WorldWideScience

Sample records for chadic speaking pastoralists

  1. Migration of Chadic speaking pastoralists within Africa based on population structure of Chad Basin and phylogeography of mitochondrial L3f haplogroup

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    Mulligan Connie J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chad Basin, lying within the bidirectional corridor of African Sahel, is one of the most populated places in Sub-Saharan Africa today. The origin of its settlement appears connected with Holocene climatic ameliorations (aquatic resources that started ~10,000 years before present (YBP. Although both Nilo-Saharan and Niger-Congo language families are encountered here, the most diversified group is the Chadic branch belonging to the Afro-Asiatic language phylum. In this article, we investigate the proposed ancient migration of Chadic pastoralists from Eastern Africa based on linguistic data and test for genetic traces of this migration in extant Chadic speaking populations. Results We performed whole mitochondrial genome sequencing of 16 L3f haplotypes, focused on clade L3f3 that occurs almost exclusively in Chadic speaking people living in the Chad Basin. These data supported the reconstruction of a L3f phylogenetic tree and calculation of times to the most recent common ancestor for all internal clades. A date ~8,000 YBP was estimated for the L3f3 sub-haplogroup, which is in good agreement with the supposed migration of Chadic speaking pastoralists and their linguistic differentiation from other Afro-Asiatic groups of East Africa. As a whole, the Afro-Asiatic language family presents low population structure, as 92.4% of mtDNA variation is found within populations and only 3.4% of variation can be attributed to diversity among language branches. The Chadic speaking populations form a relatively homogenous cluster, exhibiting lower diversification than the other Afro-Asiatic branches (Berber, Semitic and Cushitic. Conclusion The results of our study support an East African origin of mitochondrial L3f3 clade that is present almost exclusively within Chadic speaking people living in Chad Basin. Whole genome sequence-based dates show that the ancestral haplogroup L3f must have emerged soon after the Out-of-Africa migration (around

  2. Migration of Chadic speaking pastoralists within Africa based on population structure of Chad Basin and phylogeography of mitochondrial L3f haplogroup

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Viktor; Fernandes, V.; Costa, M. D.; Hájek, Martin; Mulligan, C. J.; Pereira, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 63 (2009), s. 1-9. ISSN 1471-2148 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/1587 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : migration * Chadic * phylogeography Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 4.294, year: 2009 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/9/63

  3. Diet-related buccal dental microwear patterns in Central African Pygmy foragers and Bantu-speaking farmer and pastoralist populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Alejandro; Ramírez-Rozzi, Fernando V; De Juan, Joaquín; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Pygmy hunter-gatherers from Central Africa have shared a network of socioeconomic interactions with non-Pygmy Bantu speakers since agropastoral lifestyle spread across sub-Saharan Africa. Ethnographic studies have reported that their diets differ in consumption of both animal proteins and starch grains. Hunted meat and gathered plant foods, especially underground storage organs (USOs), are dietary staples for pygmies. However, scarce information exists about forager-farmer interaction and the agricultural products used by pygmies. Since the effects of dietary preferences on teeth in modern and past pygmies remain unknown, we explored dietary history through quantitative analysis of buccal microwear on cheek teeth in well-documented Baka pygmies. We then determined if microwear patterns differ among other Pygmy groups (Aka, Mbuti, and Babongo) and between Bantu-speaking farmer and pastoralist populations from past centuries. The buccal dental microwear patterns of Pygmy hunter-gatherers and non-Pygmy Bantu pastoralists show lower scratch densities, indicative of diets more intensively based on nonabrasive foodstuffs, compared with Bantu farmers, who consume larger amounts of grit from stoneground foods. The Baka pygmies showed microwear patterns similar to those of ancient Aka and Mbuti, suggesting that the mechanical properties of their preferred diets have not significantly changed through time. In contrast, Babongo pygmies showed scratch densities and lengths similar to those of the farmers, consistent with sociocultural contacts and genetic factors. Our findings support that buccal microwear patterns predict dietary habits independent of ecological conditions and reflect the abrasive properties of preferred or fallback foods such as USOs, which may have contributed to the dietary specializations of ancient human populations. PMID:24367696

  4. Diet-related buccal dental microwear patterns in Central African Pygmy foragers and Bantu-speaking farmer and pastoralist populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Romero

    Full Text Available Pygmy hunter-gatherers from Central Africa have shared a network of socioeconomic interactions with non-Pygmy Bantu speakers since agropastoral lifestyle spread across sub-Saharan Africa. Ethnographic studies have reported that their diets differ in consumption of both animal proteins and starch grains. Hunted meat and gathered plant foods, especially underground storage organs (USOs, are dietary staples for pygmies. However, scarce information exists about forager-farmer interaction and the agricultural products used by pygmies. Since the effects of dietary preferences on teeth in modern and past pygmies remain unknown, we explored dietary history through quantitative analysis of buccal microwear on cheek teeth in well-documented Baka pygmies. We then determined if microwear patterns differ among other Pygmy groups (Aka, Mbuti, and Babongo and between Bantu-speaking farmer and pastoralist populations from past centuries. The buccal dental microwear patterns of Pygmy hunter-gatherers and non-Pygmy Bantu pastoralists show lower scratch densities, indicative of diets more intensively based on nonabrasive foodstuffs, compared with Bantu farmers, who consume larger amounts of grit from stoneground foods. The Baka pygmies showed microwear patterns similar to those of ancient Aka and Mbuti, suggesting that the mechanical properties of their preferred diets have not significantly changed through time. In contrast, Babongo pygmies showed scratch densities and lengths similar to those of the farmers, consistent with sociocultural contacts and genetic factors. Our findings support that buccal microwear patterns predict dietary habits independent of ecological conditions and reflect the abrasive properties of preferred or fallback foods such as USOs, which may have contributed to the dietary specializations of ancient human populations.

  5. Aspects of a Grammar of Makary Kotoko (Chadic, Cameroon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sean David

    2012-01-01

    Makary Kotoko (MK), a Central Chadic B language, is spoken in the north of Cameroon just south of Lake Chad. Published works on MK to date include about a dozen articles on different aspects of the grammar of the language, primarily by H. Tourneux. The present work, which is based on a substantial corpus of recorded texts, is a systematic…

  6. Tracing pastoralist migrations to southern Africa with lactase persistence alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macholdt, Enrico; Lede, Vera; Barbieri, Chiara; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-04-14

    Although southern African Khoisan populations are often assumed to have remained largely isolated during prehistory, there is growing evidence for a migration of pastoralists from eastern Africa some 2,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of Bantu-speaking populations in southern Africa. Eastern Africa harbors distinctive lactase persistence (LP) alleles, and therefore LP alleles in southern African populations may be derived from this eastern African pastoralist migration. We sequenced the lactase enhancer region in 457 individuals from 18 Khoisan and seven Bantu-speaking groups from Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia and additionally genotyped four short tandem repeat (STR) loci that flank the lactase enhancer region. We found nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the most frequent is -14010(∗)C, which was previously found to be associated with LP in Kenya and Tanzania and to exhibit a strong signal of positive selection. This allele occurs in significantly higher frequency in pastoralist groups and in Khoe-speaking groups in our study, supporting the hypothesis of a migration of eastern African pastoralists that was primarily associated with Khoe speakers. Moreover, we find a signal of ongoing positive selection in all three pastoralist groups in our study, as well as (surprisingly) in two foraging groups. PMID:24704073

  7. Molecular genetics relationships of Chadic populations from Northern Cameroon in peri-Saharan Area

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Viktor; Hájek, Martin; Čmejla, R.; Brůžek, J.; Žáková, D.; Bromová, Markéta; Brdička, R.

    Leuven : PEETERS publishers, 2006 - (Caron, B.; Zima, P.), s. 67-93 ISBN 90-429-1745-8. [Dynamics of Contacts between Populations and Languages - Lexical and Structural Diffusion and the Genealogies in the Sahel. Praha (CZ), 10.10.2003-12.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA404/03/0318 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : Chadic * mtDNA diversity * genetic distances * African populations Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  8. Pastoralist health care in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Duba, Huka H.; Mur-Veeman, Ingrid M; van Raak, Arno

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Health care for the Kenyan pastoralist people has serious shortcomings and it must be delivered under difficult circumstances. Often, the most basic requirements cannot be met, due to the limited accessibility of health care provisions to pastoralists. This adds major problems to the daily struggle for life, caused by bad climatic circumstances, illiteracy and poverty. We argue that strong, integrated and community based primary health care could provide an alternative for these inad...

  9. Lactase persistence alleles reveal partial East African ancestry of southern African Khoe pastoralists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Gwenna; Schlebusch, Carina M; Lombard, Marlize; Sjödin, Per; Soodyall, Himla; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2014-04-14

    The ability to digest milk into adulthood, lactase persistence (LP), as well as specific genetic variants associated with LP, is heterogeneously distributed in global populations. These variants were most likely targets of selection when some populations converted from hunter-gatherer to pastoralist or farming lifestyles. Specific LP polymorphisms are associated with particular geographic regions and populations; however, they have not been extensively studied in southern Africa. We investigate the LP-regulatory region in 267 individuals from 13 southern African populations (including descendants of hunter-gatherers, pastoralists, and agropastoralists), providing the first comprehensive study of the LP-regulatory region in a large group of southern Africans. The "East African" LP single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (14010G>C) was found at high frequency (>20%) in a strict pastoralist Khoe population, the Nama of Namibia, suggesting a connection to East Africa, whereas the "European" LP SNP (13910C>T) was found in populations of mixed ancestry. Using genome-wide data from various African populations, we identify admixture (13%) in the Nama, from an Afro-Asiatic group dating to >1,300 years ago, with the remaining fraction of their genomes being from San hunter-gatherers. We also find evidence of selection around the LCT gene among Khoe-speaking groups, and the substantial frequency of the 14010C variant among the Nama is best explained by adaptation to digesting milk. These genome-local and genome-wide results support a model in which an East African group brought pastoralist practices to southern Africa and admixed with local hunter-gatherers to form the ancestors of Khoe people. PMID:24704072

  10. Nutritional Status of Maasai Pastoralists under Change

    OpenAIRE

    Galvin, Kathleen A.; Beeton, Tyler A.; Boone, Randall B.; Shauna B. BurnSilver

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the nutritional status of Maasai pastoralists living in a period of great social, economic and ecological changes in Kajiado County, southern Kenya. Data on weight, height, skinfolds, and circumferences were collected from 534 individuals in the year 2000. The data were used to describe mean differences in human nutrition between ages, sexes, and within and among three Group Ranches. Nutritional data and diet recall data were compared with past studies of Maasai nutrition ...

  11. Rangeland degradation in North China : Perceptions of pastoralists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Peter; Azadi, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Rangeland degradation, a worldwide problem, is serious in China, especially in the Northern provinces. To assess the pastoralists' perceptions toward rangeland trend and degradation, a survey was conducted in Ningxia, North China. Data were collected from a total of 284 pastoralists in six Ningxia c

  12. The benefits of 'One Health' for pastoralists in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greter, Helena; Jean-Richard, Vreni; Crump, Lisa; Béchir, Mahamat; Alfaroukh, Idriss O; Schelling, Esther; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    'One health' is particularly suited to serve mobile pastoralists. Dinka pastoralists in Sudan inspired Calvin Schwabe to coin the term 'one medicine', indicating that there is no difference in paradigm between human and veterinary medicine. Our contemporary definition of 'one health' is any added value in terms of improved health of humans and animals or financial savings or environmental services resulting from a closer cooperation of human and animal health sectors. Here we present a summary of 'one health' studies with mobile pastoralists in Africa which were done in research partnership, demonstrating such an added value. Initial joint human and animal health studies revealed higher livestock vaccination coverage than in the pastoralist community, leading to joint animal and human vaccination intervention studies which demonstrated a better access to primary health care services for pastoralists in Chad. Further simultaneous animal and human serological studies showed that camel breeding was associated with human Q-fever seropositivity. In Borana communities in Ethiopia, human cases of Mycobacterium bovis infection could be related to strains isolated from cattle. A challenge remained with regard to how to assess vaccination coverage in mobile populations. With the advent of mobile phones, health and demographic surveillance could be established for mobile pastoralists and their animals. This presents vast possibilities for surveillance and control of human and animal diseases. Pastoralists prefer a 'one health' approach and therefore contribute toward the validation of this concept by showing real added value of the cooperation between human and animal health services. PMID:25005234

  13. Speaking of Speaking

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    Larmer, John; Mergendoller, John R.

    2013-01-01

    From the early elementary grades through high school, the Common Core State Standards ask students to organize and explain their ideas in oral presentations, use visual aids, and speak appropriately for various contexts and tasks. Although teachers could give assignments that teach some of these skills in isolation, the authors have found that…

  14. Hor - A Sedentarisation Success for Tibetan Pastoralists in Qinghai?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ptáčková, Jarmila

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2015), s. 221-240. ISSN 0822-7942 Institutional support: RVO:68378009 Keywords : Sedentarisation, resettlement, Tibetan pastoralists, grassland development, vocational training Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  15. Supporting Mongolian pastoralists by using GIS to identify grazing limitations and opportunities from livestock census and remote sensing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael Schultz; James, Robert; Adiyasuren, Ts.; Khishigsuren, P.; Naranchimeg, B.; Gankhuyag, R.; Baasanjargal, B.

    Mongolian pastoralists, GIS, grazing limitations, livestock census, remote sensing, range management......Mongolian pastoralists, GIS, grazing limitations, livestock census, remote sensing, range management...

  16. New Speak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2008-01-01

      En ny form for samfundsvidenskabeligt set uklart sprogbrug anvendes stadig oftere i organisation og politik. Ord som "sammenhængskraft", "myndighedsbetjening" og "kvalitetsløft" kritiseres ofte og kaldes varm luft eller new speak. Jeg vil hævde, at ordene i new speak rummer et dobbelt perspektiv......, uddannelse, militær etc.). Derfor er der gået varm luft og new speak i politisk og organisatorisk sprogbrug. Hvor funktionssystemer internt betjener sig af binært kodet kommunikation, må meddelelser mellem funktionssystemer nemlig afstå fra den klare veldefinerede tale.  ...

  17. Improving how meteorological information is used by pastoralists through adequate communication tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Laura Vang; Mertz, Ole; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Nieto, Hector

    2015-01-01

    In West Africa, the channels for information flow from meteorological services to end-users, such as pastoralists, are relatively limited. As meteorological information is key to improving productivity for pastoralists, it represents a challenge at both local and national level to develop an...... efficient information dissemination system. However, few studies have focused specifically on pastoralists as end-users, and the best mode of delivering meteorological information to pastoralists remains unknown. Drawing on fieldwork conducted in Burkina Faso using a combination of qualitative and...... quantitative methods, this paper examines 1) the principal modes used by pastoralists to receive information, and 2) in what form and by which type of media pastoralists actually prefer to receive information. It was found that mobile phones have replaced traditional forecasting methods as these were becoming...

  18. Tuberculosis among transhumant pastoralist and settled communities of south-eastern Mauritania

    OpenAIRE

    Lô, Aissata; Tall-Dia, Anta; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Schelling, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background Transhumant pastoralists of Mauritania were assumed to have a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) because of reduced access to diagnostic testing. No population-based survey on TB has been published for Mauritania. Objective The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of presumptive TB cases among mobile pastoralists and villagers in a remote zone of Mauritania. Design In the south-eastern province of Hodh Ech Chargui, 250 adult pastoralists and 250 villagers were random...

  19. Traditional ecological knowledge among transhumant pastoralists in Mediterranean Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Oteros-Rozas; Ricardo Ontillera-Sánchez; Pau Sanosa; Erik Gómez-Baggethun; Victoria Reyes-García; José A. González

    2013-01-01

    Mobility is a millenary human strategy to deal with environmental change. An outstanding example of mobility is transhumance, an ancient pastoralist practice consisting of the seasonal migration of livestock between ecological regions following peaks in pasture productivity. The maintenance of transhumance depends partly on the preservation of related traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). We (a) identified and characterized social groups that hold transhumance-related TEK, (b) analyzed tren...

  20. Speaking Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff

    Speaking Code begins by invoking the “Hello World” convention used by programmers when learning a new language, helping to establish the interplay of text and code that runs through the book. Interweaving the voice of critical writing from the humanities with the tradition of computing and software...

  1. Education Provision to Nomadic Pastoralists: A Literature Review. IDS Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratli, Saverio

    Educationally, pastoralists appear to be a paradox. From the perspective of official education, they are a complete failure, scoring badly in terms of enrollment, achievement, attainment, and gender balance. However, pastoralists are far from being unskilled. Their daily lives require them to perform tasks involving high levels of individual and…

  2. Institutions for Collective Action among Settled Fulani Agro-Pastoralists in Southwest Nigeria

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    Fabusoro, E.; Sodiya, C. I.

    2011-01-01

    The study identifies institutions for organizing collective action among settled Fulani agro-pastoralists in southwest Nigeria and examines their functions, processes and tools for fostering collective action. Four Fulani communities were selected purposively in Ekiti State; data were collected from 55 settled pastoralists through informal…

  3. Retinol assessment among women and children in sahelian mobile pastoralists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechir, M; Schelling, E; Kraemer, K; Schweigert, F; Bonfoh, B; Crump, L; Tanner, M; Zinsstag, J

    2012-06-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies are widespread in developing countries, particularly in remote communities such as mobile pastoralists. The nutritional and vitamin A status of this population is not well-documented in Chad. This study assessed serum retinol levels among women and children under five-year-old in nomadic and semi-nomadic pastoralist and rural-settled communities, who are similarly exposed to risk factors such as gastrointestinal parasitic infection, anaemia and emaciation. The novel method of portable fluorometry was used for the first time to measure β-carotene and retinol levels in a pastoral nomadic area. Moderate level blood retinol deficiency (<0.7 μmol/L) was observed in 5% (CI 1-11) of nomadic, 29% (CI 13-45) of semi-nomadic and 22% (CI 8-35) of sedentary women. In children, 1% (CI 0.1-4), 17% (CI 9-25) and 28% (CI 18-39), respectively, had moderate level blood retinol deficiency. In nomadic communities, women and children had blood retinol levels close to normal. Deficiency of retinol was strongly linked with lifestyle (nomadic, semi-nomadic and settled) among women and lifestyle and age among children. The results support an ecological linkage between human retinol levels and livestock milk retinol. This study shows the feasibility of portable retinol and β-carotene measurement in human blood as well as human and animal milk under remote field conditions, but the approach requires further validation. PMID:22825749

  4. Conflicts between Afar Pastoralists and their Neighbors: Triggers and Motivations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekele Hundie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Particularly pervasive violent conflicts in the Horn of Africa have detrimental effects on people's livelihoods there. While the intensity, causes, and repercussions of violent conflicts vary spatially and temporally, pastoral areas are currently the hotspots. This paper examines the causes and consequences of violent conflicts in Ethiopia between Afar pastoralists and two of their neighbors, the Issa and the Karrayyu. The findings are based on primary data (individual interviews, group discussions, and field observations and secondary data (documents and publications collected in 2005 and 2006. The results indicate that contemporary challenges such as recurrent droughts, resource appropriation, livestock raiding, proliferation of small arms, and illicit trade contribute to the perpetuation of violent conflicts. While traditional institutions manage inter-clan conflicts, their effectiveness is quite limited with regard to inter-ethnic conflicts, where the contemporary challenges in pastoral areas are too diverse and complex to be managed solely by traditional institutions. The perpetuation of violent conflicts has affected the livelihoods of pastoralists, thereby causing humanitarian crisis and limiting access to resources and opportunities.

  5. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000465.htm Tracheostomy tube - speaking To use the sharing features on ... are even speaking devices that can help you. Tracheostomy Tubes and Speaking Air passing through vocal cords ( ...

  6. Household-Level Livestock Marketing Behavior Among Northern Kenyan and Southern Ethiopian Pastoralists

    OpenAIRE

    Bellemare, Marc F.; Barrett, Christopher B.; Osterloh, Sharon M.

    2005-01-01

    Pastoralists in East Africa's arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL) regularly confront climatic shocks triggering massive herd die-offs and loss of scarce wealth. On the surface, it appears puzzling that pastoralists do not make extensive use of livestock markets to offload animals when climatic shocks temporarily reduce the carrying capacity of local rangelands, and then use markets to restock their herds when local conditions recover. In recent years, donors and policy makers have begun to hypoth...

  7. Role of extension services in the livelihoods of pastoralist women in Kwara State, Nigeria

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    Sidiqat Aderinoye-Abdulwahab

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to show that extension can play significant role in equipping pastoralist women with knowledge and technology required so as to reduce pastoralist women’s vulnerability and attainment of their desired level of economic empowerment. Most importantly, this study investigates the models being used by extension service providers to determine whether pastoralist women in this study adequately benefit or access extension services. To achieve this, the study draws on the questionnaire which was administered to 63 pastoralist women and focus group discussions which was carried out with 88 wives of pastoralists in Kwara State, Nigeria. The study found that pastoralist women face cultural barriers that deter them from accessing productive resources, live in marginalised areas and lack access to extension services as a result. It was observed the women are not willing to diversify into non-cattle related economic chores. The study therefore recommends employment of more female extension personnel so as to reach out to pastoralist’ women particularly in areas where factors such as culture bar them from benefiting from productive resources and services such as extension.

  8. The benefits of ‘One Health’ for pastoralists in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Greter

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available ‘One health’ is particularly suited to serve mobile pastoralists. Dinka pastoralists in Sudan inspired Calvin Schwabe to coin the term ‘one medicine’, indicating that there is no difference in paradigm between human and veterinary medicine. Our contemporary definition of ‘one health’ is any added value in terms of improved health of humans and animals or financial savings or environmental services resulting from a closer cooperation of human and animal health sectors. Here we present a summary of ‘one health’ studies with mobile pastoralists in Africa which were done in research partnership, demonstrating such an added value. Initial joint human and animal health studies revealed higher livestock vaccination coverage than in the pastoralist community, leading to joint animal and human vaccination intervention studies which demonstrated a better access to primary health care services for pastoralists in Chad. Further simultaneous animal and human serological studies showed that camel breeding was associated with human Q-fever seropositivity. In Borana communities in Ethiopia, human cases of  Mycobacterium bovis infection could be related to strains isolated from cattle. A challenge remained with regard to how to assess vaccination coverage in mobile populations. With the advent of mobile phones, health and demographic surveillance could be established for mobile pastoralists and their animals. This presents vast possibilities for surveillance and control of human and animal diseases. Pastoralists prefer a ‘one health’ approach and therefore contribute toward the validation of this concept by showing real added value of the cooperation between human and animal health services.

  9. TEACHING SPEAKING REPORT TEXT USING SPEAKING PROMPT

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    Sunarti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning a language means learning how to communicate either in oral or written way, that is how to listen, speak, read and write fluently, accurately and acceptaby. However students find difficulties in learning them. In speaking session, the students can not express their idea well because they have problems in vocabulay, putting the words together in the correct structure, and pronouncing them besides they are lack of information or they don’t have enough background knowledge about the topic. Those problems makes the students don’t want to speak, or they need long time to prepare their speaking. Another problem is that they are accustmed to write before speaking and memorize it to perform their speaking task. Based on these problems it is necesary to use the teaching strategies, one of them is using speaking promt. As pre activity, the teacher reviews the generic structure, the simple present tense, shows pictures related to the topic, introduces the facts which are classified based on the generic structure, and pronunciation practise. In the main activy, students describe the picture based on the facts that have been given.The sentence pattern of simple present tense is also shown. As the post activity, the students give comment on their performance each other.These activities in fact can solve their problems. Speaking prompt helps them in speaking. They don’t need to think about the background knowledge, the generic structure and the sentence pattern

  10. Barriers to tuberculosis care: a qualitative study among Somali pastoralists in Ethiopia

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    Abebe Fekadu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At the dawn of the third millennium, while the control of the second biggest infectious killer in the world (tuberculosis [TB] is an international priority, millions of pastoralist communities in the Horn of Africa are struggling to access TB care. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of pastoralist TB patients remain to be a challenge in TB control programs in many countries in this region, where pastoralism is a common means of livelihood. Better understanding of community perceptions of TB and its management could help identify reasons for the delay in diagnosis of TB among pastoral communities. The aim of this study is to explore barriers delaying diagnosis among pastoralist TB patients in the Somali Regional State (SRS of Ethiopia. Methods A qualitative study, including 19 respondents was conducted in the SRS of Ethiopia. Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA and informal interview techniques were employed to explore pastoralists' migration patterns, their perceptions of TB and their access to TB services. The influence of these factors on the delay of TB patients in receiving biomedical diagnosis was then assessed. Results We found that lack of access to formal health services as well as traditional beliefs leading to self treatment were barriers to prompt bio-medical diagnosis of TB among pastoralist TB patients in the SRS of Ethiopia. This study highlights that limited access to TB control programs is the most important barrier in early seeking of biomedical diagnosis of TB among pastoral communities with nomadic pastoralist being the most affected. Conclusions Diagnostic and treatment facilities should be established in strategic villages that pastoralist can reach in both dry and wet seasons. Such facilities may alleviate the observed long distance to health facilities and thus long delay in diagnosis of TB. This strategy should be compounded with a community based TB control approach, whereby basic medical training on TB

  11. Conservation presence, not socioeconomics, leads to differences in pastoralist perceived threats to argali

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    Wesley M. Sarmento

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Community-based conservation approaches that keep people on landscapes increasingly complement preservationist models of reserves without people. Evaluations of community conservation have shown that economic incentives and socioeconomics primarily drive people’s attitudes and perceptions. Work at Mongolia’s Ikh Nart Nature Reserve demonstrates how to achieve successful conservation by integrating local people into the overall program. Using a short questionnaire, we interviewed pastoralist families across two soums (similar to a U.S. county in Ikh Nart. We examined (1 pastoralists’ perceived threats to argali sheep (Ovis ammon, (2 socioeconomic differences among pastoralists, and (3 differences between pastoralists from different soums. We found that 15 years of conservation activities—education, research, and modest ecotourism—that occurred in the northern soum led to influences on people’s perceptions toward argali conservation. Compared with pastoralists from southern Ikh Nart, pastoralists from the northern part of the reserve more likely knew that argali are protected and understood primary threats to the species. Socioeconomic factors, such as age, sex, and wealth, did not significantly influence responses. The negligible economic incentives in Ikh Nart did not lead to response differences. Our results demonstrate that conservation can influence people across socioeconomic classes without providing large economic incentives.

  12. Testosterone and paternal care in East African foragers and pastoralists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Martin N; Marlowe, Frank W; Bugumba, Revocatus; Ellison, Peter T

    2009-01-22

    The 'challenge hypothesis' posits that testosterone facilitates reproductive effort (investment in male-male competition and mate-seeking) at the expense of parenting effort (investment in offspring and mates). Multiple studies, primarily in North America, have shown that men in committed relationships, fathers, or both maintain lower levels of testosterone than unpaired men. Data from non-western populations, however, show inconsistent results. We hypothesized that much of this cross-cultural variation can be attributed to differential investment in mating versus parenting effort, even among married fathers. Here, we directly test this idea by comparing two neighbouring Tanzanian groups that exhibit divergent styles of paternal involvement: Hadza foragers and Datoga pastoralists. We predicted that high levels of paternal care by Hadza fathers would be associated with decreased testosterone in comparison with non-fathers, and that no such difference between fathers and non-fathers would be evident in Datoga men, who provide minimal direct paternal care. Twenty-seven Hadza men and 80 Datoga men between the ages of 17 and 60 provided morning and afternoon saliva samples from which testosterone was assayed. Measurements in both populations confirmed these predictions, adding further support to the hypothesis that paternal care is associated with decreased testosterone production in men. PMID:18826936

  13. Traditional ecological knowledge among transhumant pastoralists in Mediterranean Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Oteros-Rozas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobility is a millenary human strategy to deal with environmental change. An outstanding example of mobility is transhumance, an ancient pastoralist practice consisting of the seasonal migration of livestock between ecological regions following peaks in pasture productivity. The maintenance of transhumance depends partly on the preservation of related traditional ecological knowledge (TEK. We (a identified and characterized social groups that hold transhumance-related TEK, (b analyzed trends in transhumance-related TEK across generations and social groups, (c examined the factors that influence variation in levels of TEK, and (d analyzed elements of transhumance-related TEK as examples of adaptive strategies to cope with global change. We used transhumance on the Conquense Drove Road, a major active transhumant network in Spain, as a case study. Through an indepth literature review, participant observation, semistructured interviews, and a focus group discussion, we developed a survey to examine transhumance-related knowledge, practices, and beliefs. We collected survey data from 150 informants. Although a rich body of TEK persisted among transhumant shepherds, we found a marked loss of TEK among transhumants born after 1975, who scored one-fifth lower on survey items than other generations. The maintenance of transhumance on foot is the most important factor influencing TEK preservation. We conclude that in developed country settings, maintaining conditions for herd mobility can contribute to enhancing the adaptive capacity of agrarian societies to cope with global environmental change.

  14. The use of trypanocides and antibiotics by Maasai pastoralists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, S; Stevenson, P; Mwendia, C; Okech, G

    2000-12-01

    Information was collected on the use of veterinary drugs by Maasai pastoralists in an area of Kenya where tsetse flies and trypanosomosis occur. Three herds of cattle were followed for between 4 and 5 years and records were kept of every veterinary drug treatment given by the livestock owners. Almost all treatments were either with the trypanocides homidium or diminazene, or with oxytetracycline by intramuscular injection. The rate of trypanocide use varied between 0.66 and 1.56 treatments per animal per year, while oxytetracycline use was between 0.20 and 1.00 treatments per animal per year. Farmers were injecting these drugs in the absence of veterinary supervision, obtaining their supplies mainly from local village shops or informal traders. Underdosing with trypanocides appeared to be uncommon and the indications were that farmers generally gave the drugs at dosage rates above the recommended standard dose. Accurate information on the dose rates of oxytetracycline could not be obtained, but it was noted that in most cases farmers gave a single injection rather than a course of treatment. In a proportion of cases, trypanocides and antibiotics were mixed together before injection. The farmers administered the drugs when disease was recognized and were rarely using trypanocides as prophylactics. Although necessity forces the livestock owners to obtain and use these drugs without veterinary supervision, there are concerns with regard to the possibility of drug misuse and the development of drug resistance. PMID:11147276

  15. Pastoralists at War: Violence and Security in the Kenya-Sudan-Uganda Border Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonah Leff

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of those living in the border region of Kenya, Sudan, and Uganda are pastoralists, whose livelihoods are dictated by the upkeep and size of their herds. Harsh environmental conditions force pastoralists to migrate in search of water and pasturelands during the dry season. With limited access to water and competing rights to land, intertribal conflict arises when pastoralists from one tribe enter the territory of another. The increased availability of small arms in the region from past wars increasingly makes ordinary clashes fatal. Governments in the region have responded with heavy-handed coercive disarmament operations. These have led to distrust and subsequent violent clashes between communities and security providers. This report reviews the scale, consequences of, and responses to the many pastoral conflicts, utilizing methodological tools such as key informant interviews, retrospective analysis, and a thorough review of available literature.

  16. Distinguishing dietary indicators of pastoralists and agriculturists via dental microwear texture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christopher W.; Beach, Jeremy J.; McKinley, Jacqueline I.; Eng, Jacqueline T.

    2016-03-01

    The current study employs dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA) to discern dietary differences between groups of archaeologically derived pastoralists and agriculturists. The study followed standard DMTA methods and is part of an ongoing research effort called the DENTALWEAR project, which is a global survey of microwear texture in ancient humans. The texture variables studied herein were complexity (Asfc), anisotropy (epLsar), and textural fill volume. The study found statistically significant differences between the pastoralists and agriculturists for all three variables; as predicted, the pastoralists had lower values. In addition to demonstrating the efficacy of DMTA for dietary study in ancient humans, this study supports models indicating mitigated microwear texture values for populations thought to have consumed high levels of meat.

  17. The benefits of ‘One Health’ for pastoralists in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Greter; Vreni Jean-Richard; Lisa Crump; Mahamat Béchir; Idriss O. Alfaroukh; Esther Schelling; Bassirou Bonfoh; Jakob Zinsstag

    2014-01-01

    ‘One health’ is particularly suited to serve mobile pastoralists. Dinka pastoralists in Sudan inspired Calvin Schwabe to coin the term ‘one medicine’, indicating that there is no difference in paradigm between human and veterinary medicine. Our contemporary definition of ‘one health’ is any added value in terms of improved health of humans and animals or financial savings or environmental services resulting from a closer cooperation of human and animal health sectors. Here we present a summar...

  18. The economic impact of malignant catarrhal fever on pastoralist livelihoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankester, Felix; Lugelo, Ahmed; Kazwala, Rudovick; Keyyu, Julius; Cleaveland, Sarah; Yoder, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This study is the first to partially quantify the potential economic benefits that a vaccine, effective at protecting cattle against malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), could accrue to pastoralists living in East Africa. The benefits would result from the removal of household resource and management costs that are traditionally incurred avoiding the disease. MCF, a fatal disease of cattle caused by a virus transmitted from wildebeest calves, has plagued Maasai communities in East Africa for generations. The threat of the disease forces the Maasai to move cattle to less productive grazing areas to avoid wildebeest during calving season when forage quality is critical. To assess the management and resource costs associated with moving, we used household survey data. To estimate the costs associated with changes in livestock body condition that result from being herded away from wildebeest calving grounds, we exploited an ongoing MCF vaccine field trial and we used a hedonic price regression, a statistical model that allows estimation of the marginal contribution of a good's attributes to its market price. We found that 90 percent of households move, on average, 82 percent of all cattle away from home to avoid MCF. In doing so, a herd's productive contributions to the household was reduced, with 64 percent of milk being unavailable for sale or consumption by the family members remaining at the boma (the children, women, and the elderly). In contrast cattle that remained on the wildebeest calving grounds during the calving season (and survived MCF) remained fully productive to the family and gained body condition compared to cattle that moved away. This gain was, however, short-lived. We estimated the market value of these condition gains and losses using hedonic regression. The value of a vaccine for MCF is the removal of the costs incurred in avoiding the disease. PMID:25629896

  19. Rangeland degradation assessment: a new strategy based on indigenous ecological knowledge of pastoralists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Behmanesh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the changing world, the prevalence of land degradation is becoming a serious problem worldwide especially in countries with arid and semiarid rangelands. There are many techniques to assess rangeland degradation but most of them rely on classic science. So a study was conducted to find out how indigenous people assess rangeland degradation and how their ecological knowledge can be used for rangeland degradation assessment. We interviewed pastoralists of two sites (Mirza-Baylu and Dasht where part of both areas is located in Golestan National Park (NE Iran. A structured questionnaire was designed based on some indicators taken from literature and also primary discussions with pastoralists in order to evaluate land degradation. A qualitative Likert scale was used for scoring rangeland degradation indicators. The results revealed that pastoralist pay first attention to edaphic indicators than vegetative and other indicators. There were significant differences between inside and outside of the park in rangeland degradation indicators for both sites. The results show that the rangelands outside the park in both sites were degraded compare to inside the park especially in the areas near to villages. It can be concluded that pastoralists own a vast amount of knowledge on the vegetation and grazing animal habits that can be used in rangeland degradation assessment and it is necessary to document their ecological indigenous knowledge and involve them in rangeland degradation assessment process.

  20. Emotional Understanding in Quechua Children from an Agro-Pastoralist Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Harriet R.; Visscher, Paloma; Pons, Francisco; Harris, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Research on children's understanding of emotion has rarely focused on children from nonindustrialised countries, who may develop an understanding at different ages as compared to children reared in industrialised countries. Quechua children from an agro-pastoralist village were given an adapted version of the Test of Emotion Comprehension (TEC) to…

  1. Climate change and pastoralists: investing in people to respond to adversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, Ced; Cotula, Lorenzo

    2006-10-15

    While climatic fluctuations have always been a defining feature of dryland areas, and pastoralists have developed resilient livelihood systems to cope with difficult climates, global climate change is raising new challenges for pastoral systems in Africa and elsewhere. Action at local, national and international levels is needed to prevent destitution and help pastoral groups respond to the changing environment.

  2. Rangeland degradation assessment: a new strategy based on indigenous ecological knowledge of pastoralists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behmanesh, B.; Barani, H.; Abedi Sarvestani, A.; Shahraki, M. R.; Sharafatmandrad, M.

    2015-10-01

    In the changing world, the prevalence of land degradation is becoming a serious problem worldwide especially in countries with arid and semiarid rangelands. There are many techniques to assess rangeland degradation but most of them rely on classic science. So a study was conducted to find out how indigenous people assess rangeland degradation and how their ecological knowledge can be used for rangeland degradation assessment. We interviewed pastoralists of two sites (Mirza-Baylu and Dasht) where part of both areas is located in Golestan National Park (NE Iran). A structured questionnaire was designed based on some indicators taken from literature and also primary discussions with pastoralists in order to evaluate land degradation. A qualitative Likert scale was used for scoring rangeland degradation indicators. The results revealed that pastoralist pay first attention to edaphic indicators than vegetative and other indicators. There were significant differences between inside and outside of the park in rangeland degradation indicators for both sites. The results show that the rangelands outside the park in both sites were degraded compare to inside the park especially in the areas near to villages. It can be concluded that pastoralists own a vast amount of knowledge on the vegetation and grazing animal habits that can be used in rangeland degradation assessment and it is necessary to document their ecological indigenous knowledge and involve them in rangeland degradation assessment process.

  3. Weather, climate, and resource Information should meet the needs of Sahelian pastoralists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Laura Vang; Mertz, Ole; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Nieto Solana, Hector; Ali, Abdou; Maiga, Idrissa

    2014-01-01

    season. Such information could be used to adjust the purchase of supplementary fodder, to make qualified choices on transhumance destinations, and to make changes in herd composition. As pastoralists primarily acquire this information by calling friends and family in nearby areas, the results point to a...

  4. Kenyan pastoralist societies in transition: varying perceptions of the value of ecosystem services

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Kaye-Zwiebel; Elizabeth King

    2014-01-01

    In the drylands of northern Kenya, as elsewhere in Africa, traditional pastoralist social-ecological systems are undergoing profound transformations. Diminishing resource availability, changing social values and governance systems, and new resource management institutions challenge the capacity of communities for effective common pool resource management. Individuals’ values and environmental perceptions play a substantial role in decision making regarding resource use and management. Additi...

  5. Tuberculosis among transhumant pastoralist and settled communities of south-eastern Mauritania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lô, Aissata; Tall-Dia, Anta; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Schelling, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background Transhumant pastoralists of Mauritania were assumed to have a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) because of reduced access to diagnostic testing. No population-based survey on TB has been published for Mauritania. Objective The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of presumptive TB cases among mobile pastoralists and villagers in a remote zone of Mauritania. Design In the south-eastern province of Hodh Ech Chargui, 250 adult pastoralists and 250 villagers were randomly enrolled using multistage cluster sampling in February 2012. A TB centre nurse examined participants using a standard clinical protocol, and a participant questionnaire was completed. Focus group discussions and interviews were conducted with community members and health personnel, respectively. Results Fourteen new presumptive TB cases were identified, leading to an overall prevalence of 2.8%, (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5–4.7%). The prevalence was non-significantly higher among villagers than pastoralists (3.6% vs. 2.0%). Assuming illness duration was 3 years and all presumptive cases started treatment, an overall crude incidence of 933 cases/100,000 was derived. Five of six presumptive cases in Djiguenni were confirmed by sputum smear microscopy, but none out of eight presumptive cases were confirmed in Néma, although the same nurse performed all clinical examinations in both departments. This result was attributed to the use of expired reagents in Néma. Communities mentioned distance rather than lack of information as the main constraint to seeking diagnosis, but poor diagnostic centre performance also delayed decision-making. Conclusions TB prevalences were high among both pastoralists and villagers. None of the 14 presumptive cases sought prior diagnostic testing. TB diagnostic centres in the remote rural study zone were poorly equipped. These centres must remain in operation to reduce TB incidence in vulnerable communities in insecure remote rural zones and to

  6. Tuberculosis among transhumant pastoralist and settled communities of south-eastern Mauritania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aissata Lô

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transhumant pastoralists of Mauritania were assumed to have a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB because of reduced access to diagnostic testing. No population-based survey on TB has been published for Mauritania. Objective: The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of presumptive TB cases among mobile pastoralists and villagers in a remote zone of Mauritania. Design: In the south-eastern province of Hodh Ech Chargui, 250 adult pastoralists and 250 villagers were randomly enrolled using multistage cluster sampling in February 2012. A TB centre nurse examined participants using a standard clinical protocol, and a participant questionnaire was completed. Focus group discussions and interviews were conducted with community members and health personnel, respectively. Results: Fourteen new presumptive TB cases were identified, leading to an overall prevalence of 2.8%, (95% confidence interval (CI 1.5–4.7%. The prevalence was non-significantly higher among villagers than pastoralists (3.6% vs. 2.0%. Assuming illness duration was 3 years and all presumptive cases started treatment, an overall crude incidence of 933 cases/100,000 was derived. Five of six presumptive cases in Djiguenni were confirmed by sputum smear microscopy, but none out of eight presumptive cases were confirmed in Néma, although the same nurse performed all clinical examinations in both departments. This result was attributed to the use of expired reagents in Néma. Communities mentioned distance rather than lack of information as the main constraint to seeking diagnosis, but poor diagnostic centre performance also delayed decision-making. Conclusions: TB prevalences were high among both pastoralists and villagers. None of the 14 presumptive cases sought prior diagnostic testing. TB diagnostic centres in the remote rural study zone were poorly equipped. These centres must remain in operation to reduce TB incidence in vulnerable communities in insecure

  7. Assessing Second Language Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    While the viva voce (oral) examination has always been used in content-based educational assessment (Latham 1877: 132), the assessment of second language (L2) speaking in performance tests is relatively recent. The impetus for the growth in testing speaking during the 19th and 20th centuries is twofold. Firstly, in educational settings the…

  8. Land Holding Rights of Fulani Pastoralists and its Effect on their Agropastoral Production System in Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodiya, CI.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on land holding rights of the Fulani pastoralists and its effect on their agropastoral production system. It was discovered that among the land holding rights options available for land users in Yoruba communities where the Fulanis are settled, leasehold right was the viable option for the pastoralists. The implications of this is that the Fulani pastoralists cannot use the allotted lands for viable social and economic activities such as building of modern houses, establishment of small cottage industry and cultivation of permanent or cash crops such as Oil palm, Cacao, Kola etc since they are holding the land in their custody on a temporary basis. Therefore, their economic activities were limited to production of arable crops. From the average land size of about 5 ha available to majority of the pastoralist, between 0.5 and 1 ha are used for building livestock sheds, residential housing units and storage silos. Land size of about 1ha or more are cultivated for crop production and grazing pad. The situation of the pastoralists calls for government intervention in order to ensure that they have access to secured land rights. This is essential as it will make it possible for the pastoralists to become empowered to use allotted land for viable economic activities that would enhance their living status and meaningfully impact on the economy and development of their areas of settlement.

  9. Shaping the Herders' "Mental Maps": Participatory Mapping with Pastoralists' to Understand Their Grazing Area Differentiation and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wario, Hussein T.; Roba, Hassan G.; Kaufmann, Brigitte

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the perception of environmental resources by the users is an important element in planning its sustainable use and management. Pastoralist communities manage their vast grazing territories and exploit resource variability through strategic mobility. However, the knowledge on which pastoralists' resource management is based and their perception of the grazing areas has received limited attention. To improve this understanding and to document this knowledge in a way that can be communicated with `outsiders', we adopted a participatory mapping approach using satellite imagery to explore how Borana pastoralists of southern Ethiopia differentiated and characterized their grazing areas. The Borana herders conceptualized their grazing areas as set of distinctive grazing units each having specific names and characteristics. The precise location and the borders of each grazing unit were identified on the satellite image. In naming of the grazing units, the main differentiating criteria were landforms, vegetation types, prevalence of wildlife species, and manmade features. Based on the dominant soil type, the grazing units were aggregated into seasonal grazing areas that were described using factors such as soil drainage properties, extent of woody cover, main grass species, and prevalence of ecto-parasites. Pastoralists ranking of the seasonal grazing areas according to their suitability for cattle grazing matched with vegetation assessment results on the abundance of desirable fodder varieties. Approaching grazing area differentiation from the pastoralists' perspectives improves the understanding of rangeland characteristics that pastoralists considered important in their grazing management and visualization of their mental representation in digital maps eases communication of this knowledge.

  10. Shaping the Herders' "Mental Maps": Participatory Mapping with Pastoralists' to Understand Their Grazing Area Differentiation and Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wario, Hussein T; Roba, Hassan G; Kaufmann, Brigitte

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the perception of environmental resources by the users is an important element in planning its sustainable use and management. Pastoralist communities manage their vast grazing territories and exploit resource variability through strategic mobility. However, the knowledge on which pastoralists' resource management is based and their perception of the grazing areas has received limited attention. To improve this understanding and to document this knowledge in a way that can be communicated with 'outsiders', we adopted a participatory mapping approach using satellite imagery to explore how Borana pastoralists of southern Ethiopia differentiated and characterized their grazing areas. The Borana herders conceptualized their grazing areas as set of distinctive grazing units each having specific names and characteristics. The precise location and the borders of each grazing unit were identified on the satellite image. In naming of the grazing units, the main differentiating criteria were landforms, vegetation types, prevalence of wildlife species, and manmade features. Based on the dominant soil type, the grazing units were aggregated into seasonal grazing areas that were described using factors such as soil drainage properties, extent of woody cover, main grass species, and prevalence of ecto-parasites. Pastoralists ranking of the seasonal grazing areas according to their suitability for cattle grazing matched with vegetation assessment results on the abundance of desirable fodder varieties. Approaching grazing area differentiation from the pastoralists' perspectives improves the understanding of rangeland characteristics that pastoralists considered important in their grazing management and visualization of their mental representation in digital maps eases communication of this knowledge. PMID:25957624

  11. Defoliation by pastoralists affects savanna tree seedling dynamics by limiting the facilitative role of canopy cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufford, Jennifer L; Gaoue, Orou G

    2015-07-01

    Recurrent tree defoliation by pastoralists, akin to herbivory, can negatively affect plant reproduction and population dynamics. However, our understanding of the indirect role of defoliation in seedling recruitment and tree-grass dynamics in tropical savanna is limited. In West African savanna, Fulani pastoralists frequently defoliate several fodder tree species to feed livestock in the dry season. We investigated the direct and indirect effects of recurrent defoliation of African mahogany (Khaya senegalensis) by Fulani people on seedling (forest systems in West Africa, it has the potential to affect tree-grass coexistence. Incorporating the influence of large tree defoliation into existing models of savanna dynamics can further our understanding of tree-grass coexistence and improve management. A rotating harvest system, which allows seedlings to recruit episodically, or a patchwork harvest, which maintains some nursery trees in the mosaic, could help sustain seedling recruitment and minimize the indirect effects of harvest. PMID:26485958

  12. Costs of Implementing Collective Action and Capacity Building Among Pastoralists in Southern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Coppock, David Layne; Tezera, Seyoum; Desta, Solomon

    2009-01-01

    Since 2000, the PARIMA project has implemented risk-management activities among semi-settled pastoralists in southern Ethiopia. The goal has been to improve human welfare via collective action and capacity building. Outcomes include progress in income generation, asset conservation, and livelihood diversification. Fifty-nine collective-action groups were created. Dominated by women, they included over 2,000 founding members and groups have recently merged to form 37 cooperatives, consistent w...

  13. Rangeland degradation assessment: a new strategy based on the ecological knowledge of indigenous pastoralists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behmanesh, Bahareh; Barani, Hossein; Abedi Sarvestani, Ahmad; Shahraki, Mohammad Reza; Sharafatmandrad, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    In a changing world, the prevalence of land degradation is becoming a serious problem, especially in countries with arid and semi-arid rangelands. There are many techniques to assess rangeland degradation that rely on scientific knowledge but ignore indigenous people. Indigenous people have accumulated precious knowledge about land management through generations of experience. Therefore, a study was conducted to find out how indigenous people assess rangeland degradation and how their ecological knowledge can be used for rangeland degradation assessment. Interviews were conducted with the pastoralists of two sites (Dasht and Mirza Baylu), where part of both areas is located in Golestan National Park (north-eastern Iran). A structured questionnaire was designed based on 17 indicators taken from literature and also primary discussions with pastoralists in order to evaluate land degradation. A qualitative Likert five-point scale was used for scoring rangeland degradation indicators. The results revealed that pastoralists pay more attention to edaphic indicators than to vegetative and other indicators. There were significant differences between the inside and outside of the park in terms of rangeland degradation indicators for both sites. The results show that the rangelands outside of the park in both sites were degraded compared to those inside of the park, especially in the areas close to villages. It can be concluded that pastoralists have a wealth of knowledge about the vegetation and grazing animal habits that can be used in rangeland degradation assessment. It is therefore necessary to document their ecological indigenous knowledge and involve them in the process of rangeland-degradation assessment.

  14. Traditional Ecological Knowledge among transhumant pastoralists in Mediterranean Spain: learning for adaptation to global change

    OpenAIRE

    Oteros Rozas, E.; Ontillera-Sánchez, R.; Sanosa, P.; Gómez-Baggethun, E.; Reyes-García, V.; González, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Mobility is a millenary human strategy to deal with environmental change. An outstanding example of mobility is transhumance, an ancient pastoralist practice consisting of the seasonal migration of livestock between ecological regions following peaks in pasture productivity. The maintenance of transhumance depends partly on the preservation of related traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). We (a) identified and characterized social groups that hold transhumance-related TEK, (b) analyzed tren...

  15. COOPERATION OR CONFLICT? IDENTITY AND SCARCE RESOURCES OF PREHISTORIC SAHARAN PASTORALISTS

    OpenAIRE

    Lenssen-Erz, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Nomadic or transhumant pastoralists in the Ennedi Highlands in north easternChad have always had to cope with scarce resources. When the region was first made use of bypastoralists circa 3000 BC, aridification had already started. Despite progressing aridification, the landscape was used for herding cattle and goats, and later also for keeping horses and camelsin the following millennia. Hundreds of rock art sites are witness to this appropriation.While demographic data are still missing, it ...

  16. Entrepreneurs, elites, and exclusion in Maasailand: Trends in wildlife conservation and pastoralist development

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, M.; Homewood, K.

    2002-01-01

    Maasai pastoralists in Kenya are rapidly diversifying. Maasai may now derive their main livelihoods (and sometimes considerable income) from farming, wildlife tourism, and/or the leasing of land for large-scale cereal cultivation. The spread of large-scale commercial cultivation competes with wildlife for grazing land, and wildlife populations around protected areas are rapidly declining as a result. This paper presents new data to analyse the way returns from different land uses, and the soc...

  17. Animal milk sustains micronutrient nutrition and child anthropometry among pastoralists in Samburu, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannotti, Lora; Lesorogol, Carolyn

    2014-09-01

    Milk has been integral to pastoralist nutrition for thousands of years, but as communities move toward settled livelihoods, milk consumption is dropping with only minimal evidence for the health and nutrition implications. This longitudinal study aimed to first test whether increased dependency on agriculture reduced household milk production and consumption, and ultimately, nutrient adequacy among the Samburu pastoralists. Second, we investigated whether household milk availability affected child milk intakes and anthropometry. Socioeconomic and dietary intake data were collected from households (n = 200) in 2000, 2005, and 2010, and anthropometric measures and individual child milk intakes in 2012. Nutrient intakes were assessed by the probability of nutrient adequacy method, and generalized least-squared regression modeling with mixed effects was applied to identify predictors of milk consumption. Milk contributed 10% of energy intakes, below maize (52%) and sugar (11%), but over one-half of critical micronutrients, vitamins A, B12 , and C. Livestock holdings and income increased the likelihood of higher milk intakes (overall adj R(2)  = 0.88, P pastoralists could provide insight into leaner and taller anthropometrics for other populations globally. PMID:24942144

  18. Early agriculture and crop transmission among Bronze Age mobile pastoralists of Central Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Robert; Frachetti, Michael; Doumani, Paula; Rouse, Lynne; Cerasetti, Barbara; Bullion, Elissa; Mar'yashev, Alexei

    2014-05-22

    Archaeological research in Central Eurasia is exposing unprecedented scales of trans-regional interaction and technology transfer between East Asia and southwest Asia deep into the prehistoric past. This article presents a new archaeobotanical analysis from pastoralist campsites in the mountain and desert regions of Central Eurasia that documents the oldest known evidence for domesticated grains and farming among seasonally mobile herders. Carbonized grains from the sites of Tasbas and Begash illustrate the first transmission of southwest Asian and East Asian domesticated grains into the mountains of Inner Asia in the early third millennium BC. By the middle second millennium BC, seasonal camps in the mountains and deserts illustrate that Eurasian herders incorporated the cultivation of millet, wheat, barley and legumes into their subsistence strategy. These findings push back the chronology for domesticated plant use among Central Eurasian pastoralists by approximately 2000 years. Given the geography, chronology and seed morphology of these data, we argue that mobile pastoralists were key agents in the spread of crop repertoires and the transformation of agricultural economies across Asia from the third to the second millennium BC. PMID:24695428

  19. East Africa's pastoralist emergency: is climate change the straw that breaks the camel's back?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, P J

    2010-01-01

    The global warming trend of climate change is having severe adverse effects on the livelihoods of the Turkana pastoralists of northwestern Kenya. Care has to be taken in making assertions about the impact of climate change. The biggest effects may come not from lower average rainfall but from a widening of the standard deviation as weather extremes become more frequent. In a region already prone to drought, disease and conflict, climate change, access to modern weapons and new viral livestock diseases are now overwhelming pastoralists' coping capacity and deepening the region's roughly 30-year dependency on famine relief. This article examines the livelihood strategies of the Turkana and several poverty reduction programmes currently established, while addressing the reality that traditional pastoralism may no longer be a viable livelihood option, given the effects of climate change, disease and the ensuing conflict over diminishing resources. The findings conclude that the future for traditional Turkana pastoralists is dismal because they continue to depend on an environment that may no longer support them. Humanitarians are recommended to shift their focus to advocate and invest in alternative livelihood strategies that generate economic independence and help the Turkana adapt to their changing environment. PMID:21506297

  20. Climate Change Adaptation Among Tibetan Pastoralists: Challenges in Enhancing Local Adaptation Through Policy Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yao; Grumbine, R. Edward; Wilkes, Andreas; Wang, Yun; Xu, Jian-Chu; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2012-10-01

    While researchers are aware that a mix of Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK), community-based resource management institutions, and higher-level institutions and policies can facilitate pastoralists' adaptation to climate change, policy makers have been slow to understand these linkages. Two critical issues are to what extent these factors play a role, and how to enhance local adaptation through government support. We investigated these issues through a case study of two pastoral communities on the Tibetan Plateau in China employing an analytical framework to understand local climate adaptation processes. We concluded that LEK and community-based institutions improve adaptation outcomes for Tibetan pastoralists through shaping and mobilizing resource availability to reduce risks. Higher-level institutions and policies contribute by providing resources from outside communities. There are dynamic interrelationships among these factors that can lead to support, conflict, and fragmentation. Government policy could enhance local adaptation through improvement of supportive relationships among these factors. While central government policies allow only limited room for overt integration of local knowledge/institutions, local governments often have some flexibility to buffer conflicts. In addition, government policies to support market-based economic development have greatly benefited adaptation outcomes for pastoralists. Overall, in China, there are still questions over how to create innovative institutions that blend LEK and community-based institutions with government policy making.

  1. Communicative Language Testing of Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚小菊

    2007-01-01

    Testing speaking ability offers plenty of scope for meeting the criteria for communicative testing.The article describes the model of CLA,analyzes basic factors involved in speaking competence,discusses what is a communicative language test of speaking,and suggests some factors that should be taken into consideration when designing a communicative language test of speaking.

  2. Communicative Language Testing of Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚小菊

    2007-01-01

    Testing speaking ability offers plenty of scope for meeting the criteria for communicative testing. The article describes the model of CLA,analyzes basic factors involved in speaking competence,discusses what is a communicative language test of speaking,and suggests some factors that should be taken into consideration when designing a communicative language test of speaking.

  3. Teachers' awareness regarding public speaking

    OpenAIRE

    Košir, Mateja

    2013-01-01

    Teacher do many speaking appearances, therefore they have to consciously develop their ability of effective speaking appearances. It is expected that the teacher is a good speaker, that he knows how to provide content, draw attention and to quicken interest. Knowledge on speaking appearance contributes to the improvement and upgrade of this skill. In the theoretical part of the thesis I have defined rhetoric, speaking appearances and factors that impact the successfulness of the speaking appe...

  4. Pastoralist Community's Perception of Tuberculosis: A Quantitative Study from Shinille Area of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaku, Samuel; Sharma, Hardeep Rai; Alemie, Getahun Asres

    2013-01-01

    Background. In Ethiopia the prevalence of all forms of TB is estimated at 261/100 000 population, leading to an annual mortality rate of 64/100 000 population. The incidence rate of smear-positive TB is 108/100 000 population. Objectives. To assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding TB among pastoralists in Shinille district, Somali region, Ethiopia. Method. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 821 pastoralists aged >18 years and above from February to May, 2011 using self-structured questionnaire. Results. Most (92.8%) of the study participants heard about TB, but only 10.1% knew about its causative agent. Weight loss as main symptom, transmittance through respiratory air droplets, and sputum examination for diagnosis were the answers of 34.3%, 29.9%, and 37.9% of pastoralists, respectively. The majority (98.3%) of respondents reported that TB could be cured, of which 93.3% believed with modern drugs. About 41.3% of participants mentioned covering the nose and mouth during sneezing and coughing as a preventive measure. The multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that household income >300 Ethiopian Birr and Somali ethnicity were associated with high TB knowledge. Regarding health seeking behaviour practice only 48.0% of the respondents preferred to visit government hospital and discuss their problems with doctors/health care providers. Conclusion. This study observed familiarity with gaps and low overall knowledge on TB and revealed negative attitudes like discrimination intentions in the studied pastoral community. PMID:24381757

  5. Pastoralists' responses to variation of rangeland resources in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Ryan R J; Gordon, Iain J; Janssen, Marco A; Abel, Nick

    2006-04-01

    We explore the response of pastoralists to rangeland resource variation in time and space, focusing on regions where high variation makes it unlikely that an economically viable herd can be maintained on a single management unit. In such regions, the need to move stock to find forage in at least some years has led to the evolution of nomadism and transhumance, and reciprocal grazing agreements among the holders of common-property rangeland. The role of such informal institutions in buffering resource variation is well documented in some Asian and African rangelands, but in societies with formally established private-property regimes, where we focus, such institutions have received little attention. We examine agistment networks, which play an important role in buffering resource variation in modern-day Australia. Agistment is a commercial arrangement between pastoralists who have less forage than they believe they require and pastoralists who believe they have more. Agistment facilitates the movement of livestock via a network based largely on trust. We are concerned exclusively with the link between the characteristics of biophysical variation and human aspects of agistment networks, and we developed a model to test the hypothesis that such a link could exist. Our model builds on game theory literature, which explains cooperation between strangers based on the ability of players to learn whom they can trust. Our game is played on a highly stylized landscape that allows us to control and isolate the degree of spatial variation and spatial covariation. We found that agistment networks are more effective where spatial variation in resource availability is high, and generally more effective when spatial covariation is low. Policy design that seeks to work with existing social networks in rangelands has potential, but this potential varies depending on localized characteristics of the biophysical variability. PMID:16711045

  6. Pastoralist Community’s Perception of Tuberculosis: A Quantitative Study from Shinille Area of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Melaku

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Ethiopia the prevalence of all forms of TB is estimated at 261/100 000 population, leading to an annual mortality rate of 64/100 000 population. The incidence rate of smear-positive TB is 108/100 000 population. Objectives. To assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding TB among pastoralists in Shinille district, Somali region, Ethiopia. Method. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 821 pastoralists aged >18 years and above from February to May, 2011 using self-structured questionnaire. Results. Most (92.8% of the study participants heard about TB, but only 10.1% knew about its causative agent. Weight loss as main symptom, transmittance through respiratory air droplets, and sputum examination for diagnosis were the answers of 34.3%, 29.9%, and 37.9% of pastoralists, respectively. The majority (98.3% of respondents reported that TB could be cured, of which 93.3% believed with modern drugs. About 41.3% of participants mentioned covering the nose and mouth during sneezing and coughing as a preventive measure. The multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that household income >300 Ethiopian Birr and Somali ethnicity were associated with high TB knowledge. Regarding health seeking behaviour practice only 48.0% of the respondents preferred to visit government hospital and discuss their problems with doctors/health care providers. Conclusion. This study observed familiarity with gaps and low overall knowledge on TB and revealed negative attitudes like discrimination intentions in the studied pastoral community.

  7. HIV/AIDS among pastoralists and refugees in north-east Africa: a neglected problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbessa, Mirgissa Kaba; Mariam, Damen Haile; Kassa, Afework; Alwan, Fathia; Kloos, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    The eight member states (Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda) of the Intergovernmental Authority for Development (IGAD) have the largest proportions of cross-border mobile pastoralists and refugees in Africa. Although all IGAD countries have had national HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment programmes since the late 1980s, the IGAD Regional HIV & AIDS Partnership Program was (IRAPP) established in 2007 to mitigate the challenges of HIV among neglected pastoral and refugee communities. This article assesses vulnerability of pastoralists and refugee communities to HIV and interventions targeting these groups in the IGAD countries. Outcomes from this study may serve as a baseline for further research and to improve interventions. Published articles were accessed through web searches using PubMed and Google Scholar engines and unpublished documents were collected manually. The search terms were HIV risk behaviour, vulnerability, HIV prevalence and interventions, under the headings pastoralists, refugees, IGAD and north-east Africa for the period 2001-2014. Of the 214 documents reviewed, 78 met the inclusion criteria and were included. Most HIV/AIDS related studies focusing of pastoral communities in IGAD countries were found to be limited in scope and coverage but reveal precarious situations. Sero-prevalence among various pastoral populations ranged from 1% to 21% in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia and Uganda and from 1% to 5% among refugees in Sudan, Kenya and Uganda. Socioeconomic, cultural, logistic, infrastructure and programmatic factors were found to contribute to continuing vulnerability to HIV. Interventions need to be further contextualised to the needs of those impoverished populations and integrated into national HIV/AIDS programmes. HIV/AIDS remains a major public health concern among the pastoral and refugee communities of IGAD countries. This calls for IGAD to collaborate with national and international partners in

  8. Treatment delay among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in pastoralist communities in Bale Zone, Southeast Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussen Awol

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB is a major public health problem in Africa with Ethiopia being the most affected. Treatment delay is an important indicator of access to TB diagnosis and treatment. However, little is known about factors associated with treatment delay of pulmonary TB among pastoralists. Health facility based cross sectional study was conducted on 129 pulmonary TB patients in pastoralist community. The study was conducted in three health centers and a hospital. Time between onset of TB symptoms and first visit to a professional health care provider (patient delay, and the time between first visits to the professional health care provider to the date of diagnosis (provider's delay were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. Findings A total of 129 new smear positive pulmonary TB patients participated in the study. The median total delay was 97 days. The median patient and health provider delays were 63 and 34 days, respectively. Ninety six percent of the patients were delayed for more than the twenty one days cutoff point. Patient delay was positively associated with first visit to traditional healer/private clinic/drug shop, rural residence, being illiterate, living in more than 10 kilometers from health facility; severity of illness at first presentation to health facility. Provider delay was positively associated with rural residence, being illiterate, patient with good functional status, patients in contact with more than two health providers, and place of first visit being traditional healer/private clinic/drug shop. Conclusions This study showed that majority of smear positive patients delayed either for diagnosis or treatment, thus continue to serve as reservoirs of infection. This indicates that there is a need for intervention to decrease patient and provider delays. Effort to reduce delays in pastoralist communities should focus on improving access to services in rural communities, engaging traditional and

  9. Victims of conservation or rights as forest dwellers: Van Gujjar pastoralists between contesting codes of law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooch Pernille

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Van (forest Gujjars, surviving as forest pastoralists in the central part of the Indian Himalaya, are a people who, due to their nomadic lifestyle, have since colonial rule found themselves at the margin of Indian society. This paper will look at the relationship between the Van Gujjars and their forest base in a historical perspective from colonial rule to ′conservation of nature′ and the ′rights of forest dwellers′ and further discuss how changing codes and rules of power affect the society-citizen-nature / forest relationship for the community. We will look back into history and see how a system of strict control and regulation of Van Gujjars as nomadic pastoralists without a fixed address, initiated during colonial time, was continued by the national state of India after independence. We will further discuss how a history of unequal treatment and marginalisation of Van Gujjar pastoralists has continued into the present. What is manifest here is ′the forest′ as a contested space: a site of power struggles, where forest dwellers are threatened with displacement in order to provide space, first for modern forestry and revenue producing land, and later for conservation of nature. The paper further looks at the latest developments where the Van Gujjars now have obtained domicile rights such as voters′ rights and have been linked with Government services for education and health. It finishes by discussing the new possibilities and hopes for the community provided by the The Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights Act.

  10. Governing violence in the pastoralist space: Karrayu and state notions of cattle raiding in the Ethiopian Awash Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulugeta, Alemmaya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on recent fieldwork this article examines how cattle raids involving Karrayu pastoralists are governed by the local administration and customary authorities in Ethiopia’s Upper and Middle Awash Valley. It argues that the regulation of violent conflicts in areas marked by weak state presence and legitimacy must be understood as a function of multiple social orders, actors and norms. The authors draw attention to the evolving rationales of inter-ethnic cattle raids, highlight the incomplete nature of state expansion into the Karrayu pastoralist space, and scrutinize the ambiguities of government and community peacemaking.

  11. A Measure of Pastoralist Women’s Vulnerability to the Impact of Seasonality: Evidence from Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aderinoye-Abdulwahab, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines factors that predispose pastoralist women to social and environmental vulnerability and how the women cope with their livelihoods when their husbands relocate with cattle during dry season. The paper adopts a case study research design to select Kwara State of Nigeria where focus groups discussions and interviews were held to elicit information. It was found that food insecurity, low incomes, seasonal changes, conflict, and culture deter women from sustaining a well-being. The study recommends that organisations and policy makers should capitalise on indigenous knowledge when designing measures to reduce people’s vulnerability as this would enhance their livelihood sustainability.

  12. Speaking in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Too much speaking and indiscipline in class is an on-going problem for any teacher, it is at its least disruptive and at most it destroys a good positive classroom atmosphere. This article recognizes this and continues this debate and suggests key clues to support teachers in their efforts to maintain a positive classroom atmosphere and discipline…

  13. My Hesitation to Speak English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Naruha

    2015-01-01

    Even though English was the author's favorite subject, she was not good at speaking in English, and always tried to avoid it. However, it did not matter because she did not have to speak to demonstrate her English ability. After entering university, her lack of confidence in speaking English became a major issue, and other students face the same…

  14. From subsistence to market economy: Responses of Tibetan pastoralists to new economic realities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Manderscheid

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In many regions around the world the pastoral economy shifted from subsistence-oriented to a market-oriented production. Pastoral goods acquired monetary value and became a market commodity that entailed changes in the production system and in the attitude towards livestock. On the Tibetan plateau this shift did not follow a linear way. Until the 1950s, most consumption requirements could be satisfied with animal products. Economic exchange relations were essential to provide grain requirements, at least for those households who relied exclusively on animal husbandry. During the Mao era, animal husbandry was carried out in line with state targets and the produce was delivered according to central planning. In the late 1970s the transition towards a market-oriented production began. This paper discusses the recent reactions of pastoralists to the new realities in one specific area on the eastern Tibetan plateau. This shift from pastoral products to market commodities, the commercial network established as well as the market places for pastoral produce, are examined in this paper. These facts show that the pastoralists in question successfully market their produce. The research area, Dzoge county, is located on the eastern border area of the Tibetan plateau, where different ethnic groups live in proximity to each other. Grassland predominates the landscape, used by nomads as pastures for livestock breeding (yak, sheep and horses. Mobile animal husbandry and the marketing of the livestock products are decisive to guarantee the livelihood of the majority of the population.

  15. Social versus Spatial Mobility? Mongolia’s Pastoralists in the Educational Development Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Stolpe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to education for mobile pastoralists, Mongolia is an exceptional case. Until fifty years ago, herders comprised the majority of the Mongolian population. Although a satellite of the Soviet Union, the Mongolian People’s Republic was a state in which mobile pastoralism was not challenged, and herders were not constructed as social outcasts. Equally exceptional was the country’s modernisation, witnessed in its decided alignment with equal opportunities. In Mongolia, it was not ‘nomadism’ that was associated with backwardness, but illiteracy. Policy-makers aimed to combine spatial with social mobility by building schools further and further out in the grasslands, employing locals as teachers, and fostering interplay between modern formal education and extensive animal husbandry. Yet after 1990, when development discourse pigeon-holed post-socialist Mongolia as a Third World country, the so-called shock therapy led to severe cuts in education. Herders were essentialised as ‘nomads’, which caused donor-driven policies of educational planning to construe pastoralists as challenges. Ironically, during the initial decade of Education for All, the younger generation had—for the first time in Mongolia’s history—less educational opportunities than their parents. This article discusses narratives of inclusion and the political consequences of ascribed social identities.

  16. Even "Bigger Gods" developed amongst the pastoralist followers of Moses and Mohammed: Consistent with uncertainty and disadvantage, but not prosocality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Edward; Madison, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The gods of monotheistic religions, which began amongst pastoralists and defeated exiles, are closer to Big Gods than those associated with ancient city-based polities. The development of Big Gods is contingent upon a need to reduce uncertainty and negative feelings in combination with a relatively high level of prosociality, rather than a need to induce or assess prosociality. PMID:26948728

  17. The use of mobile phones for demographic surveillance of mobile pastoralists and their animals in Chad: proof of principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vreni Jean-Richard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Demographic information is foundational for the planning and management of social programmes, in particular health services. The existing INDEPTH network surveillance sites are limited to coverage of sedentary populations. Including mobile populations in this approach would be expensive, time consuming and possibly low in accuracy. Very little is known about the demography of mobile pastoralists and their animals, so innovative approaches are urgently needed. Objective: To test and evaluate a mobile demographic surveillance system for mobile pastoralist households, including livestock herds, using mobile phones. Design: Mobile pastoralist camps were monitored (10 for 12 months and 10 for 18 months using biweekly mobile phone calls with camp leaders and their wives to conduct interviews about the households and livestock. The collected information was validated through personal visits, GPS data and a livestock demographic model. Results: The study showed the feasibility of mobile phone surveillance for mobile pastoralist camps, providing usable, valid information on human and livestock population structures, pregnancy outcomes and herd dynamics, as well as migration patterns. The approach was low-cost and applicable with the existing local resources. Conclusion: Demographic surveillance in mobile populations is feasible using mobile phones. Expansion of the small-scale system into a full mobile demographic surveillance system is warranted and would likely lead to improved planning and provision of human and animal health care.

  18. Turkana Children's Sociocultural Practices of Pastoralist Lifestyles and Science Curriculum and Instruction in Kenyan Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng'asike, John Teria

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation discusses the findings of an ethnographic exploratory study of Turkana nomadic pastoralist children's sociocultural practices of their everyday lifestyles and science curriculum and instruction in Kenyan early childhood curriculum. The study uses the findings from Turkana elders to challenge the dominant society in Kenya that…

  19. Does Mobility Have to Mean Being Hard to Reach? Mobile Pastoralists and Education's "Terms of Inclusion"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Nomadic groups are highly discriminated against in access to education services, and the 2010 Education For All Global Monitoring Report demanded urgent action to address their education deprivation. Mobile pastoralists, particularly, appear to be falling beyond the remit of migration studies in education, although they are among the most mobile…

  20. Knowledge of Bovine Tuberculosis, Cattle Husbandry and Dairy Practices amongst Pastoralists and Small-Scale Dairy Farmers in Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F Kelly

    Full Text Available Control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB and zoonotic tuberculosis (zTB has relied upon surveillance and slaughter of infected cattle, milk pasteurisation and public health education. In Cameroon, like many other sub-Saharan African countries, there is limited understanding of current cattle husbandry or milk processing practices or livestock keepers awareness of bTB. This paper describes husbandry and milk processing practices within different Cameroonian cattle keeping communities and bTB awareness in comparison to other infectious diseases.A population based cross-sectional sample of herdsmen and a questionnaire were used to gather data from pastoralists and dairy farmers in the North West Region and Vina Division of Cameroon.Pastoralists were predominately male Fulanis who had kept cattle for over a decade. Dairy farmers were non-Fulani and nearly half were female. Pastoralists went on transhumance with their cattle and came into contact with other herds and potential wildlife reservoirs of bTB. Dairy farmers housed their cattle and had little contact with other herds or wildlife. Pastoralists were aware of bTB and other infectious diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease and fasciolosis. These pastoralists were also able to identify clinical signs of these diseases. A similar proportion of dairy farmers were aware of bTB but fewer were aware of foot-and-mouth and fasciolosis. In general, dairy farmers were unable to identify any clinical signs for any of these diseases. Importantly most pastoralists and dairy farmers were unaware that bTB could be transmitted to people by consuming milk.Current cattle husbandry practices make the control of bTB in cattle challenging especially in mobile pastoralist herds. Routine test and slaughter control in dairy herds would be tractable but would have profound impact on dairy farmer livelihoods. Prevention of transmission in milk offers the best approach for human risk mitigation in Cameroon but requires

  1. Ehancing students' Speaking Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Bilová Štěpánka

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims at sharing the experience from developing students’ speaking skills both inside and outside their classes. The author uses examples from English for legal purposes, nevertheless, the methodology can be adapted to various other ESP settings. The presented tasks focus on practicing discussions, role-plays and short spoken deliveries. In order to succeed in effective oral practice, it is beneficial to engage the students in the feedback. If such activities are used systematically,...

  2. Modern wildlife conservation initiatives and the pastoralist/hunter nomads of northwestern Tibet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L. Fox

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1993 the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR of China established the 300 000 km2 Chang Tang Nature Preserve on the northwestern Tibetan plateau, an action precipitated by rapidly diminishing populations of chiru (Tibetan antelope and wild yak. Some 30 000 nomadic pastoralists use areas within this reserve for livestock grazing, with many having traditionally depended in part on hunting for supplementary subsistence and trade. Following a 1997 request from TAR leaders for international assistance in addressing the conservation issues associated with the creation of this reserve, the TAR Forestry Bureau and the Network for University Co-operation Tibet — Norway began a 3-year research collaboration program in 2000 to outline human-wildlife interactions and conservation priorities in the western part of the reserve. To date, four excursions (2-6 weeks each have been made to the western Chang Tang region, and investigations of interactions between pastoralists and wildlife conservation objectives have been initiated in an area of about 5000 km2, including the 2300 km2 Aru basin located at 5000 m elevation at the northern edge of pastoralist inhabitation. The Aru site is unique in that nomads have only recently returned to this previously off-limits basin. But, as in surrounding areas, the people's lives are undergoing changes recently influenced by the introduction of permanent winter houses, changing international trade in shahtoosh and cashmere wool, and a move towards stricter hunting regulations. The northwestern Chang Tang, with the Aru basin as a prime site, represents one of the last strongholds of the endangered chiru and wild yak, as well as home to Tibetan gazelle, kiang, Tibetan argali, blue sheep, wolf, snow leopard and brown bear. In autumn 2000, for example, with approximately 12 000 of the wild ungulates (mostly the migratory chiru within the Aru basin along with some 8000 domestic livestock, issues of land use overlap and possible

  3. Speaking In Code

    OpenAIRE

    Croxall, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Brian Croxall Emory University Over the last five years, there have been countless articles written about the digital humanities. It’s been called both the savior and the death knell of scholarship in the twenty-first century. But what do we mean when we say “digital humanities”? How “digital” and how “humanities” need we be? Why is so much faith being placed in code and code words? In this presentation, Brian Croxall argues that digital humanists need to speak in code less frequently and tha...

  4. Developing Speaking Skills through Reading

    OpenAIRE

    Cagri Tugrul Mart

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasingly high relationship between reading and speaking skills. There is no question that people who develop large reading vocabularies tend to develop large speaking vocabularies. Indeed, reading power relies on continuous improvement in vocabulary knowledge that provides communication. The importance of word knowledge, which facilitates speaking skills, has been a major resource in the development of reading skills. Therefore fostering improvement in word knowledge through w...

  5. Do non-monetary incentives for pregnant women increase antenatal attendance among Ethiopian pastoralists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khogali, M; Zachariah, R; Reid, A J; Alipon, S C; Zimble, S; Gbane, M; Etienne, W; Veerman, R; Hassan, A; Harries, A D

    2014-03-21

    In a pastoralist setting in Ethiopia, we assessed changes in attendance between the first and subsequent antenatal care (ANC) visits following the implementation of non-monetary incentives in a primary health care centre over a 3-year period from October 2009 to September 2012. Incentives included the provision of a bar of soap, a bucket, a mosquito net, sugar, cooking oil, a jerrycan and a delivery kit. The first ANC visits increased by 48% in the first year to 60% in the second. Subsequent visits did not show a similar pattern due to ruptures in incentive stocks. Incentives appear to increase ANC attendance; however, ruptures in stock should be avoided to sustain the effect. PMID:26423755

  6. Androgen Receptor Gene Polymorphism, Aggression, and Reproduction in Tanzanian Foragers and Pastoralists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butovskaya, Marina L.; Lazebny, Oleg E.; Vasilyev, Vasiliy A.; Dronova, Daria A.; Karelin, Dmitri V.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Shibalev, Dmitri V.; Shackelford, Todd K.; Fink, Bernhard; Ryskov, Alexey P.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) gene polymorphism in humans is linked to aggression and may also be linked to reproduction. Here we report associations between AR gene polymorphism and aggression and reproduction in two small-scale societies in northern Tanzania (Africa)—the Hadza (monogamous foragers) and the Datoga (polygynous pastoralists). We secured self-reports of aggression and assessed genetic polymorphism of the number of CAG repeats for the AR gene for 210 Hadza men and 229 Datoga men (aged 17–70 years). We conducted structural equation modeling to identify links between AR gene polymorphism, aggression, and number of children born, and included age and ethnicity as covariates. Fewer AR CAG repeats predicted greater aggression, and Datoga men reported more aggression than did Hadza men. In addition, aggression mediated the identified negative relationship between CAG repeats and number of children born. PMID:26291982

  7. Forced migration, processes of return and livelihood construction among pastoralists in northern Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Ruth

    2002-03-01

    The Hawaweer, a nomadic, pastoralist group in northern Sudan, were seriously affected by the drought in the Sahel during the mid-1980s. Their experience illustrates the connection between internally displaced people, normal mobility, forced migration, dilemmas and opportunities of return and how new livelihoods can be successfully constructed based on traditional rights, strong local institutions and external resources. Some displaced Hawaweer got the chance to return to their homeland as new livelihood opportunities were established; others did not get this opportunity nor would they have returned if they had been given the chance. In both situations, the processes of displacement and return had an impact on the sense of belonging and identity. PMID:11929161

  8. Examining the relationship between environmental factors and conflict in pastoralist areas of East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayana, Essayas K; Ceccato, Pietro; Fisher, Jonathan R B; DeFries, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    The eastern Africa region has long been known for recurring drought, prolonged civil war and frequent pastoral conflicts. Several researchers have suggested that environmental factors can trigger conflicts among pastoralist communities, but quantitative support for this hypothesis is lacking. Here we use 29years of georeferenced precipitation and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data to evaluate long term trends in scarcity of water and forage for livestock, and then ask whether these environmental stressors have any predictive power with respect to the location and timing of 11years of conflict data based on Armed Conflict Location and Event Data Project (ACLED) and Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP). Results indicate that environmental stressors were only partly predictive of conflict events. To better understand the drivers behind conflict, the contribution of other potential stressors to conflict need to be systematically quantified and be taken into consideration. PMID:27037881

  9. Native predators reduce harvest of reindeer by Sámi pastoralists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, N Thompson; Andrén, Henrik; Persson, Jens; Aronsson, Malin; Chapron, Guillaume

    2012-07-01

    Contemporary efforts to protect biological diversity recognize the importance of sustaining traditional human livelihoods, particularly uses of the land that are compatible with intact landscapes and ecologically complete food webs. However, these efforts often confront conflicting goals. For example, conserving native predators may harm pastoralist economies because predators consume domestic livestock that sustain people. This potential conflict must be reconciled by policy, but such reconciliation requires a firm understanding of the effects of predators on the prey used by people. We used a long-term, large-scale database and Bayesian models to estimate the impacts of lynx (Lynx lynx), wolverine (Gulo gulo), and brown bear (Ursus arctos) on harvest of semi-domesticated reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) by Sami pastoralists in Sweden. The average annual harvest of reindeer averaged 25% of the population (95% credible interval = 19, 31). Annual harvest declined by 96.6 (31, 155) reindeer for each lynx family group (the surveyed segment of the lynx population) in a management unit and by 94.3 (20, 160) for each wolverine reproduction (the surveyed segment of the wolverine population). We failed to detect effects of predation by brown bear. The mechanism for effects of predation on harvest was reduced population growth rate. The rate of increase of reindeer populations declined with increasing abundance of lynx and wolverine. The density of reindeer, latitude, and weather indexed by the North Atlantic Oscillation also influenced reindeer population growth rate. We conclude that there is a biological basis for compensating the Sámi reindeer herders for predation on reindeer. PMID:22908719

  10. Teaching Public Speaking with Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Carl L.; Winn, Larry James

    In public-speaking courses, the use of games--a specific type of simulation--can help to overcome three of the most basic problems faced by the teacher: the gap between the study of theory and the application of that theory, the limited experience gained by students confined to speaking situations within classroom walls, and student stage fright.…

  11. Influence of Pastoralists' Sociocultural Activities on Tsetse-Trypanosome-Cattle Reservoir Interface: The Risk of Human African Trypanosomiasis in North-Central Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaji, N B; Kabir, J

    2016-06-01

    The study investigated socio-cultural characteristics of pastoralists that influenced on the tsetse-trypanosome-cattle reservoir interface thereby predisposing them to HAT in Niger State, North-central Nigeria. It was a cross-sectional survey of adult pastoral herders, aged 30 years and above, and conducted between October 2012 and February 2013. A face-to-face structured questionnaire was administered on the pastoralists nested in 96 cattle herds with questions focused on pastoralists' socio-cultural activities and behavioral practices related to HAT risk. Descriptive and analytic statistics were used to describe the obtained data. A total of 384 pastoralists participated, with mean age of 49.6  ± 10.76 SD years. Male respondents constituted 86.7% of gender, while pastoralists of age group 40-49 years constituted 35.4% of respondents. About 59.4% of the pastoralists had knowledge about HAT and its symptoms and only 33.9% of them believed that cattle served as reservoir of HAT trypanosome. Knowledge/belief levels of the pastoralists about African trypanosomiasis occurrence in humans and animals were statistically significant. Males were four times more likely to be exposed to HAT (OR = 3.67; 95% CI: 1.42, 9.52); age group 60-69 was also four times more likely to be exposed (OR = 3.59; 95% CI: 1.56, 8.28); and nomadic pastoralists were two times more likely to be exposed to HAT (OR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.37, 3.14). All cultural practices significantly influenced exposure to HAT with extensive husbandry system three times more likely to predisposed pastoralists to HAT (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.65, 6.24). Socio-cultural characteristics of pastoralists influenced exposure to HAT risk and, therefore, there is a need to sensitize them to bring changes to their socio-cultural practices and perceptions to achieve effective and long term sustainable HAT control. Elimination strategies of parasites in animals and vectors should be considered to avoid reintroduction

  12. Successful Implementation of Collective Action and Human-Capacity Building Among Pastoralists in Southern Ethiopia: Lessons Learned, 2001-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Coppock, David Layne; Tezera, Seyoum; Desta, Solomon; Gebru, Getachew

    2008-01-01

    Since 2000 the PARIMA project has implemented pilot risk-management activities among poverty-stricken, semi-settled pastoralists in southern Ethiopia. The goal has been to improve human welfare via collective action and capacity building. Outcomes include progress in income generation, asset conservation, and livelihood diversification. The approach has been unique to southern Ethiopia in that a bottom-up, participatory perspective has dominated. It has focused on the priorities and felt need...

  13. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) on Rift Valley Fever among Pastoralist Communities of Ijara District, North Eastern Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Ismail H; Affognon, Hippolyte D; Wanjoya, Anthony K; Onyango-Ouma, Washington; Sang, Rosemary

    2015-11-01

    Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis, have previously been associated with unusually heavy rainfall and extensive flooding. The disease is a serious public health problem in Africa and the Middle East, and is a potential global health threat. In Kenya, outbreaks of the disease have disproportionately affected impoverished pastoralist communities. This study sought to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) regarding RVF among the pastoralists of North Eastern Kenya, and to establish the determinants of KAP on RVF. A cross-sectional study involving 392 pastoralists living in Ijara district (Masalani and Ijara wards) was carried out using an interview questionnaire. All respondents interviewed (100%) had heard about RVF disease. They recognized that the disease is dangerous (99%), and had a positive attitude towards vaccination of animals (77%). However, few respondents knew that abortion (11%) and high mortality of young animals (10%) were key signs of RVF in animals. Very few (4%) use any form of protection when handling sick animals to avoid infection. Significant factors associated with knowledge were being in a household with a history of RVF infection (OR = 1.262, 95% CI = 1.099-1.447), having more livestock (OR = 1.285, 95% CI = 1.175-1.404) and the place of residence, Masalani (OR = 0.526, 95% CI = 0.480-0.576). Overall knowledge score on RVF was found to be a significant predictor of good preventive practice of the disease (OR = 1.073, 95% CI = 1.047-1.101). Despite the positive attitude that pastoralist communities have towards the prevention of RVF, there exist gaps in knowledge and good practices on the disease. Therefore there is need for public health education to address these gaps, and to identify and facilitate the removal of barriers to behavioural change related to the prevention of RVF. PMID:26566218

  14. Environmental Change and the Vulnerability of Pastoralists to Drought: A Case Study of the Maasai in Amboseli, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Western, D.; Manzolillo Nightingale, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Chapter Three of the Africa Environment Outlook Report is concerned with the impact of environmental change on human vulnerability. The Report considers vulnerability in the context of exposure to environmental hazards (contingencies, shocks and stresses) and the coping capabilities of people. In this case study, we will show that the Maasai of Kajiado district in Kenya (as well as other pastoralists) face two distinct types of environmental hazards. The first includes climatic...

  15. Socio-economic factors influencing control of vector-borne diseases in the pastoralist system of south western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugisha, Anthony; McLeod, Anni; Percy, Rachel; Kyewalabye, Elizabeth

    2008-05-01

    Research in control of tick-borne diseases and trypanosomosis, and their vectors, namely, ticks and tsetse flies respectively, has been on going for decades. However, very little attention has been paid to the socio-economic factors that are likely to influence the outcome of the interventions in the control of these diseases. Thus, this study was designed to investigate these factors, mainly the intra-household factors influencing decision-making in the control of Vector-borne diseases in the pastoralist areas of Uganda. These factors included: indigenous technical knowledge, household economic factors, and gender. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in the collection and analysis of data. The tools used for data collection included among others, participatory learning and action (PLA), and Case studies. The findings included the following: In pastoralist households, a big proportion of the household budget was allocated to vector-borne diseases control. In the male-headed households, men dominated decision-making on vector-borne diseases control, although the goals and priorities of men and women in these households were not the same. Also, vector-borne disease control was predominantly by use of modern veterinary drugs, and pastoralists treated sick cattle by themselves even in situations where there were veterinary personnel. PMID:18557192

  16. Effects of Climate Change on Indigenous Livelihoods: The Case of Recurrent Droughts among Nomadic Pastoralist of Southeastern Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, M. N.; Desanker, P. V.

    2006-12-01

    Drought is the most injurious impact of climate change that decimates lives and hinders socioeconomic development in most rangelands of Kenya. Several scientific evidences indicate that global climate change will increase frequency and intensity of droughts. This will have important ramification for ecosystems and social systems in the rangelands of southeastern Kenya, and correctly so. These rangelands are fragile and degraded; and the inhabitants are mostly poverty-stricken. Nomadic pastoralism is the chief source of livelihood in this region; it relies on local natural pastures. Besides, pressures from land use change constitute an additional exposure, of nomadic pastoralism, to vulnerabilities of this climatic hazard. This region is highly prone to droughts; it is currently recovering from a devastating drought that started in early 2005 and terminated at the start this year. Most important, and like most societies in sub-Saharan Africa, inadequate adaptive capacity among nomadic pastoralists of Kenya, exacerbates deleterious impacts of drought. The livelihood of these pastoralists, therefore, stands to be destabilized. This study presents findings from an on-going research in Kajiado District of southeastern Kenya. Impacts of and adaptation strategies to recurrent and prolonged droughts among the nomadic Maasai pastoralist are presented. The study concludes with possible future scenarios of this form of pastoralism from which climate change actors can draw from.

  17. Speak Up: Anesthesia and Sedation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The drugs can stay in your body for up to 24 hours. Remember, it is important to ... the instructions provided after the procedure. Do: • Speak up if you have any questions • Ask for written ...

  18. The Key Principles for Developing Speaking Skills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马波

    2008-01-01

    Of all the four skills listening,speaking,reading and writing,speaking seems to be the most important one.During the teaching process,there are so many difficuties in speaking that the students cannot solve.In the paper,it is mentioned some approaches to improve the speaking ability of the students,they are useful and efficient for teaching.

  19. Well Spoken: Teaching Speaking to All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Erik

    2011-01-01

    All teachers at all grade levels in all subjects have speaking assignments for students, but many teachers believe they don't know how to teach speaking, and many even fear public speaking themselves. In his new book, "Well Spoken", veteran teacher and education consultant Erik Palmer shares the art of teaching speaking in any classroom. Teachers…

  20. Livestock mortality in pastoralist herds in Ethiopia and implications for drought response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catley, Andy; Admassu, Berhanu; Bekele, Gezu; Abebe, Dawit

    2014-07-01

    Participatory epidemiology methods were employed retrospectively in three pastoralist regions of Ethiopia to estimate the specific causes of excess livestock mortality during drought. The results showed that starvation/dehydration accounted for between 61.5 and 100 per cent of excess livestock mortality during drought, whereas disease-related mortality accounted for between 0 and 28.1 per cent of excess mortality. Field observations indicate that, in livestock, disease risks and mortality increase in the immediate post-drought period, during rain. The design of livelihoods-based drought response programmes should include protection of core livestock assets, and it should take account of the specific causes of excess livestock mortality during drought and immediately afterwards. This study shows that, when comparing livestock feed supplementation and veterinary support, relatively more aid should be directed at the former if the objective is to protect core livestock during drought. Veterinary support should consider disease-related mortality in the immediate post-drought period, and tailor inputs accordingly. PMID:24905708

  1. High prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in a remote, undertreated population of Namibian pastoralists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, A; Ponnaluri-Wears, S; Davis, G S; Low, B S; Foxman, B

    2014-11-01

    The highly remote pastoralist communities in Kaokoland, Namibia, have long been presumed to have high gonorrhoea prevalence. To estimate gonorrhoea prevalence and correlates of infection, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 446 adults across 28 rural villages. Gonorrhoea status was determined from urethral and vaginal swabs via qPCR assay. All participants answered a closed-ended interview about demographics, sexual behaviour and symptom history. Sixteen per cent of participants had high-level infections (⩾ID(50) dose) and 48% had low-level infections (

  2. Characterization of Camel Production System in Afar Pastoralists, North East Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Simenew

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A cross sectional questionnaire survey was conducted to characterize camel production system in Afar Region. From the 110 responses of the camel owners interviewed 68.2% of them prefer camels as their first choice over other livestock species and mainly kept in the society for milk production. Disease accounted 40.9% of the main problems of camel rearing society of the Afar pastoralist and about 35.8% of the camel culling reasons were attributed to camel diseases. External parasite infestation and pneumonia were the most common health problems with 51% and 31.8% respectively. More than 80% of breeding male camels were selected from the own herd and rarely acquired from other sources. The (Mean±S.D. age at first calving was 5.36±0.74 years in afar female camels and the life span ranges from 14-29 years. Daily milk yield of Afar camels ranges from 2.01-12.0 liters per day in 2-3 milking times. The average age to select breeding male is 2.75±1.50 years. The production system of the Afar society has never got enough support from the respected bodies. Policy makers, researchers and funding agencies should give attentions to camels in combating food security in the ever widening desertification in areas like Afar.

  3. Adopting Cultivation to Remain Pastoralists: The Diversification of Maasai Livelihoods in Northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, J Terrence; Leslie, Paul W; Deluca, Laura

    2010-06-01

    Over the past four decades, Maasai pastoralists in Tanzania have adopted agriculture, integrating it with their traditional pastoralism. This livelihood diversification has complex origins and profound implications for Maasai social organization, culture, and demography, and ultimately for their health and well being and for the local and regional environment. In this paper, we examine the process by which this engagement with, and increasing dependence upon, agriculture came about in Ngorongoro District, northern Tanzania. The process there was more complex and influenced by a wider variety of factors than has been reported by previous descriptions of Maasai livelihood diversification. It generally involved two stages: planting a garden first, and later expanding the garden to a farm. We found that some households adopted cultivation out of necessity, but far more did so by choice. Among the latter, some adopted cultivation to reduce risk, while for others it was a reflection of changing cultural and social norms. Motivations for adopting cultivation differed among people of different wealth categories. Diversification was part of wider cultural changes, and was also influenced by power differentials among Maasai age sets and by government policies. PMID:21915157

  4. Indigenous knowledge of pastoralists on respiratory diseases of camels in northern Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, D D; Younan, M; Tessema, T S; Glücks, I V; Baumann, M P O

    2016-08-01

    The camel disease terminology of pastoralists in northern Kenya differentiates between two respiratory disease complexes of camels. Participatory epidemiology data were collected in 2011 in three camel keeping communities (Gabra, Garri, and Somali) and analysed to assess the validity of this differentiation. Further queries assessed recurrence of the disease in the same animal, most affected age group, relative frequency of occurrence, morbidity rates, mortality rates and response to antibiotic treatment. Based on matrix scoring the cardinal symptom nasal discharge was significantly correlated with Respiratory Disease Complex 1 (RDC1; Somali Hergeb, Gabra & Garri Furri) while cough was correlated with Respiratory Disease Complex 2 (RDC2; Somali Dhuguta, Gabra Qufa, Garri Dhugud). RDC1 appears to occur regularly every year and does not respond to antibiotic treatments while outbreaks of RDC2 are only observed at intervals of several years and treated cases do generally respond to antibiotics. While RDC1 is more severe in calves, RDC 2 is mostly associated with respiratory disease in adults. Elements of this differentiation appear to be in agreement with other authors who differentiate between camel influenza (PI3 virus) and bacterial camel pneumonia, respectively. PMID:27435647

  5. HUMANISTIC STRATEGIES IN THE EFL SPEAKING CLASS

    OpenAIRE

    Josefa J. Mardijono

    2001-01-01

    This paper focuses on the humanistic strategies woven into the EFL speaking class activities. The speaking class, which the writer used for her study, is the highest level of speaking course offered in the curriculum of the English Department of Petra Christian University, to develop students' English speaking skills, particularly in public speaking. The humanistic strategies are based on the assumption that a "supportive and co-operative group atmosphere" ((Hadfield, 1995, p.15) will enhance...

  6. Speaking Tasks Be Designed to Improve Different Aspects of Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于莹

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate how can speaking tasks be designed to improve different aspects of speaking.The author will first analyze three different aspects and introduce four criteria which can use to define the meaning of task.The result about whether the learner achieves the goal of the task is very important since evaluation of the outcome is the vital way to judge a task is successful or not.After getting to know the definition of task,communicative effectiveness will be analyzed from the angle of its two dimensions.The level of communicative effectiveness can decide the outcome of learner production in the speaking task.Task implementation cannot be ignored in the research of task designing since the feedback from it would enlighten the operation of task design.

  7. Factors influencing choice of veterinary service provider by pastoralist in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onono, Joshua Orungo; Wieland, Barbara; Rushton, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    This study analyzed the determinants for choice of animal health providers in a semiarid pastoral area with an aim of identifying specific attributes that could be targeted for intervention to enhance pastoralist access to quality veterinary services. The data were collected through administration of semi-structured questionnaires to 350 randomly selected household heads in different locations in Narok County of Kenya. Most of these respondents had no formal education (66.9%), and most households were headed by men (88.9%). The men were in control of sales (84.2%), purchases (83.7%), and treatment of sick cattle (70.3%), while women were responsible for milking (83.8%). Animal health services were delivered by drug stockists (87.76%) and government veterinarians (12.24%). The time spent while seeking animal health services and transport cost were specific attributes with impact on the probability of choice for service providers. Although distance covered to the preferred service provider was a significant attribute, it was inversely related to the probability of choice. The other factors including herd sizes, age and sex of household head, cost incurred per visit, level of education of household head, and the number of visits did not have significant impact on choices. These findings support commercialization of veterinary services in marginalized areas where the delivery of essential animal health services such as disease control programs are often viewed as a public good. In order to enhance delivery of veterinary services in these areas, it is proposed that public and private means are investigated to support qualified veterinarians and to strengthen the activities of untrained personnel operating drug outlets. PMID:23420069

  8. Kenyan pastoralist societies in transition: varying perceptions of the value of ecosystem services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kaye-Zwiebel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the drylands of northern Kenya, as elsewhere in Africa, traditional pastoralist social-ecological systems are undergoing profound transformations. Diminishing resource availability, changing social values and governance systems, and new resource management institutions challenge the capacity of communities for effective common pool resource management. Individuals’ values and environmental perceptions play a substantial role in decision making regarding resource use and management. Additionally, social capital within communities can influence cooperative and adaptive resource management. We studied five Laikipia Maasai communities in Kenya, which share a common natural environment, history, and political organization. We surveyed pastoralists’ perceptions of the adequacy of two ecosystem services, forage availability and livestock abundance. We also assessed indicators of three forms of social capital: reciprocity, sanctioning, and norms of fairness. Four communities established set-aside conservation areas through partnership with external organizations. In those communities, we examined residents’ perceptions of five different potential ecological and economic benefits from the conservation areas. We found that communities varied in residents’ perceptions of grazing resource adequacy, the economic sufficiency of their livestock herds, and the benefits of conservation areas. Communities also varied in measures of social capital. We contextualize our findings in terms of the rules and conditions governing each conservation area, the roles of social capital, and the challenges of resource-use trade-offs when perceptions diverge. We conclude that taking stock of perceptions and values placed on ecosystem services is a crucial element of formulating plans for sustainable resource management and navigating trade-offs in the future.

  9. Brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis prevalence in livestock from pastoralist communities adjacent to Awash National Park, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, Rea; Bekele, Shiferaw; Moti, Tesfaye; Young, Douglas; Aseffa, Abraham

    2015-06-15

    This cross-sectional study investigated the prevalence of brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in local cattle and goat breeds of Oromo and Afar pastoralist communities living in two distinct parts around the Awash National Park. A questionnaire survey was carried out to assess information on husbandry, milk consumption habits, and on knowledge-attitude-practice regarding both diseases. Among a total of 771 animals from all sites tested by comparative intradermal tuberculin test (CIDT) none were BTB reactors with the >4mm cut-off. Using the >2mm cut-off, individual apparent prevalence was 0.9% (95%CI: 0.23-3.56%) in cattle and 0.7% (95%CI: 0.12-3.45%) in goats. Herd prevalence in Oromia and Afar sites was 0% and 66.7% respectively in goats and 16.7% and 50% in cattle. Among the 327 animals tested by enzyme linked immunoassay for brucellosis, 4.8% (95%CI: 1.2-17.1%) of cattle and 22.8% (95%CI: 5.98-29.5%) of goats were reactors. Highest individual prevalence of both diseases was found in Afar settlements with brucellosis being as high as 50%. Respondent ethnicity was the only risk factor for brucellosis positivity in goats in the univariable risk factor analysis. Knowledge about the diseases was poor. Raw goat milk was regularly consumed by women and children, putting them at risk for brucellosis. This study highlighted an increased prevalence gradient of BTB and brucellosis from West to East along the study sites with high brucellosis individual prevalence and abortion rates among Afar settlements in particular. PMID:25841999

  10. Demographic and health surveillance of mobile pastoralists in Chad: integration of biometric fingerprint identification into a geographical information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Weibel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for baseline demographic and health-related data to plan, implement and evaluate health interventions in developing countries, and to monitor progress towards international development goals. However, mobile pastoralists, i.e. people who depend on a livestock production system and follow their herds as they move, remain marginalized from rural development plans and interventions. The fact that mobile people are hard to reach and stay in contact with is a plausible reason why they are underrepresented in national censuses and/or alternative sequential sample survey systems. We present a proof-of-concept of monitoring highly mobile, pastoral people by recording demographic and health-related data from 933 women and 2020 children and establishing a biometric identification system (BIS based on the registration and identification of digital fingerprints. Although only 22 women, representing 2.4% of the total registered women, were encountered twice in the four survey rounds, the approach implemented is shown to be feasible. The BIS described here is linked to a geographical information system to facilitate the creation of the first health and demographic surveillance system in a mobile, pastoralist setting. Our ultimate goal is to implement and monitor interventions with the “one health” concept, thus integrating and improving human, animal and ecosystem health.

  11. Suicide in Three East African Pastoralist Communities and the Role of Researcher Outsiders for Positive Transformation: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straight, Bilinda; Pike, Ivy; Hilton, Charles; Oesterle, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    We examine cultural understandings and practices surrounding suicide in Pokot, Samburu, and Turkana pastoralists in north-central Kenya--three geographically overlapping and mutually interacting pastoralist communities. We collected our data in the context of a study of poverty, violence, and distress. In all three communities, stigma associated with suicide circumscribed individual responses to the World Health Organization's Self-Report Questionnaire, which led to an ethnographic sub-study of suicide building upon our long-standing research in East Africa on distress, violence, and death. As is true for most of sub-Saharan Africa, reliable statistical data are non-existent for these communities. Thus, we deliberately avoid making assertions about generalizable statistical trends. Rather, we take the position that ethnographically nuanced studies like the one we offer here provide a necessary basis for the respectful collection of accurate quantitative data on this important and troubling practice. Moreover, our central point in this paper is that positive transformational work relating to suicide is most likely when researcher outsiders practice 'deep engagement' while respectfully restricting their role to (1) iterative, community-driven approaches that contextualize suicide; and (2) sharing contextualized analyses with other practitioners. We contend that situating suicide within a broader cultural framework that includes attitudes and practices surrounding other forms of death is essential to both aspects of anthropological-outsiders' role. PMID:25381581

  12. Plain Facts on Plain Speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1993-01-01

    Public speaking goes with being on the school board. A few pointers and practice can help you get better at communicating in public. Experts suggest the following: know what your point is and state it precisely; strive to be expressive, using your voice and gestures; and present a story that people can relate to. (MLF)

  13. Just Smile and Speak Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    To take fear out of public speaking, superintendents and other school executives are advised to have something interesting to say, set aside time to practice, use eye contact to advantage, pay attention to body language, be wary of using humor or gimmicks, lean toward relatively short presentations, keep abreast of current events, realize people…

  14. Evaluating Experiencing English: Listening and Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小玲

    2014-01-01

    Experiencing English: Listening and Speaking is widely used by most colleges for non-English majors.The achievement in speaking and listening has a close relationship with students’ learning attitude and teachers’ guide towards English.

  15. Quality Education for the Pastoralist in Public Primary Schools in Kajiado County, Kenya: Case Study of Dupoto-E-Maa Education Project in Kajiado Central District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouda, James Bill; Opiyo, Rose Atieno; Wambiya, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Conditions of learning are critical in determining quality of education. There have been real concerns raised by stakeholders regarding the quality of education for pastoralists in public primary schools in Kajiado Central District in Kenya. Interventions have been put in place to address the issue of quality education. One such intervention is…

  16. ACTFL Speaking Proficiency Guidelines. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Charles W.

    This digest focuses on the American Council on the Speaking of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Speaking Proficiency Guidelines. The history and development of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines (originally, the ACTFL Provisional Proficiency Guidelines) are reviewed, the generic characteristics of each level of the speaking guidelines are presented in…

  17. An Assessment of IELTS Speaking Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Shahzad; Haq, Naushaba

    2014-01-01

    The present study focused on assessing the speaking test of IELTS. The assessment discussed both positive aspects and weaknesses in IELTS speaking module. The researchers had also suggested some possible measures for the improvement in IELTS speaking test and increasing its validity and reliability. The researchers had analysed and assessed IELTS…

  18. Discourse Analysis and the Teaching of Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于润梅

    2007-01-01

    Speaking is a productive skill and it is acknowledged to be hard for learners to master. Certain elements related to phonetics in discourse analysis, which play a significant role in EFL teaching of speaking, seem to be neglected. This paper analyses three of these elements:pause, intonation and tonic syllable, and their application in the teaching of speaking.

  19. What Prevent You from Improving Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻彤

    2008-01-01

    As we know, we have four factors including listening, speaking, reading and writing in our English learning. The speaking factor is the basic one among these. It is a common knowledge that language is a system of arbitrary vocal symbols used for human communication. But today's education is not "teaching students in accordance with their talents." According to the speaking situation of the students and the analysis of the reason which leads to their present speaking situations, the teacher should take some measures that can raise the students' interest to present their speaking situations and to improve their ability in many aspects.

  20. Estimating population and livestock density of mobile pastoralists and sedentary settlements in the south-eastern Lake Chad area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Richard, Vreni; Crump, Lisa; Abicho, Abbani Alhadj; Abakar, Ali Abba; Mahamat, Abdraman; Bechir, Mahamat; Eckert, Sandra; Engesser, Matthias; Schelling, Esther; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Mobile pastoralists provide major contributions to the gross domestic product in Chad, but little information is available regarding their demography. The Lake Chad area population is increasing, resulting in competition for scarce land and water resources. For the first time, the density of people and animals from mobile and sedentary populations was assessed using randomly defined sampling areas. Four sampling rounds were conducted over two years in the same areas to show population density dynamics. We identified 42 villages of sedentary communities in the sampling zones; 11 (in 2010) and 16 (in 2011) mobile pastoralist camps at the beginning of the dry season and 34 (in 2011) and 30 (in 2012) camps at the end of the dry season. A mean of 64.0 people per km2 (95% confidence interval, 20.3-107.8) were estimated to live in sedentary villages. In the mobile communities, we found 5.9 people per km2 at the beginning and 17.5 people per km2 at the end of the dry season. We recorded per km2 on average 21.0 cattle and 31.6 small ruminants in the sedentary villages and 66.1 cattle and 102.5 small ruminants in the mobile communities, which amounts to a mean of 86.6 tropical livestock units during the dry season. These numbers exceed, by up to five times, the published carrying capacities for similar Sahelian zones. Our results underline the need for a new institutional framework. Improved land use management must equally consider the needs of mobile communities and sedentary populations. PMID:26054513

  1. Estimating population and livestock density of mobile pastoralists and sedentary settlements in the south-eastern Lake Chad area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vreni Jean-Richard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile pastoralists provide major contributions to the gross domestic product in Chad, but little information is available regarding their demography. The Lake Chad area population is increasing, resulting in competition for scarce land and water resources. For the first time, the density of people and animals from mobile and sedentary populations was assessed using randomly defined sampling areas. Four sampling rounds were conducted over two years in the same areas to show population density dynamics. We identified 42 villages of sedentary communities in the sampling zones; 11 (in 2010 and 16 (in 2011 mobile pastoralist camps at the beginning of the dry season and 34 (in 2011 and 30 (in 2012 camps at the end of the dry season. A mean of 64.0 people per km2 (95% confidence interval, 20.3-107.8 were estimated to live in sedentary villages. In the mobile communities, we found 5.9 people per km2 at the beginning and 17.5 people per km2 at the end of the dry season. We recorded per km2 on average 21.0 cattle and 31.6 small ruminants in the sedentary villages and 66.1 cattle and 102.5 small ruminants in the mobile communities, which amounts to a mean of 86.6 tropical livestock units during the dry season. These numbers exceed, by up to five times, the published carrying capacities for similar Sahelian zones. Our results underline the need for a new institutional framework. Improved land use management must equally consider the needs of mobile communities and sedentary populations.

  2. Essays of a peripheral mind: Speaking other languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongolian rangelands have been used for livestock production for hundreds of years. A pastoralist culture has been a key aspect of Mongolia throughout its 800-year history. Approximately 65% of Mongolia’s rural herders live at or below the poverty line, and there are few opportunities to improve r...

  3. Neuroanatomical markers of speaking Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinion, Jenny T; Green, David W; Chung, Rita; Ali, Nliufa; Grogan, Alice; Price, Gavin R; Mechelli, Andrea; Price, Cathy J

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify regional structural differences in the brains of native speakers of a tonal language (Chinese) compared to nontonal (European) language speakers. Our expectation was that there would be differences in regions implicated in pitch perception and production. We therefore compared structural brain images in three groups of participants: 31 who were native Chinese speakers; 7 who were native English speakers who had learnt Chinese in adulthood; and 21 European multilinguals who did not speak Chinese. The results identified two brain regions in the vicinity of the right anterior temporal lobe and the left insula where speakers of Chinese had significantly greater gray and white matter density compared with those who did not speak Chinese. Importantly, the effects were found in both native Chinese speakers and European subjects who learnt Chinese as a non-native language, illustrating that they were language related and not ethnicity effects. On the basis of prior studies, we suggest that the locations of these gray and white matter changes in speakers of a tonal language are consistent with a role in linking the pitch of words to their meaning. PMID:19530216

  4. Exploring the apparent absence of psychosis amongst the Borana pastoralist community of Southern Ethiopia. A mixed method follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Shibre, Teshome; Teferra, Solomon; Morgan, Craig; ALEM, ATALAY

    2010-01-01

    There are few reports of the prevalence of psychotic disorders among isolated population groups. Where present, variations in prevalence estimates raise questions about the validity of methods of case ascertainment in such settings. In a previous population-based survey of the Borana pastoralist community in Ethiopia using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, no cases of schizophrenia were identified. In order to further explore this finding and investigate how ...

  5. Working with Pastoralist NGOs and Land Conflicts in Tanzania: A Report on a Workshop in Terrat, Tanzania, 11th-15th December, 1994

    OpenAIRE

    Bradbury, M.; Fisher, S.; Lane, C

    1995-01-01

    Metadata only record The report is the result of a 'conflict resolution' training workshop that was held in Terrat village, Simanjiro district, Arusha, Tanzania, between 11-15th December 1994. The workshop was planned by the Education, Research and Planning Committee of PINGOs, a forum for Pastoral Indigenous Non-Governmental Organization as the first module of a longer term programme entitled 'Democracy training for pastoralist development workers'. It bought together local NGOs from the ...

  6. Pragmatic Activities for the Speaking Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Being able to speak naturally and appropriately with others in a variety of situations is an important goal for many English as a foreign language (EFL) learners. Because the skill of speaking invariably involves interaction with people and using language to reach objectives (e.g., ordering food, making friends, asking for favors), it is crucial…

  7. Repetition in English Political Public Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红梅

    2010-01-01

    Repetition is frequently used in English political public speaking to make it easy to be remembered and powerful to move the feelings of the public. This paper is intended to analyze the functions of repetition and different levels of repetition to highlight the significance of repetition in English political public speaking and the ability of using it in practice.

  8. The Key Principles to Develop Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YueYueWang; Lan Xiao

    2009-01-01

    There are various approaches to progress speaking competence of foreign language.The author analyzes some promoted conditions created to enable learners to improve oral English proficiency.Some personal teaching experience and suggestions are presented to aid learners' improvement on speaking.

  9. To speak and be heard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, M E; Guinn, D E; Greenfield, L

    1999-01-01

    This article is excerpted from the Park Ridge Center for the Study of Health, Faith, and Ethics 28-page handbook entitled "Religion and Public Discourse: Principles and Guidelines for Religious Participants." These principles are the product of a three-year research project conducted by the Center. The project "To Speak and Be Heard" is based upon a wide range of resources from within the participants' religious traditions, including practices, rituals, and tenets of faith. While this project grew out of the specific controversies around the Cairo Conference, the principles of civil discourse spelled out in this document are general in application and may be used to facilitate constructive public dialogue. This article also discusses the nature of civil discourse in the public square, covenants of conversation, engaging the other, living with conflict during and after conversation and argument, and the hope of civil discourse. PMID:12178896

  10. Turkana Children's Sociocultural Practices of Pastoralist Lifestyles and Science Curriculum and Instruction in Kenyan Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng'asike, John Teria

    This dissertation discusses the findings of an ethnographic exploratory study of Turkana nomadic pastoralist children's sociocultural practices of their everyday lifestyles and science curriculum and instruction in Kenyan early childhood curriculum. The study uses the findings from Turkana elders to challenge the dominant society in Kenya that draws from Western education ideology to unfairly criticize Turkana traditional nomadic cultural practices as resistant to modern education. Yet Turkana people have to rely on the cultural knowledge of their environment for survival. In addition, the community lives in abject poverty caused by the harsh desert environment which has contributed to parents' struggle to support their children's education. Cultural knowledge of Turkana people has received support in research demonstrating the role cultural lifestyles such as nomadic pastoralism play as important survival strategy that enable people to adapt to the harsh desert environment to ensure the survival of their livestock critical for their food security. The study documented ways in which the Kenya national education curriculum, reflecting Western assumptions about education, often alienates and marginalises nomadic children, in its failure to capture their cultural Indigenous knowledge epistemologies. The research investigated the relationships between Turkana children's sociocultural practices of pastoralist lifestyles and the national science curriculum taught in local preschools and first grade science classrooms in Kenya and the extent to which Turkana children's everyday life cultural practices inform science instruction in early childhood grades. Multiple ethnographic methods such as participant and naturalistic observation, focus group interviews, analysis of documents, archival materials, and cultural artifacts were used to explore classrooms instruction and Indigenous sociocultural practices of the Turkana nomads. The findings from the elders' narratives

  11. Effective Elocution. Communication IV: Teaching Speaking Skills in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpening, Dodie K.

    1985-01-01

    Activities are presented to help gifted students overcome the fear of public speaking. Activities include exercises to improve confidence and understand the principles of effective public speaking. (CL)

  12. Speaking rate adjustment across changes in talker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Rochelle S.; Sawusch, James R.

    2002-05-01

    Individuals vary their speaking rate, and listeners use the speaking rate of precursor sentences to adjust for these changes [Kidd (1989)]. Recent work has suggested that speaking rate adjustment may not always be limited to speech from a single talker (Sawusch and Newman, 2000). When a talker change occurs in the midst of a vowel, the durations of both portions of the vowel influence perception of the rate-based contrast. In the present experiments, we examined the effect of talker change on rate normalization for precursor phrases. A male talker produced the sentence, I heard him say the word-at one of three different speaking rates. A female talker then produced a nonword containing a duration-based contrast. We examined whether the male talker's speaking rate would influence perception of the female talker's speech. The results were somewhat surprising. The speaking rate of the first talker did influence perception of the contrast in the second talker. However, the effect was a U-shaped function of speaking rate, rather than the linear function typically demonstrated in the single-voice condition. Several follow-up studies replicated this basic pattern. Implications of this finding for studies of rate normalization will be discussed.

  13. Comigrants and friends: informal networks and the transmission of traditional ecological knowledge among seminomadic pastoralists of Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Salpeteur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that social organization may affect the distribution of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK within local communities of natural resource users in multiple ways. However, in this line of research the potential role of informal relationships has mostly been overlooked. In this article, we contribute toward filling this research gap by studying how two types of informal relationships, namely migration partnership and friendship, affect the distribution of TEK within a community of seminomadic pastoralists from the Kutch area, Gujarat, India. Using social network analysis, we map three networks, migration, men friendship, and women friendship, and compare with similarity-based quantitative approaches the clusters extracted from these networks in relation to four domains of TEK: knowledge about soils, about ethnoveterinary practices, about sheep breeds, and in ethnobotany. Our results show that (1 migration clusters are associated to significant variations in three TEK domains, while (2 friendship clusters are associated to minor variations. We relate these results to the importance of common practical experiences involved by joint migration. Moreover, kin relations are shown to strongly underlie friendship and migration relations, and as such appear as a potential driver of the dynamics of the local TEK system. We conclude by advocating for a better inclusion of such informal relationships in future research on local TEK dynamics, following recent developments in studies on natural resource governance.

  14. Assessing the impact of East Coast Fever immunisation by the infection and treatment method in Tanzanian pastoralist systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, S Babo; Di Giulio, G; Lynen, G; Peters, A; Rushton, J

    2010-12-01

    A field trial was carried out in a Maasai homestead to assess the impact of East Coast Fever (ECF) immunisation by the infection and treatment method (ITM) with the Muguga Cocktail on the occurrence of this disease in Tanzanian pastoralist systems. These data were further used in partial budgeting and decision analysis to evaluate and compare the value of the control strategy. Overall, ITM was shown to be a cost-effective control option. While one ECF case was registered in the immunised group, 24 cases occurred amongst non-immunised calves. A significant negative association between immunisation and ECF cases occurrence was observed (p≤0.001). ECF mortality rate was also lower in the immunised group. However, as anti-theilerial treatment was given to all diseased calves, no significant negative association between immunisation and ECF mortality was found. Both groups showed an overall similar immunological pattern with high and increasing percentages of seropositive calves throughout the study. This, combined with the temporal distribution of cases in the non-immunised group, suggested the establishment of endemic stability. Furthermore, the economic analysis showed that ITM generated a profit estimated to be 7250 TZS (1 USD=1300 TZS) per vaccinated calf, and demonstrated that it was a better control measure than natural infection and subsequent treatment. PMID:20974501

  15. Serum retinol of Chadian nomadic pastoralist women in relation to their livestocks' milk retinol and beta-carotene content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinsstag, Jakob; Schelling, Esther; Daoud, Saada; Schierle, Josef; Hofmann, Peter; Diguimbaye, Colette; Daugla, Doumagoum Moto; Ndoutamia, Guelmbaye; Knopf, Lea; Vounatsou, Penelope; Tanner, Marcel

    2002-07-01

    Human serum retinol and livestock milk retinol levels were assessed as part of a study on the health status of Chadian nomadic pastoralists and their livestock in close partnership between Chadian public health and livestock institutions. Of the examined women (n = 99), 43% were moderately retinol-deficient (0.35 mol/L fresh vegetables were reported consumed in the past 24 hours. Milk is the almost exclusive source of vitamin A for these populations. Goats (n = 6) had the highest average milk retinol level (329 +/- 84 micrograms/kg [mean +/- SEM]), followed by cattle (n = 25; 247 +/- 32 micrograms/kg), and camels (n = 12; 120 +/- 18 micrograms/kg). Milk retinol levels did not differ between the rainy and dry seasons. Human serum retinol depends significantly on livestock milk retinol levels (partial slope 0.23; 95% CI: 0.008-0.47). Our study supports the use of goat and cow milk as an important source of vitamin A in pastoral nomadic settings. However, the levels still require to be complemented further by promoting green leafy vegetables, fruits, and supplements. PMID:12214559

  16. STRATEGIES OF LEARNING SPEAKING SKILL BY INDONESIAN LEARNERS OF ENGLISH AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO SPEAKING PROFICIENCY

    OpenAIRE

    JUNAIDI MISTAR; ATIK UMAMAH

    2014-01-01

    This paper was a subset report of a research project on skill-based English learning strategies by Indonesian EFL learners. It focusses on the at- tempts to reveal: (1) the differences in the use of strategies of learning speaking skill by male and female learners, and (2) the contribution of strategies of learning speaking skill on the learners’ speaking proficiency. The data from 595 second year senior high school students from eleven schools in East Java, Indonesia were collected using a 7...

  17. Speaking Activities for the Advanced College-Bound Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Don

    Three activities for developing speaking skills of advanced English as second language students are presented. Impromptu speaking, extemporaneous speaking, and debate activities are designed to train students to organize concepts, develop spontaneous oral skills, and enhance confidence and clarity of thought. Impromptu speaking develops…

  18. Application of Communicative Method in EFL Listening and Speaking Class

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chenlu

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of EFL listening and speaking teaching is to improve the English learners’ listening and speaking ability. By analyzing the communicative method of teaching (CMT) and the influence upon English teachers, this paper explores to apply CMT to listen and speaking teaching by presenting a sample plan in order to shed light on EFL listening and speaking teaching in China.

  19. Parasitic infections, anemia and malnutrition among rural settled and mobile pastoralist mothers and their children in Chad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechir, M; Schelling, E; Hamit, M A; Tanner, M; Zinsstag, J

    2012-06-01

    Malnutrition, resulting from various etiologies, is common in rural Chadian women and children. This cross-sectional study assessed the spectrum of parasitic infection and level of anemia and their effect on nutritional status in settled and mobile pastoral mothers and children near Lake Chad. Intestinal parasites were evaluated using direct fecal smears and the Kato-Katz technique. Malaria status was determined using Paracheck-Pf(®) rapid diagnostic test, and anemia was assessed with the Hemocue photometer. Nutritional status was evaluated using anthropometric parameters. At the end of the 2008 wet season, the prevalence of malnutrition was 36% [confidence interval (CI) 30-42] among women and 15% (CI 11-18) among children. The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection was 75% (CI 68-83) among women and 60% (CI 53-66) among children. The predominant helminth species was Ascaris lumbricoides while Entamoeba histolytica/dispar was the most common protozoan. The hookworm prevalence was 14% (CI 8-20) in women and 18% (CI 13-23) in children. Malaria prevalence was low among women (1%, CI 0.5-2) and children (3% CI 2-5). No significant difference was observed in the prevalence of parasitic infection between the mobile pastoralist and rural sedentary populations. Thirty-four percent (CI 27-40) of nonpregnant women, 53% (CI 34-72) of pregnant women, and 27% (CI 23-32) of children were anemic. In subjects infected with Plasmodium, all women and 54% (CI 22-85) of children were anemic. Malnutrition was significantly associated with anemia in mothers and with selected intestinal parasites, anemia and age in their children. PMID:22160444

  20. Identification systems and selection criteria for small ruminants among pastoralist communities in northern Kenya: prospects for a breeding programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuku, S M; Kosgey, I S; Kahi, A K

    2010-10-01

    Data on animal identification systems and selection criteria for sheep and goats were collected from the Rendille and Gabra communities in northern Kenya. These were then analysed through computation of indices, which represented a weighted average of all rankings of a particular trait or identification system. The three most important records kept were castration (index = 0.224), dates of birth (0.188) and entries into the flock (0.185). Identification was done through ear notching (0.409), branding (0.248), and coat colour of the animals (0.150). Characteristics with index >or=0.200 were considered more important and included big body size (Rendille, 0.260; Gabra, 0.251) and milk yield (Rendille, 0.206) for the buck's dam. Big body size (Rendille, 0.264; Gabra, 0.245) and offspring quality (Rendille, 0.252; Gabra, 0.265) were considered important attributes for the buck's sire. Important qualities for the ram's dam were big body size (Rendille, 0.246; Gabra, 0.216), offspring quality (Rendille, 0.200; Gabra, 0.235), fat deposition (0.233) among the Rendille and drought tolerance (0.246) among the Gabra. For the rams' sire, big body size (Rendille, 0.235; Gabra, 0.233), offspring quality (Rendille, 0.200; Gabra, 0.235) and fat deposition (Rendille, 0.203; Gabra, 0.220) were considered important. The results from this study imply that pedigree and performance recording have been practiced through own intricate knowledge and that pastoralists have deliberate selection criteria. This information is the cornerstone in the establishment of appropriate breeding programmes in the slowly changing pastoral systems. PMID:20419472

  1. English-Speaking and Spanish-Speaking Domestic Violence Perpetrators: An MMPI-2 Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ronald L.; Flowers, John V.; Bulnes, Alejandro; Olmsted, Eileen; Carbajal-Madrid, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    The use of assessments to characterize domestic violence perpetrators continues to develop with an emphasis on increasing the effectiveness of domestic violence interventions. The present study examines and compares Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-2 responses from 41 English-speaking and 48 Spanish-speaking men who were in…

  2. THE IMPORTANCE OF SPEAKING FOR SENIOR MANAGERS: HOW A DIRECTOR SHOULD SPEAK?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemdar Yalçın

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The participants of this study, the aim of which was to determine the importance of speaking in career according to senior manager and speaking traits which a director should have, constitute fifteen senior manager who are working as counselor, deputy counselor, general director and chairman who were assigned by minister, prime minister or president. In this study which was based on qualitative data, semi-structured interviews were conducted and the data obtained was descriptively analyzed. According to senior managers, speaking was an important issue in terms of introduction of the institution to the public, creation of a positive image of the institution, achievement of prestige and commication with the workers by the director. It was determined that senior managers qualify their speaking as “good” level and they see themselves competent. According to senior managers, the speaking traits that a manager should have are classified as; planning traits, articulation/pronunciation, explanation traits and speaking traits that are used in communication process with working personnel. It was proposed taking part of speaking education in higher education programs for all branches of jobs and development of new programs regarding speaking education for managers.

  3. STRATEGIES OF LEARNING SPEAKING SKILL BY INDONESIAN LEARNERS OF ENGLISH AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO SPEAKING PROFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNAIDI MISTAR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper was a subset report of a research project on skill-based English learning strategies by Indonesian EFL learners. It focusses on the at- tempts to reveal: (1 the differences in the use of strategies of learning speaking skill by male and female learners, and (2 the contribution of strategies of learning speaking skill on the learners’ speaking proficiency. The data from 595 second year senior high school students from eleven schools in East Java, Indonesia were collected using a 70 item questionnaire of Oral Communication Learning Strategy (OCLS and a 10 item self-assessment of speaking proficiency. The statistical analysis revealed that gender provided significant effects on the intensity of use of six types of strategies of learning speaking skill – interactional-maintenance, self-evaluation, fluency-oriented, time gaining, compensation, and interpersonal strategies – with female learners reporting higher intensity of use. A further analysis found that four strategy types – interactional-maintenance, self-improvement, compensation, and memory strategies – greatly contribute to the speaking proficiency. These findings imply that strategies-based instruction, covering the four most influential strategies, needs to be integrated explicitly in the speaking class to help learners, particularly male learners, cope with problems in learning speaking skill.

  4. HUMANISTIC STRATEGIES IN THE EFL SPEAKING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa J. Mardijono

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the humanistic strategies woven into the EFL speaking class activities. The speaking class, which the writer used for her study, is the highest level of speaking course offered in the curriculum of the English Department of Petra Christian University, to develop students' English speaking skills, particularly in public speaking. The humanistic strategies are based on the assumption that a "supportive and co-operative group atmosphere" ((Hadfield, 1995, p.15 will enhance learning to bring out the best of the students. The primary aims are to help the students, through active participation, to develop more positive feelings about themselves and their classmates, to co-operate and support each other to grow and excel at their speech performance. Based on the students' evaluation and the teacher's observation of the students' public speech performance and their academic achievement, it can be concluded that the humanistic strategies have created a co-operative and supportive group atmosphere and has given positive effects on the students' speech performance. This is also a rewarding experience for the teacher.

  5. Problems and Strategies in Teaching Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖丽利

    2011-01-01

    The basic aim of English teaching is to enable students to acquire the basic knowledge of FL language system so that they develop the ability to use English in listening, speaking, reading and writing, But among the four kinds of language skills of Chinese learners of English, oral skills are found to be the weakest, which are certainly incompatible with the demands of the increasingly growing intercultural communication. With the development of the economic globalization, communicative competence has been valued greatly. As a result, oral English has been paid much more attention than before by many English learners and English teachers. So the teaching of speaking must be strengthened. This paper is going to explore and analyze the problems of hindering the students' development of oral skills and discuss the strategies to help them to improve their speaking ability.

  6. ‘Everybody knows’, but the rest of the world: the case of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome in dromedary camels observed by Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volpato, G.; Nardo, Di A.; Rossi, D.; Lamin Saleh, S.; Broglia, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The traditional knowledge of local communities throughout the world is a valuable source of novel ideas and information to science. In this study, the ethnoveterinary knowledge of Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara has been used in order to put forward a scientific hypothesis regardin

  7. Autism Speaks Toolkits: Resources for Busy Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellando, Jayne; Fussell, Jill J; Lopez, Maya

    2016-02-01

    Given the increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), it is likely that busy primary care providers (PCP) are providing care to individuals with ASD in their practice. Autism Speaks provides a wealth of educational, medical, and treatment/intervention information resources for PCPs and families, including at least 32 toolkits. This article serves to familiarize PCPs and families on the different toolkits that are available on the Autism Speaks website. This article is intended to increase physicians' knowledge on the issues that families with children with ASD frequently encounter, to increase their ability to share evidence-based information to guide treatment and care for affected families in their practice. PMID:26149848

  8. Comparison of intervention methods for reducing human exposure to Mycobacterium bovis through milk in pastoralist households of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roug, Annette; Perez, Andres; Mazet, Jonna A K; Clifford, Deana L; VanWormer, Elizabeth; Paul, Goodluck; Kazwala, Rudovick R; Smith, Woutrina A

    2014-08-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a disease of zoonotic concern, especially in countries with no control programs in livestock and where routine pasteurization of milk is not practiced. In Tanzania, bTB is widespread in livestock and has been diagnosed in humans; however, herd bTB testing is primarily carried out for bTB-free certification in commercial dairy herds at the expense of the dairy cattle owner. For rural livestock holders, such an expense is prohibitive, and consequently there is no control of bTB in most areas. Although effective long-term solutions to control bTB in livestock are desirable, there is a need to assess the effect of preventive measures on reducing human exposure to bTB in such settings. We utilized locally relevant cattle herd characteristics and management data from the Health for Animals and Livelihood Improvement (HALI) project in south-central Tanzania to build a Reed-Frost model that compared the efficacy of alternative methods aimed at reducing the exposure of humans to infectious milk from a typical pastoralist cattle herd. During a 10-year simulation period, the model showed that boiling milk 80% of the time is necessary to obtain a reduction in liters of infectious milk approximately equivalent to what would be obtained with a standard 2-year testing and removal regimen, and that boiling milk was more effective than animal test and removal early in the time period. In addition, even with testing and removing infected cattle, a residual risk of exposure to infectious milk remained due to imperfect sensitivity of the skin test and a continuous risk of introduction of infectious animals from other herds. The model was sensitive to changes in initial bTB prevalence but not to changes in herd size. In conclusion, continuous complimentary treatment of milk may be an effective strategy to reduce human exposure to M. bovis-infected milk in settings where bTB is endemic and a comprehensive bTB control program

  9. Gifted Education in German-Speaking Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Anna; Nevo, Baruch

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a comprehensive yet detailed account of the current giftedness and gifted education situation in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. It is concerned with four main research questions: (1) How is "giftedness" defined in German-speaking countries? (2) How are gifted children identified? (3)…

  10. Gifted Education in German-Speaking Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Albert; Stoeger, Heidrun; Harder, Bettina; Balestrini, Daniel Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The authors first briefly describe how the concepts of talents and giftedness found in German-speaking Europe have evolved in the school system and in general over the past two centuries, and how the variety of gifted-education efforts found within and beyond schools as well as counseling efforts attest to these changes. They then discuss four…

  11. Speaking and Listening in Content Area Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Oral language development facilitates print literacy. In this article, we focus on the ways in which teachers can ensure students' speaking and listening skills are developed. We provide a review of some time-tests classroom routines as well as some that can be enhanced with technology.

  12. Confident Communication: Speaking Tips for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Douglas A.

    This resource book seeks to provide the building blocks needed for public speaking while eliminating the fear factor. The book explains how educators can perfect their oratorical capabilities as well as enjoy the security, confidence, and support needed to create and deliver dynamic speeches. Following an Introduction: A Message for Teachers,…

  13. Speak Up: Help Avoid Mistakes in Your Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not understand something on the form – speak up. For your safety, the staff may ask you ... www.jointcommission.org The goal of the Speak Up ™ program is to help patients become more informed ...

  14. Speak Up! But Don't Strain Your Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Hearing Disorders Speak Up! But don't strain your voice Past Issues / ... Noise Exposure / How Loud Is Too Loud? / Speak Up! But don't strain your voice / Medical Mystery: ...

  15. On improving senior students’speaking ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马俊海

    2015-01-01

    With the opening-up of China,English teaching has been getting more and more attention.People are enthusiastic about learning English.As a result,English teaching and reform are coming to a turning point,which predicts a bright future in English education in China.Now,a 9-year voluntary education program is put forward in China.A Standard English course is being used to replace the former teaching outline.The new standard adopts the international system according to which English language education is divided into 9 levels.This has changed the old style of teaching,which attaches importance to grammar and vocabulary.Adopting the new standard helps to develop the senior students’ability to use English in their daily life,by focusing on arousing their interest,and encouraging their participation. The new method will place less stress on“reading and writing”,in favor of“listening”and“speaking”.So now,speaking is getting more and more important in middle high school English teaching. This paper discuss how to improve students’speaking ability and expound the theme through three aspects as follows:⒈The importance of speaking.⒉Some barriers in the process of speaking communication.⒊Essential methods for improving students’speaking ability. The issue will be discussed from the perspective of a teacher of English in junior middle school and a possible conclusion will bereached with the help of some theoretical and practical support.

  16. THE IMPORTANCE OF SPEAKING FOR SENIOR MANAGERS: HOW A DIRECTOR SHOULD SPEAK?

    OpenAIRE

    Alemdar Yalçın; Ferah Burgul Adıgüzel

    2014-01-01

    The participants of this study, the aim of which was to determine the importance of speaking in career according to senior manager and speaking traits which a director should have, constitute fifteen senior manager who are working as counselor, deputy counselor, general director and chairman who were assigned by minister, prime minister or president. In this study which was based on qualitative data, semi-structured interviews were conducted and the data obtained was descriptively analyzed. A...

  17. Contagion Theory and the Communication of Public Speaking State Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Ralph R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports on research into the communication of speech state anxiety between adjacent speakers in the speaking order in a public speaking setting. Finds, based on classical response contagion theory, that public speaking state anxiety in an educational setting is contagious. Discusses possible consequences, and advances suggestions for future…

  18. 29 CFR 1606.7 - Speak-English-only rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speak-English-only rules. 1606.7 Section 1606.7 Labor... BECAUSE OF NATIONAL ORIGIN § 1606.7 Speak-English-only rules. (a) When applied at all times. A rule requiring employees to speak only English at all times in the workplace is a burdensome term and...

  19. Fearless Public Speaking: Oral Presentation Activities for the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Janet S.; Alber-Morgan, Sheila R.; Riley, Jeanetta G.

    2007-01-01

    Nausea, sweating, weak knees, and a dry mouth are all symptoms associated with the fear of standing in front of an audience. Considering the anxiety that public speaking produces, students of any age are facing a significant challenge when they speak in front of a group. While speaking is considered to be an integral part of language arts, it…

  20. Strategies for Reducing Fear in Students of Public Speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert

    Based on his own experiences with public speaking courses, the instructor of a speech communication course for adults brings students to the task of speaking in front of the room gradually to reduce speech anxiety or communication apprehension. During successive class sessions, students speak sitting in their seats, standing beside their seats,…

  1. Online Speaking Strategy Assessment for Improving Speaking Ability in the Area of Language for Specific Purposes: The Case of Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaiboonnugulkij, Malinee; Prapphal, Kanchana

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in strategies used in an online language for specific purposes (LSP) speaking test in tourism with two proficiency groups of students, and to investigate the strategies that should be used for low-proficiency students to improve their LSP speaking ability. The Web-based Speaking Test in…

  2. Alpine ecosystem vulnerability to climate change on the Tibetan Plateau: Global implications for carbon balance, regional consequences for local pastoralists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopping, K. A.; Klein, J. A.; Hu, J.; Kang, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is predicted to undergo climate warming much greater than the global average, as well as shifts in its currently monsoon-dominated precipitation regime. These changes will likely affect the vegetation composition, carbon balance, and nutrient cycling of this alpine, social-ecological system. In 2009 we established a fully factorial experiment to test ecosystem responses to predicted climate changes on the Tibetan Plateau. Our experiment site (4870 m) is located in the foothills of the Nyanchenthanglha Mountains, where local pastoralists graze their livestock. The site is representative of central Tibet’s alpine meadow ecosystems, with the turf-forming sedge, Kobresia pygmaea, as both the dominant species and preferred forage of yaks. Our climate treatments are spring snow addition, which is added at 1-m depth to simulate severe snowstorms, and warming with open top chambers, which elevate air temperatures by an average of 1.2 degrees Celsius. The climate treatments are fully crossed with controlled grazing by yaks, which represents the primary livelihood practice of herders at our study site and throughout Tibet’s grasslands. To better understand the ecosystem shifts that may occur under climate change in this alpine system and to elucidate the drivers of these shifts, we collected data from a suite of measurements in each of our plots. Using a LiCOR 6400 infrared gas analyzer, we measured CO2 fluxes at 4 periods throughout the growing season to obtain values for net ecosystem productivity (NEP), ecosystem respiration, and gross primary productivity. We also measured available nitrogen (N) across three distinct moisture regimes (snowmelt, dry-down, and monsoon). Finally, we quantified changes in vegetation composition and recorded air and soil temperature and soil moisture throughout the growing season. After two years of applying treatments, our findings suggest that Tibet’s alpine grasslands are particularly vulnerable to climate change

  3. Islam in Portuguese-Speaking Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Tiesler, Nina Clara

    2016-01-01

    Muslims are citizens and active members of society in nearly all lusophone areas. Among the Portuguese-speaking African countries, Guinea Bissau and Mozambique have long-standing Muslim populations, while, Angola, for example, received immigrants from Islamic majority countries only recently. The Islamic presence in Portugal goes back to Gharb al-Andalus, but the contemporary Muslim communities must be understood as a postcolonial phenomenon. Brazil, East Timor and Macao, also have particular...

  4. Nurses must speak louder on climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Could nurses use their political influence more effectively? From social media to tweeting, why do nurses stay quiet when they could harness their political power? Writing in Primary Health Care, professor of nursing Mary Chiarella argues that nurses, considered one of the most ethical groups of voters, have influence to speak out about the dangers of global warming on people's health. Ms Chiarella encourages nurses to engage professionally to save the planet. PMID:27305265

  5. Freedom to Speak Up - Qualitative Research Report

    OpenAIRE

    Vandekerckhove, Wim; Rumyantseva, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    This is the report from a qualitative research study commissioned by The Freedom to Speak Up Review, which set out to be an independent review into creating an open and honest reporting culture in the NHS. This qualitative study aimed to: • gain an understanding of views and attitudes to whistleblowing in the NHS held by those in various roles in the whistleblowing process - i.e. whistleblowers, frontline staff, managers, directors, regulators, unions, and whistleblowing support group...

  6. Perceptual compensation for differences in speaking style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitela, A Davi; Warner, Natasha; Lotto, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    It is well-established that listeners will shift their categorization of a target vowel as a function of acoustic characteristics of a preceding carrier phrase (CP). These results have been interpreted as an example of perceptual normalization for variability resulting from differences in talker anatomy. The present study examined whether listeners would normalize for acoustic variability resulting from differences in speaking style within a single talker. Two vowel series were synthesized that varied between central and peripheral vowels (the vowels in "beat"-"bit" and "bod"-"bud"). Each member of the series was appended to one of four CPs that were spoken in either a "clear" or "reduced" speech style. Participants categorized vowels in these eight contexts. A reliable shift in categorization as a function of speaking style was obtained for three of four phrase sets. This demonstrates that phrase context effects can be obtained with a single talker. However, the directions of the obtained shifts are not reliably predicted on the basis of the speaking style of the talker. Instead, it appears that the effect is determined by an interaction of the average spectrum of the phrase with the target vowel. PMID:23847573

  7. Perceptual compensation for differences in speaking style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Davi eVitela

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well-established that listeners will shift their categorization of a target vowel as a function of acoustic characteristics of a preceding carrier phrase. These results have been interpreted as an example of perceptual normalization for variability resulting from differences in talker anatomy. The present study examined whether listeners would normalize for acoustic variability resulting from differences in speaking style within a single talker. Two vowel series were synthesized that varied between central and peripheral vowels (the vowels in beat‐bit and bod‐bud. Each member of the series was appended to one of four carrier phrases that were spoken in either a clear or reduced speech style. Participants categorized vowels in these eight contexts. A reliable shift in categorization as a function of speaking style was obtained for three of four phrase sets. This demonstrates that phrase context effects can be obtained with a single talker. However, the directions of the obtained shifts are not reliably predicted on the basis of the speaking style of the talker. Instead, it appears that the effect is determined by an interaction of the average spectrum of the phrase with the target vowel.

  8. The Principles of Developing Speaking Skills in Classrooms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴斯斯; 刘俊

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Speaking is intuitively the most important of all the four skills in foreign language learning. However, speaking is regarded as the most difficult micro-skill of the four. Classroom-based speaking practice normally focuses on mechanically practising artificial materials or specific grammar points which are irrelevant to the real world. In addition,speaking is usually taught by teachers without considering its close relationship with the social context. As a result, students easily get frustrated since they cannot understand or be understood by native speakers even though they do a good job in language classrooms.Therefore, the principles of developing speaking skills should be taken into consideration as a good starting point. Speaking is an integral part of people's daily life. It has formed a part of the shared social activity of talking, which means speaking cannot be isolated from the social context.Moreover, language acquisition theory proposes to build up a natural speaking environment. Since developing speaking skills is a demanding task which takes time, students may easily become de-motivated if they lose confidence or encounter difficulties. Based on those assumptions,this essay will argue that the students should be motivated to develop speaking skills in a socio-cultural context, in a natural environment. The essay will explore why the principles should be followed and how to apply them in classrooms.

  9. Pair Negotiation When Developing English Speaking Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Liliana Bohórquez Suárez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes what characterizes the negotiations of seventh graders at a public school in Bogotá when working in pairs to develop speaking tasks in EFL classes. The inquiry is a descriptive case study that follows the qualitative paradigm. As a result of analyzing the data, we obtained four consecutive steps that characterize students’ negotiations: Establishing a connection with a partner to work with, proposing practical alternatives, refusing mates’ propositions, and making practical decisions. Moreover, we found that the constant performance of the process of negotiation provokes students to construct a sociolinguistic identity that allows agreements to emerge.

  10. How Adults Learn English Listening and Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈继红

    2009-01-01

    The study of second Language Acquisition (SLA) is always one of the most important researching aspects in the field of applied linguistics. The correlations of how well one can acquire Second Language (SL) and the beginning age is one of the hot issues in the SLA, for it is theoretically and practically significant. This paper analyses the difference be-tween adults and children Second Language Acquisition. This paper also analyzed the importance of current adult learn-ing English listening and speaking ,the difficulties they faced of the learning process and made the proposal to help re-solve problems

  11. Brain Dominance And Speaking Strategy Use of Iranian EFL Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Nastaran Mireskandari; Sepideh Alavi

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of brain dominance on the use of Language learning speaking strategies. One hundred forty two undergraduate students of Shiraz University, Iran, participated in this study. The Hemispheric Dominance Test (HDT) was employed to categorize participants as right-, left- and whole-brain dominant, and a Speaking Strategy Questionnaire was administered to evaluate their use of speaking strategies. The results were analyzed using a one-way between groups anal...

  12. Speaking and writing strategies for the TOEFL IBT

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive Prep for the TOEFL Increase your TOEFLʼ iBT score by increasing your speaking and writing scores. How? By using the strategy called argument mapping. Why argument mapping? Because the TOEFLʼ iBT speaking and writing sections are all argument-based tasks. That means if you want high speaking and writing scores, you must know how to map out (develop and deliver) spoken and written arguments, quickly and proficiently. With argument mapping, you will be able to do just that. Best of all, you can apply argument mapping to all six speaking tasks and both writing tasks. That means you w

  13. Prevalence of tuberculosis, HIV, and TB-HIV co-infection among pulmonary tuberculosis suspects in a predominantly pastoralist area, northeast Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulugeta Belay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: TB-HIV co-infection is one of the biggest public health challenges in sub-Saharan Africa. Although there is a wealth of information on TB-HIV co-infection among settled populations in Africa and elsewhere, to our knowledge, there are no published reports on TB-HIV co-infection from pastoral communities. In this study, we report the prevalence of TB, HIV and TB-HIV co-infection among pulmonary TB suspects in the Afar Regional State of Ethiopia. Design: In a cross-sectional study design, 325 pulmonary TB suspects were included from five health facilities. Three sputum samples (spot-morning-spot were collected from each participant. Sputum samples were examined for the presence of acid fast bacilli using Ziehl–Neelsen staining method, and culture was done on the remaining sputum samples. Participants were interviewed and HIV tested. Results: Of the 325 pulmonary TB suspects, 44 (13.5% were smear positive, and 105 (32.3% were culture positive. Among smear-positive patients, five were culture negative and, therefore, a total of 110 (33.8% suspects were bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB patients. Out of 287 pulmonary TB suspects who were tested for HIV infection, 82 (28.6% were HIV positive. A significantly higher proportion of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB patients [40 (40.4%] were HIV co-infected compared with patients without bacteriological evidence for pulmonary TB [42 (22.3%]. However, among ethnic Afar pastoralists, HIV infections in smear- and/or culture-negative pulmonary TB suspects [7 (7.6%] and bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB patients [4 (11.8%] were comparable. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, Afar ethnicity was independently associated with low HIV infection [OR=0.16 (95% CI: 0.07–0.37], whereas literacy was independently associated with higher HIV infection [OR=2.21 (95% CI: 1.05–4.64]. Conclusions: Although the overall prevalence of TB-HIV co-infection in the current study is

  14. Prevalence and risk factors for brucellosis in domestic yak Bos grunniens and their herders in a transhumant pastoralist system of Dolpo, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daniel S; Nydam, Daryl V; Altier, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Disease caused by Brucella spp. represents the most common bacterial zoonotic infection worldwide. The distribution and public health impact of these infections in Nepal's mountain regions are poorly characterized. This cross sectional study assesses the burden of brucellosis on transhumant pastoralists and their yak in and around Shey Phoksundo National Park, Nepal. Objectives were to: (1) estimate individual animal prevalence of Brucella-seropositive yak, (2) identify herd- and individual-level risk factors associated with Brucella seropositivity in individual yak, and (3) identify herd-level risk factors associated with reported human brucellosis-like symptoms in a household. A case of household symptoms was defined as the reported occurrence within the previous year of at least one of three acute symptoms (chills, fever, night chills) and one of two chronic symptoms (joint pain, swollen joint(s)) in one or both of two individuals interviewed in a household. Two-hundred-ninety-seven yak from 61 herds were sampled, and 61 household questionnaires were completed. Estimated true prevalence was 0.22 (95% CI: 0.17; 0.28). Poisson regression with generalized estimating equations was used to account for repeated measures within a cluster (herd). Yak in herds reporting abortion occurrence within the previous year were 2.3 times more likely to be seropositive than those in herds not reporting abortion (95% CI: 1.2; 4.2, p = 0.01). For every 10 animal increase in herd number, individual animal seropositivity risk increased by 30% (95% CI: 10%; 50%, p = 0.001). Male yak were 0.7 times as likely to be seropositive as female yak (95% CI: 0.5; 0.9, p = 0.01). Three to five year old yak were 2 times more likely to be seropositive than yak 5 years old were 4.9 times more likely to be seropositive than yak 1 reactor, and was 3.6 (95% CI: 1.4; 9.2, p = 0.008) times greater for households reporting the practice of raw milk consumption. These results indicate that yak

  15. Homework Practices of English and Non-English-Speaking Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelamour, Barbara; Jacobs, D'Andrea L.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the homework practices of English-speaking and non-English-speaking parents. Using a national data set of 7,992 students across ages and ethnicities, the frequency and type of homework practices were investigated. Statistical analysis revealed significant (though small) differences between the overall homework practices between…

  16. Understanding English Speaking Difficulties: An Investigation of Two Chinese Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhengdong

    2013-01-01

    Compared with reading, writing and listening, there has been a paucity of empirical data documenting learners' experiences of speaking English as a second language (ESL) or English as a foreign language (EFL) in different learning contexts in spite of the fact that developing the ability to speak in a second or foreign language is widely…

  17. Using Critical Communication Pedagogy to Teach Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Mare, Danielle M.

    2014-01-01

    Using Critical Communication Pedagogy, this semester-long service-learning approach to public speaking requires students to apply public speaking concepts to a speech they develop and deliver to a specific community audience, to examine their own biases, and to explore and evaluate various strategies for adapting to their audience.

  18. EFL Teachers' Conceptions of Speaking Competence in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Nasrollahi Shahri, Mohammad Naseh

    2014-01-01

    The present article lies at the intersection of research on teacher cognition and speaking competence in a second language. It is a qualitative analysis of teacher accounts of speaking in the context of English as a foreign language (EFL) in Iran. More specifically, the study is an exploration of three EFL teachers' conceptions of learning…

  19. Grammatical Abilities of Greek-Speaking Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Arhonto; Marinis, Theodoros; Kotsopoulou, Angeliki; Francis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates pronoun reference and verbs with nonactive morphology in high-functioning Greek-speaking children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). It is motivated by problems with reflexive pronouns demonstrated by English-speaking children with ASD and the fact that reflexivity is also expressed via nonactive (reflexive) verbs in…

  20. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... member of your health care team. The “Speak Up” program is sponsored by The Joint Commission. They ... health care mistakes, patients are urged to “Speak Up.” S peak up if you have questions or concerns. ...

  1. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills…

  2. Linguistic Skills and Speaking Fluency in a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, Nivja H.; Steinel, Margarita P.; Florijn, Arjen; Schoonen, Rob; Hulstijn, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated how individual differences in linguistic knowledge and processing skills relate to individual differences in speaking fluency. Speakers of Dutch as a second language ("N" = 179) performed eight speaking tasks, from which several measures of fluency were derived such as measures for pausing, repairing, and speed…

  3. Article Use in Spanish-Speaking Children with SLI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Maria Adelaida; Gutierrez-Clellen, Vera F.

    2001-01-01

    Analyzed article use in Spanish-speaking children with specific language impairment who are learning English as a Second Language. The surface hypothesis account of specific language impairment was evaluated in relation to the use of articles in these children. Language samples were obtained from 15 Spanish-speaking children with language…

  4. Attitudes to Improving Speaking Skills by Guided Individual Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Kavaliauskienė

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Students’ perceptions of difficulties in speaking on professional issues are in the focus of the present article. It is generally assumed that the skill of speaking a foreign language is very difficult to master, while speaking on professional topics involves such difficulties as the usage of specific vocabulary and ability to deal with listeners’ oncoming arguments. The aims of the current research are to investigate learners’ attitudes to the level of difficulty in speaking activi - ties on a subject matter at university and apply an innovative approach to improving their speaking skills. The methodology applied was focused on guided individual learning (GIL, with gradually increasing amount of spontaneity in public talks on the subject matter, starting with prepared short talks on an ESP issue leading to group discussions; moving on to Power Point presentations, involving spontaneous deviations from the subject and followed by question time; further, adding some complex subject matter, such as a discussion on a problematic professional subject suggested by learning materials; and, eventually, speaking impromptu on an issue, with a high level of control of one’s speaking skills. The research method of the learners’ attitudes employed the survey on learner attitudes to four different speaking activities in the classroom, which included short talks, Power Point Presentations, discussions and speaking impromptu. The questionnaire was administered to students of two different specializations by the end of the semester. The respondents were students who studied Psychology and Social Work at the Faculty of Social Policy, at Mykolas Romeris University in Vilnius, Lithuania. The respondents were asked to indicate the degree of difficulty they had with the various speaking activities on the Likert’s scale ranging from “very difficult” (1 to “very easy” (5. The results indicated that perceptions of difficulties to developing speaking

  5. The Effect of Reading Aloud on English Speaking Ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱子奇

    2014-01-01

    English speaking ability is one of the most direct ways and standards to judge whether one ’s English is good or not. How to improve English speaking ability is always a heated topic among English learners. Many educators have examined that reading English aloud has been attested to be an effective method of learning English, especially improving English speaking abili-ty. This paper, through a questionnaire survey, is to analyze the relationship between students ’oral English outcome and their reading aloud, followed by the reasons why reading aloud affects English speaking ability, attempting to find out effective strate-gies to help English learners to improve their English speaking ability.

  6. Giving Speaking Practice in Self-Access Mode a Chance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Dofs

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Finding resources and activities which will interest students and promote speaking in a self-access resource can be challenging. This article describes how the School of English at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT, Christchurch, New Zealand, works to enable speaking practice in their Language Self Access Centre (LSAC. The activities which students are encouraged to do were produced consequent to research and an examination of good practice world- wide within the field of autonomy in language learning. The article will explore some basic design principles and conditions which were followed with the aim of creating maximal “comprehensible outputs” for speaking (Anderson, Maclean & Lynch, 2004, and, at the same time, creating conditions for these speaking tasks which would optimise development of autonomous language use (Thornbury, 2005. This is followed by an analysis of how the resources provided in a designated speaking area in the LSAC fulfil these principles and conditions, and how they may foster autonomous learning.

  7. Spatial predictors of bovine tuberculosis infection and Brucella spp. exposure in pastoralist and agropastoralist livestock herds in the Ruaha ecosystem of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roug, Annette; Clifford, Deana; Mazet, Joana; Kazwala, Rudovick; John, Julius; Coppolillo, Peter; Smith, Woutrina

    2014-06-01

    While many studies investigate animal-related risk factors for disease, few have considered environmental or spatial risk factors in the dynamics of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) and brucellosis. In the Ruaha ecosystem of Tanzania, we investigated the role of household location as a predictor for infection with Mycobacterium bovis and exposure to Brucella in pastoralist and agropastoralist cattle herds in a typical African wildlife-livestock-human interface. ArcGIS was utilized to calculate Euclidian distances between households and the nearest river, village center, protected area, and other infected households, followed by multivariate logistic regression to assess the association between risk factors and herd-level bTB and Brucella outcomes. Global and local spatial clustering of bTB-infected and Brucella-exposed herds was explored using the Cuzick-Edward’s test and SaTScan spatial scan statistics. Households located farther from rivers and closer to village centers and herds belonging to agropastoralists were more likely to have bTB-positive cattle. Risk of Brucella exposure increased with proximity to protected areas. One spatial cluster of households with Brucella spp. seropositive cattle was identified. Spatial factors may be useful for assessing disease risk and for formulating intervention and control strategies for households that manage cattle in ecosystems characterized by seasonally limited resources and intense wildlife-livestock interfaces. PMID:24659301

  8. Write to speak revisited: An ecological investigation of transfer between chatting and speaking in foreign languages

    OpenAIRE

    Mendelson, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Dating back to some of the earliest investigations of the use of text-based, online chat in foreign language instruction, researchers and instructors have been hypothesizing that and asking if there is some transfer between chatting and oral language development (e.g., Beauvois, 1992; Chun, 1994). The possibility of this sort of transfer is especially promising for the many students whose ability to speak their foreign language lags behind their ability to read and write. In these cases, the ...

  9. THE CONTRIBUTION OF ENGLISH STUDENTS’ SPEAKING STRATEGIES AND MOTIVATION ON THEIR SPEAKING ABILITY AT TARBIYAH FACULTY OF IAIN IMAM BONJOL PADANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kustati

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aims of the study are to describe: 1. Speaking strategies that are most frequently used by the students of the English Department in Tarbiyah Faculty; 2. The contribution of Students’ Speaking-Related LLS in developing their speaking ability; and, 3. The contribution of students’ learning motivation in the development of their speaking skills. speaking test, strategy inventory for language learning (SILL, and learning motivation questionnaire were employed to collect the data. The research findings revealed that there were thirty-four speaking strategies which were most frequently used by high, average, and low achievement students. The findings also showed that bothe students’ speaking strategies and motivation give significant contribution on students’ speaking ability.  Thus, speaking lecturers are expected to be able to implement innovative and varied teaching techniques.

  10. Who taught Adam to speak?1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur C. Custance

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available It is taken for granted that the first man, being half-ape, 'spoke’ by copying them. Research shows that such grunts and cries cannot ‘evolve' into cultured speech because the speech organs and brain structure required for human language are entirety different from those needed for of animal communication. The difference in animal and human thinking processes is not merely one of degree but rather of kind. This difference is seen in the use of signs vs. symbols, of emotional and situational language v.v. conceptual, objective language. No animal communication system can account for the human one. Perhaps, then, speech is instinctive? No, for people, however primitive, have been found without a language. Yet unless spoken to, one does not learn to speak as demonstrated by feral (wild children and deaf-mutes(like Helen Keller. So the question is - who spoke to the first human being - Adam to teach him? About all that scientific investigation can do is to demonstrate what cannot be the origin of this extraordinary trait of human nature. The only light we have is from revelation. The first two chapters of Genesis not only tell us Who spoke first but also how the process of language was acquired. But the implications of the necessity of this unique faculty in terms of his humanity and the purpose of his very creation are profound.

  11. Speaking without Broca's area after tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Monique; Gatignol, Peggy; Leroy, Marianne; Duffau, Hugues

    2009-08-01

    We present the case of a right-handed patient who received surgical treatment for a left frontal WHO grade II glioma invading the left inferior and middle frontal gyri, the head of the caudate nucleus, the anterior limb of the internal capsule and the anterior insula, in direct contact also with the anterior-superior part of the lentiform nucleus. The tumor resection was guided by direct electrical stimulation on brain areas, while the patient was awake. Adding a narrative production task to the neuropsychological assessment, we compared pre-, peri- and post-surgical language skills in order to analyze the effects of the tumor infiltration and the consequences of the left IFG resection, an area known to be involved in various language and cognitive processes. We showed that the tumor infiltration and its resection did not lead to the severe impairments predicted by the localization models assigning a significant role in language processing to the left frontal lobe, notably Broca's area. We showed that slow tumor evolution - the patient had been symptom-free for a long time - enabled compensatory mechanisms to process most language functions endangered by the tumor infiltration. However, a subtle fragility was observed in two language devices, i.e., reported speech and relative clauses, related to minor working memory deficits. This case study of a patient speaking without Broca's area illustrates the efficiency of brain plasticity, and shows the necessity to broaden pre-, peri-, post-surgery language and cognitive assessments. PMID:19274574

  12. On the Influence of Cyber-speak on Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙丽娟; 时耀红

    2007-01-01

    Internet today is not only a kind of high-technology,but also considered to be a kind of cultural phenomenon.As its carrier,cyber-speak has brought convenient and quick communication since its advent.But due to unbalanced development of Internet and misuse of cyber-speak,traditional Chinese language is influenced negatively.In this paper,through questionnaire about Internet conducted among 20 young interviewees and 20 senior interviewees,results shows that the young are more willing to accept cyber-speak and even use it in daily communication,but unlimited use,plus senior citizens' conservative attitude toward Internet,brings about the communicative gap to some extent.In fact,as a kind of complementary part of our traditional language,cyber-speak will not affect direct communication with right understanding and reasonable use.

  13. The Development and Validation of the Portuguese Speaking Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Charles W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development and validation of the Portuguese Speaking Test, a simulated oral proficiency interview that uses a semidirect approach to examine proficiency in personal conversation, direction-giving, description, narration, topical discourse, and real-life situations. (CB)

  14. Suicide Prevention Exposure, Awareness, and Knowledge Survey (SPEAKS) - Student

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SPEAKS- student dataset contains individual level information from a sample of college students on GLS funded campuses. These data include student demographics,...

  15. Speak Up! But don't strain your voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders Speak Up! But don't strain your voice Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. A clinical trial at the NIDCD Voice Center gave Sherdina Jones tools to limit voice ...

  16. Dopamine receptor genetic polymorphisms and body composition in undernourished pastoralists: An exploration of nutrition indices among nomadic and recently settled Ariaal men of northern Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Peter B

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minor alleles of the human dopamine receptor polymorphisms, DRD2/TaqI A and DRD4/48 bp, are related to decreased functioning and/or numbers of their respective receptors and have been shown to be correlated with body mass, height and food craving. In addition, the 7R minor allele of the DRD4 gene is at a higher frequency in nomadic compared to sedentary populations. Here we examine polymorphisms in the DRD2 and DRD4 genes with respect to body mass index (BMI and height among men in two populations of Ariaal pastoralists, one recently settled (n = 87 and the other still nomadic (n = 65. The Ariaal live in northern Kenya, are chronically undernourished and are divided socially among age-sets. Results Frequencies of the DRD4/7R and DRD2/A1 alleles were 19.4% and 28.2%, respectively and did not differ between the nomadic and settled populations. BMI was higher in those with one or two DRD4/7R alleles in the nomadic population, but lower among the settled. Post-hoc analysis suggests that the DRD4 differences in BMI were due primarily to differences in fat free body mass. Height was unrelated to either DRD2/TaqI A or DRD4/48 bp genotypes. Conclusion Our results indicate that the DRD4/7R allele may be more advantageous among nomadic than settled Ariaal men. This result suggests that a selective advantage mediated through behaviour may be responsible for the higher frequency of the 7R alleles in nomadic relative to sedentary populations around the world. In contrast to previous work, we did not find an association between DRD2 genotypes and height. Our results support the idea that human phenotypic expression of genotypes should be rigorously evaluated in diverse environments and genetic backgrounds.

  17. USP Marion: A Few Prisoners Summon the Courage to Speak

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen C. Richards

    2015-01-01

    USP Marion is the first supermax federal penitentiary. Marionization refers to the experimental control program used at this prison. The prisoners speaking in this article suffered many years of solitary confinement. This research brief discusses some of what they experienced in their own words. These are the recollections of a few Marion prisoners that have summoned the courage to speak out and share their darkest memories.

  18. DEVELOPING THINKING SKILLS IN THE SPEAKING SKILLS CLASS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaiWei

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the non-linguistic problems that prevent students from expressing themselves effectively at a more advanced level. It then proposes the integration of thinking instruction with the teaching of speaking skills by arguing why and how effective thinking can improve the content and effectiveness of students' utterances. The last part of the paper discusses specific ways of developing thinking in the speaking skills class.

  19. Emotion episodes of Afrikaans-speaking employees in the workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Cara S. Jonker; Althea Van der Merwe

    2013-01-01

    Orientation: Emotions must be investigated within the natural contexts in which they occur. It therefore becomes crucial to study episodes in the workplace.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the positive and negative emotion episodes and frequencies of working Afrikaans-speaking adults.Motivation for the study: To date, no study has been conducted to determine emotion episodes amongst White Afrikaans-speaking working adults in South Africa. Gooty, Connelly, Griffit...

  20. The Portuguese-speaking community in Lambeth: a scoping study

    OpenAIRE

    Melo Nogueira, Maria-Joao; Porteous, David; Guerreiro, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the findings from research with the Portuguese-speaking community in Lambeth commissioned by the London Community Foundation. It is designed to inform the work of the Lambeth Community Fund Grant Committee which makes decisions regarding the distribution the Portuguese Speakers Community Fund. Based mainly on semi-structured, face to face interviews with community representatives and local service providers, it provides a snapshot of the Portuguese-speaking community in L...

  1. Whole Person Education of English Majors through English Public Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉明; 王晨; 吴闻博; 陈文娟; 何倩倩

    2015-01-01

    English public speaking proves to play a significant role in the speaker’s whole person education, which has been gain⁃ing increasing attention among scholars at home and abroad. The paper analyzes possible relations between them and argues that great importance and awareness are supposed to be attached to the development and promotion of English public speaking espe⁃cially among English majors for them to be more versatile and more competitive both in job markets and in work places.

  2. R U Txting? Is the Use of Text Speak Hurting Your Literacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Michelle; Davis, Claire

    2009-01-01

    Recent negative media attention surrounding the use of text speak (shorthand abbreviations of words such as "gr8" for "great") and the potentially detrimental effects of text speak on literacy prompted this study of texting and literacy in 80 college students. Thirty-four text speak users and 46 nontext speak users were assessed on their…

  3. Brain Dominance And Speaking Strategy Use of Iranian EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Mireskandari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of brain dominance on the use of Language learning speaking strategies. One hundred forty two undergraduate students of Shiraz University, Iran, participated in this study. The Hemispheric Dominance Test (HDT was employed to categorize participants as right-, left- and whole-brain dominant, and a Speaking Strategy Questionnaire was administered to evaluate their use of speaking strategies. The results were analyzed using a one-way between groups analysis of variance (ANOVA to investigate whether there were any significant differences between the three brain dominant groups in their overall use of speaking strategies. A MANOVA was also run to investigate whether the groups had preferences regarding the use of any particular strategy type. Results indicated a statistically significant difference between the whole brain dominant participants and both left brain and right brain dominant learners for using compensation speaking strategies. To teach and learn more effectively, instructors and learners need to better understand and appreciate individual differences and how they can affect the learning process. They could find ways to combine activities that accommodate both left and right brain learners, employing not only the usual linear, verbal model, but also the active, image-rich, visuo-spatial models so that learners would be able to use both hemispheres.           Keywords: Brain dominance, language proficiency, speaking strategies, listening strategies

  4. Public speaking attitudes: does curriculum make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Adrienne B; Stone, Matthew D; Brundage, Shelley B; Zeigler, Mark T

    2010-05-01

    In light of infamous levels of fear associated with public speaking, businesses are training staff in communication effectiveness and universities are requiring courses in public speaking. A variety of approaches to individual training are available, but few studies have assessed effectiveness of group instruction, as in academic curricula. The specific purpose of this study was to compare changes in scores on measures of self-perceived confidence, competence, and apprehension associated with public speaking after two types of courses: one focused on knowledge of the vocal mechanism and mastering vocal characteristics (pitch, volume, rate, quality), and one addressing general communication theory and public speaking. Seventy-one undergraduate students enrolled in "Voice and Diction" at George Washington University (GWU) and 68 enrolled in "Fundamental Speech" at Florida State University completed questionnaires before and after the courses. Scores on Self-Perceived Communication Competence Scale, Personal Report of Confidence as a Speaker, and Personal Report of Communication Apprehension-24, were compared within subjects (ie, prepost course) and between courses. Significant differences (ppublic speaking curriculum of how to design and deliver a speech and curriculum tailored to the voice and speech mechanism succeeded in reducing public speaking apprehension and increasing feelings of confidence and competency for these undergraduate students. PMID:19481418

  5. TO SPEAK OR NOT TO SPEAK:THE ORAL ENGLISH CONUNDRUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lynn Fair

    2005-01-01

    Oral English classes are offered at most colleges and Universities in China and often are taught by an inexperienced foreign teacher. Unfortunately, there is no uniformity in the way it is presented to students or in the way student performance is assessed. Every teacher seems to have a different methodology and assessment procedure. Although the supposed objective of the course is to improve the student's ability to speak English, the actual results are of questionable value. As well, an apparent lack of progress can lead to a lessening of a student's initiative to learn English.The teaching of oral English in China should be standardized. There should be a universally recognized teaching methodology and textual materials for both the teachers and the students. An effective and fair method of assessment.is also required. Teachers should receive guidance and support from their respective colleges and universities. Textual materials need to be supplied, classes need to be limited in size (e. g. oral English classes should not exceed 30 students), classroom seating arrangements should be flexible to allow for groups to interact, and most importantly,schools need to provide an effective and standard teaching methodology.Oral English classes can be a valuable learning experience for both the student and teacher by improving and broadening cultural understanding. They can increase a student's confidence in his or her ability to speak English and improve English pronunciation, stress and modulation.

  6. Speaking out for sexual and reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrojee, S

    1993-01-01

    The view was presented that the living conditions of South Asian women do not allow for information, power, or support for controlling their own sexuality and reproductive health. Western biases are frequently incorporated into women's programs. The Asian rules governing women's sexuality are governed by sexism, racism, and class consciousness. Asian reproductive policies and programs need to break the silences, destroy the stereotypes, and give women control of their own sexuality and health. Cultures in South Asia prevent open discussion of sexuality, and the female body is considered "unclean." The perception of the Asian women who emigrated to the US is replete with visions of exotic sex or tightly controlled segregation. Asian males were denied involvement with American women. American servicemen abroad have used Asian women in the sex industry; the stereotyped Asian woman is "exotically beautiful, submissive, and willing." Stereotyped American pornography depicts female images in the Kama Sutra in a distorted way. The Asian community does not provide women with the information, tools, and services needed for Asian women to protect themselves from the consequences of unwanted and unprotected sex. The Asian community uses fear and shame to control women's sexuality outside the reproductive role. It is difficult for Asian women to exercise control over their own bodies or exercise reproductive choice. Decisions are made by husbands and families and may be dependent on the sex of the children born. Sexually transmitted diseases are not adequately diagnosed or treated. Asian women need to continue to speak out and to challenge the external controls on their sexuality. The consequences of the stereotyping and controls on Asian women's expression of sexuality are negative feelings about sexuality, lack of attention to proper gynecological care, and a lower likelihood of protection against unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:12290479

  7. A case study of lexical development of writing and speaking in identical twins

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Hui-Ping; Lowie, Wander; de Bot, Kees

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the lexical performances of two beginner learners of English in writing and speaking tasks. Based on theoretical models of writing and speaking, we find major similarities and differences between writing and speaking. We analyzed 100 writing and 100 speaking samples of two identical twins with respect to two lexical dimensions: lexical diversity and lexical difficulty. The results show a higher degree of lexical diversity in writing than in speaking. However, dynamic c...

  8. Health services utilisation disparities between English speaking and non-English speaking background Australian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jack

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the differences in health services utilisation and the associated risk factors between infants from non-English speaking background (NESB and English speaking background (ESB within Australia. Methods We analysed data from a national representative longitudinal study, the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC which started in 2004. We used survey logistic regression coupled with survey multiple linear regression to examine the factors associated with health services utilisation. Results Similar health status was observed between the two groups. In comparison to ESB infants, NESB infants were significantly less likely to use the following health services: maternal and child health centres or help lines (odds ratio [OR] 0.56; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 0.40-0.79; maternal and child health nurse visits (OR 0.68; 95% CI, 0.49-0.95; general practitioners (GPs (OR 0.58; 95% CI, 0.40-0.83; and hospital outpatient clinics (OR 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31-0.93. Multivariate analysis results showed that the disparities could not be fully explained by the socioeconomic status and language barriers. The association between English proficiency and the service utilised was absent once the NESB was taken into account. Maternal characteristics, family size and income, private health insurance and region of residence were the key factors associated with health services utilisation. Conclusions NESB infants accessed significantly less of the four most frequently used health services compared with ESB infants. Maternal characteristics and family socioeconomic status were linked to health services utilisation. The gaps in health services utilisation between NESB and ESB infants with regard to the use of maternal and child health centres or phone help, maternal and child health nurse visits, GPs and paediatricians require appropriate policy attentions and interventions.

  9. Techniques of reading and speaking teaching in vocational school

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金前英

    2016-01-01

    The students have learned English in the middle school, They learned the skills of reading writing listening and speaking. But of the four skills, speaking is usually the poorest for the students of learning English in China, most of students are lack of reading ,they learned English just for exam, but in vocational school, reading is the skill that the students will be judged upon . A lots of problems exist in the English teaching especially in the teaching of reading. In this paper, the importance and methods of reading will be further discussed.

  10. Film and Television Policies in English-speaking Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Bréan, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    This one-day conference was organised by CinEcoSA (Cinéma, Économie & Sociétés Anglophones - Cinema, Economy in English-Speaking Countries), a research group which brings together academics working on the cinema and television industries of English-speaking countries. It is part of a new series of events on “Film & TV Policy” (2013-2014); the first such series organised by this research group was “Film Marketing” (2010-2011). This conference was itself the second installment in the cycle, aft...

  11. The Folktale as a Site of Framing Palestinian Memory and Identity in Speak, Bird, Speak Again and Qul Ya Tayer

    OpenAIRE

    Abou Bakr alkhammash, Farah

    2014-01-01

    Following the trauma of the Nakba (Catastrophe) of 1948, Palestinians still suffer from constant violations of their rights, land and culture. To fight forgetfulness and denial, some Palestinian folklorists have sought to collect, document, analyse and translate pre-1948 Palestinian folktales. One major example is Speak, Bird, Speak Again (1989), a selection edited by Ibrahim Muhawi and Sharif Kanaana, and its Arabic version Qul Ya Tayer (قول يا طير (2001. The folktales, told mainly by women,...

  12. Dynamic Development in Speaking versus Writing in Identical Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, HuiPing; Verspoor, Marjolijn; Vahtrick, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Taking a dynamic usage-based perspective, this longitudinal case study compares the development of sentence complexity in speaking versus writing in two beginner Taiwanese learners of English (identical twins) in an extensive corpus consisting of 100 oral and 100 written texts of approximately 200 words produced by each twin over 8 months. Three…

  13. Professional Rhetorics: Bridging the Gap between Writing, Speaking, & Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Justin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the syllabus for the course "Professional Rhetorics: Bridging the Gap Between Writing, Speaking, & Digital Media." The course is designed to help students develop into effective rhetors for today's professional environments, and it will do so by exploring numerous rhetorical strategies associated with oral, written, and…

  14. Speaking, Reading and Earnings among Low-Skilled Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiswick, Barry R.

    The determinants of English language fluency among immigrants and the effects of fluency on earnings are examined, using a unique data set and a sample of more than 800 illegal aliens apprehended in Los Angeles, California. Analysis of the data show the importance of certain variables not previously available, speaking fluency at migration and…

  15. Writing and Speaking Skills Can Be Taught in Psychology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugh, Henry E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a program that gives psychology students practice in written and oral communication. It involves students in writing an abstract of a journal article and in making an oral presentation. Writing and speaking skills, along with methodology, may be the most enduring legacy of introductory psychology courses. (CS)

  16. "Woman Speaks": Representations of Working Women in Postwar America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalas, Andrea; Berenstein, Rhona J.

    1996-01-01

    Looks at the ways in which the relationship between women and work was characterized during the late 1940s in "Woman Speaks," a combination newsreel/television show in Chicago. Expands upon the work of other historians and critics who have examined the representations of gender in early television marketing ploys and variety/situation comedy…

  17. Environmental sciences and engineering expert to speak at Virginia Tech

    OpenAIRE

    Fay, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Gregory Characklis of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will be speaking at Virginia Tech's Fralin Biotechnology Center Auditorium on Friday, April 23 from 9-10 a.m., to student and faculty as part of the Spring 2010 Water Seminar Series.

  18. Changes in Thinking for Speaking: A Longitudinal Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Gale

    2015-01-01

    Cross-linguistic research on motion events has shown that Spanish speakers and English speakers have different patterns of thinking for speaking about motion, both linguistically and gesturally (for a review, see Stam, 2010b). Spanish speakers express path linguistically with verbs, and their path gestures tend to occur with path verbs, whereas…

  19. The new French Development aid towards French-speaking Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Sindou Michel Konate

    2013-01-01

    This project is focused on French president François Hollande new policy initiation around French Development assistance issue, particularly to French speakingAfrica South of the Sahara. President Hollande wishes to distance himself from the practices of his predecessors on French Public Development Assistance toward its former African colonies

  20. Developing College Students' English Speaking Skills in Chinese Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔令会

    2011-01-01

    As one of the four important communication skills, speaking has long been neglected in the language teaching, while oral English teaching has always been the weak points in college English education. Since China began to reform and open the door to the ou

  1. 5 CFR 2635.807 - Teaching, speaking and writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... employee other than a covered noncareer employee as defined in 5 CFR 2636.303(a), travel expenses... CFR chapter 304, and authorizes an employee to undertake the travel. At the conference the advocacy... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Teaching, speaking and writing....

  2. Observing Pair-Work Task in an English Speaking Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Achmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on students’ pair-work interactions to develop their speaking skills in an ELT classroom which consisted of international learners. A number of 16 learners of intermediate proficiency with IELTS score band 5.5 were observed. The teacher had paired those he considered among them to be the more competent ones (hereafter, stronger with the less competent ones (hereafter, weaker; therefore, eight pairs were observed during the lesson. The task given to the students was to express ‘Agree and Disagree’ in the context of giving opinions related to social life. Based on the observations, the task was successfully implemented by six pairs; thus, the two others faced some problems. From the first pair, it was seen that the stronger student had intimated the weaker one into speaking during the task. The other pair, who was both of the same native, did not converse in English as expected and mostly used their native language to speak with one another presumably due to respect from the stronger student towards the weaker one. In situations like this, when pair-work becomes unproductive, rotating pairs is recommended to strengthen information sharing and assigning roles to avoid a student from taking over the activity from his or her pair. In conclusion, pairing international learners with mixed speaking proficiency by teachers must be conducted as effectively as possible by initially identifying their ability and learning culture to profoundly expand the students’ language resources.

  3. English Spelling Errors Made by Arabic-Speaking Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Busaidi, Saleh; Al-Saqqaf, Abdullah H.

    2015-01-01

    Spelling is a basic literacy skill in any language as it is crucial in communication. EFL students are often unable to spell or pronounce very simple monosyllabic words even after several years of English instruction. Similarly, teachers and researchers usually focus on the larger skills such as speaking and reading and ignore the smaller…

  4. Effect of Dialogue Journal Writing on EFL Students' Speaking Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Koumy, Abdel Salam A.

    A study investigated the effect of dialogue journal writing on English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) students' speaking skills. Subjects were 136 students enrolled in a history program at an Egyptian university, divided randomly into experimental and control groups. The experimental group received training in dialogue journal writing in addition to…

  5. Early Lexical Development in Spanish-Speaking Infants and Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Maldonado, Donna; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The development of a new parent report instrument, Inventario del Desarollo de Habilidades Communicativas, is reported and 5 studies carried out with the instrument for 328 children aged 8 months to 2 years/7 months are presented. Among the findings are similar trajectories of development for Spanish- and English-speaking children and for children…

  6. Phonological Processes in Kannada-Speaking Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupela, Vani; Manjula, R.; Velleman, Shelley L.

    2010-01-01

    Phonological process analysis was carried out using a 40-word imitation task with 30 11;6-14;6 year old Kannada-speaking persons with Down syndrome in comparison with 15 non-verbal mental age matched typically developing children. Percentages of occurrence were significantly higher for the Down syndrome group with certain exceptions. Some…

  7. Getting Our Act Together: A Justification for a Speaking Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKiernan, John

    Research indicates that about 40% of the population fear public speaking. There is a wide variety of possible causes for this unwillingness to communicate: a lack of skills, social introversion, alienation, lack of fluency in English, and communication apprehension. Despite the fact that evidence indicates everyone may have some difficulty with…

  8. Synthesis Of Realistic Animations Of A Person Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kenneth C.; Kagels, David S.; Watson, Stephen H.; Rom, Hillel S.; Lorre, Jean J.; Wright, John R.; Duxbury, Elizabeth D.

    1995-01-01

    Actors computer program implements automated process that synthesizes realistic animations of person speaking. Produces "newscaster" type video sequences. Uses images of person and, therefore, not limited to cartoons and cartoonlike movies. Potential applications also include use of process for automatically producing on-the-fly animations for human/computer interfaces and for reducing bandwidth needed to transmit video telephone signals.

  9. Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening: Perspectives in Applied Linguistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, James

    2007-01-01

    In this paper I examine the citations in recent review articles in applied linguistics to point out that there appears to be a distinct lack of overlap between references to work in four inter-related areas--reading, writing, speaking, and listening. I then point to areas of research where I think it particularly important to consider these…

  10. Energy, environment leaders to speak at Virginia Tech

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Six key national energy and environmental policy leaders from government and business--including Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and James R. Schlesinger--will speak at Virginia Tech this spring as part of a broader university initiative to foster collective participation from faculty, staff, students, and the community, in addressing the environmental challenges of the region, nation, and world.

  11. Impromptu: great impromptu speaking is never just impromptu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramlah A. Nawi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Great impromptu speaking, reciting and singing are never just an isolated impromptu act. It is the result of endless practice to perfect performance that can then be given impromptu. One of the main objectives of learning English as a Second Language (ESL is to be able to speak English impromptu, not just on the stage or in front of an audience but also in a casual meeting, on the street or during a formal meeting in a board-room. In fact to be able to speak “impromptu” should be the Holy Grail of teaching and learning ESL, more important than reading, writing and listening. So how come it is not given the priority it deserves – and how come it seems such a difficult goal? We believe it is because teachers and learners neglect to emphasize and practice the key to learning impromptu speaking. That key we believe is practice, practice and more practice. We can remember songs from our kindergarten years and we can still sing them because we practiced, practiced and practiced them. We believe that the teaching of ESL often overlooks the critical importance of lots of practice to create depth of learning and that creative methods of practicing need to be taught and practiced in ESL courses until such methods become deeply habitual, in fact they become a new personal paradigm. If our students aim to become great at ESL, they, too, must take continuous never-ending practice to heart.

  12. Using Habit Reversal to Decrease Filled Pauses in Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Carolyn; Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of simplified habit reversal in reducing filled pauses that occur during public speaking. Filled pauses consist of "uh," "um," or "er"; clicking sounds; and misuse of the word "like." After baseline, participants received habit reversal training that consisted of…

  13. Social Competence of Mandarin-Speaking Immigrant Children in Childcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine social competence of Chinese immigrant children and its associations with age, length of attendance in childcare, gender, generational status and proficiencies in English and Mandarin Chinese. One hundred Mandarin-speaking children aged three to five years from 15 childcare centres in Sydney were assessed by normed…

  14. Self-Persuasion: The Effects of Public Speaking on Speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Keith; Carter, David A.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the effects of the preparation and presentation of a speech on the changing attitudes of the speaker. Concludes that individual attitudes are affected by the preparation stage more than the presentation stage. Draws implications for the teaching of public speaking. (JMF)

  15. Riddle Appreciation and Reading Comprehension in Cantonese-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ivy N. Y.; To, Carol K. S.; Weekes, Brendan S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Inference-making skills are necessary for reading comprehension. Training in riddle appreciation is an effective way to improve reading comprehension among English-speaking children. However, it is not clear whether these methods generalize to other writing systems. The goal of the present study was to investigate the relationship between…

  16. Socializing English-Speaking Navajo Children to Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how young children are socialized to the process and products of storytelling as part of everyday family life is important for language and literacy instruction. A language socialization framework was used to understand storytelling practices on the Navajo Nation. This study examined how three young English-speaking Navajo children,…

  17. 5 CFR 7301.102 - Prior approval for outside teaching, speaking and writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or Federal regulation, including 5 CFR part 2635. ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prior approval for outside teaching... approval for outside teaching, speaking and writing. (a) Before engaging in outside teaching, speaking...

  18. Increases in Cognitive and Linguistic Processing Primarily Account for Increases in Speaking Rate with Age

    OpenAIRE

    Nip, Ignatius S. B.; Green, Jordan R.

    2013-01-01

    Age-related increases of speaking rate are not fully understood, but have been attributed to gains in biologic factors and learned skills that support speech production. This study investigated developmental changes in speaking rate and articulatory kinematics of participants aged 4 (N = 7), 7 (N = 10), 10 (N = 9), 13 (N = 7), 16 (N = 9) years and young adults (N = 11) in speaking tasks varying in task demands. Speaking rate increased with age, with decreases in pauses and articulator displac...

  19. Speaking of Science: stepping out of the stereotype (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Just because we are scientists and engineers, does not mean that our presentations must be dry and boring. Step out of the stereotype! Success in your career depends not only upon the rigor of your research, but also hinges on your ability to communicate with your peers and with the public. According to many somewhat dubious internet polls, public speaking is the number one human fear. And yet public speaking is defined as speaking to more than four people at any given time. Hence, you are a public speaker more than you may realize. Given this seemingly natural fear, it is not surprising that delivering a presentation at large, or even small, science gatherings can be frightening, overwhelming, and intimidating, but it can also be extremely rewarding and gratifying. On very few occasions do we, as scientists and engineers, get to reach out to dozens or hundreds of our colleagues in a single session. Make the most of your moment on stage, wherever that stage may be. If you would like to improve your public speaking skills, please join me for a session on making your presentations interesting and effective, while also reducing your stress and actually enjoying the experience. Participants will leave the workshop with a greater skill set to develop and deliver presentations. The workshop is interactive and builds on the collective experience of the audience and the instructor. 'The problem with most bad presentations I see is not the speaking, the slides, the visuals, or any of the other things people obsess about. Instead, it's the lack of thinking.' Scott Berkun, Confessions of a Public Speaker, 2010

  20. Speaking of Science: Stepping out of the Stereotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Just because we are scientists and engineers, does not mean that our presentations must be dry and boring. Step out of the stereotype! Success in your career depends not only upon the rigor of your research, but also hinges on your ability to communicate with your peers and with the public. According to many somewhat dubious internet polls, public speaking is the number one human fear. And yet public speaking is defined as speaking to more than four people at any given time. Hence, you are a public speaker more than you may realize. Given this seemingly natural fear, it is not surprising that delivering a presentation at large, or even small, science gatherings can be frightening, overwhelming, and intimidating, but it can also be extremely gratifying. On very few occasions do we, as scientists and engineers, reach out to dozens or hundreds of our colleagues in a single event. Make the most of your moment on stage, wherever that stage may be.If you would like to improve your public speaking skills, please join me for a session on making your presentation interesting and effective, while also reducing your stress and actually enjoying the experience. Participants will leave the workshop with a greater skill set to develop and deliver presentations. The workshop is interactive and builds on the collective experience of the audience and the instructor. "The problem with most bad presentations I see is not the speaking, the slides, the visuals, or any of the other things people obsess about. Instead, it's the lack of thinking." Scott Berkun, 2010

  1. The Effect of Instructing Impression Management Behaviors on Maximizing Applicants' Performance in the IELTS Speaking Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdar, Sara; Bagheri, Mohammad Sadegh

    2012-01-01

    Speaking proceeds under the constraint of time. While speaking, speakers are under constant pressure to follow the message being received and to formulate rapid responses to their partners. In the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) Speaking Test, the communicative nature of the interview creates an ideal situation for applicants…

  2. Speaking up for patient safety by hospital-based health care professionals: a literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okuyama, A.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Speaking up is important for patient safety, but often, health care professionals hesitate to voice concerns. Understanding the influencing factors can help to improve speaking-up behaviour and team communication. This review focused on health care professionals’ speaking-up behaviour fo

  3. Using Seminars to Teach the Common Core's Speaking and Listening Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Terry; Billings, Laura

    2011-01-01

    As educators, the authors know the importance of teaching reading and writing, but they often overlook speaking and listening skills. They believe that if they have class discussions on a regular basis, students are "naturally" learning to speak and to listen. However, that is not the case. On the contrary, speaking and listening skills are ones…

  4. Reducing Student Apprehension of Public Speaking: Evaluating Effectiveness of Group Tutoring Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Misty L.; Johnson, Karen Gabrielle; Stewart, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates that the fear of public speaking is an extraordinarily common phobia and that a significant portion of the population experiences some form of anxiety over public speaking. Although there is a great deal of research available on the etiology of public speaking anxiety, there is far less research available on interventional…

  5. A Listening and Speaking Lesson Design for EFL Undergraduates in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Jing; LI Ming-jun

    2013-01-01

    Freshmen and sophomores in universities of China usually have Listening and Speaking class. A two-period listening and speaking lesson is designed by taking full use of the teaching material and taking the modern listening and speaking teaching theories into consideration.

  6. To Speak Like a TED Speaker--A Case Study of TED Motivated English Public Speaking Study in EFL Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingxia; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Dongyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper intends to investigate the effectiveness of a new course pattern--TED-motivated English Public Speaking Course in EFL teaching in China. This class framework adopts TED videos as the learning materials to stimulate students to be a better speaker. Meanwhile, it aims to examine to what extent the five aspects of language skills are…

  7. The Evolution of beliefs and opinions on matters related to marriage and sexual behaviour among French-speaking Catholic Quebecers and English-speaking Protestant Ontarians

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Caia; Malherbe, Paskall; Laplante, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    EnglishThe authors argue that the important changes in behaviour related to family andsexual life that were seen in Quebec during the second half of the 20th centuryare a consequence of a major transformation of the foundation of the normativesystem shared by the members of Quebec's main socio-religious group, French speakingCatholics. Using data from Gallup polls, the authors compare theevolution of the opinions of French-speaking Quebec Catholics and English speakingOntario Protestants on m...

  8. Louisiana Speaks Transportation Option B Transit Corridors, UTM Zone 15N NAD 83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_transportation_option_b_transit_corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates the regional, subregional, and local transit corridors included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan community growth option of...

  9. Louisiana Speaks Transportation Option C Roadway Improvements, UTM Zone 15N NAD 83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_transportation_option_c_roadway_improvements

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates the regional roadways included in the Louisiana Speaks community growth option of compact development (Option C). This network...

  10. Louisiana Speaks Transportation Option B Roadway Improvements, UTM Zone 15N NAD 83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_transportation_option_b_roadway_improvements

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates the regional roadways included in the Louisiana Speaks community growth option of compact and dispersed development (Option B)....

  11. Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision Reinvestment Centers, UTM Zone 15N NAD83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_vision_reinvestment_centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates reinvestment centers included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision. Reinvestment centers highlight communities that...

  12. Louisiana Speaks Transportation Option A Roadway Improvements, UTM Zone 15N NAD 83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_transportation_option_a_roadway_improvements

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates the regional roadways included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan community growth option of dispersed development (Option...

  13. Louisiana Speaks Transportation Option C Transit Corridors, UTM Zone 15N NAD 83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_transportation_option_c_transit_corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates the regional, subregional, and local transit corridors included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan community growth option of...

  14. Louisiana Speaks Regional Vision Transit Corridors, UTM Zone 15N NAD 83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_vision_transit_corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates the primary and secondary transit corridors included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision. This network accommodates a...

  15. Louisiana Speaks Transportation Option C Transit Stations, UTM Zone 15N NAD 83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_transportation_option_c_transit_stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates potential fixed-transit stations included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan community growth option of compact development...

  16. Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision Special Economic Zones, UTM Zone 15N NAD83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_vision_special_economic_zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates special economic zones included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision. Special economic zones include existing national,...

  17. Effects of Board Game on Speaking Ability of Low-proficiency ESL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Mei Fung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ESL learners often experience anxiety and feel uncomfortable when speaking in the target language. This paper examines the anxiety level of polytechnic students when speaking English and the effects of board game on their speaking performance. The participants were selected from two intact classes which were randomly assigned into experimental and control groups comprising 30 students each. Data were obtained from pre- and post-treatment speaking tests and questionnaire. The questionnaire measuring anxiety factors was adapted from Yaikhong and Usaha (2012 and Woodrow (2006. The board game “What Say You” employed during the treatment was a speaking activity which required players to speak on a topic within a given time frame. The experimental group played the board games over six sessions. The results from the experimental and control groups showed significant difference in the pre- and post-treatment speaking test scores. However, the speaking performance of the experimental group revealed significantly higher scores. Students who were initially hesitant and passive were more willing to speak and were able to present and justify their ideas more confidently as compared to the control group after the treatment. The findings reveal that the board game is a useful tool to engage learners’ participation in class and to enhance the speaking ability of low-proficiency ESL learners. Keywords: anxiety level, board game, speaking ability, low-proficiency students, ESL learners  

  18. The Effect of Empathy on College English Speaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingdi Chen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available With various learner factors identified, empathy have been assumed to affect foreign learning to the extent to which it may result in certain differences in learner’s learning styles and strategies as well as the ultimate achievements. This paper reviews the research on the correlation between empathy and language learning .A small-scale survey about empathic state of non-English majors was carried out to indicate the effect of empathy on language learners’ speaking proficiency. It aims to implicate that college language researchers could attempt empathy-related teaching techniques to create completely “native” classroom environment to help language learners improve their speaking performance in a most favorable affective state.

  19. Maintaining students’ Speaking Fluency through Exhibition Examination in Sociolinguistic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khusnul Qhotimah Yuliatuty

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Using exhibition for the final project in Sociolinguistic study is really interesting for Universitas Siswa Bangsa Internasional students, especially for 2011 English Department students. Exhibition becomes interesting because this is the new thing to conduct the final project for English Department students’ cohort 2011 at Universitas Siswa Bangsa Internasional. The lecturer divides the students into pairs and each pairs should master one content or topic in Sociolinguistic study.  The students will do the exhibition about the topic that they get in a pairs. The lecturer also gives the students rubric sheet to fill by the visitors. The exhibition will make the students prepare themselves well because they will face many questions about the content which will be delivered by them. Beside, this exhibition also maintains students’ fluency in speaking English because they will explain and answer the questions from visitors with English. This paper tries to focus on how exhibition examination can maintain students’ fluency in speaking English.

  20. Enhancing ESL Learners Speaking Skills through Asynchronous Online Discussion Forum

    OpenAIRE

    Nadzrah Abu Bakar; Hafizah Latiff; Afendi Hamat

    2013-01-01

    Communicating orally in a second or foreign language such as English can be a difficult task especially for the low proficiency learners as they may lack the confidence and feel shy and apprehensive when interacting verbally in the target language. This may hold them back from expressing themselves vocally though they are fully aware that in order to be fluent in the target language, they need to practise speaking not only in the classroom but also outside the classroom. This paper discusses ...

  1. Testing Speaking Skill with Help of Language Lab or Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩美竹

    2005-01-01

    Speaking skill is an important component in the student's communicative competence. The testing of this skill is indispensable with its functions of providing useful feedback and motivating students. Where direct face-to-face oral test is impossible when large number of candidates involved, language lab or computer can be used to carry out various testing tasks in the evaluation of the students' oral communicative competence.

  2. Entrepreneurship education in German speaking Europe: a mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Achleitner, Ann-Kristin; Kaserer, Christoph; Jarchow, Svenja; Wilson, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Entrepreneurship education plays a crucial role in shaping the attitudes of students towards entrepreneurship as well as spurring the creation of future young companies. It is a crucial topic in any economy and increasingly becoming key on the agenda for universities around the world. In this study, we took a look at the higher education entrepreneurship education landscape in German-speaking Europe. We have reviewed all universities, including the technical ones, across Germany, Austria, Lie...

  3. German-speaking economists in British exile 1933-1945

    OpenAIRE

    Herald Hagemann

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with the contributions by German-speaking economists in the UK during the Nazi period. It first gives an overview on the emigration of economistsfrom Germany and Austria and the subgroup who came to Britain. Adolph Lowe's reflections on contemporary Britain, liberty, and economics and sociology are then discussed as an example how exile and acculturation have influenced topics and methodology of emigre scholars. The Oxford Institute of Statistics, with Jacob Marschak as the fo...

  4. Cheater's Guide to Speaking English Like a Native

    CERN Document Server

    De Mente, Boye

    2007-01-01

    Native English-speakers use a large number of proverbs and colloquial expressions in their daily conversations. These common sayings, which evolved over the centuries, are like "codes" that reveal the cultural values and attitudes of the speakers. To fully understand and communicate in English, it's necessary to be familiar with these expressions and know how and when to use them. The Cheater's Guide to Speaking English like a Native is a shortcut to achieving that goal.

  5. Study of English Speaking Anxiety in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳梅

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety has an important influence on two language learning as one of the affective factors in language learning. Peo-ple usually think that excessive anxiety can interfere with the learning of English, especially the spoken English. This paper mainly studies the reasons of causing anxiety, strategies of solving speaking anxiety and help students overcome affective barriers, enhanc-ing the level of spoken english.

  6. Mingle Model for Teaching English Speaking Skill for College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmayenti darmayenti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a report of a research and development project conducted in a speaking skill for the first-year students of State Institute for Islamic Studies Imam Bonjol Padang, academic year 2012/2013. Mingle as a technique in teaching speaking proposed by Pollard and Hess in 1997 was developed into a new model. Using ADDIE model as proposed by Dick and Carey in 1996, we collected the intended data through observation, questionnaire, and test. The result of the research showed that the implementation of model gave a significant difference in term of the students-learning outcome between the students who are taught through Mingle model and by traditional one or without Mingle model. The development of Mingle model included preparation, warming up, set the rule, act Mingle model, presentation, review and discussion. It is concluded that Mingle model is more effective to improve students on all components of speaking skill. Therefore, it is recommended that this model can be implemented at IAIN Imam Bonjol Padang. Copyright © 2015 by Al-Ta'lim All right reserved

  7. Does Teaching Grammar Really Hinder Students' Speaking Abilities?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazumi Araki

    2015-01-01

    In the history of formal English education in Japan, grammar used to be the mainstream. In the secondary education system, teachers used to spend many hours teaching grammar to the students. However, it has been replaced by the aural/oral method of teaching a foreign language. There was even a remark that teaching grammar hinders students from communicating fluently. Literally, there was a time when grammar was set aside in formal English education. However, the author noticed that in grammar classes, the students speak English more loudly and confidently without much hesitation than in other types of English classes. One of the reasons is that they are not worried about the contents of the speeches. They are simply concentrating on the forms. They are not afraid of making major mistakes, and the errors they make are minor so they do not feel embarrassed in public. The atmosphere of the grammar classes is very positive and the students enjoy speaking English. In this paper, the author shows how grammar classes can contribute to the acquisition of the students' speaking abilities and manners. "Learning grammar was a precious experience", one student reported after the course.

  8. El programa de reconocimiento de voz Dragon Naturally Speaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Serrahima

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Dragon Naturally Speaking es un programa de reconocimiento de voz que constituye una herramienta útil para los traductores porque permite dictar textos al ordenador en lugar de teclearlos. El entrenamiento previo es muy breve, y el aprendizaje del programa resulta muy intuitivo. Permite dictar en español o en inglés, indistintamente, con mucha precisión, revisar el texto dictado o dejar que el programa nos lo lea en voz alta, e incluso permite trabajar sin tener el ordenador delante. Sus inconvenientes principales residen en que exige una mayor atención a la hora de revisar los textos, solamente funciona con el sistema operativo Windows, tiene algunas incompatibilidades con los programas que trabajan con memorias de traducción y exige trabajar en soledad. ----------------------------------------------- A Voice-recognition Software: Dragon Naturally Speaking. Dragon Naturally Speaking is a voice-recognition software which represents a highly useful tool for translators. The user can dictate the texts into the computer instead of typing them. The training period required is short and user-friendly. The program allows the user to dictate in either Spanish or English with a high level of accuracy, to edit the text or to request the system to perform a back-reading aloud. It even allows to work away from the computer. Its main drawbacks are the additional attention required for editing, the exclusive Windows compatibility. the incompatibility with some TM applications and the need to work in an isolated environment.

  9. Developing Vocabulary and Speaking Skills for EFL Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽波

    2013-01-01

    [Introduction]A great number of researchers have investigated how to improve EFL learners’sub-skills through various classroom activities. Within this,some research has been specifically conducted on why teachers should help learners enlarge their vocabulary knowledge and to develop their speaking skills through diverse tasks(Thurston,1997;Marco,1998;Nation,2004;Demo,2001). One common outcome from the above research indicates that the most productive way for learners to develop speaking and vocabulary learning skills is through different activities rather than for example repeating words;memorizing grammatical rules or simply talking to native speakers whenever learners have the chance. It can be concluded from the previous research that it is essential for teachers to investigate what activities/tasks are appropriate to be utilised in order to help learners develop their sub-skills and vocabulary. This article aims to shed light on two activities which are designed to help EFL learners develop their vocabulary knowledge and speaking skills. These activities are specifically organised for EFL learners to gradually develop their discourse skills. The targeted EFL learners are intermediate learners who are year 12 learners in China. The ultimate goal of the article is to share opinions with EFL teachers about what kinds of activities are efficient and should be adopted in the EFL classroom teaching.

  10. French-speaking Children's Freely Produced Labels for Facial Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PierreGosselin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the labeling of facial expressions in French-speaking children. The participants were 137 French-speaking children, between the ages of 5 and 11 years, recruited from three elementary schools in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The facial expressions included expressions of happiness, sadness, fear, surprise, anger, and disgust. Participants were shown one facial expression at a time, and asked to say what the stimulus person was feeling. Participants’ responses were coded by two raters who made judgments concerning the specific emotion category in which the responses belonged. Five- and 6-year-olds were quite accurate in labeling facial expressions of happiness, anger, and sadness but far less accurate for facial expressions of fear, surprise, and disgust. An improvement in accuracy as a function of age was found for fear and surprise only. Labeling facial expressions of disgust proved to be very difficult for the children, even for the 11-year-olds. In order to examine the fit between the model proposed by Widen and Russell (2003 and our data, we looked at the number of participants who had the predicted response patterns. Overall, 88.52% of the participants did. Most of the participants used between 3 and 5 labels, with correspondence percentages varying between 80.00% and 100.00%. Our results suggest that the model proposed by Widen and Russell is not limited to English-speaking children, but also accounts for the sequence of emotion labeling in French-Canadian children.

  11. Self-assessment: an alternative method of assessing speaking skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterini Chalkia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on self-assessment as an alternative method of assessing the speaking skills of a group of sixth graders of a Greek State Primary School. The paper consists of two parts. In the first part, traditional and alternative assessment approaches are compared and a literature review on self-assessment is presented. In the second part the methodology and the findings of the study are presented. The study was carried out by means of a questionnaire and observation notes. This was done in order to draw conclusions on the benefits of self-assessment, the difficulties students faced while carrying out self-assessment as well as to reveal the extent to which students improved their speaking skills after being involved in self-assessment. The findings revealed that the students were positive towards self-assessment. Although self-assessment was of limited duration, it turned out to be a worthwhile activity as it fostered motivation and sensitized the students to take a more active role in the learning process. It also enabled them to notice their strengths and weaknesses and improve their speaking skills. The study also revealed the practical difficulties the students faced in carrying out their self-assessment. Finally, the study concludes with recommendations for further research into this specific assessment method.

  12. Speaking in their Language: An Overview of the Major Difficulties Faced by the Libyan EFL Learners in Speaking Skill

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Mubarak Pathan; Zamzam Emhemad Mari Aldersi; Ergaya Ali Gerair Alsout

    2014-01-01

    Of the four major language skills, speaking is regarded as the most crucial and central one as it enables the learner to establish successful communication in that language, which is often the main aim of learning any foreign language. That is why it forms the focus of attention in any foreign language teaching and learning as failure to master this crucial language skill leads to the failure to establish successful communication. However, mastering this language skill does not go so easily w...

  13. Speaking in their Language: An Overview of the Major Difficulties Faced by the Libyan EFL Learners in Speaking Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Mubarak Pathan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Of the four major language skills, speaking is regarded as the most crucial and central one as it enables the learner to establish successful communication in that language, which is often the main aim of learning any foreign language. That is why it forms the focus of attention in any foreign language teaching and learning as failure to master this crucial language skill leads to the failure to establish successful communication. However, mastering this language skill does not go so easily with the EFL learners and particularly for the Arab EFL learners as many factors, including the mother tongue interference, hinder and influence the process of learning and mastering this crucial foreign language skill. The consequent result is that the EFL learners, especially Arab learners, encounter various difficulties while communicating in English and speak the language in their own way with the flavour of their mother tongue, Arabic. This problem of the Libyan EFL learners, encountered while speaking in English, is the subject of investigation in this paper. Various other problems, nature of these problems, sources of these problems and some pedagogical suggestion to overcome these problems are also some of the central topics of discussion in the paper.

  14. Training public-speaking behavior: an experimental analysis and social validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, S B; Miller, L K

    1975-01-01

    The effect of an instructional package on public-speaking behaviors was analyzed in two experiments. The instructional package was designed to teach public-speaking trainees to look at the audience, make gestures, and perform a number of speaking behaviors. The results of Experiment I, with a university student serving as the trainee, showed that the percentage of each category of public-speaking target behavior increased only after the instructional package was introduced for that category. The results of Experiment 2, with three low-income paraprofessional staff members of a neighborhood service center serving as trainees, showed that the percentage of target behaviors increased after the instructional package was introduced for the respective trainee. Audience ratings of public-speaking performance were correlated with direct observations of target responses. All trainees showed marked improvements in audience ratings from pretraining to posttraining. This study demonstrated an effective procedure for training public-speaking behaviors. PMID:16795490

  15. An Investigation of Speaking Strategies Employed by Iranian EFL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Skandari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Speaking, as one of the four macro-skills, fulfills the communicative function of language in both EFL and ESL settings. It is a tool for expressing thoughts and feelings and a way of linking to the society. Despite its importance and frequent use, speaking has remained the least studied and accessible skill for students to learn and for teachers to teach, and it has raised many questions for researchers to answer. Due to the shift from teacher- to student-centered learning environments, students need to be helped in becoming strategic language learners in the long run. This study investigated the use of speaking strategies by Iranian EFL university students. Thirty-five female and 25 male students participated in the study. An Oxford Proficiency Test was administered to determine the students’ proficiency level. Accordingly, they were assigned to the three groups of high, intermediate, and low proficiency levels. The main instrument was a 38-item strategy questionnaire which was developed based on Likert-Scale answers. A t-test and a one-way ANOVA were run to compare the mean scores of the four factors and see if there are any significant differences between males and females, on the one hand, and high, intermediate, and low groups, on the other, with regard to different strategies. The result indicated that sex and proficiency level had significant roles in the using metacognitive strategies, with females showing greater favor over this factor than males. Also, high proficient students revealed more interest in the same factor than intermediate and low level students. For compensation strategies, sex showed to have a significant influence on strategic choice, with males having more preference for this factor than females. For other factors including cognitive and memory, and social/affective strategies, no significant differences were found among the variables of the study.

  16. Emotion episodes of Afrikaans-speaking employees in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara S. Jonker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Emotions must be investigated within the natural contexts in which they occur. It therefore becomes crucial to study episodes in the workplace.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the positive and negative emotion episodes and frequencies of working Afrikaans-speaking adults.Motivation for the study: To date, no study has been conducted to determine emotion episodes amongst White Afrikaans-speaking working adults in South Africa. Gooty, Connelly, Griffith and Gupta also argue for research on emotions in the natural settings in which they occur – the workplace.Research design, approach and method: A survey design with an availability sample was used. The participants (N = 179 consisted of White Afrikaans-speaking working adults. The Episode Grid was administered to capture the emotion episodes.Main findings: The main emotion episodes reported on with positive content included goal achievement, receiving recognition and personal incidents. Emotion episodes with negative content included categories such as behaviour of work colleagues, acts of boss/superior/management and task requirements.Practical and/or managerial implications: The findings are useful for managers who want to enhance the emotional quality of the work-life of employees. Changes could be made, for example, to practices of giving recognition within work environments and the clarification of task requirements. The knowledge on emotion episodes could be very useful in planning interventions.Contribution and/or value-adding: The findings and results of this study provided insight into emotion episodes as events in the workplace can cause positive and negative workplace experiences. This information should be taken into consideration with regard to wellness and emotion measurement efforts.

  17. Why do We Speak of Laws of Nature?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of a law of nature has origins which date back several millennia. The idea of a divine law-giver is found in the Mesopotamian, Jewish and Christian religions. Hellenistic scientists did not speak of laws, but used mathematical terms to describe their discoveries. The religious and scientific traditions would not converge, however, until Descartes and Newton laid the foundations of modern science and shaped the modern concept of a law of nature. It seems that during the 20th century this notion gradually comes out of use at least in the scientific language. (author)

  18. THE STUDENTS’ LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES IN READING AND SPEAKING

    OpenAIRE

    Hidayat Al Azmi

    2012-01-01

    Many types of learning strategies can be used by the language learners to make the learning process running well. However, in the doing the practice the students are identified have limited types of learning strategies and it makes them face many problems in learning. The aims of the study is to find the typical language learning strategies used by the English Department Students in speaking and reading in English. The result of the study showed that the level of the strategies used were stil...

  19. Wini Breines Speaks on The Trouble Between Us

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Mignon R.

    2006-01-01

    Wini Breines, you are a brave woman.” I shared this sentiment with her during the Q&A portion of the talk she gave on her November 6th visit to UCLA. Dr. Winifred Breines, Professor of Sociology and Women’s Studies at Northeastern University, had come to speak about her new book The Trouble Between Us: An Uneasy History of White and Black Women in the Feminist Movement. The crowd in Royce Hall that afternoon was a diverse mixture of students, young faculty, more seasoned feminist scholars, an...

  20. Become proficient in speaking and writing good English

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, Archana

    2012-01-01

    Become Proficient in Speaking and Writing GOOD ENGLISH. The book offers practical advice for writing proper and attractive prose. It will help improve one's communication ability and skill. The topics cover Common Errors, Confusing set of Figures of Speech, Foreign Words and Phrases and various aspects of Grammar and Syntax. The entries have adequate and appropriate examples. The topics are arranged alphabetically for easy reference. Eight Appendices are added to enrich the Vocabulary. This work is a contribution to various aspects of writing correct and good English, focusing on the requirem

  1. Comparing candidates’ beliefs and exam performance in speaking tests

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Guillot, Cristina; Zabala-Delgado, Julia

    2015-01-01

    The development of a language exam is not a linear process but rather a round cycle in which, by using the test, we obtain information that will in turn be applied to improve each of the steps in the cycle. The goal of our study was to analyse students’ beliefs about their performance in the speaking section of a language proficiency exam and compare them with their actual results in the exam, in order to determine whether their beliefs were based on their actual level of competen...

  2. Improve Students'Listening and Speaking Ability in Intensive Course

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆佳琳

    2008-01-01

    It is particularly important and necessary to try to make intensive course interesting and iffective for the students.Their study will become a lot more effective if the student come to the classroom willingly instead of being forced to.That is to say,how a teacher can succeed in arousing the students' interest in intensive course and making the students more active and aggressive in thinking,listening and speaking.For this purpose,we should change the teacher dominated class for a student-centered one.

  3. El programa de reconocimiento de voz Dragon Naturally Speaking

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo Serrahima

    2009-01-01

    Dragon Naturally Speaking es un programa de reconocimiento de voz que constituye una herramienta útil para los traductores porque permite dictar textos al ordenador en lugar de teclearlos. El entrenamiento previo es muy breve, y el aprendizaje del programa resulta muy intuitivo. Permite dictar en español o en inglés, indistintamente, con mucha precisión, revisar el texto dictado o dejar que el programa nos lo lea en voz alta, e incluso permite trabajar sin tener el ordenador delante. Sus inco...

  4. Capitalizing on Speaking Skill of EFL Learners for the Language Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Fauzia Hasan Siddiqui

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at grabbing the attention of EFL /ESL teachers, trainers, and administrators towards the importance of teaching speaking skill to enhance overall language proficiency of EFL learners. Comprehensive research done in the field of applied linguistics and English Language Teaching (ELT) establishes a positive correlation of speaking skill with the overall language proficiency. Despite this obvious significance of speaking skill in language learning process, it has not gained suffi...

  5. Consumer’s obstacles when looking for an English speaking daycare in Espoo region

    OpenAIRE

    Payo, Dinar

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a marketing research. The topic is “Consumers’ obstacles when looking for English speaking daycare in Espoo region”. The goal of this research is to evaluate the market demand and understand the consumers’ needs and obstacles when looking for English speaking daycare. Another aim of this research is to get some in-formation about consumer behavior which can be beneficial to the English speaking daycare business. This research attempts to use various models, framewor...

  6. Capitalizing on Speaking Skill of EFL Learners for the Language Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzia Hasan Siddiqui

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at grabbing the attention of EFL /ESL teachers, trainers, and administrators towards the importance of teaching speaking skill to enhance overall language proficiency of EFL learners. Comprehensive research done in the field of applied linguistics and English Language Teaching (ELT establishes a positive correlation of speaking skill with the overall language proficiency. Despite this obvious significance of speaking skill in language learning process, it has not gained sufficient attention in the ELT or the assessments in Oman.  Relying on the available literature on the importance of the speaking skill and its effective role in enhancing other language macro skills (listening, reading, and writing, this exploratory research analyzes the currents status of speaking skill in ELT and assessments at the General Foundation Programme (GFP in Oman. As many GFP’s have IELTS (International English Language Testing System  exam as their programme exit examination, the study begins with measuring the correlation of speaking skill grades with other macro skill in order to accentuate the positive impact of speaking skill on other language skills. Secondly, it presents the statistics of time devoted to teaching and weights that speaking skill hold in the GFP in Oman. Finally, the study suggests the ways to optimize speaking skill opportunities to create successful literacy experience among adult EFL learners.Keywords: English Language Teaching (ELT, English as a Foreign Language (EFL, English as a Second Language (ESL, General Foundation Program (GFP

  7. The Impact of Task-based Approach in Enhancing Non-English Major Students’ Speaking Fluency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooshang Khoshsima

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper sought to scrutinize the effects of tasks-based instruction on non-English major students’ speaking fluency. To this aim 40 students were selected who were divided into two homogeneous groups by administering  a pretest to determine their current proficiency level in speaking skill. Both control and experimental groups received the same kinds of language material. Only experimental group received material through tasks-based instruction. Findings of post test revealed significant differences between control and experimental groups in term of their speaking fluency.Keywords: Tasks, Tasks –based language teaching, speaking skill

  8. Tracking Intermittently Speaking Multiple Speakers Using a Particle Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinlan Angela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of tracking multiple intermittently speaking speakers is difficult as some distinct problems must be addressed. The number of active speakers must be estimated, these active speakers must be identified, and the locations of all speakers including inactive speakers must be tracked. In this paper we propose a method for tracking intermittently speaking multiple speakers using a particle filter. In the proposed algorithm the number of active speakers is firstly estimated based on the Exponential Fitting Test (EFT, a source number estimation technique which we have proposed. The locations of the speakers are then tracked using a particle filtering framework within which the decomposed likelihood is used in order to decouple the observed audio signal and associate each element of the decomposed signal with an active speaker. The tracking accuracy is then further improved by the inclusion of a silence region detection step and estimation of the noise-only covariance matrix. The method was evaluated using live recordings of 3 speakers and the results show that the method produces highly accurate tracking results.

  9. Ombud’s Corner: Do you speak CERNese?

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2015-01-01

    CERNese is the language spoken here: based on English and French, it’s a mixture of accents, pronunciations and body languages that go well together. CERNese is also an attitude: we make an effort to understand others and to ensure that other people understand what we say. Do you speak this language?   Joe works in an office with four colleagues who all share a national language, their direct supervisor also happens to be of the same nationality, and most of the communication in the team therefore also takes place in this language - one that Joe does not speak. Moreover, they often go for coffee together and although they sometimes remember their CERNese and invite him to go with them, they inevitably end up switching to the national language that he does not share. He feels very uncomfortable because he is not included in the conversations. Sometimes he suspects that they are talking about his work. What is worse is that sometimes he realises that they have shared...

  10. Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision New or Improved Roadways, UTM Zone 15N NAD 83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_vision_roadway_improvements

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates new or improved roadways included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision. This network accommodates a land use pattern...

  11. Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision New Town Center Growth Areas, UTM Zone 15N NAD83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_vision_new_town_growth_areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates town center new growth areas included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision. Town center new growth areas include local...

  12. Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision New Growth Areas, UTM Zone 15N NAD83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_vision_new_growth_areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates new growth areas included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision. New growth areas include a mix of industrial, single...

  13. Louisiana Speaks Transportation Option B Transit Stations, UTM Zone 15N NAD 83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_transportation_option_b_transit_stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates potential fixed-transit stations included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan community growth option of compact and dispersed...

  14. Turkish and Kurdish Speaking Teachers in the Danish Folkeskole: The Ambiguous Concept of Equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldenhawer, Bolette

    1999-01-01

    Studied the functions of Turkish- and Kurdish-speaking teachers in the Danish "folkeskole" and their positions relative to other teachers in the system. Despite their Danish teaching qualifications, most still attend to the integration of Turkish- and Kurdish-speaking minority students and occupy a subordinate position to majority teachers. (SLD)

  15. The Question of Culture: EFL teaching in non-English-speaking countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cem and Margaret Alptekin

    2009-01-01

    @@ Two conflicting pedagogical views exist in teaching EFL (English as a foreign language) abroad. One, promoted chiefly by native English speaking teachers, is that English teaching should be done with reference to the socio-cultural norms and val-ues of an English-speaking country, with the pur-pose of developing bilingual and bicultural individu-als.

  16. Psychological Factor Affecting English Speaking Performance for the English Learners in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidara, Youssouf

    2016-01-01

    In every learning situation or environment, human psychology plays a significant role. English speaking is a language skill that is highly affected by human psychology. This research aimed at describing the psychological factor that affects negatively the English speaking performance for the English learners in Indonesia. A descriptive qualitative…

  17. Validating TOEFL[R] iBT Speaking and Setting Score Requirements for ITA Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiaoming

    2007-01-01

    Although the primary use of the speaking section of the Test of English as a Foreign Language Internet-based test (TOEFL[R] iBT Speaking) is to inform admissions decisions at English medium universities, it may also be useful as an initial screening measure for international teaching assistants (ITAs). This study provides criterion-related…

  18. Test-Takers' Strategic Behaviors in Independent and Integrated Speaking Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaoui, Khaled; Brooks, Lindsay; Swain, Merrill; Lapkin, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the strategic behaviors that test-takers reported using when responding to integrated and independent speaking tasks in an English oral proficiency test [the Speaking Section of the Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language[TM] (TOEFL iBT)] and the relationship between test-takers' strategic behaviors and their…

  19. Predictors of English Reading Comprehension: Cantonese-Speaking English Language Learners in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikoshi, Yuuko

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, first language (L1) and second language (L2) oral language and word reading skills were used as predictors to devise a model of reading comprehension in young Cantonese-speaking English language learners (ELLs) in the United States. L1 and L2 language and literacy measures were collected from a total of 101 Cantonese-speaking ELLs…

  20. Effects of Length, Complexity, and Grammatical Correctness on Stuttering in Spanish-Speaking Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jennifer B.; Byrd, Courtney T.; Carlo, Edna J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the effects of utterance length, syntactic complexity, and grammatical correctness on stuttering in the spontaneous speech of young, monolingual Spanish-speaking children. Method: Spontaneous speech samples of 11 monolingual Spanish-speaking children who stuttered, ages 35 to 70 months, were examined. Mean number of syllables,…

  1. Characteristics of Korean Phonology: Review, Tutorial, and Case Studies of Korean Children Speaking English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seunghee; Johnson, Cynthia J.; Kuehn, David P.

    2009-01-01

    A significant number of bilinguals in English-speaking countries speak Korean as their first language. One such country is the United States (U.S.). As the U.S. becomes increasingly diverse, providing more effective services for culturally and linguistically diverse children is a critical issue and growing challenge for speech-language…

  2. Picture Books for Oral Language Development for Non-English Speaking Children: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Margaret

    1980-01-01

    Indicates the value of picture books in teaching English to non-English speaking children; lists a number of picture books in two categories: those that are appropriate for children with little or no previous experience in English, and those for children in the limited-English speaking stage. (ET)

  3. Validation of Empirically Derived Rating Scales for a Story Retelling Speaking Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Akiyo; Koizumi, Rie

    2013-01-01

    In recognition of the rating scale as a crucial tool of performance assessment, this study aims to establish a rating scale suitable for a Story Retelling Speaking Test (SRST), which is a semidirect test of speaking ability in English as a foreign language for classroom use. To identify an appropriate scale, three rating scales, all of which have…

  4. Heritage Language Acquisition and Maintenance: Home Literacy Practices of Japanese-Speaking Families in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takako; Caidi, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we examine the case of Japanese-speaking families in Canada and their experiences with teaching a heritage language at home, along with the uses and perceived usefulness of public library resources, collections, and services in the process. Methods: We interviewed fourteen mothers who speak Japanese to their children.…

  5. The Supervision Experiences of Non-Hispanic Bilingual Therapists Who Worked with Spanish-Speaking Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzate, Nancy Ascencio

    2014-01-01

    This study utilized a qualitative approach to explore the supervision experiences of nine participants (seven females and two males) or non-Hispanic bilingual therapists who worked with Spanish-speaking clients and were under the supervision of a monolingual English-speaking supervisor. Their interviews data were audio recorded, transcribed and…

  6. Dialect Awareness and Lexical Comprehension of Mainstream American English in African American English-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jan; Gross, Megan; Chen, Jianshen; MacDonald, Maryellen C.; Kaplan, David; Brown, Megan; Seidenberg, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to examine the relationships among minority dialect use, language ability, and young African American English (AAE)-speaking children's understanding and awareness of Mainstream American English (MAE). Method: Eighty-three 4- to 8-year-old AAE-speaking children participated in 2 experimental tasks. One task…

  7. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Behavioral Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... working to make safety a priority. The “Speak Up” program is sponsored by The Joint Commission. They ... in your care, you are urged to “Speak Up.” S peak up if you have questions or concerns. ...

  8. Understanding Learners' Self-Assessment and Self-Feedback on Their Foreign Language Speaking Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    This study examines university learners' self-assessment and self-feedback on performance as captured in audio files from a foreign language speaking test. The learners' were guided to listen, transcribe and analyse their own speaking samples, as well as propose future actions for improvement. Content of learners' self-feedback was scrutinised…

  9. From CIRCUS to EL CIRCO: Issues in Instrument Development for Young Spanish-speaking Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Roy

    The CIRCO project is a large scale effort to design a series of diagnostic instruments, based on the CIRCUS tests, for Spanish-speaking children in preschool, kindergarten, and first grade classrooms in the United States. The goal is to develop measures with the following characteristics: (1) is suitable for use with Spanish-speaking children from…

  10. A Brief, Self-Directed Written Cognitive Exercise to Reduce Public Speaking Anxiety in College Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibartolo, Patricia Marten; Molina, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Fear of public speaking is the most common social fear experienced by the general population and can have far-reaching academic effects, including lower course grades and even an increased likelihood to drop out of college. The typical curricular approach to remediating public speaking fears in college students is to provide training in basic…

  11. A Racing Heart, Rattling Knees, and Ruminative Thoughts: Defining, Explaining, and Treating Public Speaking Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodie, Graham D.

    2010-01-01

    Considered by many to be the foundation upon which our discipline was built, the study of public speaking has evolved from its humble beginnings into a vast literature of experimental and expositional studies. The focus of research on public speaking has primarily been to discover the antecedents, causes, and consequences of anxiety associated…

  12. Experimental public speaking: contributions to the understanding of the serotonergic modulation of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Leal, Cybele; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Del-Ben, Cristina Marta

    2014-10-01

    Public speaking is widely used as a model of experimental fear and anxiety. This review aimed to evaluate the effects of pharmacological challenges on public speaking responses and their implications for the understanding of the neurobiology of normal and pathological anxiety, specifically panic disorder. We also describe methodological features of experimental paradigms using public speaking as an inducer of fear and stress. Public speaking is a potent stressor that can provoke significant subjective and physiological responses. However, variations in the manners in which public speaking is modelled can lead to different responses that need to be considered when interpreting the results. Results from pharmacological studies with healthy volunteers submitted to simulated public speaking tests have similarities with the pharmacological responses of panic patients observed in clinical practice and panic patients differ from controls in the response to the public speaking test. These data are compatible with the Deakin and Graeff hypothesis that serotonin inhibits fear, as accessed by public speaking tasks, and that this inhibition is likely related to the actions of serotonin in the dorsal periaqueductal grey matter. PMID:25277282

  13. Interlanguage Syntax of Arabic-Speaking Learners of English: The Noun Phrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zughoul, Muhammad Raji

    This study examined the interlanguage syntax of Arabic speaking learners of English in the area of the noun phrase, focusing on the closed system elements that can occur before or after the noun head, the noun head and pronouns in line with Quirk and Greenbaum's (1977) treatment of the noun phrase. Participants were 25 Arabic speaking English…

  14. An Exploration of Oral Language Development in Spanish-Speaking Preschool Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Renee A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, multi-case study was to explore the oral language of Spanish-speaking preschool students and their responses to questions, comments and requests made by an English-speaking teacher. Research questions focused on students' responses to questions; comments and requests by the teacher; and whether the response was…

  15. Attention for speaking: domain-general control from the anterior cingulate cortex in spoken word production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piai, V.; Roelofs, A.P.A.; Acheson, D.J.; Takashima, A.

    2013-01-01

    ulating evidence suggests that some degree of attentional control is required to regulate and monitor processes underlying speaking. Although progress has been made in delineating the neural substrates of the core language processes involved in speaking, substrates associated with regulatory and mon

  16. Dysarthria Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury: Speaking Rate and Emphatic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.T.; Kent, R.D.; Duffy, J.R.; Thomas, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    Prosodic abnormality is common in the dysarthria associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and adjustments of speaking rate and emphatic stress are often used as steps in treating the speech disorder in patients with TBI-induced dysarthria. However, studies to date do not present a clear and detailed picture of how speaking rate and emphatic…

  17. Indigenous Language Speaking Students Learning Mathematics in English: Expectations of and for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds-Wathen, Cris

    2015-01-01

    Effective mathematics teaching for Indigenous language speaking students needs to be based on fair expectations of both students and teachers. Concepts of "age-appropriate learning" and "school readiness" structure assessment expectations that entire cohorts of Indigenous language speaking students are unable to meet. This…

  18. Butterflies in Formation: Predicting How Speech Order in College Public Speaking Affects Student Communication Apprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmond, Erica R.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed pedagogical practices in the public speaking classroom in an attempt to help control communication apprehension (CA) levels and improve retention rates among college students in the basic public speaking course. Guided by the theoretical frameworks of Berger and Calabrese's uncertainty reduction theory and Weiner's attribution…

  19. Effects of Storytelling to Facilitate EFL Speaking Using Web-Based Multimedia System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Shadiev, Rustam; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Huang, Yueh-Min; Hsu, Guo-Liang; Lin, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study applied storytelling in the English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom in order to promote speaking skills. Students were asked to practice speaking EFL through producing individual and interactive stories with a Web-based multimedia system. We aimed to investigate an effectiveness of applying individual and interactive storytelling…

  20. ERRORS ANALYSIS AND TEACHERS' STRATEGIES IN SPEAKING CLASSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiMinquan

    2004-01-01

    In oral classes, teachers are often faced with all sorts oferrors made by students. Because of insufficient study of them,some correct all of the errors and some neglect them. The authorin this paper, through investigation of real class situation andall the possible collections of errors in his past teaching work,studies the errors and finds out four causes of the errors, andthen puts forward his suggestions for dealing with the differenterrors at different stages. In teaching students to speak English, teachers often find alot of errors in their speech. How should these errors be dealtwith properly? This is something many teachers are working at.Through investigation of real class situation and all the possiblecollections of errors in teaching work, it is believed that ateacher's knowledge of the learning law, careful observation ofthe errors being made by the students and proper attitudestoward the errors are very important. It has been found that when a child starts to learn his native language,he makes errors constantly, such as “This mammy chair”or “Mammy, apple eat” But he con say them correctly without much correction when he grows up. This is because “a human infant is born with an innate predisposition toacquire language”(Richards, 21). When an adult learns aforeign language, it is even more difficult, for physiologicallyhe has to train the muscles of his tongue and lips to get used tothe new ways of pronouncing a word, and psychologically hehas to receive new concepts of the language which are quitedifferent from his native tongue. Therefore, he unavoidablymakes errors in his speech. Even when he has mastered thelanguage to a certain degree, he still makes errors because “heknows very well what he should have done, but owing to thenervousness, tiredness, pressure and the effects of innertranslation (a kind of interference from home language), hejust lapses and forgets for a moment what to do” (McArthur,107-108). This doesn't mean that an

  1. Speaking their language: communicating research through new media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goruk, B.; Byrne, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The research community primarily communicates internally through papers, books and other forms of print publication. Researchers typically depend upon the media to pick up on research important to policymakers, planners, managers and society at large. However in recent decades, there has been a major failure in this communication process as the media has become much less objective and far more opinionated; often contributing more confusion than clarity. We argue that the research community should be much more active in communicating work to sectors of society most in need of the knowledge. Members of society do not read research publications - we essentially speak different languages. Researchers have to reach out to society in a communication form that works for the listeners. We put forward a range of examples using new media to communicate climate change research results to society.

  2. Astronomically speaking a dictionary of quotations on astronomy and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gaither, CC

    2003-01-01

    To understand the history, accomplishments, failures, and meanings of astronomy requires a knowledge of what has been said about astronomy by philosophers, novelists, playwrights, poets, scientists, and laymen. With this in mind, Astronomically Speaking: A Dictionary of Quotations on Astronomy and Physics serves as a guide to what has been said about astronomy through the ages. Containing approximately 1,550 quotations and numerous illustrations, this resource is the largest compilation of astronomy and astrophysics quotations published to date.Devoted to astronomy and the closely related areas of mathematics and physics, this resource helps form an accurate picture of these interconnected disciplines. It is designed as an aid for general readers with little knowledge of astronomy who are interested in astronomical topics. Students can use the book to increase their understanding of the complexity and richness that exists in scientific disciplines. In addition, experienced scientists will find it as a handy s...

  3. EMPOWERING NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKING TEACHERS THROUGH CRITICAL PEDAGOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Hayati

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Critical pedagogy is a teaching approach that aims to develop students’ critical thinking, political and social awareness, and self esteem through dialogue learning and reflection. Related to the teaching of EFL, this pedagogy holds the potential to empower non native English speaking teachers (NNESTs when incorporated into English teacher education programs. It can help aspiring NNESTs to grow awareness of the political and sociocultural implications of EFL teaching, to foster their critical thinking on any concepts or ideas regarding their profession, and more importantly, to recognize their strengths as NNESTs. Despite the potential, the role of critical pedagogy in improving EFL teacher education program in Indonesia has not been sufficiently discussed. This article attempts to contribute to the discussion by looking at a number of ways critical pedagogy can be incorporated in the programs, the rationale for doing so, and the challenges that might come on the way.

  4. Syntax in Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Burraco, Antonio; Garayzábal, Elena; Cuetos, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The syntactic skills of Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) were assessed in different areas (phrase structure, recursion, and bound anaphora). Children were compared to typically-developing peers matched either in chronological age (CA-TD) or in verbal age (VA-TD). In all tasks children with WS performed significantly worse than CA-TD children, but similarly to VA-TD children. However, significant differences were observed in specific domains, particularly regarding sentences with cross-serial dependencies. At the same time, children with WS were less sensitive to syntactic constraints and exhibited a poorer knowledge of some functional words (specifically, of nonreflexive pronouns). A processing bottleneck or a computational constraint may account for this outcome. PMID:26967348

  5. Affect labeling enhances exposure effectiveness for public speaking anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N; Craske, Michelle G; Lieberman, Matthew D; Hur, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Exposure is an effective treatment for anxiety but many patients do not respond fully. Affect labeling (labeling emotional experience) attenuates emotional responding. The current project examined whether affect labeling enhances exposure effectiveness in participants with public speaking anxiety. Participants were randomized to exposure with or without affect labeling. Physiological arousal and self-reported fear were assessed before and after exposure and compared between groups. Consistent with hypotheses, participants assigned to Affect Labeling, especially those who used more labels during exposure, showed greater reduction in physiological activation than Control participants. No effect was found for self-report measures. Also, greater emotion regulation deficits at baseline predicted more benefit in physiological arousal from exposure combined with affect labeling than exposure alone. The current research provides evidence that behavioral strategies that target prefrontal-amygdala circuitry can improve treatment effectiveness for anxiety and these effects are particularly pronounced for patients with the greatest deficits in emotion regulation. PMID:25795524

  6. Speaking skills in scientific English: Intelligibility, redundancy and compensation strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Upjohn, Jonathan; Amadis, Diana; Fries-Verdeil, Marie-Hélène

    2013-01-01

    Speaking Skills for Scientific English est le troisième volet dans la série Minimum Competence in Scientific English(MCSE). Il a été conçu pour aider ceux qui doivent présenter leurs recherches en anglais lors des colloques à améliorer leurs communications. La prononciation, malheureusement, par manque de temps, est souvent négligée dans l’enseignement des langues. Par conséquent, l’intelligibilité ne va pas de soi. Après une esquisse de l’historique de la série MCSE, nous analysons un court ...

  7. Who speaks for extinct nations? The Beothuk and narrative voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Leggo

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available The Beothuk of Newfoundland were among the first inhabitants of North America to encounter European explorers and settlers. By the first part of the nineteenth century the Beothuk were extinct, exterminated by the fishers and soldiers and settlers of western Europe. The last Beothuk was a woman named Shanadithit. She was captured and lived with white settlers for a few years before she died in 1829. Today all that remains of the Beothuk nation, which once numbered seven hundred to one thousand people, are some bones, arrowheads, tools, written records of explorers and settlers, and copies of drawings by Shanadithit in the Newfoundland Museum. In recent years several writers (all are white and male have written fiction and poetry and drama about the Beothuk, including Peter Such (Riverrun, 1973, Paul O'Neill (Legends of a Lost Tribe, 1976, Sid Stephen (Beothuk Poems, 1976, Al Pittman ("Shanadithit," 1978, Geoffrey Ursell (The Running of the Deer; A Play, 1981, Donald Gale (Sooshewan: A Child of the Beothuk, 1988, and Kevin Major (Blood Red Ochre, 1990. A recurring theme in all these narratives is the theme of regret and guilt. These narrative accounts of the Beothuk raise significant questions about voice and narrative, including: Who can speak for Native peoples? Who can speak for extinct peoples? Are there peoples without voices? How is voice historically determined? What is the relationship between voice and power? How are the effects of voice generated? What is an authentic voice? How is voice related to the illusion of presence? What is the relation between voice and silence? In examining contemporary narrative accounts of the Beothuk my goal is to reveal the rhetorical ways in which the Beothuk are given voice(s and to interrogate the ethical and pedagogical implications of contemporary authors revisiting and revisioning and re-voicing a nation of people long extinct.

  8. French Speaking and Listening (KS2) Fun Ways to Get KS2 Pupils to Talk to Each Other in French

    CERN Document Server

    Leleu, Sinead

    2011-01-01

    Wouldn't you love your pupils to have meaningful conversations with each other in French? French Speaking Activities contains 60 time-saving photocopiable activities for promoting oral communication. Activities range from role plays and surveys to quizzes, presentations and games. All encourage pupils to practise speaking autonomously, leading to more pupil-speaking time and less teacher-speaking time. These tried-and-tested activities provide a fun and enjoyable way of supplementing, consolida

  9. Development of a Practical Speaking Test with a Positive Impact on Learning Using a Story Retelling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Akiyo; Koizumi, Rie

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a test development project for classroom speaking assessment. With the aim of enhancing and specifically easing the process of test preparation and administration and generating positive washback effects on learning, we developed a semi-direct speaking test called the Story Retelling Speaking Test (SRST). Although a story…

  10. Assessing public speaking fear with the short form of the Personal Report of Confidence as a Speaker scale: confirmatory factor analyses among a French-speaking community sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeren A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alexandre Heeren,1,2 Grazia Ceschi,3 David P Valentiner,4 Vincent Dethier,1 Pierre Philippot11Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; 2National Fund for Scientific Research, Brussels, Belgium; 3Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; 4Department of Psychology, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, USABackground: The main aim of this study was to assess the reliability and structural validity of the French version of the 12-item version of the Personal Report of Confidence as Speaker (PRCS, one of the most promising measurements of public speaking fear.Methods: A total of 611 French-speaking volunteers were administered the French versions of the short PRCS, the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale, as well as the Trait version of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II, which assess the level of anxious and depressive symptoms, respectively.Results: Regarding its structural validity, confirmatory factor analyses indicated a single-factor solution, as implied by the original version. Good scale reliability (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.86 was observed. The item discrimination analysis suggested that all the items contribute to the overall scale score reliability. The French version of the short PRCS showed significant correlations with the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (r = 0.522, the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (r = 0.414, the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (r = 0.516, and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (r = 0.361.Conclusion: The French version of the short PRCS is a reliable and valid measure for the evaluation of the fear of public speaking among a French-speaking sample. These findings have critical consequences for the measurement of psychological and pharmacological treatment effectiveness in public speaking fear among a French-speaking sample.Keywords: social phobia, public speaking, confirmatory

  11. Development of myoelectric control type speaking valve with low flow resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Sakurai, Kohei; Mimaki, Shinya

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to develop welfare devices for patients with phonation disorder. One of these devices is the electrical controltype speaking valve system. The conventional speaking valves have one-way valve architecture, they open when the user breathes in, and they close when user breathes out and produce voices. This type is very simple and tough, but some users feel closeness in case of exhalation without phonation. This problem is caused by its mechanism what can not be controlled by user's will. Therefore, we proposed an electrical control-type speaking valve system to resolve this problem. This valve is controlled by neck myoelectric signal of sternohyoid muscle. From our previous report, it was clarified that this valve had better performance about easy-to-breath. Furthermore, we proposed the compact myoelectric control-type speaking valve system. The new-type speaking valve was enough small to attach the human body, and its opening area is larger than that of conventional one. Additionally, we described the improvement of flow channel shape by using of FEM analysis. According to the result of the analysis, it was clarified that the shape-improved speaking valve gets the low flow resistance channel in case of inspiration. In this report, we tried to make the flow resistance lower by the shape of current plates, in case of both inspiration and exhalation. From the result of FEM analysis, our speaking valve could get better flow channel than older one.

  12. ‘Everybody knows’, but the rest of the world: the case of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome in dromedary camels observed by Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The traditional knowledge of local communities throughout the world is a valuable source of novel ideas and information to science. In this study, the ethnoveterinary knowledge of Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara has been used in order to put forward a scientific hypothesis regarding the competitive interactions between camels and caterpillars in the Sahara ecosystem. Methods Between 2005 and 2009, 44 semi-structured interviews were conducted with Sahrawi pastoralists in the territories administered by the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic, Western Sahara, using a snow-ball sampling design. Results Sahrawi pastoralists reported the existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome, known locally as duda, affecting their camels. On the basis of Sahrawi knowledge about duda and of a thorough literature review, we built the hypothesis that: 1) caterpillars of the family Lasiocampidae (genera Lasiocampa, Psilogaster, or Streblote) have sudden and rare outbreaks on Acacia treetops in the Western Sahara ecosystem after heavy rainfall; 2) during these outbreaks, camels ingest the caterpillars while browsing; 3) as a consequence of this ingestion, pregnant camels have sudden abortions or give birth to weaklings. This hypothesis was supported by inductive reasoning built on circumstantiated evidence and analogical reasoning with similar syndromes reported in mares in the United States and Australia. Conclusions The possible existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome among camels has been reported for the first time, suggesting that such syndromes might be more widespread than what is currently known. Further research is warranted to validate the reported hypothesis. Finally, the importance of studying folk livestock diseases is reinforced in light of its usefulness in revealing as yet unknown biological phenomena that would deserve further investigation. Resumen ‘Todos lo saben’, menos el resto del mundo: el caso de un s

  13. ‘Everybody knows’, but the rest of the world: the case of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome in dromedary camels observed by Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volpato Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The traditional knowledge of local communities throughout the world is a valuable source of novel ideas and information to science. In this study, the ethnoveterinary knowledge of Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara has been used in order to put forward a scientific hypothesis regarding the competitive interactions between camels and caterpillars in the Sahara ecosystem. Methods Between 2005 and 2009, 44 semi-structured interviews were conducted with Sahrawi pastoralists in the territories administered by the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic, Western Sahara, using a snow-ball sampling design. Results Sahrawi pastoralists reported the existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome, known locally as duda, affecting their camels. On the basis of Sahrawi knowledge about duda and of a thorough literature review, we built the hypothesis that: 1 caterpillars of the family Lasiocampidae (genera Lasiocampa, Psilogaster, or Streblote have sudden and rare outbreaks on Acacia treetops in the Western Sahara ecosystem after heavy rainfall; 2 during these outbreaks, camels ingest the caterpillars while browsing; 3 as a consequence of this ingestion, pregnant camels have sudden abortions or give birth to weaklings. This hypothesis was supported by inductive reasoning built on circumstantiated evidence and analogical reasoning with similar syndromes reported in mares in the United States and Australia. Conclusions The possible existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome among camels has been reported for the first time, suggesting that such syndromes might be more widespread than what is currently known. Further research is warranted to validate the reported hypothesis. Finally, the importance of studying folk livestock diseases is reinforced in light of its usefulness in revealing as yet unknown biological phenomena that would deserve further investigation. Resumen ‘Todos lo saben’, menos el resto del

  14. POLITENESS OF SPEAKING IN WATAMPONE COMMUNITY (Ethnographic Research Communications In Kabupaten Bone, Sulawesi Selatan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muh. Safar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe in detail about politeness of speaking in Watampone community. The focus of this research is politeness of speaking in Watampone community. The subfocus is politeness in terms of the principles of cooperative and cultural aspects of Watampone community. This study was a qualitative research by using ethnographyof communication method. The technigues and procedures of data collection were used such as observation, recordings and transcrips, and interviews. Based on data analysis, the politeness of speaking in Watampone community used in  formal in situation the first Watampone community apply the principles of cooperative and second, cultural aspects can be seen verbal and nonverbally.

  15. Feedback in online course for non-native English-speaking students

    CERN Document Server

    Olesova, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Feedback in Online Course for Non-Native English-Speaking Students is an investigation of the effectiveness of audio and text feedback provided in English in an online course for non-native English-speaking students. The study presents results showing how audio and text feedback can impact on non-native English-speaking students' higher-order learning as they participate in an asynchronous online course. It also discusses the results of how students perceive both types of the feedback provided. In addition, the study examines how the impact and perceptions differ when the instructor giving the

  16. Pleonastic use of verbs of speaking in Greek: an interpretation in terms of naturalness theory

    OpenAIRE

    Jerneja Kavčič

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates a special use of the verbs of speaking in Greek, in which a personal verbal form of a verb of speaking is accompanied by a participle of ano­ ther verb of speaking. The latter is used pleonastically because the clause would be grammatical if the participle were omitted; cf. Chr. J. Mal. 15, 13, 31:'0 8s: Zvwv &.xoucrcx.c; btwµ6crcx.'t'o "Ai::ywv &.yvoc.1v 't'v xcx.'t'a: 'l"A"Aou xcx.ccx.crxw v. 'But when Zeno heard, he swore, saying that he knew nothing about the c...

  17. The Advantages of Using an Analytic Scoring Procedure in Speaking Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Mukminatien

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article describes the advantages of using analytic proce­dure in speaking assessment. An analytic scoring guide, as compared to the impressionistic one, has a double function: as an instrument to mea­sure the learner's speaking proficiency and as a diagnostic procedure for remedial teaching. Thus, it provides reliable sources of information in the form of scores of the speaking components and can be used as feed-back for the teacher and learner to identify which component needs im­provement.

  18. English-Listening-Comprehension & Speaking-Teaching in Senior High School Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周传爱

    2005-01-01

    @@ English-Listening-Comprehension & SpeakingTeaching (ELCST) plays a vital role in Senior High School Education. In recent years a greater emphasis is being placed on English-listening and speaking-Teaching in senior high schools because of the steady progress that has been made in Chinese Elementary Education, and as a listening comprehension test is now required for College Entrance Examinations. Therefore, it is now essential that English teaching reform done properly. This article is a summary of my experiences of English-Listening-Comprehension & Speaking-Teaching over the past several years.

  19. CarSpeak: a content-centric network for autonomous driving

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh Kumar, Swarun; Shi, Lixin; Ahmed, Nabeel; Gil, Stephanie; Katabi, Dina; Rus, Daniela L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces CarSpeak, a communication system for autonomous driving. CarSpeak enables a car to query and access sensory information captured by other cars in a manner similar to how it accesses information from its local sensors. CarSpeak adopts a content-centric approach where information objects -- i.e., regions along the road -- are first class citizens. It names and accesses road regions using a multi-resolution system, which allows it to scale the amount of transmitted data wit...

  20. Enhancing ESL Learners Speaking Skills through Asynchronous Online Discussion Forum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadzrah Abu Bakar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Communicating orally in a second or foreign language such as English can be a difficult task especially for the low proficiency learners as they may lack the confidence and feel shy and apprehensive when interacting verbally in the target language. This may hold them back from expressing themselves vocally though they are fully aware that in order to be fluent in the target language, they need to practise speaking not only in the classroom but also outside the classroom. This paper discusses the use of an asynchronous online discussion forum (AODF as a communication tool to assist the low proficiency ESL learners to build their confidence and practise using the target language orally. As an online discussion forum, the Multimedia Enhance Discussion Forum (MEDiF was specifically designed to be used by a selected group of low proficiency ESL learners at tertiary level for one academic semester. This online forum allows the learners to audio and video-record their discussions, listen to the recorded discussions and respond to their friends’ ideas and opinions. Interviews and observations of the discussions on the MEDiF were conducted to gather data. The findings generally indicate positive responses from the ESL learners although there were also some obstacles faced by them while utilizing the MEDiF.

  1. Words speak louder: conforming to preferences more than actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yanping; Fishbach, Ayelet

    2015-08-01

    Whereas people generally conform to others' choices, this research documents that conformity decreases once others have acted on their chosen options. It suggests words speak louder than actions-people are more likely to conform to others' preferences than their actions. Specifically, people are less likely to follow another person's food choice if that person has already eaten his or her selected food (Study 1), and are less likely to follow others' choices of household items if these choices are framed in terms of action (others "want to have it") rather than preference (others "like it"; Study 2). People's tendency to mentally share others' actions causes the decrease in conformity. Indeed, people recall greater past consumption of items that others have had (Study 3), choose differently only when they can complement (vs. contradict) what others have (Study 4), and are more strongly affected by the choices of those close to them (vs. strangers; Study 5). Finally, even when information about others' actions and preferences are simultaneously available (e.g., in online shopping and the consumption of social media), people are more likely to follow what others prefer, rather than what others have (Study 6). PMID:26191960

  2. Will smart surveillance systems listen, understand and speak Slovene?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Dobrišek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the spoken language technologies that could enable the so-called smart (intelligent surveillance systems to listen, understand and speak Slovenian in the near future. Advanced computational methods of artificial perception and pattern recognition enable such systems to be at least to some extent aware of the environment, the presence of people and other phenomena that could be subject to surveillance. Speech is one such phenomenon that has the potential to be a key source of information in certain security situations. Technologies that enable automatic speech and speaker recognition as well as their psychophysical state by computer analysis of acoustic speech signals provide an entirely new dimension to the development of smart surveillance systems. Automatic recognition of spoken threats, screaming and crying for help, as well as a suspicious psycho-physical state of a speaker provide such systems to some extent with intelligent behaviour. The paper investigates the current state of development of these technologies and the requirements and possibilities of these systems to be used for the Slovenian spoken language, as well as different possible security application scenarios. It also addresses the broader legal and ethical issues raised by the development and use of such technologies, especially as audio surveillance is one of the most sensitive issues of privacy protection.

  3. Speaking of food: connecting basic and applied plant science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Briana L; Kellogg, Elizabeth A; Miller, Allison J

    2014-10-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) predicts that food production must rise 70% over the next 40 years to meet the demands of a growing population that is expected to reach nine billion by the year 2050. Many facets of basic plant science promoted by the Botanical Society of America are important for agriculture; however, more explicit connections are needed to bridge the gap between basic and applied plant research. This special issue, Speaking of Food: Connecting Basic and Applied Plant Science, was conceived to showcase productive overlaps of basic and applied research to address the challenges posed by feeding billions of people and to stimulate more research, fresh connections, and new paradigms. Contributions to this special issue thus illustrate some interactive areas of study in plant science-historical and modern plant-human interaction, crop and weed origins and evolution, and the effects of natural and artificial selection on crops and their wild relatives. These papers provide examples of how research integrating the basic and applied aspects of plant science benefits the pursuit of knowledge and the translation of that knowledge into actions toward sustainable production of crops and conservation of diversity in a changing climate. PMID:25326609

  4. An Analysis of English Speaking Teaching Approaches Based on New Cutting Edge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lu

    2016-01-01

    Speech production involves four main processes including conceptualization, formulation, articulation and self-moni-toring. During these processes, learners need to use sociocultural, pragmatic and discourse knowledge in conceptualization, vo-cabulary and grammar in formulation, and phonological knowledge in articulation. By utilizing the knowledge mentioned above, learners are expected to possess such speaking skills as routine skills and improvisation skills. Current speaking teaching meth-ods are broadly divided into“skill-getting”direct approach and“skill-using”indirect approach. As they are mutually comple-mentary, a balance of activities types should be provided. On the basis of these theories, a modification of a listening and speak-ing lesson in New Cutting Edge Pre-intermediate is designed to get students notice, retrieve and use some useful expressions for giving direction.

  5. Suicide Prevention Exposure, Awareness, and Knowledge Survey (SPEAKS) - Faculty/Staff

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SPEAKS- faculty/staff dataset contains individual level information from a sample of faculty and staff on GLS funded campuses. These data include faculty...

  6. Comprehensible Input PLUS the Language Experience Approach: Reading Instruction for Limited English Speaking Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Margaret; Penrose, Joyce

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that limited English speaking students' oral language can be developed by using pictures and concrete referents and then by using the language experience approach to teach English reading. (FL)

  7. Improvement of Listening and Speaking Skills for English Majors in Foreign Trade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章慧

    2016-01-01

    In china, with the guidance of the exam-oriented education, both teachers and students pay more attention to the improvement of English writing skills. However, under the growing trend of economic globalization, mastering English listening and speaking skills is a necessity for students, especially for English majors in foreign trade. In recent years, many researchers have discussed listening and speaking teaching separately. In fact, the two skills are supplementary to each other, which should be taught and practiced simultaneously. Based on the current situation of English listening and speaking skills of English majors in foreign trade, therefore, this thesis aims to summarize a comprehensive teaching method to improve students’ listening and speaking skills in foreign trade. It is also hoped that the findings will provide valuable resources for the relevant studies in the near future.

  8. Effects of a senior practicum course on nursing students' confidence in speaking up for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Lauren; Anderson, Gabrielle; Ciocca, Rebecca; Shanks, Linda; Enlow, Michele

    2015-03-01

    As patient advocates, nurses are responsible for speaking up against unsafe practices. Nursing students must develop the confidence to speak up for patient safety so that they can hold themselves, as well as their peers and coworkers, accountable for patients' well-being. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a senior practicum course on confidence for speaking up for patient safety in nursing students. Confidence in speaking up for patient safety was measured with the Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey. The study showed a significant increase in nursing students' confidence after the senior practicum course, but there was no significant change in students' confidence in questioning someone of authority. PMID:25692337

  9. Engineering alumna, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency head to speak to incoming class

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2009-01-01

    Regina Dugan, the newly appointed director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), will speak to incoming College of Engineering students at Virginia Tech, Thursday, Aug. 27, at 7 p.m. in Burruss Hall.

  10. Technologies of Public Speaking with Presentation in Teaching English for Specific Purposes Students of Telecommunication Systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Nazarenko, O.

    2014-01-01

    In the article the author analyzes the peculiarities of future Telecom professionals training, gives arguments for necessity and importance of developing public speaking skills in combination with presentation in teaching English for specific purposes.

  11. Exploration and Practice of Improving College Students’Speaking Com-petence through Group Discussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jin-zhong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of English teaching is not only to make the students learn new words and grammar, answer multiple- choice questions to get good scores, but also to enhance the students’abilities of the integrated application of English, speaking and listen⁃ing in particular. The ultimate goal of learning English is to use English to communicate with others in the future jobs and real life. However, the non-English majors have great trouble speaking English in class and in real life. Such ways as Socratic dialogues, cause analysis and questionnaire are used to investigate the reasons. In order to improve speaking ability, group discussion is used in class. In consequence, the students have more interest, motivation, courage and confidence in speaking English. Meanwhile, they have also established the concept of using what they learned in class, in practical work and real life.

  12. Assessment Demands of the Second Language Curricula of Belgium’s French-Speaking Secondary Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Noiroux, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The second language curricula of Belgium’s French-speaking community demand that secondary school teachers administer two yearly summative assessments of five skills, which forces them to overlook formative assessments.

  13. SPEAK YOUR MIND: SIMPLIFIED DEBATES AS A LEARNING TOOL AT THE UNIVERSITY LEVEL

    OpenAIRE

    LUSTIGOVÁ, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of speaking skills in intermediate and lower level university classes through the simplified format of debates. The aim of this paper is to describe teaching observations with special attention given to the preparatory stages, strengths and challenges of simplified debate faced by both the teacher and the students. Observations were made while teaching speaking through simple debate to 19 - 20 year-old-students of general English at the Czech University o...

  14. The Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries. A New Forum of Coordination and Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Frigdiano Álvaro Durántez Prados

    2000-01-01

    The constitution of the Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries (CPLP) in Lisbon, July 1996, represented the culmination of the manifest willingness for association among the Portuguese-speaking nations on different continents. As an exponent of the currents of international solidarity founded on cultural and historical bases, the countries of Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea Bissau, Mozambique, Portugal and Santo Tome and Principe formalized a new forum for dialogue, reflection and coop...

  15. The needs of young Afrikaans speaking married couples for marriage enrichment programmes / Elsje Viviers Swart

    OpenAIRE

    Swart, Elsje Viviers

    2013-01-01

    Marriages in South Africa in today’s times were found to be in a critical situation. Statistics have proven that most marriages end in divorce within the first five years of marriage. Although marital preparation and enrichment courses are available in South Africa, no specific course exists that is specifically designed for the needs of young married Afrikaans speaking couples. On the grounds of available information it was decided to determine the needs of young Afrikaans speaking marrie...

  16. Depression literacy among Australians of Chinese-speaking background in Melbourne, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Poon Ada; Lam Yuk; Wong Fu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the knowledge of depression and preference for professional help, medications and treatment methods among Australians of Chinese-speaking background, and the perceptions of this population of the causes of mental illness. Methods Adopting a cluster convenience sampling method, the study recruited 200 Chinese-speaking subjects from four major areas in metropolitan Melbourne where many Chinese live. The respondents were presented with a vignette descr...

  17. Detecting Differential Memory Performance Among Spanish-speaking Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Marquez de la Plata, C.; Lacritz, L.H.; Mitschke, R.; Van Ness, P.; Agostini, M.; Diaz-Arrastia, R.; Cullum, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    There is relatively little research pertaining to neuropsychological assessment of Spanish-speaking individuals with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The current study examined verbal and visual memory performances in 38 primarily Spanish-speaking patients with TLE (Right = 15, Left = 23) of similar epilepsy duration to determine if lateralizing differences can be found using verbal and nonverbal memory tests. On a test specifically designed to assess auditory learning and memory amo...

  18. Public health and epidemiology journals published in Brazil and other Portuguese speaking countries

    OpenAIRE

    Barreto, Mauricio L; Barata, Rita Barradas

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that papers written in languages other than English have a great risk of being ignored simply because these languages are not accessible to the international scientific community. The objective of this paper is to facilitate the access to the public health and epidemiology literature available in Portuguese speaking countries. It was found that it is particularly concentrated in Brazil, with some few examples in Portugal and none in other Portuguese speaking countries. This l...

  19. Public health and epidemiology journals published in Brazil and other Portuguese speaking countries

    OpenAIRE

    Barata Rita; Barreto Mauricio L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract It is well known that papers written in languages other than English have a great risk of being ignored simply because these languages are not accessible to the international scientific community. The objective of this paper is to facilitate the access to the public health and epidemiology literature available in Portuguese speaking countries. It was found that it is particularly concentrated in Brazil, with some few examples in Portugal and none in other Portuguese speaking countrie...

  20. Measures to be Taken to Enhance Freshmen's English Listening-Speaking Abilities in College

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xu-hua; Cao Rui; ZHANG Guang-ling

    2009-01-01

    The English Listening-Speaking abilities of college freshmen should be trained in a multi-faceted approach.This paper suggests some effective training methods which can enhance the abilities in English Listening-Speaking for freshmen such as: story telling,special topics,picture talks,free talks,proverbs,debating,oral reports,group discussions and so on from a practical point of view.

  1. Portfolio Αssessment of Speaking Skills in English as a Foreign Language in Primary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Georgia Efthymiou

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the assessment of speaking skills with reference to young learners. This is achieved by using an alternative method of assessment, namely portfolios. The general aim is to introduce learners’ to portfolio assessment of their speaking skills and to promote further learning and autonomy making, thus, learning and assessment coexist in a non-threatening mode. Three methodological tools are used for this research; a needs analysis questionnaire addressing the pupils��� needs...

  2. How to Develop Accuracy and Fluency in Speaking Skills in Second Language Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘曦

    2013-01-01

    This paper firstly defines the key concepts of accuracy and fluency in relation to the development of speaking skills. Then, consider the challenges presented to lan-guage teachers of ensuring that learners develop accuracy and complexity in their speaking, as well as fluency. Finally according to the teaching materials supplied, identify and evaluate the opportunities provided for the development of spoken ac-curacy and fluency, and explain how to exploit the materials to the fullest extent.

  3. The Relationship between Speaking Anxiety and Oral Fluency of Special Education Arab Learners of English

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf Atta M. S. Salem; Mosaad Abu Al Dyiar

    2014-01-01

    The current study aimed at investigating the relationship between speaking anxiety and oral fluency of Arab intermediate school students. It also investigates the differences between male and females students in speaking anxiety profile and their oral fluency performance. The sample of the study consists of (121) students in intermediate school in the state of Kuwait (68 males and 53 females). The mean age of the sample is (9.74) years and standard deviation is (1.46) years. The descriptive r...

  4. Attentional Control Buffers the Effect of Public Speaking Anxiety on Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher R. Jones; Fazio, Russell H.; Vasey, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    We explored dispositional differences in the ability to self-regulate attentional processes in the domain of public speaking. Participants first completed measures of speech anxiety and attentional control. In a second session, participants prepared and performed a short speech. Fear of public speaking negatively impacted performance only for those low in attentional control. Thus, attentional control appears to act as a buffer that facilitates successful self-regulation despite performance a...

  5. Korean- and English-speaking children use cross-situational information to learn novel predicate terms*

    OpenAIRE

    Childers, Jane B.; PAIK, JAE H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines children’s attention to cross-situational information during word learning. Korean-speaking children in Korea and English-speaking children in the US were taught four nonce words that referred to novel actions. For each word, children saw four related events: half were shown events that were very similar (Close comparisons), half were shown events that were not as similar (Far comparisons). The prediction was that children would compare events to each other and thus be inf...

  6. STUDY ABOUT THE INCIDENCE OF HEARING-SPEAKING DISORDERS IN A POPULATION WITH MENTAL DEFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mihaela Tomulescu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is about the incidence of hearing-speaking disorders in a population with mental deficiency. We studied 596 children interned in Neurology and Psychiatry Clinical Hospital of Oradea during the 1999 - 2001 period. In 596 children, 393 presented different types of mental deficiency. The most frequent disorders observed are hearing loss or deafness, deaf-mutism, mutism and speaking retardation. Also, we related an increased frequency in rural area and in group of children with severe mental deficiency.

  7. Attentional Control Buffers the Effect of Public Speaking Anxiety on Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher R; Fazio, Russell H; Vasey, Michael W

    2012-09-01

    We explored dispositional differences in the ability to self-regulate attentional processes in the domain of public speaking. Participants first completed measures of speech anxiety and attentional control. In a second session, participants prepared and performed a short speech. Fear of public speaking negatively impacted performance only for those low in attentional control. Thus, attentional control appears to act as a buffer that facilitates successful self-regulation despite performance anxiety. PMID:22924093

  8. Overview of “Splendid Speaking” Website (http://splendid-speaking.com)

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Travis

    2011-01-01

    It is natural for adult learners preparing for upper-intermediate and advanced speaking examinations like the Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE), the Business English Certificate (BEC) or International English Language Teaching System (IELTS) to feel daunted by the Speaking examination. Having their spoken English assessed ‘live’ in a high stakes situation can be quite stressful. To perform at their best in the exam learners need to be able to contribute fully to the various tas...

  9. Introduction of the speaking rate in the model of speech recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Abdellah Yousfi; Abdelouafi Meziane

    2002-01-01

    We propose an improvement to the centisecond TLHMM model (Meziane, 1999) applied to the sound duration. Indeed, the distribution of the sound duration depends on the speaking rate. An adaptation in a post-processing step is needed. This adaptation is studied by proposing a model of the speaking rate based on average syllabic duration. The experiments elaborated on a set of BDSONS show the interest of this approach. This work is a continuation of those by Meziane (1999) and Suaudeau (1994).

  10. Common Interference Errors in Macedonian - Speaking German as a foreign language - Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanovska, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a practical reference guide that explains how Macedonian-speaking German language students make errors in their interlanguage by borrowing and using patterns from their mother tongue, a process referred to as “negative transfer” or “interference” by a number of researchers. The author hopes that this paper will help teachers of Macedonian-speaking German language students anticipate the characteristic errors potentially made by this particular student population and understand h...

  11. An approach to creative speaking activities in the young learners’ classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Carmen; Roos, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of early foreign language learning in Europe is on the development of oral skills. In the classroom, speaking is usually reproductive and imitative and activities aim at the production of closely supported accurate output. Opportunities for young learners to experiment with the language and to use it productively outside of fixed dialogues are often rare. However, developing fluency and basic speaking competencies requires more than just producing memorized chunks of language. ...

  12. The Collaborative Construction of Non-Serious Episodes of Interaction by Non-Speaking Children with Cerebral Palsy and Their Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michael; Wilkinson, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Inequality in communicative resources available to non-speaking children with cerebral palsy in comparison with their "naturally" speaking co-participants has material consequences for the ways in which face-to-face interaction is organized. Analyses of interaction involving non-speaking children with physical disability and speaking adults has…

  13. ADHD and adolescent EFL learners’ speaking complexity, accuracy, and fluency in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Marashi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to investigate the relationships among Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD and speaking complexity, accuracy, and fluency (CAF among Iranian EFL learners. To fulfill the purpose of this study, the teachers and parents of 593 male students were given the Farsi version of the CSI-4 ADHD diagnostic questionnaire, out of which 61 students scored above the cut-off score of nine in both the teacher and parent questionnaires. These students then sat for a sample speaking section of the Key English Test (KET; the interviews were scored by two raters according to the measures of CAF. The data were thus analyzed and the results revealed a significant positive correlation between ADHD and speaking fluency; in contrast, a significant negative correlation was observed between ADHD and speaking complexity and ADHD and speaking accuracy. The regressions disclosed that ADHD is a significant predictor of complexity, accuracy, and fluency in speaking. The findings of this study have pedagogical implications for both parents and teachers in contact with students with ADHD with respect to the importance of identifying such students and thus planning and monitoring their progress.

  14. Effective oral presentations: speaking before groups as part of your job.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2009-01-01

    Fear of public speaking is a widespread phenomenon that afflicts a large percentage of the population. Some working people will go to great lengths to avoid having to speak before a group; however, inability or unwillingness to speak in public can contribute to limiting an individual's promotional possibilities and thus capping a career at a level beneath the individual's technical abilities. This can be especially true in an arena such as health care in which oral communication in group settings figures so strongly in work relations. Yet anyone can overcome speaking fear through thorough preparation and practice. It is necessary to research one's topic thoroughly, outline the points the intended talk will cover, study the composition of one's audience, and plan on targeting some specific level of understanding and remaining ever conscious of the few areas in which problems can occur. With conscientious preparation and plenty of practice, anyone can learn to speak before any group of people, although it may mean facing one's fear head-on a number of times before gaining a level of confidence sufficient to control the fear of speaking. PMID:19668069

  15. Ethnopharmacy of Turkish-speaking Cypriots in Greater London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yöney, Ahmet; Prieto, José M; Lardos, Andreas; Heinrich, Michael

    2010-05-01

    For centuries, in the Eastern Mediterranean region, medicinal plant use has been widely accepted as a treatment method for both minor and major diseases. Although some knowledge exists on the use of such medicinal plants within the Greek Cypriot culture and considerable information is available on various regions in Turkey, no detailed ethnopharmaceutical or ethnobotanical studies exist on Turkish-speaking Cypriots (TSC) both in Cyprus and within one of the largest TSC migrant communities in London, UK. Semi-structured interviews with members of the TSC community in London were conducted by using a questionnaire consisting both of open and closed questions. Open questions were aimed at identifying herbs, spices, medicinal plants and their uses. Also, graded questions were used to define informants' opinions as a quantitative parameter, constructing a statistical basis. A wide range of therapeutic claims were recorded, including 13 chronic illnesses within 85 different plant species, of which 18 were cited more than 10 times. The most frequently mentioned species were Mentha spicata, Salvia fruticosa and Pimpinella anisum. The plants recorded are frequently based on knowledge derived from Turkish-Cypriot traditions, but many examples of medicinal plants with a use based on UK or general western herbal medical traditions were also recorded. Informants highlighted the risk of knowledge loss in younger generations and thus this study serves as a repository of knowledge for use in the future. Due to a lack of knowledge about such usages in the healthcare professions, our study also highlights the need to develop information sources for use by healthcare practitioners in order to raise awareness about benefits and risks of such medical and health food products. PMID:19827023

  16. Speaking denunciation: satire as confrontation language in contemporary Nigerian poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akingbe, Niyi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary Nigerian poets have had to contend with the social and political problems besetting Nigeria’s landscape by using satire as a suitable medium, to distil the presentation and portrayal of these social malaises in their linguistic disposition. Arguably, contemporary Nigerian poets, in an attempt to criticize social ills, have unobtrusively evinced a mastery of language patterns that have made their poetry not only inviting but easy to read. This epochal approach in the crafting of poetry has significantly evoked an inimitable sense of humour which endears these poems to the readers. In this regard, the selected poems in this paper are crowded with anecdotes, the effusive use of humour, suspense and curiosity. The over-arching argument of the paper is that satire is grounded in the poetics of contemporary Nigerian poetry in order to criticize certain aspects of the social ills plaguing Nigerian society. The paper will further examine how satire articulates social issues in the works of contemporary Nigerian poets, including Niyi Osundare, Tanure Ojaide, Chinweizu, Femi Fatoba, Odia Ofeimun, Ezenwa Ohaeto, Obiora Udechukwu and Ogaga Ifowodo. Viewed in the light of artistic commitment, the paper will demonstrate how satire accentuates the role of these poets as the synthesizers/conduits of social and cultural concerns of Nigerian society for which they claim to speak. As representatively exemplified in the selected poems, the paper will essentially focus on the mediation of satire for the impassioned criticism of social and moral vices, militating against Nigeria’s socio-political development.

  17. Using Student Teams-Achievement Divisions (STAD Strategy to Improve the Students’ Speaking Skill at Vocational School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumiarsih Rumiarsih

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in order to describe how Student Teams-Achievement Divisions (STAD Strategy can improve the students’ speaking skill. The researcher used Classroom Action Research (CAR and applied it in the teaching of speaking of XII TKR 2 of SMK Negeri 1 Madiun. The finding of this research indicated that the STAD Strategy was successful in improving the students’ speaking skill. The STAD Strategy employed in this study consisted five steps, namely: (1 forming teams; (2 class presentation; (3 quiz; (4 individual improvement score; and (5 team recognition. The activities in those five steps which were don chronologically improved both in the students’ speaking achievements and the students’ participation during the teaching and learning of speaking.Key Words: speaking skill, student teams-achievement divisions (STAD strategy

  18. Development of Accounting Theory in English-Speaking Countries: On the Way to Multi-Paradigmatic Discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr Petruk; Serhiy Legenchuk; Nataliya Koroliuk

    2013-01-01

    The features and promising directions of the accounting theory development in English-speaking countries nowadays are studied. Consideration of selected features and future directions allows you: - to research historic features of the accounting theory development in English-speaking countries; - to identify the basic stages of accounting theory development in the English-speaking countries (normative stage; positive stage (American positivism, English positivism); new normative stage (new no...

  19. The Effect of Storytelling Technique on Speaking Ability of Female Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners

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    Esmail Zare-Behtash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present quasi-experimental study is to investigate the effect of storytelling technique on writing ability of Iranian intermediate EFL learners. To this end, 40 female intermediate EFL learners with the age range of 14-16 attending Chabahar Maritime University High School were initially selected. The homogeneity of their proficiency level was established via the administration of a TOEFL (the Paper-Based Test proficiency test. Then they were randomly divided into two control and experimental groups. A speaking test was administered to female subjects of both groups at the beginning of the study. The experimental group used storytelling technique two times a week while the control group was not trained on this technique. At the end of the study, a speaking test was administered to all subjects for examining their ability in speaking skill. Independent sample t-test and paired sample t-test were performed for data analysis. The results showed that storytelling technique had a significant effect on improving the speaking ability of intermediate EFL learners.Keywords: storytelling technique, speaking ability, EFL learners 

  20. The Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries. A New Forum of Coordination and Cooperation

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    Frigdiano Álvaro Durántez Prados

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The constitution of the Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries (CPLP in Lisbon, July 1996, represented the culmination of the manifest willingness for association among the Portuguese-speaking nations on different continents. As an exponent of the currents of international solidarity founded on cultural and historical bases, the countries of Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea Bissau, Mozambique, Portugal and Santo Tome and Principe formalized a new forum for dialogue, reflection and cooperation that merits the attention in and of itself, as a new formalized scheme for political-diplomatic coordination and privileged cooperation among its members.At the same time, the manifest identification of the historical processes, conceptualizations, principles, objectives and the identifiable reference points of this Community with the Latin American Community of Nations (comprised of Spanish and Portuguese-speaking countries on the American and European continents, besides the many reciprocal interconnections and parallelisms, point to the need –perhaps the historical opportunity– of considering a substantial and formalized coming together of all members and parts toarticulate a forum or general space for “Iberian”-speaking countries, in which the Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries could be one of the primary elements for coherence.

  1. Overview of “Splendid Speaking” Website (http://splendid-speaking.com

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Travis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is natural for adult learners preparing for upper-intermediate and advanced speaking examinations like the Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE, the Business English Certificate (BEC or International English Language Teaching System (IELTS to feel daunted by the Speaking examination. Having their spoken English assessed ‘live’ in a high stakes situation can be quite stressful. To perform at their best in the exam learners need to be able to contribute fully to the various task formats within their spoken exam.Students preparing for these exams need to have regular practice in responding fully to questions, working cooperatively with a partner, and generally taking the opportunity to showcase their use of English. In our experience there was little in the way of freely-available structured materials for advanced speaking skills online. We decided we would like to help learners preparing for their respective exams as well as general upper intermediate to advanced students wishing to develop their speaking skills. We launched splendid-speaking.com in 2006.

  2. SPEAK YOUR MIND: SIMPLIFIED DEBATES AS A LEARNING TOOL AT THE UNIVERSITY LEVEL

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    LUSTIGOVÁ, Lenka

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the development of speaking skills in intermediate and lower level university classes through the simplified format of debates. The aim of this paper is to describe teaching observations with special attention given to the preparatory stages, strengths and challenges of simplified debate faced by both the teacher and the students. Observations were made while teaching speaking through simple debate to 19 - 20 year-old-students of general English at the Czech University of Life Sciences Prague in intermediate and lower level classes. By describing the methods and procedures used to engage in debates, this paper aims to enrich pedagogical methods for effectively teaching speaking skills and thus serve ESL teachers at large. By contextualizing debate within a milieu larger than the ESL classroom, this study also accesses possibilities for further application of simplified debate to heighten training for other subjects, while drawing upon the democratic context supported by debate.

  3. Communicative Language Teaching Methodology for Speaking%口语交际语言教学法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红

    2001-01-01

    Speaking is often considered the most effective and practical part of communicative language teaching methodology. This article describes speaking theories and also discusses some teaching activities. Through them,teachers learn some methods to teach learners second language speaking, at the same time, learners learn skills to use the new language in their daily life.%口语通常被认为是交际语言教学法中最有效而又最实际的部分.本文就口语方面讨论了一些理论知识,同时也讨论了一些教学活动,以便在教师获得一些教外语口语方法的同时,学生也学到一些在他们日常生活中使用新语言的技巧.

  4. A profile of the belief in Jesus and salvation among the Afrikaans speaking Christian youth

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    Hendrik J.C. Pieterse

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the results of a large-scale empirical-theolo-gical research project on “Religion and Human Rights among South African Youth.” Using the extensive database of this project, the article focuses on the results on the images of Jesus and the belief in salvation of Grade 11 learners. The results present a profile of the pluralistic and diverse scale of nuances in the belief structures of Christian teenagers. The results of the English-speaking private school learners are placed alongside the results of the Afrikaans speaking public school learners in order to obtain a more prolific picture of the belief of the Afrikaans speaking youth. The effect their belief in salvation has on their views regarding human rights is also examined. The results challenge the preacher to think dialectically and hermeneutically in a new age and context.

  5. Teaching To Speak – Strategies To Enhance The Spoken English Of Prospective Teachers

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    A.Joycilin Shermila

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To teach the skill of speaking is to teach the learners to produce English sounds correctly using vocabulary in grammatically correct sentences coherently and fluently. Learners are to use English confidentially. It is imperative for teachers to use methods and techniques to kindle interaction in the second language classroom. Speaking has a crucial place in second language learning and teaching. Task based language teaching will encourage students to communicate in English fluently and effectively. Teachers must provide maximum opportunity to students to speak the target language through a rich environment that contains collaborative work, authentic materials and tasks, and shared knowledge. This is an experimental study and the investigator has devised few spoken English strategies to enhance the spoken English of prospective teachers. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of using spoken English strategies effectively to enhance the spoken English of prospective teachers.

  6. Language-Specific Effects on Story and Procedural Narrative tasks between Korean-speaking and English-speaking Individuals with Aphasia

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    Jee Eun Sung

    2015-04-01

    Results suggested that Korean-speaking individuals with aphasia produced more numbers of different verbs, number of verbs per utterance and higher VNRs than English speakers. Both groups generated more words in story. The significant two-way interactions between the language group and task type suggested that there are task-specific effects on linguistic measures across the groups. The study implied that the linguistic characteristics differentially affected language symptoms of aphasia across the different languages and task types.

  7. The Impact of Problem-Based Learning on Iranian EFL Learners’ Speaking Proficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Loghman Ansarian; Ali Akbar Adlipour; Mehrnoush Akhavan Saber; Elmira Shafiei

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of problem-based learning through cognition-based tasks on speaking proficiency of Iranian intermediate EFL learners in comparison to the effect of objective-based tasks. To this end, a true experimental research design was employed. Ninety five (N=95) language learners studying at a language institute in the city of Esfahan, Iran were given an IELTS listening and speaking test as the proficiency test and 75 learners were selected. In the next phase of the st...

  8. China's rhetoric and soft power towards the Portuguese-speaking countries : the case of Angola

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares Martins, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    The thesis analyses China’s foreign policy towards the Portuguese-speaking countries, particularly the case of Angola. The People’s Republic of China has been putting great emphasis on the relations with other developing countries. The eight Portuguese-speaking countries, Angola, Brazil, Cabo Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Portugal, São Tomé and Príncipe and Timor-Leste constitute a group with a population of around 250 million people, a vast wealth of natural resources and ...

  9. Joining a discourse community: How graduate students learn to speak like astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleisis, Audra

    Almost half of all graduate students leave their doctoral programs without finishing. Who leaves, taking which skills and strengths with them, is still poorly understood, however, because it is hard to measure exactly what graduate students learn in their doctoral programs. Since the expertise required of a PhD holder is highly dependent on discipline, the development of a better understanding of graduate education and attrition requires studying the process at the departmental level. This is a qualitative study of the cultural values and norms of academic astronomy, as transmitted through the socialization of graduate students in to giving talks, asking questions, and participating in departmental speaking events. This study also looks at the conflicts that arise when implicit cultural norms, which are practiced but remain unacknowledged, are inconsistent with the official, explicit values and norms for speaking in astronomy. Doctoral students and faculty members in a single astronomy department, at a large western university, filled out a short survey about the stakes involved in astronomy speaking events. A subset of these individuals was interviewed in- depth about the goals of, and their experiences with, five departmental speaking events: Coffee Hour, Journal Club, research talks, Thesis defense talks, and Colloquia. These interviewees were: (1) graduate students who had given a verbal presentation at one of these events, and (2) graduate students and faculty members who were in the audience at a graduate student's presentation. The desired outcomes which were expressed for these speaking events included: (1) lively, informal discussion among all participants, (2) increasing graduate student verbal participation in these events as they "learn to speak like astronomers," and (3) the utility of these events in helping graduate students learn and practice their speaking and reasoning skills related to astronomy research. In practice these goals were not achieved

  10. English in French-speaking African countries: The case of GABON*

    OpenAIRE

    Ndinga-Koumba-Binza, Hugues Steve

    2009-01-01

    A number of historically French-speaking countries have adopted English as second or one of the official languages. This does not only pose a problem of multilingualism at State level as well as at social level, but it also questions the actual status of English as a language at both levels. In fact, English does not only have to compete with French, but also with native African languages. This article gives an insight into the status of English in Gabon – a French-speaking country in western...

  11. The Impact of Socioeconomic versus Linguistic Factors on Achievement Gaps between Hebrew-Speaking and Arabic-Speaking Students in Israel in Reading Literacy and in Mathematics and Science Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzovsky, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    The study intends to choose between two alternative explanations for the low attainment of Arabic-speaking students in reading literacy who participated in the PIRLS (2006), i.e., one that relates to lower socioeconomic conditions in the Arabic-speaking sector, and another that relates to the diglossic situation in Arabic. After controlling for…

  12. Analyzing cognitive and spelling skills in Spanish-speaking English-language learners and English-speaking Canadian learners Analizando procesos cognitivos y de escritura en niños hispano-parlantes que aprenden inglés como segunda lengua y niños canadienses de habla inglesa

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel O’Shanahan; Siegel, Linda S.; Jiménez, Juan E.; Silvia Mazabel

    2010-01-01

    The principal purpose of this study has been to analyze the cognitive processes and spelling skills in Spanish-speaking English-language learners. A sample of English-speaking Canadian learners and Spanish-speaking English-language learners was selected from different Canadian schools in the Vancouver District within British Columbia's province. We examined cognitive and spelling skills of English-speaking students and Spanish-speaking English language learners in the primary grades. We hypot...

  13. Communicative teaching of French in upper secondary education and the improvement of pupils' interactive speaking proficiency through peer feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rentrop, J.; Haenen, J.P.P.; de Graaff, R.

    2011-01-01

    Language teachers experience great difficulties in stimulating their students to speak the target language. In the Netherlands, this is certainly the case for French. Much time and energy are needed from the part of the teachers in order to engage their students in interactive speaking learning situ

  14. EFL Students' and Teachers' Attitudes toward Foreign Language Speaking Anxiety: A Look at NESTs and Non-NESTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Turgay; Tanriöver, Ahmet Serkan; Sahan, Özgür

    2016-01-01

    Native English Speaking Teachers (NESTs) have been employed in various English language teaching (ELT) positions and departments at private and state universities in Turkey, particularly over the last three decades. However, undergraduate EFL students' attitudes toward NESTs and Non-Native English Speaking Teachers (Non-NESTs) remain seriously…

  15. Scaffolding Learning: Developing Materials to Support the Learning of Science and Language by Non-Native English-Speaking Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afitska, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the UK, like many other English first-language-speaking countries, has encountered a steady and continuous increase in the numbers of non-native English-speaking learners entering state primary and secondary schools. A significant proportion of these learners has specific language and subject learning needs, many of which can only…

  16. Standard Setting for Next Generation TOEFL Academic Speaking Test (TAST): Reflections on the ETS Panel of International Teaching Assistant Developers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papajohn, Dean

    2006-01-01

    While many institutions have utilized TOEFL scores for international admissions for many years, a speaking section has never before been a required part of TOEFL until the development of the iBT/Next Generation TOEFL. So institutions will need to determine how to set standards for the speaking section of TOEFL, also known as TOEFL Academic…

  17. Spoken Language Comprehension of Phrases, Simple and Compound-Active Sentences in Non-Speaking Children with Severe Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geytenbeek, Joke J. M.; Heim, Margriet J. M.; Knol, Dirk L.; Vermeulen, R. Jeroen; Oostrom, Kim J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with severe cerebral palsy (CP) (i.e. "non-speaking children with severely limited mobility") are restricted in many domains that are important to the acquisition of language. Aims To investigate comprehension of spoken language on sentence type level in non-speaking children with severe CP. Methods & Procedures…

  18. Examining the Relationship between Emergent Literacy Skills and Invented Spelling in Prekindergarten Spanish-Speaking Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Meghan; Bingham, Gary; Patton-Terry, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine associations among English and Spanish emergent literacy skills of prekindergarten (pre-K) Spanish-speaking dual language learners in relation to their English invented spelling. Study participants included 141 Spanish-speaking 4-year-old children enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs in a large…

  19. Designing a Competence-Based Syllabus for Turkish Speaking Learners of English in Terms of Accessibility to Universal Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, Emrullah

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on designing an English grammar syllabus for Turkish speaking English learners, which is based on the assumption that learning English grammar will be simpler and easier for Turkish speaking learners if it is introduced in a way by which they can achieve accessibility to Universal Grammar. In this study, I analyze almost all…

  20. If First-Year Students Are Afraid of Public Speaking Assessments What Can Teachers Do to Alleviate Such Anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Gregory; Crimmins, Gail; Oprescu, Florin

    2016-01-01

    Public speaking and oral assessments are common in higher education, and they can be a major cause of anxiety and stress for students. This study was designed to measure the student experience of public speaking assessment tasks in a mandatory first-year course at a regional Australian university. The research conducted was an instrumental case…

  1. The Impact of Multiple Intelligences-Based Instruction on Developing Speaking Skills of the Pre-Service Teachers of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ashraf Atta M. S.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigates the impact of multiple intelligences-based Instruction on developing speaking skills of the pre-service teachers of English. Therefore, the problem of the current study can be stated in the lack of speaking skills of the pre-service teachers of English in Hurgada faculty of Education, South Valley University. To…

  2. I Help, Therefore, I Learn: Service Learning on Web 2.0 in an EFL Speaking Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Chih; Yang, Fang-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The present study integrates service learning into English as a Foreign Language (EFL) speaking class using Web 2.0 tools--YouTube and Facebook--as platforms. Fourteen undergraduate students participated in the study. The purpose of the service-learning project was to link service learning with oral communication training in an EFL speaking class…

  3. Morphological Awareness in Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: Within and Cross-Language Effects on Word Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Gloria; Chen, Xi; Geva, Esther; Kiefer, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated within and cross-language effects of morphological awareness on word reading among Spanish-speaking children who were English Language Learners. Participants were 97 Spanish-speaking children in grade 4 and grade 7. Morphological awareness in Spanish and in English was evaluated with two measures of derivational morphology.…

  4. Verbal and Nonverbal Identification of Pitch Changes in a Familiar Song by English- and Spanish-Speaking Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Patricia J.; Costa-Giomi, Eugenia

    1991-01-01

    Assesses children's ability to indicate verbally and nonverbally their awareness of two-octave pitch shifts in a familiar song. Compares abilities of English- and Spanish-speaking children by age and by native language. Discovers older children indicate changes more proficiently whereas Spanish-speaking children respond less often. Finds many…

  5. Communication between Early Educators and Parents Who Speak English as a Second Language: A Semantic and Pragmatic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Gregory A.; Ro, Yeonsun Ellie

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we discuss communication between early educators speaking their native language and parents who speak English as a second language. Parents who may have a limited proficiency in the second language face challenges to understanding semantic and pragmatic aspects of English. Actual early childhood conference talk in which parents…

  6. Teaching Minority Students within Minority Schools: Teachers' Conceptions of Multicultural Education in Swedish-Speaking Schools in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansikka, Jan-Erik; Holm, Gunilla

    2011-01-01

    Finland is experiencing increased cultural diversity due to immigration and is facing challenges in developing multicultural education (ME) in schools. There is a Swedish-speaking minority in Finland, and immigrant students entering Swedish-speaking schools hence become a minority within a minority. In this study, using open-ended interviews, we…

  7. Talking Shop: The Communicative Teaching of English in Non-English-Speaking Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Excerpts from a discussion session involving six panelists and 150 teachers of English in non-English-speaking countries range from the revolution in the communicative approach to the extent to which the mother tongue is taken into account, translation, grammatical correctness, teaching large classes, and textbook development. (MSE)

  8. Speech Analysis of Bengali Speaking Children with Repaired Cleft Lip & Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Madhushree; Kumar, Suman; Chatterjee, Indranil; Maheshwari, Neha

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims at analyzing speech samples of four Bengali speaking children with repaired cleft palates with a view to differentiate between the misarticulations arising out of a deficit in linguistic skills and structural or motoric limitations. Spontaneous speech samples were collected and subjected to a number of linguistic analyses…

  9. "Speak English!" A Prescription or Choice of English as a Lingua Franca in Ghanaian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edu-Buandoh, Dora F.; Otchere, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    One of the common practices in many basic schools in Ghana is the constant reminder to students to speak English at all times, and the threat of sanctions to those who do not abide by this language regulation. Considering that Ghana is a multilingual country, one would have thought that any of the Ghanaian languages can be used by students at…

  10. Interplay between Phonology and Syntax in French-Speaking Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the relationship between phonological and syntactic disorders of French-speaking children with specific language impairment in production. Aims: To compare three theories (pure phonological theory, surface theory, and mapping theory) of language developmental disorders, all of which view phonological…

  11. Diversity among Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners: Profiles of Early Literacy Skills in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Karen L.; Cabell, Sonia Q.; Konold, Timothy R.; Invernizzi, Marcia; Gartland, Lauren B.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored heterogeneity in literacy development among 2,300 Hispanic children receiving English as a Second Language (ESL) services at the start of kindergarten. Two research questions guided this work: (1) Do Spanish-speaking English language learners receiving ESL services in the fall of kindergarten demonstrate homogeneous early…

  12. Effects of Using Mobile Devices on English Listening Diversity and Speaking for EFL Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Huang, Yueh-Min; Shadiev, Rustam; Wu, Sheng-Yi; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2014-01-01

    This study designed learning activities supported by a mobile learning system for students to develop listening and speaking skills in English as a foreign language (EFL). How students perceive learning activities and a mobile learning system were examined in this study. Additionally, how different practices relate to students' language…

  13. The Effect of Dramatized Instruction on Speaking Ability of Imam Ali University EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Khosronejad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching language as a second or foreign language, undoubtedly, is so demanding and seeking to find methods for facilitating this prominent practice whets the appetite of any practitioner who works in this field. Research shows that using drama in the classroom as a means of teaching helps students learn socially, academically, and developmentally. This study was an attempt to determine the effect of dramatized instruction on the speaking ability of EFL learners of Imam Ali University. Sixty EFL male students at the intermediate level participated in the study. Their age range was 19-22. Two instruments were utilized in this study; pretest, and posttest.  The data were analyzed through t-test. The data analysis indicated that the mean scores of the experimental group students (M = 72.80 were significantly different (3.29>2; df = 58 from the control group students (M = 65.39. In other words, the experimental group outperformed the control group in the posttest significantly. Moreover, the findings indicated that dramatized instruction does have a great effect on the speaking skills. This study supported the idea of effectiveness of dramatized instruction on developing speaking skill and the teachers can help the learners at lower levels promote their speaking skill through dramatized instruction in EFL classes.Key words: Drama, Dramatized Instruction, Conventional Methods

  14. Evaluating Listening and Speaking Skills in a Mobile Game-Based Learning Environment with Situational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Shih, Timothy K.; Ma, Zhao-Heng; Shadiev, Rustam; Chen, Shu-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Game-based learning activities that facilitate students' listening and speaking skills were designed in this study. To participate in learning activities, students in the control group used traditional methods, while students in the experimental group used a mobile system. In our study, we looked into the feasibility of mobile game-based learning…

  15. Pinyin Invented Spelling in Mandarin Chinese-Speaking Children with and without Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Liu, Ru-De; McBride, Catherine; Zhang, Dake

    2015-01-01

    This study examined analytical pinyin (a phonological coding system for teaching pronunciation and lexical tones of Chinese characters) skills in 54 Mandarin-speaking fourth graders by using an invented spelling instrument that tapped into syllable awareness, phoneme awareness, lexical tones, and tone sandhi in Chinese. Pinyin invented spelling…

  16. Orthography-Induced Transfer in the Production of English-Speaking Learners of Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafat, Yasaman

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study on the effect of orthography on L1-based phonological transfer in L2 production in 40 novice English-speaking learners of Spanish. In particular, the role of auditory-orthographic training and production and the influence of grapheme-to-phoneme correspondences are examined. Data elicited via a picture-naming task…

  17. The Development and Evaluation of Listening and Speaking Diagnosis and Remedial Teaching System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hsien-Sheng; Chang, Cheng-Sian; Lin, Chiou-Yan; Chen, Berlin; Wu, Chia-Hou; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a system was developed to offer adaptive remedial instruction materials to learners of Chinese as a foreign language (CFL). The Chinese Listening and Speaking Diagnosis and Remedial Instruction (CLSDRI) system integrated computerized diagnostic tests and remedial instruction materials to diagnose errors made in listening…

  18. TOEFL iBT Speaking Test Scores as Indicators of Oral Communicative Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Brent; Powers, Donald; Stone, Elizabeth; Mollaun, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Scores assigned by trained raters and by an automated scoring system (SpeechRater[TM]) on the speaking section of the TOEFL iBT[TM] were validated against a communicative competence criterion. Specifically, a sample of 555 undergraduate students listened to speech samples from 184 examinees who took the Test of English as a Foreign Language…

  19. Using Raters from India to Score a Large-Scale Speaking Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiaoming; Mollaun, Pam

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the scoring of the Speaking section of the Test of English as a Foreign Language[TM] Internet-based (TOEFL iBT[R]) test by speakers of English and one or more Indian languages. We explored the extent to which raters from India, after being trained and certified, were able to score the TOEFL examinees with mixed first languages…

  20. Investigating Differences between American and Indian Raters in Assessing TOEFL iBT Speaking Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jing; Llosa, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of the role raters' language background plays in raters' assessment of test takers' speaking ability. Specifically, this article examines differences between American and Indian raters in their scores and scoring processes when rating Indian test takers' responses to the Test of English as a Foreign…

  1. The effect of speaking rate on perception of syllables in second-language speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Keiichi; Akahane-Yamada, Reiko

    2005-04-01

    Past studies on second-language (L2) speech perception have suggested that L2 learners have difficulty exploiting contextual information when perceiving L2 utterances, and that they exhibit greater difficulty than native listeners when faced with variability in temporal context. The present study investigated the extent to which native Japanese listeners, who are known to have difficulties perceiving English syllables, are influenced by changes in speaking rate when asked to count syllables in spoken English words. The stimuli consisted of a set of English words and nonwords varying in syllable structure spoken at three rates by a native English speaker. The stimuli produced at the three rates were presented to native Japanese listeners in a random order. Results indicated that listeners' identification accuracy did not vary as a function of speaking rate, although it decreased significantly as the syllable structure of the stimuli became more complex. Moreover, even though speaking rate varied from trial to trial, Japanese listeners' performance did not decline compared to a condition in which the speaking rate was fixed. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings will be discussed. [Work supported by JSPS and NICT.

  2. The time course of speaking rate specificity effects in spoken word recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Conor T.; Luce, Paul A.

    2005-09-01

    Specificity effects in spoken word recognition were previously examined by examining the circumstances under which variability in speaking rate affects participants perception of spoken words. The word recognition and memory literatures are now replete with demonstrations that variability has representational and processing consequences. The research focuses on one of the conditions expected to influence the extent to which variability plays a role in spoken word recognition, namely time course of processing. Based on previous work, it was hypothesized that speaking rate variability would only affect later stages of spoken word recognition. The results confirmed this hypothesis: Specificity effects were only obtained when processing was relatively slow. However, previous stimuli not only differed in speaking rate, but also in articulation style (i.e., casual and careful). Therefore, in the current set of experiments, it was sought to determine whether the same pattern of results would be obtained with stimuli that only differed in speaking rate (i.e., in the absence of articulation style differences). Moreover, to further generalize time course findings, the stimuli were produced by a different speaker than the speaker in the earlier study. The results add to the knowledge of the circumstances under which variability affects the perception of spoken words.

  3. Cultural Differences In Politeness Principle Between China and English-speaking Countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕾

    2009-01-01

    Therw are many cultural differences in China and English-speaking Countries.They will cause communication problems if you don't know them.This paper states one of thenr-the differences in politeness principle.And it helps people communicate properly when you are in different cultural background.

  4. Structure and Organization of the SWRL Drama and Public Speaking Program for 1972-73 Tryout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, Fred C.; And Others

    The structure and organization of the first four levels of the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) Drama and Public Speaking Program to be tried out in 1972-1973 are described in this paper. The program structure is defined in terms of skill, content, and assessment areas. Specific subareas of content are listed and are to be used to guide lesson…

  5. Exploring Language Anxiety Regarding Speaking Skill in Iranian EFL Learners in an Academic Site in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Yousefi Azarfam

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to explore the language anxiety in speaking skill of Iranian EFL language learners from two different perspectives of language teachers and language learners. In doing so, it follows a qualitative method in the form of case study through in-depth semi-structured interviews with three experienced EFL teachers along with three EFL learners. Purposive sampling is conducted in order to choose these informants for the study. This research provided some alternative insights on language anxiety from two different perspectives. The results of the study showed that language anxiety could affect the speaking skills of learners by lowering the quality of oral performance as the anxiety increases. Further, as is clearly shown by the interview results, many of the accounts from the informants seem to generally validate the findings offered by earlier research on language anxiety. For instance, among the strategies to lower student anxiety in class is considered learner-centered approach that was agreed up on by both instructors and learners, but it is also maintained that there are  some differences or gaps between the EFL teachers’ and learners’ perceptions on the role of anxiety in EFL classroom settings. Finally, based on the viewpoints of the EFL teachers and students there are suggested some strategies to confront, control, and alleviate anxiety in speaking of EFL learners.  Keywords: language anxiety; speaking skill; qualitative method; EFL teachers and learners

  6. Using a Multimedia-Based Program for Developing Student Teachers' EFL Speaking Fluency Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diyyab, Eman Aly; Abdel-Haq, Eman Muhamad; Aly, Mahsoub Abdel-Sadeq

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of using a multimedia-based program for developing EFL speaking fluency skills among second year, English section student teachers. The sample of the present study consisted of thirty students at Sadat Faculty of Education, Minufiya University, Egypt. The study sample was…

  7. Hints from Discourse Analysis and Pragnmtics in the Teaching of Listening and Speaking in ESL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangLljuan; YangWenhong; WangWeigang

    2004-01-01

    Communicative language teaching method has been adopted for years in China. However, can students who can speak fluent English without grammatical mistakes be regarded as successful communicators in English? As a matter of fact, a lot of Chinese abroad are regarded as " rude, bad communicators" by the native speakers of English not became

  8. Guidelines for Leveraging University Didactics Centers to Support OER Uptake in German-Speaking Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, M.; Schön, S.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Although less well established than in other parts of the world, higher education institutions in German-speaking countries have seen a marked increase in the number of open educational resource (OER) initiatives and in government-supported OER funding in recent years. OER implementation, however, brings with it a unique set of challenges in…

  9. How to Improve the Speaking Ability of College Students in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩雅轩

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of economic globalization, the increasingly fierce competition of the world has put forward a higher demand on people’s English competence. recently, the speaking ability of Chinese college students has become a heated discus-sion which is well worth our attention.

  10. The Thing Never Speaks for Itself: Lacan and the Pedagogical Politics of Clarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Douglas Sadao

    2000-01-01

    Asserts that teaching conceived of as translation of complex material into plain language is actually refusal to teach. Using Lacan's psychoanalytic theory, describes teaching framed by clarity is suspect and exclusionary. States that no text speaks for itself, without context. (Author/SK)

  11. Relations between Early Reading and Writing Skills among Spanish-Speaking Language Minority Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J. Marc; Farrington, Amber L.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is a growing body of literature on the development of reading skills of Spanish-speaking language minority children, little research has focused on the development of writing skills in this population. This study evaluated whether children's Spanish early reading skills (i.e., print knowledge, phonological awareness, oral language)…

  12. Factors Negatively Affect Speaking Skills at Saudi Colleges for Girls in the South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mona M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated factors negatively affect English language speaking skills in Saudi colleges for girls in the South in terms of: a) Instructors. b) Students. c) Curriculum and textbook. d) English Language teaching methods and exercises. e) Teaching and learning environment. To collect data for the study, a questionnaire papers were…

  13. MOBILE CONTENT AND ADVERTISEMENT CHOICES OF TURKISH SPEAKING MOBILE MEDIA USERS

    OpenAIRE

    Osman Köroğlu

    2011-01-01

    Turkish speaking mobile communication device users’ mobile content and advertisement choices researched via a questionnaire prepared in the light of reasoned action theory, technology acceptance model, diffusion of innovations theory, unified technology acceptance and usage theory, and uses and gratifications approach. Findings of research analyzed and explained descriptively and statistically. In mobile content choices, economic viability, environment, function and context are important issu...

  14. Multicultural Neuropsychology: Performance of Mandarin-Speaking Children On Widely Used Assessment Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shaio-Ling Judy; Tori, Christopher D.; Saito, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In order to extend the multicultural horizons of neuropsychological assessment in the Chinese mainland, a battery of eight commonly used neurocognitive tests assessing motor speed, verbal and visual-spatial memory, language fluency, attention, and executive functioning were given to 224 Mandarin-speaking school children (107 boys and 117 girls)…

  15. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Response to Speaking Rate and Loudness Manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefferd, Antje S.; Green, Jordan R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this investigation, the authors determined the strength of association between tongue kinematic and speech acoustics changes in response to speaking rate and loudness manipulations. Performance changes in the kinematic and acoustic domains were measured using two aspects of speech production presumably affecting speech clarity:…

  16. Assessing Working Memory in Spanish-Speaking Children: Automated Working Memory Assessment Battery Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injoque-Ricle, Irene; Calero, Alejandra D.; Alloway, Tracy P.; Burin, Debora I.

    2011-01-01

    The Automated Working Memory Assessment battery was designed to assess verbal and visuospatial passive and active working memory processing in children and adolescents. The aim of this paper is to present the adaptation and validation of the AWMA battery to Argentinean Spanish-speaking children aged 6 to 11 years. Verbal subtests were adapted and…

  17. Rapid Automatized Naming and Immediate Memory Functions in Chinese Mandarin-Speaking Elementary Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Richman, Lynn C.; Yang, Ling-yan; Guo, Jian-peng

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate rapid automatized naming skills (RAN) and immediate memory processes in 243 Chinese Mandarin-speaking elementary readers (ranging from Grade 1 to Grade 5). For RAN subtests, the mean naming time decreased monotonically with grade level in good and average readers, and a similar trajectory was found in poor…

  18. Survey of Native English Speakers and Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners in Tertiary Introductory Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Lawrence M.; Wagler, Amy E.; Esquinca, Alberto; Valenzuela, M. Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    The framework of linguistic register and case study research on Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs) learning statistics informed the construction of a quantitative instrument, the Communication, Language, And Statistics Survey (CLASS). CLASS aims to assess whether ELLs and non-ELLs approach the learning of statistics differently with…

  19. Improve Oral Training: The Method of Innovation Assessment on English Speaking Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Jyu; Chang, Hung-Fan

    2011-01-01

    The advantages of portfolios come from observing the student learning process and recording feedback. Students utilized their own learning portfolios to do learning assessment and self-correction. The research that has been done in Taiwan has shown that using a portfolio is effective in improving English speaking performances (ESP). The purpose of…

  20. Examination of Speaking, Listening, Empathy Skills of Preschool Teachers in Terms of Liking of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan DURMUŞOĞLU SALTALI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of study consists of revealing effect of liking of children on speaking, listening and empathy skills of teachers who are working in preschool education institutions. In this research, both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used together. Participants for quantitative dimension consist of 155 pre-school teachers. Participants for qualitative dimension consist of 6 preschool teachers who are selected according to purposeful sampling approach. As instruments, Barnett Liking of Children Scale (BLOCS and Teacher-Child Communication Scale, the sub-dimension of speaking, listening and empathy skills were used. Also, semi-structured open-ended interview form was used. In order to analyze the data of the research Pearson’s moments correlation coefficient, simple linear regression and content analysis have been used. It was concluded that liking of children was a significant explanatory of speaking, listening and empathy skills. Also, it is found that teachers express opinion that they use effective speaking, listening and empathy skills during activities.

  1. Effects of speaking rate on the acceptability of change in segmental duration within a phrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Makiko; Kato, Hiroaki; Tsuzaki, Minoru; Sagisaka, Yoshinori

    2001-05-01

    To contribute to the naturalness criteria of speech synthesis, acceptability of changes in segment duration has been investigated. Previous studies showed context dependency of the acceptability evaluation such as intraphrase positional effect, where listeners were more sensitive to the phrase-initial segment duration than the phrase-final one. Such contextual effects were independent of the original durations of the segments tested [Kato et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104, 540-549 (1998)]. However, past studies used only normal-speed speech and temporal variation was limited. The current study, therefore, examined the contextual effect with a wide variety of speaking rates. The materials were three-mora phrases with either rising or falling accent that were spoken at three rates (fast, normal, and slow) with or without a carrier sentence. The duration of each vowel was either lengthened or shortened (10-50 ms) and listeners evaluated the acceptability of these changes. The results showed a clear speaking-rate effect in parallel with the intraphrase positional effect: the acceptability declined more rapidly as the speaking rate became faster. These results, along with those of Kato et al., suggest that acceptability is evaluated based on the speaking rate rather than on the original duration itself. [Work supported by TAO, Japan.] a)Currently at GITI, Waseda University.

  2. French-Speaking International Students in Canada. CBIE Research in Brief #3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This report details the experience and perspectives of the 454 French-speaking international students who responded to the "2015 International Student Survey," with an aim of supporting member institutions and the broader international education sector to better understand francophone international education markets and, ultimately, to…

  3. Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners' Experiences in High School Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Annette; Smith, K. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the experiences of Spanish-speaking English language learners in high school chemistry courses, focusing largely on experiences in learning the English language, experiences learning chemistry, and experiences learning chemistry in the English language. The findings illustrate the cognitive processes the students undertake…

  4. Language Usage and Culture Maintenance: A Study of Spanish-Speaking Immigrant Mothers in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Glenda

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the usage of the Spanish language by Hispanic mothers with their children, their views on language maintenance and culture within their bilingual families and their opinions on the benefits of bilingualism in a globalised world. Drawing upon detailed case studies of 16 native Spanish-speaking mothers married to…

  5. Short-Term Study Abroad: Perspectives on Speaking Gains and Language Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Todd A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that study abroad has a positive effect on second language (L2) learning outcomes for students who spend at least a semester abroad. It is unclear, however, whether a short-term experience also has a measurable impact on L2 development. The present study examines the relationship between speaking proficiency gains made…

  6. Virtual Reality Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Public Speaking Anxiety: One-Year Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safir, Marilyn P.; Wallach, Helene S.; Bar-Zvi, Margalit

    2012-01-01

    Public speaking anxiety (PSA) is a common social phobia. Although cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice, difficulties arise with both in vivo and in vitro exposure (lack of therapist control, patient's inability to imagine, self-flooding, and a lack of confidentiality resulting from public exposure). Virtual reality CBT…

  7. The Development of English Oral Communication in Learning Disabled Spanish Speaking Students in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Bonilla, Maria A.; Carrasquillo, Angela L.

    In a study that sought to identify the gains in English oral communication skills of Spanish speaking learning disabled students in the elementary schools, the Basic Inventory of Natural Language (BINL) and the Woodcock Language Proficiency Battery (WLPB) were administered to two groups of students aged 8 to 12 years: an experimental group of 20…

  8. Late-Life Benzodiazepine Use among Russian-Speaking Immigrants in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isralowitz, Richard; Reznik, Alex; Borkin, Sofia

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this prospective study, we examine the reasons for benzodiazepine use among Russian-speaking elderly people in Israel, and we discuss issues related to immigrants. We provide information that can be applied to the improvement of age-related health and social services. Design and Methods: During a 6-month period, we interviewed…

  9. Contextualizing Performances: Comparing Performances during TOEFL iBT™ and Real-Life Academic Speaking Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lindsay; Swain, Merrill

    2014-01-01

    In this study we compare test takers' performance on the Speaking section of the TOEFL iBT™and their performances during their real-life academic studies. Thirty international graduate students from mixed language backgrounds in two different disciplines (Sciences and Social Sciences) responded to two independent and four integrated speaking…

  10. Native and Non-Native English Speaking Student Teachers Engage in Peer Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarrell, Hedy

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on data from questionnaires and participant discussion posts on WebCT to show how native and non-native English speaking student teachers explore the topic of peer feedback. Engaging in peer feedback for their own draft papers provides student teachers an opportunity to gain experience, then reflect on their experience and…

  11. Auxiliary BE Production by African American English-Speaking Children with and without Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, April W.; Oetting, Janna B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine 3 forms ("am," "is," "are") of auxiliary BE production by African American English (AAE)-speaking children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: Thirty AAE speakers participated: 10 six-year-olds with SLI, 10 age-matched controls, and 10 language-matched controls. BE production was examined through…

  12. Speaking up for African American English: Equity and Inclusion in Early Childhood Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneke, Margaret; Cheatham, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    A large percentage of young children entering preschool are English speakers who speak a language variety that often differs from the English dialect expected by educators within early childhood programs. While African American English (AAE) is one of the most widely recognized English dialects in the United States, the use of AAE in schools and…

  13. Passive Participle Marking by African American English-Speaking Children Reared in Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Sonja L.; Oetting, Janna B.; Hegarty, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined the linguistic profile of African American English (AAE)-speaking children reared in poverty by focusing on their marking of passive participles and by comparing the results with the authors' previous study of homophonous forms of past tense (S. Pruitt & J. Oetting, 2009). Method: The data were from 45…

  14. What Do People Think Causes Stage Fright? Naive Attributions about the Reasons for Public Speaking Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bippus, Amy M.; Daly, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Identifies nine factors offered in explanation for stage fright by undergraduate students without any formal background in communication: mistakes, unfamiliar role, humiliation, negative results, rigid rules, personality traits, preparation, audience interest, and physical appearance. Shows that respondents' own previous public-speaking experience…

  15. Comparing the Effects of Test Anxiety on Independent and Integrated Speaking Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Heng-Tsung Danny; Hung, Shao-Ting Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrated speaking test tasks (integrated tasks) offer textual and/or aural input for test takers on which to base their subsequent oral responses. This path-analytic study modeled the relationship between test anxiety and the performance of such tasks and explored whether test anxiety would differentially affect the performance of independent…

  16. Think, Speak, Succeed!...Applied Oral Communications Activities for High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlington, Anita; Timms, Keith

    This module contains speaking assignments for high school students that are taken from six different career areas. Each career section begins with a brief introduction to the career and a communications profile of the person interviewed. These pages can be copied and given to students as handouts. Each section also contains some assignments…

  17. Critique of Viewing, Listening and Speaking Coursebook (New Horizon College English)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Bi-hua

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a tentative application of the foreign pedagogical theories into the evaluation of the Chinese mainstream college English textbook Viewing, Listening and Speaking (New Horizon College English, 2nd edition). Targeting the present imper-fection, the paper also proposes respective suggestions for the further improvement of the coursebook.

  18. Computer Vision Syndrome for Non-Native Speaking Students: What Are the Problems with Online Reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Min-chen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the online reading performances and the level of visual fatigue from the perspectives of non-native speaking students (NNSs). Reading on a computer screen is more visually more demanding than reading printed text. Online reading requires frequent saccadic eye movements and imposes continuous focusing and alignment demand.…

  19. Do Individuals with High-Functioning Autism Who Speak a Tone Language Show Intonation Deficits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kary K. L.; To, Carol K. S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether intonation deficits were observed in 19 Cantonese-speaking adults with high-functioning autism (HFA) when compared to 19 matched neurotypical (NT) controls. This study also investigated the use of sentence-final particles (SFPs) and their relationship with intonation in both groups. Standard deviations…

  20. French-Speaking Children's Understanding of Sarcasm: The Role of Intonation and Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Virginie; Bert-Erboul, Alain

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine a form of sarcasm that has hardly been considered to date, sarcastic requests, at an earlier period of development than addressed in past developmental research. This article looked specifically at the role of intonation and context in sarcastic-request understanding by native French-speaking children ages 3 to…

  1. How to investigate and manage the child who is slow to speak

    OpenAIRE

    Jamiu O. Busari; Weggelaar, Nielske M

    2004-01-01

    Children who are slow to speak often present clinicians with a dilemma—should they conduct further investigations or just wait and see if the problem resolves (as it does in most children aged under 3 years)? Two paediatricians propose a guideline that can be used to investigate and manage children with speech or language delays

  2. "Being Underdog": Supporting Nonnative English-Speaking Teachers (NNESTs) in Claiming and Asserting Professional Legitimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    The author reports on a case study investigating how one nonnative English-speaking teacher (NNEST) struggled to claim professional legitimacy as a university-level ESL writing instructor. Using Vygotskian sociocultural theory (Vygotsky, 1978, 1986; Wertsch, 1985) and Bucholtz and Hall's (2005) indexicality principle, the author explores the…

  3. Developing Reading and Writing Skills of Learners' from Arabic-Speaking Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuqua, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The number of native Arabic-speaking students coming to America to study English in university programs has grown over the past few years, and continues to be substantial. It has also been noticed by the English Language Institute (ELI) at Sam Houston State University (SHSU) that these students often struggle more with reading activities in class,…

  4. Australians from a Non-English Speaking Background with Intellectual Disability: The Importance of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolan, Claire E.; Gomez, Miriam Taylor; Lennox, Nicholas G.; Ware, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    The authors review available data on Australians from a non-English speaking background (NESB) with intellectual disability (ID). They find that intellectual disability in the Australian NESB community has received limited attention in terms of both qualitative and quantitative research. The existing literature is over 10 years old and is relevant…

  5. Speak Truth and Shame the Devil: An Ethnodrama in Response to Racism in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward Randolph, Adah; Weems, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    This ethnodrama examines how two African American women experience racism in the academe. Both scholars examine the social/political context of racism in higher education and its manifestation in institutional practices. Both authors seek to "speak truth and shame the devil" by examining institutional responses to the racism they encounter in…

  6. Linguistic Processing in Hebrew-Speaking Children from Low and High SES Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Rachel; Ravid, Dorit

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Socio-Economic Status (SES) on Hebrew-speaking children's developing ability to pluralize nouns and mark adjectives in agreement with them. Participants were 180 gradeschool children from mid-high SES and 180 peers from low SES, in six consecutive grade levels. The task consisted of 32…

  7. Book Reading Mediation, SES, Home Literacy Environment, and Children's Literacy: Evidence from Arabic-Speaking Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korat, Ofra; Arafat, Safieh H.; Aram, Dorit; Klein, Pnina

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the contribution of maternal mediation in storybook reading, socioeconomic status (SES), and home literacy environment (HLE) to children's literacy level in kindergarten and first grade in Israeli Arabic-speaking families. A total of 109 kindergarten children and their mothers participated. Children's literacy level was…

  8. Validity of a Parent-Report Measure of Vocabulary and Grammar for Spanish-Speaking Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, Donna; Jackson-Maldonado, Donna; Acosta, Dora

    2000-01-01

    The validity of the Fundacion MacArthur Inventaria de Habilidades Communicativas: Palabras y Enuciados was examined with twenty 20- and nineteen 28-month-old, typically developing, monolingual, Spanish-speaking children in Mexico. Results indicated validity for assessing expressive vocabulary in 20-month-olds and expressive vocabulary and grammar…

  9. Design and Implementation of an Intelligent Virtual Environment for Improving Speaking and Listening Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Kaveh; Nahvi, Ali; Ahmadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an intelligent architecture, called intelligent virtual environment for language learning, with embedded pedagogical agents for improving listening and speaking skills of non-native English language learners. The proposed architecture integrates virtual environments into the Intelligent Computer-Assisted Language…

  10. Macro-Level Policy and Micro-Level Planning: Afrikaans-Speaking Immigrants in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, Gary; Knoch, Ute

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on a study which investigated the language lives of Afrikaans-speaking South African immigrants in New Zealand. Particularly, it focuses on their awareness of and attitudes to language policy in both South Africa and New Zealand, and how these influence their own and their family's language practices. Narrative interviews with…

  11. Deferred Imitation and Social Communication in Speaking and Nonspeaking Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strid, Karin; Heimann, Mikael; Gillberg, Christopher; Smith, Lars; Tjus, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Deferred imitation and early social communication skills were compared among speaking and nonspeaking children with autism and children developing typically. Overall, the children with autism showed a lower frequency on measures of deferred imitation and social communication compared with typically developing children. Deferred imitation was…

  12. I Will Fear No Audience: General Semantics Applied to a Communication Apprehensive Public Speaking Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Michael R.

    1996-01-01

    Applies general semantics to a public speaking communication apprehension (CA) lab and divides the lab into four main frames or semester sections. Suggests that CA has been treated elementalistically up to now, and that programs need to view the person holistically. States that general semantics applied to CA teaches awareness of the natural order…

  13. One-Session Exposure Treatment for Social Anxiety with Specific Fear of Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindo, Cindy S.; Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This pilot study evaluated the effectiveness of one-session, exposure-based therapy, to treat social anxiety disorder (SAD) with specific fear of public speaking. Methods: A quasi-experimental pre-posttest design with repeated measures-within-subject Analysis of Variance and paired sample t-tests was used to compare pretest, posttest…

  14. Telepsychology and Self-Help: The Treatment of Fear of Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Cristina; Guillen, Veronica; Banos, Rosa M.; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Gallego, Maria J.; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a self-help, Internet-based telepsychology program for the treatment of public speaking fears. The system is comprised of 3 parts: The "assessment protocol" gives the patient information about his or her problem (i.e., amount of interference it creates in his or her life, severity, degree of fear and avoidance). The system also…

  15. Communication Apprehension and the Hispanic Public Speaking Student at the University of Texas--Pan American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Jan; And Others

    This pilot study examined the communication apprehension (CA) in the student public speaking population, specifically the high risk Mexican American students, at the University of Texas, Pan American. The study also measured the effectiveness of the beginning speech class and the optional speech lab on CA and grade performance. Both high and low…

  16. Using a Speech Apprehension Questionnaire as a Tool to Reduce Students' Fear of Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablamowicz, Halina

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an activity that makes use of a questionnaire similar to a Personal Report of Communication Apprehension (PRCA) which elicit students' responses about their previous speaking experiences, their own definitions of anxiety and its causes, and their plans for future careers. This activity is aimed at helping students overcome…

  17. Placement , Methodology, and Techniques for the Student from Spanish-Speaking Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkin, Rita

    1968-01-01

    Special features of teaching Spanish to the Spanish speaking are identified and compared with objectives of teaching Spanish as a second language. Described are the (1) feasibility of achieving effective ability placement through a listening-comprehension test designed for use in Albuquerque Public Schools, (2) linguistic and motivational problems…

  18. Augmentative Device Helps Max Speak. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets. PHP-c75

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This Action Information Sheet follows a family's process of selecting and using augmentative and alternative communication to help their young son, Max, speak. Max is affected by global dyspraxia, which makes learning new motor skills--especially speech--quite difficult. For the first years of his life, Max could not say words. Before he and his…

  19. Classification Accuracy of Nonword Repetition when Used with Preschool-Age Spanish-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark; Rodriguez, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to (a) describe and compare the nonword repetition (NWR) performance of preschool-age Spanish-speaking children (3- to 5-year-olds) with and without language impairment (LI) across 2 scoring approaches and (b) to contrast the classification accuracy of a Spanish NWR task when item-level and percentage…

  20. Understanding, Connection, and Identification: Friendship Features of Bilingual Spanish-English Speaking Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebanc, Anne M.; Hernandez, Maria D.; Alvarado, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Bilingual undergraduates may have closer friendships with other bilinguals than with monolinguals. This study investigated this hypothesis and explored the friendship features of 46 bilingual Spanish and English speaking undergraduates by combining quantitative analyses of surveys and qualitative analyses of interviews. Survey results indicated…

  1. Flights of Fancy: Imaginary Travels as Motivation for Reading, Writing, and Speaking German.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Keri L.; Pohl, Rosa Marie

    1994-01-01

    The article describes an innovative teaching project suitable for students at any age and all levels of German. The project, conducted entirely in German, includes writing, reading, and speaking, and promotes the skills of letter-writing, reading for content, note-taking, and oral presentation. (JL)

  2. Acoustic Characteristics of Vowels and Plosives/Affricates of Mandarin-Speaking Hearing-Impaired Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shu-Chuan; Kuei, Ko; Tsou, Pei-Chen

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of an acoustic analysis of vowels and plosives/affricates produced by 45 Mandarin-speaking children with hearing impairment. Vowel production is represented and categorized into three groups by vowel space size calculated with normalized F1 and F2 values of corner vowels. The correlation between speech…

  3. The Relationship of Phonological Skills to Language Skills in Spanish-English-Speaking Bilingual Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperson, Solaman J.; Bedore, Lisa M.; Pena, Elizabeth D.

    2013-01-01

    These two studies investigate the relationship between phonological production skills and performance in other domains of language in Spanish-English-speaking bilingual children. We examine the relationship between scores on a single-word phonology test and language measures selected from formal testing and narrative samples in Spanish and…

  4. Speaking Rate from Proximal and Distal Contexts Is Used during Word Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Eva; Jesse, Alexandra; McQueen, James M.

    2011-01-01

    A series of eye-tracking and categorization experiments investigated the use of speaking-rate information in the segmentation of Dutch ambiguous-word sequences. Juncture phonemes with ambiguous durations (e.g., [s] in "eens (s)peer," "once (s)pear," [t] in "nooit (t)rap," "never staircase/quick") were perceived as longer and hence more often as…

  5. Cross-Cultural Adaptation of a Developmental Assessment for Arabic-Speaking Children with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrine, Sheila L.; Heji, Hayat; Sabri, Amel; Dalton, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Developmental screening has become an established component of child health programs in many developed countries. The research objective of this project was to translate and adapt a developmental assessment (Oregon Project Skills Inventory) for use with young children with visual impairments who speak Arabic. The study was prompted by the lack of…

  6. The Search for Better Ways of Speaking about Culture, Identity and Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to provide better metaphors for thinking and speaking about culture, identity and values. In terms of human behaviour, the words culture, identity and values are viewed as useful reifications which have allowed us to discuss human action in terms of nouns. However, the terms have been used over many years in various theoretical…

  7. Speaking Conflict: Ideological Barriers to Bilingual Policy Implementation in Civil War Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christina P.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a holistic view of ideological barriers to bilingual policy implementation in Sri Lanka, a conflict-ridden postcolonial nation-state. I examine Sinhalese youth and adults' Tamil as a second language (TSL) learning and speaking practices across three contexts: a multilingual school, a program for government servants, and an…

  8. Patients' anxiety of public speaking to a group audience versus dropping-out the group therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Sikorski

    2015-09-01

    The author provides several ways for reducing the anxiety of public speaking, such as exercises based on role-playing techniques, drama and using the camera, and learning how to achieve the state of relaxation, as well as those arising due to the attitude of the therapist and his/her attention to initiate.

  9. Social Styles and the Second Language Acquisition of Spanish-Speaking Kindergartners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Michael

    1983-01-01

    Seven personality traits are examined as they relate to the speed of English acquisition among 13 children. Contrary to previous conclusions, faster learners did not seek to befriend or identify more with English-speaking children than slow learners, but were more talkative, responsive, and gregarious. Implications are discussed. (MSE)

  10. "Be the Tree": Classical Literature, Art Therapy, and Transcending Trauma in "Speak"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Jessi

    2014-01-01

    Laurie Halse Anderson's young adult novel "Speak" concerns the rape and subsequent silence of ninth grade protagonist Melinda Sordino. By relying on extensive literary allusions involving trees, rape, silence, and transformation, Anderson creates a young adult problem novel that is both of the moment and timeless in its themes. The…

  11. Evaluative Language Used by Mandarin-Chinese-Speaking Dyads in Personal Narratives: Age and Socioeconomic Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wen-Feng; Chen, Yen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of age and family socioeconomic status (SES) on the evaluative language performance of Mandarin-Chinese-speaking young children and their mothers. The participants were 65 mother-child dyads recruited in Taiwan. Thirty-four of these dyads were from middle-class families and 31 were from…

  12. Chinese Students' Perceptions of Native English-Speaking Teachers in EFL Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhenhui

    2010-01-01

    The article reports the views of 20 Chinese English as a foreign Language (EFL) students on the strengths and weaknesses of native English-speaking (NES) teachers in EFL teaching. Responding to an open-ended questionnaire and in-depth interviews, EFL students named the following as NES teachers' strengths: native language authenticity, cultural…

  13. Economic Returns to Speaking "Standard Mandarin" among Migrants in China's Urban Labour Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenshu; Smyth, Russell

    2011-01-01

    This article uses data from the China Urban Labour Survey administered across 12 cities in 2005 to estimate the economic returns to speaking standard Mandarin among internal migrants in China's urban labour market. The article builds on studies that estimate the economic returns to international immigrants of being fluent in the major language of…

  14. Youth Speaks Up: Perceived Communication Changes Experienced by Grade 6 Participants in a Personal Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brann-Barrett, M. Tanya

    2005-01-01

    A nine-month program entitled Youth Speaks Up is delivered annually to grade 6 students from Sydney, Nova Scotia. One goal of the program is to provide an opportunity for the development of positive communication skills in participants. The purpose of this project was to determine if students participating in the program perceived changes in their…

  15. Phonological Development in Specific Contexts: Studies of Chinese-Speaking Children. Child Language and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Zhu

    This book examines the phonological development and impairment of Chinese-speaking children. It contains a series of studies of phonological acquisition and development of children in specific contexts (Putonghua or Modern Standard Chinese, the language variety promoted by the Chinese government, and normally developing children, children with…

  16. Contributions of Phonological Processing Skills to Reading Skills in Arabic Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibah, Nadia J.; Haynes, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated contributions of phonological awareness (Elision and blending), rapid naming (object, color, letter, and digit), and phonological memory (nonword repetition and Digit Span) to basic decoding and fluency skills in Arabic. Participants were 237 Arabic speaking children from Grades K-3. Dependent measures…

  17. Idiom Comprehension in French-Speaking Children and Adolescents with Williams' Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Agnes; Aguert, Marc; Dardier, Virginie; Stojanovik, Vesna; Laval, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    This study looks at idiom comprehension by French-speaking people with Williams' syndrome (WS) and metapragmatic knowledge is examined. Idiomatic expressions are a nonliteral form of language where there is a considerable difference between what is said (literal interpretation) and what is meant (idiomatic interpretation). WS is characterized by a…

  18. A Place from where to Speak: The University and Academic Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badley, Graham

    2009-01-01

    The university is promoted as "a place from where to speak". Academic freedom is examined as a crucial value in an increasingly uncertain age which resonates with Barnett's concern to encourage students to overcome their "fear of freedom". My concern is that the putative university space of freedom and autonomy may well become constricted by those…

  19. The Comparison of Politeness Strategies in Chinese Culture and in Eng-lish Speaking Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆龄

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary society, as the development of globalization a growing tendency of how to communication effective⁃ly between different culture and languages has becoming a matter of fact. Even though a great number of communication strate⁃gies used to reduce the culture shock, obstacles in cultural exchanges still remains due to the culture differences. Politeness theory, as an important communication strategy, is still the most important and influential theory for cross-cultural communication. While there still has a few controversial arguments being conducted. It results in the issue of this article:Is there different compar⁃ing Chinese culture with English Speaking Culture in Terms of Politeness Strategies? In this paper, I will present a general review of classic politeness theories including Brown&Levinson, Leech’s research in English speaking culture and Gu and Xu’s findings in Chinese culture. Among their theories some specific politeness strategies such as face-saving strategy, politeness principle and its maxims will be used to give an image of the difference between Chinese culture and English speaking culture in terms of po⁃liteness strategies. In the definition of‘politeness’, two characteristics are worth mentioning:universality as well as culture-specif⁃ic. Therefore the article concludes by the arguing that, in spite of a few similarities, there are differences between in Chinese cul⁃ture and in English speaking context in politeness.

  20. Conflict between Learners' Beliefs and Actions: Speaking in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    Based on sociocultural and contextual perspectives, this study examines how Japanese language learners perceive a conflict between their beliefs and actions when speaking the target language in the classroom context, and how these learners change their beliefs or actions to overcome the conflict. Data were collected during a second-year level…