the presence of ventricular arrhythmia. Electrocardiogram, treadmill exercise test, Holter and CMR were carried out in 61 patients, who were divided into three groups as follows: (1) normal electrocardiogram and CMR without SWMA; (2) abnormal electrocardiogram and CMR without SWMA; (3) CMR with SWMA independently of electrocardiogram. The number of patients with ventricular arrhythmia in relation to the total of patients, the percentage of fibrosis, and the LVEF were, respectively: Group 1, 4/26, 0.74% and 74.34%; Group 2, 4/16, 3.96% and 68.5%; and Group 3, 11/19, 14.07% and 55.59%. Ventricular arrhythmia was found in 31.1% of the patients. Those with and without ventricular arrhythmia had mean LVEF of 59.87% and 70.18%, respectively, and fibrosis percentage of 11.03% and 3.01%, respectively. Of the variables SWMA, groups, age, LVEF and fibrosis, only the latter was significant for the presence of ventricular arrhythmia, with a cutoff point of 11.78% for fibrosis mass (p < 0.001). Even in patients with Chagas disease and preserved or minimally impaired ventricular function, electrical instability can be present. Regarding the presence of ventricular arrhythmia, fibrosis is the most important variable, its amount being proportional to the complexity of the groups

  12. Polymorphisms in the gene for lymphotoxin-alpha predispose to chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; Fae, Kellen C; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Müller, Natalie G; Cavalcanti, Vanessa L; Ferreira, Renata C; Drigo, Sandra A; Ianni, Barbara; Mady, Charles; Goldberg, Anna C; Kalil, Jorge

    2007-12-15

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, displays clinical heterogeneity and may be attributable to differential genetic susceptibility. Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops only in a subset of T. cruzi-infected individuals and may lead to heart failure that has a worse clinical course and that leads to reduced life expectancy, compared with heart failure of other etiologies. Proinflammatory cytokines play a key role in the development of CCC. Clinical, genetic, and epidemiological studies have linked lymphotoxin-alpha (LTA), a proinflammatory cytokine, to coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. We used polymerase chain reaction to genotype the LTA +80A-->C and LTA +252A-->G variants in 169 patients with CCC and in 76 T. cruzi-infected asymptomatic (ASY) patients. Homozygosity with respect to the LTA +80C and LTA +252G alleles was significantly more frequent in the patients with CCC than in the ASY patients (homozygosity for LTA +80C, 47% vs. 33%; homozygosity for LTA +252G, 16% vs. 8%). Haplotype LTA +80A-252A was associated with protection against CCC, whereas haplotype LTA +80C-252G was associated with susceptibility to CCC. Furthermore, homozygosity for the LTA +80A allele correlated with the lowest levels of plasmatic tumor-necrosis factor-alpha. Our results suggest that the study of genetic variations in patients with Chagas disease may help in the identification of individuals at increased risk of progressing to CCC and, by providing early treatment, reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  13. Estudo longitudinal do eletrocardiograma na doença de Chagas desde a fase aguda

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    Roberto C. Pedrosa

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Vários trabalhos com eletrocardiograma na doença de Chagas têm sido feitos. Alguns referindo-se a grupos selecionados de casos, outros a estudos longitudinais, relatam as características da mortalidade nas diversas fases da doença. Com o objetivo de avaliar o valor do eletrocardiograma como índice de avaliação terapêutica e de seu comportamento na doença de Chagas desde a fase aguda, no presente trabalho, analisou-se evolutivamente o eletrocardiograma de 42 pacientes (18 mulheres e 24 homens procedentes da zona rural do Norte de Minas Gerais; predomínio etário foi nas duas primeiras décadas; todos com comprometimento cardíaco; todos receberam tratamento específico. O acompanhamento dos 42 pacientes foi de 9 anos dos quais 3 pacientes tiveram seguimento de 20 anos. Foram analisados 270 eletrocardiogramas. Nós utilizamos os seguintes critérios para a análise do ECG: código de Minnesota modificado para doença de Chagas; WHO/I. S. F. C. TASK FORCE para condução intraventricular e critérios de Pieretti para área eletricamente inativa. Concluímos que as alterações eletrocardiográficas agravam com a evolução da doença e que o eletrocardiograma não serve de índice de avaliação terapêutica.

  14. Cultivation-independent methods reveal differences among bacterial gut microbiota in triatomine vectors of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Mota, Fabio Faria; Marinho, Lourena Pinheiro; Moreira, Carlos José de Carvalho; Lima, Marli Maria; Mello, Cícero Brasileiro; Garcia, Eloi Souza; Carels, Nicolas; Azambuja, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is a trypanosomiasis whose agent is the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to humans by hematophagous bugs known as triatomines. Even though insecticide treatments allow effective control of these bugs in most Latin American countries where Chagas disease is endemic, the disease still affects a large proportion of the population of South America. The features of the disease in humans have been extensively studied, and the genome of the parasite has been sequenced, but no effective drug is yet available to treat Chagas disease. The digestive tract of the insect vectors in which T. cruzi develops has been much less well investigated than blood from its human hosts and constitutes a dynamic environment with very different conditions. Thus, we investigated the composition of the predominant bacterial species of the microbiota in insect vectors from Rhodnius, Triatoma, Panstrongylus and Dipetalogaster genera. Microbiota of triatomine guts were investigated using cultivation-independent methods, i.e., phylogenetic analysis of 16s rDNA using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and cloned-based sequencing. The Chao index showed that the diversity of bacterial species in triatomine guts is low, comprising fewer than 20 predominant species, and that these species vary between insect species. The analyses showed that Serratia predominates in Rhodnius, Arsenophonus predominates in Triatoma and Panstrongylus, while Candidatus Rohrkolberia predominates in Dipetalogaster. The microbiota of triatomine guts represents one of the factors that may interfere with T. cruzi transmission and virulence in humans. The knowledge of its composition according to insect species is important for designing measures of biological control for T. cruzi. We found that the predominant species of the bacterial microbiota in triatomines form a group of low complexity whose structure differs according to the vector genus.

  15. [The history of Chagas' disease in Argentina: conceptual, institutional, and political evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabala, Juan Pablo

    2009-07-01

    In the one hundred years since the identification of Chagas disease, major changes have occurred in its scientific conception, institutional recognition, and political weight. From a medical perspective, it was seen as the cause of goiter, next its acute effects were emphasized, and then its effects on cardiac health received greater attention. In similar fashion, sanitary policy first downplayed the disease's importance, then elevated it to the role of a national cause, and gradually relegated it to the bottom of the agenda. The article briefly presents the key points of this historical trajectory in Argentina, exploring the cognitive, political, and institutional underpinnings of the disease as both a social and biological fact.

  16. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE IN A RURAL AREA IN THE STATE OF CEARA, BRAZIL

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    Erlane Chaves FREITAS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and affects about two to three million people in Brazil, still figuring as an important public health problem. A study was conducted in a rural area of the municipality of Limoeiro do Norte - CE, northeastern Brazil, aiming to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi infection. Of the inhabitants, 52% were examined, among whom 2.6% (4/154 were seropositive in at least two serological tests. All seropositive individuals were older than 50 years, farmers, with a low education and a family income of less than three minimum wages. Active surveillance may be an alternative for early detection of this disease.

  17. Description of an oral Chagas disease outbreak in Venezuela, including a vertically transmitted case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón de; Pérez-Chacón, Gladymar; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Dickson, Sonia; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Hernández, Carlos; Pérez, Yadira; Mauriello, Luciano; Moronta, Eyleen

    2017-08-01

    We describe the eleventh major outbreak of foodborne Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in urban Venezuela, including evidence for vertical transmission from the index case to her fetus. After confirming fetal death at 24 weeks of gestation, pregnancy interruption was performed. On direct examination of the amniotic fluid, trypomastigotes were detected. T. cruzi specific-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) also proved positive when examining autopsied fetal organs. Finally, microscopic fetal heart examination revealed amastigote nests. Acute orally transmitted Chagas disease can be life threatening or even fatal for pregnant women and unborn fetuses owing to vertical transmission. There is therefore an urgent need to improve national epidemiologic control measures.

  18. Distantiae transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: a new epidemiological feature of acute Chagas disease in Brazil.

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    Samanta Cristina das Chagas Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The new epidemiological scenario of orally transmitted Chagas disease that has emerged in Brazil, and mainly in the Amazon region, needs to be addressed with a new and systematic focus. Belém, the capital of Pará state, reports the highest number of acute Chagas disease (ACD cases associated with the consumption of açaí juice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The wild and domestic enzootic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated in the two locations (Jurunas and Val-de Cães that report the majority of the autochthonous cases of ACD in Belém city. Moreover, we evaluated the enzootic cycle on the three islands that provide most of the açaí fruit that is consumed in these localities. We employed parasitological and serological tests throughout to evaluate infectivity competence and exposure to T. cruzi. In Val-de-Cães, no wild mammal presented positive parasitological tests, and 56% seroprevalence was observed, with low serological titers. Three of 14 triatomines were found to be infected (TcI. This unexpected epidemiological picture does not explain the high number of autochthonous ACD cases. In Jurunas, the cases of ACD could not be autochthonous because of the absence of any enzootic cycle of T. cruzi. In contrast, in the 3 island areas from which the açaí fruit originates, 66.7% of wild mammals and two dogs displayed positive hemocultures, and 15.6% of triatomines were found to be infected by T. cruzi. Genotyping by mini-exon gene and PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I targeting revealed that the mammals and triatomines from the islands harbored TcI and Trypanosoma rangeli in single and mixed infections. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings show that cases of Chagas disease in the urban area of Belém may be derived from infected triatomines coming together with the açaí fruits from distant islands. We term this new epidemiological feature of Chagas disease as "Distantiae transmission".

  19. Training Systems Modelers through the Development of a Multi-scale Chagas Disease Risk Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, J.; Stevens-Goodnight, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Bustamante, D.; Fytilis, N.; Goff, P.; Monroy, C.; Morrissey, L. A.; Orantes, L.; Stevens, L.; Dorn, P.; Lucero, D.; Rios, J.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of our NSF-sponsored Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences grant is to create a multidisciplinary approach to develop spatially explicit models of vector-borne disease risk using Chagas disease as our model. Chagas disease is a parasitic disease endemic to Latin America that afflicts an estimated 10 million people. The causative agent (Trypanosoma cruzi) is most commonly transmitted to humans by blood feeding triatomine insect vectors. Our objectives are: (1) advance knowledge on the multiple interacting factors affecting the transmission of Chagas disease, and (2) provide next generation genomic and spatial analysis tools applicable to the study of other vector-borne diseases worldwide. This funding is a collaborative effort between the RSENR (UVM), the School of Engineering (UVM), the Department of Biology (UVM), the Department of Biological Sciences (Loyola (New Orleans)) and the Laboratory of Applied Entomology and Parasitology (Universidad de San Carlos). Throughout this five-year study, multi-educational groups (i.e., high school, undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral) will be trained in systems modeling. This systems approach challenges students to incorporate environmental, social, and economic as well as technical aspects and enables modelers to simulate and visualize topics that would either be too expensive, complex or difficult to study directly (Yasar and Landau 2003). We launch this research by developing a set of multi-scale, epidemiological models of Chagas disease risk using STELLA® software v.9.1.3 (isee systems, inc., Lebanon, NH). We use this particular system dynamics software as a starting point because of its simple graphical user interface (e.g., behavior-over-time graphs, stock/flow diagrams, and causal loops). To date, high school and undergraduate students have created a set of multi-scale (i.e., homestead, village, and regional) disease models. Modeling the system at multiple spatial scales forces recognition that

  20. Inositol metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi: potential target for chemotherapy against Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MECIA M. OLIVEIRA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is a debilitating and often fatal disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The great majority of surface molecules in trypanosomes are either inositol-containing phospholipids or glycoproteins that are anchored into the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors. The polyalcohol myo-inositol is the precursor for the biosynthesis of these molecules. In this brief review, recent findings on some aspects of the molecular and cellular fate of inositol in T. cruzi life cycle are discussed and identified some points that could be targets for the development of parasite-specific therapeutic agents.

  1. [Why defer blood donor candidates because of an exposure risk to Chagas disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, O; Pelletier, B; Aznar, C

    2008-06-01

    Various infectious agents can be transmitted by blood exposure, which comprises of transfusion, of which hemoparasites that are commonly absent from European countries but that can have infected blood donor candidates born, raised or having been living in the Tropics. Among those hemoparasites is Trypanosoma cruzi, responsible for Chagas disease. T. cruzi is responsible for acute post-transfusion infections every year in endemic areas (South America) and also, more incidently, in North America. There are situations which expose European blood donors to this risk and the present essay discusses arguments which have now been taken into consideration by certain transfusion systems such as the French one.

  2. Chagas cardiomyopathy and serologic testing in a small rural hospital in Chiapas, Mexico Miocardiopatía chagásica y pruebas serológicas de enfermedad de Chagas en un hospital rural pequeño de Chiapas, México

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    Linnea Capps

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To conduct a study in a small rural hospital located in the state of Chiapas, Mexico, to: (1 examine the prevalence of chagasic cardiomyopathy among patients with the diagnosis of congestive heart failure and (2 assess the prevalence of positive serologic results in blood donors in the hospital, in an attempt to ascertain whether Chagas' disease remains an important cause of heart failure at least in some areas of Mexico. METHODS: The study of patients with cardiomyopathy was conducted by retrospective chart review of patients with the diagnosis of congestive heart failure treated at the hospital during the years 2000­2002. With the blood donors, the results of their serologic screening were reviewed for a six-month period beginning in April 2002. Serologic testing was done in both groups with either indirect hemagglutination (IHA or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, or with both. RESULTS: Of 67 patients with heart failure and no risk factors for other causes of heart failure, 40 of them had serologic tests performed. Thirty-three of these 40 (82.5% were positive by ELISA, IHA, or both. With 97 blood donors, one or both serologic tests were positive in 17 of them (17.5%. CONCLUSIONS: This research adds to the evidence that Chagas' disease continues to be a major cause of heart failure in some areas of Mexico and that there continues to be a risk of transmission by blood transfusion if donated blood is not consistently screened.OBJETIVO: Llevar a cabo un estudio en un hospital rural pequeño del Estado de Chiapas, México, con el fin de: 1 examinar la prevalencia de miocardiopatía chagásica en pacientes con un diagnóstico de insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva y 2 estimar la prevalencia de positividad serológica en donantes de sangre del hospital, con objeto de determinar si la enfermedad de Chagas sigue siendo una causa importante de insuficiencia cardíaca en algunas partes de México. MÉTODOS: El estudio de los

  3. A regional fight against Chagas disease: lessons learned from a successful collaborative partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Rosina; Salvatella, Roberto; Issa, Julie; Anzola, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    To identify the intangible elements that characterize the successful effort to fight Chagas disease in the Americas, determine how they contributed to the overall success of the partnership, and learn lessons from the experience that could be applied to other programs. This study was based on the Partnership Assessment Tool (PAT) developed by the Nuffield Institute for Health ("the Institute") at the University of Leeds (London). The PAT draws heavily on scientific literature and the extensive experience of sociologists and health experts working for the Institute. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) modified the tool slightly to adapt it to its needs and provide a general structure for the study. The six key principles of the PAT framework were applied in the design of the research questionnaires. The findings show that a successful collaboration requires a clear objective; a good-quality pool of data; and comprehensive qualitative and quantitative knowledge of the problem, its dimensions, and its impact. The collaboration was elaborated from a common idea and a shared, quantified plan based on data gathered by independent scientists plus a strategy with explicit milestones. The clarity of purpose allowed for an improved synergy of efforts and made it possible to resolve differences in opinions and approaches. PAHO's experience with effective collaborations such as the joint initiative to fight Chagas disease provides a rich knowledge base for analysis of the advantages, limitations, and paradigms of community involvement, collaborative practices, and partnerships.

  4. Molecular diagnostics for Chagas disease: up to date and novel methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Gallego, Montserrat; Schijman, Alejandro G; Gascon, Joaquim

    2017-07-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It affects 7 million people, mainly in Latin America. Diagnosis is usually made serologically, but at some clinical scenarios serology cannot be used. Then, molecular detection is required for early detection of congenital transmission, treatment response follow up, and diagnosis of immune-suppression reactivation. However, present tests are technically demanding and require well-equipped laboratories which make them unfeasible in low-resources endemic regions. Areas covered: Available molecular tools for detection of T. cruzi DNA, paying particular attention to quantitative PCR protocols, and to the latest developments of user-friendly molecular diagnostic methodologies. Expert commentary: In the absence of appropriate biomarkers, molecular diagnosis is the only option for the assessment of treatment response. Besides, it is very useful for the early detection of acute infections, like congenital cases. Since current Chagas disease molecular tests are restricted to referential labs, research efforts must focus in the implementation of easy-to-use diagnostic tools in order to overcome the access to diagnosis gap.

  5. Chagas disease: modulation of the inflammatory response by acetylcholinesterase in hematological cells and brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Aniélen D; Bottari, Nathieli B; do Carmo, Guilherme M; Baldissera, Matheus D; Souza, Carine F; Machado, Vanessa S; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Mendes, Ricardo E; Monteiro, Silvia G; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2018-01-01

    Chagas disease is an acute or chronic illness that causes severe inflammatory response, and consequently, it may activate the inflammatory cholinergic pathway, which is regulated by cholinesterases, including the acetylcholinesterase. This enzyme is responsible for the regulation of acetylcholine levels, an anti-inflammatory molecule linked to the inflammatory response during parasitic diseases. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether Trypanosoma cruzi infection can alter the activity of acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine levels in mice, and whether these alterations are linked to the inflammatory cholinergic signaling pathway. Twenty-four mice were divided into two groups: uninfected (control group, n = 12) and infected by T. cruzi, Y strain (n = 12). The animals developed acute disease with a peak of parasitemia on day 7 post-infection (PI). Blood, lymphocytes, and brain were analyzed on days 6 and 12 post-infection. In the brain, acetylcholine and nitric oxide levels, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathology were analyzed. In total blood and brain, acetylcholinesterase activity decreased at both times. On the other hand, acetylcholinesterase activity in lymphocytes increased on day 6 PI compared with the control group. Infection by T. cruzi increased acetylcholine and nitric oxide levels and histopathological damage in the brain of mice associated to increased myeloperoxidase activity. Therefore, an intense inflammatory response in mice with acute Chagas disease in the central nervous system caused an anti-inflammatory response by the activation of the cholinergic inflammatory pathway.

  6. Influence of the HLA class II polymorphism in chronic Chagas' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Mestre, M T; Layrisse, Z; Montagnani, S; Acquatella, H; Catalioti, F; Matos, M; Balbas, O; Makhatadze, N; Dominguez, E; Herrera, F; Madrigal, A

    1998-04-01

    Chagas' disease or American trypanosomiasis due to Trypanosoma cruzi has existed at least since the time of the Inca empire and contributes significantly to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several countries of this continent. Due to the fundamental role of human class II molecules polymorphic residues in the control of the immune response, a study was designed to define by DNA typing HLA class II alleles in a sample of 67 serologically positive individuals with and without cardiomyopathy and in 156 healthy controls of similar ethnic origin. Genomic DNA extraction, PCR amplification of the HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 second exon regions and hybridization to labelled specific probes were carried out following the 11th International Histocompatibility Workshop reference protocol. Comparison of DRB1 and DQB1 allele frequencies among the patients and control subjects showed a decreased frequency of DRB1*14 and DQB1*0303 in the patients, suggesting independent protective effects to the chronic infection in this population. Allele frequencies comparison between patients with and without cardiomyopathy showed a higher frequency of DRB1*01, DRB1*08 and DQB1*0501 and a decreased frequency of DRB1*1501 in the patients with arrhythmia and congestive heart failure. The results suggest that HLA Class II genes may be associated with the development of a chronic infection and with heart damage in Chagas' disease.

  7. Acute Chagas' cardiopathy in a polar bear (Ursus maritimus in Guadalajara, Mexico

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    J. Jaime-Andrade G.

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a 24 year old female polar bear (Ursus maritimus who contracted Chagas' infection at the Guadalajara Zoo, in Jalisco, México, and died of acute Chagas' carditis 15 days later. The histopathological findings are described, as well as the presence of triatomines (Triatoma longipennis Usinger infected with Trypanosoma cruzi collected within 5 meters from the place where the animal lived in the city of Guadalajara.Relatamos o caso de uma ursa polar (Ursus maritimus de 24 anos de idade, que contraiu a infecção chagásica no Zoológico de Guadalajara, em Jalisco, no México, e morreu de cardite chagásica aguda 15 dias após o início da sintomatologia. Os achados histopatológicos são descritos, bem como a presença de triatomíneos (Triatoma longipennis Usinger infectados por Trypanosoma cruzi coletados a 5 metros do local onde o animal vivia, na cidade de Guadalajara.

  8. Evolution of Chagas' disease in Brazil. Epidemiological perspective and challenges for the future: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello Corassa, Rafael; Aceijas, Carmen; Alves, Paula Aryane Brito; Garelick, Hemda

    2017-09-01

    This article aimed to provide a critical review of the evolution of Chagas' disease (ChD) in Brazil, its magnitude, historical development and management, and challenges for the future. A literature search was performed using PubMed, SciELO and Google Scholar and throughout collected articles' references. Narrative analysis was structured around five main themes identified: vector transmission, control programme, transfusion, oral and congenital transmission. In Brazil, the Chagas' Disease Control Programme was fully implemented in the 1980s, when it reached practically all the endemic areas, and in 1991, the Southern Cone Initiative was created, aiming to control the disease transmission through eliminating the Triatoma infestans and controlling blood banks. As a result, the prevalence of chagasic donors in blood banks reduced from 4.4% in the 1980s to 0.2% in 2005. In 2006, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) certified the interruption of transmission of ChD through this vector in Brazil. However, there are still challenges, such as the domiciliation of new vector species, the need for medical care of the infected individuals, the prevention of alternative mechanisms of transmission, the loss of political concern regarding the disease and the weakening of the control programme. Despite the progress towards control, there are still many challenges ahead to maintain and expand such control and minimise the risk of re-emergence.

  9. Congenital Chagas's disease in an urban population: investigation of infected twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, R; Mott, K E; Milanesi, M L; Bittencourt, A L; Barbosa, H S

    1978-01-01

    In the Nordeste de Amaralina suburb of Salvador Bahia, Brazil, 47 of 285 pregnant women surveyed had complement fixing antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. At delivery T. cruzi was detected in one of 17 placentas from the sero-positive women. The offspring of this case were premature twins and T. cruzi was detected in the peripheral blood of each before death. At autopsy the gastro-intestinal tract and urinary bladder of both were severely affected. Immunofluorescence tests on cord sera, including the single case with T. cruzi in the placenta, were negative for IgM antibodies to T. cruzi. The mother of the infected twins and three of her living children, who were born and have resided in the city, were also infected with T. cruzi. Although the children had visited an area endemic for Chagas's disease for short periods, the mode of transmission in this family may have been transplacental. The value of the immunofluorescence test in the diagnosis of congenital Chagas's disease is discussed.

  10. Prevalence of Chagas disease in medical students from 16 Latin American countries attending

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    Miguel A. Serra Valdés

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the infectious illnesses that have repercussion in Latin America are the Chagas illness. Objective: with the objective of identifying the students with positive serology for the illness of Chagas and describe the characteristics in the same thing with focussing epidemiological carried out to him the present study. Method: It become fulfilled a observational investigation, descriptive and prospectival. It decided the prevalencial in the Latin American students of medicine that resides in the school Salvador Allende in the period understanded between October of the 2009 to January of the 2010 by means of serology, other clinical studieses and examination. They took shelter the variables of the clinical records and of personal interview.. Results: Affected 50 of the Bolivian delegation. The prevalence went of 6.6% of this delegation. Have clinical symptoms. The detected alterations went the ventricular hypertrophy left and the disorders of transportation and of the rhythm for electrocardiogram. It predominated the masculine sex and the rural origin. It found variability in the results of laboratory, being positive in their country and negative in Cuba and vice versa. Single 56% fulfilled the treatment. The adverse reactions went minims. Conclusion: It constitutes a sanitary problem and demands a better diagnosis, control and follow-up.

  11. A revision of thirteen species of Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae vectors of Chagas disease in Mexico

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    Salazar-Schettino Paz Maria

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, parasite responsible for Chagas disease, are divided in intradomestic, peridomestic and sylvatic. The intradomestic are Triatoma barberi and Triatoma dimidiata, two species that represent the highest health risk among the Mexican population. Triatoma dimidiata is a species found mainly inside human habitats, but in Yucatan, it corresponds to the peridomicile vectors. Also in the peridomicile most of Chagas disease vectors are found: Meccus bassolsae, M. longipennis, M. mazzottii, M pallidipennis, M. phyllosomus, M picturata, Triatoma gerstaeckeri, T mexicana, T rubida, Dipetalogaster máxima (the last two are in the process of becoming adapted to the domicile, Panstrongylus rufotuberculatus which occasionally enters the domicile in its adult stage, and Rhodnius prolixus, which is practically controlled in the country. Peridomestic vectors are of lower risk in the transmission dynamics, as compared to the intradomestic ones. For the control of the intradomestic vectors, health education programs, improvements of housing, and the use of pesticides are essential To control the peridomestic vectors, health education programs are required, as well as the use of mosquito nets on doors and windows and around beds, aside from cementing the stone wall fences.

  12. Diagnostic electrocardiography in epidemiological studies of Chagas' disease: multicenter evaluation of a standardized method

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    Lázzari Julio O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available An electrocardiographic recording method with an associated reading guide, designed for epidemiological studies on Chagas' disease, was tested to assess its diagnostic reproducibility. Six cardiologists from five countries each read 100 electrocardiographic (ECG tracings, including 30 from chronic chagasic patients, then reread them after an interval of 6 months. The readings were blind, with the tracings numbered randomly for the first reading and renumbered randomly for the second reading. The physicians, all experienced in interpreting ECGs from chagasic patients, followed printed instructions for reading the tracings. Reproducibility of the readings was evaluated using the kappa (k index for concordance. The results showed a high degree of interobserver concordance with respect to the diagnosis of normal vs. abnormal tracings (k = 0.66; SE 0.02. While the interpretations of some categories of ECG abnormalities were highly reproducible, others, especially those having a low prevalence, showed lower levels of concordance. Intraobserver concordance was uniformly higher than interobserver concordance. The findings of this study justify the use by specialists of the recording of readings method proposed for epidemiological studies on Chagas' disease, but warrant caution in the interpretation of some categories of electrocardiographic alterations.

  13. Diagnostic electrocardiography in epidemiological studies of Chagas' disease: multicenter evaluation of a standardized method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio O. Lázzari

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available An electrocardiographic recording method with an associated reading guide, designed for epidemiological studies on Chagas' disease, was tested to assess its diagnostic reproducibility. Six cardiologists from five countries each read 100 electrocardiographic (ECG tracings, including 30 from chronic chagasic patients, then reread them after an interval of 6 months. The readings were blind, with the tracings numbered randomly for the first reading and renumbered randomly for the second reading. The physicians, all experienced in interpreting ECGs from chagasic patients, followed printed instructions for reading the tracings. Reproducibility of the readings was evaluated using the kappa (k index for concordance. The results showed a high degree of interobserver concordance with respect to the diagnosis of normal vs. abnormal tracings (k = 0.66; SE 0.02. While the interpretations of some categories of ECG abnormalities were highly reproducible, others, especially those having a low prevalence, showed lower levels of concordance. Intraobserver concordance was uniformly higher than interobserver concordance. The findings of this study justify the use by specialists of the recording of readings method proposed for epidemiological studies on Chagas' disease, but warrant caution in the interpretation of some categories of electrocardiographic alterations.

  14. Bibliometric assessment of the contributions of literature on Chagas disease in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Osorio, Nathalia; Vera-Polania, Felipe; Lopez-Isaza, Andres F; Martinez-Pulgarin, Dayron F; Murillo-Abadia, Jonathan; Munoz-Urbano, Marcela; Cardona-Ospina, Jaime A; Bello, Ricardo; Lagos-Grisales, Guillermo J; Villegas-Rojas, Soraya; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, considered a parasitic neglected disease, is endemic in Latin America. Although, its mortality rate has decreased over time, it still represents a public health problem in the region. A bibliometric evaluation of the Latin American contributions on this disease was done. This study used SCI (1980-2013), MEDLINE/GOPUBMED (1802-2013), Scopus (1959-2013), SCIELO (2004-2013), and LILACS (1980-2013). Different study types have been characterized by years, origin city/country, journals and most productive authors, by country, cites and H-index. 2988 articles were retrieved from SCI (30.85% of total). Brazil was found to be the highest producer (31.22%), followed by Argentina (18.14%) and México (9.57%); the region received 47241 citations, 28.60% for Brazil (H-index=52), 18.26% of Argentina (Hindex= 43), 11.40% Bolivia (H-index=37). 4484 were retrieved from Scopus (30.20% of the total), 38.58% of which were from Brazil, 12.40% from Argentina and 8.90% from Mexico. From Medline, 6647 records were retrieved (45.58% Brazil). From SciELO, 917 articles (47.66% Brazil). From LILACS, 2165 articles (60.05% Brazil). Brazil has the highest output in the region. Despite advances in controlling Chagas disease, scientific production is low, particularly for regional bibliographic databases, which calls for more research on this disease.

  15. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance-Verified Myocardial Fibrosis in Chagas Disease: Clinical Correlates and Risk Stratification

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    Marly Uellendahl

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Chagas disease (CD is an important cause of heart failure and mortality, mainly in Latin America. This study evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the heart as well the extent of myocardial fibrosis (MF in patients with CD by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR. The prognostic value of MF evaluated by myocardial-delayed enhancement (MDE was compared with that via Rassi score. Methods: This study assessed 39 patients divided into 2 groups: 28 asymptomatic patients as indeterminate form group (IND; and symptomatic patients as Chagas Heart Disease (CHD group. All patients underwent CMR using the techniques of cine-MRI and MDE, and the amount of MF was compared with the Rassi score. Results: Regarding the morphological and functional analysis, significant differences were observed between both groups (p < 0.001. Furthermore, there was a strong correlation between the extent of MF and the Rassi score (r = 0.76. Conclusions: CMR is an important technique for evaluating patients with CD, stressing morphological and functional differences in all clinical presentations. The strong correlation with the Rassi score and the extent of MF detected by CMR emphasizes its role in the prognostic stratification of patients with CD.

  16. Soro-epidemiologia da doença de Chagas em Santa Catarina

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    BR Schlemper Jr

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Em Santa Catarina, o Inquérito Sorológico Nacional para doença de Chagas (CNPq-SUCAM revelou positividade de 1,3% em cerca de 74.000 amostras de soro processadas pela reação de imunofluorescência indireta em papel de filtro, com 15 municípios apresentando prevalências de 5,4% a 41,3%. Na presente investigação, em 9 dos municípios com alta prevalência, foram obtidas amostras de sangue, por punção venosa, de 222 indivíduos dos quais 140 haviam sido sorologicamente positivos e 58 negativos no Inquérito Nacional. Em 24 outros indivíduos a reação foi executada pela primeira vez. Os testes sorológicos (imunofluorescência indireta, hemaglutinação indireta, aglutinação direta com e sem 2-mercaptoetanol e fixação do complemento realizados em 3 diferentes laboratórios evidenciaram 220 soros negativos e apenas 2 positivos. Dados epidenúológicos obtidos nas áreas trabalhadas confirmaram estes resultados negativos. Os resultados discordam daqueles encontrados pelo Inquérito Sorológico Nacional e confirmam a inexistência de focos domiciliares de transmissão da doença de Chagas em Santa Catarina.

  17. Geographic Distribution of Chagas Disease Vectors in Brazil Based on Ecological Niche Modeling

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    Rodrigo Gurgel-Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Brazil was declared free from Chagas disease transmission by the domestic vector Triatoma infestans, human acute cases are still being registered based on transmission by native triatomine species. For a better understanding of transmission risk, the geographic distribution of Brazilian triatomines was analyzed. Sixteen out of 62 Brazilian species that both occur in >20 municipalities and present synanthropic tendencies were modeled based on their ecological niches. Panstrongylus geniculatus and P. megistus showed broad ecological ranges, but most of the species sort out by the biome in which they are distributed: Rhodnius pictipes and R. robustus in the Amazon; R. neglectus, Triatoma sordida, and T. costalimai in the Cerrado; R. nasutus, P. lutzi, T. brasiliensis, T. pseudomaculata, T. melanocephala, and T. petrocchiae in the Caatinga; T. rubrovaria in the southern pampas; T. tibiamaculata and T. vitticeps in the Atlantic Forest. Although most occurrences were recorded in open areas (Cerrado and Caatinga, our results show that all environmental conditions in the country are favorable to one or more of the species analyzed, such that almost nowhere is Chagas transmission risk negligible.

  18. Mannose-Binding Lectin and Toll-Like Receptor Polymorphisms and Chagas Disease in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulantay, Inés; Danquah, Ina; Hamann, Lutz; Schumann, Ralf R.; Apt, Werner; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) polymorphisms may influence susceptibility and manifestation of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In northern Chile, we examined 61 asymptomatic patients with chronic Chagas disease (CD), 64 patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), and 45 healthy individuals. Low-producer MBL2*B genotypes were more common in CD patients (48%) than healthy individuals (31%; adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.01–5.4, P = 0.047) but did not differ with manifestation. In contrast, the heterozygous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-deficiency genotype D299G/T399I occurred more frequently in asymptomatic (14.8%) than CCC patients (3.1%; P = 0.02). TLR1-I602S, TLR2-R753Q, TLR6-S249P, and MAL/TIRAP-S180L did not associate with CD or CCC. These findings support the complement system to be involved in defense against Trypanosoma cruzi infection and indicate that curbed TLR4 activation might be beneficial in preventing CCC. PMID:22302853

  19. Echocardiographic parameters and survival in Chagas heart disease with severe systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Arruda, Ana Lúcia Martins; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Furtado, Rogério Gomes; Rassi, Danilo Teixeira; Rassi, Salvador

    2014-03-01

    Echocardiography provides important information on the cardiac evaluation of patients with heart failure. The identification of echocardiographic parameters in severe Chagas heart disease would help implement treatment and assess prognosis. To correlate echocardiographic parameters with the endpoint cardiovascular mortality in patients with ejection fraction Celular em Cardiopatias) - Chagas heart disease arm. The following parameters were collected: left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters and volumes; ejection fraction; left atrial diameter; left atrial volume; indexed left atrial volume; systolic pulmonary artery pressure; integral of the aortic flow velocity; myocardial performance index; rate of increase of left ventricular pressure; isovolumic relaxation time; E, A, Em, Am and Sm wave velocities; E wave deceleration time; E/A and E/Em ratios; and mitral regurgitation. In the mean 24.18-month follow-up, 27 patients died. The mean ejection fraction was 26.6 ± 5.34%. In the multivariate analysis, the parameters ejection fraction (HR = 1.114; p = 0.3704), indexed left atrial volume (HR = 1.033; p 70.71 mL/m2 were associated with a significant increase in mortality (log rank p < 0.0001). The indexed left atrial volume was the only independent predictor of mortality in this population of Chagasic patients with severe systolic dysfunction.

  20. A regional fight against Chagas disease: lessons learned from a successful collaborative partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosina Salerno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify the intangible elements that characterize the successful effort to fight Chagas disease in the Americas, determine how they contributed to the overall success of the partnership, and learn lessons from the experience that could be applied to other programs. Methods. This study was based on the Partnership Assessment Tool (PAT developed by the Nuffield Institute for Health ("the Institute" at the University of Leeds (London. The PAT draws heavily on scientific literature and the extensive experience of sociologists and health experts working for the Institute. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO modified the tool slightly to adapt it to its needs and provide a general structure for the study. The six key principles of the PAT framework were applied in the design of the research questionnaires. Results. The findings show that a successful collaboration requires a clear objective; a good-quality pool of data; and comprehensive qualitative and quantitative knowledge of the problem, its dimensions, and its impact. The collaboration was elaborated from a common idea and a shared, quantified plan based on data gathered by independent scientists plus a strategy with explicit milestones. The clarity of purpose allowed for an improved synergy of efforts and made it possible to resolve differences in opinions and approaches. Conclusions. PAHO's experience with effective collaborations such as the joint initiative to fight Chagas disease provides a rich knowledge base for analysis of the advantages, limitations, and paradigms of community involvement, collaborative practices, and partnerships.

  1. Seroprevalencia de la enfermedad de Chagas y factores de riesgo asociados en una población de Morroa, Sucre

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    Richard Hoyos

    2007-01-01

    Conclusiones. Nuestros resultados indican que la zona estudiada presenta elementos de riesgo para el establecimiento de un ciclo de transmisión activa, se hace necesario verificar la presencia de triatominos en la zona de estudio y establecer medidas para prevenir la presencia de la enfermedad de Chagas en el área de Morroa, Sucre.

  2. Análisis epidemiológico de pacientes coinfectados con enfermedad de Chagas y cisticercosis

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    Ana Carolina Guimaraes

    2009-03-01

    Conclusión. En teoría, todos los pacientes tuvieron un riesgo similar de exposición para ambos parásitos. Sin embargo, este trabajo demuestra que, en la población estudiada, la enfermedad de Chagas fue, aproximadamente, 10 veces más frecuente en los casos coinfectados con cisticercosis.

  3. Case-control study of factors associated with chronic Chagas heart disease in patients over 50 years of age

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    Silvana de Araújo Silva

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A case-control study on chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD was carried out between 1997 and 2005. Ninety patients over 50 years of age were examined for factors related to (CCHD. Fourty-six patients (51.1% with Chagas heart disease (anomalous ECG were assigned to the case group and 44 (48.9% were included in the control group as carriers of undetermined forms of chronic disease. Social, demographic (age, gender, skin color, area of origin, epidemiological (permanence within an endemic zone, family history of Chagas heart disease or sudden death, physical strain, alcoholism, and smoking, and clinical (systemic hypertension variables were analyzed. The data set was assessed through single-variable and multivariate analysis. The two factors independently associated with heart disease were age - presence of heart disease being three times higher in patients over 60 years of age (odds ratio, OR: 2.89; confidence interval of 95%: 1.09-7.61 - and family history of Chagas heart disease (OR: 2.833, CI 95%: 1.11-7.23. Systemic hypertension and gender did not prove to hold any association with heart disease, as neither did skin color, but this variable showed low statistical power due to reduced sample size.

  4. CHARITY: Chagas cardiomyopathy bisoprolol intervention study: a randomized double-blind placebo force-titration controlled study with Bisoprolol in patients with chronic heart failure secondary to Chagas cardiomyopathy [NCT00323973

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    Casas Juan P

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chagas' disease is the major cause of disability secondary to tropical diseases in young adults from Latin America, and around 20 million people are currently infected by T. cruzi. Heart failure due to Chagas cardiomyopathy is the main clinical presenation in Colombia. Heart failure due to Chagas' disease may respond to digoxin, diuretics and vasodilator therapy. Beta-adrenoreceptor antagonism seems to protect against the increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death due to chronic sympathetic stimulation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of the selective beta-adrenergic receptor blocker Bisoprolol on cardiovascular mortality, hospital readmission due to progressive heart failure and functional status in patients with heart failure secondary to Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Methods/design A cohort of 500 T. cruzi seropositive patients (250 per arm will be selected from several institutions in Colombia. During the pretreatment period an initial evaluation visit will be scheduled in which participants will sign consent forms and baseline measurements and tests will be conducted including blood pressure measurements, twelve-lead ECG and left ventricular ejection fraction assessment by 2D echocardiography. Quality of life questionnaire will be performed two weeks apart during baseline examination using the "Minnesota living with heart failure" questionnaire. A minimum of two 6 minutes corridor walk test once a week over a two-week period will be performed to measure functional class. During the treatment period patients will be randomly assigned to receive Bisoprolol or placebo, initially taking a total daily dose of 2.5 mgrs qd. The dose will be increased every two weeks to 5, 7.5 and 10 mgrs qd (maximum maintenance dose. Follow-up assessment will include clinical check-up, and blood collection for future measurements of inflammatory reactants and markers. Quality of life measurements will be obtained at six

  5. Mast Cell Coupling to the Kallikrein–Kinin System Fuels Intracardiac Parasitism and Worsens Heart Pathology in Experimental Chagas Disease

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    Clarissa R. Nascimento

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of Chagas disease, infectious forms of Trypanosoma cruzi are occasionally liberated from parasitized heart cells. Studies performed with tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCTs, Dm28c strain demonstrated that these parasites evoke neutrophil/CXCR2-dependent microvascular leakage by activating innate sentinel cells via toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. Upon plasma extravasation, proteolytically derived kinins and C5a stimulate immunoprotective Th1 responses via cross-talk between bradykinin B2 receptors (B2Rs and C5aR. Awareness that TCTs invade cardiovascular cells in vitro via interdependent activation of B2R and endothelin receptors [endothelin A receptor (ETAR/endothelin B receptor (ETBR] led us to hypothesize that T. cruzi might reciprocally benefit from the formation of infection-associated edema via activation of kallikrein–kinin system (KKS. Using intravital microscopy, here we first examined the functional interplay between mast cells (MCs and the KKS by topically exposing the hamster cheek pouch (HCP tissues to dextran sulfate (DXS, a potent “contact” activator of the KKS. Surprisingly, although DXS was inert for at least 30 min, a subtle MC-driven leakage resulted in factor XII (FXII-dependent activation of the KKS, which then amplified inflammation via generation of bradykinin (BK. Guided by this mechanistic insight, we next exposed TCTs to “leaky” HCP—forged by low dose histamine application—and found that the proinflammatory phenotype of TCTs was boosted by BK generated via the MC/KKS pathway. Measurements of footpad edema in MC-deficient mice linked TCT-evoked inflammation to MC degranulation (upstream and FXII-mediated generation of BK (downstream. We then inoculated TCTs intracardiacally in mice and found a striking decrease of parasite DNA (quantitative polymerase chain reaction; 3 d.p.i. in the heart of MC-deficient mutant mice. Moreover, the intracardiac parasite load was significantly reduced in WT

  6. Conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas sobre la enfermedad de Chagas en población escolar de una zona endémica del Perú

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    Cabrera Rufino

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio es presentar los resultados obtenidos sobre conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas acerca de la enfermedad de Chagas, en 241 escolares de educación primaria en La Tinguiña, Ica, Perú (diciembre 2000 - enero 2001. Menos del 1% de los encuestados reconoce que los triatomas trasmiten la enfermedad de Chagas, y casi la cuarta parte reconoce la enfermedad por la formación de "ronchas" en la piel; el 35,27% sabe que la infestación por el vector se controla con insecticidas. El 26,56% reconoce a los estados adultos del vector y el 21,16% a las ninfas; el 14,11% lo conoce con el nombre de "chirimacha"; el 82,57% aceptaría una encuesta entomológica; el 66,80% permitiría un estudio serológico y el 63,90% participaría en la búsqueda de triatominos. Este estudio revela que la población, a pesar de tener conocimientos muy limitados sobre la enfermedad y su vector, muestra interés en colaborar. Por lo tanto, se recomienda que las estrategias de vigilancia y control de esta enfermedad, incluyan necesariamente programas educativos y de participación comunitaria, en la implantación de futuros programas de control.

  7. Chagas disease: current epidemiological trends after the interruption of vectorial and transfusional transmission in the Southern Cone countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Alvaro

    2003-07-01

    Chagas disease, named after Carlos Chagas who first described it in 1909, exists only on the American Continent. It is caused by a parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, transmitted to humans by blood-sucking triatomine bugs and by blood transfusion. Chagas disease has two successive phases, acute and chronic. The acute phase lasts 6 to 8 weeks. After several years of starting the chronic phase, 20% to 35% of the infected individuals, depending on the geographical area will develop irreversible lesions of the autonomous nervous system in the heart, esophagus, colon and the peripheral nervous system. Data on the prevalence and distribution of Chagas disease improved in quality during the 1980's as a result of the demographically representative cross-sectional studies carried out in countries where accurate information was not available. A group of experts met in Bras lia in 1979 and devised standard protocols to carry out countrywide prevalence studies on human T. cruzi infection and triatomine house infestation. Thanks to a coordinated multi-country program in the Southern Cone countries the transmission of Chagas disease by vectors and by blood transfusion has been interrupted in Uruguay in1997, in Chile in 1999, and in 8 of the 12 endemic states of Brazil in 2000 and so the incidence of new infections by T. cruzi in the whole continent has decreased by 70%. Similar control multi-country initiatives have been launched in the Andean countries and in Central America and rapid progress has been recorded to ensure the interruption of the transmission of Chagas disease by 2005 as requested by a Resolution of the World Health Assembly approved in 1998. The cost-benefit analysis of the investments of the vector control program in Brazil indicate that there are savings of US$17 in medical care and disabilities for each dollar spent on prevention, showing that the program is a health investment with good return. Since the inception in 1979 of the Steering Committee on Chagas Disease

  8. Antithrombin III blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003661.htm Antithrombin III blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present ...

  9. Lineage Analysis of Circulating Trypanosoma cruzi Parasites and Their Association with Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease in Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Puerto, Ramona; Nishizawa, Juan Eiki; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Iihoshi, Naomi; Roca, Yelin; Avilas, Cinthia; Gianella, Alberto; Lora, Javier; Gutierrez Velarde, Freddy Udalrico; Renjel, Luis Alberto; Miura, Sachio; Higo, Hiroo; Komiya, Norihiro; Maemura, Koji; Hirayama, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Background The causative agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, is divided into 6 Discrete Typing Units (DTU): Tc I, IIa, IIb, IIc, IId and IIe. In order to assess the relative pathogenicities of different DTUs, blood samples from three different clinical groups of chronic Chagas disease patients (indeterminate, cardiac, megacolon) from Bolivia were analyzed for their circulating parasites lineages using minicircle kinetoplast DNA polymorphism. Methods and Findings Between 2000 and 2007, patients sent to the Centro Nacional de Enfermedades Tropicales for diagnosis of Chagas from clinics and hospitals in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, were assessed by serology, cardiology and gastro-intestinal examinations. Additionally, patients who underwent colonectomies due to Chagasic magacolon at the Hospital Universitario Japonés were also included. A total of 306 chronic Chagas patients were defined by their clinical types (81 with cardiopathy, 150 without cardiopathy, 100 with megacolon, 144 without megacolon, 164 with cardiopathy or megacolon, 73 indeterminate and 17 cases with both cardiopathy and megacolon). DNA was extracted from 10 ml of peripheral venous blood for PCR analysis. The kinetoplast minicircle DNA (kDNA) was amplified from 196 out of 306 samples (64.1%), of which 104 (53.3%) were Tc IId, 4 (2.0%) Tc I, 7 (3.6%) Tc IIb, 1 (0.5%) Tc IIe, 26 (13.3%) Tc I/IId, 1 (0.5%) Tc I/IIb/IId, 2 (1.0%) Tc IIb/d and 51 (25.9%) were unidentified. Of the 133 Tc IId samples, three different kDNA hypervariable region patterns were detected; Mn (49.6%), TPK like (48.9%) and Bug-like (1.5%). There was no significant association between Tc types and clinical manifestations of disease. Conclusions None of the identified lineages or sublineages was significantly associated with any particular clinical manifestations in the chronic Chagas patients in Bolivia. PMID:20502516

  10. Histological and endoscopic features of the stomachs of patients with Chagas disease in the era of Helicobacter pylori

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    Fernanda Machado Fonseca

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Most studies that have evaluated the stomachs of patients with Chagas disease were performed before the discovery of Helicobacter pylori and used no control groups. This study compared the gastric features of chagasic and non-chagasic patients and assessed whether gastritis could be associated with Chagas disease. Methods Gastric biopsy samples were taken from patients who underwent endoscopy for histological analysis according to the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori infection was assessed by histology, 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR, serology and the 13C-urea breath test. Patients were considered H. pylori-negative when all of these diagnostic tests were negative. Clinical and socio-demographic data were obtained by reviewing medical records and using a questionnaire. Results The prevalence of H. pylori infection (70.3% versus 71.7% and chronic gastritis (92.2% versus 85% was similar in the chagasic and non-chagasic groups, respectively; such as peptic ulcer, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Gastritis was associated with H. pylori infection independent of Chagas disease in a log-binomial regression model. However, the chagasic H. pylori-negative patients showed a significantly higher grade of mononuclear (in the corpus and polymorphonuclear (PMN (in the antrum cell infiltration. Additionally, the patients with the digestive form of Chagas disease showed a significantly lower prevalence of corpus atrophy than those with other clinical forms. Conclusions The prevalence of H. pylori infection and of gastric histological and endoscopic features was similar among the chagasic and non-chagasic patients. Additionally, this is the first controlled study to demonstrate that H. pylori is the major cause of gastritis in patients with Chagas disease.

  11. Globalização, iniqüidade e doença de Chagas Globalization, inequity and Chagas disease

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    João Carlos Pinto Dias

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Chagas (tripanossomíase americana, apresenta múltiplos aspectos sócio-culturais e político-econômicos que envolvem questões de iniqüidade e globalização. São relações presentes tanto nos processos de produção da doença como nas possibilidades de sua prevenção e manejo. Apesar da pobreza da região, envolvendo questões de iniqüidade e globalização, a doença tem sido controlada em várias áreas, o que reforça a auto-estima dos países. Para o futuro, problemas e desafios podem ser esperados, principalmente em termos da assistência médica para os indivíduos já infectados e da sustentação de uma vigilância epidemiológica permanente. Ambos estes pontos dependem de um melhor desempenho dos sistemas nacionais de saúde, principalmente em termos de sua competência e da superação de situações de iniqüidade. Particularmente, tem cabido à comunidade científica e acadêmica latino-americana um papel de grande destaque na implementação e sustentação de políticas de controle da doença, que hoje evoluíram para estratégias de ação compartida entre países, o que pode significar importante avanço no contexto político da região.Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis bears a close relationship to multiple social and political aspects involving issues of globalization and inequity. Such relations concern the process of disease production and control in parallel with medical management. Despite the poverty in Latin America and various problems related to inequities and globalization, Chagas disease has been controlled in several areas, a fact that reinforces the countries' self-reliance. Several problems and challenges related to the disease can be expected in the future, mainly concerning medical care for already infected individuals and the sustainability of effective epidemiological surveillance. Both points depend heavily on improved performance by the national health systems, principally in

  12. Epidemiología de la enfermedad de Chagas en el estado de Veracruz Epidemiology of Chagas disease in the state of Veracruz

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    Elsa L Segura

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar la seroprevalencia de enfermedad de Chagas, los factores de riesgo de la vivienda e índices entomológicos, para proponer medidas de control en 11 jurisdicciones sanitarias del estado de Veracruz. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Entre 1997 y 2001 se hizo un estudio transversal cuya muestra quedó integrada por 281 localidades, 2 526 viviendas y 9 782 individuos. Se aplicó un cuestionario sobre factores de riesgo, se tomó sangre en papel filtro y se buscaron triatominos en el intra y peridomicilio. Se obtuvo la prevalencia de exposición a factores de riesgo y de seropositividad para la enfermedad. Se hizo análisis bivariado mediante la razón de momios, ji de Mantel y Haenszel e intervalo de confianza a 95% como prueba de significancia estadística. El análisis multivariado se hizo mediante la regresión logística no condicional y se incluyeron las variables que durante el análisis bivariado mostraron un valor de p hasta de 0.20. El impacto potencial se estimó con base en la fracción etiológica en expuestos. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia de enfermedad de Chagas fluctuó entre 0 y 2.8%. Las jurisdicciones con mayor riesgo fueron Tuxpan, Pánuco y Córdoba, y sin riesgo, Orizaba. Los principales factores de riesgo de la vivienda fueron el techo y muro de palma/zacate y piso de tierra, así como la presencia del vector y la ventilación. CONCLUSIONES: Es necesario realizar vigilancia epidemiológica basada en educación para la salud, mejoramiento de la vivienda y uso de insecticidas.OBJECTIVE: To assess the seroprevalence, household risk factors, and entomological indicators, in order to frame control measures in 11 Sanitary Jurisdictions of the state. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study included 281 towns, 2 526 households, and 9782 individuals. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Blood was obtained in filter paper and a search for triatomines was conducted inside of and around dwellings. Prevalence rates were used to

  13. Clínica e terapêutica da doença de Chagas

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    Francisco S. Laranja

    1948-06-01

    Full Text Available 1 - Baseados na experiência adquirida nos últimos cinco anos em Bambuí, Minas Gerais, onde mais de seiscentos casos de doença de Chagas tém sido estudados, os autores fazem uma revisão das manifestações clínicas desta doença. mencionam alguns dados sôbre a incidência da esquizotripanose e chamam a atenção para a importância social desta moléstia. 2 - Sugerem a seguinte sistematização das fórmas clinicas da esquizotripanose: a Forma aguda; b Formas crônicas: 1 - Forma indeterminada (cardiacos potenciais, 2 - Forma cardíaca (cardiopatia crônica. Os autores não encontraram no material estudado em Bambuí casos classificaveis como forma nervosa crônica. 3 - Apresentam evidências de ordem clínica e experimental que justificam admitir-se a cardiopatia crônica da doença de Chagas como entidade clinica definida. 4 - As manifestações da infecção aguda são estudadas à luz da experiência adquirida com os 103 casos agudos diagnosticados em Bambuí. Dois tipos de fenômenos edematosos podem ocorrer em pacientes com esquizotripanose aguda: o edema local, de porta de entrada do parasito, e o edema generalizado (o chamado "mixedema". A patogenia dêste último é revista e sugere-se que ele seja devido a uma hipoproteinemia. O edema local parece de natureza inflamatória. As manifestações da cardiopatia aguda da doença de Chagas são descritas. Ritmo de galope, aumento da area cardíaca (em alguns casos devido a transudato pericárdico, prolongamento do espaço P-R, alterações primárias da onda T e extra-sístoles ventriculares - constituem os sinais mais importantes para o diagnóstico da cardiopatia aguda. Bloqueio de ramo direito foi encontrado em três casos fatais de cardiopatia aguda, um dos quais apresentou também pronunciado desnivelamento de ST (padrão de injúria. A morte durante a infecção aguda é usualmente precedida por manifestações convulsivas. Na maioria dos casos as manifestações, da infec

  14. Inoculação experimental de Equus asinus com Leishmania chagasi Cunha & Chagas, 1937 Experimental infection of Equus asinus with Leishmania chagasi Cunha & Chagas, 1937

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    Elúzio José Lima Cerqueira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Quatro Equus asinus foram inoculados com promastigotas de Leishmania chagasi Cunha & Chagas, 1937 e acompanhados durante 12 meses através de: pesquisa de amastigotas em esfregaços e culturas de sangue periférico em fragmentos de tecido do lábio inferior, medula óssea, baço e fígado e de testes de ELISA e TRALd. Estes foram positivos nos 8º, 10º e 12º meses após a inoculação. O exame histopatológico pós necropsia, demonstrou discreto número de amastigotas no fígado de dois dos eqüídeos inoculados. Apesar de desafiados com elevado número de promastigotas, os animais não desenvolveram infecções patentes e não infectaram experimentalmente a vetora Lutzomya longipalpis. Os resultados induzem a acreditar que os eqüídeos são desprovidos de importância como reservatórios na cadeia de transmissão da leishmaniose visceral, embora sirvam como boa fonte de alimentação sangüínea e proliferação da vetora Lutzomyia longipalpis.Four Equus asinus were challenged with promastigotes of Leishmania chagasi Cunha & Chagas, 1937, and followed up for 12 months. They were observed by means of direct testing for promastigotes in smears and culture of peripheral blood, fragments from inferior lip, bone marrow, spleen and liver and the immunological assays ELISA and TRALd. The post-necropsy histological examination demonstrated a small number of amastigotes in the liver of two animals. ELISA and TRALd tests were positive at the 8th, 10th and 12th month after inoculation. The results suggest that the donkeys were able to overcome the experimental leishmanial infection and did not infect the vector Lutzomyia longipalpis in the laboratory. Consequently they can not be considered an important reservoir in the epidemiological chain of transmission of visceral leishmaniasis, although they represent an important blood source for the vector and its proliferation.

  15. A critical evaluation of subtalar joint arthrosis associated with middle facet talocalcaneal coalition in 21 surgically managed patients: a retrospective computed tomography review. Investigations involving middle facet coalitions-part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernbach, Klaus J; Barkan, Howard; Blitz, Neal M

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition is frequently associated with rearfoot arthrosis that is often managed surgically with rearfoot fusion. However, no objective method for classifying the extent of subtalar joint arthrosis exists. No study has clearly identified the extent of posterior facet arthrosis present in a large cohort treated surgically for talocalcaneal coalition through preoperative computerized axial tomography. The authors conducted a retrospective review of 21 patients (35 feet) with coalition who were surgically treated over a 12-year period for coalition on at least 1 foot. Using a predefined original staging system, the extent of the arthrosis was categorized into normal or mild (Stage I), moderate (Stage II), and severe (Stage III) arthrosis. The association of stage and age is statistically significant. All of the feet with Stage III arthrosis had fibrous coalitions. No foot with osseous coalition had Stage III arthrosis. The distribution of arthrosis staging differs between fibrous and osseous coalitions. Only fibrous coalitions had the most advanced arthrosis (Stage III), whereas osseous coalitions did not. This suggests that osseous coalitions may have a protective effect in the prevention of severe degeneration of the subtalar joint. Concomitant subtalar joint arthrosis severity progresses with age; surgeons may want to consider earlier surgical intervention to prevent arthrosis progression in patients with symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition.

  16. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S. Code...

  17. Columnar modelling of nucleation burst evolution in the convective boundary layer – first results from a feasibility study Part III: Preliminary results on physicochemical model performance using two "clean air mass" reference scenarios

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    O. Hellmuth

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Paper I of four papers, a revised columnar high-order model to investigate gas-aerosol-turbulence interactions in the convective boundary layer (CBL was proposed. In Paper II, the model capability to predict first-, second- and third-order moments of meteorological variables in the CBL was demonstrated using available observational data. In the present Paper III, the high-order modelling concept is extended to sulphur and ammonia chemistry as well as to aerosol dynamics. Based on the previous CBL simulation, a feasibility study is performed using two "clean air mass" scenarios with an emission source at the ground but low aerosol background concentration. Such scenarios synoptically correspond to the advection of fresh post-frontal air in an anthropogenically influenced region. The aim is to evaluate the time-height evolution of ultrafine condensation nuclei (UCNs and to elucidate the interactions between meteorological and physicochemical variables in a CBL column. The scenarios differ in the treatment of new particle formation (NPF, whereas homogeneous nucleation according to the classical nucleation theory (CNT is considered. The first scenario considers nucleation of a binary system consisting of water vapour and sulphuric acid (H2SO4 vapour, the second one nucleation of a ternary system additionally involving ammonia (NH3. Here, the two synthetic scenarios are discussed in detail, whereas special attention is payed to the role of turbulence in the formation of the typical UCN burst behaviour, that can often be observed in the surface layer. The intercomparison of the two scenarios reveals large differences in the evolution of the UCN number concentration in the surface layer as well as in the time-height cross-sections of first-order moments and double correlation terms. Although in both cases the occurrence of NPF bursts could be simulated, the burst characteristics and genesis of the bursts are completely different. It is demonstrated

  18. Association of L-ficolin levels and FCN2 genotypes with chronic Chagas disease.

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    Paola R Luz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: L-ficolin (encoded by FCN2 binds to acetylated sugar moieties of many pathogens, including Trypanosoma cruzi, promoting their phagocytosis and lysis by the complement system. METHODS: We investigated L-ficolin levels in 160 T. cruzi infected patients with chronic Chagas disease and 71 healthy individuals, and FCN2 polymorphisms (-986 G>A, -602 G>A, and -4 A>G in the promoter and A258S in exon 8 in 243 patients, being 88 indeterminate (asymptomatic, 96 with cardiac, 23 with digestive and 33 with cardiodigestive manifestations (two were unspecified and 305 controls (135 for A258S. RESULTS: Patients presented lower L-ficolin plasma levels than controls (p<0.0001. Among the different groups of cardiac commitment, individuals with moderate forms had higher L-ficolin levels than the severe forms (P = 0.039. Lower L-ficolin levels were found associated with the 258S variant in the patients (P = 0.034. We found less -4A/G heterozygotes in the cardiac patients, than in the controls (OR = 0.56 [95% CI = 0.33-0.94], P = 0.034. Heterozygote -4A/G genotypes with the 258S variant and 258SS homozygotes were nevertheless more frequent among cardiodigestive patients than in controls (OR = 14.1 [95% CI = 3.5-56.8], P = 0.0001 and in indeterminate patients (OR = 3.2 [95% CI = 1.1-9.4], P = 0.037. We also found an association of the allelic frequency of the 258S variant with cardiodigestive Chagas disease compared to controls (OR = 2.24 [95% CI = 1.1-4.5], P = 0.037. Thus, decreased patient levels of L-ficolin reflect not only protein consumption due to the disease process, but also the higher frequency of the 258S variant in patients with cardiodigestive symptoms. CONCLUSION: The very first study on Brazilian cohort associates both L-ficolin plasma levels and FCN2 variants to Chagas disease and subsequent disease progression. The prognostic value of L-ficolin levels and the FCN2*A258S polymorphism

  19. A field trial of alternative targeted screening strategies for Chagas disease in Arequipa, Peru.

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    Gabrielle C Hunter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is endemic in the rural areas of southern Peru and a growing urban problem in the regional capital of Arequipa, population ∼860,000. It is unclear how to implement cost-effective screening programs across a large urban and periurban environment.We compared four alternative screening strategies in 18 periurban communities, testing individuals in houses with 1 infected vectors; 2 high vector densities; 3 low vector densities; and 4 no vectors. Vector data were obtained from routine Ministry of Health insecticide application campaigns. We performed ring case detection (radius of 15 m around seropositive individuals, and collected data on costs of implementation for each strategy.Infection was detected in 21 of 923 (2.28% participants. Cases had lived more time on average in rural places than non-cases (7.20 years versus 3.31 years, respectively. Significant risk factors on univariate logistic regression for infection were age (OR 1.02; p = 0.041, time lived in a rural location (OR 1.04; p = 0.022, and time lived in an infested area (OR 1.04; p = 0.008. No multivariate model with these variables fit the data better than a simple model including only the time lived in an area with triatomine bugs. There was no significant difference in prevalence across the screening strategies; however a self-assessment of disease risk may have biased participation, inflating prevalence among residents of houses where no infestation was detected. Testing houses with infected-vectors was least expensive. Ring case detection yielded four secondary cases in only one community, possibly due to vector-borne transmission in this community, apparently absent in the others.Targeted screening for urban Chagas disease is promising in areas with ongoing vector-borne transmission; however, these pockets of epidemic transmission remain difficult to detect a priori. The flexibility to adapt to the epidemiology that emerges during screening is key to

  20. A Field Trial of Alternative Targeted Screening Strategies for Chagas Disease in Arequipa, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gabrielle C.; Borrini-Mayorí, Katty; Ancca Juárez, Jenny; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Verastegui, Manuela R.; Malaga Chavez, Fernando S.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan Geny; Córdova Benzaquen, Eleazar; Náquira, César; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn; Levy, Michael Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is endemic in the rural areas of southern Peru and a growing urban problem in the regional capital of Arequipa, population ∼860,000. It is unclear how to implement cost-effective screening programs across a large urban and periurban environment. Methods We compared four alternative screening strategies in 18 periurban communities, testing individuals in houses with 1) infected vectors; 2) high vector densities; 3) low vector densities; and 4) no vectors. Vector data were obtained from routine Ministry of Health insecticide application campaigns. We performed ring case detection (radius of 15 m) around seropositive individuals, and collected data on costs of implementation for each strategy. Results Infection was detected in 21 of 923 (2.28%) participants. Cases had lived more time on average in rural places than non-cases (7.20 years versus 3.31 years, respectively). Significant risk factors on univariate logistic regression for infection were age (OR 1.02; p = 0.041), time lived in a rural location (OR 1.04; p = 0.022), and time lived in an infested area (OR 1.04; p = 0.008). No multivariate model with these variables fit the data better than a simple model including only the time lived in an area with triatomine bugs. There was no significant difference in prevalence across the screening strategies; however a self-assessment of disease risk may have biased participation, inflating prevalence among residents of houses where no infestation was detected. Testing houses with infected-vectors was least expensive. Ring case detection yielded four secondary cases in only one community, possibly due to vector-borne transmission in this community, apparently absent in the others. Conclusions Targeted screening for urban Chagas disease is promising in areas with ongoing vector-borne transmission; however, these pockets of epidemic transmission remain difficult to detect a priori. The flexibility to adapt to the epidemiology that

  1. Chagas disease in an area of recent occupation in Cochabamba, Bolivia

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    Albarracin-Veizaga Hugo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A descriptive, entomological and seroepidemiological study on Chagas disease was conducted in a place of recent occupation on the outskirts of Cochabamba, Bolivia: Avaroa/Primer de Mayo (population:3,000, where the socio-economic level is low and no control measures have been made available. METHODS: The immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT was used for IgG and IgM anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in filter paper bloodspot eluates from 128 subjects (73 females, 55 males selected by systematic sampling. Concerning each subject age, gender, birthplace, occupation, duration of residence and building materials used in their houses were recorded. Vectors were captured both in domestic and peridomestic environments. RESULTS: Seropositive, 12.5% (16/128: females, 15.1% (11/73; males, 9.1% (5/55. Average time of residence: 6.1 years for the whole population sample and 7.4 years for the seropositive subjects. Most houses had adobe walls (76.7% , n= 30, galvanized iron rooves (86.7% and earthen floors (53.4% 80% of the walls had crevices. One hundred forty seven specimens of Triatoma infestans were captured, of which 104 (70.7% were domestic, and 1 peridomestic Triatoma sordida. Precipitin host identification: birds, 67.5%; humans, 27.8%; rodents, 11.9%; dogs, 8.7%; cats, 1.6%. House infestation and density indices were 53.3 and 493.0 respectively. We found 21 (14.3% specimens of T. infestans infected with trypanosomes, 18 (85.7% of which in domestic environments. DISCUSSION: The elements for the vector transmission of Chagas disease are present in Avaroa/Primer de Mayo and the ancient custom of keeping guinea pigs indoors adds to the risk of human infection. In neighboring Cochabamba, due to substandard quality control, contaminated blood transfusions are not infrequent, which further aggravates the spread of Chagas disease. Prompt action to check the transmission of this infection, involving additionally the congenital and transfusional

  2. Accuracy of chimeric proteins in the serological diagnosis of chronic chagas disease - a Phase II study.

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    Fred Luciano Neves Santos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of current serologic tests for diagnosing chronic Chagas disease (CD is highly variable. The search for new diagnostic markers has been a constant challenge for improving accuracy and reducing the number of inconclusive results.Here, four chimeric proteins (IBMP-8.1 to -8.4 comprising immunodominant regions of different Trypanosoma cruzi antigens were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proteins were used to detect specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies in the sera of 857 chagasic and 689 non-chagasic individuals to evaluate their accuracy for chronic CD diagnosis. The antigens were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. The sensitivity and specificity values ranged from 94.3% to 99.3% and 99.4% to 100%, respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR values were 6,462 for IBMP-8.1, 3,807 for IBMP-8.2, 32,095 for IBMP-8.3, and 283,714 for IBMP-8.4. These chimeric antigens presented DORs that were higher than the commercial test Pathozyme Chagas. The antigens IBMP-8.3 and -8.4 also showed DORs higher than the Gold ELISA Chagas test. Mixtures with equimolar concentrations were tested in order to improve the diagnosis accuracy of negative samples with high signal and positive samples with low signal. However, no gain in accuracy was observed relative to the individual antigens. A total of 1,079 additional sera were used to test cross-reactivity to unrelated diseases. The cross-reactivity rates ranged from 0.37% to 0.74% even for Leishmania spp., a pathogen showing relatively high genome sequence identity to T. cruzi. Imprecision analyses showed that IBMP chimeras are very stable and the results are highly reproducible.Our findings indicate that the IBMP-8.4 antigen can be safely used in serological tests for T. cruzi screening in blood banks and for chronic CD laboratory diagnosis.

  3. Antigenicity and diagnostic potential of vaccine candidates in human Chagas disease.

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    Shivali Gupta

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and an emerging infectious disease in the US and Europe. We have shown TcG1, TcG2, and TcG4 antigens elicit protective immunity to T. cruzi in mice and dogs. Herein, we investigated antigenicity of the recombinant proteins in humans to determine their potential utility for the development of next generation diagnostics for screening of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease.Sera samples from inhabitants of the endemic areas of Argentina-Bolivia and Mexico-Guatemala were analyzed in 1(st-phase for anti-T. cruzi antibody response by traditional serology tests; and in 2(nd-phase for antibody response to the recombinant antigens (individually or mixed by an ELISA. We noted similar antibody response to candidate antigens in sera samples from inhabitants of Argentina and Mexico (n=175. The IgG antibodies to TcG1, TcG2, and TcG4 (individually and TcG(mix were present in 62-71%, 65-78% and 72-82%, and 89-93% of the subjects, respectively, identified to be seropositive by traditional serology. Recombinant TcG1- (93.6%, TcG2- (96%, TcG4- (94.6% and TcG(mix- (98% based ELISA exhibited significantly higher specificity compared to that noted for T. cruzi trypomastigote-based ELISA (77.8% in diagnosing T. cruzi-infection and avoiding cross-reactivity to Leishmania spp. No significant correlation was noted in the sera levels of antibody response and clinical severity of Chagas disease in seropositive subjects.Three candidate antigens were recognized by antibody response in chagasic patients from two distinct study sites and expressed in diverse strains of the circulating parasites. A multiplex ELISA detecting antibody response to three antigens was highly sensitive and specific in diagnosing T. cruzi infection in humans, suggesting that a diagnostic kit based on TcG1, TcG2 and TcG4 recombinant proteins will be useful in diverse situations.

  4. Use of a Chagas Urine Nanoparticle Test (Chunap) to Correlate with Parasitemia Levels in T. cruzi/HIV Co-infected Patients

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    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Mejia, Carolina; Clark, Daniel E.; Choi, Jeong; Reimer-McAtee, Melissa J.; Castro, Rosario; Valencia-Ayala, Edward; Flores, Jorge; Bowman, Natalie; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Torrico, Faustino; Liotta, Lance; Bern, Caryn; Luchini, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of reactivated Chagas disease in HIV patients could be lifesaving. In Latin America, the diagnosis is made by microscopical detection of the T. cruzi parasite in the blood; a diagnostic test that lacks sensitivity. This study evaluates if levels of T. cruzi antigens in urine, determined by Chunap (Chagas urine nanoparticle test), are correlated with parasitemia levels in T. cruzi/HIV co-infected patients. Methodology/Principal Findings T. cruzi antigens in urine of HIV patients (N = 55: 31 T. cruzi infected and 24 T. cruzi serology negative) were concentrated using hydrogel particles and quantified by Western Blot and a calibration curve. Reactivation of Chagas disease was defined by the observation of parasites in blood by microscopy. Parasitemia levels in patients with serology positive for Chagas disease were classified as follows: High parasitemia or reactivation of Chagas disease (detectable parasitemia by microscopy), moderate parasitemia (undetectable by microscopy but detectable by qPCR), and negative parasitemia (undetectable by microscopy and qPCR). The percentage of positive results detected by Chunap was: 100% (7/7) in cases of reactivation, 91.7% (11/12) in cases of moderate parasitemia, and 41.7% (5/12) in cases of negative parasitemia. Chunap specificity was found to be 91.7%. Linear regression analysis demonstrated a direct relationship between parasitemia levels and urine T. cruzi antigen concentrations (p 105 pg was chosen to determine patients with reactivation of Chagas disease (7/7). Antigenuria levels were 36.08 times (95% CI: 7.28 to 64.88) higher in patients with CD4+ lymphocyte counts below 200/mL (p = 0.016). No significant differences were found in HIV loads and CD8+ lymphocyte counts. Conclusion Chunap shows potential for early detection of Chagas reactivation. With appropriate adaptation, this diagnostic test can be used to monitor Chagas disease status in T. cruzi/HIV co-infected patients. PMID:26919324

  5. Quality assurance of the serologic diagnosis of Chagas' disease Garantía de calidad en el diagnóstico serológico de la enfermedad de Chagas

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    Estela N. Cura

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available A quality assurance program of the Chagas' disease laboratory network of Argentina has been conducted by the National Reference Center since 1988, with the aim of assessing the reliability of serologic test results. Chagas' disease is endemic in Argentina, but the prevalence of seropositivity for Trypanosoma cruzi among 18- to 20-year-old men decreased from 5.8% in 1981 to 1.8% in 1994. About 600 laboratories form the Chagas' disease laboratory network, with main central laboratories in each of the 24 provinces in Argentina. The quality assurance program promotes regular use of good laboratory practice and internal and external quality control to improve performance of the participants; it also provides technical assistance and guidelines. Eventual corrective measures are discussed in workshops. Results of the first external evaluation by proficiency testing of serum panels and confirmation of results for 58 of the main laboratories reveal that from 1988 to 1994 the rate of agreement has increased.El Centro Nacional de Referencia ha llevado a cabo desde 1988 un programa de garantía de calidad en la red de laboratorios para el diagnóstico de la enfermedad de Chagas en Argentina. El propósito ha sido evaluar la confiabilidad de los resultados de la prueba serológica. La enfermedad de Chagas es endémica en Argentina, pero la prevalencia de seropositividad a Trypanosoma cruzi en hombres de 18 a 24 años bajó de 5,8% en 1981 a 1,8% en 1994. Alrededor de 600 laboratorios forman la red para el diagnóstico de la enfermedad de Chagas, que cuenta con un laboratorio central en cada una de las 24 provincias argentinas. El programa para la garantía de la calidad promueve la aplicación continua de las buenas prácticas de laboratorio y se vale de controles de calidad internos y externos para mejorar el rendimiento de los participantes. También provee asistencia técnica y sienta parámetros normativos. Cualquier enmienda que resulte necesaria se

  6. Capacidade funcional máxima, fração de ejeção e classe funcional na cardiomiopatia chagásica: existe relação entre estes índices? Maximal functional capacity, ejection fraction, and functional class in Chagas cardiomyopathy: are these indices related?

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    Charles Mady

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a potencial associação entre a capacidade funcional máxima (VO2max, fração de ejeção do ventrículo esquerdo (FEVE e a classe funcional (CF pela NYHA em pacientes com cardiomiopatia chagásica. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 104 homens, com idade média de 40.3± 9.0 anos (variação: de 18 a 65, com diagnóstico estabelecido de cardiomiopatia chagásica. A FEVE e VO2max foram classificadas em três categorias: FEVE 0.50 e VO2max 20 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: Do total, 31 (29.8% pacientes estavam em CF II, 41 (39.4% em classe funcional III, e 32 (30.8% em CF IV. Os valores correspondentes do VO2max e da FEVE para CF II, III e IV foram 21.5±4.0 ml.kg-1.min-1, 18.3±5.8 ml.kg-1.min-1 e 14.7±4.9 ml.kg-1.min-1 e 0.50±0.6, 0.35±0.9 e 0.29±0.7, respectivamente. FEVE 0.50 como também VO2max >20 ml.kg-1.min-1. CONCLUSÃO: Existe uma boa associação entre a classe funcional, a capacidade funcional máxima e a fração de ejeção do ventrículo esquerdo em pacientes com cardiomiopatia chagásica. Dados que podem ser úteis no manuseio da insuficiência cardíaca, em chagásicos.OBJECTIVE: Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and maximal functional capacity (VO2max have both been shown to be related to a poor long-term survival in Chagas' disease patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the potential association of VO2max, LVEF, and NYHA functional class in patients with Chagas' disease cardiomyopathy. METHODS: One hundred four male patients, aged 40.3±9.0 years (range, 18 to 65, with a definite diagnosis of Chagas disease cardiomyopathy were studied. LVEF and VO2max were both classified into 3 degrees: LVEF 0.50 and VO2max 20 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectively. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients (29.8% were in NYHA functional class II, 41 (39.4% in functional class III, and 32 (30.8% in functional class IV. The corresponding values of VO2max and LVEF for functional classes II, III, and IV were 21.5±4.0 ml.kg-1

  7. Trasplante cardíaco en pacientes con enfermedad de Chagas. Experiencia de un único centro

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    Alfredo Inácio Fiorelli

    2011-07-01

    Conclusiones: El trasplante cardíaco es el único tratamiento actual eficaz de tratamiento de la enfermedad de Chagas en fase terminal. La reactivación de la enfermedad es un problema real que es fácilmente revertido con la introducción de la terapéutica farmacológica específica, restaurando los padrones histológicos del miocardio sin dejar secuelas. La inmunosupresión, en especial los corticoides, predisponen al desarrollo de neoplasias y a la reactivación de la enfermedad, exigiendo una atención especial su interrupción o reducción precoz.

  8. Automated identification of insect vectors of Chagas disease in Brazil and Mexico: the Virtual Vector Lab

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    Rodrigo Gurgel-Gonçalves

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Identification of arthropods important in disease transmission is a crucial, yet difficult, task that can demand considerable training and experience. An important case in point is that of the 150+ species of Triatominae, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease across the Americas. We present a fully automated system that is able to identify triatomine bugs from Mexico and Brazil with an accuracy consistently above 80%, and with considerable potential for further improvement. The system processes digital photographs from a photo apparatus into landmarks, and uses ratios of measurements among those landmarks, as well as (in a preliminary exploration two measurements that approximate aspects of coloration, as the basis for classification. This project has thus produced a working prototype that achieves reasonably robust correct identification rates, although many more developments can and will be added, and—more broadly—the project illustrates the value of multidisciplinary collaborations in resolving difficult and complex challenges.

  9. Nuclear angiocardiographic evaluation of effect of the isosorbide dinitrate in chronic Chagas' patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin Neto, J.A.; Souza, A.C.S.; Maciel, B. C.; Gallo Junior, L.; Iazigi, N.

    1988-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of a systemic vasodilator therapy (isosorbide dinitrate - ID) were studied in 13 normal individuals and in 40 chronic Chagas' patients, grouped as follows: 13 in the indeterminate phase of the disease; 14 with the chronic cardiac form and 13 presenting only clinical and laboratory findings of megaesophagus and/or megacolon (digestive form). The LV pump function was studied by means of radionuclide angiography in baseline condition and after 5-10 min of sublingual administration of 5mg of ID.Ejection fraction (EF), peak velocity of LV emptying (Vmax), heart rate (HR) and blood pressure BP) were determined under each condition. All groups showed comparable mean HR and BP values. Only the cardiac group exhibited lower values of EF and Vmax, as compared to normal controls. The vasodilator drug elicited significant comparable (p [pt

  10. Nuevas perspectivas en el manejo terapéutico de la enfermedad de chagas

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    Alfonso J Rodríguez-Morales

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Desde hace un par de décadas y más aun en los últimos cinco años, se ha desarrollado un gran número de estudios que demuestran la actividad tripanocida de diversas drogas, algunas nuevas, muchas viejas, lo cual aunado al conocimiento acerca de la persistencia parasitaria de Trypanosoma cruzi en tejido miocárdico, entre otros, durante las fases crónicas de la enfermedad, permiten hacer patente que existe un nuevo paradigma, nuevas aproximacio-nes al manejo terapéutico del paciente con enfermedad de Chagas. En el presente artículo se revisan las principales bases que sustentan dichas perspectivas terapéuticas en la tripanosomiasis americana.

  11. Could the bug Triatoma sherlocki be vectoring Chagas disease in small mining communities in Bahia, Brazil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, C E; Folly-Ramos, E; Peterson, A T; Lima-Neiva, V; Gumiel, M; Duarte, R; Lima, M M; Locks, M; Beltrão, M; Costa, J

    2009-12-01

    Searches for Chagas disease vectors were performed at the type locality from which Triatoma sherlocki Papa et al. (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae) was described in the municipality of Gentio do Ouro, in the state of Bahia, Brazil, and in a small artisan quarry-mining community approximately 13 km distant in a remote area of the same municipality. The latter site represents a new locality record for this species. Adults, nymphs and exuviae of T. sherlocki were found in 21% of human dwellings, indicating that the species is in the process of domiciliation. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in collected bugs was 10.8%. Simple predictive approaches based on environmental similarity were used to identify additional sites likely suitable for this species. The approach successfully predicted an additional five sites for the species in surrounding landscapes. Ecological and entomological indicators were combined to discuss whether this scenario likely represents an isolated case or an emerging public health problem.

  12. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

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    Luiz Henrique Conde SANGENIS

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro.

  13. An experimental and clinical assay with ketoconazole in the treatment of Chagas disease

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    Zigman Brener

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available Ketoconazole an azole antifungic drug which is already in the market has also been demonstrated to be active against Trypanossoma cruzi experimental infections. In this paper we confirmed the drug effect and investigated its range of activity against different T. cruzi strains naturally resistant or susceptible to both standard drugs Nifurtimox and Benznidazole used clinically in Chagas disease. Moreover, we have shown that the association of Ketoconazole plus Lovastatin (an inhibitor of sterol synthesis, which has an antiproliferative effect against T. cruzi in vitro, failed to enhance the supressive effect of Ketoconazole displayed when administered alone to infected mice. Finally, administration in chronic chagasic patients of Ketoconazole at doses used in the treatment of deep mycosis also failed to induce cure as demonstrated by parasitological and serological tests. The strategy of identify and test drugs which are already in the market and fortuitously are active against T. cruzi has been discussed.

  14. Biology, diversity and strategies for the monitoring and control of triatomines--Chagas disease vectors.

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    Costa, Jane; Lorenzo, Marcelo

    2009-07-01

    Despite the relevant achievements in the control of the main Chagas disease vectors Triatoma infestans and Rhodnius prolixus, several factors still promote the risk of infection. The disease is a real threat to the poor rural regions of several countries in Latin America. The current situation in Brazil requires renewed attention due to its high diversity of triatomine species and to the rapid and drastic environmental changes that are occurring. Using the biology, behaviour and diversity of triatomines as a basis for new strategies for monitoring and controlling the vectorial transmission are discussed here. The importance of ongoing long-term monitoring activities for house infestations by T. infestans, Triatoma brasiliensis, Panstrongylus megistus, Triatoma rubrovaria and R. prolixus is also stressed, as well as understanding the invasion by sylvatic species. Moreover, the insecticide resistance is analysed. Strong efforts to sustain and improve surveillance procedures are crucial, especially when the vectorial transmission is considered interrupted in many endemic areas.

  15. Polymerase chain reaction and blood culture in blood donors screened by ELISA test for Chagas' disease

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    Andréa Tieko Kinoshita-Yanaga

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate, through blood culture and PCR, the results of the ELISA for Chagas' disease in the screening of blood donors in the public blood-supply network of the state of Paraná, Brazil, and to map the epidemiological profile of the donors with respect to their risk of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi. The negative and positive results of the ELISA were confirmed by blood culture and PCR for 190/191 individuals (99.5%. For one individual (0.5%, the ELISA was inconclusive, blood culture and IIF were negative, and IHA and PCR positive. Three individuals (1.6% were positive for T. cruzi on all the tests. Donors were predominantly female, and natives of Paraná, of rural origin, had observed or been informed of the presence of the vector in the municipalities where they resided, had never received a blood transfusion, had donated blood 1 to 4 times, and reported no cases of Chagas' disease in their families. We concluded that PCR and blood culturing have excellent potential for confirming the results of the ELISA, and that candidate blood donors with negative or positive tests have a similar risk of infection by T. cruzi, indicating that the ELISA test is sufficiently safe for screening blood prior to use.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar, pela hemocultura e PCR, os resultados do teste ELISA utilizado para doença de Chagas na triagem de doadores de sangue na rede pública do Estado do Paraná, Brasil, e traçar o perfil epidemiológico dos doadores quanto ao risco de infecção pelo Trypanosoma cruzi. Os resultados negativos e positivos do ELISA foram confirmados pela hemocultura e PCR em 190/191 indivíduos (99,5%. Para um indivíduo (0,5%, o teste de ELISA foi inconclusivo, hemocultura e IFI foram negativas, HAI e PCR foram positivas. Três indivíduos (1,6% foram positivos para T. cruzi em todos os testes. A maioria dos doadores era do sexo feminino, oriundos do Estado do Paraná, de origem rural, tinham

  16. Different infective forms trigger distinct immune response in experimental Chagas disease.

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    Paula Melo de Abreu Vieira

    Full Text Available Although metacyclic and blood trypomastigotes are completely functional in relation to parasite-host interaction and/or target cell invasion, they differ in the molecules present on the surface. Thus, aspects related to the variability that the forms of T. cruzi interacts with host cells may lead to fundamental implications on the immune response against this parasite and, consequently, the clinical evolution of Chagas disease. We have shown that BT infected mice presented higher levels of parasitemia during all the acute phase of infection. Moreover, the infection with either MT or BT forms resulted in increased levels of total leukocytes, monocytes and lymphocytes, specifically later for MT and earlier for BT. The infection with BT forms presented earlier production of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α and later of IFN-γ by both T cells subpopulations. This event was accompanied by an early cardiac inflammation with an exacerbation of this process at the end of the acute phase. On the other hand, infection with MT forms result in an early production of IFN-γ, with subsequent control in the production of this cytokine by IL-10, which provided to these animals an immunomodulatory profile in the end of the acute phase. These results are in agreement with what was found for cardiac inflammation where animals infected with MT forms showed intense cardiac inflammation later at infection, with a decrease in the same at the end of this phase. In summary, our findings emphasize the importance of taking into account the inoculums source of T. cruzi, since vectorial or transfusional routes of T. cruzi infection may trigger distinct parasite-host interactions during the acute phase that may influence relevant biological aspects of chronic Chagas disease.

  17. Echocardiographic Parameters and Survival in Chagas Heart Disease with Severe Systolic Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Arruda, Ana Lúcia Martins; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Furtado, Rogério Gomes; Rassi, Danilo Teixeira; Rassi, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Echocardiography provides important information on the cardiac evaluation of patients with heart failure. The identification of echocardiographic parameters in severe Chagas heart disease would help implement treatment and assess prognosis. To correlate echocardiographic parameters with the endpoint cardiovascular mortality in patients with ejection fraction < 35%. Study with retrospective analysis of pre-specified echocardiographic parameters prospectively collected from 60 patients included in the Multicenter Randomized Trial of Cell Therapy in Patients with Heart Diseases (Estudo Multicêntrico Randomizado de Terapia Celular em Cardiopatias) - Chagas heart disease arm. The following parameters were collected: left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters and volumes; ejection fraction; left atrial diameter; left atrial volume; indexed left atrial volume; systolic pulmonary artery pressure; integral of the aortic flow velocity; myocardial performance index; rate of increase of left ventricular pressure; isovolumic relaxation time; E, A, Em, Am and Sm wave velocities; E wave deceleration time; E/A and E/Em ratios; and mitral regurgitation. In the mean 24.18-month follow-up, 27 patients died. The mean ejection fraction was 26.6 ± 5.34%. In the multivariate analysis, the parameters ejection fraction (HR = 1.114; p = 0.3704), indexed left atrial volume (HR = 1.033; p < 0.0001) and E/Em ratio (HR = 0.95; p = 0.1261) were excluded. The indexed left atrial volume was an independent predictor in relation to the endpoint, and values > 70.71 mL/m 2 were associated with a significant increase in mortality (log rank p < 0.0001). The indexed left atrial volume was the only independent predictor of mortality in this population of Chagasic patients with severe systolic dysfunction

  18. Health-related quality of life in patients with Chagas disease: a review of the evidence

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    Giovane Rodrigo Sousa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (ChD, a neglected tropical disease caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, remains a serious public health issue in Latin America and is an emerging disease in several non-endemic countries, where knowledge of the condition and experience with its clinical management are limited. Regionally, the disease is the major cause of disability secondary to tropical diseases in young adults. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL impairment is common in patients with ChD, especially in those with Chagas dilated cardiomyopathy, the most severe manifestation of the disease, which frequently leads to heart failure. The aim of this review was to conduct a literature search for studies that have evaluated the determining factors of HRQoL in ChD patients. We included cross-sectional, case-control, cohort, and experimental studies, as well as clinical trials that evaluated the HRQoL in ChD patients aged 18 to 60 years and are presenting an explicit description of statistical analysis. Using a combination of keywords based on Descriptors in Health Sciences (DeCS and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH for searches in PubMed and the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO, 148 studies were found. After exclusions, 12 studies were selected for analysis. Three main findings were extracted from these studies: 1 cardiac involvement is associated with a worse HRQoL in ChD patients; 2 HRQoL is associated with the patients' functional capacity; and 3 simple and inexpensive therapeutic measures are effective for improving HRQoL in ChD patients. Hence, ChD patients' functional capacity, the effectiveness of non-surgical conservative treatment, and cardiac involvement are important determining factors for the HRQoL in ChD patients.

  19. Plasma cytokine expression is associated with cardiac morbidity in chagas disease.

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    Giovane Rodrigo Sousa

    Full Text Available The expression of immune response appears to be associated with morbidity in Chagas disease. However, the studies in this field have usually employed small samples of patients and statistical analyses that do not consider the wide dispersion of cytokine production observed in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the plasma cytokine levels in well-defined clinical polar groups of chagasic patients divided into categories that better reflect the wide cytokine profile and its relationship with morbidity. Patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi were grouped as indeterminate (IND and cardiac (CARD forms ranging from 23 to 69 years of age (mean of 45.6±11.25. The IND group included 82 individuals, ranging from 24 to 66 years of age (mean of 39.6±10.3. The CARD group included 94 patients ranging from 23 to 69 years of age (mean of 48±12.52 presenting dilated cardiomyopathy. None of the patients have undergone chemotherapeutic treatment, nor had been previously treated for T. cruzi infection. Healthy non-chagasic individuals, ranging from 29 to 55 years of age (mean of 42.6±8.8 were included as a control group (NI. IND patients have a higher intensity of interleukin 10 (IL-10 expression when compared with individuals in the other groups. By contrast, inflammatory cytokine expression, such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β, proved to be the highest in the CARD group. Correlation analysis showed that higher IL-10 expression was associated with better cardiac function, as determined by left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular diastolic diameter values. Altogether, these findings reinforce the concept that a fine balance between regulatory and inflammatory cytokines represents a key element in the establishment of distinct forms of chronic Chagas disease.

  20. Treatment with Fenofibrate plus a low dose of Benznidazole attenuates cardiac dysfunction in experimental Chagas disease

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    Ágata C. Cevey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi induces serious cardiac alterations during the chronic infection. Intense inflammatory response observed from the beginning of infection, is critical for the control of parasite proliferation and evolution of Chagas disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR-α, are known to modulate inflammation.In this study we investigated whether a PPAR-α agonist, Fenofibrate, improves cardiac function and inflammatory parameters in a murine model of T. cruzi infection. BALB/c mice were sequentially infected with two T. cruzi strains of different genetic background. Benznidazole, commonly used as trypanocidal drug, cleared parasites but did not preclude cardiac pathology, resembling what is found in human chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Fenofibrate treatment restored to normal values the ejection and shortening fractions, left ventricular end-diastolic, left ventricular end-systolic diameter, and isovolumic relaxation time. Moreover, it reduced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-6, TNF-α and NOS2 and heart remodeling mediators (MMP-9 and CTGF, and reduced serum creatine kinase activity. The fact that Fenofibrate partially inhibited NOS2 expression and NO release in the presence of a PPAR-α non-competitive inhibitor, suggested it also acted through PPAR-α-independent pathways. Since IκBα cytosolic degradation was inhibited by Fenofibrate, it can be concluded that the NFκB pathway has a role in its effects. Thus, we demonstrate that Fenofibrate acts through PPAR-α-dependent and -independent pathways.Our study shows that combined treatment with Fenofibrate plus Benznidazole is able both to reverse the cardiac dysfunction associated with the ongoing inflammatory response and fibrosis and to attain parasite clearance in an experimental model of Chagas disease. Keywords: Trypanosoma cruzi, Heart dysfunction, PPAR-α, Fenofibrate treatment, Inflammatory mediators

  1. Risk factors associated with Chagas disease in pregnant women in Santander, a highly endemic Colombian area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Domínguez, Yeny Z; Cucunubá, Zulma M; Orozco, Luis C; Valencia-Hernández, Carlos A; León, Cielo M; Florez, Astrid C; Muñoz, Lyda; Pavía, Paula; Montilla, Marleny; Uribe, Luz Marina; García, Carlos; Ardila, William; Nicholls, Rubén Santiago; Puerta, Concepción J

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with Chagas disease in pregnant women in an endemic area of Santander, Colombia. Cross-sectional study included 23 municipalities of Santander, Colombia. Serological IFAT and ELISA tests were undertaken to detect IgG anti- Trypanosoma cruzi. A questionnaire was conducted for assessing the risk factors of each participant. Newborns were evaluated at birth and followed up to 1 year of age to determine congenital infection. An overall prevalence of 3.2% (95% CI 2.4-4.2) among 1518 pregnant women was detected. Prevalences by provinces were as follows: Guanentina: 6.0% (95% CI 4.1-8.5), García Rovira: 2.9% (95% CI: 1.5-4.8) and Comunera: 0.4% (0.4-2.3). The main risk factors identified were age >32 years old (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1-3.9); currently having a thatched roof (OR: 11.8; CI95% 2.2-63.2) and a thatched roof during childhood (OR: 3.0; 95% CI: 1.4-6.6); having below primary school education level (OR: 4.6; 95% CI: 2.2-9.5); and a history of a close contact with the vector (triatomine bugs) at least once during their lifetime (OR: 6.9; 95% CI: 3.7-12.9). No congenital cases were detected by parasitological or serological techniques. Prevalence of Chagas disease in pregnant women is a potential source of infection in this Colombian endemic area. The main risk factors associated with seropositivity were related to conditions favouring the contact with the vector. The results show that it is necessary to continue an active surveillance in order to offer diagnosis and treatment to mothers and their newborns in addition to screening to pregnant women from endemic areas. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Echocardiographic Parameters and Survival in Chagas Heart Disease with Severe Systolic Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo, E-mail: dani.rassi@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Medicina e Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos [Instituto do Coração da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arruda, Ana Lúcia Martins [Instituto de Radiologia da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hotta, Viviane Tiemi [Instituto do Coração da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Furtado, Rogério Gomes; Rassi, Danilo Teixeira; Rassi, Salvador [Faculdade de Medicina e Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Echocardiography provides important information on the cardiac evaluation of patients with heart failure. The identification of echocardiographic parameters in severe Chagas heart disease would help implement treatment and assess prognosis. To correlate echocardiographic parameters with the endpoint cardiovascular mortality in patients with ejection fraction < 35%. Study with retrospective analysis of pre-specified echocardiographic parameters prospectively collected from 60 patients included in the Multicenter Randomized Trial of Cell Therapy in Patients with Heart Diseases (Estudo Multicêntrico Randomizado de Terapia Celular em Cardiopatias) - Chagas heart disease arm. The following parameters were collected: left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters and volumes; ejection fraction; left atrial diameter; left atrial volume; indexed left atrial volume; systolic pulmonary artery pressure; integral of the aortic flow velocity; myocardial performance index; rate of increase of left ventricular pressure; isovolumic relaxation time; E, A, Em, Am and Sm wave velocities; E wave deceleration time; E/A and E/Em ratios; and mitral regurgitation. In the mean 24.18-month follow-up, 27 patients died. The mean ejection fraction was 26.6 ± 5.34%. In the multivariate analysis, the parameters ejection fraction (HR = 1.114; p = 0.3704), indexed left atrial volume (HR = 1.033; p < 0.0001) and E/Em ratio (HR = 0.95; p = 0.1261) were excluded. The indexed left atrial volume was an independent predictor in relation to the endpoint, and values > 70.71 mL/m{sup 2} were associated with a significant increase in mortality (log rank p < 0.0001). The indexed left atrial volume was the only independent predictor of mortality in this population of Chagasic patients with severe systolic dysfunction.

  3. Dynamics of sylvatic Chagas disease vectors in coastal Ecuador is driven by changes in land cover.

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    Mario J Grijalva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a serious public health problem in Latin America where about ten million individuals show Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Despite significant success in controlling domiciliated triatomines, sylvatic populations frequently infest houses after insecticide treatment which hampers long term control prospects in vast geographical areas where vectorial transmission is endemic. As a key issue, the spatio-temporal dynamics of sylvatic populations is likely influenced by landscape yet evidence showing this effect is rare. The aim of this work is to examine the role of land cover changes in sylvatic triatomine ecology, based on an exhaustive field survey of pathogens, vectors, hosts, and microhabitat characteristics' dynamics.The study was performed in agricultural landscapes of coastal Ecuador as a study model. Over one year, a spatially-randomized sampling design (490 collection points allowed quantifying triatomine densities in natural, cultivated and domestic habitats. We also assessed infection of the bugs with trypanosomes, documented their microhabitats and potential hosts, and recorded changes in landscape characteristics. In total we collected 886 individuals, mainly represented by nymphal stages of one triatomine species Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. As main results, we found that 1 sylvatic triatomines had very high T. cruzi infection rates (71% and 2 densities of T. cruzi-infected sylvatic triatomines varied predictably over time due to changes in land cover and occurrence of associated rodent hosts.We propose a framework for identifying the factors affecting the yearly distribution of sylvatic T. cruzi vectors. Beyond providing key basic information for the control of human habitat colonization by sylvatic vector populations, our framework highlights the importance of both environmental and sociological factors in shaping the spatio-temporal population dynamics of triatomines. A better understanding of the dynamics of such socio

  4. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part III - Electronic device; Reaktorski oscilator - I-III, III Deo - Elektronski uredjaj

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolic, B; Jovanovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za fiziku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    This report describes functioning of the reactor oscillator electronic system. Two methods of oscillator operation were discussed. The first method is so called method of amplitude modulation of the reactor power, and the second newer method is phase method. Both methods are planned for the present reactor oscillator.

  5. Insecticidal paint and fumigant canisters for Chagas' disease control: community acceptance in Honduras Pintura insecticida y botes de fumigación para el control de la enfermedad de Chagas: aceptación por la comunidad en Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Ávila Montes

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed public acceptance for two new vectorial control techniques for Chagas' disease: insecticidal paint and fumigant canisters. The study compared the two with traditional fenitrothion insecticide spraying. An experimental field study was performed in an endemic area of central Honduras from August to November 1992, a year after the initial application of the treatments. The objectives of the study were to determine the acceptability of the tools on the part of the population whose homes were treated, and on the part of the personnel applying the treatments. The sample size was drawn up according to a uniform protocol applied in six Latin American countries. For this study a total of 651 persons were surveyed in 15 rural communities. Along with the surveys, focus groups were used to collect information to learn the reasons for accepting or rejecting particular treatments. The survey was done with heads of households. Focus groups were done with heads of households and also with the field operators who applied the treatments. The research showed that insecticidal paint had a low level of community acceptance (28.8%. Field operators strongly disliked the paint because of problems with its transport, application, unpleasant smell, and very low effectiveness against triatomines and pest insects. The traditional insecticide was more acceptable to the community (93.9% and to the field operators, especially for its strong effect against the triatomines and pest insects. The results showed that in order to increase the public acceptance for insecticidal paint, it would be necessary to make the paint easier to transport and apply and to increase its effectiveness. Because of their very low effectiveness, fumigant canisters did not represent an acceptable alternative for triatomine vector control. A public educational effort should be a component of any new control method developed.Este estudio analizó la aceptación por la comunidad de

  6. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase III), I-V, Part IV, Influence of isotopic composition of nuclear fuel on the reactivity with constant flux; Razrada metoda teorijske analize nuklearnih reaktora (III faza) I-IV, IV Deo, Uticaj promene izotopnog sastava goriva na reaktivnost uz konstantan fluks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)