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Sample records for cftr-knockout mice subjected

  1. The "Goldilocks Effect" in Cystic Fibrosis: identification of a lung phenotype in the cftr knockout and heterozygous mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bates Jason HT

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic Fibrosis is a pleiotropic disease in humans with primary morbidity and mortality associated with a lung disease phenotype. However, knockout in the mouse of cftr, the gene whose mutant alleles are responsible for cystic fibrosis, has previously failed to produce a readily, quantifiable lung phenotype. Results Using measurements of pulmonary mechanics, a definitive lung phenotype was demonstrated in the cftr-/- mouse. Lungs showed decreased compliance and increased airway resistance in young animals as compared to cftr+/+ littermates. These changes were noted in animals less than 60 days old, prior to any long term inflammatory effects that might occur, and are consistent with structural differences in the cftr-/- lungs. Surprisingly, the cftr+/- animals exhibited a lung phenotype distinct from either the homozygous normal or knockout genotypes. The heterozygous mice showed increased lung compliance and decreased airway resistance when compared to either homozygous phenotype, suggesting a heterozygous advantage that might explain the high frequency of this mutation in certain populations. Conclusions In the mouse the gene dosage of cftr results in distinct differences in pulmonary mechanics of the adult. Distinct phenotypes were demonstrated in each genotype, cftr-/-, cftr +/-, and cftr+/+. These results are consistent with a developmental role for CFTR in the lung.

  2. Bioelectric characterization of epithelia from neonatal CFTR knockout ferrets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Fisher (John); S.R. Tyler (Scott); Y. Zhang (Yulong); B.J. Lee (Ben); X. Liu (Xiaoming); X. Sun (Xinying); H. Sui (Hongshu); B. Liang (Bo); M. Luo (Ma); W. Xie (Weiliang); I. Yi (Iasson); W. Zhou (Weili); Y. Song (Yiqing); N. Keiser (Nicholas); K. Wang (Kai); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); J.F. Engelhardt (John)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening, recessive, multiorgan genetic disorder caused by the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function found in many types of epithelia. Animal models that recapitulate the human disease phenotype are critical to un

  3. Analysis of Cornea Transplant Tissue Rejection Delay in Mice Subjects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valenta, Zdeněk; Svozílková, P.; Filipec, M.; Zvárová, Jana; Farghali, H.

    Berlin: Springer, 2004 - (Barreiro, J.; Martin-Sanchez, F.; Maojo, V.), s. 292-298. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science. 3337). ISBN 3-540-23964-2. [ISBMDA. International Symposium /5./. Barcelona (ES), 18.11.2004-19.11.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP305/03/D130; GA MZd NI7531; GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : cornea transplant * immunosuppressant * hazard ratio Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  4. Olfactory sensitivity for six predator odorants in CD-1 mice, human subjects, and spider monkeys.

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    Amir Sarrafchi

    Full Text Available Using a conditioning paradigm, we assessed the olfactory sensitivity of six CD-1 mice (Mus musculus for six sulfur-containing odorants known to be components of the odors of natural predators of the mouse. With all six odorants, the mice discriminated concentrations <0.1 ppm (parts per million from the solvent, and with five of the six odorants the best-scoring animals were even able to detect concentrations <1 ppt (parts per trillion. Four female spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi and twelve human subjects (Homo sapiens tested in parallel were found to detect the same six odorants at concentrations <0.01 ppm, and with four of the six odorants the best-scoring animals and subjects even detected concentrations <10 ppt. With all three species, the threshold values obtained here are generally lower than (or in the lower range of those reported for other chemical classes tested previously, suggesting that sulfur-containing odorants may play a special role in olfaction. Across-species comparisons showed that the mice were significantly more sensitive than the human subjects and the spider monkeys with four of the six predator odorants. However, the human subjects were significantly more sensitive than the mice with the remaining two odorants. Human subjects and spider monkeys significantly differed in their sensitivity with only two of the six odorants. These comparisons lend further support to the notion that the number of functional olfactory receptor genes or the relative or absolute size of the olfactory bulbs are poor predictors of a species' olfactory sensitivity. Analysis of odor structure-activity relationships showed that in both mice and human subjects the type of alkyl rest attached to a thietane and the type of oxygen moiety attached to a thiol significantly affected olfactory sensitivity.

  5. Aggravated renal inflammatory responses in TRPV1 gene knockout mice subjected to DOCA-salt hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Youping; Wang, Donna H.

    2009-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that deletion of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel exaggerates hypertension-induced renal inflammatory response, wild-type (WT) or TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1−/−) mice were subjected to uninephrectomy and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt treatment for 4 wk. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) determined by radiotelemetry increased in DOCA-salt-treated WT or TRPV1−/− mice, whereas there was no difference in MAP between two strains at the base...

  6. Myricetin Attenuates Depressant-Like Behavior in Mice Subjected to Repeated Restraint Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Zegang Ma; Guilin Wang; Lin Cui; Qimin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that oxidative stress may be implicated in chronic stress-induced depression. Several flavonoids with anti-oxidative effects have been proved to be anti-depressive. Myricetin is a well-defined flavonoid with the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and neuroprotective properties. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible effects of chronic administration of myricetin on depressant-like behaviors in mice subjected to repeated restra...

  7. Brain neuronal CB2 cannabinoid receptors in drug abuse and depression: from mice to human subjects.

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    Emmanuel S Onaivi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Addiction and major depression are mental health problems associated with stressful events in life with high relapse and reoccurrence even after treatment. Many laboratories were not able to detect the presence of cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2-Rs in healthy brains, but there has been demonstration of CB2-R expression in rat microglial cells and other brain associated cells during inflammation. Therefore, neuronal expression of CB2-Rs had been ambiguous and controversial and its role in depression and substance abuse is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested the hypothesis that genetic variants of CB2 gene might be associated with depression in a human population and that alteration in CB2 gene expression may be involved in the effects of abused substances including opiates, cocaine and ethanol in rodents. Here we demonstrate that a high incidence of (Q63R but not (H316Y polymorphism in the CB2 gene was found in Japanese depressed subjects. CB2-Rs and their gene transcripts are expressed in the brains of naïve mice and are modulated following exposure to stressors and administration of abused drugs. Mice that developed alcohol preference had reduced CB2 gene expression and chronic treatment with JWH015 a putative CB2-R agonist, enhanced alcohol consumption in stressed but not in control mice. The direct intracerebroventricular microinjection of CB2 anti-sense oligonucleotide into the mouse brain reduced mouse aversions in the plus-maze test, indicating the functional presence of CB2-Rs in the brain that modifies behavior. We report for the using electron microscopy the sub cellular localization of CB2-Rs that are mainly on post-synaptic elements in rodent brain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate the functional expression of CB2-Rs in brain that may provide novel targets for the effects of cannabinoids in depression and substance abuse disorders beyond neuro-immunocannabinoid activity.

  8. Protective role of coriandrum sativum oily extracts on ehrlich tumour bearing mice subjected to gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was planned to evaluate the potency of coriandrum, sativum oily extract [in a dose of 1 mg/kg body weight; for six successive doses] as a chemopreventive agent against solid ehrlich tumour transplanted to the thigh of the left leg of mice subjected or not to gamma irradiation. The protective role of coriander oil was assessed through studying the level of serum phosphorus, calcium, prostaglandins, and anti-thyroid antibodies levels. Meanwhile, the content of cholesterol and triacylglycerols both in hepatic and tumor tissues were also measured. The levels of serum calcium ions revealed significant decline in the tested groups as compared with the control ones. Measurements of serum PGE2 and anti-thyroid antibodies levels exhibited significant fluctuated changes as compared with the control levels. Serum phosphorus levels induced only non-significant changes. The contents of cholesterol both in hepatic and tumor tissues induced significant decline in the tested proups as compared with the control ones

  9. Attenuation of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice subjected to chronic social stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sommershof, Annette; Basler, Michael; Riether, Carsten; Engler, Harald; Gröttrup, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Chronic stress is suspected to increase the susceptibility to infections but experimental evidence from physiological stress models is scarce. We examined the effects of chronic social stress on virus-specific CTL responses in mice after infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Mice subjected to social stress on six consecutive days prior to infection showed a significant reduction of IFN-γ producing TCD8+ splenocytes and markedly lowered plasma concentrations of IFN-γ. In co...

  10. Functional Role of HSP47 in the Periodontal Ligament Subjected to Occlusal Overload in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Hiroaki; Takaya, Tatsuo; Matsuda, Saeka; Nakano, Keisuke; Muraoka, Rina; Tomida, Mihoko; Okafuji, Norimasa; Fujii, Takeo; Kawakami, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We carried out an experiment to induce traumatic occlusion in mice periodontal tissue and analyzed the expression of HSP47. Continuous traumatic occlusion resulted to damage and remodeling of periodontal ligament as well as increase in osteoclasts and bone resorption. Four days after traumatic occlusion, osteoclasts did not increase but Howship's lacunae became enlarged. That is, the persistent occlusal overload can destroy collagen fibers in the periodontal ligament. This was evident by the increased in HSP47 expression with the occlusal overload. HSP47 is maintained in fibroblasts for repair of damaged collagen fibers. On the other hand, osteoclasts continue to increase although the load was released. The osteoclasts that appeared on the alveolar bone surface were likely due to sustained activity. The increase in osteoclasts was estimated to occur after load application at day 4. HSP47 continued to increase until day 6 in experiment 2 but then reduced at day 10. Therefore, HSP47 appears after a period of certain activities to repair damaged collagen fibers, and the activity was returned to a state of equilibrium at day 30 with significantly diminished expression. Thus, the results suggest that HSP47 is actively involved in homeostasis of periodontal tissue subjected to occlusal overload. PMID:27076780

  11. Social isolation-induced aggression potentiates anxiety and depressive-like behavior in male mice subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress.

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    Xian-cang Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating epidemiological evidence shows that life event stressors are major vulnerability factors for psychiatric diseases such as major depression. It is also well known that social isolation in male mice results in aggressive behavior. However, it is not known how social isolation-induced aggression affects anxiety and depressive-like behavior in isolated male mice subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress (CMS, an animal model of depression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C57/B6 male mice were divided into 3 groups; non-stressed controls, in Group I; isolated mice subjected to the CMS protocol in Group II and aggression by physical contact in socially isolated mice subjected to the CMS protocol in Group III. In the sucrose intake test, ingestion of a 1% sucrose solution by mice in Groups II and III was significantly lower than in Group I. Furthermore, intake of this solution in Group III mice was significantly lower than in Group II mice. In the open field test, mice in Group III, showed reduced locomotor activity and reduced entry and retention time in the central zone, compared to Groups I and II mice. Moreover, the distances moved in 1 hour by Group III mice did not differ between night and morning. In the light/black box test, Groups II and III animals spent significantly less time in the light box compared to Group I animals. In the tail suspension test (TST and forced swimming test (FST, the immobility times of Group II and Group III mice were significantly longer than in Group I mice. In addition, immobility times in the FST were significantly longer in Group III than in Group II mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings show that social isolation-induced aggression could potentiate anxiety and depressive-like behaviors in isolated male mice subjected to CMS.

  12. Peripheral Erythrocytes Decrease upon Specific Respiratory Challenge with Grass Pollen Allergen in Sensitized Mice and in Human Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Jordakieva, Galateja; Wallmann, Julia; Schmutz, René; Lemell, Patrick; Wegmann, Michael; Nittke, Thomas; Mittlböck, Martina; Fehrenbach, Heinz; Godnic-Cvar, Jasminka; Zieglmayer, René; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Specific hyper-responsiveness towards an allergen and non-specific airway hyperreactivity both impair quality of life in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We aimed to investigate cellular responses following specific and non-specific airway challenges locally and systemically in i) sensitized BALB/c mice challenged with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5, and in ii) grass pollen sensitized allergic rhinitis subjects undergoing specific airway challenge in the Vienna ...

  13. Infection Susceptibility in Gastric Intrinsic Factor (Vitamin B12)-Defective Mice Is Subject to Maternal Influences

    OpenAIRE

    Mottram, L; Speak, AO; Selek, RM; Cambridge, EL; McIntyre, Z; Kane, L; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Grove, C; A. Colin; Brandt, C; Duque-Correa, MA; Forbester, J; Nguyen, TA; Hale, C; Vasilliou, GS

    2016-01-01

    Mice harboring a mutation in the gene encoding gastric intrinsic factor (Gif), a protein essential for the absorption of vitamin B12/cobalamin (Cbl), have potential as a model to explore the role of vitamins in infection. The levels of Cbl in the blood of Gif(tm1a/tm1a) mutant mice were influenced by the maternal genotype, with offspring born to heterozygous (high Cbl, F1) mothers exhibiting a significantly higher serum Cbl level than those born to homozygous (low Cbl, F2) equivalents. Low Cb...

  14. Uncoupling protein-2 mRNA expression in mice subjected to intermittent hypoxia

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    Luciana Rodrigues Vieira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of intermittent hypoxia-a model of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA-on pancreatic expression of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2, as well as on glycemic and lipid profiles, in C57BL mice. Methods: For 8 h/day over a 35-day period, male C57BL mice were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (hypoxia group or to a sham procedure (normoxia group. The intermittent hypoxia condition involved exposing mice to an atmosphere of 92% N and 8% CO2 for 30 s, progressively reducing the fraction of inspired oxygen to 8 ± 1%, after which they were exposed to room air for 30 s and the cycle was repeated (480 cycles over the 8-h experimental period. Pancreases were dissected to isolate the islets. Real-time PCR was performed with TaqMan assays. Results: Expression of UCP2 mRNA in pancreatic islets was 20% higher in the normoxia group than in the hypoxia group (p = 0.11. Fasting serum insulin was higher in the hypoxia group than in the normoxia group (p = 0.01. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance indicated that, in comparison with the control mice, the mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia showed 15% lower insulin resistance (p = 0.09 and 21% higher pancreatic β-cell function (p = 0.01. Immunohistochemical staining of the islets showed no significant differences between the two groups in terms of the area or intensity of α- and β-cell staining for insulin and glucagon. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of intermittent hypoxia on UCP2 expression. Our findings suggest that UCP2 regulates insulin production in OSA. Further study of the role that UCP2 plays in the glycemic control of OSA patients is warranted.

  15. Cytogenetic sequelae in sex and somatic cells at mice subjected to chronic irradiation simulating occupational conditions of radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytogenetic effect of chronic irradiation in low doses to study chronic radiation effect upon man under professional conditions has been investigated. The experiments have been carried out on white mice, subjected to chronic effect of 60Co gamma irradiation (during 15 - 19 months in doses of 6, 17 and 50 mrad for 6 - 7 hrs a day). It is shown, that under effect of chronic irradiation, modelling the conditions of professional irradiation effect, in sex and somatic cells of the mice chromosomal aberrations appear, which depend on the age of animals and magnitude of every day dose. However direct dependence of these changes on the magnitude of the total dose has not been established

  16. Peripheral erythrocytes decrease upon specific respiratory challenge with grass pollen allergen in sensitized mice and in human subjects.

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    Galateja Jordakieva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Specific hyper-responsiveness towards an allergen and non-specific airway hyperreactivity both impair quality of life in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We aimed to investigate cellular responses following specific and non-specific airway challenges locally and systemically in i sensitized BALB/c mice challenged with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5, and in ii grass pollen sensitized allergic rhinitis subjects undergoing specific airway challenge in the Vienna Challenge Chamber (VCC. METHODS AND RESULTS: BALB/c mice (n = 20 were intraperitoneally immunized with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5 and afterwards aerosol challenged with either the specific allergen Phl p 5 (n = 10 or the non-specific antigen ovalbumin (OVA (n = 10. A protocol for inducing allergic asthma as well as allergic rhinitis, according to the united airway concept, was used. Both groups of exposed mice showed significantly reduced physical activity after airway challenge. Specific airway challenge further resulted in goblet cell hyperplasia, enhanced mucous secretion, intrapulmonary leukocyte infiltration and lymphoid follicle formation, associated with significant expression of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 in splenocytes and also partially in lung tissue. Concerning circulating blood cell dynamics, we observed a significant drop of erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in both mouse groups, challenged with allergen or OVA. A significant decrease in circulating erythrocytes and hematocrit levels after airway challenges with grass pollen allergen was also found in grass pollen sensitized human rhinitis subjects (n = 42 at the VCC. The effects on peripheral leukocyte counts in mice and humans however were opposed, possibly due to the different primary inflammation sites. CONCLUSION: Our data revealed that, besides significant leukocyte dynamics, particularly erythrocytes are involved in acute hypersensitivity reactions to respiratory allergens

  17. Analysis of the cerebral transcriptome in mice subjected to traumatic brain injury: importance of IL-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Molinero, Amalia;

    2007-01-01

    several cytokines and growth factors, a cascade of events is activated that result ultimately in increased oxidative stress and tissue damage, but also in activation of counterregulatory factors and tissue regeneration. The complexity of this response is being unraveled by high-throughput methodologies...... such as microarrays. The combination of these modern techniques with the comparison of normal and genetically modified mice boosts the significance of the results obtained. With this approach, we have demonstrated that a cytokine such as interleukin-6 is one of the key players in the response of the...

  18. Altered immunological response in mice subjected to stress and exposed to fungal spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Viswanath P.; Choi, Hongyung; Kumar, Anoopa; Murali, Pazhayannur S.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1992-01-01

    Space flight and related factors such as stress appear to have an adverse effect on astronauts' immune systems. The presence of potentially pathogenic microbes including several genera of fungi reported from spacecraft environment may be a cause of concern in such situations. In order to study the role of such organisms in causing opportunistic or allergic diseases in crewmembers, we have tried to develop an animal model. BALB/c mice were suspended upside down for varying periods of time to induce stress, and their lymphocyte functions were evaluated. These studies indicate that the stress resulted in lowered mitogen induced lymphocyte stimulation as represented by 3H-thymidine uptake. We have also studied the ability of these animals to respond to Aspergillus fumigatus spores. The results of the study clearly demonstrate a definite down-regulation in T-cell proliferation and a higher incidence of infection with A. fumigatus.

  19. Effects of Orally Administered Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Disodium Salt on Dry Skin Conditions in Mice and Healthy Female Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masahiko; Kamimura, Ayako; Watanabe, Fumiko; Kamiya, Toshikazu; Watanabe, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Etsushi; Fukagawa, Mitsuhiko; Hasumi, Keiji; Suzuki, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a coenzyme involved in the redox-cycling system. The supplemental use of PQQ has been examined based on its properties as an antioxidant and redox modulator. Although an animal study on deficiency of PQQ suggested that PQQ contributes to skin conditions, its efficacy in humans has not been reported. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of orally administered PQQ on skin moisture, viscoelasticity, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) both in dry skin mouse models and in healthy female subjects with a subjective symptom of dry skin. In our dry skin mouse model study, oral intake of PQQ (0.0089%, w/w, in the diet for 6 wk) significantly decreased the number of mast cells in the dermis and the number of CD3⁺ T-cells in the epidermis. In our human study, oral intake of PQQ (20 mg/d for 8 wk) significantly inhibited the increase in TEWL on the forearm. Finally, subject questionnaires showed positive impressions for the improvement of skin conditions. These results suggest that oral intake of PQQ improves skin conditions both in female subjects with dry skin and in mice with a compromised skin barrier function. PMID:26226961

  20. Initial subjective reward: single-exposure conditioned place preference to alcohol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisel, Judith E; Beasley, John B; Bertram, Emma C; Decker, Brooke E; Duan, Chunyu A; Etuma, Mahder; Hand, Annie; Locklear, Mallory N; Whitmire, Matthew P

    2014-01-01

    Most adults consume alcohol with relative impunity, but about 10-20% of users persist (or progress) in their consumption, despite mounting and serious repercussions. Identifying at-risk individuals before neuroadaptative changes associated with chronic use become well ingrained is thus a key step in mitigating and preventing the end stage disease and its devastating impacts. Explaining liability has been impeded, in part, by the absence of animal models for assessing initial sensitivity to the drug's reinforcing properties, an important endophenotype in the trajectory toward excessive drinking. Here we assess the initial rewarding effects of the drug in a novel application of the conditioned place preference paradigm. In contrast to previous studies that have all employed repeated drug administration, we demonstrated a robust preference for a context paired with a single exposure to 1.5 g/kg EtOH in male and female subjects of three strains. This model validates an assay of initial sensitivity to the subjective rewarding effects of alcohol, a widely used drug with multifarious impacts on both brain and society, and provides a new tool for theory-driven endophenotypic pharmacogenetic approaches to understanding and treating addiction. PMID:25408633

  1. Initial subjective reward: Single-exposure conditioned place preference to alcohol in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith E. Grisel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Most adults consume alcohol with relative impunity, but about 10-20% of users persist (or progress in their consumption, despite mounting and serious repercussions. Identifying at-risk individuals before neuroadaptative changes associated with chronic use become well ingrained is thus a key step in mitigating and preventing the end stage disease and its devastating impacts. Explaining liability has been impeded, in part, by the absence of animal models for assessing initial sensitivity to the drug’s reinforcing properties, an important endophenotype in the trajectory toward excessive drinking. Here we assess the initial rewarding effects of the drug in a novel application of the conditioned place preference paradigm. In contrast to previous studies that have all employed repeated drug administration, we demonstrated a robust preference for a context paired with a single exposure to 1.5g/kg EtOH in male and female subjects of three strains. This model validates an assay of initial sensitivity to the subjective rewarding effects of alcohol, a widely used drug with multifarious impacts on both brain and society, and provides a new tool for theory-driven endophenotypic pharmacogenetic approaches to understanding and treating addiction.

  2. Characterization of a critical role for CFTR chloride channels in cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunny Yang XIANG; Linda L YE; LI-lu Marie DUAN; Li-hui LIU; Zhi-dong GE; John A AUCHAMPACH; Garrett J GROSS; Dayue Darrel DUAN

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To further characterize the functional role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in early and late (second window) ischemic preconditioning (IPC)- and postcondtioning (POC)-mediated cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury.Methods: CFTR knockout (CFTR-/-) mice and age- and gender-matched wild-type (CFTR+/+) and heterozygous (CFTR+/-) mice were used.In in vivo studies, the animals were subjected to a 30-min coronary occlusion followed by a 40-min reperfusion. In ex vivo (isolate heart) studies, a 45-min global ischemia was applied. To evaluate apoptosis, the level of activated caspase 3 and TdT-mediated dUTP-X nick end labeling (TUNEL) were examined.Results: In the in vivo I/R models, early IPC significantly reduced the myocardial infarct size in wild-type (CFTR+/+) (from 40.4%±5.3% to 10.4%±2.0%, n=8, P<0.001) and heterozygous (CFTR+/-) littermates (from 39.4%±2.4% to 15.4%±5.1%, n=6, P<0.001) but failed to protect CFTR knockout (CFTR-/-) mice from I/R induced myocardial infarction (46.9%±6.2% vs 55.5%±7.8%, n=6, P>0.5). Similar results were observed in the in vivo late IPC experiments. Furthermore, in both in vivo and ex vivo I/R models, POC significantly reduced myocardial infarction in wild-type mice, but not in CFTR knockout mice. In ex vivo I/R models, targeted inactivation of CFTRgene abolished the protective effects of IPC against I/R-induced apoptosis.Conclusion: These results provide compelling evidence for a critical role for CFTR Cl- channels in IPC- and POC-mediated cardioprotection against I/R-induced myocardial injury.

  3. Social Isolation-Induced Aggression Potentiates Anxiety and Depressive-Like Behavior in Male Mice Subjected to Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Xian-cang Ma; Dong Jiang; Wen-hui Jiang; Fen Wang; Min Jia; Jin Wu; Kenji Hashimoto; Yong-hui Dang; Cheng-ge Gao

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating epidemiological evidence shows that life event stressors are major vulnerability factors for psychiatric diseases such as major depression. It is also well known that social isolation in male mice results in aggressive behavior. However, it is not known how social isolation-induced aggression affects anxiety and depressive-like behavior in isolated male mice subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress (CMS), an animal model of depression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FIND...

  4. Impaired hippocampal acetylcholine release parallels spatial memory deficits in Tg2576 mice subjected to basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bettina; Mørk, Arne; Plath, Niels; Kristiansen, Uffe; Bastlund, Jesper Frank

    2013-01-01

    (BFCD) in 3 months old male Tg2576 mice to co-express cholinergic degeneration with Aβ overexpression as these characteristics constitutes key hallmarks of AD. At 9 months, SAP lesioned Tg2576 mice were cognitively impaired in two spatial paradigms addressing working memory and mid to long-term memory...... cortex and the reduction was comparable between groups. Our results suggest that partial BFCD acts collectively with increased levels of Aβ to induce cognitive decline and to compromise cholinergic release. Tg2576 mice with BFCD may constitute a new and suitable AD mouse model to study the interrelations...

  5. Immune responses induced by a Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis recombinant antigen in mice and lymphocytes from vaccinated subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula FERNANDES

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available In the search for Leishmania recombinant antigens that can be used as a vaccine against American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis, we identified a Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis recombinant protein of 33 kD (Larp33 which is recognized by antibodies and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL from subjects vaccinated with Leishvacin ®, Larp33 was expressed in Escherichia coli after cloning of a 2,2 kb Sau3A digested genomic fragment of L. (L. amazonensis into the pDS56-6 His vector. Immunoblotting analysis indicated that Larp33 corresponds to an approximately 40-kD native protein expressed in promastigotes of L.(L. amazonensis and L. (Viannia braziliensis. Northern blots of total RNA also demonstrated that the gene coding for this protein is expressed in promastigotes of the major lineages of Leishmania causing American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis. Larp33 induced partial protection in susceptible mouse strains (BALB/c and C57BL/10 against L. (L. amazonensis after vaccination using Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG as adjuvant. In vitro stimulation of splenocytes from BALB/c protected mice with Larp33 elicited the secretion of IL-2 and IFN-g, suggesting that a Th1 cell-mediated protective response is associated with the resistance observed in these mice. As revealed by its immunogenic and antigenic properties, this novel recombinant antigen is a suitable candidate to compose a vaccine against cutaneous leishmaniasisA resposta imune induzida por uma proteína recombinante de Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis de 33 kD (Larp33 foi avaliada em linfócitos de indivíduos vacinados com a Leishvacin® e em camundongos através de vacinação. Larp33 foi expressa em Escherichia coli após clonagem de um fragmento genômico de L. (L. amazonensis de 2,2 kb no vetor pDS56-6His. Larp33 foi reconhecida por anticorpos IgG presentes no soro de indivíduos vacinados com Leishvacin® e induziu proliferação em linfócitos desses indivíduos em níveis comparáveis ao ant

  6. Expression of HMGB1 in the periodontal tissue subjected to orthodontic force application by Waldo's method in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Shengyu; Li, Juan; Feng, Wei; Liu, Hongrui; Du, Juan; Sun, Jing; Cui, Jian; Sun, Bao; Han, Xiuchun; Oda, Kimimitsu; Amizuka, Norio; Xu, Xin; Li, Minqi

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) originating from periodontal ligament (PDL) cells can be a potential regulator in the process of orthodontic tooth movement and periodontal tissue remodeling. The aim of this study is to investigate HMGB1 expression in periodontal tissue during orthodontic tooth movement in mice according to Waldo's method. Six 7-week-old C57BL6 mice were used in these experiments. The elastic band was inserted into the teeth space between the right first and second maxillary molars. After 3 days of mechanical loading, mice were fixed with transcardial perfusion of 4 % paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), and the maxillary was extracted for histochemical analyses. The histological examination revealed local PDL tear at the tension side and the formation of extensive cell-free hyaline zones at the compression side. The immunolocalization of HMGB1 was significantly presented at tension side of PDL, apical area and dental pulp, whereas at the compression side of PDL, the labeling of HMGB1 was almost undetectable as the presence of hyaline zone. Taken together, we concluded that the orthodontic tooth movement by Waldo's method leads to histological changes and HMGB1 expression pattern that differ from those of coil spring method, including PDL tear and extensive hyaline zone which may severely destroy periodontal tissue and in turn impede tooth movement. PMID:25523715

  7. Skeletal adaptation to intramedullary pressure-induced interstitial fluid flow is enhanced in mice subjected to targeted osteocyte ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ronald Y; Meays, Diana R; Meilan, Alexander S; Jones, Jeremiah; Miramontes, Rosa; Kardos, Natalie; Yeh, Jiunn-Chern; Frangos, John A

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow (IFF) is a potent regulatory signal in bone. During mechanical loading, IFF is generated through two distinct mechanisms that result in spatially distinct flow profiles: poroelastic interactions within the lacunar-canalicular system, and intramedullary pressurization. While the former generates IFF primarily within the lacunar-canalicular network, the latter generates significant flow at the endosteal surface as well as within the tissue. This gives rise to the intriguing possibility that loading-induced IFF may differentially activate osteocytes or surface-residing cells depending on the generating mechanism, and that sensation of IFF generated via intramedullary pressurization may be mediated by a non-osteocytic bone cell population. To begin to explore this possibility, we used the Dmp1-HBEGF inducible osteocyte ablation mouse model and a microfluidic system for modulating intramedullary pressure (ImP) to assess whether structural adaptation to ImP-driven IFF is altered by partial osteocyte depletion. Canalicular convective velocities during pressurization were estimated through the use of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and computational modeling. Following osteocyte ablation, transgenic mice exhibited severe losses in bone structure and altered responses to hindlimb suspension in a compartment-specific manner. In pressure-loaded limbs, transgenic mice displayed similar or significantly enhanced structural adaptation to Imp-driven IFF, particularly in the trabecular compartment, despite up to ∼50% of trabecular lacunae being uninhabited following ablation. Interestingly, regression analysis revealed relative gains in bone structure in pressure-loaded limbs were correlated with reductions in bone structure in unpressurized control limbs, suggesting that adaptation to ImP-driven IFF was potentiated by increases in osteoclastic activity and/or reductions in osteoblastic activity incurred independently of pressure loading

  8. Skeletal adaptation to intramedullary pressure-induced interstitial fluid flow is enhanced in mice subjected to targeted osteocyte ablation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Y Kwon

    Full Text Available Interstitial fluid flow (IFF is a potent regulatory signal in bone. During mechanical loading, IFF is generated through two distinct mechanisms that result in spatially distinct flow profiles: poroelastic interactions within the lacunar-canalicular system, and intramedullary pressurization. While the former generates IFF primarily within the lacunar-canalicular network, the latter generates significant flow at the endosteal surface as well as within the tissue. This gives rise to the intriguing possibility that loading-induced IFF may differentially activate osteocytes or surface-residing cells depending on the generating mechanism, and that sensation of IFF generated via intramedullary pressurization may be mediated by a non-osteocytic bone cell population. To begin to explore this possibility, we used the Dmp1-HBEGF inducible osteocyte ablation mouse model and a microfluidic system for modulating intramedullary pressure (ImP to assess whether structural adaptation to ImP-driven IFF is altered by partial osteocyte depletion. Canalicular convective velocities during pressurization were estimated through the use of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and computational modeling. Following osteocyte ablation, transgenic mice exhibited severe losses in bone structure and altered responses to hindlimb suspension in a compartment-specific manner. In pressure-loaded limbs, transgenic mice displayed similar or significantly enhanced structural adaptation to Imp-driven IFF, particularly in the trabecular compartment, despite up to ∼50% of trabecular lacunae being uninhabited following ablation. Interestingly, regression analysis revealed relative gains in bone structure in pressure-loaded limbs were correlated with reductions in bone structure in unpressurized control limbs, suggesting that adaptation to ImP-driven IFF was potentiated by increases in osteoclastic activity and/or reductions in osteoblastic activity incurred independently of

  9. In-vivo tissue uptake and retention of Sn-117m(4+)DTPA in a human subject with metastatic bone pain and in normal mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ and tissue uptake and retention of Sn-117m(4+)DTPA were studied in a human subject treated for metastatic bone pain, and the results were compared with the biodistribution studies in five normal mice. The explanted organs from a patient who received a therapy dose of 18.6 mCi (688.2 MBq) Sn-117m(4+)DTPA and who died 47 days later were imaged with a γ-camera, and tissue samples were counted and also autoradiographed. Bone, muscle, liver, fat, lungs, kidneys, spleen, heart and pancreas tissue samples were assayed in a well counter for radioactivity. Regions of interest were drawn over bone and major organs to calculate and quantify clearance times using three in vivo Sn-117m(4+)DTPA whole-body scintigrams acquired at 1, 24 and 168 h after injection. Five normal mice injected with the same batch of Sn-117m(4+)DTPA as used for the human subject were sacrificed at 24 h, and tissue samples were collected and assayed for radioactivity for comparison with the human data. For the human subject, whole-body retention at 47 days postinjection was 81% of the injected dose, and the rest (19%) was excreted in urine. Of the whole-body retained activity at 47 days, 82.4% was in bone, 7.8% in the muscle and 1.5% in the liver, and the rest was distributed among other tissues. γ-Ray scintigrams and electron autoradiographs of coronal slices of the thoracolumbar vertebral body showed heterogenous metastatic involvement with normal bone between metastatic lesions. There was nonuniform distribution of radioactivity even within a single vertebral body, indicating normal bone between metastatic lesions. Lesion-to-nonlesion ratios ranged from 3 to 5. However, the osteoid-to-marrow cavity deposition ratio, from the microautoradiographs, was 11:1. The peak uptake in the human bone was seen at 137 h with no biological clearance. Soft tissues showed peak uptake at 1 h and exhibited three compartmental clearance components. Whole-body retention in normal mice was 38.7% of the injected

  10. Immune responses induced by a Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis recombinant antigen in mice and lymphocytes from vaccinated subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Ana Paula; Elizabeth Cortez HERRERA; Wilson MAYRINK; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; LIU Wen Yu; Carlos Alberto da COSTA; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Melo, Maria Norma; Michalick, Marilene Susan Marques; Gentz, Reiner; NASCIMENTO Evaldo

    1997-01-01

    In the search for Leishmania recombinant antigens that can be used as a vaccine against American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis, we identified a Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis recombinant protein of 33 kD (Larp33) which is recognized by antibodies and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from subjects vaccinated with Leishvacin ®, Larp33 was expressed in Escherichia coli after cloning of a 2,2 kb Sau3A digested genomic fragment of L. (L.) amazonensis into the pDS56-6 His vector. Immunoblotting ana...

  11. Effects of cadmium and monensin on renal and cardiac functions of mice subjected to subacute cadmium intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova Juliana

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd is a well-known nephrotoxic agent. Cd-induced renal dysfunction has been considered as one of the causes leading to the development of hypertension. The correlation between Cd concentration in blood and urine and cardiovascular diseases has been discussed in many epidemiological studies. A therapy with chelating agents is utilized for the treatment of toxic metal intoxication. Herein we present novel information indicating that monensin (applied as tetraethylammonium salt is a promising chelating agent for the treatment of Cd-induced renal and cardiac dysfunction. The study was performed using the ICR mouse model. Adult ICR male mice were divided into three groups with six animals in each group: control (received distilled water and food ad libitum for 28 days; Cd-intoxicated (treated orally with 20 mg/kg b.w. Cd(II acetate from day 1 to day 14 of the experimental protocol, and monensin treated group (intoxicated with Cd(II acetate as described for the Cd-intoxicated group followed by oral treatment with 16 mg/kg b.w. tetraethylammonium salt of monensic acid for 2 weeks. Cd intoxication of the animals resulted in an increase of the organ weight/body weight indexes. Cd elevated significantly creatinine and glucose level in serum. Monensin treatment improved the organ weight/body weight ratios. The therapy of the Cd-intoxicated animals with monensin ameliorated the creatinine and glucose level in serum and decreased the concentration of the toxic metal ions in the heart and kidneys by 54 % and 64 %, respectively

  12. Investigations on GSK-3β/NF-kB signaling in stress and stress adaptive behavior in electric foot shock subjected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-04-01

    The present study was designed to explore the role of GSK-3β and NF-kB signaling in electric foot shock-induced stress and stress adaptation. Mice were subjected to foot shocks of 0.5mA intensity and 1s duration of 1h to produce acute stress. Animals were exposed to the same stressor for 5 days to induce stress adaptation. The behavioral alterations were assessed using the actophotometer, hole board, open field and social interaction tests. The serum corticosterone levels were assessed as a marker of the HPA axis. The levels of total GSK-3β, p-GSK-3β-S9 and p-NF-kB were determined in the hippocampus, frontal cortex and amygdala. Acute electric foot shock stress produced behavioral and biochemical changes; decreased the levels of p-GSK-3β-S9, produced no change in total GSK-3β levels and increased p-NF-kB levels in the brain. However, repeated exposure of foot shock stress restored the behavioral and biochemical changes along with normalization of p-GSK-3β-S9 and p-NF-kB levels. Administration of AR-A01, a selective GSK-3β inhibitor, or diethyldithiocarbamic acid (DDTC), a selective NF-kB inhibitor, diminished acute stress-induced behavioral and biochemical changes. Furthermore, AR-A014418 normalized acute stress-induced alterations in p-GSK-3β-S9 and p-NF-kB levels, however, DDTC selectively restored NF-kB levels without any change in p-GSK-3β-S9 levels. It probably suggests that NF-kB is a downstream mediator of the GSK-3 signaling cascade. It may conclude that acute stress associated decrease in p-GSK-3β-S9 and increase in p-NF-kB levels in the brain contribute in the development of behavioral and biochemical alterations and normalization of GSK-3β/NF-kB signaling may contribute in stress adaptive behavior in response to repeated electric foot shock-subjected mice. PMID:26778780

  13. Purple Tea and Its Extract Suppress Diet-induced Fat Accumulation in Mice and Human Subjects by Inhibiting Fat Absorption and Enhancing Hepatic Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Hiroshi; Hitoe, Shoketsu; Nakamura, Seikou; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2015-06-01

    A number of clinical trials have been completed using green tea and black tea to investigate their effect in controlling weight in overweight adults. The results of these investigations, however, have often been contradictory, with some trials reporting positive effects of tea supplementation and some trials reporting no effect. As a result, the use of these teas for weight loss is controversial. Purple tea is a variety of green tea developed in Kenya (called TRFK306), which in addition to certain tea constituents found in green tea, also contains anthocyanins. The major constituents in the leaves of purple tea are caffeine, theobromine, epigallocatechin (ECG), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and 1,2-di-O-galloyl-4,6-O-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-β-D-glucose (GHG). We investigated the efficacy of purple tea extract (PTE) on diet-induced fat accumulation in mice. PTE administration (200 mg/kg) significantly suppressed body weight gain, liver weight, abdominal fat and triglycerides in serum and liver. Protein expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) 1A was also enhanced. In olive oil loaded mice, PTE (100 mg/kg) and caffeine (25 mg/kg) suppressed fat absorption. PTE (10 μg/mL) and GHG (10 μg/mL) also enhanced protein expression of CPT1A in HepG2 hepatoma. Moreover, 4-week daily consumption of purple tea drink in humans improved obesity parameters compared to baseline, including body weight (79.9 ± 3.1 kg vs 80.8 ± 3.2, p<0.05), body mass index (BMI) (26.8 ± 0.6 vs 27.0 ± 0.6, p<0.05) and body fat mass (21.0 ± 1.4 kg vs 21.8 ± 1.5, p<0.01). In conclusion, PTE could control diet-induced weight gain by suppression of fat absorption and enhancement of hepatic fat metabolism. PMID:26199579

  14. Distribution of selected elements in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE/LDLR-double knockout mice subjected to dietary and pharmacological treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene-targeted, apolipoprotein E and LDL receptor-double knockout (apoE/LDLR-/-) mice represent a new animal model that displays severe hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to show changes in histomorphology and in distribution of selected elements in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE/LDLR-/- mice fed egg-rich proatherosclerotic diet (5% egg-yolk lyophilisate) supplemented or not with perindopril (inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme; 2 mg/kg b.w.). Synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry was combined with histological stainings to determine distribution and concentration of trace and essential elements in atherosclerotic lesions. More advanced atherosclerotic lesions expressed by total area occupied by lipids (oil red-O staining) and by macrophages (CD68 immunohistochemistry) were observed in animals fed egg-rich diet. The perindopril treatment attenuated these effects. No significant differences were observed in the number of intimal smooth muscle cells (smooth muscle actin immunohistochemistry). In animals fed egg-rich diet significantly higher concentrations of Ca and significantly lower contents of S, Cl, , Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in atheromas were seen in comparison to chow diet-fed animals. After pharmacological treatment, concentrations of S, Cl, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se showed the tendency to achieve levels like in animals fed normal diet. K level differed only in group treated with perindopril. Concentration of P did not significantly vary in all experimental groups. Perindopril showed its potency to reduce atherosclerosis, as estimated by the size of the atheroma and content of pro- and antiatherogenic elements.

  15. Distribution of selected elements in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE/LDLR-double knockout mice subjected to dietary and pharmacological treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Mariusz; Kowalska, Joanna; Banaś, Agnieszka; Banaś, Krzysztof; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Kostogrys, Renata B.; Mateuszuk, łukasz; ChŁopicki, Stefan; Litwin, Jan A.; Appel, Karen

    2011-10-01

    Gene-targeted, apolipoprotein E and LDL receptor-double knockout (apoE/LDLR -/-) mice represent a new animal model that displays severe hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to show changes in histomorphology and in distribution of selected elements in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE/LDLR -/- mice fed egg-rich proatherosclerotic diet (5% egg-yolk lyophilisate) supplemented or not with perindopril (inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme; 2 mg/kg b.w.). Synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry was combined with histological stainings to determine distribution and concentration of trace and essential elements in atherosclerotic lesions. More advanced atherosclerotic lesions expressed by total area occupied by lipids (oil red-O staining) and by macrophages (CD68 immunohistochemistry) were observed in animals fed egg-rich diet. The perindopril treatment attenuated these effects. No significant differences were observed in the number of intimal smooth muscle cells (smooth muscle actin immunohistochemistry). In animals fed egg-rich diet significantly higher concentrations of Ca and significantly lower contents of S, Cl, , Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in atheromas were seen in comparison to chow diet-fed animals. After pharmacological treatment, concentrations of S, Cl, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se showed the tendency to achieve levels like in animals fed normal diet. K level differed only in group treated with perindopril. Concentration of P did not significantly vary in all experimental groups. Perindopril showed its potency to reduce atherosclerosis, as estimated by the size of the atheroma and content of pro- and antiatherogenic elements.

  16. Distribution of selected elements in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE/LDLR-double knockout mice subjected to dietary and pharmacological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajda, Mariusz, E-mail: mmgajda@cyf-kr.edu.pl [Department of Histology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Krakow (Poland); Kowalska, Joanna [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Banas, Agnieszka; Banas, Krzysztof [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source, National University of Singapore, 5 Research Link, 117603 Singapore (Singapore); Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Kostogrys, Renata B. [Department of Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Krakow, Balicka 122, 30-149, Krakow (Poland); Mateuszuk, Lukasz; ChLopicki, Stefan [Department of Experimental Pharmacology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-531 Krakow (Poland); Litwin, Jan A. [Department of Histology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Krakow (Poland); Appel, Karen [Hasylab, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Gene-targeted, apolipoprotein E and LDL receptor-double knockout (apoE/LDLR{sup -/-}) mice represent a new animal model that displays severe hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to show changes in histomorphology and in distribution of selected elements in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE/LDLR{sup -/-} mice fed egg-rich proatherosclerotic diet (5% egg-yolk lyophilisate) supplemented or not with perindopril (inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme; 2 mg/kg b.w.). Synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry was combined with histological stainings to determine distribution and concentration of trace and essential elements in atherosclerotic lesions. More advanced atherosclerotic lesions expressed by total area occupied by lipids (oil red-O staining) and by macrophages (CD68 immunohistochemistry) were observed in animals fed egg-rich diet. The perindopril treatment attenuated these effects. No significant differences were observed in the number of intimal smooth muscle cells (smooth muscle actin immunohistochemistry). In animals fed egg-rich diet significantly higher concentrations of Ca and significantly lower contents of S, Cl, , Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in atheromas were seen in comparison to chow diet-fed animals. After pharmacological treatment, concentrations of S, Cl, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se showed the tendency to achieve levels like in animals fed normal diet. K level differed only in group treated with perindopril. Concentration of P did not significantly vary in all experimental groups. Perindopril showed its potency to reduce atherosclerosis, as estimated by the size of the atheroma and content of pro- and antiatherogenic elements.

  17. Expression und Funktion des Na+/K+/2Cl-Kotransporters NKCC1 im Gastrointestinaltrakt von CFTR-Knockout-Mäusen

    OpenAIRE

    Wüchner, Katrin

    2004-01-01

    Die Chlorid-Sekretion stellt eine der zentralen physiologischen Funktionen im Rahmen des gastrointestinalen Verdauungsprozesses dar. Bei Aktivierung der intestinalen Chloridsekretion durch cAMP muss auch die basolaterale Aufnahme gesteigert werden um das zelluläre Elektrolytgleichgewicht aufrecht zu halten. Dabei bildet die basolaterale Chlorid-Aufnahme via dem Bumetanid-sensitiven Kotransporter NKCC1 den limitierenden Faktor für die hauptsächlich durch den Chlorid-Kanal CFTR erfolgende apika...

  18. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  19. Subjective physics

    OpenAIRE

    Brette, Romain

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a naive organism who does not know anything about the world. It can capture signals through its sensors and it can make actions. What kind of knowledge about the world is accessible to the organism? This situation is analog to that of a physicist trying to understand the world through observations and experiments. In the same way as physics describes the laws of the world obtained in this way by the scientist, I propose to name subjective physics the description of the laws that gover...

  20. About Subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    正During my high school years,I found physics,chemistry and maths specially interesting.Actually,I was interested in many subjects,such as biology,history,geography and English.But somehow I simply couldn't remember the events of history or the facts about geography.I couldn't remember the some of the English idioms well either.On the other hand,physics,chemistry and maths were easy for me to learn.After considering carefully my interests and talents,I felt that science might be the best choice for me.So I was determined to study natural science at college.After graduating from college,I would like to return to school to teach.

  1. Mouse Ability to Perceive Subjective Contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama-Uchimura, Fumi; Komai, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to the previously held notion that mice have a weak visual system, it is now generally accepted that mice can perceive rather complicated figures in various contexts such as in cognitive experiments and in social settings. Here, we show that mice could even be capable of perceiving a visual illusion--subjective contours. This illusion requires the visual system to compensate for a lack of visual information in compressed 2D images on the retina. In this experiment, we trained mice to respond appropriately to a rectangle-shaped rewarded figure of specific orientation in a two-choice visual discrimination task with a touchscreen monitor. In Transfer Test 1, mice could discriminate illusory rectangle-shaped figures significantly as compared with a figure, which did not induce illusory figures. In Transfer Test 2, the choice rate of targets decreased with imperfect illusory figures, which produced weak perception of rotated or deficient inducers. Moreover, in Transfer Test 3, mice could not discriminate the low-resolution illusory figure, which also induced weak perception. These results demonstrated the possibility that mice might be useful for investigating fundamental properties of the neural visual system. PMID:26562875

  2. Humanized mice

    OpenAIRE

    Macchiarini, Francesca; Manz, Markus G.; Palucka, A Karolina; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2005-01-01

    Animal models have been instrumental in increasing the understanding of human physiology, particularly immunity. However, these animal models have been limited by practical considerations and genetic diversity. The creation of humanized mice that carry partial or complete human physiological systems may help overcome these obstacles. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases convened a workshop on humanized mouse models for immunity in Bethesda, MD, on June 13–14, 2005, during...

  3. MICE Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Coney, L

    2009-01-01

    Muon ionization cooling provides the only practical solution for preparing high brightness beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It comprises a dedicated beam line designed to generate a range of input emittances and momenta with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to select a pure muon beam. A first measurement of emittance is performed in the upstream magnetic...

  4. Sensibility and Subjectivity: Levinas’ Traumatic Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmika Pandya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Levinas’ notions of sensibility and subjectivity are evident in the revision of phenomenological method by current phenomenologists such as Jean-Luc Marion and Michel Henry. The criticisms of key tenants of classical phenomenology, intentionality and reduction, are of a particular note. However, there are problems with Levinas’ characterization of subjectivity as essentially sensible. In “Totality and Infinity” and “Otherwise than Being”, Levinas criticizes and recasts a traditional notion of subjectivity, particularly the notion of the subject as the first and foremost rational subject. The subject in Levinas’ works is characterized more by its sensibility and affectedness than by its capacity to reason or affect its world. Levinas ties rationality to economy and suggests an alternative notion of reason that leads to his analysis of the ethical relation as the face-to-face encounter. The ‘origin’ of the social relation is located not in our capacity to know but rather in a sensibility that is diametrically opposed to the reason understood as economy. I argue that the opposition in Levinas’ thought between reason and sensibility is problematic and essentially leads to a self-conflicted subject. In fact, it would seem that violence characterizes the subject’s self-relation and, thus, is also inscribed at the base of the social relation. Rather than overcoming a problematic tendency to dualistic thought in philosophy Levinas merely reverses traditional hierarchies of reason/emotion, subject/object and self/other. 

  5. A Survey of Subject and Logical Subject

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永亮

    1999-01-01

    @@ This paper discusses Subject and Logical Subject of the English language. The grammar rules complied by some grammarians will be focused on and induced in a fuller account of the survey, aiming simply at a common- sense justification of traditional sentence analysis. Subject, a familiar grammatical term, is one of the most basic to thetraditional of grammatical analysis. It reports the concept of the subject and its history conducted with learners of English who are involved in making further English programme in the education with deep grammar explorations. Both the teachers and the students face many problems in this area, which need to be made clear and definite. The non- finite verbs have their specific rules or objective laws stipulated or summed up by grammarians. These areas of intellectual inquiry ,like most other fields of language study, have represented profoundly intelligent and important investigation in to the English deep grammars.

  6. MICE Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Coney, L

    2009-01-01

    Muon ionization cooling provides the only practical solution for preparing high brightness beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It comprises a dedicated beam line designed to generate a range of input emittances and momenta with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to select a pure muon beam. A first measurement of emittance is performed in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in liquid hydrogen and acceleration by RF cavities. A second spectrometer identical to the first and another particle identification system provide a measurement of the outgoing emittance. In late 2009, it is expected that the beam and many of the particle identification detectors will be in the final commissioning phase, and the first measurement of input beam emittance will take place in 2010. The steps of commissi...

  7. Gendered Subjectivities of Spacetimematter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juelskjaer, Malou

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates enactments of human subjectivities with a focus on how subjectivities may be studied if spatiality and temporality are taken up as constituting forces in the production of subjectivities. By reading poststructuralist feminist theorising, agential realism and empirical material diffractively through each other I re-situate…

  8. Compensatory eye movements in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Alphen, Adriaan

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis will address the generation of compensatory eye movements in naturally mutated or genetically modified mice. The reason for generating compensatory eye movements is solely related to the requirements for good vision. In a subject moving through its environment the projection of visual surround would slip across the retina and retinal slip of more than only a few degrees per second would cause blurring of the projected image and reduce visual acuity (Westheimer and McKe...

  9. Postconditioning in rats and mice

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Objective . For subsequent studies on the molecular mechanisms of postconditioning, we aimed to identify a robust postconditioning protocol in rat and mouse heart. Design. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to different postconditioning protocols (study 1 and 2). The protection was compared to preconditioning. Rats (study 3) in vivo in two different laboratories were postconditioned. Isolated mouse hearts (study 4) and mice in vivo (study 5) were postconditioned. Results. Postconditioning did...

  10. Experimental Study of Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infected Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔雯; 董永绥; 方峰

    2002-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, the mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infected mice were experimentally studied. 6 to 8 week old female BALB/C mice with immunosuppression were selected to undergo the MCMV inoculations: intracranial inoculation and peritoneal inoculation. MCMV of the infected mice in various organs and tissues were detected by using β-gal staining and in situ nucleic acid hybridization assay. The pathological changes were observed in HE staining paraffin-embedded sections. It was found that all the MCMV infected mice showed the retardation of growth and development, and feather looseness. Both intracranial inoculation of 104 PFU viruses or peritoneal inoculation of 106 PFU viruses resulted in the pathological changes, to some extent, of various organs and tissues in the mice. The pathological changes in liver were consistent with the amount of β-gal staining positive cells, indicating the liver lesions were mainly caused by viral proliferation. It was also found that the viruses in the immunosuppressed mice subjected to intracranial inoculation could spread to whole body organs, while the viruses in the immunosuppressed mice subjected to intrapeitoneal inoculation couldn't spread to the brain, suggesting blood-brain barrier could prevent the virus from spreading to the brain.

  11. Are Quantum States Subjective?

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, R. K.

    2012-01-01

    The subjective nature of the quantum states is brought out and it is argued that the objective state assignment is subsequent to the subjective state of the observer regarding his state of knowledge about the system. The collapse postulate is examined in detail to bring out the inherent subjectivity of the quantum state. The role of doubt and faith in quantum state assignment is examined.

  12. Subjectivity in inductive inference

    OpenAIRE

    Gilboa, Itzhak; Samuelson, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Working Papers - Yale School of Management's Economics Research Network International audience This paper examines circumstances under which subjectivity enhances the effectiveness of inductive reasoning. We consider a game in which Fate chooses a data generating process and agents are characterized by inference rules that may be purely objective (or data-based) or may incorporate subjective considerations. The basic intuition is that agents who invoke no subjective considerations are d...

  13. THE SUBJECTS OF RAPE

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana-Narcisa Radu

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the criminal codes of other states as well as the issues raised by the doctrine and jurisprudence, the new Criminal Code brings significant changes to the offense of rape, changes aimed at, among others, aspects regarding its subjects. In this paper are analyzed: the possibility for a legal person to have the quality of active subject of rape, issues concerning the quality of passive subject, the regulation of aggravated forms and its implications, etc.

  14. Manual for subject analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is one in a series of publications known as the ETDE/INIS Joint Reference Series and also constitutes a part of the ETDE Procedures Manual. It presents the rules, guidelines and procedures to be adopted by centers submitting input to the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) or the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE). It is a manual for the subject analysis part of input preparation, meaning the selection, subject classification, abstracting and subject indexing of relevant publications, and is to be used in conjunction with the Thesauruses, Subject Categories documents and the documents providing guidelines for the preparation of abstracts. The concept and structure of the new manual are intended to describe in a logical and efficient sequence all the steps comprising the subject analysis of documents to be reported to INIS or ETDE. The manual includes new chapters on preparatory analysis, subject classification, abstracting and subject indexing, as well as rules, guidelines, procedures, examples and a special chapter on guidelines and examples for subject analysis in particular subject fields. (g.t.; a.n.)

  15. Solutions for Subject Guides

    OpenAIRE

    Donald Moses; Jennifer Richard

    2008-01-01

    The following article describes two libraries' experiences with the implementation of newsoftware packages to deliver timely, accurate and dynamic content via library subjectguides. Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia implemented new subject guidesusing LibGuides in 2007 and Holland College in Charlottetown, PEI recently launchedtheir new guides in the fall of 2008 using SubjectsPlus.

  16. Solutions for Subject Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Moses

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The following article describes two libraries' experiences with the implementation of newsoftware packages to deliver timely, accurate and dynamic content via library subjectguides. Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia implemented new subject guidesusing LibGuides in 2007 and Holland College in Charlottetown, PEI recently launchedtheir new guides in the fall of 2008 using SubjectsPlus.

  17. Subjective poverty line definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Flik; B.M.S. van Praag (Bernard)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we will deal with definitions of subjective poverty lines. To measure a poverty threshold value in terms of household income, which separates the poor from the non-poor, we take into account the opinions of all people in society. Three subjective methods will be discussed a

  18. Subjective safety in traffic.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘subjective safety in traffic’ refers to people feeling unsafe in traffic or, more generally, to anxiety regarding being unsafe in traffic for oneself and/or others. Subjective safety in traffic can lead to road users limiting their mobility and social activities, which is one of the reasons it warrants policy-related attention. However, research has shown that, at most, there is a weak link between objective and subjective safety in traffic. There are even indications that some subj...

  19. Estimating Subjective Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.;

    2014-01-01

    either construct elicitation mechanisms that control for risk aversion, or construct elicitation mechanisms which undertake 'calibrating adjustments' to elicited reports. We illustrate how the joint estimation of risk attitudes and subjective probabilities can provide the calibration adjustments that...

  20. Estimating Subjective Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.;

    either construct elicitation mechanisms that control for risk aversion, or construct elicitation mechanisms which undertake “calibrating adjustments” to elicited reports. We illustrate how the joint estimation of risk attitudes and subjective probabilities can provide the calibration adjustments that...

  1. Education, subjectivity, literature

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Madrussan

    2014-01-01

    What kind of relationship exists between education, subject and literature? In the past this relationship was considered either a learning object or a process of identification with the main character of a novel. After Ricoeur the same re- lationship can be instead be approached from a different methodological point of view, which creates many new networks of meanings. In this context every literary experience becomes an educational experience and the subject is the restless connection betwee...

  2. Aesthetics and subjectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Bowie, Andrew,

    2003-01-01

    This new, completely revised and re-written edition of aesthetics and subjectivity brings up to date the original book's account of the path of German philosophy from Kant, via Fichte and Holderlin, the early Romantis, Schelling, Hegel, Schleimacher, to Nietzsche, in view of recent historical research and contemporary arguments in philosophy and theory in the humanities. The original book helped make subjectivity, aesthetics, music and language a significant part of debate in the humanity. Bo...

  3. Subjectivity in Incentive Pay

    OpenAIRE

    Nisar, T.

    2006-01-01

    I investigate the determinants and effects of subjectivity in incentive pay. New forms of incentive pay are increasingly being introduced by company management – for example, bonuses are now linked to wider business goals, such as quality and customer service, company reputation and employee hiring and retention policies, replacing the traditional focus on output or profit measures. A new conceptual work on subjectivity is used to evaluate these incentive pay practices. The analysis shows tha...

  4. Leishmaniasis in beige mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, C E; Farrell, J P

    1982-01-01

    The courses of two protozoal diseases, cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, were examined in three groups of C57BL/6J mice. One group of mice was homozygous recessive for the beige gene (bg/bg). Beige mice are the genetic homologue of the human Chédiak-Higashi syndrome and, among other defects, are profoundly deficient in natural killer cell activity. Wild-type (+/+) mice, which respond to experimental cutaneous or visceral leishmaniasis by eventually eliminating their parasites, and heteroz...

  5. The MICE luminosity monitor

    OpenAIRE

    Dobbs, A.; Forrest, D; F.J.P. Soler

    2013-01-01

    The MICE experiment will provide the first measurement of ionisation cooling, a technique suitable for reducing the transverse emittance of a tertiary muon beam in a future neutrino factory accelerator facility. MICE is presently in the final stages of commissioning its beam line. The MICE luminosity monitor has proved an invaluable tool throughout this process, providing independent measurements of particle rate from the MICE target, normalisation for beam line detectors and verification of ...

  6. Strain-specific renal toxicity of heterologous antilymphocyte [gamma]-globulin in mice7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, B.J.; Vries, M.J. de; Noord, M.J. van; Lubbe, F.H.

    1970-01-01

    Severe glomerulonephritis followed one to five weekly i.p. injections in TLFM mice of rabbit antimouse lymphocyte [gamma]-globulin (ALG). Glomerulonephritis did not occur in C57BL mice subjected to the same regimen. Administration of normal rabbit [gamma]-globulin (NRG) to RFM mice also caused renal

  7. Turning subjective into objective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, Maria João; Cardoso, Jaime; Amaral, Natália;

    2007-01-01

    asked to subjectively classify the aesthetic results of 30 photographed cases submitted to breast cancer conservative treatment according to the four-point Harris scale. It was pre-established that if at least two-thirds [Cardoso MJ, Cardoso J, Santos AC, Barros H, Oliveira MC. Interobserver agreement...... observer and the consensus, for computer evaluation obtained by the different participants and between software and consensus was calculated using multiple kappa (k) and weighted kappa (wk) statistics. In the subjective assessment, first-round consensus was achieved in 17 (57%) cases. Overall interobserver...

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Evolution in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ferris, Stephen D.; Sage, Richard D.; Prager, Ellen M.; Ritte, Uzi; Wilson, Allan C.

    1983-01-01

    This study extends knowledge of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity in mice to include 208 animals belonging to eight species in the subgenus Mus. Highly purified mtDNA from each has been subjected to high-resolution restriction mapping with respect to the known sequence of one mouse mtDNA. Variation attributed to base substitutions was encountered at about 200 of the 300 cleavage sites examined, and a length mutation was located in or near the displacement loop. The variability of different ...

  9. YOGA FOR SELECTED UNDERWEIGHT SUBJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    K Krishna Sharma; Thirumaleshwara Prasada H; Udayakumara K

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of yoga therapy on selected Underweight subjects. The study was conducted on 16 subjects having underweight .These subjects randomly divided into two groups 12 subjects in experimental group, 4 subjects in control group, 12 subjects, selected for experimental were given the yogic treatment .The remaining 4 subjects, of control group, they were asked to continue their routine work in the study period.16 subjects were of t...

  10. Native Americans: Subject Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Mimmo; Etter, Patricia A.

    This annotated subject guide lists reference material that deals with Native Americans and is available in the Arizona State University Libraries. Entries were published 1933-98, but mostly in the 1980s-90s. The guide is not comprehensive, but rather a selective list of resources useful for researching a topic in a variety of fields. The guide…

  11. Writing and the 'Subject'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Charlotte

    /page. It is, moreover, an index pointing to the painting/writing subject; it is a special deictic mode of painting/writing. The handwriting of the Russian avant-garde books, the poetics of handwriting, and the way handwriting is represented in poetry emphasize the way the subject (the speaking and the...... viewing/reading subject) manifests itself in the material mark on the page. The study shows how this indexical reference to a ‘subject’ is manipulated and used as a mask through which a writer/painter can perform a certain ‘subject’. Through analyses of the various levels on which the ‘subject’ is...... represented in the early as well as the contemporary avant-garde, it becomes clear that the ‘subject’ is an unstable category that can be exposed to manipulation and play. Handwriting is performing as a signature (as an index), but is at the same time similar to the signature of a subject (an icon) and a...

  12. Subjectivity of embodiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2014), s. 187-195. ISSN 1804-624X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP401/10/1164 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Levinas * phenomenology * factivity * body * experience Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  13. [Subjective memory complaints (SMC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Toji; Iwata, Atushi

    2016-03-01

    Subjective memory complaints without objective cognitive impairments are common in elderly people. Recent evidence indicates subjective memory complaints is not merely a sign of a depressive state or an aging phenomenon, but an important risk factor for proceeding to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in the future. Even when cognitively intact through the life, people with SMC tend to have more Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain, which recently been defined as preclinical AD. Though not having the same clinical significance compared to MCI, we should keep in mind that elderly people with SMC are at risk for future cognitive decline and try to find out what specific biological backgrounds or clinical characters increase this cognitive risk. PMID:27025085

  14. Doing Wholeness, Producing Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünenberg, Kristina; Hillersdal, Line; Walker, Hanne Kjærgaard; Boelsbjerg, Hanne Bess

    2013-01-01

    This article is concerned with the ways in which bodies and subjects are enacted and negotiated in the encounter between client and practitioner within specialized kinesiology - a specific complementary and alternative medical practice. In the article we trace the ideas of connections and...... disconnections, which are conceptualized and practised within kinesiology. We attempt to come to grips with these specific notions of relatedness through the introduction of the concept energetic kinship' and to relate them to more general discussions about the nature of subjects, bodies and social identity in...... late modern society. We argue that through the particular approach to the body as a prime locus of knowledge on which kinesiological treatment practices are based, kinesiology offers clients an alternative understanding of being-in-the-world. The understanding of the body as the locus of knowledge...

  15. Subjective Life Expectancy

    OpenAIRE

    Nicky Nicholls; Alexander Zimper

    2014-01-01

    Individuals' subjective life-expectancy, as elicited in large-scale surveys, shows underestimation of survival chances at young versus overestimation at old ages. These distorted perceptions of objective survival chances may cause young people to save too little and old people to accumulate too much wealth late in life with respect to the rational expectations benchmark model. Alternative explanations for these differences between perceived and objective survival chances include cognitive sho...

  16. Objectifying Subjective Probabilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Childers, Timothy

    Dordrecht: Springer, 2012 - ( Weber , M.; Dieks, D.; Gonzalez, W.; Hartman, S.; Stadler, F.; Stöltzner, M.), s. 19-28. (The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective. 3). ISBN 978-94-007-3029-8. [Pluralism in the Foundations of Statistics. Canterbury (GB), 09.09.2010-10.09.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP401/10/1504 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : probabilities * direct Inference Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  17. MICE IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conventions, and Exhibitions) industry has exploded worldwide over the past decade. The benefits brought by meetings, incentives, conventions, and exhibitions are also benefiting other sectors involved in MICE events, including hotels, travel, and retail. Industry analysts estimate that the income from the global MICE industry will soon exceed USD 220 billion, and is expected to increase by 8-10% each year.

  18. Trauma enhanced mortality in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn (B) or wound (W) trauma after exposure to radiation (R) may complicate 1) the elucidation of injury induction mechanisms and, 2) development of effective treatments for tissue damage and infections. Mouse models of sublethal B and W trauma with R, termed ''combined injury'' (CI), were used to evaluate dose and quality of R with type of injury, as well as responses to and therapy for bacterial challenges. B6D2F/J female mice were bilaterally exposed to doses of 60Co R (5-12 Gy), 0.4 Gy/min. Two hr after exposure, mice were anesthetized with methoxyfluorane and subjected to either 30% dorsal skin B or W. After R, W, B, RW, or RB, mice were given 0.5 ml 0.9% NaCl i.p. The LD50/30 radiation doses were: R = 9.63, RB = 8.2, and RW = 7.61 Gy. Slopes of CI survival curves were the same, but different (rho < .01) from that for R mice, and survival times of CI mice were 25-75% lower than for R mice. W, 48 hr before or 0.1, 24 or 48 hr after sublethal 7 Gy resulted in synergistic increases in mortality of 40, 25, 60 and 80%, respectively. In all CI, R, W, and B mice, intestinal bacteria were cultured from blood, spleen and liver. Challenge with opportunistic pathogens that routinely results in 5% mortality in normal mice, yielded increased mortality (95, 60, 26, 15, and 15% respectively) in RW, RB, R, W, and B animals. These CI models are used to evaluate immuno-modulators of non-specific resistance to bacterial infections

  19. The Subjectivity of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten

    What is a 'we' – a collective – and how can we use such communal self-knowledge to help people? This book is about collectivity, participation, and subjectivity – and about the social theories that may help us understand these matters. It also seeks to learn from the innovative practices and ideas...... of a community of social/youth workers in Copenhagen between 1987 and 2003, who developed a pedagogy through creating collectives and mobilizing young people as participants. The theoretical and practical traditions are combined in a unique methodology viewing research as a contentious modeling of prototypical...

  20. Vision as subjective perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human brain is not very different of the monkey's one: at least, its visual cortex is organized as a similar scheme. Specialized areas in the movement analysis are found and others in the forms perception. In this work, the author tries to answer to the following questions: 1)why so many visual areas? What are exactly their role in vision? Thirteen years of experimentation have not allowed to answer to these questions. The cerebral NMR imaging gives the opportunity of understanding the subjective perception of the visual world. One step which is particularly described in this work is to know how the visual cortex reacts to the optical illusions. (O.M.)

  1. Interaction, transference, and subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda

    2012-01-01

    is also subjected to psychodynamic processes. In this article, I draw upon a number of research inquiries to illustrate how psychodynamic processes influence research processes: data production, research questions and methodology, relations to informants, as well as interpretation and analysis. I further...... are important filters for fieldwork. In general, fieldwork can be understood as processes where field reports and field analysis are determined by how the researcher interacts with and experiences the field, the events and informants in it, and how she subsequently develops an ethnography. However, fieldwork...

  2. Partial correction of the CFTR-dependent ABPA mouse model with recombinant adeno-associated virus gene transfer of truncated CFTR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian; Torrez, Daniel; Braag, Sofia; Martino, Ashley; Clarke, Tracy; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Flotte, Terence R

    2008-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a model of airway inflammation in a CFTR knockout mouse utilizing Aspergillus fumigatus crude protein extract (Af-cpe) to mimic allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) 1, an unusual IgE-mediated hypersensitivity syndrome seen in up to 15% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and rarely elsewhere. We hypothesized that replacement of CFTR via targeted gene delivery to airway epithelium would correct aberrant epithelial cytokine signaling and ameliorate the ABPA phenotype in CFTR-deficient (CFTR 489X - /-, FABP-hCFTR + / +) mice. CFTR knockout mice underwent intra-tracheal (IT) delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (rAAV5Delta-264CFTR) or rAAV5-GFP at 2.58 x 10(12) viral genomes/mouse. All mice were then sensitized with two serial injections (200 microg) of crude Af antigen via the intra-peritoneal (IP) route. Untreated mice were sensitized without virus exposure. Challenges were performed 2 weeks after final sensitization, using a 0.25% solution containing Aspergillus fumigatus crude protein extract delivered by inhalation on three consecutive days. The rAAV5Delta-264CFTR-treated mice had lower total serum IgE levels (172513 ng/ml +/- 1312) than rAAV5-GFP controls (26 892 ng/ml +/- 3715) (p = 0.037) and non-treated, sensitized controls (24 816 +/- 4219 ng/ml). Serum IgG1 levels also were lower in mice receiving the CFTR vector. Interestingly, splenocytes from rAAV5Delta-264CFTR-treated mice secreted less IL-13, INFg, TNFa, RANTES and GM-CSF after ConA stimulation. Gene therapy with rAAV5Delta-264CFTR attenuated the hyper-IgE response in this reproducible CF mouse model of ABPA, with systemic effects also evident in the cytokine response of stimulated splenocytes. PMID:18023072

  3. A Family of Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 There is a family of mice in my house. They are father mouse, mother mouse and baby mouse. Baby mouse likes dancing. He is very cute. Father mouse likes watching TV. He likes the sports on TV best. These three mice are clever.

  4. Of mice and men

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    At the end of March , sixty mice were irradiated at the synchro-cyclotron in the course of an experimental programme studying radiation effects on mice and plants (Vicia faba bean roots) being carried out by the CERN Health Physics Group.

  5. Generation of Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Andrew; Haruyama, Naoto; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2009-01-01

    This unit describes detailed step-by-step protocols, reagents, and equipment required for successful generation of transgenic mice using pronuclear injection. The experimental methods and practical tips given here will help guide beginners in understanding what is required and what to avoid in these standard protocols for efficiently generating transgenic mice.

  6. The MICE Online Systems

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to test transverse cooling of a muon beam, demonstrating an important step along the path toward creating future high intensity muon beam facilities. Protons in the ISIS synchrotron impact a titanium target, producing pions which decay into muons that propagate through the beam line to the MICE cooling channel. Along the beam line, particle identification (PID) detectors, scintillating fiber tracking detectors, and beam diagnostic tools identify and measure individual muons moving through the cooling channel. The MICE Online Systems encompass all tools; including hardware, software, and documentation, within the MLCR (MICE Local Control Room) that allow the experiment to efficiently record high quality data. Controls and Monitoring (C&M), Data Acquisition (DAQ), Online Monitoring and Reconstruction, Data Transfer, and Networking all fall under the Online Systems umbrella. C&M controls all MICE systems including the target, conventional an...

  7. Depression in hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, V; Parikh, G J; Srinivasan, V

    1983-10-01

    168 patients attending hypertension clinic were randomly selected for the study. They were thoroughly investigated using E.C.G., X-ray chest, Urine analysis, Blood sugar, Blood urea, Serum cholesterol, Serum K, Serum Na, Scrum creatinine and Uric acid level. Detailed psychiatric case history and mental examination was carried out. Beck Rating Scale was used to measure the depression. 25% of hypertensive subjects exhibited depressive features and their mean score in Beck Rating scale is 21.76. The mean score of non-depressives is 4.46. All patients were receiving methyl dopa.25 mg. twice or thrice daily with thiazide diuretic. No significant difference in the incidence of depression with the duration of medication was observed.The hypertension was classified into mild, moderate and severe depending on the diastolic pressure. Depression was more frequent in severe hypertensives but not to the statistically significant level.Further hypertensives were classified into:1. Hypertension without organ involvement2. Hypertension with LVH only3. Hypertension with additional organ involvement4. Malignant hypertensionDepression was significantly more frequent in hypertensives with complications and also hypertensives in whom the B.P. remained uncontrolled. As all the patients were on the same drug, the drug effect is common to all; hence, the higher incidence of depression in hypertensives with complications is due to the limitation and distress caused by the illness. PMID:21847301

  8. Laboratory instruction and subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Barolli

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The specific aspects which determined the way some groups of students conducted their work in a university laboratory, made us understand the articulation of these groups´s dynamics, from elements that were beyond the reach of cognition. In more specific terms the conduction and the maintenance of the groups student´s dynamics were explicited based on a intergame between the non conscious strategies, shared anonymously, and the efforts of the individuals in working based on their most objective task. The results and issues we have reached so far, using a reference the work developed by W.R.Bion, with therapeutical groups, gave us the possibility for understanding the dynamics of the student´s experimental work through a new approach that approximates the fields of cognition and subjectivity. This approximation led us to a deeper reflection about the issues which may be involved in the teaching process, particularly in situations which the teacher deals with the class, organised in groups.

  9. Antidepressant activity of fingolimod in mice

    OpenAIRE

    di Nuzzo, Luigi; Orlando, Rosamaria; Tognoli, Cristina; Di Pietro, Paola; Bertini, Giuseppe; Miele, Jessica; Bucci, Domenico; Motolese, Marta; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Mauro, Gianluca; De Lucia, Carmine; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Fabene, Paolo Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that fingolimod, the first oral drug approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), acts as a direct inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and enhances the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the CNS. Both mechanisms are relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of major depression. We examined the antidepressant activity of fingolimod in mice subjected to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), a model of reactive depression endowed ...

  10. Measures in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Schlutzenberg, Farmer

    2013-01-01

    This thesis analyses extenders in fine structural mice. Kunen showed that in the inner model for one measurable cardinal, there is a unique measure. This result is generalized, in various ways, to mice below a superstrong cardinal. The analysis is then used to show that certain tame mice satisfy $V=\\mathsf{HOD}$. In particular, the approach proides a new proof of this result for the inner model $M_n$ for $n$ Woodin cardinals. It is also shown that in $M_n$, all homogeneously Suslin sets of re...

  11. The atrophy and changes in the cellular compositions of the thymus and spleen observed in mice subjected to short-term exposure to perfluorooctanesulfonate are high-dose phenomena mediated in part by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously shown that short-term, high-dose exposure of mice to the environmentally persistent perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) results in thymic and splenic atrophy and the attenuation of specific humoral immune responses. Here we characterize the effects of a 10-day treatment with different dietary doses (1-0.001%, w/w) of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), a similar fluorochemical, on the immune system of male C57BL/6 mice. At doses greater than 0.02%, PFOS induced clinical signs of toxicity in the animals, whereas at the concentration of 0.02%, this compound caused weight loss, hepatomegaly and atrophy of the thymus, spleen and adipose tissue without toxicity. With this latter dose, histopathological and flow-cytometric analysis revealed that (i) the thymic cortex was virtually depleted of cells; (ii) the total numbers of thymocytes and splenocytes were reduced by 84 and 43%, respectively; (iii) although all populations of thymocytes and splenocytes were smaller, the thymic CD4+CD8+ cells and the splenic B-lymphocytes were most decreased. These alterations resembled those evoked by analogous exposure to PFOA, but were less pronounced. At lower doses (less than 0.02%), PFOS induced hepatomegaly without affecting the thymus or spleen. Finally, comparison of male wild-type 129/Sv mice and the corresponding knock-outs lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) indicated that these effects of PFOS are not strain-dependent. More importantly, hepatomegaly is independent of PPARα, the thymic changes are partially dependent on this receptor, and splenic responses are largely eliminated in its absence. Thus, immunomodulation caused by PFOS is a high-dose phenomenon partially dependent on PPARα.

  12. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  13. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Boorman, Gary A. [Covance, Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P. [Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, RTP, NC 27713 (United States); Melnyk, Stepan B. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72201 (United States); Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  14. Lactoferrin restrains allergen-induced pleurisy in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta; Kocięba, Maja; Kaleta-Kuratewicz, Katarzyna; Kruzel, Marian L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the utility of lactoferrin (LF), a natural immunomodulator, to restrain allergen-induced pleurisy in mice. Material and subjects BALB/c female mice, 8- to 10-week old, weighing 24 g on average, were used. Treatment Mice were immunized intraperitoneally with 50 μg of ovalbumin (OVA) and the pleurisy was elicited 14 days later by intrapleural injection of 12.5 μg of OVA. LF was given 24 and 3 h before elicitation of the allergic reaction. Methods T...

  15. Mice Status Report: September 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Blondel, Alain; Hanson, G.

    2010-01-01

    This report is prepared for the MICE Project Board meeting of September 2010. It constitutes an update of the reports produced for the MICE Funding Agency Committee in December 20081, October 20092 and April 20103 and concentrates on the progress made since. The design of the MICE experiment can be found in the MICE proposal

  16. Exploring MICE Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU BO

    2006-01-01

    @@ With commerce and entertainment increasingly intertwined and the Chinese economy becoming more internationally integrated, Meetings,Incentives, Conference and Exhibitions (MICE) travel, is regarded by many travel agencies as one of the most potentially profitable tourism trends of the future.

  17. Influence of conditioned psychological stress on immunological recovery in mice exposed to low-dose x irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was initiated to determine the effects of psychological stress on the immune response in BALB/c mice recovering from exposure to a low dose of ionizing radiation. Mice were first subjected to conditioning training for 12 days, then exposed to 200 R, subjected to psychological stress for 14 days, and assessed for peak anti-sheep RBC response. The seven treatment groups included two unirradiated groups and five irradiated groups. Mice exposed to 200 R and then subjected to conditioned psychological stress responded less vigorously to antigenic stimulation than those of the other irradiated groups. The psychological stress imposed upon these mice did not influence the antibody-forming capacity of unirradiated mice. These results indicate that a psychological stress which did not affect the immunological activity of unirradiated mice can curtail the immunological recovery of mice exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation

  18. Cardiovascular manifestations of renovascular hypertension in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Sonu; Engel, Sean; Osman, Mazen; Al-Saiegh, Yousif; Wongjarupong, Asarn; Grande, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Type 2 diabetes is the leading cause of end stage renal disease in the United States. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is commonly observed in diabetic patients and impacts the rate of renal and cardiovascular disease progression. We sought to test the hypothesis that renovascular hypertension, induced by unilateral renal artery stenosis, exacerbates cardiac remodeling in leptin-deficient (db/db) mice, which serves as a model of human type II diabetes. Methods. We employed a murine model of renovascular hypertension through placement of a polytetrafluoroethylene cuff on the right renal artery in db/db mice. We studied 109 wild-type (non-diabetic, WT) and 95 db/db mice subjected to renal artery stenosis (RAS) or sham surgery studied at 1, 2, 4, and 6+ weeks following surgery. Cardiac remodeling was assessed by quantitative analysis of the percent of myocardial surface area occupied by interstitial fibrosis tissue, as delineated by trichrome stained slides. Aortic pathology was assessed by histologic sampling of grossly apparent structural abnormalities or by section of ascending aorta of vessels without apparent abnormalities. Results. We noted an increased mortality in db/db mice subjected to RAS. The mortality rate of db/db RAS mice was about 23.5%, whereas the mortality rate of WT RAS mice was only 1.5%. Over 60% of mortality in the db/db mice occurred in the first two weeks following RAS surgery. Necropsy showed massive intrathoracic hemorrhage associated with aortic dissection, predominantly in the ascending aorta and proximal descending aorta. Aortas from db/db RAS mice showed more smooth muscle dropout, loss of alpha smooth muscle actin expression, medial disruption, and hemorrhage than aortas from WT mice with RAS. Cardiac tissue from db/db RAS mice had more fibrosis than did cardiac tissue from WT RAS mice. Conclusions. db/db mice subjected to RAS are prone to develop fatal aortic dissection, which is not observed in WT mice with RAS. The db

  19. MICE Particle Identification Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being built, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), to demonstrate the feasibility of ionization cooling of muon beams. This is one of the major technological steps needed in the development of a muon collider and a neutrino factory based on muon decays in a storage ring. MICE will use particle detectors to measure the cooling effect with high precision, achieving a precision on the measurement of emittance of 0.1% or better...

  20. Effect of pulmonary irradiation from inhaled 90Y on immunity to Listeria monocytogenes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immunological response of mice subjected to irradiation from particles deposited in the lungs and challenged with Listeria monocytogenes was investigated. Mice, exposed by inhalation to 90Y (a beta-emitting radionuclide) in relatively insoluble fused aluminosilicate particles, were immunized with L. monocytogenes either before or after exposure. Two additional groups of mice were either immunized or irradiated only. A group of control mice received no irradiation or immunization. The beta radiation dose absorbed by the lungs of each mouse at time of challenge averaged 10,000 rads. Fourteen days after immunization, all mice were challenged with 2 LD50 doses of L. monocytogenes via the respiratory route. Survival of all immunized mice either with or without exposure to 90Y varied from 90 to 100% as compared to 10 to 20% for the mice irradiated only and for control mice through 14 days after challenge. Pulmonary clearance of inhaled L. monocytogenes during the first 4 hr after challenge was suppressed in the mice irradiated only but not in those immunized only, or in the immunized and irradiated groups, and control mice. There appeared to be a suppression of proliferation of L. monocytogenes in lungs and spleen in the immunized groups 72 hr after challenge, whereas the lungs and spleens of the mice irradiated only and the control mice had extensive bacterial invasion. It was concluded that the 10,000 rads of beta radiation absorbed by the lungs did not suppress the immune mechanisms of the immunized mice

  1. Is Piaget's Epistemic Subject Dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    1991-01-01

    Argues that the Piaget's epistemic subject is not supported by evidence and contains weaknesses. Concludes that the epistemic subject is dead and that continued acceptance of this aspect of Piagetian theory would be counterproductive. (PR)

  2. Transgenic mice: beyond the knockout

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, R. Lance

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic mice have had a tremendous impact on biomedical research. Most researchers are familiar with transgenic mice that carry Cre recombinase (Cre) and how they are used to create conditional knockouts. However, some researchers are less familiar with many of the other types of transgenic mice and their applications. For example, transgenic mice can be used to study biochemical and molecular pathways in primary cultures and cell suspensions derived from transgenic mice, cell-cell interac...

  3. Transgenic mice susceptible to poliovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Koike; Taya, C; Kurata, T; Abe, S.; Ise, I; Yonekawa, H; Nomoto, A

    1991-01-01

    Poliovirus-sensitive transgenic mice were produced by introducing the human gene encoding cellular receptors for poliovirus into the mouse genome. Expression of the receptor mRNAs in tissues of the transgenic mice was analyzed by using RNA blot hybridization and the polymerase chain reaction. The human gene is expressed in many tissues of the transgenic mice just as in tissues of humans. The transgenic mice are susceptible to all three poliovirus serotypes, and the mice inoculated with poliov...

  4. Objective Tests versus Subjective tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏福林

    2007-01-01

    objective test has only one correct answer, while subjective test has a range of possible answers. Because of this feature, reliability will not be difficult to achieve in the marking of the objective item, while the marking of the subjective items is reliable. On the whole, a good test must contain both subjective and objective test items.

  5. Observational learning in C57BL/6j mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Pascal; Jamon, Marc

    2006-11-01

    The ability of mice to solve a complex task by observational learning was investigated with C57BL/6j mice. Four female demonstrators were trained to reliably perform a sequence that consisted in pushing a piece of food into a tube attached to the side of a puzzle box, and recovering it by opening a drawer in front of the box. They then performed this sequence in front of naive mice assigned to individual cubicles in a box with a wire mesh front arranged in a row facing the demonstrators. A total of 25 naive mice (13 males and 12 females) were used. Fifteen mice observed 14 demonstrations a day for 5 days; 10 control mice were placed in similar cubicles, but behind a plastic screen which prevented them from observing the demonstrators. The mice were post-tested in the demonstrator situation, and 6 of 15 observers immediately reproduced the complete task successfully, but none of the naive or control mice were able to solve the task. The observers and controls were then subjected to a five level individual learning schedule. Observers learned the individual task significantly faster than the controls. No sex difference was found. These results suggest that observational learning processes at work were based on stimulus enhancement and observational conditioning. PMID:16939695

  6. Intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein increases mortality in aged mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice with conditional, intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp-IKO exhibit a complete block in chylomicron assembly together with lipid malabsorption. Young (8-10 week Mttp-IKO mice have improved survival when subjected to a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced sepsis. However, 80% of deaths in sepsis occur in patients over age 65. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age impacts outcome in Mttp-IKO mice subjected to sepsis. METHODS: Aged (20-24 months Mttp-IKO mice and WT mice underwent intratracheal injection with P. aeruginosa. Mice were either sacrificed 24 hours post-operatively for mechanistic studies or followed seven days for survival. RESULTS: In contrast to young septic Mttp-IKO mice, aged septic Mttp-IKO mice had a significantly higher mortality than aged septic WT mice (80% vs. 39%, p = 0.005. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice exhibited increased gut epithelial apoptosis, increased jejunal Bax/Bcl-2 and Bax/Bcl-XL ratios yet simultaneously demonstrated increased crypt proliferation and villus length. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice also manifested increased pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels, suggesting increased neutrophil infiltration, as well as decreased systemic TNFα compared to aged septic WT mice. CONCLUSIONS: Blocking intestinal chylomicron secretion alters mortality following sepsis in an age-dependent manner. Increases in gut apoptosis and pulmonary neutrophil infiltration, and decreased systemic TNFα represent potential mechanisms for why intestine-specific Mttp deletion is beneficial in young septic mice but harmful in aged mice as each of these parameters are altered differently in young and aged septic WT and Mttp-IKO mice.

  7. Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

  8. Ultrasonic Sound as an Indicator of Acute Pain in Laboratory Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Wendy O; Daniel K Riskin; Mott, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    In response to pain, mice may vocalize at frequencies above the range of human hearing (greater than 20 kHz). To determine whether an ultrasonic recording system is a reliable tool for assessing acute pain, we measured audible and ultrasonic vocalization in mice subjected to either nonpainful or potentially painful procedures performed routinely in animal facilities. Data were collected from 109 weanling mice (Mus musculus; B6, 129S6-Stab 5b) scheduled for 2 potentially painful procedures: DN...

  9. Neuroglobin over expressing mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raida, Zindy; Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Nyengaard, Jens R;

    2013-01-01

    thoroughly validated antibodies and oligos, we give a detailed brain anatomical characterization of transgenic mice over expressing Neuroglobin. Moreover, using permanent middle artery occlusion the effect of elevated levels of Neuroglobin on ischemic damage was studied. Lastly, the impact of mouse strain...... genetic background on ischemic damage was investigated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A four to five fold increase in Neuroglobin mRNA and protein expression was seen in the brain of transgenic mice. A β-actin promoter was used to drive Neuroglobin over expression, but immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization...... infarct volume 24 hours after ischemia. Immunohistochemistry showed no selective sparing of Neuroglobin expressing cells in the ischemic core or penumbra. A significant difference in infarct volume was found between mice of the same strain, but from different colonies. SIGNIFICANCE: In contrast to some...

  10. MICE Particle Identification Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, D A

    2009-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being built, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), to demonstrate the feasibility of ionization cooling of muon beams. This is one of the major technological steps needed in the development of a muon collider and a neutrino factory based on muon decays in a storage ring. MICE will use particle detectors to measure the cooling effect with high precision, achieving a precision on the measurement of emittance of 0.1% or better. The particle i.d. detectors and trackers must work in harsh environmental conditions due to high magnetic fringe fields and RF noise. We will briefly describe the MICE particle i.d. detector systems, and show some current performance measurements of these detectors.

  11. Human subjects and experimental irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years the public has expressed concern about the use of human subjects in scientific research. Some professional institutions have adopted codes of practice to guide them in this matter. At the University of New South Wales, where human subjects are used in teaching and research programmes, a committee ensures that high ethical standards are maintained. As the volunteer subjects do not gain any benefit themselves from the procedures, their level of risk is kept low. One type of procedure in which risk is becoming quantifiable, is the irradiation of human subjects. To assist peer review groups, the ICRP, WHO and the National Health and Medical Research Council have enunciated principles which should be followed in the irradiation of human volunteer subjects. In general the role of the Committee is advisory to protect the rights of the investigator, the subject, and the institution. Some of the inherent problems are discussed

  12. II Infused Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin L. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR-α plays an important role in attenuating hypertension. The current study determines the anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory role of PPAR-α agonist during a slow-pressor dose of Ang II (400 ng/kg/min. Ten to twelve week old male PPAR-α KO mice and their WT controls were implanted with telemetry devices and infused with Ang II for 12 days. On day 12 of Ang II infusion, MAP was elevated in PPAR-α KO mice compared to WT (161±4 mmHg versus 145±4 mmHg and fenofibrate (145 mg/kg/day reduced MAP in WT + Ang II mice (134±7 mmHg. Plasma IL-6 levels were higher in PPAR-α KO mice on day 12 of Ang II infusion (30±4 versus 8±2 pg/mL and fenofibrate reduced plasma IL-6 in Ang II-treated WT mice (10±3 pg/mL. Fenofibrate increased renal expression of CYP4A, restored renal CYP2J expression, reduced the elevation in renal ICAM-1, MCP-1 and COX-2 in WT + Ang II mice. Our results demonstrate that activation of PPAR-α attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension through up-regulation of CYP4A and CYP2J and an attenuation of inflammatory markers such as plasma IL-6, renal MCP-1, renal expression of ICAM-1 and COX-2.

  13. MICE Particle Identification System

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M

    2010-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment, MICE, at the ISIS accelerator lo- cated at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, will be the first experiment to study muon cooling at high precision. Demonstration of muon ionization cooling is an essential step towards the construction of a neutrino factory or a muon collider. Muons are produced by pion decay in a superconducting solenoid and reach MICE with a range of emittances and momenta. The purity of the muon beam is ensured by a system of particle detectors we will briefly describe here.

  14. Subjective experience and subjective response to neuroleptics in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A; Arduini, L; Stratta, P; Pallanti, S

    2000-01-01

    Although several studies have addressed the issue of the relationship between the subjective response to neuroleptics and drug compliance, very little attention has been given to the study of the subjective experience of psychosis and drug attitudes. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine the relationship between the subjective experience of psychosis as assessed by the Frankfurter Beschwerde-Fragebogen (FBF) and subjective response (SR) to neuroleptics as assessed by the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI) in a group of schizophrenic patients. Significant correlations were found between the total scores on the FBF and DAI (r= .46, P< .01). The DAI total score also correlated with all four factors (central cognitive disturbances, perception and motility, depressivity, and internal and external overstimulation) on the FBF. This finding suggests that the SR neuroleptics is partly explained by a "positive" subjective experience of psychosis. PMID:11086150

  15. The curative activity of thioridazine on mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Marta; Viveiros, Miguel; Kristiansen, Jette E; Molnar, Joseph; Amaral, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of thioridazine (TZ) at different dose levels on mice that had been infected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with a high dose of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATCC H37Rv strain. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Groups of five female BALB/C mice were...

  16. Effects of Endurance Exercise on Mitochondrial Function in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Gun-Soo; Kim, Seon-Rye

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 8 weeks of endurance exercise on the cardiac mitochondrial function of mice. [Subjects] Ten 129 SvJ/C57BL6 Male mice were used. The mice were randomly divided into an exercise group (n=5; mean ± SD weight, 27.4 ± 1.6 g) and a control (n=5; mean ± SD weight, 28.2 ± 1.1 g). The exercise mice ran on a motor driven treadmill 5 days per week for 30 minutes at a speed of 24 m/min for 8 weeks. Mitochondrial function as measured RC...

  17. Varying levels of female promiscuity in four Apodemus mice species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bryja, Josef; Patzenhauerová, Hana; Albrecht, Tomáš; Mošanský, L.; Stanko, M.; Stopka, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2008), s. 251-260. ISSN 0340-5443 R&D Projects: GA MŠk MEB090802; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : mating systems * multiple paternity * wood mice * testis size Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.917, year: 2008

  18. The pathology of facial vein blood sampling in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ket; Harslund, Jakob le Fèvre; Bollen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The use of retro-orbital blood sampling is prohibited in Denmark. For this reason, alternative methods are used for obtaining larger blood samples of a good quality. The facial vein is generally recommended for this. However, we have experienced discomfort for mice subjected to facial...

  19. Comparing ontogeny trajectories of inbred and wild house mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hiadlovská, Zuzana; Mikula, Ondřej; Vošlajerová Bímová, Barbora; Macholán, Miloš

    London: Biochemical Society, 214. s. 10-10. [Behaviour Meets Biochemistry: Animals Making Sense of Molecules Making Scents. 18.02.2014-20.02.2014, London] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/0640; GA ČR GAP506/11/1792 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:68081766 Keywords : house mice Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  20. Photoperiodic entrainment of the circadian molecular clock in the mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sosniyenko, Serhiy; Hut, R.; Matějů, Kristýna; Sládek, Martin; Illnerová, Helena; Sumová, Alena

    Praha : The Czech Neuroscience Society, 2007. s. 92-92. [Conference of the Czech Neuroscience Society /6./. 19.11.2007-20.11.2007, Praha] Grant ostatní: 6th Framework project EUCLOCK(XE) 18741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : spo2 * photoperiod * clock genes * mice Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  1. Photoperiodic entrainment of the circadian molecular clock in the mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sosniyenko, Serhiy; Laurinová, Kristýna; Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    Brno : Fyziologický ústav LF MU, 2007. [Fyziologické dny /83./. 06.02.2007-08.02.2007, Brno] Grant ostatní: 6th Framework project EUCLOCK(XE) 18741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : spo2 * photoperiod * clock genes * mice Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  2. Changing the Subject: Psychology, Social Regulation and Subjectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Julian F.; Hollway, Wendy; Urwin, Cathy; Venn, Couze; Walkerdine, Valerie

    1984-01-01

    Changing the Subject is a classic critique of traditional psychology in which the foundations of critical and feminist psychology are laid down. Pioneering and foundational, it is still the groundbreaking text crucial to furthering the new psychology in both teaching and research. Now reissued with a new foreword describing the changes which have taken place over the last few years, Changing the Subject will continue to have a significant impact on thinking about psychology and social theory.

  3. Subject Responses to Electrochromic Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clear, Robert; Inkarojrit, Vorapat; Lee, Eleanor

    2006-03-03

    Forty-three subjects worked in a private office with switchable electrochromic windows, manually-operated Venetian blinds, and dimmable fluorescent lights. The electrochromic window had a visible transmittance range of approximately 3-60%. Analysis of subject responses and physical data collected during the work sessions showed that the electrochromic windows reduced the incidence of glare compared to working under a fixed transmittance (60%) condition. Subjects used the Venetian blinds less often and preferred the variable transmittance condition, but used slightly more electric lighting with it than they did when window transmittance was fixed.

  4. Is Piaget's epistemic subject dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    Niaz (1990) presents arguments in favor of the retention of Piaget's epistemic subject as a theoretical construct to guide research and practice in science education and psychology. The intent of this article is to point out the weaknesses of those arguments and to suggest that the weight of evidence argues against the existence of the logical thinker postulated by Piaget. Therefore, contrary to Niaz's conclusion that the acceptance of Piaget's epistemic subject will facilitate the development of cognitive theories with greater explanatory power, the conclusion is reached that Piaget's epistemic subject is dead and that continued acceptance of this aspect of Piagetian theory would be counterproductive.

  5. Mice Drawer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancedda, Ranieri

    2008-01-01

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) facility which is able to support mice onboard the International Space Station during long-duration exploration missions (from 100 to 150-days) by living space, food, water, ventilation and lighting. Mice can be accommodated either individually (maximum 6) or in groups (4 pairs). MDS is integrated in the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation (uploading and downloading) to the ISS and in an EXPRESS Rack in Destiny, the US Laboratory during experiment execution. Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton. This bone loss experienced by astronauts is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population. MDS will help investigate the effects of unloading on transgenic (foreign gene that has been inserted into its genome to exhibit a particular trait) mice with the Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1, OSF-1, a growth and differentiation factor, and to study the genetic mechanisms underlying the bone mass pathophysiology. MDS will test the hypothesis that mice with an increased bone density are likely to be more protected from osteoporosis, when the increased bone mass is a direct effect of a gene involved in skeletogenesis (skeleton formation). Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton, a loss that is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population on Earth. Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1 (OSF-1), also known as pleiotrophin (PTN) or Heparin-Binding Growth- Associated Molecule (HB-GAM) belongs to a family of secreted heparin binding proteins..OSF-1 is an extracellular matrix-associated growth and

  6. Subjective probability models for lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Spizzichino, Fabio

    2001-01-01

    Bayesian methods in reliability cannot be fully utilized and understood without full comprehension of the essential differences that exist between frequentist probability and subjective probability. Switching from the frequentist to the subjective approach requires that some fundamental concepts be rethought and suitably redefined. Subjective Probability Models for Lifetimes details those differences and clarifies aspects of subjective probability that have a direct influence on modeling and drawing inference from failure and survival data. In particular, within a framework of Bayesian theory, the author considers the effects of different levels of information in the analysis of the phenomena of positive and negative aging.The author coherently reviews and compares the various definitions and results concerning stochastic ordering, statistical dependence, reliability, and decision theory. He offers a detailed but accessible mathematical treatment of different aspects of probability distributions for exchangea...

  7. PERSONAL LEADERSHIP PROTECTS RESEARCH SUBJECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personal leadership promotes the ethical conduct of human research activities. Leadership entails application of one’s cognitive abilities, technical skills, and emotional intelligence during the conduct of research activities, Personal leadership assures human research subject protection....

  8. SUBJECT ONTOLOGY INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.С. ФІЛІПЕНКО

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available  The article presents a research of presentive ontology of international economic policy. A subject field of international economic policy in the context of its multilevel methodology is defined.

  9. Ethical Obligation Towards Research Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The progress of biomedical research depends on ready availability of research subjects. But such ready availability, in turn, depends on ethical practices by researchers and sponsoring agencies. The clear-cut power to protect research subjects should be inbuilt in the contract process. Establishment of Best Practice Guidelines for researchers and academic medical centers and Good Publication Practice for sponsoring pharmaceuticals, are two important developments worth a close study and replication to assess feasibility across diverse geographical areas.

  10. Ethical Obligation Towards Research Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ajai R.; Shakuntala A. Singh

    2007-01-01

    The progress of biomedical research depends on ready availability of research subjects. But such ready availability, in turn, depends on ethical practices by researchers and sponsoring agencies. The clear-cut power to protect research subjects should be inbuilt in the contract process. Establishment of Best Practice Guidelines for researchers and academic medical centers and Good Publication Practice for sponsoring pharmaceuticals, are two important developments worth a close study and replic...

  11. Psychoanalysis And Politics: Historicising Subjectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Lynne Layton

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I compare three different views of the relation between subjectivity and modernity: one proposed by Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, a second by theorists of institutionalised individualisation, and a third by writers in the Foucaultian tradition of studies of the history of governmentalities. The theorists were chosen because they represent very different understandings of the relation between contemporary history and subjectivity. My purpose is to ground psychoanalytic theory about wh...

  12. Subjective Illness theory and coping

    OpenAIRE

    Gessmann H.-W.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a view of a problem of subjective illness theory in context of coping behavior. The article compiles the results of the latest studies of coping; discloses the way subjective illness theory affects the illness coping and patient's health; presents the study of differences in coping behaviour of patients at risk of heart attack and oncology. The article is recommended for specialists, concerned with psychological reasons of pathogenic processes and coping strategies of pat...

  13. Subject categories and scope descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is one in a series of publications known as the ETDE/INIS Joint Reference Series. It defines the subject categories and provides the scope descriptions to be used for categorization of the nuclear literature for the preparation of INIS and ETDE input by national and regional centres. Together with the other volumes of the INIS Reference Series it defines the rules, standards and practices and provides the authorities to be used in the International Nuclear Information System and ETDE. A complete list of the volumes published in the INIS Reference Series may be found on the inside front cover of this publication. This INIS/ETDE Reference Series document is intended to serve two purposes: to define the subject scope of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and to define the subject classification scheme of INIS and ETDE. It is thus the guide to the inputting centres in determining which items of literature should be reported, and in determining where the full bibliographic entry and abstract of each item should be included in INIS or ETDE database. Each category is identified by a category code consisting of three alphanumeric characters. A scope description is given for each subject category. The scope of INIS is the sum of the scopes of all the categories. With most categories cross references are provided to other categories where appropriate. Cross references should be of assistance in finding the appropriate category; in fact, by indicating topics that are excluded from the category in question, the cross references help to clarify and define the scope of the category to which they are appended. A Subject Index is included as an aid to subject classifiers, but it is only an aid and not a means for subject classification. It facilitates the use of this document, but is no substitute for the description of the scope of the subject categories

  14. Subjective Illness theory and coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessmann H.-W.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a view of a problem of subjective illness theory in context of coping behavior. The article compiles the results of the latest studies of coping; discloses the way subjective illness theory affects the illness coping and patient's health; presents the study of differences in coping behaviour of patients at risk of heart attack and oncology. The article is recommended for specialists, concerned with psychological reasons of pathogenic processes and coping strategies of patients.

  15. Ecosecent:: Essence, Subject and Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozachenko Hanna V.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article shows that due to multi-laterality the knowledge about security is distributed by various branches, one of which is ecosestate, within which conditions of secure functioning of socio-economic systems and methods of their provision are studied. It shows the essence of ecosecent as a component of the “state – region (branch – subject of economic activity” ecosestate vertical – a set of knowledge about economic security of subjects of economic activity. It considers reasons that cause establishment of ecosecent: practical needs and a necessity to reconsider basic concepts of the essence, limits and factors of economy. It formulates the subject of ecosecent. It considers the status of the “economic security of the subject of economic activity” notion as its state, described with a set of parameters or characteristic features as characteristics of the subject of economic activity as a condition of its activity and as a set of actions that allow ensuring or preservation of the state of security, in other words, protection of the subject of economic activity. It presents general approaches to structuring of ecosecent by activity, functional and branch features.

  16. The MICE PID Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Bonesini, M

    2008-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will carry out a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. As the emittance measurement will be done on a particle-by-particle basis, sophisticated beam instrumentation is needed to measure particle coordinates and timing vs RF. A PID system based on three time-of-flight stations, two Aerogel Cerenkov detectors and a KLOE-like calorimeter has been constructed in order to keep beam contamination ($e, \\pi$) well below 1%. The MICE time-of-flight system will measure timing with a resolution better than 70 ps per plane, in a harsh environment due to high particle rates, fringe magnetic fields and electron backgrounds from RF dark current.

  17. Status of MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Bross, Alan D.; Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    Muon ionization cooling is the only practical method for preparing high-brilliance beams needed for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory comprises a dedicated beamline to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. A first measurement of emittance is performed in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillati...

  18. The MICE PID Instrumentation

    OpenAIRE

    M. Bonesini(Sezione INFN Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Milano, Italy)

    2008-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will carry out a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. As the emittance measurement will be done on a particle-by-particle basis, sophisticated beam instrumentation is needed to measure particle coordinates and timing vs RF. A PID system based on three time-of-flight stations, two Aerogel Cerenkov detectors and a KLOE-like calorimeter has been constructed in order to keep beam contamination ($e, \\pi$) well be...

  19. Retinoblastoma in transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Windle, J J; Albert, D. M.; O'Brien, J. M.; Marcus, D. M.; Disteche, Ch.M.; Bernards, R.A.; Mellon, P L

    1990-01-01

    Retinoblastoma, a malignancy of the eye occurring in young children, has been widely studied as a model for genetic predisposition to cancer. This disease is caused by mutations in both alleles of an anti-oncogene (the retinoblastoma gene, Rb) that inactivate or eliminate the Rb encoded protein, pl05rb. Here we report that expression of a viral oncogene, the simian virus 40 T antigen, in the retina of transgenic mice produces heritable ocular tumours with histological, ultrastructural and imm...

  20. Transthoracic Echocardiography in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Respress, Jonathan L.; Wehrens, Xander H. T.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, murine models have become the primary avenue for studying the molecular mechanisms of cardiac dysfunction resulting from changes in gene expression. Transgenic and gene targeting methods can be used to generate mice with altered cardiac size and function,1-3 and as a result, in vivo techniques are needed to evaluate their cardiac phenotype. Transthoracic echocardiography, pulse wave Doppler (PWD), and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) can be used to provide dimensional measurement...

  1. Protective Effects of Overexpression of bcl-xl Gene on Local Cerebral Infarction in Transgenic Mice Undergoing Permanent Occlusion of Middle Cerebral Artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Furong WANG; Yongsheng JIANG; Suming ZHANG; Wenwu XIAO; Suiqiang ZHU

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the protective effects of the overexpression of bcl-xl gene on local cerebral infarction in the transgenic mice subject to permanent occlusion of middle cerebral artery, the models of bcl-xl transgenic mice were established and subjected to cerebral infarction by intralu- minal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The infarct volume and the neurological scores were observed and comparison between the wild type mice and the transgenic mice was made. It was found that the infarct volume and the neurological scores in the transgenic mice were significantly decreased as compared with those in the wild type mice. It was suggested that the overexpression of bcl-xl gene in transgenic mice could reduce the infarct volume and improve the neurological function of the mice.

  2. Novel transcranial magnetic stimulation coil for mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Stephen; Stark, Spencer; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) shows potential for non-invasive treatment of various neurological disorders. Significant work has been performed on the design of coils used for TMS on human subjects but few reports have been made on the design of coils for use on the brains of animals such as mice. This work is needed as TMS studies utilizing mice can allow rapid preclinical development of TMS for human disorders but the coil designs developed for use on humans are inadequate for optimal stimulation of the much smaller mouse brain. A novel TMS coil has been developed with the goal of inducing strong and focused electric fields for the stimulation of small animals such as mice. Calculations of induced electric fields were performed utilizing an MRI derived inhomogeneous model of an adult male mouse. Mechanical and thermal analysis of this new TMS helmet-coil design have also been performed at anticipated TMS operating conditions to ensure mechanical stability of the new coil and establish expected linear attraction and rotational force values. Calculated temperature increases for typical stimulation periods indicate the helmet-coil system is capable of operating within established medical standards. A prototype of the coil has been fabricated and characterization results are presented.

  3. Effect of clotiazepam on gastric mucosal lesions produced by conditioned emotional stimuli in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomita,Yutaka

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available The anti-ulcer action of clotiazepam (a thienodiazepine derivative was studied in mice subjected to non-physical and physical stimuli in a communication box. There were two groups of mice: the "sender" mice that received electric shocks on the feet and responded by squealing and jumping, and the "responder" mice that were affected by the senders' responses without receiving shocks on the feet. Gastric ulcers resulted in both groups. The effect of clotiazepam was compared with that of diazepam. The incidence of gastric ulcers was suppressed by clotiazepam at a dose of 3 mg/kg, per os, in "responder" and "sender" mice, and by diazepam at a dose of 1 mg/kg, per os, in "responder" mice. These results suggest that clotiazepam has a suppressive action against gastric ulcers produced by non-physical or physical stimuli, although its potency is slightly weaker than that of diazepam.

  4. Subject to Form: Research Interviews, Performative Subjectivity, Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarigianides, Sophia Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, I analyze teacher, literacy coach and researcher subjectivities in a five-year study of on-site professional development with middle-grade Language Arts teachers in a school designated by its district and state as severely underperforming. Interested in the role of research interviews as both research method and cultural…

  5. Weak Subjectivity, Trans-Subjectivity and the Power of Event

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kouba, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 3 (2010), s. 391-406. ISSN 1387-2842 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP401/10/1164 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Heidegger * Nietschean model of thought Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  6. Cytokine expression profile over time in burned mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Przkora, Rene; Herndon, David N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2009-01-01

    The persistent inflammatory response induced by a severe burn increases patient susceptibility to infections and sepsis, potentially leading to multi-organ failure and death. In order to use murine models to develop interventions that modulate the post-burn inflammatory response, the response in mice and the similarities to the human response must first be determined. Here we present the temporal serum cytokine expression profiles in burned in comparison to sham mice and human burn patients. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomized to control (n=47) or subjected to a 35% TBSA scald burn (n=89). Mice were sacrificed 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 48 hours and 7, 10, and 14 days post-burn; cytokines were measured by multi-plex array. Following the burn injury, IL-6, IL-1β, KC, G-CSF, TNF, IL-17, MIP-1α, RANTES, and GM-CSF were increased, p<0.05. IL-2, IL-3, and IL-5 were decreased, p<0.05. IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12p70 were expressed in a biphasic manner, p<0.05. This temporal cytokine expression pattern elucidates the pathogenesis of the inflammatory response in burned mice. Expression of 11 cytokines were similar in mice and children, returning to lowest levels by post-burn day 14, confirming the utility of the burned mouse model for development of therapeutic interventions to attenuate the post-burn inflammatory response. PMID:19019696

  7. Psychoanalysis and politics: historicising subjectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I compare three different views of the relation between subjectivity and modernity: one proposed by Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, a second by theorists of institutionalised individualisation, and a third by writers in the Foucaultian tradition of studies of the history of governmentalities. The theorists were chosen because they represent very different understandings of the relation between contemporary history and subjectivity. My purpose is to ground psychoanalytic theory about what humans need in history and so to question what it means to talk ahistorically about what humans need in order to thrive psychologically. Only in so doing can one assess the relation between psychoanalysis and progressive politics. I conclude that while psychoanalysis is a discourse of its time, it can also function as a counter-discourse and can help us understand the effects on subjectivity of a more than thirty year history in the West of repudiating dependency needs and denying interdependence. PMID:23678239

  8. Psychoanalysis and politics: Historicising subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Layton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I compare three different views of the relation between subjectivity and modernity: one proposed by Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, a second by theorists of institutionalised individualisation, and a third by writers in the Foucaultian tradition of studies of the history of governmentalities. The theorists were chosen because they represent very different understandings of the relation between contemporary history and subjectivity. My purpose is to ground psychoanalytic theory about what humans need in history and so to question what it means to talk ahistorically about what humans need in order to thrive psychologically. Only in so doing can one assess the relation between psychoanalysis and progressive politics. I conclude that while psychoanalysis is a discourse of its time, it can also function as a counter-discourse and can help us understand the effects on subjectivity of a more than thirty year history in the West of repudiating dependency needs and denying interdependence.

  9. Visual perception of spatial subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principally, any imaging technology consists of two consecutive, though strictly separated processes: data acquisition and subsequent processing to generate an image that can be looked at, either on a monitor screen or printed on paper. Likewise, the physiological process of viewing can be separated into vision and perception, though these processes are much more overlapping. Understanding the appearance of a subject requires the entire sequence from receiving the information carried e.g. by photons up to an appropriate processing leading to the perception of the subject shown. As a consequence, the imagination of a subject is a result of both, technological and physiological processes. Whenever an evaluation of an image is critical, also the physiological part of the processing should be considered. However, an image has two dimensions in the first place and reality is spatial, it has three dimensions. This problem has been tackled on a philosophical level at least since Platon's famous discussion on the shadow image in a dark cave. The mere practical point is which structural details can be perceived and what may remain undetected depending on the mode of presentation. This problem cannot be resolved without considering each single step of visual perception. Physiologically, there are three 'tools' available to understanding the spatial structure of a subject: binocular viewing, following the course of perspective projection and motion to collect multiple aspects. Artificially, an object may be cut in various ways to display the interior or covering parts could be made transparent within a model. Samples will be shown how certain details of a subject can be emphasised or hidden depending on the way of presentation. It needs to be discussed what might help to perceive the true spatial structure of a subject with all relevant details and what could be misleading. (authors)

  10. The Collective Subject that speaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lefevre

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the Discourse of the Collective Subject as a qualitative-quantitative proposal for opinion polling or research on social representations. The authors propose the presentation of collective opinion in research as an empirical variable of qualitative and quantitative nature. This is achieved by introducing a subject of discourse, who is individual and collective at the same time. This empowers the speaker to express him or herself directly, without the intervention of the researcher's meta-discourse and avoids converting opinion in a mere quantitative variable, mutilating its essentially discursive nature.

  11. On philosophical subjects and methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Fuchun

    2006-01-01

    With the consideration of some issues in contemporary philosophy,this thesis attempts to analyze being,thinking and language as philosophical subjects,and clear up the multiple meanings for each of them.It will also inquire the traditional methods in both Chinese and Western philosophy,and those in contemporary thinking.Finally,it puts forward a theory of"the critique without principles".The thesis aims to explore a new way to solve the problems of contemporary philosophy by changing its subjects and methods.

  12. Hemopoietic support capacity of adult mouse liver. Studies in 89Sr marrow-ablated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capacity of normal livers in adult mice to support proliferation of pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) was studied. We assayed CFU-S of the blood and livers of mice with intact marrows and of mice whose marrows had been ablated with 89Sr (4 μCi/g) either before or after removal of their spleens, the major hemopoietic organ in marrow-ablated mice. Splenectomy alone resulted in an increase in the numbers of blood and hepatic CFU-S; since the spleen is an efficient trapper of CFU-S released from the marrow, in the splenectomized mice more CFU-S were available for trapping by the liver. Mice splenectomized 3 days prior to 89Sr injection had virtually no blood or liver CFU-S by the tenth day after 89Sr injection. Fourteen days after injection of 89Sr there were supranormal numbers of CFU-S in both blood and liver of intact mice. One week after such mice were splenectomized, however, CFU-S were virtually absent from both blood and liver. This study suggests that normal livers in adult mice cannot support detectable proliferation of normal CFU-S even if the animal is subjected to severe and relatively prolonged hemopoietic stress. In addition, the results of our studies demonstrate that normal livers of adult mice have the capacity to trap large numbers of CFU-S

  13. Carotid chemoreceptor development in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Shirahata, Machiko; Kostuk, Eric W.; Pichard, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    Mice are the most suitable species for understanding genetic aspects of postnatal developments of the carotid body due to the availability of many inbred strains and knockout mice. Our study has shown that the carotid body grows differentially in different mouse strains, indicating the involvement of genes. However, the small size hampers investigating functional development of the carotid body. Hypoxic and/or hyperoxic ventilatory responses have been investigated in newborn mice, but these r...

  14. Native American Languages: Subject Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joyce, Comp.

    This document is an eleven-page supplemental subject guide listing reference material that focuses on Native American languages that is not available in the Labriola National American Indian Data Center in the Arizona State University, Tempe (ASU) libraries. The guide is not comprehensive but offers a selective list of resources useful for…

  15. The Societal Nature of Subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2013-01-01

    The HSR Focus presents a psycho-societal approach to qualitative empirical research in several areas of everyday social life. It is an approach which integrates a theory of subjectivity and an interpretation methodology which integrates hermeneutic experiences from text analysis and psychoanalysis...

  16. Subjective perception of personal change

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blatný, Marek; Osecká, Terezie

    Huddersfield : University of Huddersfield, 2005, 59-67. ISBN 1 86218 075 X. [Narrative, Memory, and Everyday Life. Huddersfield (GB), 01.04.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA8025004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : personality * stability * change Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  17. Subjective or objective? What matters?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sunega, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2014), s. 35-43. ISSN 2336-2839 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP404/12/1446 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : comparative housing policy * globalisation Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography

  18. Youth Homelessness and Individualised Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, David

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to understandings of youth homelessness and subjectivity by analysing identity construction in terms of young people's negotiation of the structural and institutional environment of youth homelessness. I suggest that while existing literature on this topic concentrates mainly on micro-social encounters, the…

  19. Russia needs the Subjective Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the comparative analysis of different kinds of philosophic thinking, the paper reveals the advantages of subjective philosophy – the most adequate universal essentiality of socialized human being, opening the prospects for Russia as the creative society of cultural spontaneous activity. Objective principle of thinking is limited by the logic of outward definition. According to the above logic, people are regarded as tiny parts of social mechanism, the objects of manipulation. Separating action from spontaneous activity, object changes from self-alteration of human subject, executive functions from norm-creating ones brings about alienated practices and such social situation that makes individuals perceive their own existence as alien non- existence, or opposing existence.Subjectivity is a form of social activity regarding individuals and groups according to their ability in self-definition, self-organizing, self-control, norm-creating, as well as their actual rights and duties in social spheres of needs and objectives, and their feasible power over forces of nature and society. Subjective philosophy perceives the material production as the means for cultivating wholesome and spontaneously active individuals due to educational fundamentality and cultural prosperity. Accordingly, accumulation of capital turns into accumulation of culture and personal creativity growth. The results of the undertaken analysis and its conclusions can be implemented in developing creative anthropological bases for philosophy, pedagogy, psychology, economics, political science, as well as the relating discipline teaching. 

  20. Teachers' subjective theories on algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Meinke, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This project concerns the impact of the belief system of teachers on their algebra teaching practices in secondary education. The first step is to reconstruct this belief system. The methodological framework is provided by the Research Project Subjective Theories (RPST). The research design is described here.

  1. Topical subjects of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report supplements and extends basic information contained in the seminar report 'Use and risk of nuclear energy' (Juel-Conf-17). The contributions deal with nuclear waste management, measures to avoid the misuse of nuclear fuels, and the properties and use of plutonium. As against the last edition, the subject 'Energy and environment' has been added. (orig.)

  2. Formal Institutions and Subjective Wellbeing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Dreher, Axel; Fischer, Justina A.V.

    2010-01-01

    cross-country studies on the institution-happiness association. Our findings suggest that their conclusions are qualitatively rather insensitive to the specific measure of 'happiness' used, while the associations between formal institutions and subjective well-being differ among poor and rich countries...

  3. Changes in Dictionary Subject Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2003-01-01

    The general content of the three editions of the Duden dictionary has undergone few changes. The most substantial changes are the addition of syllabification and the deletion of antonomy in respect of lemmata in the second and third editions. The concept of dictionary subject matter is questioned...

  4. Of mice and men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1 % of the population. It is a complex disease, which may be caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studies in human genetics have led to the identification of more than 50 human genes, involved in isolated CHD or genetic syndromes, where...... CHD is part of the phenotype. Furthermore, mapping of genomic copy number variants and exome sequencing of CHD patients have led to the identification of a large number of candidate disease genes. Experiments in animal models, particularly in mice, have been used to verify human disease genes and to...

  5. Emittance Measurement in MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Terrence L.; Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    Muon ionization cooling provides the only practical solution to prepare high-brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, is installing the first set of particle detectors ever built to measure to 0.1% the emittance of a 200 MeV/c or so muon beam in and out of a cooling cell, and thus measure the cooling cell's performance. Two identical "emittometers" (a precise scin...

  6. Subjectivity, individuality and singularity in children: a socially constituted subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Del Ré

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considering the hypothesis that Bakhtin and his Circle‟s reflections can help us think about issues involving the field of Language Acquisition, in addition to the fact that there are only a few works developed within this perspective in Brazil, in this article, we intend to discuss the notions of “subject”, “subjectivity”,“individuality” and “singularity”, drawing on Bakhtin‟s theory. Thus, in order to make this discussion clearer, we bring data from the speech of young children, from 1.8 to 3 years old, who were filmed in natural contexts interacting with their parents and relatives. From these data, we could verify, among other things, that children, as individuals who constitute themselves as subjects in and throughlanguage, bring marks to their discourse, revealing their subjectivity (through lexical, morphological, syntactic or genre choices.

  7. Working Memory Processing In Normal Subjects and Subjects with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, S. M.; Lajiness-O'Neill, R.; Weiland, B. J.; Mason, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to determine the neuroanatomical location of working memory (WM) processes. Differences between subjects with dyslexia (SD; n=5) and normal readers (NR; n=5) were studied during two WM tasks. A spatial WM task (SMW) consisted of blocks visually presented in one of 12 positions for 2 s each. Subjects were to determine if the current position matched the position presented 2 slides earlier (N-Back Test). The verbal task (VMW) consisted of presentation of a single letter. The location of cortical activity during SWM in NR (determined with MR-FOCUSS analysis) was in the right superior temporal gyrus (STG) and right angular gyrus (AG). Similar activation was seen in SD with a slight delay of approximately 20 ms. During VWM activity was seen in LEFT STG and LEFT AG in NR. In contrast for SD, activation was in the RIGHT STG and RIGHT AG. This study demonstrates the possibility to differentiate WM processing in subjects with and without learning disorders.

  8. Using Dragonflies as Common, Flexible & Charismatic Subjects for Teaching the Scientific Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Paul V.

    2007-01-01

    Biology laboratories are usually designed around convenient and available subjects. For example, for animal laboratories "Daphnia magna," "Drosophila melanogaster," frogs, rats, and mice are common animals that are relatively easy to obtain, relatively cheap, and consequently lend themselves well to laboratory experimentation. On many campuses, …

  9. Increased risk of traffic accidents in subjects with laten toxoplasmosis: a retrospective casecontrolstudy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flegr, J.; Havlíček, J.; Kodym, P.; Malý, M.; Šmahel, Zbyněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2002), s. 11. ISSN 1471-2334 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : behavior * mice * AIDS Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 0.958, year: 2002

  10. Influence of experimental context on the development of anhedonia in male mice imposed to chronic social stress

    OpenAIRE

    Bondar, N. P.; Kovalenko, I. L.; Avgustinovich, D. F.; Kudryavtseva, N. N.

    2007-01-01

    Anhedonia is one of the key symptoms of depression in humans. Consumption of 1% sucrose solution supplemented with 0.2% vanillin was studied in two experimental contexts in male mice living under chronic social stress induced by daily experience of defeats in agonistic interactions and leading to development of depression. In the first experiment, vanillin sucrose solution was made available as an option of water during 10 days to mice living in group home cages. Then the mice were subjected ...

  11. Subject search study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study gathered information on how users search the database of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), using indicators such as Subject categories, Controlled terms, Subject headings, Free-text words, combinations of the above. Users participated from the Australian, French, Russian and Spanish INIS Centres, that have different national languages. Participants, both intermediaries and end users, replied to a questionnaire and executed search queries. The INIS Secretariat at the IAEA also participated. A protocol of all search strategies used in actual searches in the database was kept. The thought process for Russian and Spanish users is predominantly non-English and also the actual initial search formulation is predominantly non-English among Russian and Spanish users while it tends to be more in English among French users. A total of 1002 searches were executed by the five INIS centres including the IAEA. The search protocols indicate the following search behaviour: 1) free text words represent about 40% of search points on an average query; 2) descriptors used as search keys have the widest range as percentage of search points, from a low of 25% to a high of 48%; 3) search keys consisting of free text that coincides with a descriptor account for about 15% of search points; 4) Subject Categories are not used in many searches; 5) free text words are present as search points in about 80% of all searches; 6) controlled terms (descriptors) are used very extensively and appear in about 90% of all searches; 7) Subject Headings were used in only a few percent of searches. From the results of the study one can conclude that there is a greater reluctance on the part of non-native English speakers in initiating their searches by using free text word searches. Also: Subject Categories are little used in searching the database; both free text terms and controlled terms are the predominant types of search keys used, whereby the controlled terms are used more

  12. Experimental subjects are not different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exadaktylos, Filippos; Espín, Antonio M; Brañas-Garza, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Experiments using economic games are becoming a major source for the study of human social behavior. These experiments are usually conducted with university students who voluntarily choose to participate. Across the natural and social sciences, there is some concern about how this "particular" subject pool may systematically produce biased results. Focusing on social preferences, this study employs data from a survey-experiment conducted with a representative sample of a city's population (N = 765). We report behavioral data from five experimental decisions in three canonical games: dictator, ultimatum and trust games. The dataset includes students and non-students as well as volunteers and non-volunteers. We separately examine the effects of being a student and being a volunteer on behavior, which allows a ceteris paribus comparison between self-selected students (students*volunteers) and the representative population. Our results suggest that self-selected students are an appropriate subject pool for the study of social behavior. PMID:23429162

  13. Conceptual change, subjectivity and Psychoanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Villani; Tânia Cristina Baptista Cabral

    1997-01-01

    We present the Conceptual Change Model (Posner et al., 1982) and detach how the presence of student’s subjectivity deeply marks the four conditions for the accomodation. The fundamental metaphor which supports the model, student as a little scientist, is limited, because does not consider the subjet’s relation with his community via language. We propose another metaphor: the learning process is similar with the psychoanalytic process. The analogy allow us to delineate in a sufficiently precis...

  14. Psychiatric classification and subjective experience

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This article does not directly consider the feelings and emotions that occur in mental illness. Rather, it concerns a higher level methodological question: To what extent is an analysis of feelings and felt emotions of importance for psychiatric classification? Some claim that producing a phenomenologically informed descriptive psychopathology is a prerequisite for serious taxonomic endeavor. Others think that classifications of mental disorders may ignore subjective experience. A middle view...

  15. Translating deixis: A subjective experience

    OpenAIRE

    Semlali, Hicham

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes some of the conscious cognitive processes that are inherent in equivalence formation commencing from the transfer of deixis and culminating in the experience of source-to-target and target-to-source indexicality. Its scope is interdisciplinary and the methodology is varied depending on the segment of analysis. It combines a process-oriented analysis with a product based assessment. The stance is also partly subjective because it is based on the pe...

  16. Russia needs the Subjective Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2015-01-01

    Based on the comparative analysis of different kinds of philosophic thinking, the paper reveals the advantages of subjective philosophy – the most adequate universal essentiality of socialized human being, opening the prospects for Russia as the creative society of cultural spontaneous activity. Objective principle of thinking is limited by the logic of outward definition. According to the above logic, people are regarded as tiny parts of social mechanism, the objects of manipulation. Separat...

  17. Transforming subjectivities in psychiatric care

    OpenAIRE

    Terkelsen, Toril Borch

    2009-01-01

    This paper is based upon ethnographic fieldwork in a Norwegian psychiatric unit practicing a psycho-educational treatment of young adults diagnosed with schizophrenia. An aim of the programme is that patients learn to detect and monitor their 'symptoms' in order to obtain 'insight into their own illness', thus transforming themselves into self-governed and self-responsible subjects who are able to cope with life outside institutions. The programme is constituted within a medical framework wit...

  18. Strategic analysis of choosen subject

    OpenAIRE

    Gebhart, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Thesis "Strategic Analysis of the selected entity 'of the chosen subject is about strategy BRISK Tabor as The aim is to assess the strategic focus of the company, the discovery and propose changes in the current Strategy. The work is divided into a theoretical part and a practical part of the conclusion. The theoretical part is from the perspective of economic theory and practice is portrayed strategy, strategic management process, thinking and planning. Strategic analysis of the external and...

  19. Persimmon leaf flavonoid induces brain ischemic tolerance in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingsan Miao; Xuexia Zhang; Linan Wang

    2013-01-01

    The persimmon leaf has been shown to improve cerebral ischemic outcomes; however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, mice were subjected to 10 minutes of ischemic preconditioning, and persimmon leaf flavonoid was orally administered for 5 days. Results showed that the persimmon leaf flavonoid significantly improved the content of tissue type plasminogen activator and 6-keto prostaglandin-F1 α in the cerebral cortex, decreased the content of thromboxane B2, and reduced the content of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in mice. Following optical microscopy, persimmon leaf flavonoid was also shown to reduce cell swelling and nuclear hyperchromatism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. These results suggested that persimmon leaf flavonoid can effectively inhibit brain thrombosis, improve blood supply to the brain, and relieve ischemia-induced pathological damage, resulting in brain ischemic tolerance.

  20. Inborn anemias in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an α-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes

  1. Status of MICE

    CERN Document Server

    Bross, Alan D

    2008-01-01

    Muon ionization cooling is the only practical method for preparing high-brilliance beams needed for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory comprises a dedicated beamline to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. A first measurement of emittance is performed in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating-fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in liquid hydrogen with RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a particle identification system will measure the outgoing emittance. Plans for measurements of emittance and cooling are described.

  2. Emittance Measurement in MICE

    CERN Document Server

    Hart, Terrence L

    2008-01-01

    Muon ionization cooling provides the only practical solution to prepare high-brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, is installing the first set of particle detectors ever built to measure to 0.1% the emittance of a 200 MeV/c or so muon beam in and out of a cooling cell, and thus measure the cooling cell's performance. Two identical "emittometers" (a precise scintillating-fiber tracker in solenoidal magnetic field and a 50 ps time-of-flight station) measure the six phase-space coordinates of each muon. Another TOF plane and two Cherenkov counters assure the purity of the incoming muon beam. A downstream electron/muon calorimeter eliminates contamination from decay electrons.

  3. [Child's subjectivity in postmodern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejarraga, Horacio

    2012-08-01

    From mid ´50s onwards, we witness a change of paradigm in the Western world: the expression of a historical shift from modernity to postmodernity. This new era includes a strong influence of the media on the population, a change from a lineal sense of time to a virtual, punctual one, and a flooding of overwhelming amount of information, mostly irrelevant, broadcasted in a de-contextualized, synchronic, fragmented and senseless fashion. This new age is characterized, above all, by the destitution of the State, the meta- institution source of legitimacy of all modern institutions: citizenship, factory, and mainly, School, an essential determinant this last one in the construction process of child subjectivity. Having lost its modeling power, the School loses its modern meaning, becoming thus a mere physical space in which pupils meet, but where general, transcendent rules, norms and values cannot be built, as in fact happened in modern times. According to Corea and Lewkowicz, school becomes an empty shed in which rules have to be built all the time, and become valid only for a particular occasion. These changes necessarily influence child subjectivity, the way they feel, they behave, and they "live" in contemporary society. Pediatricians have to be aware and try to understand these changes, so that we can help children, and, in doing so, to build a better world for them. PMID:22859325

  4. FASTER: an unsupervised fully automated sleep staging method for mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sunagawa, Genshiro A; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Shimba, Shigeki; Urade, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the stages of sleep, or sleep staging, is an unavoidable step in sleep research and typically requires visual inspection of electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) data. Currently, scoring is slow, biased and prone to error by humans and thus is the most important bottleneck for large-scale sleep research in animals. We have developed an unsupervised, fully automated sleep staging method for mice that allows less subjective and high-throughput evaluation of sleep. ...

  5. Photoperiodic entrainment of the circadian clock in the mice SCN

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sosniyenko, Serhiy; Matějů, Kristýna; Sládek, Martin; Illnerová, Helena; Sumová, Alena

    Praha : FgÚ AV ČR, 2008. ---. [PhD Student Workshop of Institute of Physiology. 02.06.2008-04.06.2008, Seč] Grant ostatní: EUCLOCK(XE) 018741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : spo2 * photoperiod * mice * circadian clock Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  6. Effect of Leukocytes Transfer on the Induction of Liver Damage after Renal Ischemia- Reperfusion in Inbred Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khastar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Renal ischemia-reperfusion (IR induces organ damage in remote organs such as liver, brain and lung. The aim of this study was to assess the role of leukocytes in the induction of liver damage after renal IR injury.Methods: Inbred mice were subjected to either sham operation or bilateral renal IR injury (60 min ischemia followed by 3h reperfusion. Mice were then anesthetized for collection of leukocytes by heart puncture. Isolated leukocytes were transferred to two other groups: intact recipient mice that received leukocytes from IR mice and intact recipient mice that received leukocytes from sham-operated control mice. After 24h, recipient mice were anesthetized and blood and hepatic samples were collected.Results: Alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA increased significantly in intact recipient mice that received leukocytes from IR mice in comparison to intact recipient mice receiving leukocytes from sham-operated control mice. In addition, loss of normal liver architecture, cytoplasmic vacuolization and focal infiltration of leukocytes were observed.Conclusion: These results suggest that leukocytes are one of the possible factors that contribute to liver damage after renal IR injury and this damage is partly due to the induction of oxidative stress.

  7. Subjective wellbeing, health, and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, Andrew; Deaton, Angus; Stone, Arthur A

    2015-02-14

    Subjective wellbeing and health are closely linked to age. Three aspects of subjective wellbeing can be distinguished-evaluative wellbeing (or life satisfaction), hedonic wellbeing (feelings of happiness, sadness, anger, stress, and pain), and eudemonic wellbeing (sense of purpose and meaning in life). We review recent advances in the specialty of psychological wellbeing, and present new analyses about the pattern of wellbeing across ages and the association between wellbeing and survival at older ages. The Gallup World Poll, a continuing survey in more than 160 countries, shows a U-shaped relation between evaluative wellbeing and age in high-income, English speaking countries, with the lowest levels of wellbeing in ages 45-54 years. But this pattern is not universal. For example, respondents from the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe show a large progressive reduction in wellbeing with age, respondents from Latin America also shows decreased wellbeing with age, whereas wellbeing in sub-Saharan Africa shows little change with age. The relation between physical health and subjective wellbeing is bidirectional. Older people with illnesses such as coronary heart disease, arthritis, and chronic lung disease show both increased levels of depressed mood and impaired hedonic and eudemonic wellbeing. Wellbeing might also have a protective role in health maintenance. In an analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, we identify that eudemonic wellbeing is associated with increased survival; 29·3% of people in the lowest wellbeing quartile died during the average follow-up period of 8·5 years compared with 9·3% of those in the highest quartile. Associations were independent of age, sex, demographic factors, and baseline mental and physical health. We conclude that the wellbeing of elderly people is an important objective for both economic and health policy. Present psychological and economic theories do not adequately account for the variations in patterns

  8. Effects of Anabolic Steroids and High-Intensity Aerobic Exercise on Skeletal Muscle of Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Fontana, Karina; Campos, Gerson E. R.; Staron, Robert S.; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to shorten recovery time and improve performance, strength and endurance athletes occasionally turn to the illicit use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). This study evaluated the effects of AAS treatment on the muscle mass and phenotypic characteristics of transgenic mice subjected to a high-intensity, aerobic training program (5d/wk for 6 weeks). The transgenic mice (CETP+/-LDLr-/+) were engineered to exhibit a lipid profile closer to humans. Animals were divided into group...

  9. Effects of Chronic Restraint Stress on Body Weight, Food Intake, and Hypothalamic Gene Expressions in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Joo Yeon; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sang Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background Stress affects body weight and food intake, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Methods We evaluated the changes in body weight and food intake of ICR male mice subjected to daily 2 hours restraint stress for 15 days. Hypothalamic gene expression profiling was analyzed by cDNA microarray. Results Daily body weight and food intake measurements revealed that both parameters decreased rapidly after initiating daily restraint stress. Body weights of stressed mice the...

  10. Peculiarities of extramedullar blood formation in mice under different immunodepressive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been carried out to study blood formation in the lumph nodes of mice under the influence of different chemical agents and also ionizing irradiation, similar in its immunodepressive effect with alkylating compounds. Animals were subjected to total gamma-radiation at doses of 400, 600, 800 and 1000 rad (dose rate of 73 rad/min). Results show that the ionizing radiation unlike alkylating compounds does not provoke foci of extramedullary blood formation in the lymph nodes of mice

  11. Prevention of lymphocyte apoptosis in septic mice with cancer increases mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Amy C.; Elise R Breed; Liang, Zhe; Clark, Andrew T.; Zee-Cheng, Brendan R.; Chang, Katherine C.; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Jung, Enjae; Dunne, W. Michael; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.; Linehan, David C; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2011-01-01

    Lymphocyte apoptosis is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of sepsis. However, there is a disconnect between animal models of sepsis and patients with the disease, since the former use subjects that were healthy prior to the onset of infection while most patients have underlying comorbidities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether lymphocyte apoptosis prevention is effective in preventing mortality in septic mice with pre-existing cancer. Mice with lymphocyte Bcl...

  12. Moderate exercise prevents neurodegeneration in D-galactose-induced aging mice

    OpenAIRE

    Li Li; Meng Xu; Bo Shen; Man Li; Qian Gao; Shou-gang Wei

    2016-01-01

    D-galactose has been widely used in aging research because of its efficacy in inducing senescence and accelerating aging in animal models. The present study investigated the benefits of exercise for preventing neurodegeneration, such as synaptic plasticity, spatial learning and memory abilities, in mouse models of aging. D-galactose-induced aging mice were administered daily subcutaneous injections of D-galactose at the base of the neck for 10 consecutive weeks. Then, the mice were subjected ...

  13. Discriminative stimulus properties of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in C57BL/6J mice

    OpenAIRE

    Vann, Robert E.; Warner, Jonathan A.; Bushell, Kristen; Huffman, John W.; Martin, Billy R.; Wiley, Jenny L.

    2009-01-01

    Primarily, rats have served as subjects in Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol's (THC) discrimination studies although other species such as monkeys and pigeons have been used. While the introduction of the knockout and transgenic mice has vastly stimulated the study of the discriminative stimulus effects of drugs there is only a single published report of mice trained to discriminate THC. Thus, this study extended those results by providing a systematic replication that THC serves as an effective discri...

  14. Early differences in metabolic flexibility between obesity-resistant and obesity-prone mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bardová, Kristina; Horáková, Olga; Janovská, Petra; Hansíková, Jana; Kůs, Vladimír; van Schothorst, E. M.; Hoevenaars, F.P.M.; Uil, M.; Hensler, Michal; Keijer, J.; Kopecký, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 124, May (2016), s. 163-170. ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10059; GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : indirect calorimetry * glucose tolerance * weaning * C57BL/6J mice * A/J mice * metabolic flexibility Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 2.963, year: 2014

  15. Taurine effect on cytogenetic lesions in the cornea of mice exposed to 9 Gev proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of preventive measures and treatment of cytogenetic injuries in the mice cornea, subjected to proton irradiation at 9 Gev were studied. Taurine containing solution (TCS) was used as a radiomodifying agent. It is shown that TCS application enables to decrease aberrant mitoses level in cornea epithelium cells of mice. Antiactinic effect of the above agent is determined by its considerable action on mitotic delay

  16. Effects of Estrogen Receptor Modulators on Morphine Induced Sensitization in Mice Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdieh Anoush; Ali Jani; Moosa Sahebgharani; Mohammad Reza Jafari

    2015-01-01

     Objective: In this study, the effects of estradiol valerate and raloxifenea selective estrogen receptor modulator; (SERM) on morphine induced sensitization were examined in mice memory, according to the step-down passive avoidance task.  Method:The mice received morphine or estradiol and raloxifene for three days alone or in combination with morphine. After a drug free period of 5 days, the subjects received saline or morphine as pre- training treatments followed by a pre-test saline adminis...

  17. Postural control in blind subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vinicius Soares

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze postural control in acquired and congenitally blind adults. Methods: A total of 40 visually impaired adults participated in the research, divided into 2 groups, 20 with acquired blindness and 20 with congenital blindness - 21 males and 19 females, mean age 35.8 ± 10.8. The Brazilian version of Berg Balance Scale and the motor domain of functional independence measure were utilized. Results: On Berg Balance Scale the mean for acquired blindness was 54.0 ± 2.4 and 54.4 ± 2.5 for congenitally blind subjects; on functional independence measure the mean for acquired blind group was 87.1 ± 4.8 and 87.3 ± 2.3 for congenitally blind group. Conclusion: Based upon the scale used the results suggest the ability to control posture can be developed by compensatory mechanisms and it is not affected by visual loss in congenitally and acquired blindness.

  18. Social stress in male mice impairs long-term antiviral immunity selectively in wounded subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de J.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Scholten, J.W.; Koolhaas, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    An important property of the antiviral immune response is its time-dependent character. Beginning with a few antigen-specific cells upon infection, it evolves to a stage where there is an abundance of antigen-specific cells and antibodies that are needed to clear the pathogen, and ends with circulat

  19. Mice, men and MHC supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus

    2010-01-01

    vaccine formulations. Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, causes severe neurologic and ocular disease in congenitally infected and immunocompromised individuals. No protective vaccine exists against human toxoplasmosis. However, studies with mice have revealed immunodominant cytotoxic T...

  20. Owls and larks in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Martina; Wicht, Helmut; von Gall, Charlotte; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Humans come in different chronotypes and, particularly, the late chronotype (the so-called owl) has been shown to be associated with several health risks. A number of studies show that laboratory mice also display various chronotypes. In mice as well as in humans, the chronotype shows correlations with the period length and rhythm stability. In addition, some mouse models for human diseases show alterations in their chronotypic behavior, which are comparable to those humans. Thus, analysis of the behavior of mice is a powerful tool to unravel the molecular and genetic background of the chronotype and the prevalence of risks and diseases that are associated with it. In this review, we summarize the correlation of chronotype with free-running period length and rhythm stability in inbred mouse strains, in mice with a compromised molecular clockwork, and in a mouse model for neurodegeneration. PMID:26029157

  1. Owls and larks in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina ePfeffer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans come in different chronotypes and, particularly, the late chronotype (the so-called owl has been shown to be associated with a number of health risks. Recent studies indicate that laboratory mice also display various chronotypes. In mice as well as in humans, the chronotype shows correlations with the period length and rhythm stability. In addition, some mouse models for human diseases show alterations in their chronotypic behavior which are comparable to those humans. Thus, analysis of the behavior of mice is a powerful tool to unravel the molecular and genetic background of the chronotype and the prevalence of risks and diseases that are associated with it. In this review, we summarize the correlation of chronotype with free-running period length and rhythm stability in the most commonly used inbred mouse strains, in mice with a compromised molecular clockwork and in a mouse model for neurodegeneration.

  2. Tamoxifen administration to mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Jonathan; Littlewood, Trevor; Soucek, Laura

    2015-03-01

    The strategy of fusing a protein of interest to a hormone-binding domain (HBD) of a steroid hormone receptor allows fine control of the activity of the fused protein. Such fusion proteins are inactive in the absence of ligand, because they are complexed with a variety of intracellular polypeptides. Upon ligand binding, the receptor is released from its inhibitory complex and the fusion protein becomes functional. In the murine estrogen receptor (ER) fusion system, proteins are fused to the HBD of the ER. The system relies on the use of a mutant ER known as ER(TAM). Compared to the wild-type HBD, ER(TAM) has 1000-fold lower affinity for estrogen, yet remains responsive to activation by the synthetic steroid 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT). Because 4-OHT is expensive, animals can be treated with the cheaper precursor tamoxifen, which is converted into 4-OHT by a liver enzyme. Here we present an overview of the methods used to deliver tamoxifen to mice. The most used method is intraperitoneal injection, because the amount of administered compound can be better controlled, but delivery by oral gavage is also possible. For short-term and immediate-effect studies or when conversion of tamoxifen by the liver is to be avoided, 4-OHT can be used directly. PMID:25734062

  3. Stress inoculation modeled in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Brockhurst, J; Cheleuitte-Nieves, C; Buckmaster, C L; Schatzberg, A. F.; Lyons, D M

    2015-01-01

    Stress inoculation entails intermittent exposure to mildly stressful situations that present opportunities to learn, practice and improve coping in the context of exposure psychotherapies and resiliency training. Here we investigate behavioral and hormonal aspects of stress inoculation modeled in mice. Mice randomized to stress inoculation or a control treatment condition were assessed for corticosterone stress hormone responses and behavior during open-field, object-exploration and tail-susp...

  4. Transplacental Arsenic Carcinogenesis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Waalkes, Michael P.; Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-01-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from day 8 to 18 of gestation,...

  5. AGONISTIC BEHAVIOR OF LABORATORY MICE

    OpenAIRE

    D. Cinghiţă; D. Stănescu

    2005-01-01

    In this work we study agonistic behavior of laboratory white mice when they are kept in captivity. For all this experimental work we used direct observation of mice, in small lists, because we need a reduced space to emphasize characteristics of agonistic behavior. Relations between members of the same species that live in organized groups are based in most cases on hierarchical structure. Relations between leader and subservient, decided by fighting, involve a thorough observation between i...

  6. Human Malaria in Immunocompromised Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Badell, Edgar; Oeuvray, Claude; Moreno, Alicia; Soe, Soe; Van Rooijen, Nico; Bouzidi, Ahmed; Druilhe, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    We have recently described that sustained Plasmodium falciparum growth could be obtained in immunodeficient mice. We now report the potential of this new mouse model by assaying the effect of the passive transfer of antibodies (Abs) which in humans have had a well-established effect. Our results show that the total African adult hyperimmune immunoglobulin Gs (HI-IgGs) strongly reduce P. falciparum parasitemia similarly to that reported in humans, but only when mice are concomitantly reconstit...

  7. Tuberculosis Susceptibility of Diabetic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Gregory W.; Arikan, Meltem Cevik; Lee, Jinhee; Ren, Fucheng; Greiner, Dale; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2007-01-01

    Increased susceptibility to infections, including tuberculosis (TB), is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. Despite the clinical importance of this problem, little is known about how diabetes impairs protective immunity. We modeled this phenomenon by infecting acute (⩽ 1 mo) or chronic (⩾ 3 mo) diabetic mice with a low aerosol dose of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) Erdman. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment of C57BL/6 mice, while another m...

  8. Subjectivity NOT Statement and NOT APA!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihelkova, Dana

    2013-01-01

    I inspect in a brief theoretical-philosophical essay the roots of subjectivity and suggest many possible directions for examining the phenomenon of subjectivity so that multiple different meanings can be revealed. For instance, a researcher can explore her or his own subjectivity or he/she can attempt to define subjectivity per se or the…

  9. Payment expectations for research participation among subjects who tell the truth, subjects who conceal information, and subjects who fabricate information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Eric G; Knapp, Clifford M; Sarid-Segal, Ofra; O'Keefe, Sean M; Wardell, Cale; Baskett, Morgan; Pecchia, Ashley; Ferrell, Katie; Ciraulo, Domenic A

    2015-03-01

    Multiple models guide researchers' payment practices but few studies have assessed subjects' expectations for payment. Payments in excess of subjects' expectations may result in undue inducement, while payments below these expectations may be associated with exploitation. Data on subjects' payment expectations will help inform practices to avoid undue inducement and exploitation. This study examined subjects' expectations for payment for common research procedures and explored the relationship between subjects' honesty and payment expectations. One-hundred subjects who participated in two or more studies in the last year reported the minimum payment they expect for completing study procedures. They were also asked about their use of deception while screening for studies. Subjects expected $20 on average to complete the least risky and least burdensome procedure. Subjects' expectations for payment consistently increased with greater procedure risks. Subjects who denied using deception to enroll in studies refused more procedures than subjects who reported using deception. Among subjects who used deception, the rate of procedure refusal increased with procedure risks, suggesting that these subjects have some risk aversion and may act to protect themselves from undue inducement. Although subjects expect greater payments for more risky procedures, ethical considerations for limiting undue inducement may prevent researchers from meeting subjects' expectations. Subjects who use deceptive practices appear to be more risk-tolerant than subjects who deny using deception; nonetheless, these deceptive subjects also exercise some risk aversion when they refuse higher-risk procedures. These subjects may be able to protect themselves from undue inducement by refusing procedures that exceed their risk tolerance. PMID:25530307

  10. Influence of adaptative response to low dose radiation on radiation-induced thymic lymphoma in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To search for influence of low dose radiation (LDR) on thymic lymphoma (TL) induced by carcinogenic dose radiation in C57BL /6J mice and its immunologic mechanism. Methods: The model was adopted that C57BL/6J mice were subjected to whole body irradiation with 1.75 Gy X-ray once every week for 4 weeks to induce TL. The incidence of TL was observed by microscopy 6 months after irradiation. The following indexes were examined:splenic NK cytotoxic activity, IL-2 and γ- IFN secretion activity, peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis and its TNFα secretion activity, the changes of thymocyte differentiation in mice irradiated with different dose 1 month after irradiation. Results: The incidences of Tl in mice irradiated with 25mGy or 75m Gy 6h or 12h before 1.75Gy irradiation were all lower than that in mice irradiated with 1.75Gy only, and it is more obvious in mice irradiated with 75mGy prior to carcinogenic dose radiation. Immune parameters mentioned above in mice irradiated with 75mGy 12h before 1.75Gy were higher than those in mice irradiated with 1.75 only and the majority approached to those of the sham-irradiated mice. The number of thymic CD4-CD8 cells or CD4-CD8- cells was lower and CD4+CD 8+ cells was higher in mice irradiated with 75mGy 12h before 1.75Gy than that in mice irradiated with 1.75Gy only. Conclusion: LDR can induce the adaptative response of radiation-induced TL, and prevent or reduce the onset of radiation-induced TL. The suppression mechanism may be related to the immuno-enhancement effect and the adaptive response induced by LDR, decreasing immune function damage caused by carcinogenic dose radiation, eliminating thymic pre-lymphoma cells before they from solid tumor

  11. Prevention of lymphocyte apoptosis in septic mice with cancer increases mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Amy C; Breed, Elise R; Liang, Zhe; Clark, Andrew T; Zee-Cheng, Brendan R; Chang, Katherine C; Dominguez, Jessica A; Jung, Enjae; Dunne, W Michael; Burd, Eileen M; Farris, Alton B; Linehan, David C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2011-08-15

    Lymphocyte apoptosis is thought to have a major role in the pathophysiology of sepsis. However, there is a disconnect between animal models of sepsis and patients with the disease, because the former use subjects that were healthy prior to the onset of infection while most patients have underlying comorbidities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether lymphocyte apoptosis prevention is effective in preventing mortality in septic mice with preexisting cancer. Mice with lymphocyte Bcl-2 overexpression (Bcl-2-Ig) and wild type (WT) mice were injected with a transplantable pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line. Three weeks later, after development of palpable tumors, all animals received an intratracheal injection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Despite having decreased sepsis-induced T and B lymphocyte apoptosis, Bcl-2-Ig mice had markedly increased mortality compared with WT mice following P. aeruginosa pneumonia (85 versus 44% 7-d mortality; p = 0.004). The worsened survival in Bcl-2-Ig mice was associated with increases in Th1 cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreased production of the Th2 cytokine IL-10 in stimulated splenocytes. There were no differences in tumor size or pulmonary pathology between Bcl-2-Ig and WT mice. To verify that the mortality difference was not specific to Bcl-2 overexpression, similar experiments were performed in Bim(-/-) mice. Septic Bim(-/-) mice with cancer also had increased mortality compared with septic WT mice with cancer. These data demonstrate that, despite overwhelming evidence that prevention of lymphocyte apoptosis is beneficial in septic hosts without comorbidities, the same strategy worsens survival in mice with cancer that are given pneumonia. PMID:21734077

  12. The dual role of scavenger receptor class A in development of diabetes in autoimmune NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Shimizu

    Full Text Available Human type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from the autoreactive destruction of pancreatic β cells by T cells. Antigen presenting cells including dendritic cells and macrophages are required to activate and suppress antigen-specific T cells. It has been suggested that antigen uptake from live cells by dendritic cells via scavenger receptor class A (SR-A may be important. However, the role of SR-A in autoimmune disease is unknown. In this study, SR-A-/- nonobese diabetic (NOD mice showed significant attenuation of insulitis, lower levels of insulin autoantibodies, and suppression of diabetes development compared with NOD mice. We also found that diabetes progression in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with low-dose polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C was significantly accelerated compared with that in disease-resistant NOD mice treated with low-dose poly(I:C. In addition, injection of high-dose poly(I: C to mimic an acute RNA virus infection significantly accelerated diabetes development in young SR-A-/- NOD mice compared with untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. Pathogenic cells including CD4+CD25+ activated T cells were increased more in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with poly(I:C than in untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggested that viral infection might accelerate diabetes development even in diabetes-resistant subjects. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that diabetes progression was suppressed in SR-A-/- NOD mice and that acceleration of diabetes development could be induced in young mice by poly(I:C treatment even in SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggest that SR-A on antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells may play an unfavorable role in the steady state and a protective role in a mild infection. Our findings imply that SR-A may be an important target for improving therapeutic strategies for type 1 diabetes.

  13. Linkage disequilibrium in wild mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy C Laurie

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Crosses between laboratory strains of mice provide a powerful way of detecting quantitative trait loci for complex traits related to human disease. Hundreds of these loci have been detected, but only a small number of the underlying causative genes have been identified. The main difficulty is the extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD in intercross progeny and the slow process of fine-scale mapping by traditional methods. Recently, new approaches have been introduced, such as association studies with inbred lines and multigenerational crosses. These approaches are very useful for interval reduction, but generally do not provide single-gene resolution because of strong LD extending over one to several megabases. Here, we investigate the genetic structure of a natural population of mice in Arizona to determine its suitability for fine-scale LD mapping and association studies. There are three main findings: (1 Arizona mice have a high level of genetic variation, which includes a large fraction of the sequence variation present in classical strains of laboratory mice; (2 they show clear evidence of local inbreeding but appear to lack stable population structure across the study area; and (3 LD decays with distance at a rate similar to human populations, which is considerably more rapid than in laboratory populations of mice. Strong associations in Arizona mice are limited primarily to markers less than 100 kb apart, which provides the possibility of fine-scale association mapping at the level of one or a few genes. Although other considerations, such as sample size requirements and marker discovery, are serious issues in the implementation of association studies, the genetic variation and LD results indicate that wild mice could provide a useful tool for identifying genes that cause variation in complex traits.

  14. Improved muscle function and quality after diet intervention with leucine-enriched whey and antioxidants in antioxidant deficient aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Miriam; Dijk, Francina J.; Bunschoten, Annelies; van Dartel, Dorien A.M.; van Norren, Klaske; Walrand, Stephane; Jourdan, Marion; Verlaan, Sjors; Luiking, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant (AOX) deficiencies are commonly observed in older adults and oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to sarcopenia. Here we investigate if 1) low levels of dietary antioxidants had a negative impact on parameters of muscle mass, function and quality, and 2) to study if nutritional interventions with AOX and/or leucine-enriched whey protein could improve these muscle parameters in aged mice. 18-months-old mice were fed a casein-based antioxidant-deficient (lowox) diet or a casein-based control-diet (CTRL) for 7 months. During the last 3 months, lowox-mice were subjected to either: a) continued lowox, b) supplementation with vitamin A/E, Selenium and Zinc (AOX), c) substitution of casein with leucine-enriched whey protein (PROT) or d) a combination of both AOX and PROT (TOTAL). After 7 months lowox-mice displayed lower muscle strength and more muscle fatigue compared to CTRL. Compared to lowox-mice, PROT-mice showed improved muscle power, grip strength and less muscle fatigue. AOX-mice showed improved oxidative status, less muscle fatigue, improved grip strength and mitochondrial dynamics compared to lowox-mice. The TOTAL-mice showed the combined effects of both interventions compared to lowox-mice. In conclusion, nutritional intervention with AOX and/or leucine-enriched whey protein can play a role in improving muscle health in a AOX-deficient mouse model. PMID:26943770

  15. Improved muscle function and quality after diet intervention with leucine-enriched whey and antioxidants in antioxidant deficient aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Miriam; Dijk, Francina J; Bunschoten, Annelies; van Dartel, Dorien A M; van Norren, Klaske; Walrand, Stephane; Jourdan, Marion; Verlaan, Sjors; Luiking, Yvette

    2016-04-01

    Antioxidant (AOX) deficiencies are commonly observed in older adults and oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to sarcopenia. Here we investigate if 1) low levels of dietary antioxidants had a negative impact on parameters of muscle mass, function and quality, and 2) to study if nutritional interventions with AOX and/or leucine-enriched whey protein could improve these muscle parameters in aged mice. 18-months-old mice were fed a casein-based antioxidant-deficient (lowox) diet or a casein-based control-diet (CTRL) for 7 months. During the last 3 months, lowox-mice were subjected to either: a) continued lowox, b) supplementation with vitamin A/E, Selenium and Zinc (AOX), c) substitution of casein with leucine-enriched whey protein (PROT) or d) a combination of both AOX and PROT (TOTAL). After 7 months lowox-mice displayed lower muscle strength and more muscle fatigue compared to CTRL. Compared to lowox-mice, PROT-mice showed improved muscle power, grip strength and less muscle fatigue. AOX-mice showed improved oxidative status, less muscle fatigue, improved grip strength and mitochondrial dynamics compared to lowox-mice. The TOTAL-mice showed the combined effects of both interventions compared to lowox-mice. In conclusion, nutritional intervention with AOX and/or leucine-enriched whey protein can play a role in improving muscle health in a AOX-deficient mouse model. PMID:26943770

  16. Eliciting Subjective Probabilities with Binary Lotteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Glenn W.; Martínez-Correa, Jimmy; Swarthout, J. Todd

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a binary lottery procedure for inducing risk neutral behavior in a subjective belief elicitation task. Prior research has shown this procedure to robustly induce risk neutrality when subjects are given a single risk task defined over objective probabilities. Drawing a sample from the...... same subject population, we find evidence that the binary lottery procedure also induces linear utility in a subjective probability elicitation task using the Quadratic Scoring Rule. We also show that the binary lottery procedure can induce direct revelation of subjective probabilities in subjects with...

  17. Practical pathology of aging mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piper M. M. Treuting

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington.

  18. Characterization of an alcohol addiction-prone phenotype in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanska, Kasia; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2012-05-01

    Human studies indicate that high impulsivity, novelty seeking and anxiety predispose individuals to alcohol abuse. Unclear, however, is whether the same phenotypes can be observed in laboratory animals prone to uncontrolled alcohol drinking. To characterize a novelty-seeking trait, anxiety, impulsivity, compulsivity and the motivation for natural rewards in mice, numerous tests were performed in the automated IntelliCage learning system. The same mice then had extended access to alcohol for 70 days, followed by the evaluation of addiction-like behaviors, including (1) the motivation for alcohol in a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement; (2) persistent and compulsive alcohol seeking and taking during signaled 'no alcohol' periods and (3) when subjected to punishment; and (4) the intensity of relapse after alcohol withdrawal. Our data suggest that high levels of anxiety-related traits (i.e. low novelty seeking, low resistance to punishment and a high level of compulsive behaviors) and high impulsivity predict addiction-like alcohol drinking in mice. Future studies are, however, warranted to create a valid model of alcohol addiction in mice in the IntelliCage system. PMID:22017485

  19. A standardized protocol for repeated social defeat stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sam A; Covington, Herbert E; Berton, Olivier; Russo, Scott J

    2011-08-01

    A major impediment to novel drug development has been the paucity of animal models that accurately reflect symptoms of affective disorders. In animal models, prolonged social stress has proven to be useful in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying affective-like disorders. When considering experimental approaches for studying depression, social defeat stress, in particular, has been shown to have excellent etiological, predictive, discriminative and face validity. Described here is a protocol whereby C57BL/6J mice that are repeatedly subjected to bouts of social defeat by a larger and aggressive CD-1 mouse results in the development of a clear depressive-like syndrome, characterized by enduring deficits in social interactions. Specifically, the protocol consists of three important stages, beginning with the selection of aggressive CD-1 mice, followed by agonistic social confrontations between the CD-1 and C57BL/6J mice, and concluding with the confirmation of social avoidance in subordinate C57BL/6J mice. The automated detection of social avoidance allows a marked increase in throughput, reproducibility and quantitative analysis. This protocol is highly adaptable, but in its most common form it requires 3-4 weeks for completion. PMID:21799487

  20. Book review: that obscured subject of violence

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, Paul

    2010-01-01

    An extended book review of Slavoj Zizek's 2008 book 'On Violence', published as part of a special issue on Slavoj Zizek and Political Subjectivity, in Subjectivity: International Journal of Critical Psychology, 3(1), April 2010

  1. Beer, wine, spirits and subjective health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, M; Mortensen, E L; Mygind, K;

    1999-01-01

    To examine the association between intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and self reported subjective health.......To examine the association between intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and self reported subjective health....

  2. Progress of the MICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bonesini, M

    2015-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. The demonstration is based on a simplified version of a neutrino factory cooling channel. As the emittance measurement will be done on a particle-by-particle basis, sophisticated beam instrumentation has been developed to measure particle coordinates and timing vs RF. The muon beamline has been characterized and a preliminary measure of the beam emittance, using a particle-by-particle method with only the TOF detector system, has been performed (MICE STEP I). Data taking for the study of the properties that determine the cooling performance (MICE Step IV) has just started in 2015, while the demonstration of ionization cooling with re-acceleration is foreseen for 2017.

  3. Single Subject Research: Applications to Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakiroglu, Orhan

    2012-01-01

    Single subject research is a scientific research methodology that is increasingly used in the field of special education. Therefore, understanding the unique characteristics of single subject research methodology is critical both for educators and practitioners. Certain characteristics make single subject research one of the most preferred…

  4. Processing subject-object ambiguities in Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaan, Edith

    1997-01-01

    Various clause types in Dutch and German are at least temporarily ambiguous with respect to the order of subject and object. A number of previous studies regarding the processing of such subject-object ambiguities have reported a preference for a subject-object interpretation. This order preference

  5. The changing role of the subject specialist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cotta-Schønberg

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As we all know, libraries are these years rapidly undergoing change on unparalleled scale. Evidently, this applies to librarians, too, and not the least to that important category of library staff, the subject specialist. As recruiting and education of library workers differ from country to country it is difficult to give a detailed, generally valid description of the subject librarian in libraries, but I believe that you can describe an ideal model of subject librarianship as follows: Within each of the major subject disciplines covered by the library, the library should have a subject specialist preferably with a master degree or at least a bachelor degree in the particular subject discipline. The role of the subject specialist is to perform four basic functions where extensive subject knowledge is considered to be necessary: selecting and classifying books, assisting users with advanced subject inquiries, giving subject-specific courses in information retrieval, and maintaining liaison with relevant academic departments and centres. Personally, I know this system very well since I got employment in the Royal Library in Copenhagen as a subject specialist in psychology in the very month I finished my degree in psychology from the University of Copenhagen, back in 1973. The subject librarian system at the Royal Library in Copenhagen was patterned on the ideal model, as I just described it, and it was closely paralleled in the other academic libraries in Denmark, also the new university libraries which were founded in the seventies.

  6. Sex Education as a Transversal Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, Amanda Oliveira; Pereira, Graziela Raupp; Reis, Maria Amélia; Ferreira, António G.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, sex education is in many countries a transversal subject, in which the school becomes a privileged place for the implementation of policies that aim at promoting "public health." Its design as a cross-cutting subject envisages fostering the dissemination of these subjects in all pedagogical and curricular fields; however, we…

  7. Elevated Plus Maze for Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Komada, Munekazu; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Although the mouse genome is now completely sequenced, the functions of most of the genes expressed in the brain are not known. The influence of a given gene on a specific behavior can be determined by behavioral analysis of mutant mice. If a target gene is expressed in the brain, behavioral phenotype of the mutant mice could elucidate the genetic mechanism of normal behaviors. The elevated plus maze test is one of the most widely used tests for measuring anxiety-like behavior. The test is ba...

  8. Automated Three-Chambered Social Approach Task for Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mu; Silverman, Jill L.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2016-01-01

    Autism is diagnosed by three major symptom categories: unusual reciprocal social interactions, impaired communication, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Direct social approach in mice has strong face validity to simple social approach behaviors in humans, which are frequently impaired in autism. This unit presents a basic protocol for a standardized, high-throughput social approach test for assaying mouse sociability. Our automated three-chambered social approach task quantifies direct social approach behaviors when a subject mouse is presented with the choice of spending time with either a novel mouse or a novel object. Sociability is defined as the subject mouse spending more time in the chamber containing the novel target mouse than in the chamber containing the inanimate novel object. The Basic Protocol describes procedures for testing one subject at a time in a single apparatus. A Support Protocol addresses data collection. PMID:21732314

  9. Influence of dose and age of radiation exposure on attributable risk in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was aimed to clarify influence of the dose and age of radiation exposure on attributable risk, relative cumulative hazard and expression pattern of the lethal diseases. The attributable risk, relative cumulative hazard and excess cumulative hazard were estimated with the age-specific mortalities. Experimental data using female B6C3F1 mice were made subject of analysis. In this experiment mice were irradiated at day 14, 17 or 18 prenatal age or day 0, 7, 35, 105, 240 or 365 postnatal age with doses ranging from 0.95 to 5.7 Gy of 137Cs γ-rays and were allowed to live out their entire life spans under a specific pathogen free condition. Among mice irradiated at day 0 postnatal period the attributable risk and relative cumulative hazard were 38 % and 1.61, respectively; whereas, shortening of the mean life span was 7 %. Shape of dose-response relationship for the attributable risk was downward concave and that for the relative cumulative hazard was upward concave. The relative cumulative hazards in mice irradiated during neonatal or juvenile period were apparently higher than that irradiated during adulthood. Latent period for expression of radiation-induced lethal diseases in mice irradiated during the prenatal or early postnatal period was longer than that in mice exposed during adult period. Susceptibility of mice in the late fetal period to induction of late-occurring lethal diseases was lower than neonatal mice and was almost similar to young adult mice. The relative cumulative hazard did not increase with statistically significant difference when mice were irradiated at day 14 prenatal age with 0.95 Gy. (author)

  10. Evidence that radio-sensitive cells are central to skin-phase protective immunity in CBA/Ca mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni as well as in naive mice protected with vaccine serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, V.S.; McLaren, D.J. (National Inst. for Medical Research, London (UK))

    1990-02-01

    Naive CBA/Ca mice and CBA/ca mice vaccinated 4 weeks previously with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni were subjected to 550 rad of whole body (gamma) irradiation and then challenged 3 days later with normal cercariae. The perfusion recovery data showed that this procedure reduced the primary worm burden in naive mice by 22% and the challence worm burden in vaccinated mice by 82%. Irradiation also ablated the peripheral blood leucocytes of both mouse groups by 90-100% at the time of challenge. Histological data revealed that such treatment caused a dramatic change in number, size and leucocyte composition of cutaneous inflammatory skin reactions that characterize challenged vacccinated mice and are known to entrap invading larvae; cutaneous eosinophils were preferentially abolished by this treatment. Polyvaccine mouse serum that conferred protection passively upon naive recipient mice, failed to protect naive/irradiated mice when administered by the same protocol. Distraction of macrophages by treatment of mice with silica did not affect the establishment of a primary worm burden and reduced the protection exhibited by vaccinated mice by only 16%. These data indicade that radio-sensitive cells are important to both innate and specific acquired resistance in this mouse model and that macrophages contribute only marginally to the expression of vaccine immunity. (author).

  11. Evidence that radio-sensitive cells are central to skin-phase protective immunity in CBA/Ca mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni as well as in naive mice protected with vaccine serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naive CBA/Ca mice and CBA/ca mice vaccinated 4 weeks previously with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni were subjected to 550 rad of whole body (gamma) irradiation and then challenged 3 days later with normal cercariae. The perfusion recovery data showed that this procedure reduced the primary worm burden in naive mice by 22% and the challence worm burden in vaccinated mice by 82%. Irradiation also ablated the peripheral blood leucocytes of both mouse groups by 90-100% at the time of challenge. Histological data revealed that such treatment caused a dramatic change in number, size and leucocyte composition of cutaneous inflammatory skin reactions that characterize challenged vacccinated mice and are known to entrap invading larvae; cutaneous eosinophils were preferentially abolished by this treatment. Polyvaccine mouse serum that conferred protection passively upon naive recipient mice, failed to protect naive/irradiated mice when administered by the same protocol. Distraction of macrophages by treatment of mice with silica did not affect the establishment of a primary worm burden and reduced the protection exhibited by vaccinated mice by only 16%. These data indicade that radio-sensitive cells are important to both innate and specific acquired resistance in this mouse model and that macrophages contribute only marginally to the expression of vaccine immunity. (author)

  12. No effect of ablation of surfactant protein-D on acute cerebral infarction in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Østergaard, Kamilla; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm; Hansen, Søren; Stenvang, Jan; Thorsen, Stine Buch; Meldgaard, Michael; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard; Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Finsen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    -induced increase in TNF mRNA production one day after induction of ischemia; however the TNF response to the ischemic insult was affected at five days. SP-D mRNA was not detected in parenchymal brain cells in either naïve mice or in mice subjected to focal cerebral ischemia. However, SP-D mRNA was detected in...... middle cerebral artery cells in WT mice and SP-D protein in vascular cells both in normal appearing and ischemic human brain tissue. Measurements of the levels of SP-D and TNF in plasma in mice suggested that levels were unaffected by the ischemic insult. Microglial-leukocyte and astroglial responses...

  13. Mediating effect of Facebook addiction on the relationship between subjective vitality and subjective happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Recep; Satici, Seydi Ahmet; Akin, Ahmet

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the mediating effects of Facebook addiction on the relationship between subjective vitality and subjective happiness. 297 university students (157 women, 140 men; M age = 20.1 yr., SD = 1.3) were administered the Facebook Addiction Scale, the Subjective Vitality Scale, and the Subjective Happiness Scale. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that Facebook addiction partially mediated the relationship between subjective vitality and subjective happiness. PMID:24693824

  14. Early postnatal motor experience shapes the motor properties of C57BL/6J adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serradj, Nadjet; Picquet, Florence; Jamon, Marc

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the long-term consequences of early motor training on the muscle phenotype and motor output of middle-aged C57BL/6J mice. Neonatal mice were subjected to a variety of motor training procedures, for 3 weeks during the period of acquisition of locomotion. These procedures are widely used for motor training in adults; they include enriched environment, forced treadmill, chronic centrifugation, and hindlimb suspension. At 9 months, the mice reared in the enriched environment showed a slower type of fibre in slow muscles and a faster type in fast muscles, improved performance in motor tests, and a modified gait and body posture while walking. The proportion of fibres in the postural muscles of centrifuged mice did not change, but these mice showed improved resistance to fatigue. The suspended mice showed increased persistence of immature hybrid fibres in the tibialis, with a slower shift in the load-bearing soleus, without any behavioural changes. The forced treadmill was very stressful for the mice, but had limited effects on motor output, although a slower profile was observed in the tibialis. These results support the hypothesis that motor experience during a critical period of motor development shapes muscle phenotype and motor output. The different impacts of the various training procedures suggest that motor performance in adults can be optimized by appropriate training during a defined period of motor development. PMID:23869740

  15. Chronic intermittent fasting improves cognitive functions and brain structures in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liaoliao Li

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major health issue. Obesity started from teenagers has become a major health concern in recent years. Intermittent fasting increases the life span. However, it is not known whether obesity and intermittent fasting affect brain functions and structures before brain aging. Here, we subjected 7-week old CD-1 wild type male mice to intermittent (alternate-day fasting or high fat diet (45% caloric supplied by fat for 11 months. Mice on intermittent fasting had better learning and memory assessed by the Barnes maze and fear conditioning, thicker CA1 pyramidal cell layer, higher expression of drebrin, a dendritic protein, and lower oxidative stress than mice that had free access to regular diet (control mice. Mice fed with high fat diet was obese and with hyperlipidemia. They also had poorer exercise tolerance. However, these obese mice did not present significant learning and memory impairment or changes in brain structures or oxidative stress compared with control mice. These results suggest that intermittent fasting improves brain functions and structures and that high fat diet feeding started early in life does not cause significant changes in brain functions and structures in obese middle-aged animals.

  16. Effect of ethyl alcohol on thermoregulation in mice following the induction of hypothermia or hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, C J; Stead, A G

    1988-04-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) administration on behavioral and autonomic thermoregulation in mice subjected to severe hypothermia or hyperthermia. Male mice of the BALB/c strain were injected intraperitoneally with ethanol at dosages of 0, 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 g/kg and then placed within a hot environmental chamber to raise their body temperature to 41 degrees C or, alternatively, within a cold chamber to lower it to 28 degrees C. Once the desired hypothermic or hyperthermic state was achieved, the mice were removed from the chamber and placed in either a temperature gradient to monitor behavioral thermoregulatory responses or in an environmental chamber thermostabilized at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 28 degrees C to monitor metabolic rate. The 3.0 g/kg dosage significantly affected behavioral thermoregulatory responses of the hyperthermic mice when initially placed in the temperature gradient. The ability to increase metabolic rate following hypothermia was significantly suppressed at 3.0 g/kg. Dosages of 1.0 and 3.0 g/kg inhibited metabolic rate of hyperthermic mice. Both hypothermic and hyperthermic mice given 3.0 g/kg of ethanol had colonic temperatures significantly below normal after placement in the temperature gradient and metabolic chamber. In conclusion, relatively large dosages of ethanol impair behavioral and autonomic thermoregulation and may lower the set-point for the control of body temperature in mice. PMID:3413196

  17. Cassava is not a goitrogen in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the effect of cassava on the thyroid function of mice, the authors fed fresh cassava root to mice and compared this diet with low iodine diet and Purina. Cassava provided a low iodine intake and increased urine thiocyanate excretion and serum thiocyanate levels. Mice on cassava lost weight. The thyroid glands of mice on cassava were not enlarged, even when normalized for body weight. The 4- and 24-hr thyroid uptakes of mice on cassava were similar to those of mice on low iodine diets. Protein-bound [125I]iodine at 24 hr was high in mice on either the cassava or low iodine diets. The thyroid iodide trap (T/M) was similar in mice on cassava and low iodine diets. When thiocyanate was added in vitro to the incubation medium, T/M was reduced in all groups of mice; under these conditions, thiocyanate caused a dose-related inhibition of T/M. The serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations of mice on cassava were reduced compared with mice on Purina diet. Thyroid T4 and T3 contents of mice on cassava were relatively low compared with mice on Purina diet. Hepatic T3 content and T4 5'-monodeiodination in liver homogenates were reduced in mice on cassava compared with other groups. The data show that cassava does not cause goiter in mice. The thiocyanate formed from ingestation of cassava is insufficient to inhibit thyroid iodide transport or organification of iodide. The cassava diet leads to rapid turnover of hormonal iodine because it is a low iodine diet. It also impairs 5'-monodeiodination of T4 which may be related to nutritional deficiency. These data in mice do not support the concept that cassava per se has goitrogenic action in man

  18. Flatiron Mice and Ferroportin Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Erin E.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    Flatiron mice provide the first genetic model that fully recapitulates the iron-loading disorder ferroportin disease. Unlike the other known genetic causes of hemochromatosis, missense mutations in the ferroportin gene are autosomal dominant. These new findings show that ferroportin disease results from dominant negative effects rather than haplo-insufficiency.

  19. Postnatal training of 129/Sv mice confirms the long-term influence of early exercising on the motor properties of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serradj, Najet; Jamon, Marc

    2016-09-01

    A previous study showed that motor experiences during critical periods of development durably affect the motor properties of adult C57BL/6J mice. However, dependence on early environmental features may vary with the genetic profile. To evaluate the contribution of the genetic background on external influences to motricity, we performed the same experiment in a 129/Sv mouse strain that show a strongly different motor profile. Mice were subjected to endurance training (enriched environment or forced treadmill), hypergravity (chronic centrifugation), or simulated microgravity (hindlimb unloading) between postnatal days 10 and 30. They were then returned to standard housing until testing at the age of nine months. The endurance-trained mice showed a fast-slow shift in the deep zone of the tibialis. In addition, mice reared in the enriched environment showed a modified gait and body posture, and improved performance on the rotarod, whereas forced treadmill training did not affect motor output. Hypergravity induced a fast-slow shift in the superficial zone of the tibialis, with no consequence on motor output. Hindlimb unloading provoked an increased percentage of immature hybrid fibres in the tibialis and a shift in the soleus muscle. When compared with similarly reared C57BL/6J mice, 129/Sv mice showed qualitative differences attributable to the lower efficiency of early training due to their lower basal motor activity level. Nevertheless, the results are essentially consistent in both strains, and support the hypothesis that early motor experience influences the muscle phenotype and motor output. PMID:27130139

  20. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin;

    2006-01-01

    with wild-type C57BL/6N mice on an atherogenic diet. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly elevated in Spd-/- mice. Treatment of Spd-/- mice with a recombinant fragment of human SP-D resulted in decreases of HDL-C (21%) as well as total cholesterol (26%), and LDL cholesterol (28%). Plasma TNF...

  1. Progress on Cherenkov Reconstruction in MICE

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Daniel M; Rajaram, Durga; Winter, Miles; Cremaldi, Lucien; Sanders, David; Summers, Don

    2016-01-01

    Two beamline Cherenkov detectors (Ckov-a,-b) support particle identification in the MICE beamline. Electrons and high-momentum muons and pions can be identified with good efficiency. We report on the Ckov-a,-b performance in detecting pions and muons with MICE Step I data and derive an upper limit on the pion contamination in the standard MICE muon beam.

  2. Giardia lamblia infections in adult mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Byrd, L G; Conrad, J T; Nash, T E

    1994-01-01

    An adult mouse-Giardia lamblia model was developed and used to study host-parasite interactions, including antigenic variation. The H7/1 clone of isolate GS infected mice consistently and produced infections in 14 mouse strains tested. Infection patterns were mouse strain and Giardia isolate dependent. Antigenic variation occurred in immunocompetent mice but not in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency.

  3. Bone Fracture Pre-Ischemic Stroke Exacerbates Ischemic Cerebral Injury in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a devastating complication of bone fracture. Bone fracture shortly after stroke enhances stroke injury by augmenting inflammation. We hypothesize that bone fracture shortly before ischemic stroke also exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Tibia fracture was performed 6 or 24 hours before permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO on C57BL/6J mice or Ccr2RFP/+Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice that have the RFP gene knocked into one allele of Ccr2 gene and GFP gene knocked into one allele of Cx3cr1 gene. Behavior was tested 3 days after pMCAO. Infarct volume, the number of CD68+ cells, apoptotic neurons, bone marrow-derived macrophages (RFP+, and microgila (GFP+ in the peri-infarct region were quantified. Compared to mice subjected to pMCAO only, bone fracture 6 or 24 hours before pMCAO increased behavioral deficits, the infarct volume, and the number of CD68+ cells and apoptotic neurons in the peri-infarct area. Both bone marrow-derived macrophages (CCR2+ and microglia (CX3CR1+ increased in the peri-infarct regions of mice subjected to bone fracture before pMCAO compared to stroke-only mice. The mice subjected to bone fracture 6 hours before pMCAO had more severe injury than mice that had bone fracture 24 hours before pMCAO. Our data showed that bone fracture shortly before stroke also increases neuroinflammation and exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Our findings suggest that inhibition of neuroinflammation or management of stroke risk factors before major bone surgery would be beneficial for patients who are likely to suffer from stroke.

  4. Chemical derivatives of docosahexaenoic acid prevent glucose intolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rossmeisl, Martin; Jílková, Zuzana; Jeleník, Tomáš; Hensler, Michal; Flachs, Pavel; Mohamed-Ali, V.; Bryhn, M.; Kopecký, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 31, Suppl.1 (2007), S76-S76. ISSN 0307-0565. [European congress on obesity /15./. 22.04.2007-25.04.2007, Budapest] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : obesity * insulin resistance * DHA * C57BL/6N mice Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  5. Effect of gluten-free diet on incidence of spontaneously developing autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Funda, David; Řeháková, Zuzana; Kozáková, Hana; Kaas, A.; Bock, T.; Buschard, K.; Štěpánková, Renata; Hrnčíř, Tomáš; Tučková, Ludmila

    Paříž, 2002. s. 53. [International Symposium On Coeliac Disease /10./. 02.06.2002-05.06.2002, Paříž] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : gluten -free * diabetes * nod mice Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  6. Neonatal colonization of mice with probiotic bacteria: Impact on systemic sensitization to aeroallergen Bet v 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schwarzer, Martin; Repa, A.; Schabussova, I.; Šrůtková, Dagmar; Daniel, C.; Pot, B.; Štěpánková, Renata; Hudcovic, Tomáš; Hrnčíř, Tomáš; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Wiedermann, U.; Kozáková, Hana

    Praha: ČZU Praha, 2011. s. 22-23. ISBN 978-80-213-2173-1. [Sympozium Společnosti pro probiotika a prebiotika /6./. 19.04.2011, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : germ-free mice * allergy Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  7. Prevention of early cure of type 1 diabetes by intranasal administration of gliadin in NOD mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Funda, David; Fundová, Petra; Hansen, A. K.; Buschard, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2014). E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/09/1640; GA MZd(CZ) NS10340 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : gliadin * diabetes * diabetes 1 type * NOD mice Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  8. Hematopoiesis in 5-Fluorouracil-Treated Adenosine A(3) Receptor Knock-Out Mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Dušek, L.; Hoferová, Zuzana; Komůrková, Denisa

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2015), s. 255-262. ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Adenosine A(3) receptor knock-out mice * Hematopoiesis * 5-fluorouracil-induced hematotoxicity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  9. Impact of peptide ghrelin antagonists on metabolic syndrome in female obese mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maletínská, Lenka; Železná, Blanka; Matyšková, Resha; Maixnerová, Jana; Pýchová, Miroslava; Špolcová, Andrea; Blechová, Miroslava; Jurcovicová, J.; Haluzník, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, S1 (2010), s. 116-117. ISSN 1075-2617. [European Peptide Symposium /31./. 05.09.2010-09.09.2010, Copenhagen] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/09/0744 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DIO * OVX * mice * ghrelin antagonist Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  10. PILOT STUDY FOR ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS IN P53 HETEROZYGOTE DEFICIENT MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    40 p53 heterozygous knockout mice and 40 p53 wild-type controls were exposed to 4 arsenicals in drinking water at a single dose, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), in a chronic lifetime tumor bioassay, and animals were subjected to necropsy and limited pathologic examination of th...

  11. Change in the mineralization of the healing bone callus after whole-body irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delayed consolidation of diaphysial long-bone fractures in mice subjected to whole-body X-irradiation is expressed biochemically by a faulty mineralization of the repair callus. This deficiency is proportional to the irradiation intensity and is not corrected by previous administration of cycteamine

  12. Generation and basic characterization of glutamate carboxypeptidase II knock-out mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vorlová, Barbora; Kašpárek, Petr; Šácha, Pavel; Sedláček, Radislav; Konvalinka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 2 (2016), s. 267. ISSN 0962-8819. [Transgenic Technology Meeting (TT2016) /13./. 20.03.2016-23.03.2016, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : GCPII * PSMA * FolhI * knock-out mice Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  13. Exploration of commensal (Mus musculus domesticus) and aboriginal (Mus spretus) mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hiadlovská, Zuzana; Vošlajerová Bímová, Barbora; Macholán, Miloš

    Tübingen : Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, 2011. s. 221. [ Congress of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology ESEB /13./. 20.08.2011-25.08.2011, Tübingen] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : mice Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  14. Sleep loss and the inflammatory response in mice under chronic environmental circadian disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison J Brager

    Full Text Available Shift work and trans-time zone travel lead to insufficient sleep and numerous pathologies. Here, we examined sleep/wake dynamics during chronic exposure to environmental circadian disruption (ECD, and if chronic partial sleep loss associated with ECD influences the induction of shift-related inflammatory disorder. Sleep and wakefulness were telemetrically recorded across three months of ECD, in which the dark-phase of a light-dark cycle was advanced weekly by 6 h. A three month regimen of ECD caused a temporary reorganization of sleep (NREM and REM and wake processes across each week, resulting in an approximately 10% net loss of sleep each week relative to baseline levels. A separate group of mice were subjected to ECD or a regimen of imposed wakefulness (IW aimed to mimic sleep amounts under ECD for one month. Fos-immunoreactivity (IR was quantified in sleep-wake regulatory areas: the nucleus accumbens (NAc, basal forebrain (BF, and medial preoptic area (MnPO. To assess the inflammatory response, trunk blood was treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequent release of IL-6 was measured. Fos-IR was greatest in the NAc, BF, and MnPO of mice subjected to IW. The inflammatory response to LPS was elevated in mice subjected to ECD, but not mice subjected to IW. Thus, the net sleep loss that occurs under ECD is not associated with a pathological immune response.

  15. Distribution and Structure of Dental Enamel in Incisors of Tabby Mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Risnes, S.; Peterková, Renata; Lesot, H.

    Heslington, 2004. s. -. [International Conference on Tooth Morphogenesis and Differentiation /8./ COST ACTION B23. 17.07.2004-22.07.2004, Heslington] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC B23.002 Keywords : Incisors of Tabby Mice Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  16. Safety assessment of inhaled xylitol in mice and healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kline Joel N

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylitol is a 5-carbon sugar that can lower the airway surface salt concentration, thus enhancing innate immunity. We tested the safety and tolerability of aerosolized iso-osmotic xylitol in mice and human volunteers. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of C57Bl/6 mice in an animal laboratory and healthy human volunteers at the clinical research center of a university hospital. Mice underwent a baseline methacholine challenge, exposure to either aerosolized saline or xylitol (5% solution for 150 minutes and then a follow-up methacholine challenge. The saline and xylitol exposures were repeated after eosinophilic airway inflammation was induced by sensitization and inhalational challenge to ovalbumin. Normal human volunteers underwent exposures to aerosolized saline (10 ml and xylitol, with spirometry performed at baseline and after inhalation of 1, 5, and 10 ml. Serum osmolarity and electrolytes were measured at baseline and after the last exposure. A respiratory symptom questionnaire was administered at baseline, after the last exposure, and five days after exposure. In another group of normal volunteers, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL was done 20 minutes and 3 hours after aerosolized xylitol exposure for levels of inflammatory markers. Results In naïve mice, methacholine responsiveness was unchanged after exposures to xylitol compared to inhaled saline (p = 0.49. There was no significant increase in Penh in antigen-challenged mice after xylitol exposure (p = 0.38. There was no change in airway cellular response after xylitol exposure in naïve and antigen-challenged mice. In normal volunteers, there was no change in FEV1 after xylitol exposures compared with baseline as well as normal saline exposure (p = 0.19. Safety laboratory values were also unchanged. The only adverse effect reported was stuffy nose by half of the subjects during the 10 ml xylitol exposure, which promptly resolved after exposure completion. BAL

  17. Embedding subject guides at NUS Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Hsien,Aaron, Tay Chee

    2010-01-01

    Librarians around the world have begun to experiment with dynamic subject guides, dubbed “Subject Guide 2.0” (Farkas, 2007; Kroski, 2007; Yang, 2009). They took their cue from Web 2.0 sites by incorporating interactive features, social sharing and dynamic layouts to appeal to users. In this paper, the initial efforts to incorporate widgets into the subject guides of NUS Libraries are described.

  18. SUBJECTIVE MEMORY IN OLDER AFRICAN AMERICANS

    OpenAIRE

    Sims, Regina C.; Whitfield, Keith E.; Ayotte, Brian J.; Gamaldo, Alyssa A.; Edwards, Christopher L.; Allaire, Jason C.

    2011-01-01

    The current analysis examined (a) if measures of psychological well-being predict subjective memory, and (b) if subjective memory is consistent with actual memory. Five hundred seventy-nine older African Americans from the Baltimore Study of Black Aging completed measures assessing subjective memory, depressive symptomatology, perceived stress, locus of control, and verbal and working memory. Higher levels of perceived stress and greater externalized locus of control predicted poorer subjecti...

  19. Age Changes in Subjective Work Ability

    OpenAIRE

    Solem, Per Erik

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the influence of psychosocial work environment on age-related subjective changes in work ability and discusses differences between work ability and job performance. The results show age and physical health to be strong predictors of subjective decline in work ability. The age effect is independent of age-associated declining health. It is not clear what it is about age that produces the subjective decline in work ability. While primary age changes may produce decline, st...

  20. Subjectivity Making in Undocumented Immigrant Student Organizing

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez Resendiz, Chantiri

    2016-01-01

    This master thesis project explores the ways in which the deserving/undeserving immigrant binary politically targets subject for incorporation into a national neoliberal project, while excluding others. Simultaneously, I also investigate the ways in which these targeted subjects have organized in response to structural inequities and in the process, have been making their own sense of political subjectivity. In this research I ask, what are the myths of good immigrant that have been created a...

  1. Subject selection in applied behavior analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Homer, Andrew L.; Peterson, Lizette; Wonderlich, Stephen A.

    1983-01-01

    Past researchers have commented on the role of specifying relevant subject characteristics in determining the generality of experimental findings. Knowledge of subject selection criteria is important in interpreting and replicating research results. Such knowledge, as compared with many other historical and demographic characteristics of the subject, is likely to be related to a procedure's effectiveness. Data indicated that the majority of articles published in the Journal of Applied Behavio...

  2. Obesity in Indian subjects with Vascular Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    CHANDRA, Mina; Anand, Kuljeet Singh Anand

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity is considered a public health challenge in South Asia. Obesity is an independent risk factor in vascular dementia. It also contributes to other risk factors of vascular dementia like hypertension, coronary artery disease, dyslipidaemia and diabetes. As the rate of obesity in Indian subjects with vascular dementia is not known, we decided to assess obesity in subjects with vascular dementia. Methods: Subjects with vascular dementia presenting to Mem...

  3. Teachers’ subject competence in digital times

    OpenAIRE

    Kroksmark, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to generate new knowledge regarding how subject teachers in children's and young people's education conceive of the didactic relationship between their own subject knowledge and the computer's infinite possibilities concerning information and knowledge.The theoretic frames of the study lie within modern phenomenology with special inspiration from the concept of the life-world. This applies to both the relationship among subject knowledge, technology and human beings, and the th...

  4. Identity, Subjectivity and Symptom in Contemporaneous Era

    OpenAIRE

    Yvana Coutinho de Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the trio identity, subjectivity and symptom in modern times reflectingabout the individual’s working through and subjectivity processes. This is a bibliography study of psychodynamic orientation. The author emphasizes the importance of rethinking and understanding the ways in which individuals process their own subjectivity. Various modern time symptoms result from the fact that individuals end up crushed by their own singularities.

  5. Liminal subjectivities in contemporary film and literature

    OpenAIRE

    McHugh, Ian Paul

    2012-01-01

    This thesis discusses the intersection of subjectivity and the liminal in contemporary literary and filmic texts. In discussion of eight texts, the thesis weighs the dual meaning of “liminal subjectivities” – the liminal space between subjectivities, and the condition of subjectivity as it negotiates the liminal. It aims to explore how liminality manifests in manners both universal and specific to the literary or filmic form, in the embodiments of characters, and the rhythms ...

  6. A subject-specific postural instability parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argatov, I

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical modeling approach is applied for deriving subject-specific stabilometric parameters associated with center-of-pressure sway measurements for assessing balancing ability of subjects in quiet standing on a force platform. Based on the inverted pendulum model, a new combined stabilometric parameter including anthropometric characteristics (body height and mass) is obtained which represents a measure of postural instability. A physical meaning of the subject-specific parameter is related to the effective stiffness of the inverted pendulum model. PMID:22795475

  7. The effect of isoflurane anaesthesia and vasectomy on circulating corticosterone and ACTH in BALB/c mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Kalliokoski, Otto; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte;

    2012-01-01

    The use of blood corticosterone and faecal corticosterone metabolites as biomarkers of post-surgical stress and pain in laboratory animals has increased during the last decade. However, many aspects of their reliability in laboratory mice remain uninvestigated. This study investigated serum...... stress hormone profiles. Vasectomy resulted in an increase in corticosterone for at least four hours after surgery with a peak 30min after the mice regained righting reflex. Mice subjected to isoflurane anaesthesia without surgery had the highest level of serum corticosterone 5min after regained righting...... an increase in serum glucocorticoids, but the negative feedback mechanism of newly operated mice, was altered. This may have consequences for the interpretation of glucocorticoids measurements as a biomarker of post-surgical stress in mice....

  8. From mice to men: lessons from mutant ataxic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cendelin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Ataxic mutant mice can be used to represent models of cerebellar degenerative disorders. They serve for investigation of cerebellar function, pathogenesis of degenerative processes as well as of therapeutic approaches. Lurcher, Hot-foot, Purkinje cell degeneration, Nervous, Staggerer, Weaver, Reeler, and Scrambler mouse models and mouse models of SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, SCA7, SCA23, DRPLA, Niemann-Pick disease and Friedreich ataxia are reviewed with special regard to cerebellar pathology, pat...

  9. Influence diagram in evaluating the subjective judgment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author developed the idea of the subjective influence diagrams to evaluate subjective judgment. The subjective judgment of a stake holder is a primary decision making proposition. It involves a basic decision process an the individual attitude of the stake holder for his decision purpose. The subjective judgment dominates the some final decisions. A complex decision process may include the subjective judgment. An influence diagram framework is a simplest tool for analyzing subjective judgment process. In the framework, the characters of influence diagrams generate the describing the analyzing, and the evaluating of the subjective judgment. The relationship between the information and the decision, such as independent character between them, is the main issue. Then utility function is the calculating tool to evaluation, the stake holder can make optimal decision. Through the analysis about the decision process and relationship, the building process of the influence diagram identically describes the subjective judgment. Some examples are given to explain the property of subjective judgment and the analysis process

  10. Psychological methods of subjective risk estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions to situations involving risks can be divided into the following parts/ perception of danger, subjective estimates of the risk and risk taking with respect to action. Several investigations have compared subjective estimates of the risk with an objective measure of that risk. In general there was a mis-match between subjective and objective measures of risk, especially, objective risk involved in routine activities is most commonly underestimated. This implies, for accident prevention, that attempts must be made to induce accurate subjective risk estimates by technical and behavioural measures. (orig.)

  11. Transplantation of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Their Conditioned Medium Prevents Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Nude Mice

    OpenAIRE

    An, Jee Hyun; Park, Hyojung; Song, Jung Ah; Ki, Kyung Ho; Yang, Jae-Yeon; Choi, Hyung Jin; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Sang Wan; Kim, Seong Yeon; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Baek, Wook-Young; Kim, Jung-Eun; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Shin, Chan Soo

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has recently been recognized as a new source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for use in stem cell therapy. We studied the effects of systemic injection of human UCB-MSCs and their conditioned medium (CM) on ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss in nude mice. Ten-week-old female nude mice were divided into six groups: Sham-operated mice treated with vehicle (Sham-Vehicle), OVX mice subjected to UCB-MSCs (OVX-MSC), or human dermal fibroblast (OVX-DFB) transplantation, ...

  12. Preventive effects of metallothionein against DNA and lipid metabolic damages in dyslipidemic mice under repeated mild stress

    OpenAIRE

    Higashimoto, Minoru; Isoyama, Naohiro; Ishibashi, Satoshi; Ogawa, Naoko; Takiguchi, Masufumi; Suzuki, Shinya; Ohnishi, Yoshinari; Sato, Masao

    2013-01-01

    The effects of repeated mild stress on DNA and lipid metabolic damages in multiple organs of dyslipidemic mice, and the preventive role of metallothionein (MT) were investigated. Female adult wild-type and MT-null mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) or standard diet (STD) were repeatedly subjected to fasting or restraint for three weeks. The liver, pancreas, spleen, bone marrow and serum samples were taken for evaluating DNA damage, MT, glutathione (GSH), corticosterone, carnitine and adiponectin. B...

  13. Eradication of colon cancer cells before tumour formation in the peritoneal cavity of mice treated with intraperitoneal Re-186 radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A treatment adjuvant to surgical resection of the primary lesion has been proven to be beneficial in improving the prognosis of patients with high risks of peritoneal dissemination of colon cancer. This study was performed to determine the comparative efficacy of intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using Re-186 or I-131 labeled murine antibodies in the extermination of cancer cells. A murine anti-colorectal IgG1, A7 monoclonal antibody, was radio-labeled either with I-131 (by the chloramine-T method) or Re-186 (by the MAG3 pre-chelated method). A total number of 16 mice were subjected to RIT with Re-186 A7 (N=8) or I-131 A7 (N=8) at equitoxic doses in Balb/c bu/nu mice 10 min after intraperitoneal injection of LS180 human colon cancer cells. A third group of mice were subjected to chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil at 30 mg/kg for 4 consecutive days following the intraperitoneal injection of the same LS180 human colon cancer cells. There were 19 mice in the control group who were not subjected to any form of therapy. The results revealed that the mean survival of mice in the control (N-19), I-131 A7 RIT (N=8) and Chemotherapy (N=6) groups were 33.8 ± 1.0, 80.1 ± 2.5 and 49.3 ± 5.3 days respectively. The eight mice who were subjected to Re-186 A7 RIT showed much better survival compared to the other groups. Two of the eight mice from this group died at 105 and 111 days following Re-186 A7 RIT. Other six mice were sacrificed at 172 days, and autopsy revealed no macroscopic peritoneal tumor growth. Based on this pilot study we concluded that individual tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity would be effectively exterminated by intraperitoneal RIT with Re-186 A7. (author)

  14. TNF-α and temporal changes in sleep architecture in mice exposed to sleep fragmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navita Kaushal

    Full Text Available TNF-α plays critical roles in host-defense, sleep-wake regulation, and the pathogenesis of various disorders. Increases in the concentration of circulating TNF-α after either sleep deprivation or sleep fragmentation (SF appear to underlie excessive daytime sleepiness in patients with sleep apnea (OSA. Following baseline recordings, mice were subjected to 15 days of SF (daily for 12 h/day from 07.00 h to 19.00 h, and sleep parameters were recorded on days1, 7 and 15. Sleep architecture and sleep propensity were assessed in both C57BL/6J and in TNF-α double receptor KO mice (TNFR KO. To further confirm the role of TNF-α, we also assessed the effect of treatment with a TNF- α neutralizing antibody in C57BL/6J mice. SF was not associated with major changes in global sleep architecture in C57BL/6J and TNFR KO mice. TNFR KO mice showed higher baseline SWS delta power. Further, following 15 days of SF, mice injected with TNF-α neutralizing antibody and TNFR KO mice showed increased EEG SWS activity. However, SWS latency, indicative of increased propensity to sleep, was only decreased in C57BL/6J, and was unaffected in TNFR KO mice as well as in C57BL/6J mice exposed to SF but treated with TNF-α neutralizing antibody. Taken together, our findings show that the excessive sleepiness incurred by recurrent arousals during sleep may be due to activation of TNF-alpha-dependent inflammatory pathways, despite the presence of preserved sleep duration and global sleep architecture.

  15. Effects of Altered Levels of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Irradiation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Female Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Altered levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) and cranial irradiation have been shown to affect hippocampal neurogenesis. However, previous studies were only conducted in male mice, and it was not clear if there was a difference between males and females. Therefore, female mice were studied and the results compared with those generated in male mice from an earlier study. Methods and Materials: Female wild-type, EC-SOD-null (KO), and EC-SOD bigenic mice with neuronal-specific expression of EC-SOD (OE) were subjected to a single dose of 5-Gy gamma rays to the head at 8 weeks of age. Progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation, and long-term survival of newborn neurons were determined. Results: Similar to results from male mice, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation both resulted in significant reductions in mature newborn neurons in female mice. EC-SOD deficiency reduced long-term survival of newborn neurons whereas irradiation reduced progenitor cell proliferation. Overexpression of EC-SOD corrected the negative impacts from EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation and normalized the production of newborn neurons in OE mice. Expression of neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 were significantly reduced by irradiation in wild-type mice, but the levels were not changed in KO and OE mice even though both cohorts started out with a lower baseline level. Conclusion: In terms of hippocampal neurogenesis, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation have the same overall effects in males and females at the age the studies were conducted

  16. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko eHattori

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP is a neuropeptide acting as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, or neurotrophic factor. PACAP is widely expressed throughout the brain and exerts its functions through the PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1. Recent studies reveal that genetic variants of the PACAP and PAC1 genes are associated with mental disorders, and several behavioral abnormalities of PACAP knockout (KO mice are reported. However, an insufficient number of backcrosses was made using PACAP KO mice on the C57BL/6J background due to their postnatal mortality. To elucidate the effects of PACAP on neuropsychiatric function, the PACAP gene was knocked out in F1 hybrid mice (C57BL/6J x 129SvEv for appropriate control of the genetic background. The PACAP KO mice were then subjected to a behavioral test battery. PACAP deficiency had no significant effects on neurological screen. As shown previously, the mice exhibited significantly increased locomotor activity in a novel environment and abnormal anxiety-like behavior, while no obvious differences between genotypes were shown in home cage activity. In contrast to previous reports, the PACAP KO mice showed normal prepulse inhibition and slightly decreased depression-like behavior. Previous study demonstrates that the social interaction in a resident-intruder test was decreased in PACAP KO mice. On the other hand, we showed that PACAP KO mice exhibited increased social interaction in Crawley’s three-chamber social approach test, although PACAP KO had no significant impact on social interaction in a home cage. PACAP KO mice also exhibited mild performance deficit in working memory in an eight-arm radial maze and the T-maze, while they did not show any significant abnormalities in the left-right discrimination task in the T-maze. These results suggest that PACAP has an important role in the regulation of locomotor activity, social behavior, anxiety-like behavior and, potentially

  17. Effects of Altered Levels of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Irradiation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Female Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yani [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Leu, David [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Palo Alto Institute of Research and Education, Palo Alto, California (United States); Chui, Jennifer [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Fike, John R. [Departments of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Huang, Ting-Ting, E-mail: tthuang@stanford.edu [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Altered levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) and cranial irradiation have been shown to affect hippocampal neurogenesis. However, previous studies were only conducted in male mice, and it was not clear if there was a difference between males and females. Therefore, female mice were studied and the results compared with those generated in male mice from an earlier study. Methods and Materials: Female wild-type, EC-SOD-null (KO), and EC-SOD bigenic mice with neuronal-specific expression of EC-SOD (OE) were subjected to a single dose of 5-Gy gamma rays to the head at 8 weeks of age. Progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation, and long-term survival of newborn neurons were determined. Results: Similar to results from male mice, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation both resulted in significant reductions in mature newborn neurons in female mice. EC-SOD deficiency reduced long-term survival of newborn neurons whereas irradiation reduced progenitor cell proliferation. Overexpression of EC-SOD corrected the negative impacts from EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation and normalized the production of newborn neurons in OE mice. Expression of neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 were significantly reduced by irradiation in wild-type mice, but the levels were not changed in KO and OE mice even though both cohorts started out with a lower baseline level. Conclusion: In terms of hippocampal neurogenesis, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation have the same overall effects in males and females at the age the studies were conducted.

  18. Oral Self-Administration Of EtOH In Transgenic Mice Lacking Beta-Endorphin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephani Allen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available EtOH modifies the production and/or release of endogenous opioid peptides, including -endorphin (Gianoulakis, 2004; Przewlocka et al., 1994; Schulz et al., 1980. Opioids subsequently influence the reinforcing properties of EtOH and the development of alcoholism (Terenius, 1996; Van Ree, 1996. In this study, beta-endorphin deficient mutant mice were used to examine the effects of a specific opioid peptide on EtOH consumption. Mice were obtained from The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA. Male and female, adult naïve mice were single housed in Plexiglas cages with corn cob bedding and ad lib access to food (mouse chow and water. A two-bottle free choice EtOH oral self-administration paradigm was administered to homozygous mutant mice (void of all beta-endorphin, heterozygous mice (50% beta-endorphin expression, and sibling wildtype mice (C57BL/6J. Subjects received increasing concentrations of EtOH (0%, 3%, 6%, 12%, and 15% each given over an eight day span, and were evaluated for preference and consumption each day. Bottles were switched every other day to avoid the development of a side preference. Overall, females drank more than males. Homozygous mutant mice (KO showed decreased preference for EtOH at all concentrations, and self-administered significantly less than heterozygous mice (HT and wildtype mice (C57. The HTs had a tendency to drink the most followed by the C57s, and the KOs drank the least. These data support the hypothesis that beta-endorphin influences the reinforcing effects of EtOH.

  19. Secretory and electrophysiological characteristics of insulin cells from gastrectomized mice: Evidence for the existence of insulinotropic agents in the stomach.

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi, S. Albert; Eliasson, Lena; Ma, Xiaosong; Rorsman, Patrik; Håkanson, Rolf; Lundquist, Ingmar

    2007-01-01

    Mice were subjected to gastrectomy (GX) or sham operation (controls). Four to six weeks later the pancreatic islets were isolated and analysed for cAMP or alternatively incubated in a Krebs-Ringer based medium in an effort to study insulin secretion and cAMP accumulation in response to glucose or the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin. Freshly isolated islets from GX mice had higher cAMP content than islets from control mice, a difference that persisted after incubation for I h at a glucos...

  20. Chronic psychosocial stress causes delayed extinction and exacerbates reinstatement of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-luc

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Here, we examined the impact of chronic subordinate colony (CSC) exposure on EtOH-CPP extinction, as well as ethanol-induced reinstatement of CPP.Methods: Mice were conditioned with saline or 1.5 g/kg ethanol and were tested in the EtOH-CPP model. In the first experiment, the mice were subjected to 19 days of chronic stress, and EtOH-CPP extinction was assessed during seven daily trials without ethanol injection. In the second experiment and after the EtOH-CPP test, the mice were s...

  1. Progress of MICE RFCC Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Green, M.; Li, N.; Niinikoski, T.; Pan, H.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Bross, A.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Sylvester, C.; Chen, A. B.; Guo, Bin; Li, Liyi; Xu, Fengyu; Cao, Y.; Sun, S.; Wang, Li; Yin, Lixin; Luo, Tianhuan; Summers, Don; Smith, B.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Kaplan, D.

    2012-05-20

    Recent progress on the design and fabrication of the RFCC (RF and superconducting Coupling Coil) module for the international MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) are reported. The MICE ionization cooling channel has two RFCC modules, each having four 201- MHz normal conducting RF cavities surrounded by one superconducting coupling coil (solenoid) magnet. The magnet is designed to be cooled by three cryocoolers. Fabrication of the RF cavities is complete; preparation for the cavity electro-polishing, low power RF measurements, and tuning are in progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Fabrication of the cold mass of the first coupling coil magnet has been completed in China and the cold mass arrived at LBNL in late 2011. Preparations for testing the cold mass are currently under way at Fermilab. Plans for the RFCC module assembly and integration are being developed and are described.

  2. MAUS: MICE Analysis User Software

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has developed the MICE Analysis User Software (MAUS) to simulate and analyse experimental data. It serves as the primary codebase for the experiment, providing for online data quality checks and offline batch simulation and reconstruction. The code is structured in a Map-Reduce framework to allow parallelization whether on a personal machine or in the control room. Various software engineering practices from industry are also used to ensure correct and maintainable physics code, which include unit, functional and integration tests, continuous integration and load testing, code reviews, and distributed version control systems. Lastly, there are various small design decisions like using JSON as the data structure, using SWIG to allow developers to write components in either Python or C++, or using the SCons python-based build system that may be of interest to other experiments.

  3. Alternative method of oral administration by peanut butter pellet formulation results in target engagement of BACE1 and attenuation of gavage-induced stress responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, C; Zaleska, M M; Riddell, D R; Atchison, K P; Robshaw, A; Zhou, H; Sukoff Rizzo, S J

    2014-11-01

    Development of novel therapeutic agents aimed at treating neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases require chronic and preferentially oral dosing in appropriate preclinical rodent models. Since many of these disease models involve transgenic mice that are frequently aged and fragile, the commonly used oro-gastric gavage method of drug administration often confounds measured outcomes due to repeated stress and high attrition rates caused by esophageal complications. We employed a novel drug formulation in a peanut butter (PB) pellet readily consumed by mice and compared the stress response as measured by plasma corticosterone levels relative to oral administration via traditional gavage. Acute gavage produced significant elevations in plasma corticosterone comparable to those observed in mice subjected to stress-induced hyperthermia. In contrast, corticosterone levels following consumption of PB pellets were similar to levels in naive mice and significantly lower than in mice subjected to traditional gavage. Following sub-chronic administration, corticosterone levels remained significantly higher in mice subjected to gavage, relative to mice administered PB pellets or naive controls. Furthermore, chronic 30day dosing of a BACE inhibitor administered via PB pellets to PSAPP mice resulted in expected plasma drug exposure and Aβ40 lowering consistent with drug treatment demonstrating target engagement. Taken together, this alternative method of oral administration by drug formulated in PB pellets results in the expected pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics with attenuated stress levels, and is devoid of the detrimental effects of repetitive oral gavage. PMID:25242810

  4. Clostridium difficile in gnotobiotic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Onderdonk, A B; Cisneros, R L; Bartlett, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Germfree mice associated with Clostridium difficile developed intestinal disease characterized by polymorphonuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, diarrhea, and cecal cytotoxin concentrations positive at a 10(-6) dilution. The numbers of viable bacteria never exceeded 10(10) colony-forming units per g (dry weight). Despite the high toxin levels and chronic inflammation over a 30-day period, the mortality rate was low (less than 2%). Daily treatment of these animals with two oral dos...

  5. Linkage Disequilibrium in Wild Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Laurie, Cathy C.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Anderson, Amy D; Weir, Bruce S.; Livingston, Robert J; Dean, Matthew D.; Smith, Kimberly L.; Schadt, Eric E; Nachman, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Crosses between laboratory strains of mice provide a powerful way of detecting quantitative trait loci for complex traits related to human disease. Hundreds of these loci have been detected, but only a small number of the underlying causative genes have been identified. The main difficulty is the extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) in intercross progeny and the slow process of fine-scale mapping by traditional methods. Recently, new approaches have been introduced, such as association studi...

  6. Heterotopic Heart Transplantation in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fengchun; Kang, Sang Mo

    2007-01-01

    The mouse heterotopic heart transplantation has been used widely since it was introduced by Drs. Corry and Russell in 1973. It is particularly valuable for studying rejection and immune response now that newer transgenic and gene knockout mice are available, and a large number of immunologic reagents have been developed. The heart transplant model is less stringent than the skin transplant models, although technically more challenging. We have developed a modified technique and have complete...

  7. Antiretroviral Restriction Factors in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Smita; Rein, Alan

    2014-01-01

    One of the most exciting areas in contemporary retrovirus research is the discovery of “restriction factors”. These are cellular proteins that act after virus entry to inhibit infection by or replication of retroviruses (and other viruses and intracellular pathogens). We briefly discuss here three antiretroviral restriction factors in mice: Fv1, APOBEC3, and tetherin, touching on both biological and molecular aspects of these restriction systems.

  8. Pup mortality in laboratory mice

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Elin M

    2015-01-01

    Successful mouse breeding is a crucial part of providing animals for research. However, loss of single pups or entire litters after birth is a relatively common problem. Determining how pups die is crucial for the understanding of mortality, but the scientific literature does not provide a clear picture of pup mortality and the reason why pups die is still poorly understood. The overall aim with this thesis was to investigate the causes of pup mortality in laboratory mice, focusing on mat...

  9. Progressive Neurodegeneration in Aspartylglycosaminuria Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Mononen, Ilkka; Heisterkamp, Nora; Groffen, John; Kaartinen, Vesa

    1998-01-01

    Aspartylglycosaminuria (AGU) is one of the most common lysosomal storage disorders in humans. A mouse model for AGU has been recently generated through targeted disruption of the glycosylasparaginase gene, and at a young age the glycosyl asparaginase-deficient mice demonstrated many pathological changes found in human AGU patients (Kaartinen V, Mononen I, Voncken J-W, Gonzalez-Gomez I, Heisterkamp N, Groffen J: A mouse model for aspartylglycosaminuria. Nat Med 1996, 2:1375–1378). Our current ...

  10. Hepatotoxicity of ethanol in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldin, R D; Wickramasinghe, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    Mice continuously exposed to ethanol vapour (for up to 19 days) developed fatty change in the liver (from 2 days onwards) and lesions resembling those of alcoholic hepatitis in man (from 5 days onwards). They also showed biochemical evidence of liver cell damage. Sera from ethanol-treated animals contained immunoglobulins that bound to the hepatocytes of ethanol-treated but not of control animals suggesting that exposure to ethanol was followed by an immunological response to a hepatocyte neo...

  11. Primordial Germ Cells in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Saitou, Mitinori; Yamaji, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    Germ cell development creates totipotency through genetic as well as epigenetic regulation of the genome function. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the first germ cell population established during development and are immediate precursors for both the oocytes and spermatogonia. We here summarize recent findings regarding the mechanism of PGC development in mice. We focus on the transcriptional and signaling mechanism for PGC specification, potential pluripotency, and epigenetic reprogramming ...

  12. Arterial Pressure Monitoring in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xin; Ho, David; Gao, Shumin; Hong, Chull; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    The use of mice for the evaluation and study of cardiovascular pathophysiology is growing rapidly, primarily due to the relative ease for developing genetically engineered mouse models. Arterial pressure monitoring is central to the evaluation of the phenotypic changes associated with cardiovascular pathology and interventions in these transgenic and knockout models. There are four major techniques for measuring arterial pressure in the mouse: tail cuff system, implanted fluid filled catheter...

  13. Measuring Motor Coordination in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Deacon, Robert M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Mice are increasingly being used in behavioral neuroscience, largely replacing rats as the behaviorist's animal of choice. Before aspects of behavior such as emotionality or cognition can be assessed, however, it is vital to determine whether the motor capabilities of e.g. a mutant or lesioned mouse allow such an assessment. Performance on a maze task requiring strength and coordination, such as the Morris water maze, might well be impaired in a mouse by motor, rather than cognitive, impairme...

  14. Subjective Expected Utility Theory with "Small Worlds"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Jacob; Hansen, Frank

    which is a more general construction than a state space. We retain preference axioms similar in spirit to the Savage axioms and obtain, without abandoning linearity of expectations, a subjective expected utility theory which allows for an intuitive distinction between risk and uncertainty. We also...... obtain separation of subjective probability and utility as in the state space models....

  15. Game-Space: Unfolding Experiments in Subjectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Stenner, Jack; LeMieux, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Using computer vision techniques and game engine technology, the interactive installation, Game-Space, explores subjectivity in mediated environments. The paper discusses the development of this work and its current conception as a machine for the experimental production of a new subjectivity in the form of a machinic hybrid.

  16. Eliciting Subjective Probabilities with Binary Lotteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Glenn W.; Martínez-Correa, Jimmy; Swarthout, J. Todd

    We evaluate the binary lottery procedure for inducing risk neutral behavior in a subjective belief elicitation task. Harrison, Martínez-Correa and Swarthout [2013] found that the binary lottery procedure works robustly to induce risk neutrality when subjects are given one risk task defined over o...

  17. "Wo Es War": Psychoanalysis, Marxism, and Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Subjectivity, for Descartes, emerged when he doubted the veracity of his knowledge. Instead of truth, he counted this knowledge to be inherited myth. Cartesian subjectivity has been helpful for forming a critical education predicated on doubting ideology and hegemony. But Marx indicates a very different kind of knowledge in his analysis of…

  18. Inferring Beliefs as Subjectively Imprecise Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.; Hole, Arna Risa; Rutström, E. Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method for estimating subjective beliefs, viewed as a subjective probability distribution. The key insight is to characterize beliefs as a parameter to be estimated from observed choices in a well-defined experimental task and to estimate that parameter as a random coefficient. The...... probabilities are indeed best characterized as probability distributions with non-zero variance....

  19. Centring the Subject in Order to Educate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R. Scott

    2007-01-01

    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject--or self--should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially…

  20. Objective versus Subjective Assessment of Methylphenidate Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Iris; Meidad, Sheera; Zalsman, Gil; Zemishlany, Zvi; Tyano, Sam; Weizman, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    Subjective improvement-assessment in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), following a single dose of methylphenidate (MPH) was compared to performance on the Test-of-Variables-of-Attention (TOVA). Self-perception was assessed with the clinical-global-impression-of-change (CGI-C). Participants included 165 ADHD subjects (M:F ratio…

  1. Virtual materiality, potentiality and gendered subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Dorte Marie

    How do we conceptualize virtual materiality, in terms of for instance avatars and weapons in computer games, virtual discourse, subjectivity and the enactment of masculinity as phenomena intra-acting with real life materiality, discourse, subjectivity and masculinity in children’s everyday lives...

  2. Innovativeness and Subjective Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Martin

    2013-01-01

    What are the effects of innovativeness on well-being? This paper argues that research on subjective well-being has progressed to a point where measures of subjective well-being (or: happiness) can usefully be employed to assess the welfare effects of innovative change. Based on a discussion of the prospects and pitfalls associated with subjective…

  3. Elementary School Teachers' Attitudes toward Different Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the favorite subject to teach and enjoyment of teaching of 490 elementary school teachers (K-5) from two rural school districts in the southeastern United States. Reading and language arts were consistently ranked among the favorite and most enjoyed subjects to teach, whereas science and writing were consistently ranked…

  4. The implications of subjective career success

    OpenAIRE

    Dyke, Lorraine; Duxbury, Linda

    2011-01-01

    "The study examined the relationship between employees' ability to achieve subjective success and their work attitudes. Four dimensions of subjective success were measured: fulfilling work, financial rewards, recognition, and authority. Hierarchical regression models predicting job satisfaction, commitment, and turnover were examined. Objective indicators of success (organizational level, promotions, and salary) were included as control variables along with importance scores and achievement s...

  5. NASA Scope and Subject Category Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This guide provides a simple, effective tool to assist aerospace information analysts and database builders in the high-level subject classification of technical materials. Each of the 76 subject categories comprising the classification scheme is presented with a description of category scope, a listing of subtopics, cross references, and an indication of particular areas of NASA interest. The guide also includes an index of nearly 3,000 specific research topics cross referenced to the subject categories. The portable document format (PDF) version of the guide contains links in the index from each input subject to its corresponding categories. In addition to subject classification, the guide can serve as an aid to searching databases that use the classification scheme, and is also an excellent selection guide for those involved in the acquisition of aerospace literature. The CD-ROM contains both HTML and PDF versions.

  6. Age Changes in Subjective Work Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solem, Per Erik

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the influence of psychosocial work environment on age-related subjective changes in work ability and discusses differences between work ability and job performance. The results show age and physical health to be strong predictors of subjective decline in work ability. The age effect is independent of age-associated declining health. It is not clear what it is about age that produces the subjective decline in work ability. While primary age changes may produce decline, stereotypes and self-stereotypes about ageing may also be important. Among psychosocial factors, options for learning and problems at work are robust predictors of subjective changes in work ability. One practical consequence is to ensure learning opportunities for workers, even for workers approaching retirement age. By giving learning opportunities to senior workers, subjective work ability may be maintained, and competence acquired through learning may in a direct way support stability or improvements in job performance.

  7. Visual impairment in FOXG1-mutated individuals and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, E M; Pancrazi, L; Gennaro, M; Lo Rizzo, C; Mari, F; Meloni, I; Ariani, F; Panighini, A; Novelli, E; Biagioni, M; Strettoi, E; Hayek, J; Rufa, A; Pizzorusso, T; Renieri, A; Costa, M

    2016-06-01

    The Forkead Box G1 (FOXG1 in humans, Foxg1 in mice) gene encodes for a DNA-binding transcription factor, essential for the development of the telencephalon in mammalian forebrain. Mutations in FOXG1 have been reported to be involved in the onset of Rett Syndrome, for which sequence alterations of MECP2 and CDKL5 are known. While visual alterations are not classical hallmarks of Rett syndrome, an increasing body of evidence shows visual impairment in patients and in MeCP2 and CDKL5 animal models. Herein we focused on the functional role of FOXG1 in the visual system of animal models (Foxg1(+/Cre) mice) and of a cohort of subjects carrying FOXG1 mutations or deletions. Visual physiology of Foxg1(+/Cre) mice was assessed by visually evoked potentials, which revealed a significant reduction in response amplitude and visual acuity with respect to wild-type littermates. Morphological investigation showed abnormalities in the organization of excitatory/inhibitory circuits in the visual cortex. No alterations were observed in retinal structure. By examining a cohort of FOXG1-mutated individuals with a panel of neuro-ophthalmological assessments, we found that all of them exhibited visual alterations compatible with high-level visual dysfunctions. In conclusion our data show that Foxg1 haploinsufficiency results in an impairment of mouse and human visual cortical function. PMID:27001178

  8. Distinct motor impairments of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor knockout mice revealed by three types of motor behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru eNakamura

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Both D1R and D2R knock out (KO mice of the major dopamine receptors show significant motor impairments. However, there are some discrepant reports, which may be due to the differences in genetic background and experimental procedures. In addition, only few studies directly compared the motor performance of D1R and D2R KO mice. In this paper, we examined the behavioral difference among N10 congenic D1R and D2R KO, and wild type (WT mice. First, we examined spontaneous motor activity in the home cage environment for consecutive five days. Second, we examined motor performance using the rota-rod task, a standard motor task in rodents. Third, we examined motor ability with the Step-Wheel task in which mice were trained to run in a motor-driven turning wheel adjusting their steps on foothold pegs to drink water. The results showed clear differences among the mice of three genotypes in three different types of behavior. In monitoring spontaneous motor activities, D1R and D2R KO mice showed higher and lower 24 h activities, respectively, than WT mice. In the rota-rod tasks, at a low speed, D1R KO mice showed poor performance but later improved, whereas D2R KO mice showed a good performance at early days without further improvement. When first subjected to a high speed task, the D2R KO mice showed poorer rota-rod performance at a low speed than the D1R KO mice. In the Step-Wheel task, across daily sessions, D2R KO mice increased the duration that mice run sufficiently close to the spout to drink water, and decreased time to touch the floor due to missing the peg steps and number of times the wheel was stopped, which performance was much better than that of D1R KO mice. These incongruent results between the two tasks for D1R and D2R KO mice may be due to the differences in the motivation for the rota-rod and Step-Wheel tasks, aversion- and reward-driven, respectively. The Step-Wheel system may become a useful tool for assessing the motor ability of WT

  9. Differences in strength-duration curves of electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists between DJ-1 homozygous knockout and wild-type mice: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Won-Deok; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Strength-duration (SD) curves are used in electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists to confirm muscle degeneration. However, the usefulness of SD curves in comparing muscle degeneration in DJ-1 homozygous knockout (DJ-1(-/-)) and wild-type mice (DJ-1(+/+)) is not yet fully understood. The electrical properties of the gastrocnemius muscles of DJ-1(-/-) and DJ-1(+/+) mice were compared in the current study. [Subjects and Methods] The electrode of an electrical stimulator was applied to the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the rheobase until the response of contractive muscle to electrical stimulation became visible in mice. [Results] The rheobase of DJ-1(-/-) mice showed a significant increase in a time-dependent manner, compared to that of DJ-1(+/+) mice. [Conclusion] These results demonstrate that the DJ-1 protein may be implicated in the regulation of neuromuscular activity of gastrocnemius muscles of mice. PMID:27313379

  10. Differences in strength-duration curves of electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists between DJ-1 homozygous knockout and wild-type mice: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Won-Deok; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Strength-duration (SD) curves are used in electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists to confirm muscle degeneration. However, the usefulness of SD curves in comparing muscle degeneration in DJ-1 homozygous knockout (DJ-1−/−) and wild-type mice (DJ-1+/+) is not yet fully understood. The electrical properties of the gastrocnemius muscles of DJ-1−/− and DJ-1+/+ mice were compared in the current study. [Subjects and Methods] The electrode of an electrical stimulator was applied to the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the rheobase until the response of contractive muscle to electrical stimulation became visible in mice. [Results] The rheobase of DJ-1−/− mice showed a significant increase in a time-dependent manner, compared to that of DJ-1+/+ mice. [Conclusion] These results demonstrate that the DJ-1 protein may be implicated in the regulation of neuromuscular activity of gastrocnemius muscles of mice.

  11. Effects of social defeat and of diazepam on behavior in a resident-intruder test in male DBA/2 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, L A; Charles, R F; Charles, R C; Hebert, M A; Morton, D M; Meyerhoff, J L

    2000-11-01

    Social stress induces robust behavioral and physiological changes, some of which may alter the responsiveness to pharmacological agents, including diazepam (DZP). We used a resident-intruder paradigm to (1) develop a comprehensive ethogram of behavioral changes following social defeat (SD) in the socially reactive strain, DBA/2 male mice, (2) determine whether acute exposure of DBA/2 mice to low-dose DZP would induce flight or aggressive behavior, both of which have been observed in other rodent models and (3) to test whether prior social stress affects responses to DZP. Behavioral responses to a nonaggressive intruder (NAI) mouse 24 h post-SD were measured in resident subject mice exposed to DZP (0, 0.5, 2.0 mg/kg, ip) either prior to the resident-intruder test (Experiment 1) or immediately post-SD (Experiment 2); control mice were not defeated (NOSD). In general, SD mice displayed increased passive and active avoidance, defense, immobility, and risk assessment relative to NOSD mice. In Experiment 1, mice treated acutely with 0.5 mg/kg DZP had more approach and flight behavior, while those treated with 2.0 mg/kg DZP had more avoidance than vehicle-treated mice, independent of SD. In Experiment 2, acute DZP (2 mg/kg) induced effects 24 h later, possibly secondary to withdrawal. In a nonsocial context (Experiment 3), DZP increased exploratory activity. PMID:11164070

  12. Deficiency in type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor in mice protects against oxygen-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flejou Jean-François

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular responses to aging and oxidative stress are regulated by type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R. Oxidant injury, which is implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of respiratory diseases, acutely upregulates IGF-1R expression in the lung. This led us to suspect that reduction of IGF-1R levels in lung tissue could prevent deleterious effects of oxygen exposure. Methods Since IGF-1R null mutant mice die at birth from respiratory failure, we generated compound heterozygous mice harboring a hypomorphic (Igf-1rneo and a knockout (Igf-1r- receptor allele. These IGF-1Rneo/- mice, strongly deficient in IGF-1R, were subjected to hyperoxia and analyzed for survival time, ventilatory control, pulmonary histopathology, morphometry, lung edema and vascular permeability. Results Strikingly, after 72 h of exposure to 90% O2, IGF-1Rneo/- mice had a significantly better survival rate during recovery than IGF-1R+/+ mice (77% versus 53%, P neo/- mice which developed conspicuously less edema and vascular extravasation than controls. Also, hyperoxia-induced abnormal pattern of breathing which precipitated respiratory failure was elicited less frequently in the IGF-1Rneo/- mice. Conclusion Together, these data demonstrate that a decrease in IGF-1R signaling in mice protects against oxidant-induced lung injury.

  13. Fluoxetine protection in decompression sickness in mice is enhanced by blocking TREK-1 potassium channel with the spadin antidepressant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eVallée

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In mice, disseminated coagulation, inflammation and ischemia induce neurological damages that can lead to the death. These symptoms result from circulating bubbles generated by a pathogenic decompression. An acute fluoxetine treatment or the presence of the TREK-1 potassium channel increased the survival rate when mice are subjected to an experimental dive/decompression protocol. This is a paradox because fluoxetine is a blocker of TREK-1 channels. First, we studied the effects of an acute dose of fluoxetine (50mg/kg in wild-type (WT and TREK-1 deficient mice (Knockout homozygous KO and heterozygous HET. Then, we combined the same fluoxetine treatment with a five-day treatment by spadin, in order to specifically block TREK-1 activity (KO-like mice. KO and KO-like mice could be regarded as antidepressed models.167 mice (45 WTcont 46 WTflux 30 HETflux and 46 KOflux constituting the flux-pool and 113 supplementary mice (27 KO-like 24 WTflux2 24 KO-likeflux 21 WTcont2 17 WTno dive constituting the spad-pool were included in this study. Only 7% of KO-TREK-1 treated with fluoxetine (KOflux and 4% of mice treated with both spadin and fluoxetine (KO-likeflux died from decompression sickness (DCS symptoms. These values are much lower than those of WT control (62% or KO-like mice (41%. After the decompression protocol, mice showed a significant consumption of their circulating platelets and leukocytes.Spadin antidepressed mice were more likely to declare DCS. Nevertheless, which had both blocked TREK-1 channel and were treated with fluoxetine were better protected against DCS. We conclude that the protective effect of such an acute dose of fluoxetine is enhanced when TREK-1 is inhibited. We confirmed that antidepressed models may have worse DCS outcomes, but a concomitant fluoxetine treatment not only decreases DCS severity but increases the survival rate.

  14. THE EXTRACT OF PURPLE SWEET POTATO DECREASE BLOOD AND LIVER MDA OF MICE AFTER INTENSE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Jawi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress as consequence of intense physical exercises cause tissue lesions. The objective of this study was to identify the comparable antioxidant effect of water extract and syrup of Balinese purple sweet potato to the liver tissue in mice after maximal exercise, through the quantification of blood and liver malondialdehyde (MDA, and the histologic feature of liver tissue. Subjects of this study were 60 adult male Swiss mice divided into 6 groups with control group post-test only design. Blood and liver were collected after exercise protocol of exhausting swimming in ten mice without water extract, ten mice with water extract and ten mice with syrup of Balinese purple sweet potato. The MDA was quantification with TBARS method. Samples were also collected from control group of ten mice without water extract, ten mice with water extract and ten mice with syrup of Balinese purple sweet potato as sedentary mice. The results show a significant increase of MDA in the blood and liver, after swimming with and without water extract or syrup of Balinese purple sweet potato respectively (p<0,05. The increase of MDA was slightly significant in the group with water extract or syrup of Balinese purple sweet potato (p<0,05. The increase of liver cell necrosis was slightly significant in the group with water extract of Balinese purple sweet potato (p<0,05. From this finding it can be concluded that water extract or syrup of Balinese purple sweet potato has antioxidant effect in exhausting exercise in mice. Water extract of Balinese purple sweet potato has protective effect to the liver cell in exhausting exercise in mice

  15. Effect of single and fractionated x-irradiation on maze learning ability of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-six-day-old male ddk mice at the starting of the investigation were used as subjects through the experiment for 64 weeks. After 15 days' preliminary training, and 16 times of weekly trial training using complete maze, 15 mice received a single 224 rads of x-rays (S group), another 15 mice received two 112 rads spaced two weeks apart (F group) and another 15 mice were sham-irradiated (Control group). Then those mice were tested on the multiple T-maze with nine-choice points and change of performance was observed in terms of errorchoices by giving one test trial a week. We introduced the concept of ''confusional trials'' as an index for surmising to what extent mice failed to exhibit good maze learning habits. In the results, the F group showed significantly worse performance than the two other groups at early stages, opposite to it the S group exhibited the same, but at late stages after irradiation. The worse performance of F group should be considered to be due to the psychological after-effect to fractionated irradiation and that for S group could be assumed to be due to the acceleration of aging by the irradiation. (auth.)

  16. Oral P. gingivalis infection alters the vascular reactivity in healthy and spontaneously atherosclerotic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanon Ivanita

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering that recent studies have demonstrated endothelial dysfunction in subjects with periodontitis and that there is no information about vascular function in coexistence of periodontitis and atherosclerosis, we assessed the impact of oral inoculation with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis on vascular reactivity in healthy and hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE mice. In vitro preparations of mesenteric arteriolar bed were used to determine the vascular responses to acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine (PE. Results Alveolar bone resorption, an evidence of periodontitis, was assessed and confirmed in all infected mice. Acetylcholine- and sodium nitroprusside-induced vasorelaxations were similar among all groups. Non-infected ApoE mice were hyperreactive to PE when compared to non-infected healthy mice. P gingivalis infection significantly enhanced the vasoconstriction to PE in both healthy and spontaneous atherosclerotic mice, when compared to their respective controls. Conclusions This study demonstrates that oral P gingivalis affects the alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated vascular responsiveness in both healthy and spontaneous atherosclerotic mice, reinforcing the association between periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Behavioral Deficits in Juveniles Mediated by Maternal Stress Hormones in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Maguire

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal depression has been shown to negatively impact offspring development. Investigation into the impact of maternal depression and offspring behavior has relied on correlative studies in humans. Further investigation into the underlying mechanisms has been hindered by the lack of useful animal models. We previously characterized a mouse model which exhibits depression-like behaviors restricted to the postpartum period and abnormal/fragmented maternal care (Gabrd−/− mice. Here we utilized this unique mouse model to investigate the mechanism(s through which maternal depression-like behaviors adversely impact offspring development. Cross-fostering experiments reveal increased anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in mice reared by Gabrd−/− mothers. Wild type and Gabrd−/− mice subjected to unpredictable stress during late pregnancy exhibit decreased pup survival and depression-like behavior in the postpartum period. Exogenous corticosterone treatment in wild type mice during late pregnancy is sufficient to decrease pup survival and induce anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in the offspring. Further, the abnormal behaviors in juvenile mice reared by Gabrd−/− mice are alleviated by treatment of the mothers with the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH antagonist, Antalarmin. These studies suggest that hyperresponsiveness of the HPA axis is associated with postpartum depression and may mediate the adverse effects of maternal depression on offspring behavior.

  18. Neurobiological and pharmacological validity of curcumin in ameliorating memory performance of senescence-accelerated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen Y; Qi, Shuang S; Zhou, Peng; Cui, Huai R; Chen, Shi X; Dai, Kai Y; Tang, Mao L

    2013-04-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8 mice) is known as a neurodegenerative model and may show age-related deficits of cognition. Curcumin, a major active component of spic turmeric, could increase the capacity of learning and memory in the aged rat. However, it is not known whether curcumin could improve cognitive deficits in SAMP8 mice. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of curcumin on the learning and memory of SAMP8 mice and its possible mechanisms. Subjects were randomly divided into four groups: SAMR1 mice, SAMP8 mice and two SAMP8 mice groups treated, intragastrically, with curcumin at the dose of 20 and 50mg/kg per day, respectively. After 25days, spatial memory, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, p-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (p-CaMKII) and p-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 1 (p-NMDAR1) expression in the hippocampus of mice were examined by using the Morris water maze, biochemical analysis, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Compared with SAMR1 mice, SAMP8 mice had longer escape latency, higher MDA content, lower SOD activity in the hippocampus, and lower intensity of p-CaMKII in the stratum lucidum of hippocampal CA3 and p-NMDAR1 expression in the hippocampal membrane fraction. Both 20 and 50mg/kg curcumin administration significantly shortened the escape latencies and decreased the hippocampal MDA content in the SAMP8 mice. 50mg/kg curcumin administration significantly ameliorated the hippocampal SOD activity, and increased the intensity of p-CaMKII in the stratum lucidum of hippocampal CA3 and p-NMDAR1 expression in the hippocampal membrane fraction of the SAMP8 mice. The present study demonstrated that curcumin treatment could attenuate cognitive deficits of SAMP8 mice in a dose-dependent manner by decreasing the oxidative stress and improving the expression of p-CaMKII and p-NMDAR1 in the hippocampus. Thus treatment with curcumin may have a potential therapeutic agent

  19. Vocal development and auditory perception in CBA/CaJ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziwon, Kelly E.

    Mice are useful laboratory subjects because of their small size, their modest cost, and the fact that researchers have created many different strains to study a variety of disorders. In particular, researchers have found nearly 100 naturally occurring mouse mutations with hearing impairments. For these reasons, mice have become an important model for studies of human deafness. Although much is known about the genetic makeup and physiology of the laboratory mouse, far less is known about mouse auditory behavior. To fully understand the effects of genetic mutations on hearing, it is necessary to determine the hearing abilities of these mice. Two experiments here examined various aspects of mouse auditory perception using CBA/CaJ mice, a commonly used mouse strain. The frequency difference limens experiment tested the mouse's ability to discriminate one tone from another based solely on the frequency of the tone. The mice had similar thresholds as wild mice and gerbils but needed a larger change in frequency than humans and cats. The second psychoacoustic experiment sought to determine which cue, frequency or duration, was more salient when the mice had to identify various tones. In this identification task, the mice overwhelmingly classified the tones based on frequency instead of duration, suggesting that mice are using frequency when differentiating one mouse vocalization from another. The other two experiments were more naturalistic and involved both auditory perception and mouse vocal production. Interest in mouse vocalizations is growing because of the potential for mice to become a model of human speech disorders. These experiments traced mouse vocal development from infant to adult, and they tested the mouse's preference for various vocalizations. This was the first known study to analyze the vocalizations of individual mice across development. Results showed large variation in calling rates among the three cages of adult mice but results were highly

  20. Doing mathematics convention, subject, calculation, analogy

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Martin H

    2003-01-01

    This book discusses some ways of doing mathematical work and the subject matter that is being worked upon and created. It argues that the conventions we adopt, the subject areas we delimit, what we can prove and calculate about the physical world, and the analogies that work for mathematicians - all depend on mathematics, what will work out and what won't. And the mathematics, as it is done, is shaped and supported, or not, by convention, subject matter, calculation, and analogy. The cases studied include the central limit theorem of statistics, the sound of the shape of a drum, the connection

  1. Subjective performance evaluations and employee careers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Lange, Fabian; Kriechell, Ben

    Firms commonly use supervisor evaluations to assess the performance of employees who work in complex environments. Doubts persist whether their subjective nature invalidates using these performance measures to learn about careers of individuals and to inform theory in personnel economics. We...... examine personnel data from six large companies and establish how subjective ratings, interpreted as ordinal rankings of employee performances within narrowly defined peer-groups, correlate with objective career outcomes. We find many similarities across firms in how subjective ratings correlate with base...

  2. Tracheobronchial calcification in adult health study subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracheobronchial calcification is reportedly more frequent in women than in men. Ten cases of extensive tracehobronchial calcification were identified on chest radiographs of 1,152 consecutively examined Adult Health Study subjects, for a prevalence of 0.87 %. An additional 51 subjects having this coded diagnosis were identified among 11,758 members of this fixed population sample. Sixty of the 61 subjects were women. The manifestations and extent of this type of calcification and its correlations with clinical and histopathologic features, which have not been previously reported, are described here. (author)

  3. Subjective evaluation of noise from neighbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Rye; Rindel, Jens Holger; Mortensen, Frank Rysgaard

    1998-01-01

    This publication describes the preparations for and the results obtained in subjective listening tests conducted at the Department of Acoustic Technology. The focus area is the annoyance produced by noise from neighbours and transmitted through different types of constructions with special focus ...... low frequencies. The evaluation method was subjective listening tests. In the publication a detailed description can be found.......This publication describes the preparations for and the results obtained in subjective listening tests conducted at the Department of Acoustic Technology. The focus area is the annoyance produced by noise from neighbours and transmitted through different types of constructions with special focus on...

  4. Idiotypic manipulation in mice: BALB/c mice can express the crossreactive idiotype of A/J mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, M.; Leo, O.; Hiernaux, J.; Urbain, J

    1983-01-01

    The response of A/J mice to arsonate-coupled keyhole limpet hemocyanin is characterized by a crossreactive idiotype (CRIA). CRIA+ antibodies are restricted to the Igh-Ic haplotype and are never expressed in BALB/c mice after immunization with antigen. Studies at the DNA level suggest that the gene encoding the CRIA heavy chain in A/J mice is probably absent in the genome of BALB/c mice. Despite this, using the immunization cascade tool, we have been able to induce the expression of CRIA+ anti...

  5. Combined Effects of Acamprosate and Escitalopram on Ethanol Consumption in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ada Man-Choi; Qiu, Yanyan; Jia, Yun-Fang; Aguiar, Felipe S.; Hinton, David J.; Karpyak, Victor M.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depression is one of the most prevalent psychiatry comorbidities of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Since negative emotions can trigger craving and increase the risk of relapse, treatments that target both conditions simultaneously may augment treatment success. Previous studies showed a potential synergist effect of FDA approved medication for AUD acamprosate and the antidepressant escitalopram. In this study, we investigated the effects of combining acamprosate and escitalopram on ethanol consumption in stress-induced depressed mice. Methods Forty singly-housed C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to chronic unpredictable stress. In parallel, 40 group-housed male mice were subjected to normal husbandry. After 3 weeks, depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and ethanol consumption were assessed. For the next 7 days, mice were injected with saline, acamprosate (200 mg/kg; twice/day), escitalopram (5 mg/kg; twice/day), or their combination (n = 9–11/drug group/stress group). Two-bottle choice limited access drinking of 15% ethanol and tap water was performed 3 hours into dark phase for 2 hours immediately after the dark phase daily injection. Ethanol drinking was monitored for another 7 days without drug administration. Results Mice subjected to the chronic unpredictable stress paradigm for 3 weeks showed apparent depression- and anxiety-like behaviors compared to their non-stressed counterparts including longer immobility time in the forced swim test and lower sucrose preference. Stressed mice also displayed higher ethanol consumption and preference in a 2-bottle choice drinking test. During the drug administration period, the escitalopram-only and combined drug groups showed significant reduction in ethanol consumption in non-stressed mice, while only the combined drug group showed significantly reduced consumption in stressed mice. However, such reduction did not persist into the post-drug administration period. Conclusions The combination of

  6. Constrained tibial vibration does not produce an anabolic bone response in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Blaine A; Kotiya, Akhilesh A; Silva, Matthew J

    2009-10-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and increased fracture risk. High frequency, low-amplitude whole-body vibration (WBV) has been proposed as a treatment for osteoporosis because it can stimulate new bone formation and prevent trabecular bone loss. We developed constrained tibial vibration (CTV) as a method for controlled vibrational loading of the lower leg of a mouse. We first subjected mice to five weeks of daily CTV loading (0.5 G maximum acceleration) with loading parameters chosen to independently investigate the effects of strain magnitude, loading frequency, and cyclic acceleration on the adaptive response to vibration. We hypothesized that mice subjected to the highest magnitude of dynamic strain would have the largest bone formation response. We observed a slight, local benefit of CTV loading on trabecular bone, as BV/TV was 5.2% higher in the loaded vs. non-loaded tibia of mice loaded with the highest bone strain magnitude. However, despite these positive differences, we observed significantly lower measures of trabecular structure in both loaded and non-loaded tibias from CTV loaded mice compared to Sham and Baseline Control animals, indicating a negative systemic effect of CTV on trabecular bone. Based on this evidence, we conducted a follow-up study wherein mice were subjected to CTV or sham loading, and tibias were scanned at the beginning and end of the study period using in vivo microCT. Consistent with the findings of the first study, trabecular BV/TV in both tibias of CTV loaded and Sham mice was, on average, 36% and 31% lower on day 36 than day 0, respectively, compared to 20% lower in Age-Matched Controls over the same time period. Contrary to the first study, there were no differences between loaded and non-loaded tibias in CTV loaded mice, providing no evidence for a local benefit of CTV. In summary, 5 weeks of daily CTV loading of mice was, at best, weakly anabolic for trabecular bone in the proximal tibia, while daily handling

  7. Protective effect of intermittent fasting on the mortality of gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubik, A.; Pospisil, M.

    1982-12-01

    The effect of 1 to 6 weeks' adaptation to intermittent fasting (alternating periods of 24 h fasting and subsequent 24 h feeding) on the manifestations of radioresistance of mice subjected to whole-body gamma-irradiation was studied. A favourable effect of this feeding regimen on the survival of irradiated animals was observed. The optimal redioprotective effect was achieved in mice adapted to intermittent fasting for 2 to 3 weeks and irradiated after 24 h of food intake. Furthermore, it was shown that the radioresistance of the adapted organism depends on the momentary state of food intake. After renewal of the normal ad libitum feeding the adaptively induced radioresistance decreases.

  8. Liver Oxidative Stress after Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury is Leukocyte Dependent in Inbred Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Khastar, Hossein; Kadkhodaee, Mehri; Sadeghipour, Hamid Reza; Seifi, Behjat; Hadjati, Jamshid; Najafi, Atefeh; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2011-01-01

    Objective(s) There are some reports in recent years indicating that renal ischemia – reperfusion (IR) induces deleterious changes in remote organs such as liver. The aim of this study was to investigate whether leukocytes have a role on the induction of oxidative stress in liver after renal IR. Materials and Methods Inbred mice in IR donor group were subjected to renal IR injury. In sham donor group the procedure was almost the same except that ischemia was not induced. Then, mice were anesth...

  9. Protective effect of intermittent fasting on the mortality of gamma-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of 1 to 6 weeks' adaptation to intermittent fasting (alternating periods of 24 h fasting and subsequent 24 h feeding) on the manifestations of radioresistance of mice subjected to whole-body gamma-irradiation was studied. A favourable effect of this feeding regimen on the survival of irradiated animals was observed. The optimal redioprotective effect was achieved in mice adapted to intermittent fasting for 2 to 3 weeks and irradiated after 24 h of food intake. Furthermore, it was shown that the radioresistance of the adapted organism depends on the momentary state of food intake. After renewal of the normal ad libitum feeding the adaptively induced radioresistance decreases. (orig.)

  10. Improvement of skin wound healing in diabetic mice by kinin B2 receptor blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Desposito, D.; Chollet, C.; Taveau, C.; Descamps, V.; Alhenc-Gelas, F.; Roussel, R.; Bouby, Nadine; Waeckel, L.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired skin wound healing is a major medical problem in diabetic subjects. Kinins exert a number of vascular and other actions limiting organ damage in ischaemia or diabetes, but their role in skin injury is unknown. We investigated, through pharmacological manipulation of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors (B1R and B2R respectively), the role of kinins in wound healing in non-diabetic and diabetic mice. Using two mouse models of diabetes (streptozotocin-induced and db/db mice) and non-diabetic...

  11. Is Chinese as a Subject Important?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In January, six universities in Shanghai held independent admission tests to select students from more than 10,000 appli- cants. At four of the universities, Chinese was not a test subject or science students

  12. Subjective experiences in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, Luca; Kalyvoka, Artemis; Stratta, Paolo; Gianfelice, Daniela; Rinaldi, Osvaldo; Rossi, Alessandro

    2002-02-01

    Studies comparing 'subjective experiences' in schizophrenic and affective disorders have reached inconclusive results. We investigated the pattern of 'subjective perceived cognitive disturbances' in a group of 55 schizophrenic patients and 39 bipolar patients hospitalized for an index psychotic episode. The assessment of the subjective experiences was made using the Frankfurter Beschwerde-Fragebogen (FBF). Comparing the two groups on the four FBF factors, schizophrenic patients showed significantly higher scores in the areas of 'central cognitive disturbances', 'perception and motility' other than a significantly higher FBF total score. Our results suggest that cognitive, perception and motility disturbances are the most characteristic subjective experiences of schizophrenic patients in comparison with bipolar patients. This finding need to be further explored in light of the issue of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:12056578

  13. Ethical aspects of trade subject to risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper pleads for unrestricted use of the requirement of rational risk comparison. The ethical aspects of the problem are that human beings cannot help expecting certain people to take risks and others to forsake them. Expectation of risk requires an ethical justification. Consideration of justification has of course to originate from the fact that both readiness to accept risk and also the preference system are subject to strong subjective variations. Consequently, intercession has to be made to compare the definition of subjective probability (competitiveness) and a subjective preference matrix as the basis for a rational definition of risk. General liability results first due to the fact that consistency can be expected from each individual in relation to the readiness to accept risk expected of him. According to the requirement for consistency introduced here, a readiness to accept risk may be expected of an individual which is otherwise already accepted. (orig.)

  14. THE SUBJECTIVE HUMAN PRODUCTIVITY IN LEARNING ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Yurievna Galiullina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the relationship of divergent thinking and achievement in learning activities. J. Guilford and some Russian scientists, divergent thinking is understood as a common creative ability. To be creators, to initiate and carry out initial practice and other forms of specifically human activity is to be subject. This ability – the main characteristic of subjectivity. Proved the importance of the relationship of divergent thinking and achievement in learning activities, for disclosure of subject student productivity. The study found «positive» relationship between divergent thinking and academic performance of students of the middle classes and the «negative» relationship among elementary school students. As we know from the writings of SL Rubinstein and N. Bernstein, training activities associated with the mastery of relevant skills. Formation of skills takes time. Therefore subjective productivity in educational activity is observed in the textbooks of the middle classes and does not manifest itself in elementary school students.

  15. Cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data have established an association between cardiovascular disease and psoriasis. Only one general population study has so far compared prevalences of cardiovascular risk factors among subjects with psoriasis and control subjects. We aimed to determine the prevalence of...... cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with and without psoriasis in the general population. Methods During 2006-2008, a cross-sectional study was performed in the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 3471 subjects participated in a general health examination that included assessment of current...... smoking status, weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, resting heart rate, and plasma lipids, hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, and insulin levels. Results Physician-diagnosed psoriasis was reported by 238 (7.1%) of 3374 participants. There were no differences...

  16. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ~1% contamination. To make the final muon sel...

  17. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; Bari, AD; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, VJ; Warburton, P; Watson, S; White, C.; Whyte, CG

    2016-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final m...

  18. Effect of melittin on mice stomach

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Zinadah, Osama; Rahmy, Tarek; Alahmari, Abeer; Abdu, Faiza

    2013-01-01

    Melittin, the main bee venom component, has many positive biological effects and a relatively low toxicity in various cell types. However, there is no evidence of the effect of melittin on gastrointestinal cells. In the present study, we investigated the histological and immuonohistochemical effects of melittin on mice stomach. Adult male mice (Albino Swiss) were randomly divided into two groups (7 mice for each group): control group and melittin only treated group (10 and 40 μg/kg). These mi...

  19. Subjective Probability and the Theory of Games

    OpenAIRE

    Kadane, Joseph B.; Patrick D. Larkey

    1982-01-01

    This paper explores some of the consequences of adopting a modern subjective view of probability for game theory. The consequences are substantial. The subjective view of probability clarifies the important distinction between normative and positive theorizing about behavior in games, a distinction that is often lost in the search for "solution concepts" which largely characterizes game theory since the work of von Neumann and Morgenstern. Many of the distinctions that appear important in con...

  20. Protecting Human Subjects in Internet Research

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The growth of the Internet as a research venue has led to practical, legal, and ethical problems regarding the protection of human subjects. Among these are difficulty in verifying subjects’ identities, gaining informed consent, and assuring ethically- correct research. The authors summarize the current standards pertaining to the protection of human subjects in online research and present a set of guidelines for dealing ethically, legally, and practically with the issues of priva...

  1. Recruiting phobic research subjects: effectiveness and cost.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaakko, T.; Murtomaa, H.; Milgrom, P.; Getz, T.; Ramsay, D. S.; Coldwell, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    Efficiently enrolling subjects is one of the most important and difficult aspects of a clinical trial. This prospective study evaluated strategies used in the recruitment of 144 dental injection phobics for a clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of combining alprazolam with exposure therapy. Three types of recruitment strategies were evaluated: paid advertising, free publicity, and professional referral. Sixty-three percent of subjects were enrolled using paid advertising (the majority...

  2. Finding the student voice in subject blogging

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Maren; Sansom, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Kingston University’s Library and Learning Services launched a set of subject focussed blogs in September 2011 with the aim to provide more timely and relevant information than was previously available via the subject web pages. The blogs have been successful in attracting user views, but there is scope to provide more opportunities for interactivity through student collaboration. Blog content is currently conceived by the information advisors pulling inspiration from help desk and e-mail...

  3. Objective and subjective responsibility in business sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the distinction between objective responsibility – determined by social norms – and subjective responsibility – as a feeling and an attitude of an individual subject. The paper argues that both types of responsibility are necessary for the well functioning of businesses or social production and considers two consequences of the distinction for business sustainability. The first consequence comes through the interpretation of markets as systems to organize objective respons...

  4. Information structure, (inter)subjectivity and objectification

    OpenAIRE

    van der Wal, Jenneke

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses how information structure can be seen as a subjective and intersubjective concept in Verhagen's (2005) and Breban's (2010) definitions, though less so in Traugott's (2010) use of the terms. More difficult is the question of whether markers of information structure can be characterised as (inter)subjective; this is more easily determined for morphological markers than for prosody or word order. For unambiguous markers of information structure, I suggest that their emergenc...

  5. PSA, subjective probability and decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSA is the natural way to making decisions in face of uncertainty relative to potentially dangerous plants; subjective probability, subjective utility and Bayes statistics are the ideal tools for carrying out a PSA. This paper reports that in order to support this statement the various stages of the PSA procedure are examined in detail and step by step the superiority of Bayes techniques with respect to sampling theory machinery is proven

  6. Dopamine Transporter Levels in Cocaine Dependent Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Newberg, Andrew; Wintering, Nancy; Ploessl, Karl; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; RING-KURTZ, SARAH; Gallop, Robert; Present, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine use is a significant problem in the US and it is well established that cocaine binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT) in the brain. This study was designed to determine if the DAT levels measured by 99mTc TRODAT SPECT brain scans are altered in cocaine dependent subjects and to explore clinical correlates of such alterations. SPECT brain scans were acquired on 21 cocaine dependent subjects and 21 healthy matched controls. There were significantly higher DAT levels in cocaine dependen...

  7. Incentives for subjects in internet experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Duersch, Peter; Oechssler, Jörg; Burkhard C. Schipper

    2008-01-01

    Internet experiments are a new and convenient way for reaching a large subject pool. Yet, providing incentives to subjects can be a tricky design issue. One cost effective and simple method is the publication of a high score (as in computer games). We test whether a high score provides adequate and non-distortionary incentives by comparing it to the usual performance based incentives. We find significant differences and conclude that high scores are not always appropriate as an incentive devi...

  8. Incentives for Subjects in Internet Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhard C. Schipper; Jörg Oechssler

    2008-01-01

    Internet experiments are a new and convenient way for reaching a large subject pool. Yet, providing incentives to subjects can be a tricky design issue. One cost effective and simple method is the publication of a high score (as in computer games). We test whether a high score provides adequate and non-distortionary incentives by comparing it to the usual performance based incentives. We find significant differences and conclude that high scores are not always appropriate as an incentive devi...

  9. Can subjectivity be avoided in translation evaluation?

    OpenAIRE

    Segers, Winibert; Kockaert, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    The didactics of translation and interpreting Testing and assessment criteria and methods Can subjectivity be avoided in translation evaluation? Winibert Segers & Hendrik J Kockaert, KU Leuven Camiel Paulusstraat 8, 2630 Aartselaar, België Is translation evaluation a subjective, personal matter? Is evaluating translations the same as beer tasting or listening to a piece of music? Is the judgment determined by personal taste? We will try to answe...

  10. Questioning the Subject in Biographical Interviewing

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Harding

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers how different approaches to interviewing and styles of questioning produce different sorts of biographical subjects and accounts. It compares styles of biographical interview (chronological and narrative) and types of question (narrative and explanatory), and presents an approach, which treats the interview as a collaborative co-production primarily concerned with the present and subjectivity, rather than the past and fact. It also considers how biographical interviewing ...

  11. Exploitation of Folksonomies in Subject Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Παπαθεοδώρου, Χρήστος; Κακάλη, Κωνσταντία

    2010-01-01

    Social tagging is one of the most popular of social media applications and has attracted the interest of a number of libraries and museums, which have developed services that facilitate user-community collaboration. This paper presents a methodology for the exploitation of social tagging in subject indexing, and explores that method through a case study in an academic library setting. The findings reveal the characteristics of users' tagging behavior, which mainly enhances the subject descrip...

  12. Subjective Vitality as Mediator and Moderator of the Relationship between Life Satisfaction and Subjective Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Recep; Satici, Seydi Ahmet; Satici, Begüm; Akin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the mediator and moderator effects of subjective vitality on the relationship between life satisfaction and subjective happiness were investigated. The participants were 378 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Subjective Vitality Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Subjective…

  13. Multi-tissue computational modeling analyzes pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in MKR mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    Full Text Available Computational models using metabolic reconstructions for in silico simulation of metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM can provide a better understanding of disease pathophysiology and avoid high experimentation costs. There is a limited amount of computational work, using metabolic reconstructions, performed in this field for the better understanding of T2DM. In this study, a new algorithm for generating tissue-specific metabolic models is presented, along with the resulting multi-confidence level (MCL multi-tissue model. The effect of T2DM on liver, muscle, and fat in MKR mice was first studied by microarray analysis and subsequently the changes in gene expression of frank T2DM MKR mice versus healthy mice were applied to the multi-tissue model to test the effect. Using the first multi-tissue genome-scale model of all metabolic pathways in T2DM, we found out that branched-chain amino acids' degradation and fatty acids oxidation pathway is downregulated in T2DM MKR mice. Microarray data showed low expression of genes in MKR mice versus healthy mice in the degradation of branched-chain amino acids and fatty-acid oxidation pathways. In addition, the flux balance analysis using the MCL multi-tissue model showed that the degradation pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid oxidation were significantly downregulated in MKR mice versus healthy mice. Validation of the model was performed using data derived from the literature regarding T2DM. Microarray data was used in conjunction with the model to predict fluxes of various other metabolic pathways in the T2DM mouse model and alterations in a number of pathways were detected. The Type 2 Diabetes MCL multi-tissue model may explain the high level of branched-chain amino acids and free fatty acids in plasma of Type 2 Diabetic subjects from a metabolic fluxes perspective.

  14. Hypertension is a conditional factor for the development of cardiac hypertrophy in type 2 diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc van Bilsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes is frequently associated with co-morbidities, including hypertension. Here we investigated if hypertension is a critical factor in myocardial remodeling and the development of cardiac dysfunction in type 2 diabetic db/db mice. METHODS: Thereto, 14-wks-old male db/db mice and non-diabetic db/+ mice received vehicle or angiotensin II (AngII for 4 wks to induce mild hypertension (n = 9-10 per group. Left ventricular (LV function was assessed by serial echocardiography and during a dobutamine stress test. LV tissue was subjected to molecular and (immunohistochemical analysis to assess effects on hypertrophy, fibrosis and inflammation. RESULTS: Vehicle-treated diabetic mice neither displayed marked myocardial structural remodeling nor cardiac dysfunction. AngII-treatment did not affect body weight and fasting glucose levels, and induced a comparable increase in blood pressure in diabetic and control mice. Nonetheless, AngII-induced LV hypertrophy was significantly more pronounced in diabetic than in control mice as assessed by LV mass (increase +51% and +34%, respectively, p<0.01 and cardiomyocyte size (+53% and +31%, p<0.001. This was associated with enhanced LV mRNA expression of markers of hypertrophy and fibrosis and reduced activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, while accumulation of Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs and the expression levels of markers of inflammation were not altered. Moreover, AngII-treatment reduced LV fractional shortening and contractility in diabetic mice, but not in control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, the present findings indicate that type 2 diabetes in its early stage is not yet associated with adverse cardiac structural changes, but already renders the heart more susceptible to hypertension-induced hypertrophic remodeling.

  15. Obesity-Associated Alterations in Inflammation, Epigenetics, and Mammary Tumor Growth Persist in Formerly Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Emily L; de Angel, Rebecca E; Bowers, Laura W; Khatib, Subreen A; Smith, Laura A; Van Buren, Eric; Bhardwaj, Priya; Giri, Dilip; Estecio, Marcos R; Troester, Melissa A; Hair, Brionna Y; Kirk, Erin L; Gong, Ting; Shen, Jianjun; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Hursting, Stephen D

    2016-05-01

    Using a murine model of basal-like breast cancer, we tested the hypothesis that chronic obesity, an established breast cancer risk and progression factor in women, induces mammary gland epigenetic reprogramming and increases mammary tumor growth. Moreover, we assessed whether the obesity-induced epigenetic and protumor effects are reversed by weight normalization. Ovariectomized female C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet or diet-induced obesity (DIO) regimen for 17 weeks, resulting in a normal weight or obese phenotype, respectively. Mice on the DIO regimen were then randomized to continue the DIO diet or were switched to the control diet, resulting in formerly obese (FOb) mice with weights comparable with control mice. At week 24, all mice were orthotopically injected with MMTV-Wnt-1 mouse mammary tumor cells. Mean tumor volume, serum IL6 levels, expression of proinflammatory genes in the mammary fat pad, and mammary DNA methylation profiles were similar in DIO and FOb mice and higher than in controls. Many of the genes found to have obesity-associated hypermethylation in mice were also found to be hypermethylated in the normal breast tissue of obese versus nonobese human subjects, and nearly all of these concordant genes remained hypermethylated after significant weight loss in the FOb mice. Our findings suggest that weight normalization may not be sufficient to reverse the effects of chronic obesity on epigenetic reprogramming and inflammatory signals in the microenvironment that are associated with breast cancer progression. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 339-48. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26869351

  16. Decreased hepatic contents of coenzyme A molecular species in mice after subchronic mild social defeat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yoshifumi; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Hagiya, Yuki; Chohnan, Shigeru; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    Social stress may precipitate psychiatric disorders such as depression, which is related to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. We have evaluated the effects of social stress on central and peripheral metabolism using a model of depression in mice. In the present study, we focused on coenzyme A (CoA) molecular species [i.e. non-esterified CoA (CoASH), acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA] which play important roles in numerous metabolic pathways, and we analyzed changes in expression of these molecules in the hypothalamus and liver of adult male mice (C57BL/6J) subjected to 10 days of subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) with ICR mice as aggressors. Mice (n = 12) exposed to showed hyperphagia- and polydipsia-like symptoms and increased body weight gain compared with control mice which were not affected by exposure to ICR mice (n = 12). To elucidate the underlying metabolic features in the sCSDS model, acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and CoASH tissue levels were analyzed using the acyl-CoA cycling method. The levels of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, which decreases feeding behavior, were not influenced by sCSDS. However, sCSDS reduced levels of acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and total CoA (sum of the three CoA molecular species) in the liver. Hence, hyperphagia-like symptoms in sCSDS mice evidently occurred independently of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, but might consequently lead to down-regulation of hepatic CoA via altered expression of nudix hydrolase 7. Future studies should investigate the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the down-regulation of liver CoA pools in sCSDS mice. PMID:26864137

  17. Zinc metabolism in genetically obese mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent reports indicate that the concentrations and total amounts of several essential trace metals in various tissues of genetically obese rodents differ markedly from lean controls. In the present studies the absorption, retention and tissue distribution of zinc was compared in obese (ob/ob) and lean (+/?) C57BL/6J mice. When administered 0.1 and 1 umole 65Zn by stomach tube and killed after 4 h, fasted 10 week old obese mice had 2.7 and 2.2 times more radioactivity in their carcasses, respectively, than age-matched lean mice. Higher levels of 65Zn were also present in the intestinal mucosa of obese mice. To eliminate possible differences in the effects of fasting and gastric emptying rates between the phenotypes, zinc absorption and retention were determined according to the method of Heth and Hoekstra. Analysis of data revealed that obese and lean mice absorbed 43 and 18% of the oral dose, respectively. Also, the rate of 65Zn excretion between 2 and 6 days post-treatment was similar for obese and lean mice. After 6 days obese mice had significantly lower levels of radioisotope in skin, muscle plus bone, spleen and testes and higher levels of 65Zn in liver, small intestine and adipose tissue compared to tissues from lean mice. These results demonstrate increased absorption, altered tissue distribution and similar excretion of zinc in ob/ob mice

  18. Aortic Impedance in Little Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Taffet, George E.; Hartley, Craig J.

    2008-01-01

    The Little dwarf mouse lives 30% longer than its age-matched wild-type (WT) mouse. We determined aortic input impedance in 21 (8 Little, 13 WT) 4 month-old mice. Modulus of impedance was calculated from the Fourier transformed aortic pressure (P) and average luminal flow velocity (Vavg) as ∣Zi∣ = ∣P∣/∣Vavg∣. Characteristic impedance was estimated by averaging the 2nd-10th harmonic of the impedance moduli. We found the impedance modulus ∣Zi∣ to be similar in the 2 groups (WT vs. Little; mean±S...

  19. Measuring the Strength of Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Deacon, Robert M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Kondziela7 devised the inverted screen test and published it in 1964. It is a test of muscle strength using all four limbs. Most normal mice easily score maximum on this task; it is a quick but insensitive gross screen, and the weights test described in this article will provide a finer measure of muscular strength. There are also several strain gauge-based pieces of apparatus available commercially that will provide more graded data than the inverted screen test, but their cost may put them ...

  20. Lymphocytes from Chronically Stressed Mice Confer Antidepressant-Like Effects to Naive Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Brachman, Rebecca A.; Lehmann, Michael L.; Maric, Dragan; Herkenham, Miles

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether cells of the adaptive immune system retain the memory of psychosocial stress and thereby alter mood states and CNS function in the host. Lymphocytes from mice undergoing chronic social defeat stress or from unstressed control mice were isolated and adoptively transferred into naive lymphopenic Rag2−/− mice. Changes in affective behavior, hippocampal cell proliferation, microglial activation states, and blood cytokine levels were examined in reconstituted stress-naive mice....

  1. Testosterone and Dihydrotestosterone Differentially Improve Cognition in Aged Female Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benice, Ted S.; Raber, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Compared with age-matched male mice, female mice experience a more severe age-related cognitive decline (ACD). Since androgens are less abundant in aged female mice compared with aged male mice, androgen supplementation may enhance cognition in aged female mice. To test this, we assessed behavioral performance on a variety of tasks in 22- to…

  2. [Subjectivity sense, language and subject: a new postrationalist perspective in psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Rey, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the philosophical roots of the concept of sense in Russian philosophy and linguistic, analyzing its consequences for the social sciences, in particular for psychology. Starting from the relevance of the Vygotsky's definition of sense, through which that concept became psychological, is discussed its relevance for advancing forward in a proposal about subjectivity from a cultural historical approach. Advancing on this proposal, the concept of subjective sense is defined as a subjective unity whose focus, rather than being on the unity between word and psychological elements, as Vygotsky stated, is on the unity between symbolical processes and emotions. This theoretical account leads to a different representation of the relation between language, subject and subjectivity, which support a non rationalistic reductionism concerning subjectivity. Finally, on the basis of this non individualistic and non essentialist definition of subjectivity are discussed some of its implications for the development of a non rationalistic approach in psychotherapy. PMID:22322683

  3. Experimental paracoccidioidomycosis in immunosuppressed mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice were immunosuppressed by means of whole-body irradiation or cyclophosphamide, in order to investigate the influence on the initial phase of infection induced by a strain of the fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, in the yeast phase and inoculated intraperitoneally. A group of mice was irradiated with 600 rad (cobalt γ-irradiation) 24 h before infection. Two groups were treated with cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg intravenously), one two days before, and the other, one day after infection. A control group received the fungus, but no radiation of cyclophosphamide. All animals developed lesions at the site of inoculation. Metastatic lesions were observed in 100% of the animals in the irradiated group, 67% in each of the cyclophosphamide-treated groups and 33% in the control group. These lesions were found both in the liver and lungs, being more numerous in the irradiated group, followed by the cyclophosphamide-treated group in which the drug was given after the infection; they were slight in both viscera in the other cyclophosphamide-treated group and also slight in the liver and absent in the lungs of the controls. (Auth.)

  4. Extended Cognitive System and Epistemic Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trybulec Barbara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of an extended cognitive system is central to contemporary studies of cognition. In the paper I analyze the place of the epistemic subject within the extended cognitive system. Is it extended as well? In answering this question I focus on the differences between the first and the second wave of arguments for the extended mind thesis. I argue that the position of Cognitive Integration represented by Richard Menary is much more intuitive and fruitful in analyses of cognition and knowledge than the early argument formulated by Andy Clark and David Chalmers. Cognitive Integration is compatible with virtue epistemology of John Greco’s agent reliabilism. The epistemic subject is constituted by its cognitive character composed of an integrated set of cognitive abilities and processes. Some of these processes are extended, they are a manipulation of external informational structures and, as such, they constitute epistemic practices. Epistemic practices are normative; to conduct them correctly the epistemic subject needs to obey epistemic norms embedded in the cultural context. The epistemic subject is not extended because of the casual coupling with external informational artifacts which extend his mind from inside the head and into the world. Rather, cognitive practices constitute the subject’s mind, they transform his cognitive abilities, and this is what makes the mind and epistemic subject “extended”.

  5. Effects of Chronic Mild Stress on the Development of Atherosclerosis and Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathway in Adolescent Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfeng Gu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we investigated the effect of chronic mild stress (CMS on the development of atherosclerosis as well as the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs signaling pathway in adolescent apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE-/- mice. Mice were subjected to daily CMS for 0, 4, and 12 weeks, respectively. To identify the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway in adolescent apolipoprotein E knockout mice subjected to CMS, we compared gene expression in aortas of stressed and unstressed mice using TLRs signaling pathway real-time PCR microarrays consisting of 87 genes. We found that atherosclerosis lesions both in aortic tress and sinuses of CMS mice were significantly increased linearly in response to duration of CMS exposure. Among 87 genes analyzed, 15 genes were upregulated in stressed mice, especially TLR4, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88, and IL-1β, and 28 genes were downregulated compared with nonstressed mice. CMS mice demonstrated markedly increased aortic atherosclerosis that were associated with significant increases in levels of expression of TLR4, MyD88, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB, MCP-1, IL-1β, TNF-α, and sICAM-1. Taken together, our results suggest an important role for TLR4 signaling pathway in atherosclerosis in a CMS mouse model.

  6. BK channel β1 and β4 auxiliary subunits exert opposite influences on escalated ethanol drinking in dependent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreifeldt, Max; Le, David; Treistman, Steven N; Koob, George F; Contet, Candice

    2013-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels play a key role in the control of neuronal activity. Ethanol is a potent activator of BK channel gating, but how this action may impact ethanol drinking still remains poorly understood. Auxiliary β subunits are known to modulate ethanol-induced potentiation of BK currents. In the present study, we investigated whether BK β1 and β4 subunits influence voluntary ethanol consumption using knockout (KO) mice. In a first experiment, mice were first subjected to continuous two-bottle choice (2BC) and were then switched to intermittent 2BC, which progressively increased ethanol intake as previously described in wildtype mice. BK β1 or β4 subunit deficiency did not affect ethanol self-administration under either schedule of access. In a second experiment, mice were first trained to drink ethanol in a limited-access 2BC paradigm. BK β1 or β4 deletion did not affect baseline consumption. Weeks of 2BC were then alternated with weeks of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) or air inhalation. As expected, a gradual escalation of ethanol drinking was observed in dependent wildtype mice, while intake remained stable in non-dependent wildtype mice. However, CIE exposure only produced a mild augmentation of ethanol consumption in BK β4 KO mice. Conversely, ethanol drinking increased after fewer CIE cycles in BK β1 KO mice than in wildtype mice. In conclusion, BK β1 or β4 did not influence voluntary ethanol drinking in non-dependent mice, regardless of the pattern of access to ethanol. However, deletion of BK β4 attenuated, while deletion of BK β1 accelerated, the escalation of ethanol drinking during withdrawal from CIE. Our data suggest that BK β1 and β4 subunits have an opposite influence on the negative reinforcing properties of ethanol withdrawal. Modulating the expression, distribution or interactions of BK channel auxiliary subunits may therefore represent a novel avenue for the treatment of alcoholism

  7. BK channel β1 and β4 auxiliary subunits exert opposite influences on escalated ethanol drinking in dependent mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max eKreifeldt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK channels play a key role in the control of neuronal activity. Ethanol is a potent activator of BK channel gating, but how this action may impact ethanol drinking still remains poorly understood. Auxiliary β subunits are known to modulate ethanol-induced potentiation of BK currents. In the present study, we investigated whether BK β1 and β4 subunits influence voluntary ethanol consumption using knockout mice. In a first experiment, mice were first subjected to continuous two-bottle choice (2BC and were then switched to intermittent 2BC, which progressively increased ethanol intake as previously described in wildtype mice. BK β1 or β4 subunit deficiency did not affect ethanol self-administration under either schedule of access. In a second experiment, mice were first trained to drink ethanol in a limited-access 2BC paradigm. BK β1 or β4 deletion did not affect baseline consumption. Weeks of 2BC were then alternated with weeks of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE or air inhalation. As expected, a gradual escalation of ethanol drinking was observed in dependent wildtype mice, while intake remained stable in non-dependent wildtype mice. However, CIE exposure only produced a mild augmentation of ethanol consumption in BK β4 knockout mice. Conversely, ethanol drinking increased after fewer CIE cycles in BK β1 knockout mice than in wildtype mice. In conclusion, BK β1 or β4 did not influence voluntary ethanol drinking in non-dependent mice, regardless of the pattern of access to ethanol. However, deletion of BK β4 attenuated, while deletion of BK β1 accelerated, the escalation of ethanol drinking during withdrawal from CIE. Our data suggest that BK β1 and β4 subunits have an opposite influence on the negative reinforcing properties of ethanol withdrawal. Modulating the expression, distribution or interactions of BK channel auxiliary subunits may therefore represent a novel avenue for the

  8. Long-Lived αMUPA Mice Show Attenuation of Cardiac Aging and Leptin-Dependent Cardioprotection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Levy

    Full Text Available αMUPA transgenic mice spontaneously consume less food compared with their wild type (WT ancestors due to endogenously increased levels of the satiety hormone leptin. αMUPA mice share many benefits with mice under caloric restriction (CR including an extended life span. To understand mechanisms linked to cardiac aging, we explored the response of αMUPA hearts to ischemic conditions at the age of 6, 18, or 24 months. Mice were subjected to myocardial infarction (MI in vivo and to ischemia/reperfusion ex vivo. Compared to WT mice, αMUPA showed functional and histological advantages under all experimental conditions. At 24 months, none of the WT mice survived the first ischemic day while αMUPA mice demonstrated 50% survival after 7 ischemic days. Leptin, an adipokine decreasing under CR, was consistently ~60% higher in αMUPA sera at baseline. Leptin levels gradually increased in both genotypes 24h post MI but were doubled in αMUPA. Pretreatment with leptin neutralizing antibodies or with inhibitors of leptin signaling (AG-490 and Wortmannin abrogated the αMUPA benefits. The antibodies also reduced phosphorylation of the leptin signaling components STAT3 and AKT specifically in the αMUPA myocardium. αMUPA mice did not show elevation in adiponectin, an adipokine previously implicated in CR-induced cardioprotection. WT mice treated for short-term CR exhibited cardioprotection similar to that of αMUPA, however, along with increased adiponectin at baseline. Collectively, the results demonstrate a life-long increased ischemic tolerance in αMUPA mice, indicating the attenuation of cardiac aging. αMUPA cardioprotection is mediated through endogenous leptin, suggesting a protective pathway distinct from that elicited under CR.

  9. Prevention of exercised induced cardiomyopathy following Pip-PMO treatment in dystrophic mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Hammond, Suzan M; Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Varela, Miguel A; Roberts, Thomas C; Clarke, Kieran; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene. In addition to skeletal muscle wasting, DMD patients develop cardiomyopathy, which significantly contributes to mortality. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are a promising DMD therapy, restoring functional dystrophin protein by exon skipping. However, a major limitation with current AOs is the absence of dystrophin correction in heart. Pip peptide-AOs demonstrate high activity in cardiac muscle. To determine their therapeutic value, dystrophic mdx mice were subject to forced exercise to model the DMD cardiac phenotype. Repeated peptide-AO treatments resulted in high levels of cardiac dystrophin protein, which prevented the exercised induced progression of cardiomyopathy, normalising heart size as well as stabilising other cardiac parameters. Treated mice also exhibited significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and improved sarcolemmal integrity. This work demonstrates that high levels of cardiac dystrophin restored by Pip peptide-AOs prevents further deterioration of cardiomyopathy and pathology following exercise in dystrophic DMD mice. PMID:25758104

  10. Salmonella Typhimurium undergoes distinct genetic adaption during chronic infections of mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndberg, Emilie; Jelsbak, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    type strains of S. Typhimurium 4/74 were used to establish chronic infections of 129X1/SvJ mice. Over the course of infections, S. Typhimurium bacteria were isolated from feces and from livers and spleens upon termination of the experiment. In all samples dominant clones were identified and select...... clones were subjected to whole genome sequencing. Dominant clones isolated from either systemic organs or fecal samples exhibited distinct single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). One mouse appeared to have distinct adapted clones in the spleen and liver, respectively. Three mice were colonized in the...... current study genetic adaptation during experimental chronic S. Typhimurium infections of mice, an established model of chronic typhoid fever, was probed as an approach for studying the molecular mechanisms of host-adaptation during long-term host-association. Results Individually sequence-tagged wild...

  11. Increased intensity discrimination thresholds in tinnitus subjects with a normal audiogram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epp, Bastian; Hots, J.; Verhey, J. L.;

    2012-01-01

    Recent auditory brain stem response measurements in tinnitus subjects with normal audiograms indicate the presence of hidden hearing loss that manifests as reduced neural output from the cochlea at high sound intensities, and results from mice suggest a link to deafferentation of auditory nerve...... fibers. As deafferentation would lead to deficits in hearing performance, the present study investigates whether tinnitus patients with normal hearing thresholds show impairment in intensity discrimination compared to an audiometrically matched control group. Intensity discrimination thresholds were...... significantly increased in the tinnitus frequency range, consistent with the hypothesis that auditory nerve fiber deafferentation is associated with tinnitus....

  12. Subjective video quality comparison of HDTV monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, G.; Lim, C.; Lee, S.; Lee, C.

    2009-01-01

    HDTV broadcasting services have become widely available. Furthermore, in the upcoming IPTV services, HDTV services are important and quality monitoring becomes an issue, particularly in IPTV services. Consequently, there have been great efforts to develop video quality measurement methods for HDTV. On the other hand, most HDTV programs will be watched on digital TV monitors which include LCD and PDP TV monitors. In general, the LCD and PDP TV monitors have different color characteristics and response times. Furthermore, most commercial TV monitors include post-processing to improve video quality. In this paper, we compare subjective video quality of some commercial HD TV monitors to investigate the impact of monitor type on perceptual video quality. We used the ACR method as a subjective testing method. Experimental results show that the correlation coefficients among the HDTV monitors are reasonable high. However, for some video sequences and impairments, some differences in subjective scores were observed.

  13. A New Kind of Subjective Trust Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guangwei; KANG Jianchu; LUO Ziqiang; MENG Xiangyi; FANG Peici; LI Deyi

    2006-01-01

    Based on the outstanding characteristics of Cloud Model on the process of transforming a qualitative concept to a set of quantitative numerical values, a formalized model of subjective trust is introduced by which we can transform between qualitative reputation and quantitative voting data. The present paper brings forward algorithms to compute direct trust and recommender trust. Further more, an effective similarity measuring method used to distinguish two users'reputation on knowledge level is also proposed. The given model properly settles the uncertainty and fuzziness properties of subjective trust which is always the weakness of traditional subjective trust model, and provides a step in the direction of proper understanding and definition of human trust.

  14. Human Subjects Research and the Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitskey, Beth W.; Thomsen, Marshall

    2012-09-01

    Physics Education Research is a form of social science research in that it uses human subjects. As physicists we need to be aware of the ethical and legal ramifications of performing this research, taking into account the fundamental differences between working with substances and working with people. For several decades, the federal government has regulated research involving human subjects. With current procedures, a proposal soliciting federal funds for a research project involving human subjects will be flagged by the applicants institution and checked for compliance with appropriate regulations. However, there is a large body of Physics Education Research that is not federally funded and thus may not be flagged. Nevertheless, there are ethical standards that apply to this research. This paper outlines the preliminary considerations for conducting such research.

  15. Euthanasia of neonatal mice with carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, K.; Corrow, D.; Stockwell, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prevalent method used to euthanize rodents in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine the time of CO2 exposure required to euthanize neonatal mice (0 to 10 days old). Multiple groups of mice were exposed to 100% CO 2 for time periods between 5 and 60 min. Mice were placed in room air for 10 or 20 min after CO2 exposure, to allow for the chance of recovery. If mice recovered at one time point, a longer exposure was examined. Inbred and outbred mice were compared. Results of the study indicated that time to death varied with the age of the animals and could be as long as 50 min on the day of birth and differed between inbred and outbred mice. Institutions euthanizing neonatal mice with CO2 may wish to adjust their CO 2 exposure time periods according the age of the mice and their genetic background. Copyright 2005 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.

  16. Commissioning of the MICE RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, A.; Stanley, T.; White, C.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C.G.; Dick, A.J.; Speirs, D.C.; Alsari, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being constructed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The muon beam will be cooled using multiple hydrogen absorbers then reaccelerated using an RF cavity system operating at 201MHz. This paper describes recent progress in commissioning the amplifier systems at their design operation conditions, installation and operation as part of the MICE project.

  17. Subjective biological self and self-actualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumerlin, J R; Berretta, S A; Privette, G; Bundrick, C M

    1994-12-01

    Ginsburg, Rogers, and Maslow, humanistic theorists, have maintained that the self is an emergent characteristic of one's biological makeup. The relationship between physical self-efficacy as an appraisal of subjective biology and self-actualization was examined in a sample of 160 black and white participants. An r of .46 supports the association of subjective biology and self-actualization. Whereas there were no gender or racial differences in scores on self-actualization, men scored higher on physical self-efficacy and subscales of perceived physical ability and perceived self-presentation confidence. PMID:7899017

  18. [The aging of Down's Syndrome subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromage, B; Anglade, P

    2002-01-01

    The normal ageing of Down's Syndrome subjects is comparable to that observed in individuals who have an equivalent cognitive deficit. However it is earlier and is related to the former intellectual level and life story of the person. Before 50 years, there is no significant reduction of memory. After this age short-term memory, the speed of information processing and selective attention weaken. These changes are similar to those in older non-Down's Syndrome defective adults, giving the impression of early ageing in Down's Syndrome subjects. In terms of autonomy in everyday life, it is possible to establish an average evolutionary profile. From 60 years old, deterioration is estimated at 45% of the score obtained at 40 years, affecting in particular the skills necessary for the carrying out daily tasks (washing, dressing, feeding without assistance.). We have little knowledge of the psychiatric evolution of this people because older handicapped people are a new group in society. In the three fields of cognition, autonomy and mental health, the ageing of Down's Syndrome subjects is very sensitive to their environment. Pathological ageing of the Down's Syndrome subject is associated with the dementia syndrome that, with varying degrees, combines disorders of the cognitive functions and behavior, modifying the personality. The clinical diagnosis of dementia is difficult to establish in the Down's Syndrome subject and opinions diverge, also it is important to comply with three rules: 1) to establish an individual base line and to observe, with the help of regular evaluations, a clear change in performance; this must be confirmed by similar modifications in daily conducts; 2) the decline depends not only on the resources of the subject, but also on the demands made by environment; 3) lasting deterioration of capacities must be clearly greater than that observable in normal ageing to signify dementia. As a function of actual age, the Down's Syndrome shows early signs of

  19. Null Subjects in European and Brazilian Portuguese

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Pilar; Duarte, Maria Eugênia L.; Kato, Mary Aizawa

    2005-01-01

    The goals of this paper are twofold: a) to provide a structural account of the effects of the informal ‘Avoid Pronoun Principle’, proposed in Chomsky (1981: 65) for the Null Subject Languages (NSLs), and b) to compare, in European and Brazilian Portuguese (EP and BP), the distribution of the third person pronouns in its full and null forms, to check whether in written corpora BP incorporates signs of the ongoing loss of the null subject, largely attested in its contemporary spoken language. T...

  20. Early Labour Market Returns to College Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buonanno, Paolo; Pozzoli, Dario

    2009-01-01

    We estimate early labour market outcomes of Italian university  graduates across college subjects. We devote great attention to endogenous selection issues using alternative methods to control for potential self-selection associated with the choice of the degree subject in order to unravel the...... causal link between college major and subsequent outcomes in the labour market. Our results suggest that 'quantitative' fields (i.e. Sciences, Engineering, and Economics) increase not only the speed of transition into the first job and employment probability but also early earnings, conditional on...

  1. Early labour market returns to college subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buonanno, Paolo; Pozzoli, Dario

    This paper aims at estimating early labour market outcomes  of Italian university graduates across college subjects. We devote great attention to endogenous selection issues using alternative methods to control for potential self-selection associated with the choice of the degree subject in order...... to unravel the causal link between college major and subsequent outcomes in the labour market.  Our results suggest that "quantitative" fields (i.e. Sciences, Engineering and Economics) increase not only the speed of transition into the first job and employment probability but also early earnings...

  2. Early labour market returns to college subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzoli, Dario; Buonanno, Paolo

    This paper aims at estimating early labour market outcomes  of Italian university graduates across college subjects. We devote great attention to endogenous selection issues using alternative methods to control for potential self-selection associated with the choice of the degree subject in order...... to unravel the causal link between college major and subsequent outcomes in the labour market.  Our results suggest that "quantitative" fields (i.e. Sciences, Engineering and Economics) increase not only the speed of transition into the first job and employment probability but also early earnings...

  3. Subjective performance evaluations and employee careers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Lange, Fabian; Kriechel, Ben

    data are for evaluating theories in personnel economics and whether findings from such data generalize to the labor force at large. In this paper, we examine personnel data from six large companies and establish how subjective ratings, interpreted as ordinal rankings of employees within narrowly......Firms commonly use supervisor ratings to evaluate employees when objective performance measures are unavailable. Supervisor ratings are subjective and data containing supervisor ratings typically stem from individual firm level data sets. For both these reasons, doubts persist on how useful such...

  4. Subjectivities as Centers of Citizen Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANGÉLICA MARÍA OCAMPO-TALERO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents academic reflections resulting from the teaching work of the authors with students of the Psychology career at the Javeriana University.Beginning from Latinamerica’s sociopolitical reality, it is pointed out that complex views of citizenship are needed that permit the confrontation of the region’s crises, particularly in Colombia, from the educational scenarios. Formative implications of that view for the professional work of Psychologists are reviewed, proposing subject and subjectivity as the heart of formative practices. Finally, some significant challenges to the Psychologists’ task inthe field of civic formation in educational contexts are outlined.

  5. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin;

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd......-/-) mice. Atherogenesis involves both inflammation and lipid deposition, and we investigated the role of SP-D in the development of atherosclerosis. SP-D synthesis was localized to vascular endothelial cells. Atherosclerotic lesion areas were 5.6-fold smaller in the aortic roots in Spd-/- mice compared...... with wild-type C57BL/6N mice on an atherogenic diet. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly elevated in Spd-/- mice. Treatment of Spd-/- mice with a recombinant fragment of human SP-D resulted in decreases of HDL-C (21%) as well as total cholesterol (26%), and LDL cholesterol (28%). Plasma TNF...

  6. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Palladino, V.; de Bari, A.; Cecchet, G.; Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Ishimoto, S.; Japan, Ibaraki; Filthaut, F.; Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Drielsma, F.; Karadzhov, Y.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; Stokes, G.; Warburton, P.; White, C.; Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Bayes, R.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Uchida, M.A.; Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Langlands, J.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J.; Dick, A.; Ronald, K.; Speirs, D.; Whyte, C.G.; Young, A.; Boyd, S.; Franchini, P.; Greis, J.R.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I.; Gardener, R.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Drews, M.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Winter, M.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bravar, U.; Onel, Y.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Cline, D.; Yang, X.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.

    2016-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$ at 90\\% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  7. Pion Contamination in the MICE Muon Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogomilov, M.; et al.

    2016-03-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$ at 90\\% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  8. PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN THE MICE BEAMLINE

    CERN Document Server

    Coney, L; Karadzhov, Y

    2010-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being built at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) to test ionization cooling of a muon beam. Successful demonstration of cooling is a necessary step along the path toward creating future high intensity muon beams in either a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. Production of particles in the MICE beamline begins with a titanium target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. The resulting pions are captured, momentum-selected, and fed into a 5T superconducting decay solenoid which contains the pions and their decay muons. Another dipole then selects the final particles for propagation through the rest of the MICE beamline. Within the last year, the MICE target has been redesigned, rebuilt, and has begun operating in ISIS. The decay solenoid has also become operational, dramatically increasing the number of particles in the MICE beamline. In parallel, particle identification detectors have also been installed and commissioned. In this paper, the commissioning of t...

  9. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ~1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is fπ < 1.4% at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  10. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ∼1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is fπ < 1.4% at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling

  11. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone differentially improve cognition in aged female mice

    OpenAIRE

    Benice, Ted S.; Raber, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Compared with age-matched male mice, female mice experience a more severe age-related cognitive decline (ACD). Since androgens are less abundant in aged female mice compared with aged male mice, androgen supplementation may enhance cognition in aged female mice. To test this, we assessed behavioral performance on a variety of tasks in 22- to 24-mo-old gonadally intact female mice treated for 6 wk with silastic capsules containing either testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or empty c...

  12. Adaptation to experimental jet-lag in R6/2 mice despite circadian dysrhythmia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel I Wood

    Full Text Available The R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD shows a disintegration of circadian rhythms that can be delayed by pharmacological and non-pharmacological means. Since the molecular machinery underlying the circadian clocks is intact, albeit progressively dysfunctional, we wondered if light phase shifts could modulate the deterioration in daily rhythms in R6/2 mice. Mice were subjected to four x 4 hour advances in light onset. R6/2 mice adapted to phase advances, although angles of entrainment increased with age. A second cohort was subjected to a jet-lag paradigm (6 hour delay or advance in light onset, then reversal after 2 weeks. R6/2 mice adapted to the original shift, but could not adjust accurately to the reversal. Interestingly, phase shifts ameliorated the circadian rhythm breakdown seen in R6/2 mice under normal LD conditions. Our previous finding that the circadian period (tau of 16 week old R6/2 mice shortens to approximately 23 hours may explain how they adapt to phase advances and maintain regular circadian rhythms. We tested this using a 23 hour period light/dark cycle. R6/2 mice entrained to this cycle, but onsets of activity continued to advance, and circadian rhythms still disintegrated. Therefore, the beneficial effects of phase-shifting are not due solely to the light cycle being closer to the tau of the mice. Our data show that R6/2 mice can adapt to changes in the LD schedule, even beyond the age when their circadian rhythms would normally disintegrate. Nevertheless, they show abnormal responses to changes in light cycles. These might be caused by a shortened tau, impaired photic re-synchronization, impaired light detection and/or reduced masking by evening light. If similar abnormalities are present in HD patients, they may suffer exaggerated jet-lag. Since the underlying molecular clock mechanism remains intact, light may be a useful treatment for circadian dysfunction in HD.

  13. Mast cells and gastrointestinal dysmotility in the cystic fibrosis mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C De Lisle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF has many effects on the gastrointestinal tract and a common problem in this disease is poor nutrition. In the CF mouse there is an innate immune response with a large influx of mast cells into the muscularis externa of the small intestine and gastrointestinal dysmotility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential role of mast cells in gastrointestinal dysmotility using the CF mouse (Cftr(tm1UNC, Cftr knockout. METHODOLOGY: Wild type (WT and CF mice were treated for 3 weeks with mast cell stabilizing drugs (ketotifen, cromolyn, doxantrazole or were treated acutely with a mast cell activator (compound 48/80. Gastrointestinal transit was measured using gavage of a fluorescent tracer. RESULTS: In CF mice gastric emptying at 20 min post-gavage did not differ from WT, but was significantly less than in WT at 90 min post-gavage. Gastric emptying was significantly increased in WT mice by doxantrazole, but none of the mast cell stabilizers had any significant effect on gastric emptying in CF mice. Mast cell activation significantly enhanced gastric emptying in WT mice but not in CF mice. Small intestinal transit was significantly less in CF mice as compared to WT. Of the mast cell stabilizers, only doxantrazole significantly affected small intestinal transit in WT mice and none had any effect in CF mice. Mast cell activation resulted in a small but significant increase in small intestinal transit in CF mice but not WT mice. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that mast cells are not involved in gastrointestinal dysmotility but their activation can stimulate small intestinal transit in cystic fibrosis.

  14. Impaired inflammatory response and increased oxidative stress and neurodegeneration after brain injury in interleukin-6-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Giralt, M; Carrasco, J;

    2000-01-01

    In order to determine the role of the neuropoietic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) during the first 3 weeks after a focal brain injury, we examined the inflammatory response, oxidative stress and neuronal survival in normal and interleukin-6-deficient (knockout, IL-6KO) mice subjected to a cortical...... of the antioxidants Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), Mn-SOD, and catalase remained unaffected by the IL-6 deficiency. The lesioned mice showed increased oxidative stress, as judged by malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrotyrosine (NITT) levels and by formation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (i...... freeze lesion. In normal mice, the brain injury was followed by reactive astrogliosis and recruitment of macrophages from 1 day postlesion (dpl), peaking at 3-10 dpl, and by 20 dpl the transient immunoreactions were decreased, and a glial scar was present. In IL-6KO mice, the reactive astrogliosis and...

  15. Del.icio.us Subject Guides: Maintaining Subject Guides Using a Social Bookmarking Site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Corrado

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available By using Web 2.0 social bookmarking sites, libraries can more easily manage subject guides and other lists of Web resources. Social bookmarking services such as Delicious provide a one-click method to bookmark a Web site, allowing librarians to describe and categorize Web sites. Using a small amount of JavaScript, these bookmarked resources can be dynamically included into subject guides and other Web-based library resources. This paper describes and analyses the use of social bookmarking at a medium-sized comprehensive college library for the creation and maintenance of modern languages subject guides. A brief technical description outlining necessary JavaScript code provides a way for librarians to try this idea elsewhere. This paper examines the initiative at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ Library to utilize the social bookmarking Web site del.icio.us to easily update and maintain modern language subject-specific guides on the library Web site. Previously, the subject guides have proven difficult to maintain and a solution that allowed subject librarians to quickly and easily update subject guides from anywhere was desired. By using del.icio.us, librarians at TCNJ have been able to stream line subject guide maintenance. This paper describes the process used to include resources bookmarked on del.icio.us by librarians from both the subject librarians' and systems librarian's perspectives. Included is a brief technical description that outlines the JavaScript code that needs to be included in the subject guides that other libraries can use as an example if they choose to embark on a similar project. The response from librarians and teaching faculty has been positive. Librarians appreciate the ease of use while teaching faculty appreciate the constantly evolving nature of the subject guides. Recommendations on ways to expand this project, including methods to allowing students and faculty to identify content to be included in subject guides

  16. Vibration Response Imaging: evaluation of rater agreement in healthy subjects and subjects with pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Makris Demosthenes; Kerenidi Theodora; Triantaris Apostolos; Zygoulis Paris; Preau Sebastien; Daenas Christos; Bartziokas Konstantinos; Gourgoulianis Konstantinos I; Daniil Zoe

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background We evaluated pulmonologists variability in the interpretation of Vibration response imaging (VRI) obtained from healthy subjects and patients hospitalized for community acquired pneumonia. Methods The present is a prospective study conducted in a tertiary university hospital. Twenty healthy subjects and twenty three pneumonia cases were included in this study. Six pulmonologists blindly analyzed images of normal subjects and pneumonia cases and evaluated different aspects ...

  17. THE SUBJECTS OF MEDIADISCOURSE OF BUDGET PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya Vyacheslavovna Sulina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The author highlights the media discourse of the budget process in its subject-temporal dimension. Place and role of the subjects of media discourse of the budget process are determined on the basis of the analysis of budgetary legislation, practical implementation of the budgeting process in the executive and legislative bodies and its reflection in the media. Public discourse of budgeting process includes not only participants, who are legally empowered, but also other actors involved in the formation of the informational agenda regarding the budget. For example, the subjects of media discourse of the budget process are executive and legislative bodies, regulatory authorities, recipients of budgetary funds, political parties, professional and expert communities, civil society activists. Sociocommunicative description of the budgeting process and its subjects is presented based on analytical and inductive methods. At the same time political journalism is not only a space for the formation of media discourse and reflection of the budgetary process, but also one of the indicators of the state of the political system as a whole. The conclusions present methodological aids for the media discourse analysis of specific cases of the budgeting process and may be used for scientific and practical research.

  18. A Subject Clitic in Child Catalan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gavarró

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine an instance of subject cliticisation in child Catalan previously unattested in the literature (1,. Given the lack of an adult counterpart to (1 in the input the child is exposed to, the claim is made that its occurrence, far from being accidental, must result from deep properties of grammar, also detectable in other Romance varieties. (1M'he vist una pel.lícula.    (Lena, 5;9 1sCL have seen a film 'I have seen a film.' This subject clitic is sensitive to the presence of a person feature - it is limited to first person singular - and tense-sensitive - it is only found in the present perfect. The subject clitic is analysed as a means to identify the empty subject of the sentence in cases where incorporation of be to yield have is taking place, along the lines of Kayne (1993. The analysis extends to also previously unattested existential constructions found in child Catalan, which involve instances of be instead of have (Hi era un caçador instead of Hi havia un caçador 'There was a hunter' (Joan 3;5 , but not vice-versa.

  19. Emergent Subjectivity in Caring Institutions for Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severinsson, Susanne; Nord, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how different mealtime situations help shape teenager and staff subjectivities in two Swedish residential care homes and a special school for girls and boys, 12-15 years old, with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. Three mealtime networks are analysed using concepts from actor-network theory, treating architectural…

  20. Women, Subjectivities and Learning to Be Adaptable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Jillian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance understandings of the subjectivities that influence auxiliary-level female employees' work and learning experiences in general legal practice. Moreover, the aim is to maximise the opportunities for these workers. Design/methodology/approach: A broader critical ethnographic study investigated…

  1. What Is the Impact of Subject Benchmarking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidcock, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of subject benchmarking led to fears of increased external intervention in the activities of universities and a more restrictive view of institutional autonomy, accompanied by an undermining of the academic profession, particularly through the perceived threat of the introduction of a national curriculum for higher education. For…

  2. Subjective Well-Being among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzgol Dost, Meliha

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of subjective well-being to gender, perceived economic status, perceived parental attitudes, satisfaction with physical appearance, religious belief, and locus of control among university students. The sample of the study consisted of 700 university students of Hacettepe University during…

  3. Subject Gateway Sites and Search Engine Ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelwall, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Discusses subject gateway sites and commercial search engines for the Web and presents an explanation of Google's PageRank algorithm. The principle question addressed is the conditions under which a gateway site will increase the likelihood that a target page is found in search engines. (LRW)

  4. Subjective Quantitative Studies of Human Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkire, Sabina

    2005-01-01

    Amartya Sen's writings have articulated the importance of human agency, and identified the need for information on agency freedom to inform our evaluation of social arrangements. Many approaches to poverty reduction stress the need for empowerment. This paper reviews "subjective quantitative measures of human agency at the individual level." It…

  5. Subjects' Hypotheses, Experimental Instructions and Autonomic "Conditioning".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Charles W.

    Research on learning and conditioning suggests that verbal response modification does not occur in the absence of the subject's ability to define verbally (1) the response-reinforcement relationships and (2) his intention to change his behavior in the direction of reinforcement. This seems to be true for operant conditioning of verbal behavior,…

  6. Objective, subjective and intersubjective selectors of knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Heylighen, Francis

    1997-01-01

    It is argued that the acceptance of knowledge in a community depends on several, approximately independent selection "criteria". The objective criteria are distinctiveness, invariance and controllability, the subjective ones are individual utility, coherence, simplicity and novelty, and the intersubjective ones are publicity, expressivity, formality, collective utility, conformity and authority. Science demarcates itself from other forms of knowledge by explicitly controlling for the objectiv...

  7. Human Subjects Research and the Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitskey, Beth W.; Thomsen, Marshall

    2012-01-01

    Physics Education Research is a form of social science research in that it uses human subjects. As physicists we need to be aware of the ethical and legal ramifications of performing this research, taking into account the fundamental differences between working with substances and working with people. For several decades, the federal government…

  8. Subjective evaluation of HEVC in mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ray; Kalva, Hari

    2013-03-01

    Mobile compute environments provide a unique set of user needs and expectations that designers must consider. With increased multimedia use in mobile environments, video encoding methods within the smart phone market segment are key factors that contribute to positive user experience. Currently available display resolutions and expected cellular bandwidth are major factors the designer must consider when determining which encoding methods should be supported. The desired goal is to maximize the consumer experience, reduce cost, and reduce time to market. This paper presents a comparative evaluation of the quality of user experience when HEVC and AVC/H.264 video coding standards were used. The goal of the study was to evaluate any improvements in user experience when using HEVC. Subjective comparisons were made between H.264/AVC and HEVC encoding standards in accordance with Doublestimulus impairment scale (DSIS) as defined by ITU-R BT.500-13. Test environments are based on smart phone LCD resolutions and expected cellular bit rates, such as 200kbps and 400kbps. Subjective feedback shows both encoding methods are adequate at 400kbps constant bit rate. However, a noticeable consumer experience gap was observed for 200 kbps. Significantly less H.264 subjective quality is noticed with video sequences that have multiple objects moving and no single point of visual attraction. Video sequences with single points of visual attraction or few moving objects tended to have higher H.264 subjective quality.

  9. [Traits of personality in hypochondriacal subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vanna, M; Cauzer, M; Spreafichi, A

    1995-06-01

    Among the several mental originated clinical syndromes, hypochondria is not still well understood and listed. Indeed, hypochondria is often a complicating element in other psychopathological pictures; a slight form of hypochondria can appear in phobic-obsessing neurosis, and a worse one at the beginning of psychosis. The Authors, trying to explain the complex questions about diagnosis and prognosis of hypochondria, look for common personality traits in these patients. The research instrument was the Adjective Check List (ACL), a psychological test highly standardized and diffused, composed of 300 adjectives, or adjectival sentences, used to describe a person's attributes. The ACL was given to 65 subjects divided into two groups. The first group was made of 15 subjects, 10 women and 5 men, ambulatory treated at the Psychiatric Clinic in Trieste for the following diagnosis: psychosis (4 persons), depressing syndrome (3 persons), hypochondria (6 persons), obsessive neurosis (1 persons), anxiety syndrome (1 person). The second group was made of 50 subjects, 28 women and 22 men, diagnosed as hypochondriac by their medical officers. The results point out that some personality traits rising above the others are suggesting for an apathetical patient, not ready to accept himself, easily overcome by everyday life problems. These subjects are introverted, intolerant to frustrations, and inclined to take refuge in their own imaginary world, not able to self-governing. In the considered group the Authors find a moderate tendency to change, and it could be interpreted like a good prognostic element for a psychotherapeutic treatment. PMID:7643735

  10. Subjective comparison of temporal and quality scalability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korhonen, Jari; Reiter, Ulrich; You, Junyong

    2011-01-01

    reduced either by downscaling the frame rate (temporal scalability) or the image quality (quality scalability). However, the user preferences between different scalability types are not well known in different scenarios. In this paper, we present a methodology for subjective comparison between temporal...

  11. Life Events and Subjective Well-being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder J.; Schmidt, Torben Dall

    2014-01-01

    The literature on Happiness and Subjective Well-Being (SWB) has been dominated by studies of the impact from income and labour market status - and the impact on happiness from changes in these determinants. It seems obvious to expect an impact from non-economic factors as well. In the present paper...

  12. Family Support and Subjective Well-Being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnettler, Berta; Denegri, Marianela; Miranda, Horacio;

    2015-01-01

    In order to distinguish typologies of university students based on family support received in the form of tangible and intangible resources, their level of satisfaction with life and food-related life as well as subjective happiness, a survey was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 347 stude...

  13. Homeownership and subjective well-being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloze, Gintautas; Skak, Morten

    Favouring homeownership is an important part of housing policies in many countries. Although this may be explained by the preferences of the majority of voters, it may also be because homeownership is believed to have positive effects on individuals’ behaviour and welfare. Previous research seems...... and subjective well-being....

  14. Political Subjects: Decision and Subjectivity from a Post-Fundational Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Retamozo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of decision and of political subjects was addressed in the field of 20th century political philosophy by authors such as Carl Schmitt, Hannah Arendt, and Jacques Derrida, who related it closely to the concepts of sovereignty, freedom, and contingency. The works of Ernesto Laclau and Slavoj Žižek have currently turnedto the issue of decision in order to address the constitutive spects of the political. In a context dominated by deconstruction, post-Marxism, and post-structuralism,the article inquires into the elation between decision and political subjects in a contemporary setting, examining in depth the difference between subjectivity,subjectivization, and subject.

  15. The Mice and the Cat

    OpenAIRE

    ‘Ubayd-i Zākānī, Niẓām al-Dīn; Muhaddis, Ali; Utas, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This work consists of an edition of a hitherto unknown manuscript of the Persian poem Mūš u gurbah (The Cat and the Mice), ascribed to ‘Ubayd-i Zākānī (d. 771–772 A.H.q. [corresponding to Aug. 1369 – July 1371 A.D.]), a facsimile of this manuscript which is preserved in the National Library of Tunis, and translations into English and Swedish of the poem. ‘Ubayd-i Zākānī’s authorship of the poem Mūš u gurbah is discussed and refuted in favour of a more likely theory, namely that Mūš u gurbah w...

  16. Pre-sleep behaviour in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis; Lemmens; Parkes

    1995-12-01

    Behaviour in the 2-h period before sleep onset was evaluated in 90 subjects with normal sleep/wake habits using an anonymous self-report questionnaire. This determined the timing of events from the initial preparation for sleep. The nature of the pre-sleep environment, the level of physical activity, and patterns of feeding behaviour were recorded together with self-ratings of tiredness, mood and security. Estimated sleep duration and sleep quality were determined. Ninety of 120 subjects responded. Sleep 'preparatory latency', from the time of initial sleep preparation to sleep onset, was 77 +/- 48 min; bed time to sleep onset time (sleep latency) was 41 +/- 42 min; lights out to sleep onset latency was 26 +/- 45 min. The estimated total sleep time was 7 +/- 1 h. In the pre-sleep period, mean noise and illumination levels were low and environmental temperature rating was at the median point on a very cold-very hot scale (mean scale scores: 23, 28 and 50, respectively). All subjects went to the bathroom before going to bed. Twenty-five percent of normal subjects had a snack or meal in the 2-h period before sleep onset. Sixty percentage recorded setting an alarm, 27% had a bath or shower, 23% checked door locks or windows and 49% read in bed. Nine percent of subjects slept with a cat on the bed. Humans, like other animal species, show a complex behavioural sequence in the 2-h period before falling asleep. A constant environment with limited metabolic activity may predispose to thermoregulatory changes prior to sleep onset. PMID:10607159

  17. Cervical Spine Stenosis Measures in Normal Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Ryan T; Maldjian, Catherine; Mattacola, Carl G; Straub, Stephen J; Sitler, Michael R

    2002-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare 2 methods of determining cervical spinal stenosis (Torg ratio, space available for the cord [SAC]); determine which of the components of the Torg ratio and the SAC account for more of the variability in the measures; and present standardized SAC values for normal subjects using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). DESIGN AND SETTING: The research design consisted of a posttest-only, comparison-group design. The independent variable was method of measurement (Torg ratio and SAC). The dependent variables were Torg ratio and SAC scores. SUBJECTS: Fourteen men (age = 24.4 +/- 2.5 years, height = 181.0 +/- 5.8 cm, weight = 90 +/- 13.5 kg) participated in this study. The C3 to C7 vertebrae were examined in each subject (n = 70). MEASUREMENTS: The Torg ratio was determined by dividing the sagittal spinal-canal diameter by the corresponding sagittal vertebral-body diameter. The SAC was determined by subtracting the sagittal spinal-cord diameter from the corresponding sagittal spinal-canal diameter. The Torg ratio and SAC were measured in millimeters. RESULTS: The SAC ranged from 2.5 to 10.4 mm and was greatest at C7 in 71% (10 of 14) of the subjects. The SAC was least at C3 or C5 in 71% (10 of 14) of the subjects. A Pearson product moment correlation revealed a significant relationship between the Torg ratio and SAC (r =.53, P SAC than the spinal cord (r (2) =.23). CONCLUSIONS: The SAC measure relies more on the spinal canal compared with the Torg ratio and, therefore, may be a more effective indicator of spinal stenosis. This is relevant clinically because neurologic injury related to stenosis is a function of the spinal canal and the spinal cord (not the vertebral body). Further research must be done, however, to validate the SAC measure. PMID:12937434

  18. Adaptive response in mice exposed to 900 MHz radiofrequency fields: primary DNA damage.

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    Bingcheng Jiang

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of adaptive response (AR in animal and human cells exposed to ionizing radiation is well documented in scientific literature. We have examined whether such AR could be induced in mice exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields (RF used for wireless communications. Mice were pre-exposed to 900 MHz RF at 120 µW/cm(2 power density for 4 hours/day for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days and then subjected to an acute dose of 3 Gy γ-radiation. The primary DNA damage in the form of alkali labile base damage and single strand breaks in the DNA of peripheral blood leukocytes was determined using the alkaline comet assay. The results indicated that the extent of damage in mice which were pre-exposed to RF for 1 day and then subjected to γ-radiation was similar and not significantly different from those exposed to γ-radiation alone. However, mice which were pre-exposed to RF for 3, 5, 7 and 14 days showed progressively decreased damage and was significantly different from those exposed to γ-radiation alone. Thus, the data indicated that RF pre-exposure is capable of inducing AR and suggested that the pre-exposure for more than 4 hours for 1 day is necessary to elicit such AR.

  19. Using "Mighty Mouse" to understand masticatory plasticity: myostatin-deficient mice and musculoskeletal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravosa, Matthew J; López, Elisabeth K; Menegaz, Rachel A; Stock, Stuart R; Stack, M Sharon; Hamrick, Mark W

    2008-09-01

    Knockout mice lacking myostatin (Mstn), a negative regulator of the growth of skeletal muscle, develop significant increases in the relative mass of masticatory muscles as well as the ability to generate higher maximal muscle forces. Wild-type and Mstn-deficient mice were compared to investigate the postnatal influence of elevated masticatory loads due to increased jaw-adductor and bite forces on the biomineralization of mandibular articular and cortical bone, the internal structure of the jaw joints, and the composition of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articular cartilage. To provide an interspecific perspective on the long-term responses of mammalian jaw joints to altered loading conditions, the findings on mice were compared to similar data for growing rabbits subjected to long-term dietary manipulation. Statistically significant differences in joint proportions and bone mineral density between normal and Mstn-deficient mice, which are similar to those observed between rabbit loading cohorts, underscore the need for a comprehensive analysis of masticatory tissue plasticity vis-à-vis altered mechanical loads, one in which variation in external and internal structure are considered. Differences in the expression of proteoglycans and type-II collagen in TMJ articular cartilage between the mouse and rabbit comparisons suggest that the duration and magnitude of the loading stimulus will significantly affect patterns of adaptive and degradative responses. These data on mammals subjected to long-term loading conditions offer novel insights regarding variation in ontogeny, life history, and the ecomorphology of the feeding apparatus. PMID:21669797

  20. Chronic exercise ameliorates the neuroinflammation in mice carrying NSE/htau23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The progress of neurodegeration are directly linked to the neuroinflammatory response. → We investigate whether exercise improves the neuroinflammation using Tg-NSE/htau23 mice. → This provides insights that exercise may beneficial effects on the neuroinflammatory disorders. -- Abstract: The objective of the present study was to investigate whether chronic endurance exercise attenuates the neuroinflammation in the brain of mice with NSE/htau23. In this study, the tau-transgenic (Tg) mouse, Tg-NSE/htau23, which over expresses human Tau23 in its brain, was subjected to chronic exercise for 3 months, from 16 months of age. The brains of Tg mice exhibited increased immunoreactivity and active morphological changes in GFAP (astrocyte marker) and MAC-1 (microglia marker) expression in an age-dependent manner. To identify the effects of chronic exercise on gliosis, the exercised Tg mice groups were treadmill run at a speed of 12 m/min (intermediate exercise group) or 19 m/min (high exercise group) for 1 h/day and 5 days/week during the 3 month period. The neuroinflammatory response characterized by activated astroglia and microglia was significantly repressed in the exercised Tg mice in an exercise intensity-dependent manner. In parallel, chronic exercise in Tg mice reduced the increased expression of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, COX-2, and iNOS. Consistently with these changes, the levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-ERK were markedly downregulated in the brain of Tg mice after exercise. In addition, nuclear NF-κB activity was profoundly reduced after chronic exercise in an exercise intensity-dependent manner. These findings suggest that chronic endurance exercise may alleviate neuroinflammation in the Tau pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Pulmonary immunostimulation with MALP-2 in influenza virus-infected mice increases survival after pneumococcal superinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppe, Katrin; Radünzel, Peter; Dietert, Kristina; Tschernig, Thomas; Wolff, Thorsten; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Gruber, Achim D; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary infection with influenza virus is frequently complicated by bacterial superinfection, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the most prevalent causal pathogen and hence often associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Local immunosuppression due to pulmonary influenza virus infection has been identified as a major cause of the pathogenesis of secondary bacterial lung infection. Thus, specific local stimulation of the pulmonary innate immune system in subjects with influenza virus infection might improve the host defense against secondary bacterial pathogens. In the present study, we examined the effect of pulmonary immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)-stimulating macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) in influenza A virus (IAV)-infected mice on the course of subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. Female C57BL/6N mice infected with IAV were treated with MALP-2 on day 5 and challenged with S. pneumoniae on day 6. Intratracheal MALP-2 application increased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release and enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, into the alveolar space of IAV-infected mice, without detectable systemic side effects. Local pulmonary instillation of MALP-2 in IAV-infected mice 24 h before transnasal pneumococcal infection considerably reduced the bacterial number in the lung tissue without inducing exaggerated inflammation. The pulmonary viral load was not altered by MALP-2. Clinically, MALP-2 treatment of IAV-infected mice increased survival rates and reduced hypothermia and body weight loss after pneumococcal superinfection compared to those of untreated coinfected mice. In conclusion, local immunostimulation with MALP-2 in influenza virus-infected mice improved pulmonary bacterial elimination and increased survival after subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. PMID:26371127

  2. Irisin improves endothelial function in obese mice through the AMPK-eNOS pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fang; Zhang, Shuxian; Hou, Ningning; Wang, Di; Sun, Xiaodong

    2015-11-01

    Irisin is a novel hormone secreted by myocytes. Lower levels of irisin are independently associated with endothelial dysfunction in obese subjects. The objective of this study was to explore whether irisin exerts a direct vascular protective effect on endothelial function in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were given chow or a high-fat diet with or without treatment with irisin. Aortic endothelial function was determined by measuring endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (EDV). Nitric oxide (NO) in the aorta was determined. The effect of irisin on the levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), Akt, and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in endothelial cells was determined. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were used to study the role of irisin in the AMPK-eNOS pathway. Acetylcholine-stimulated EDV was significantly lower in obese mice compared with control mice. Treatment of obese mice with irisin significantly enhanced EDV and improved endothelial function. This beneficial effect of irisin was partly attenuated in the presence of inhibitors of AMPK, Akt, and eNOS. Treatment of obese mice with irisin enhanced NO production and phosphorylation of AMPK, Akt, and eNOS in endothelial cells. These factors were also enhanced by irisin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. Suppression of AMPK expression by small interfering RNA blocked irisin-induced eNOS and Akt phosphorylation and NO production. We have provided the first evidence that irisin improves endothelial function in aortas of high-fat-diet-induced obese mice. The mechanism for this protective effect is related to the activation of the AMPK-eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:26371167

  3. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Impaired Mucosal Immune Responses in Aged Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Kazuyoshi; Tsuruhara, Akitoshi; Takagaki, Kentaro; Oki, Katsuyuki; Ota, Megumi; Nose, Yasuhiro; Tanemura, Hideki; Urushihata, Naoki; Sasanuma, Jinichi; Sano, Masayuki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Aso, Rio; McGhee, Jerry R.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) can differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Several clinical trials have shown the ability of AMSCs to regenerate these differentiated cell types. Age-associated dysregulation of the gastrointestinal (GI) immune system has been well documented. Our previous studies showed that impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract occurs earlier during agingthan is seen in the systemic compartment. In this study, we examined the potential of AMSCs to restore the GI mucosal immune system in aged mice. Aged (>18 mo old) mice were adoptively transferred with AMSCs. Two weeks later, mice were orally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) three times at weekly intervals. Seven days after the final immunization, when fecal extract samples and plasma were subjected to OVA- and CT-B-specific ELISA, elevated levels of mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) and plasma IgG antibody (Ab) responses were noted in aged mouse recipients. Similar results were also seen aged mice which received AMSCs at one year of age. When cytokine production was examined, OVA-stimulated Peyer’s patch CD4+ T cells produced increased levels of IL-4. Further, CD4+ T cells from the lamina propria revealed elevated levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ production. In contrast, aged mice without AMSC transfer showed essentially no OVA- or CT-B-specific mucosal SIgA or plasma IgG Ab or cytokine responses. Of importance, fecal extracts from AMSC transferred aged mice showed neutralization activity to CT intoxication. These results suggest that AMSCs can restore impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract of aged mice. PMID:26840058

  4. Agmatine increases proliferation of cultured hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis in chronically stressed mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-feng LI; Hong-xia CHEN; Ying LIU; You-zhi ZHANG; Yan-qin LIU; Jin LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To explore the mechanism of agmatine's antidepressant action.Methods: Male mice were subjected to a variety of unpredictable stressors on a daily basis over a 24-d period.The open-field behaviors of the mice were displayed and recorded using a Videomex-V image analytic system automatically.For bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU;thymidine analog as a marker for dividing cells) labeling,the mice were injected with BrdU (100 mg/kg,ip,twice per d for 2 d),and the hippocampal neurogenesis in stressed mice was measured by immunohistochemistry.The proliferation of cultured hippocampal progenitor cells from neonatal rats was determined by colorimetric assay (cell counting kit-8) and 3H-thymidine incorporation assay.Results:After the onset of chronic stress,the locomotor activity of the mice in the open field significantly decreased,while coadministration of agmatine 10 mg/kg (po) blocked it.Furthermore,the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus significantly decreased in chronically stressed mice, which was also blocked by chronic coadministration with agmatine 10 mg/kg (po). Four weeks after the BrdU injection, some of the new born cells matured and became neurons, as determined by double labeling for BrdU and neuron specific enolase (NSE), a marker for mature neurons.In vitro treatment with agmatine 0.1-10 μmo1/L for 3 d significantly increased the proliferation of the cultured hippocampal progenitor cells in a dose-dependent manner.Conclusion:We have found that agmatine increases proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells in vitro and the hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo in chronically stressed mice.This may be one of the important mechanisms involved in agmatine's antidepressant action.

  5. Relaxin-3 receptor (RXFP3 signalling mediates stress-related alcohol preference in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Walker

    Full Text Available Stressful life events are causally linked with alcohol use disorders (AUDs, providing support for a hypothesis that alcohol consumption is aimed at stress reduction. We have previously shown that expression of relaxin-3 mRNA in rat brain correlates with alcohol intake and that central antagonism of relaxin-3 receptors (RXFP3 prevents stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking. Therefore the objectives of these studies were to investigate the impact of Rxfp3 gene deletion in C57BL/6J mice on baseline and stress-related alcohol consumption. Male wild-type (WT and Rxfp3 knockout (KO (C57/B6JRXFP3TM1/DGen littermate mice were tested for baseline saccharin and alcohol consumption and preference over water in a continuous access two-bottle free-choice paradigm. Another cohort of mice was subjected to repeated restraint followed by swim stress to examine stress-related alcohol preference. Hepatic alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity was assessed in mice following chronic alcohol intake and in naive controls. WT and Rxfp3 KO mice had similar baseline saccharin and alcohol preference, and hepatic alcohol processing. However, Rxfp3 KO mice displayed a stress-induced reduction in alcohol preference that was not observed in WT littermates. Notably, this phenotype, once established, persisted for at least six weeks after cessation of stress exposure. These findings suggest that in mice, relaxin-3/RXFP3 signalling is involved in maintaining high alcohol preference during and after stress, but does not appear to strongly regulate the primary reinforcing effects of alcohol.

  6. Factor analysis of attentional set-shifting performance in young and aged mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geyer Mark A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Executive dysfunction may play a major role in cognitive decline with aging because frontal lobe structures are particularly vulnerable to advancing age. Lesion studies in rats and mice have suggested that intradimensional shifts (IDSs, extradimensional shifts (EDSs, and reversal learning are mediated by the anterior cingulate cortex, the medial prefrontal cortex, and the orbitofrontal cortex, respectively. We hypothesized that the latent structure of cognitive performance would reflect functional localization in the brain and would be altered by aging. Methods Young (4 months, n = 16 and aged (23 months, n = 18 C57BL/6N mice performed an attentional set-shifting task (ASST that evaluates simple discrimination (SD, compound discrimination (CD, IDS, EDS, and reversal learning. The performance data were subjected to an exploratory factor analysis to extract the latent structures of ASST performance in young and aged mice. Results The factor analysis extracted two- and three-factor models. In the two-factor model, the factor associated with SD and CD was clearly separated from the factor associated with the rest of the ASST stages in the young mice only. In the three-factor model, the SD and CD loaded on distinct factors. The three-factor model also showed a separation of factors associated with IDS, EDS, and CD reversal. However, the other reversal learning variables, ID reversal and ED reversal, had somewhat inconsistent factor loadings. Conclusions The separation of performance factors in aged mice was less clear than in young mice, which suggests that aged mice utilize neuronal networks more broadly for specific cognitive functions. The result that the factors associated with SD and CD were separated in the three-factor model may suggest that the introduction of an irrelevant or distracting dimension results in the use of a new/orthogonal strategy for better discrimination.

  7. Chronic exercise ameliorates the neuroinflammation in mice carrying NSE/htau23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, Yea-Hyun, E-mail: leemyy@empas.com [Exercise Biochemistry Laboratory, Korea National Sport University, Seoul 138-763 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Ik, E-mail: lee0ik@hanmail.net [Department of Oriental Sports Medicine, Daegu Hanny University, Daegu 712-715 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hee-Jeong, E-mail: son1106@paran.com [Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Korea National Sport University, Seoul 138-763 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Ho, E-mail: run2025@hanmail.net [Department of Sports for All, Kangnam University, Yongin 446-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} The progress of neurodegeration are directly linked to the neuroinflammatory response. {yields} We investigate whether exercise improves the neuroinflammation using T{sub g}-NSE/htau23 mice. {yields} This provides insights that exercise may beneficial effects on the neuroinflammatory disorders. -- Abstract: The objective of the present study was to investigate whether chronic endurance exercise attenuates the neuroinflammation in the brain of mice with NSE/htau23. In this study, the tau-transgenic (Tg) mouse, Tg-NSE/htau23, which over expresses human Tau23 in its brain, was subjected to chronic exercise for 3 months, from 16 months of age. The brains of Tg mice exhibited increased immunoreactivity and active morphological changes in GFAP (astrocyte marker) and MAC-1 (microglia marker) expression in an age-dependent manner. To identify the effects of chronic exercise on gliosis, the exercised Tg mice groups were treadmill run at a speed of 12 m/min (intermediate exercise group) or 19 m/min (high exercise group) for 1 h/day and 5 days/week during the 3 month period. The neuroinflammatory response characterized by activated astroglia and microglia was significantly repressed in the exercised Tg mice in an exercise intensity-dependent manner. In parallel, chronic exercise in Tg mice reduced the increased expression of TNF-{alpha}, IL-6, IL-1{beta}, COX-2, and iNOS. Consistently with these changes, the levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-ERK were markedly downregulated in the brain of Tg mice after exercise. In addition, nuclear NF-{kappa}B activity was profoundly reduced after chronic exercise in an exercise intensity-dependent manner. These findings suggest that chronic endurance exercise may alleviate neuroinflammation in the Tau pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Effect of antibiotics and bifidobacterial preparations on the intestinal microflora in mice irradiated with gamma quanta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice weighing 19-20 g have been exposed to the dose of 700 R and devided into 3 groups. During the first five days animals of the first group received antibiotics perorally - 40 units phenoxypenicillin, 30 units oxytetracycline, 40 units streptomicine. On the 6th, 10th and 15th days after irradiation the bifidobacterium preparation (75-41 strain) has been introduced perorally in the amount of 5x108 cells. Animals of the second group have received antibiotics alone in the same period as mice of the first group but the sterile physiological solution has been introduced instead of bifidobacteria. The sterile physiological solution has been perorally introduced to animals of the third group instead of antibiotics and bifidobacteria. The complex treatment has lead to the increase of survival percentage as compared with animals which have not been treated. The normalization of the intestines microbic landscape is observed in irradiated mice, subjected to treatment with antibiotics and bifidobacteria. It is expressed in a considerable reduction in the amount of clostridium, enterococci, intestinal bacilli and proteus as compared with the amount of these microbes in the intestines of non-treated mice. At the same time, a certain increase of lactobacilli amount to the level characteristic of lactobacilli in the intestinal tract of non-treated animals is observed in the intestines of irradiated and treated mice

  9. The role of endothelin-1 in hyperoxia-induced lung injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albu Gergely

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As prolonged hyperoxia induces extensive lung tissue damage, we set out to investigate the involvement of endothelin-1 (ET-1 receptors in these adverse changes. Methods Experiments were performed on four groups of mice: control animals kept in room air and a group of mice exposed to hyperoxia for 60 h were not subjected to ET-1 receptor blockade, whereas the dual ETA/ETB-receptor blocker tezosantan (TEZ was administered via an intraperitoneal pump (10 mg/kg/day for 6 days to other groups of normal and hyperoxic mice. The respiratory system impedance (Zrs was measured by means of forced oscillations in the anesthetized, paralyzed and mechanically ventilated mice before and after the iv injection of ET-1 (2 μg. Changes in the airway resistance (Raw and in the tissue damping (G and elastance (H of a constant-phase tissue compartment were identified from Zrs by model fitting. Results The plasma ET-1 level increased in the mice exposed to hyperoxia (3.3 ± 1.6 pg/ml relative to those exposed to room air (1.6 ± 0.3 pg/ml, p 2O/l, p 2O/l, p Conclusion These findings substantiate the involvement of the ET-1 receptors in the physiopathogenesis of hyperoxia-induced lung damage. Dual ET-1 receptor antagonism may well be of value in the prevention of hyperoxia-induced parenchymal damage.

  10. Radioprotective role of ethanol in mice against lethal dose of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations have thus been regarded as highly toxic agents responsible for deleterious effects in living organisms. Over the years considerable interest has been generated in protecting subjects from radiation hazards. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential protective effect of ethanol against total body-irradiation (7.5 Gy). In this investigation, adult Swiss mice were administered (i.p.) with ethanol (1 ml/mouse), 30 min. prior to total body irradiation (TBI) and then these treated mice were monitored for survival study. Attempts were also made to get an insight into the mechanism underlying protective effect of ethanol on radiation induced lipid peroxidation, conjugated diene, and decreased levels of antioxidant defense enzymes in liver and spleen of Swiss mice. It was observed that the administration of ethanol, 30 min. prior to TBI shows significant protection in terms of survival. However, administration of ethanol just before or after irradiation did not show any protective effect. It was found that there was significant decrease in lipid peroxidation, conjugated diene level and increase in the antioxidant enzyme levels after ethanol treatment as compared to untreated irradiated mice. The foregoing results suggested that ethanol can protect against radiation induced damage and therefore may act as a potential radioprotector in Swiss mice. (author)

  11. Plasminogen deficiency causes reduced corticospinal axonal plasticity and functional recovery after stroke in mice.

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    Zhongwu Liu

    Full Text Available Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA has been implicated in neurite outgrowth and neurological recovery post stroke. tPA converts the zymogen plasminogen (Plg into plasmin. In this study, using plasminogen knockout (Plg-/- mice and their Plg-native littermates (Plg+/+, we investigated the role of Plg in axonal remodeling and neurological recovery after stroke. Plg+/+ and Plg-/- mice (n = 10/group were subjected to permanent intraluminal monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. A foot-fault test and a single pellet reaching test were performed prior to and on day 3 after stroke, and weekly thereafter to monitor functional deficit and recovery. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected into the left motor cortex to anterogradely label the corticospinal tract (CST. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after stroke. Neurite outgrowth was also measured in primary cultured cortical neurons harvested from Plg+/+ and Plg-/- embryos. In Plg+/+ mice, the motor functional deficiency after stroke progressively recovered with time. In contrast, recovery in Plg-/- mice was significantly impaired compared to Plg+/+ mice (p0.82, p<0.01. Plg-/- neurons exhibited significantly reduced neurite outgrowth. Our data suggest that plasminogen-dependent proteolysis has a beneficial effect during neurological recovery after stroke, at least in part, by promoting axonal remodeling in the denervated spinal cord.

  12. Effects of Estrogen Receptor Modulators on Morphine Induced Sensitization in Mice Memory

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    Mahdieh Anoush

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: In this study, the effects of estradiol valerate and raloxifenea selective estrogen receptor modulator; (SERM on morphine induced sensitization were examined in mice memory, according to the step-down passive avoidance task.  Method:The mice received morphine or estradiol and raloxifene for three days alone or in combination with morphine. After a drug free period of 5 days, the subjects received saline or morphine as pre- training treatments followed by a pre-test saline administration. The memory retrieval was evaluated using step-down passive avoidance test both on the training and test day. Results:The results illustrated that the three- day administration of morphine induced sensitization through the enhancement of memory retrieval (morphine induced sensitization in mice memory. Both the three- day administration of estradiol valerate alone and with morphine (5 mg/kg restored memory. On the other hand, the three- day administration of raloxifene had no effect on memory retrieval alone, but declined morphine induced sensitization in mice memory. Conclusion:The results of the study indicated that there is an interaction between estrogen receptor modulators and morphine induced sensitization in mice memory.

  13. Elevated adiponectin prevents HIV protease inhibitor toxicity and preserves cerebrovascular homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasuri, Kalavathi; Pepping, Jennifer K; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Gupta, Sunita; Keller, Jeffrey N; Scherer, Philipp E; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J

    2016-06-01

    HIV protease inhibitors are key components of HIV antiretroviral therapies, which are fundamental in the treatment of HIV infection. However, the protease inhibitors are well-known to induce metabolic dysfunction which can in turn escalate the complications of HIV, including HIV associated neurocognitive disorders. As experimental and epidemiological data support a therapeutic role for adiponectin in both metabolic and neurologic homeostasis, this study was designed to determine if increased adiponectin could prevent the detrimental effects of protease inhibitors in mice. Adult male wild type (WT) and adiponectin-overexpressing (ADTg) mice were thus subjected to a 4-week regimen of lopinavir/ritonavir, followed by comprehensive metabolic, neurobehavioral, and neurochemical analyses. Data show that lopinavir/ritonavir-induced lipodystrophy, hypoadiponectinemia, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia were attenuated in ADTg mice. Furthermore, cognitive function and blood-brain barrier integrity were preserved, while loss of cerebrovascular markers and white matter injury were prevented in ADTg mice. Finally, lopinavir/ritonavir caused significant increases in expression of markers of brain inflammation and decreases in synaptic markers in WT, but not in ADTg mice. Collectively, these data reinforce the pathophysiologic link from metabolic dysfunction to loss of cerebrovascular and cognitive homeostasis; and suggest that preservation and/or replacement of adiponectin could prevent these key aspects of HIV protease inhibitor-induced toxicity in clinical settings. PMID:26912411

  14. Lack of Melanopsin Is Associated with Extreme Weight Loss in Mice upon Dietary Challenge.

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    Didem Göz Aytürk

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders have been established as major risk factors for ocular complications and poor vision. However, little is known about the inverse possibility that ocular disease may cause metabolic dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the metabolic consequences of a robust dietary challenge in several mouse models suffering from retinal mutations. To this end, mice null for melanopsin (Opn4-/-, the photopigment of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs, were subjected to five weeks of a ketogenic diet. These mice lost significantly more weight than wild-type controls or mice lacking rod and cone photoreceptors (Pde6brd1/rd1. Although ipRGCs are critical for proper circadian entrainment, and circadian misalignment has been implicated in metabolic pathology, we observed no differences in entrainment between Opn4-/- and control mice. Additionally, we observed no differences in any tested metabolic parameter between these mouse strains. Further studies are required to establish the mechanism giving rise to this dramatic phenotype observed in melanopsin-null mice. We conclude that the causality between ocular disease and metabolic disorders merits further investigation due to the popularity of diets that rely on the induction of a ketogenic state. Our study is a first step toward understanding retinal pathology as a potential cause of metabolic dysfunction.

  15. Lagged association between geomagnetic activity and diminished nocturnal pain thresholds in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galic, M A; Persinger, M A

    2007-10-01

    A wide variety of behaviors in several species has been statistically associated with the natural variations in geomagnetism. To examine whether changes in geomagnetic activity are associated with pain thresholds, adult mice were exposed to a hotplate paradigm once weekly for 52 weeks during the dark cycle. Planetary A index values from the previous 6 days of a given hotplate session were correlated with the mean response latency for subjects to the thermal stimulus. We found that hotplate latency was significantly (P geomagnetic intensity 3 days prior to testing. Therefore, if the geomagnetic activity was greater 3 days before a given hotplate trial, subjects tended to exhibit shorter response latencies, suggesting lower pain thresholds or less analgesia. These results are supported by related experimental findings and suggest that natural variations in geomagnetic intensity may influence nociceptive behaviors in mice. PMID:17657732

  16. Diabetes preventive gluten-free diet decreases the number of caecal bacteria in non-obese diabetic mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hansen, A. K.; Ling, F.; Kaas, A.; Funda, David; Farlov, H.; Buschard, K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2006), s. 220-225. ISSN 1520-7552 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : type 1 diabetes mellitus * non-obese diabetic mice * gluten Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.551, year: 2006

  17. Bioassay of steroid hormone agonist and antagonist activities of antiandrogens on mammary gland, seminal vesicles and spleen of male mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škarda, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 4 (2003), s. 204-212. ISSN 0931-184X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/02/0406; GA AV ČR KSK5020115 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : male mice Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.558, year: 2003

  18. Synergistic effect of CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide and cholecystokinin on food intake regulation in lean mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maletínská, Lenka; Maixnerová, Jana; Matyšková, Resha; Haugvicová, Renata; Pirnik, Z.; Kiss, A.; Železná, Blanka

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 101 (2008), s. 1-10. ISSN 1471-2202 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/05/0614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : mice * food intake * CART peptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.850, year: 2008

  19. Allelic variability in Toll-like receptor 1, 2, 4 and 6 in wild-derived mice (Mus musculus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bainová, Zuzana; Fornůsková, Alena; Čížková, Dagmar; Bryja, Josef; Piálek, Jaroslav; Vinkler, Michal

    Tübingen: Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, 2011. s. 493. [Congress of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology ESEB /13./. 20.08.2011-25.08.2011, Tübingen] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : mice * Toll-like receptor Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  20. Anorexigenic Lipopeptides Ameliorate Central Insulin Signaling and Attenuate Tau Phosphorylation in Hippocampi of Mice with Monosodium Glutamate-Induced Obesity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špolcová, Andrea; Mikulášková, Barbora; Holubová, Martina; Nagelová, Veronika; Pirník, Zdenko; Zemenová, Jana; Haluzík, M.; Železná, Blanka; Galas, M. C.; Maletínská, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2015), s. 823-835. ISSN 1387-2877 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/12/0576 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease * insulin signaling * liraglutide * monosodium glutamate-obese mice * obesity * pre- diabetes * prolactin-releasing peptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.151, year: 2014

  1. Basal and induced granulopoiesis in outbred, F1 hybrid and inbred mice: can inbreeding depression influence the experimental practice?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Dušek, L.; Holá, Jiřina; Hoferová, Zuzana; Weiterová, Lenka

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 235, č. 8 (2010), s. 928-931. ISSN 1535-3702 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : hematopoiesis * outbred mice * inbreeding depression Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.954, year: 2010

  2. Efficacy of magnetic capture in comparison with conventional DNA isolation in a survey of Toxoplasma gondii in wild house mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juránková, J.; Hůrková-Hofmannová, L.; Volf, J.; Baláž, V.; Piálek, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2014), s. 11-15. ISSN 0932-4739 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/0640 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : House mice * Magnetic capture * Quantitative PCR * Toxoplasma gondii Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.800, year: 2014

  3. Quantification of lung fibrosis and emphysema in mice using automated micro-computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen De Langhe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vivo high-resolution micro-computed tomography allows for longitudinal image-based measurements in animal models of lung disease. The combination of repetitive high resolution imaging with fully automated quantitative image analysis in mouse models of lung fibrosis lung benefits preclinical research. This study aimed to develop and validate such an automated micro-computed tomography analysis algorithm for quantification of aerated lung volume in mice; an indicator of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema severity. METHODOLOGY: Mice received an intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (n = 8, elastase (0.25 U elastase n = 9, 0.5 U elastase n = 8 or saline control (n = 6 for fibrosis, n = 5 for emphysema. A subset of mice was scanned without intervention, to evaluate potential radiation-induced toxicity (n = 4. Some bleomycin-instilled mice were treated with imatinib for proof of concept (n = 8. Mice were scanned weekly, until four weeks after induction, when they underwent pulmonary function testing, lung histology and collagen quantification. Aerated lung volumes were calculated with our automated algorithm. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our automated image-based aerated lung volume quantification method is reproducible with low intra-subject variability. Bleomycin-treated mice had significantly lower scan-derived aerated lung volumes, compared to controls. Aerated lung volume correlated with the histopathological fibrosis score and total lung collagen content. Inversely, a dose-dependent increase in lung volume was observed in elastase-treated mice. Serial scanning of individual mice is feasible and visualized dynamic disease progression. No radiation-induced toxicity was observed. Three-dimensional images provided critical topographical information. CONCLUSIONS: We report on a high resolution in vivo micro-computed tomography image analysis algorithm that runs fully automated and allows quantification of aerated lung volume in mice. This

  4. Cecal ligation and puncture followed by MRSA pneumonia increases mortality in mice and blunts production of local and systemic cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E.; Liang, Zhe; Breed, Elise R.; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Clark, Andrew T.; Fox, Amy C.; Dunne, W. Michael; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality in the ICU frequently results from the synergistic effect of two temporally-distinct infections. This study examined the pathophysiology of a new model of intraabdominal sepsis followed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia. Mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy followed three days later by an intratracheal injection of MRSA or saline. Both CLP/saline and sham/MRSA mice had 100% survival while animals with CLP followed by MRSA pneumonia had 67% seven-day survival. Animals subjected to CLP/MRSA had increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) concentrations of MRSA compared to sham/MRSA animals. Animals subjected to sham/MRSA pneumonia had increased BAL levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and G-CSF compared to those given intratracheal saline while CLP/MRSA mice had a blunted local inflammatory response with markedly decreased cytokine levels. Similarly, animals subjected to CLP/saline had increased peritoneal lavage levels of IL-6 and IL-1β compared to those subjected to sham laparotomy while this response was blunted in CLP/MRSA mice. Systemic cytokines were upregulated in both CLP/saline and sham/MRSA mice, and this was blunted by the combination of CLP/MRSA. In contrast, no synergistic effect on pneumonia severity, white blood cell count or lymphocyte apoptosis was identified in CLP/MRSA mice compared to animals with either insult in isolation. These results indicate that a clinically relevant model of CLP followed by MRSA pneumonia causes higher mortality than could have been predicted from studying either infection in isolation, and this was associated with a blunted local (pulmonary and peritoneal) and systemic inflammatory response and decreased ability to clear infection. PMID:21937950

  5. Night-vision goggles for night-blind subjects : subjective evaluation after 2 years of use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartong, D. T.; Kooijman, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of night-vision goggles (NVG) for night-blind subjects after 1 and 2 years of use. Methods: Eleven night-blind subjects with retinitis pigmentosa used NVG for a 2-year period. At the end of each year, they were requested to fill-in two questionnaires regarding the

  6. 76 FR 54408 - Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects and Reducing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... current regulations for protecting human subjects who participate in research might be modernized and... comments of September 26, 2011. The ANPRM requests comments on how current regulations for protecting human... protect human subjects who are involved in research, while facilitating valuable research and...

  7. Contemporary native American fiction (1968-2001) : subject-ivity and identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peraino, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    This study is a literary critical analysis of post-1960s Native American fiction and its engagement in the concepts of subject-ivity and identity in relation to both tribal- and Euroamerican -generated socio-cultural discourses and paradigms. This study adds to the critical enquiry of previous studi

  8. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....34(a) (i) General, ; 106.34 Music classes, ; 106.34(f) Physical education, ; Sex education, ; 106.34... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Index Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Education Regulations of the Offices of...

  9. Fluoxetine Protection in Decompression Sickness in Mice is Enhanced by Blocking TREK-1 Potassium Channel with the “spadin” Antidepressant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Nicolas; Lambrechts, Kate; De Maistre, Sébastien; Royal, Perrine; Mazella, Jean; Borsotto, Marc; Heurteaux, Catherine; Abraini, Jacques; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    In mice, disseminated coagulation, inflammation, and ischemia induce neurological damage that can lead to death. These symptoms result from circulating bubbles generated by a pathogenic decompression. Acute fluoxetine treatment or the presence of the TREK-1 potassium channel increases the survival rate when mice are subjected to an experimental dive/decompression protocol. This is a paradox because fluoxetine is a blocker of TREK-1 channels. First, we studied the effects of an acute dose of fluoxetine (50 mg/kg) in wild-type (WT) and TREK-1 deficient mice (knockout homozygous KO and heterozygous HET). Then, we combined the same fluoxetine treatment with a 5-day treatment protocol with spadin, in order to specifically block TREK-1 activity (KO-like mice). KO and KO-like mice were regarded as antidepressed models. In total, 167 mice (45 WTcont 46 WTflux 30 HETflux and 46 KOflux) constituting the flux-pool and 113 supplementary mice (27 KO-like 24 WTflux2 24 KO-likeflux 21 WTcont2 17 WTno dive) constituting the spad-pool were included in this study. Only 7% of KO-TREK-1 treated with fluoxetine (KOflux) and 4% of mice treated with both spadin and fluoxetine (KO-likeflux) died from decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms. These values are much lower than those of WT control (62%) or KO-like mice (41%). After the decompression protocol, mice showed significant consumption of their circulating platelets and leukocytes. Spadin antidepressed mice were more likely to exhibit DCS. Nevertheless, mice which had both blocked TREK-1 channels and fluoxetine treatment were better protected against DCS. We conclude that the protective effect of such an acute dose of fluoxetine is enhanced when TREK-1 is inhibited. We confirmed that antidepressed models may have worse DCS outcomes, but concomitant fluoxetine treatment not only decreased DCS severity but increased the survival rate. PMID:26909044

  10. The Comparison of Personality Traits and Defense Mechanisms in Addicts Subjects and Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosin Ghamari

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was carried out to compare the personality traits and defense mechanisms in Addicts group and healthy subjects. Method: In This descriptive study by cluster method in access, 100 addicted and 100 nonaddicted people were selected. Used questionnaires to assess defense mechanisms are (DSQ40 and NEO. the data were analyzed with using MANOVA. Result: Data analysis revealed a significant difference between addicted subjects and healthy subjects are used in terms of defense styles and terms of NEO. The data analysis revealed that neuroticism and immature and neurotic defense mechanism is more in addict subjects mature defense mechanism and extravertion, oppeness to exprience, agreeableness and conciosiness is more in healthy subjects. Conclution: According to this results it can be concluded that personality traits and defense mechanisms is one of the main ingridient in accession or tensification symptoms of addiction.

  11. Ghrelin Agonist JMV 1843 Increases Food Intake, Body Weight and Expression of Orexigenic Neuropeptides in Mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Martina; Špolcová, Andrea; Demianova, Zuzana; Sýkora, D.; Fehrentz, J. A.; Martinez, J.; Štofková, A.; Jurčovičová, J.; Drápalová, J.; Lacinová, Z.; Haluzík, M.; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 4 (2013), s. 435-444. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/09/0744; GA ČR GAP303/10/1368 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : GHS-R agonists * JMV 1843 * male C57BL/6 mice * food intake * NPY/AgRP Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  12. Effect of zearalenone on reproductive parameters and expression of selected testicular genes in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žatecká, Eva; Děd, Lukáš; Elzeinová, Fatima; Kubátová, Alena; Dorosh, Andriy; Margaryan, Hasmik; Dostálová, Pavla; Korenková, Vlasta; Hošková, K.; Pěknicová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 45, june (2014), s. 20-30. ISSN 0890-6238 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/1834; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : zearalenone * fertility * reproductive parameters in male mice * spermatogenesis * gene expression * qPCR Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.227, year: 2014

  13. Phenotypic assessment of THC discriminative stimulus properties in fatty acid amide hydrolase knockout and wildtype mice

    OpenAIRE

    Walentiny, D. Matthew; Vann, Robert E.; Wiley, Jenny L.

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have examined the ability of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide to elicit Δ9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-like subjective effects, as modeled through the THC discrimination paradigm. In the present study, we compared transgenic mice lacking fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme primarily responsible for anandamide catabolism, to wildtype counterparts in a THC discrimination procedure. THC (5.6 mg/kg) served as a discriminative stimulus in both genotypes, with sim...

  14. Divergent effects of oxytocin treatment of obese diabetic mice on adiposity and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Altirriba, Jordi; Poher, Anne-Laure; Caillon, Aurélie; Arsenijevic, Denis; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Lyautey, Jacqueline; Dulloo, Abdul; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin has been suggested as a novel therapeutic against obesity, because it induces weight loss and improves glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese rodents. A recent clinical pilot study confirmed the oxytocin-induced weight-reducing effect in obese nondiabetic subjects. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved and the impact on the main comorbidity associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, are unknown. Lean and ob/ob mice (model of obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and diabetes) were treated for 2...

  15. Influence of inhaled manganese oxides nanoparticles on mass of internal organs in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeman, T.; Dočekal, Bohumil; Mikuška, Pavel; Buchtová, Marcela; Míšek, Ivan; Šerý, Omar; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    Ostrava: TANGER, 2014, s. 1-6. ISBN 978-80-87294-55-0. [NANOCON 2014. International Conference /6./. Brno (CZ), 05.11.2014-07.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2315 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : inhaled nanoparticles * manganese oxides nanoparticles * changes in internal organ mass of mice * long-term inhalation experiment Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  16. Influence of inhaled manganese oxides nanoparticles on mass of internal organs in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeman, T.; Dočekal, Bohumil; Mikuška, Pavel; Buchtová, Marcela; Míšek, Ivan; Šerý, Omar; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    Ostrava: TANGER Ltd, 2014, s. 686-691. ISBN 978-80-87294-53-6. [NANOCON International Conference /6./. Brno (CZ), 05.11.2014-07.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2315 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : inhaled nanoparticles * manganese oxides nanoparticles * changes in internal organ mass of mice * long-term inhalation experiment Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  17. Organ weight changes in mice after long-term inhalation exposure to manganese oxides nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeman, T.; Buchtová, Marcela; Dočekal, Bohumil; Míšek, Ivan; Navrátil, J.; Mikuška, Pavel; Šerý, Omar; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 617, 012018 (2015), s. 1-6. ISSN 1742-6588. [International Conference on Safe Production and Use of Nanomaterials (Nanosafe2014) /4./. Grenoble, 18.11.2014-20.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2315 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : nanoparticles * inhalation * mice Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UZFG-Y)

  18. The effect of parvalbumin deficiency on the acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popelář, Jiří; Rybalko, Natalia; Burianová, Jana; Schwaller, B.; Syka, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 553, October (2013), s. 216-220. ISSN 0304-3940 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1342; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0018 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : parvalbumin-deficient mice * acoustic startle reflex * prepulse inhibition Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.055, year: 2013

  19. Morphological changes during azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colon carcinogenesis in mice model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Klára; Rossmann, Pavel; Kverka, Miloslav; Frolová, Lenka; Tlaskalová, Helena

    Prague: Verlag, 2006, s. 149-149. [Meeting of the European Mucosal Immunology Group /5./. Prague (CZ), 05.10.2006-07.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD310/03/H147; GA AV ČR 1QS500200572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : colorectal cancer * balb/c mice * dextran sodium sulfate Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  20. Escalated handling of young C57BL/6 mice results in altered Morris water maze performance

    OpenAIRE

    Fridgeirsdottir, Gudrun Andrea; Hillered, Lars; Clausen, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Background The handling of experimental animals prior to experimental interventions is often poorly described, even though it may affect the final functional outcome. This study explores how the use of repeated handling of C57BL/6 mice prior to Morris water maze (MWM) tests can affect the performance. Methods and materials The handled animals were subjected to the escalating handling protocol, with the investigator spending 5 min per day per cage for 8 days prior to the MWM test. On the last ...

  1. Organ weight changes in mice after long-term inhalation exposure to manganese oxides nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeman, T.; Buchtová, Marcela; Dočekal, Bohumil; Míšek, Ivan; Mikuška, P.; Šerý, Omar

    2014. O4a-3. [International conference on safe production and use of nanomaterials /4./. 18.11.2014-20.11.2014, Grenoble] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2315; GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : long-term inhalation exposure * manganese oxides nanoparticles * mice Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  2. Influence of inhaled manganese oxides nanoparticles on mass of internal organs in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeman, T.; Dočekal, Bohumil; Mikuška, Pavel; Buchtová, Marcela; Míšek, Ivan; Šerý, Omar; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    Ostrava : TANGER, 2014, s. 1-6. ISBN 978-80-87294-55-0. [NANOCON 2014. International Conference /6./. Brno (CZ), 05.11.2014-07.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2315 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : inhaled nanoparticles * manganese oxides nanoparticles * changes in internal organ mass of mice * long-term inhalation experiment Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  3. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Takao, Keizo; Tanda, Koichi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kasahara, Jiro; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Adachi, Minami; UMEDA, MASAHIRO; Araki, Tsutomu; Fukunaga, Kohji; Kondo, Hisatake; Sakagami, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) is a protein kinase that activates the transcription factor CREB, the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein. CREB is a key transcription factor in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CaMKIV deficiency, we subjected CaMKIV knockout (CaMKIV KO) mice to a battery of behavioral tests. CaMKIV KO had no significant effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination, social interaction, pain...

  4. SUBJECTIVITY: SOCIAL REPRESENTATION OF THE FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdete Rejane Ferro Zago

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The family, first family group of human beings, is the collective dimension of human existence and becomes responsible for the formation of the first social identity, as well as the constitution of subjectivity. Subjectivity is the inner world of each and every human being. This inner world is made up of emotions, feelings and thoughts. It is through this inner world that the individual relates to the social world, appointed by the outside world. This relationship follows the individual characteristics that mark the individual as unique, originated in shaping the individual, when they built the knowledge and beliefs. social representation as a form of knowledge, socially elaborated, shared with a practical purpose, contributing to the construction of a common reality to a social group. Is thus built up the social representation of the family.

  5. Subjective evaluation of higher dynamic range video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanhart, Philippe; Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2014-09-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging is able to capture a wide range of luminance values, closer to what the human eye can perceive. However, for capture and display technologies, it is important to answer the question on the significance of higher dynamic range for user preference. This paper answers this question by investigating the added value of higher dynamic range via a rigorous set of subjective experiments using paired comparison methodology. Video sequences at four different peak luminance levels were displayed side-by-side on a Dolby Research HDR RGB backlight dual modulation display (aka `Pulsar'), which is capable of reliably displaying video content at 4000 cd=m2 peak luminance. The results of the subjective experiment demonstrate that the preference of an average viewer increases logarithmically with the increase in the maximum luminance level at which HDR content is displayed, with 4000 cd=m2 being the most attractive option.

  6. Development of a subjective refraction simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, S.; Ares, J.; Collados, M. V.

    2013-11-01

    We have developed simulation software by Matlab (MathworksInc.) with a graphical interface designed for non-expert users. This simulator allows you to complete the process of subjective refraction starting from the aberrometry of the patients and analyse the influence of different factors during the exam. In addition to explain the graphical interface and its working, we show two examples about a complete process of subjective refraction with the influence of high order aberrations and without them showing the retinal image obtained in each step of the refraction process. When the Jackson Cross-Cylinder technique is made with this software, it becomes clear the difficulty of chosen between two images when high order aberrations are present. Therefore, the variability of response during the refraction can be a problem when the examiner has to reach an adequate optical prescription.

  7. Vulnerable Subjects: Why Does Informed Consent Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Michele

    2016-09-01

    This special issue of the Journal Law, Medicine & Ethics takes up the concern of informed consent, particularly in times of controversy. The dominant moral dilemmas that frame traditional bioethical concerns address medical experimentation on vulnerable subjects; physicians assisting their patients in suicide or euthanasia; scarce resource allocation and medical futility; human trials to develop drugs; organ and tissue donation; cloning; xenotransplantation; abortion; human enhancement; mandatory vaccination; and much more. The term "bioethics" provides a lens, language, and guideposts to the study of medical ethics. It is worth noting, however, that medical experimentation is neither new nor exclusive to one country. Authors in this issue address thorny subjects that span borders and patients: from matters dealing with children and vaccination to the language and perception of consent. PMID:27587443

  8. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Perches

    Full Text Available Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques-including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC-relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training.

  9. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  10. Photodegradation of carotenoids in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photodegradation of vitamins in vitro is responsible for large losses of these nutrients in foods, beverages, and semisynthetic liquid formula diets. In vivo photodegradation of vitamins has been reported for riboflavin in jaundiced infants exposed to blue light and for folate in patients with chronic psoriasis given photochemotherapy. Two recent studies of normal subjects have also shown that photodegradation of carotenoids in plasma occurs with cumulative exposure of the skin to an artificial light source having maximal spectral emission in the UVA range. Females showed a larger effect of the UV light on their plasma carotenoid levels than males. These observations have identified a need for further investigation of the role of sunlight exposure as a determinant of plasma carotenoid levels and vitamin A status in human subjects

  11. Biological Effect of Magnetic Field in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Wei ZENG

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological effect of magnetic field in mice bodies. Method: With a piece of permanent magnet embeded in mice bodies beside the femoral artery and vein to measure the electrophoretic velocity(um/s). Result: The magnetic field in mice bodies on the experiment group that the electrophoretic velocity is faster more than control and free group.Conclusion:The magnetic field in animal's body can raise the negative electric charges on the surface of erythrocyte to improve the microcirculation, this is the biological effect of magnetic field.

  12. The transplantation barrier of nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    Moll, Heidrun; Bösing-Schneider, Rita

    2010-01-01

    Syngeneic memory cells can be stimulated to yield a secondary immune response after their transfer into irradiated euthymie recipients as well as into young thymusless nude mice. It is shown that nude mice older than twelve weeks of age are not permissive towards memory cell activation as it is found in non-irradiated euthymie animals. This barrier to isogeneie or congeneic cells seems to be caused by a pool of cyclophosphamide-sensitive cells. Since young nude mice could be rendered as unper...

  13. SUBJECTIVE SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS AND HEALTH: RELATIONSHIPS RECONSIDERED

    OpenAIRE

    Nobles, Jenna; Ritterman Weintraub, Miranda; Adler, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Subjective status, an individual’s perception of her socioeconomic standing, is a robust predictor of physical health in many societies. To date, competing interpretations of this correlation remain unresolved. Using longitudinal data on 8,430 older adults from the 2000 and 2007 waves of the Indonesia Family Life Survey, we test these oft-cited links. As in other settings, perceived status is a robust predictor of self-rated health, and also of physical functioning and nurse-assessed general ...

  14. Can subjective survival expectations explain retirement behaviour?

    OpenAIRE

    Owen O'Donnell; Federica Teppa; Eddy van Doorslaer

    2008-01-01

    Theory predicts a number of mechanisms through which survival expectations influence retirement decisions: a wealth effect of a longer lifespan; an uncertainty effect through the return on savings; a longevity risk effect; and, an adverse selection effect from pooling within pensions. We use data from the first three waves of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing to test whether the timing of retirement is responsive to subjective survival expectations. Measurement error in reported surviv...

  15. Being transsexual: self, identity and embodied subjectivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Katherine

    2001-01-01

    In this research I employ an interdisciplinary approach in order to theorize the experience of Being Transsexual and to reflect upon current debates in critical social psychology about such notions as `self, `identity' and `embodied subjectivity'. Seven male-to-female and seven female-to-male individuals who identified as either transsexual or gender transition. A pluralistic methodological approach, drawing upon the principles of discourse analysis and phenomenology, was used to analyse the ...

  16. Repolarization Parameters in Heart Transplant Subjects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halámek, Josef; Jurák, Pavel; Veselý, P.; Reichlova, T.; Leinveber, P.

    Cambridge: Computing in Cardiology, 2015, s. 805-808. ISBN 978-1-5090-0685-4. ISSN 2325-8861. [Computing in Cardiology 2015. Nice (FR), 06.09.2015-11.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/2034 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : heart repolarization * heart transplant patients * heart rate Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  17. Personality as a Subject of Managerial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Tytova Kateryna V.; Baranov Vasiliy I.

    2014-01-01

    Psychological science, along with many other natural and social sciences, studies a person and personality, but it allocates in them its own specific aspect. The psychological science has a big number of approaches to understanding essence of the personality. Professionally important qualities are individual qualities of a subject of activity, which influence efficiency of activity and success of its mastering. The considered concepts are efforts to put in order various sociological and psych...

  18. Subject Teacher Training and Teaching in English

    OpenAIRE

    Kuoppala, Marjo-Kaisa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this Master s thesis is on one hand to find out how CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning) teachers and English teachers perceive English and its use in teaching, and on the other hand, what they consider important in subject teacher education in English that is being planned and piloted in STEP Project at the University of Helsinki Department of Teacher Education. One research question is also what kind of language requirements teachers think CLIL teachers should have...

  19. EMPIRICAL STUDIES FORMATION PROFESSIONAL SUBJECTIVITY FUTURE OFFICERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Mikhailovich Skvortsov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, based on our experimental work, presented research results subjectivity formation of professional future officers. Authors vayut substantiation, the main criteria to evaluate this work, considering the results, lead their own views on the matter. Based on the data obtained in the course of pedagogical experiment formulated conclusions. The scientific results obtained by the authors can be successfully implemented in educational practice of military high school.

  20. Didactic games in science - elective subject

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlin, Jerneja; Susman, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    In last decades, the focus on pedagogical researches is based on active learning strategies. One of these learning strategies is game based learning. Didactic Games in Science is elective subject for pre-service primary school teachers on the Faculty of Education, University of Ljubljana. In this academic year, the fourth implementation of the course is taking place. The research about students’ experiences with didactic games during their educational process was performed on the beginning of...

  1. Modern teaching methods in economic subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Maxa, Radek

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is a comprehensive assessment of the practical usability and effectiveness of modern activating teaching methods in economic subjects in fulfilling the RVP economics and business and RVP Business Academy in comparison with traditional (standard) methods. To achieve this goal, a systematic clarification and evaluation of key elements of the choice of adequate methods of teaching, presentation and comparison of traditional, modern activating and comprehensive t...

  2. A Theory of Subjective Learning, Second Version

    OpenAIRE

    David Dillenberger; Juan Sebastian Lleras; Philipp Sadowski; Norio Takeoka

    2012-01-01

    We study an individual who faces a dynamic decision problem in which the process of information arrival is unobserved by the analyst. We elicit subjective information directly from choice behavior by deriving two utility representations of preferences over menus of acts. The most general representation identifies a unique probability distribution over the set of posteriors that the decision maker might face at the time of choosing from the menu. We use this representation to characterize a no...

  3. A Theory of Subjective Learning, Third Version

    OpenAIRE

    David Dillenberger; Juan Sebastian Lleras; Philipp Sadowski; Norio Takeoka

    2012-01-01

    We study an individual who faces a dynamic decision problem in which the process of information arrival is unobserved by the analyst. We elicit subjective information directly from choice behavior by deriving two utility representations of preferences over menus of acts. One representation uniquely identifies information as a probability measure over posteriors and the other identifies information as a partition of the state space. We compare individuals who expect to learn differently in ter...

  4. Behavior of dams subjected to induced loads

    OpenAIRE

    Trebušak, Branka

    2014-01-01

    In the thesis, the influence of underwater explosion on safety of concrete gravity dams has been analysed. Moreover, a historical overwiew of various attacks on different dams and their failures has been made based on the available literature. A special attention has been given to the effects of shock wave caused by the explosion. A parametric study has been conducted in a computer program CADAM. The safety of concrete gravity dam Moste, which has been subjected to equivalent static load of t...

  5. 2.1 Man: subject of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This second chapter 'Man and environment' of the 7th state of the environment report of Austria describes the current situation of the protection of human health in terms of the European environmental policy and the main subjects of high relevance to it, such as air pollutants, water pollution, noise pollution, dangerous chemicals, food contamination, radiation protection, effects of climate change, plants, animal and habitats. (nevyjel)

  6. Material wealth and subjective well-being

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas-Diener, Robert

    2009-01-01

    People have long argued over the relation of income and material well-being to happiness. A variety of studies have examined the happiness of those living at the lowest economic levels as well as those living in relatively affluent nations. Taken together, this body of research suggests that income is correlated with subjective well-being (SWB), but is neither the most important factor in happiness, nor is this relationship unmediated or context free. The studies in the current dissertation o...

  7. Subject Acquisition for Web-Based Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, R. Michael; Sherman, Robert P.; VanBeselaere, Clara

    2003-01-01

    This article provides a basic report about subject recruitment processes for Web-based surveys. Using data from our ongoing Internet Survey of American Opinion project, two different recruitment techniques (banner advertisement and subscription campaigns) are compared. This comparison, together with a typology of Web-based surveys, provides insight into the validity and generalizability of Internet survey data. The results from this analysis show that, although Internet survey respondents dif...

  8. Marketing Strategy of the Selected Subject

    OpenAIRE

    Janda, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Marketing strategy of the chosen subject Summary The main objective was to create a marketing plan of the company. Through the situational analysis there were identified strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. The most important strength of the company is the assortment breadth and the serious threat is the eventual economic crisis. Based on the ST strategy there emerged marketing research, which is the basis for the assortment optimization as well as for reducing the impac...

  9. Chimpanzees as vulnerable subjects in research

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jane; Barnard, Neal D.

    2014-01-01

    Using an approach developed in the context of human bioethics, we argue that chimpanzees in research can be regarded as vulnerable subjects. This vulnerability is primarily due to communication barriers and situational factors—confinement and dependency—that make chimpanzees particularly susceptible to risks of harm and exploitation in experimental settings. In human research, individuals who are deemed vulnerable are accorded special protections. Using conceptual and moral resources develope...

  10. ERDA energy information data base subject thesaurus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical staff of the ERDA Technical Information Center, during its subject indexing activities, develops and structures a vocabulary that allows consistent machine storage and retrieval of information necessary to the accomplishment of the ERDA mission. This thesaurus incorporates that structured vocabulary. Terms in the thesaurus are listed alphabetically; each alphabetic entry is accompanied by a ''word block'' containing all the terms associated with the entry

  11. Earnings quality, accruals and subjective goodwill accounting

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuo, Yuko

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses accounting accruals that may relate to earnings quality and its information content. The characteristics specifying earning quality are discussed according to research surveys of earnings quality. These are compared with the characteristics of accounting income specified by the concept of ‘released from risks’ in ASBJ (2006). In this context, the conversion process of subjective goodwill, which is related to the allocation problem in accounting income and its relation to e...

  12. A subjective spin on roulette wheels.

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Ghirardato; Fabio Maccheroni; Massimo Marinacci; Marciano Siniscalchi

    2001-01-01

    We provide a behavioral foundation to the notion of ‘mixture’ of acts, which is used to great advantage in he decision setting introduced by Anscombe and Aumann. Our construction allows one to formulate mixture-space axioms even in a fully sub-jective setting, without assuming the existence of randomizing devices. This simplifies the task of developing axiomatic models which only use behavioral data. Moreover, it is immune from the difficulty that agents may ‘distort’ the probabilities associ...

  13. Mangafodipir Protects against Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coriat, Romain; Leconte, Mahaut; Kavian, Niloufar; Bedda, Sassia; Nicco, Carole; Chereau, Christiane; Goulvestre, Claire; Weill, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Aim Mangafodipir is a contrast agent used in magnetic resonance imaging that concentrates in the liver and displays pleiotropic antioxidant properties. Since reactive oxygen species are involved in ischemia-reperfusion damages, we hypothesized that the use of mangafodipir could prevent liver lesions in a mouse model of hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury. Mangafodipir (MnDPDP) was compared to ischemic preconditioning and intermittent inflow occlusion for the prevention of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in the mouse. Methods Mice were subjected to 70% hepatic ischemia (continuous ischemia) for 90 min. Thirty minutes before the ischemic period, either mangafodipir (10 mg/kg) or saline was injected intraperitoneally. Those experimental groups were compared with one group of mice preconditioned by 10 minutes' ischemia followed by 15 minutes' reperfusion, and one group with intermittent inflow occlusion. Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury was evaluated by measurement of serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) activity, histologic analysis of the livers, and determination of hepatocyte apoptosis (cytochrome c release, caspase 3 activity). The effect of mangafodipir on the survival rate of mice was studied in a model of total hepatic ischemia. Results Mangafodipir prevented experimental hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injuries in the mouse as indicated by a reduction in serum ASAT activity (P<0.01), in liver tissue damages, in markers of apoptosis (P<0.01), and by higher rates of survival in treated than in untreated animals (P<0.001). The level of protection by mangafodipir was similar to that observed following intermittent inflow occlusion and higher than after ischemic preconditioning. Conclusions Mangafodipir is a potential new preventive treatment for hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:22073237

  14. Mangafodipir protects against hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Coriat

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND AIM: Mangafodipir is a contrast agent used in magnetic resonance imaging that concentrates in the liver and displays pleiotropic antioxidant properties. Since reactive oxygen species are involved in ischemia-reperfusion damages, we hypothesized that the use of mangafodipir could prevent liver lesions in a mouse model of hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury. Mangafodipir (MnDPDP was compared to ischemic preconditioning and intermittent inflow occlusion for the prevention of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in the mouse. METHODS: Mice were subjected to 70% hepatic ischemia (continuous ischemia for 90 min. Thirty minutes before the ischemic period, either mangafodipir (10 mg/kg or saline was injected intraperitoneally. Those experimental groups were compared with one group of mice preconditioned by 10 minutes' ischemia followed by 15 minutes' reperfusion, and one group with intermittent inflow occlusion. Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury was evaluated by measurement of serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT activity, histologic analysis of the livers, and determination of hepatocyte apoptosis (cytochrome c release, caspase 3 activity. The effect of mangafodipir on the survival rate of mice was studied in a model of total hepatic ischemia. RESULTS: Mangafodipir prevented experimental hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injuries in the mouse as indicated by a reduction in serum ASAT activity (P<0.01, in liver tissue damages, in markers of apoptosis (P<0.01, and by higher rates of survival in treated than in untreated animals (P<0.001. The level of protection by mangafodipir was similar to that observed following intermittent inflow occlusion and higher than after ischemic preconditioning. CONCLUSIONS: Mangafodipir is a potential new preventive treatment for hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  15. Simultaneous ECG-gated PET imaging of multiple mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: We describe and illustrate a method for creating ECG-gated PET images of the heart for each of several mice imaged at the same time. The method is intended to increase “throughput” in PET research studies of cardiac dynamics or to obtain information derived from such studies, e.g. tracer concentration in end-diastolic left ventricular blood. Methods: An imaging bed with provisions for warming, anesthetic delivery, etc., was fabricated by 3D printing to allow simultaneous PET imaging of two side-by-side mice. After electrode attachment, tracer injection and placement of the animals in the scanner field of view, ECG signals from each animal were continuously analyzed and independent trigger markers generated whenever an R-wave was detected in each signal. PET image data were acquired in “list” mode and these trigger markers were inserted into this list along with the image data. Since each mouse is in a different spatial location in the FOV, sorting of these data using trigger markers first from one animal and then the other yields two independent and correctly formed ECG-gated image sequences that reflect the dynamical properties of the heart during an “average” cardiac cycle. Results: The described method yields two independent ECG-gated image sequences that exhibit the expected properties in each animal, e.g. variation of the ventricular cavity volumes from maximum to minimum and back during the cardiac cycle in the processed animal with little or no variation in these volumes during the cardiac cycle in the unprocessed animal. Conclusion: ECG-gated image sequences for each of several animals can be created from a single list mode data collection using the described method. In principle, this method can be extended to more than two mice (or other animals) and to other forms of physiological gating, e.g. respiratory gating, when several subjects are imaged at the same time

  16. Effect of Chronic Lead Intoxication on Risky Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Mohammadyar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With industrialization of human societies, pollutants like lead have entered in the life cycle, causing harmful effects on body organs. No sufficient studies have been done on the effects of pollutants on behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate possible effects of lead on some measurable behaviors of an animal model. Methods: Forty eight male adult mice were divided into 4 groups of 12 each. Lead acetate was added at concentrations of 0, 5, 50, or 500 ppm to the drinking water of the animals for 4 weeks (28 days. On day 29, animals were placed on an Elevated Plus maze (EPM for 5 min and the time in sec spent was measured on closed arms, open arms and the end 1/3rd of the open arms. Increased time on open arms, particularly the end 1/3rd was considered to reflect an enhanced risk-accepting behavior. Results: In this study, it was shown that lead exposure caused an increased number of entrance (P=0.006 and time spent (P=0.034 by mice on open arms of the EPM. There was a positive correlation between the concentration of lead acetate and those two effects. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that lead poisoning may decrease normal anxiety in mice and increase risky behavior in this species. Clinical studies on human subjects with risky behavior are strongly suggested in order to find a possible relation between chronic exposures to lead as well as plasma concentration of lead with the extent of this kind of behavior.

  17. Children as research subjects: a dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, L M

    2000-12-01

    A complex problem exists about how to promote the best interests of children as a group through research while protecting the rights and welfare of individual research subjects. The Nuremberg Code forbids studies without consent, eliminating most children as subjects, and the Declaration of Helsinki disallows non-therapeutic research on non-consenting subjects. Both codes are unreasonably restrictive. Another approach is represented by the Council for the International Organizations of Medical Science, the U.S. Federal Research Guidelines, and many other national policies. They allow research ethics committees or institutional review boards to authorize studies with acceptable balances of likely benefits and harms, but neither clarify how to balance them nor explain the meaning of pivotal concepts, like "minimal risk." Paths to the improvement of balancing or consequentialist approaches include (1) improving standardizing of risk assessment, (2) rejecting crude utilitarianism, (3) identifying and justifying normative or moral judgments, and (4) acknowledging extra-regulatory thresholds and deontological or non-negotiable duties to children. PMID:11262635

  18. Subjective loudness response to simulated sonic booms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1992-01-01

    A series of laboratory studies were conducted at LaRC to: (1) quantify the effects of sonic boom signature shaping on subjective loudness; (2) evaluate candidate loudness metrics; (3) quantify the effects of signature asymmetry on loudness; and (4) document sonic boom acceptability within the laboratory. A total of 212 test subjects evaluated a wide range of signatures using the NASA Langley Research Center's sonic boom simulator. Results indicated that signature shaping via front-shock minimization was particularly effective in reducing subjective loudness without requiring reductions in peak overpressure. Metric evaluations showed that A-weighted sound exposure level, Perceived Level (Stevens Mark 7), and Zwicker's Loudness level were effective descriptors of the loudness of symmetrical shaped signatures. The asymmetrical signatures were generally rated as being quieter than symmetrical signatures of equal calculated metric level. The magnitude of the loudness reductions were observed to increase as the degree of asymmetry increased and to be greatest when the rear half of the signature was loudest. This effect was not accounted for by the loudness metrics. Sonic boom acceptability criteria were determined within the laboratory. These agreed well with results previously obtained in more realistic situations.

  19. Modification of female and male social behaviors in estrogen receptor beta knockout mice by neonatal maternal separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumeko C Tsuda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Maternal separation (MS is an animal model mimicking the effects of early life stress on the development of emotional and social behaviors. Recent studies revealed that MS stress increased social anxiety levels in female mice and reduced peri-pubertal aggression in male mice. Estrogen receptor (ER β plays a pivotal role in the regulation of stress responses and anxiety-related and social behaviors. Behavioral studies using ERβ knockout (βERKO mice reported increased social investigation and decreased social anxiety in βERKO females, and elevated aggression levels in βERKO males compared to wild-type (WT mice. In the present study, using βERKO and WT mice, we examined whether ERβ contributes to MS effects on anxiety and social behaviors. βERKO and WT mice were separated from their dam daily (4 h from postnatal day 1 to 14 and control groups were left undisturbed. First, MS and ERβ gene deletion individually increased anxiety-related behaviors in the open field test, but only in female mice. Anxiety levels were not further modified in βERKO female mice subjected to MS stress. Second, βERKO female mice showed higher levels of social investigation compared with WT in the social investigation test and long-term social preference test. However, MS greatly reduced social investigation duration and elevated number of stretched approaches in WT and βERKO females in the social investigation test, suggesting elevated levels of social anxiety in both genotypes. Third, peri-pubertal and adult βERKO male mice were more aggressive than WT mice as indicated by heightened aggression duration. On the other hand, MS significantly decreased aggression duration in both genotypes, but only in peri-pubertal male mice. Altogether, these results suggest that βERKO mice are sensitive to the adverse effects of MS stress on subsequent female and male social behaviors, which could then have overrode the ERβ effects on female social anxiety and male aggression.

  20. Comparison of techniques for morphologic evaluation of glycerol-preserved human skim subjected to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive skin lesions expose the body to damaging agents, which makes spontaneous regeneration difficult and, in many cases, leads patient to death. In such cases, if there are no donating areas for auto graft, allografts can be used. In this type of graft, tissue is processed in tissue banks, where it can be subjected to radiosterilization. According to in vitro studies, gamma radiation, in doses higher than 25 kGy, causes breakdown of collagen I fibrils in the skin preserved in glycerol at 85% and this change influences fibroblast migration and deposition of new collagen. In order to assess if the alterations observed in vitro, would compromise in vivo use, transplants of human tissue, irradiated or not, were performed in Nude mice. After the surgery the skins of the mice was subjected to macroscopic analysis on the 3rd, 7th, 21st and 90th days; optical coherence tomography on the 90th day and histological assay on the 3rd, 7th, 21st days to compare the results of the repair process among the techniques, considering that the OCT allows in vivo and not destructive morphological analysis. According to the results obtained through OCT it was possible to observe a more organized repair process in the animals which received irradiated grafts (25 and 50 kGy) if compared to unirradiated grafts. It was not possible to observe such phenomena through macroscopic or histological evaluation. (author)