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Sample records for cftr gene mutations

  1. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk; Filiz Kibar; Esin Damla Ziyanoglu Karacor; Salih Cetiner; Gulhan Sahin; Akgun Yaman

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men) who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova Universi...

  2. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    OpenAIRE

    Öztürk, Özlem Görüroğlu; Filiz KIBAR; Karaçor, Esin Damla Ziyanoğlu; Çetiner, Salih; Şahin, Gülhan; Yaman, Akgün

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men) who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcalı Hospital of Çukurova Unive...

  3. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

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    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova University, were studied for 19 different CFTR mutations by the strip assay method which is based on reverse hybridization. Results: In cystic fibrosis diagnosed patients, 19 mutations were observed of which 9 were homozygous and 10 were heterozygous. ∆F508 frequency was found as 11.9%, and rate of homozygous was found as 66.7%. Mutation frequencies of W1282X and N1303K were found as 2.40% and 4.80% respectively and rate of homozygous mutations were 50% for both. I148T mutation frequency was found as 3.20% and all were heterozygous. For the whole 19 mutations, frequency of mutation in 63 subjects was 22.3%. Conclusion: Detection of CFTR gene mutations by the strip assay method by reverse hybridization is an easy, fast and informative method. However, due to improvability of the common mutations in probable cystic fibrosis patients because of heterogenity in this region, it is still a major problem and does not exclude cystic fibrosis diagnosis. But this problematic issue can be overcome by evaluating the whole exons of CFTR mutations by advanced molecular tecniques. Key words: CFTR, cystic fibrosis, molecular diagnosis, reverse hibridisation [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 202-208

  4. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C. [and others

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  5. Comprehensive and accurate mutation scanning of the CFTR gene by two-dimensional DNA electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y; Hofstra, RMW; Scheffer, H; Uitterlinden, AG; Mullaart, E; Buys, CHCM; Vijg, J

    1996-01-01

    The large number of possible disease causing mutations in the 27 exons of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene has severely limited direct diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and carriers by mutation detection. Here we show that in principle testing for mutation

  6. Mutation Analysis of CFTR Gene in 70 Iranian Cystic Fibrosis Patients

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    Reza Alibakhshi Mahdi Zamani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common inherited disorder in Caucasian populations, with over 1400 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mutations. The type of mutations and their distributions varies widely between different countries and/or ethnic groups. Seventy Iranian cystic fibrosis patients were screened for the CFTR gene mutation using ARMS/PCR (amplification refractory mutation system for the following mutations: ∆F508, N1303K, G542X, 1717-1G>A, R553X, W1282X, G551D, 621+1G>T, ∆I507 and R560T. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP analysis of exons 3, 7, 10, 11 and 17b, including both the exon/intron junctions, of the CFTR gene was performed in patients in whom no mutation could be identified on one or both CFTR genes. As a result of this screening, only three mutations were found: ∆F508 mutation was found in 25 (17.8% alleles, N1303K in six (4.3% alleles and G542X in five (3.6% alleles. Thus, a total of 3 mutations cover 25.7% of CF alleles. These finding will be used for planning future screening and appropriate genetic counseling programs in Iranian CF patients.

  7. Analysis of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene in patients with obstructive azoospermia

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    Andrea L.F. Bernardino

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD accounts for 1%-2% of sterility in men. A high incidence of mutations, as well as the involvement of the 5T variant of the T tract length in intron 8 of the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator (CFTR gene, have been previously described in males with CBAVD. Herein we report the screening for mutations and for the 5T variant of the CFTR gene in 17 patients with CBAVD and three others with non-CABVD obstructive azoospermia. In the CBAVD group, three patients (15% were compound heterozygotes for mutations, and five patients (25% had a mutation in one allele and the 5T variant in the other; the 5T variant was also present in two other patients, one of them being homozygous. The most frequent mutation was DF508, present on five chromosomes (12.5%. A novel missense mutation (A399D was detected in a Japanese CBVAD patient. Our results yield further evidence for a strong association between male obstructive azoospermia caused by CBAVD and mutation/5T variant in the CFTR gene. The search for CFTR mutations in such patients is thus recommended for genetic counseling of couples who undergo assisted fertilization due to CBAVD.

  8. Identification of CFTR Gene Mutations in Chinese Patients with Congenital Obstructive Azoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾国华; 吴开俊; 梅骅; 庄广伦

    2001-01-01

    Objective To analyze the frequency and hot spot of CFTR gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital obstructive azoospermia Materials & Methods Mutations in CFTR exon 2,3,4,5,6a,8,10,11,12,13,15A 17b, 19A,20,21and 23 were detected. PCR-single strand conformation poly-morphism (SSCP) and direct sequencing were performed on 32 patients with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD), 17 patients with congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens (CUAVD) and 50 normal Chinese.Results No CFTR gene mutations were detected in 50 normal Chinese. One CBAVD patient exhibited an abnormal band on SSCP for exon 10 of the CFTR gene and subsequent DNA sequencing showed a 3 bp deletion at position 1 653~ 1 655, which caused the deletion of a single amino acid, phenyalanine, in codon 508, i. e. , △F 508. A shift mutation was detected in another CBAVD patient in exon 2, a 1 bp deletion at position 225, 225 delC. One CUAVD patient exhibited an abnormal band on SSCP for exon 17 b of CFTR gene. Subsequent DNA sequencing showed a C-to-A transversion at position 3 295, which led to a predicted change of Leusine (codon 1 055,CUU) to Isoleucine (codon AUU), L1055I.Conclusion CFTR mutation could be detected in Chinese patients with congenital obstructive azoospermia. But no hot spots of mutations are discovered. 225 delC and L1055I are identified as two novel mutations, which are found only in Chinese.

  9. Impact of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR gene mutations on male infertility

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    Jlenia Elia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of most common mutations and intron 8 5T (IVS8-5T polymorphism of CFTR gene in Italian: a azoospermic males; b non azoospermic subjects, male partners of infertile couples enrolled in assisted reproductive technology (ART programs. Material and methods. We studied 242 subjects attending our Andrology Unit (44 azoospermic subjects and 198 non azoospermic subjects, male partners of infertile couples enrolled in ART programs. Semen analysis, molecular analysis for CFTR gene mutations and genomic variant of IVS8-5T polymorphic tract, karyotype and chromosome Y microdeletions, hormonal profile (LH, FSH, Testosterone and seminal biochemical markers (fructose, citric acid and L-carnitine were carried out. Results. The prevalence of the common CFTR mutations and/or the IVS8-5T polymorphism was 12.9% (4/31 cases in secretory azoospermia, while in obstructive azoospermia was 84.6% (11/13 cases; in these, the most frequent mutations were the F508del, R117H and W1282X. Regarding the non azoospermic subjects, the prevalence of the CFTR and/or the IVS8-5T polymorphism was 11.1% (11/99 cases in severe dyspermia, 8.1% (6/74 cases in moderate dyspermia and finally 4.0% (1/25 cases in normospermic subjects. Conclusions. This study confirms the highly significant prevalence of CFTR mutations in males with bilateral absence of the vas deferens or ejaculatory ducts obstruction compared with subjects with secretory azoospermia. Moreover, the significant prevalence of mutations in severely dyspermic subjects may suggest the possible involvement of CFTR even in the spermatogenic process. This could explain the unsatisfactory recovery of sperm from testicular fine needle aspiration in patients affected by genital tract blockage.

  10. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

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    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  11. Impact of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene mutations on male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Jlenia Elia; Rossella Mazzilli; Michele Delfino; Maria Piane; Cristina Bozzao; Vincenzo Spinosa; Luciana Chessa; Fernando Mazzilli

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of most common mutations and intron 8 5T (IVS8-5T) polymorphism of CFTR gene in Italian: a) azoospermic males; b) non azoospermic subjects, male partners of infertile couples enrolled in assisted reproductive technology (ART) programs. Material and methods. We studied 242 subjects attending our Andrology Unit (44 azoospermic subjects and 198 non azoospermic subjects, male partners of infertile couples enrolled in ART programs). S...

  12. Development of ARMS PCR tests for detection of common CFTR gene mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Livshits L. A.; Pampukha V. M.; Soloviov O. O.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To develop diagnostic assays, based on the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) principle, for detection of common mutations in the CFTR gene using two approaches: standard PCR with further gel-electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green. Materials. For this study we have chosen the following mutations: dF508, W1282X, R117H, 621 + 1G > T, 2143delT with the frequencies in Ukraine: dF508 – 43.3 %; 2143delT – 1.38 %; W1282X – 1.1 %; R117H, 621 + 1G > T – < 0.6 %. For the de...

  13. Analysis of CFTR Gene Mutations in Children with Cystic Fibrosis, First Report from North-East of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Atieh Mehdizadeh Hakkak; Mohammad Keramatipour; Saeid Talebi; Azam Brook; Jalil Tavakol Afshari; Amin Raazi; Hamid Reza Kianifar

    2013-01-01

     Objective(s):  More than 1500 registered mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene are responsible for dysfunction of an ion channel protein and a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study was performed to investigate the frequency of a number of well-known CFTR mutations in North Eastern Iranian CF patients. Material and Methods: A total number of 56 documented CF patients participated in this study. Peripheral blood...

  14. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.W.; Hamosh, A.; Macek, M. Jr. [John Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The etiology of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is not well understood. A clinical phenotype resembling the pulmonary disease seen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can occur in some individuals with ABPA. Reports of familial occurrence of ABPA and increased incidence in CF patients suggest a possible genetic basis for the disease. To test this possibility, the entire coding region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene was analyzed in 11 individuals who met strict criteria for the diagnosis of ABPA and had normal sweat electrolytes ({le}40 mmol/liter). One patient carried two CF mutations ({Delta}F508/R347H), and five were found to carry one CF mutation (four {Delta}F508; one R117H). The frequency of the {Delta}F508 mutation in patients with ABPA was significantly higher than in 53 Caucasian patients with chronic bronchitis (P < .0003) and the general population (P < .003). These results suggest that CFTR plays an etiologic role in a subset of ABPA patients. 54 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Development of ARMS PCR tests for detection of common CFTR gene mutations

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    Livshits L. A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop diagnostic assays, based on the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS principle, for detection of common mutations in the CFTR gene using two approaches: standard PCR with further gel-electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green. Materials. For this study we have chosen the following mutations: dF508, W1282X, R117H, 621 + 1G > T, 2143delT with the frequencies in Ukraine: dF508 – 43.3 %; 2143delT – 1.38 %; W1282X – 1.1 %; R117H, 621 + 1G > T – T, 2143delT mutations. To validate the developed assays we have analyzed control DNA samples with the following mutations: W1282X (n = 3, R117H (n = 2, 621 + 1G > T (n = 1, 2143delT (n = = 1. For validation of the dF508 assay we have analyzed 100 heterozygous carriers and 50 homozygous carriers. We have analyzed 48 patients with cystic fibrosis, in which only one mutation was previously detected in combination with unknown mutant variant, using the developed ARMS assay for the 2143delT mutation, and detected 4 heterozygous carriers. No differences were observed in comparison with the standard protocols. Conclusions. It was shown that ARMS is a reliable, rapid and inexpensive method, and the developed assays can be applied in the standard PCR protocol with further gel-electrophoresis as well as using Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green for the molecular genetic diagnostics of cystic fibrosis.

  16. Frequency of CFTR, SPINK1, and Cathepsin B Gene Mutation in North Indian Population: Connections between Genetics and Clinical Data

    OpenAIRE

    Shweta Singh; Gourdas Choudhuri; Sarita Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Genetic mutations and polymorphisms have been correlated with chronic pancreatitis (CP). This study aims to investigate the association of genetic variants of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK-1) genes and Cathepsin B gene polymorphisms with CP and to associate genetic backgrounds with clinical phenotypes. Methods. 150 CP patients and 150 normal controls were enrolled consecutively. We analyzed SPINK-1 N34S...

  17. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, P. W.; Hamosh, A.; Macek, M.; Greenberger, P. A.; MacLean, J; Walden, S M; Slavin, R G; Cutting, G R

    1996-01-01

    The etiology of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is not well understood. A clinical phenotype resembling the pulmonary disease seen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can occur in some individuals with ABPA. Reports of familial occurrence of ABPA and increased incidence in CF patients suggest a possible genetic basis for the disease. To test this possibility, the entire coding region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene was analyzed in 11 individuals who met ...

  18. Assessing the Disease-Liability of Mutations in CFTR

    OpenAIRE

    Ferec, Claude; Cutting, Garry R

    2012-01-01

    Over 1900 mutations have been reported in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the gene defective in patients with cystic fibrosis. These mutations have been discovered primarily in individuals who have features consistent with the diagnosis of CF. In some cases, it has been recognized that the mutations are not causative of cystic fibrosis but are responsible for disorders with features similar to CF, and these conditions have been termed CFTR-related disorders or ...

  19. Islet-intrinsic effects of CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivula, Fiona N Manderson; McClenaghan, Neville H; Harper, Alan G S; Kelly, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the most significant extra-pulmonary comorbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and accelerates lung decline. In addition to the traditional view that CFRD is a consequence of fibrotic destruction of the pancreas as a whole, emerging evidence may implicate a role for cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) in the regulation of insulin secretion from the pancreatic islet. Impaired first-phase insulin responses and glucose homeostasis have also been reported in CF patients. CFTR expression in both human and mouse beta cells has been confirmed, and recent studies have shown differences in endocrine pancreatic morphology from birth in CF. Recent experimental evidence suggests that functional CFTR channels are required for insulin exocytosis and the regulation of membrane potential in the pancreatic beta cell, which may account for the impairments in insulin secretion observed in many CF patients. These novel insights suggest that the pathogenesis of CFRD is more complicated than originally thought, with implications for diabetes treatment and screening in the CF population. This review summarises recent emerging evidence in support of a primary role for endocrine pancreatic dysfunction in the development of CFRD. Summary • CF is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the CFTR gene • The vast majority of morbidity and mortality in CF results from lung disease. However CFRD is the largest extra-pulmonary co-morbidity and rapidly accelerates lung decline • Recent experimental evidence shows that functional CFTR channels are required for normal patterns of first phase insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta cell • Current clinical recommendations suggest that insulin is more effective than oral glucose-lowering drugs for the treatment of CFRD. However, the emergence of CFTR corrector and potentiator drugs may offer a personalised approach to treating diabetes in the CF population

  20. Frequency of CFTR, SPINK1, and Cathepsin B Gene Mutation in North Indian Population: Connections between Genetics and Clinical Data

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    Shweta Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Genetic mutations and polymorphisms have been correlated with chronic pancreatitis (CP. This study aims to investigate the association of genetic variants of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK-1 genes and Cathepsin B gene polymorphisms with CP and to associate genetic backgrounds with clinical phenotypes. Methods. 150 CP patients and 150 normal controls were enrolled consecutively. We analyzed SPINK-1 N34S and IVS3+2T>C gene mutations by PCR-restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. The identification of DF508, G551D, G542X, R117H, and W1282X mutations was carried out by ARMS-PCR. S549N mutation, IVS8 polyTn polymorphism, and Cathepsin B Lec26Val were analysed by PCR-RFLP, nested PCR, and PCR-RFLP plus sequencing, respectively. Results. We found a significant association of SPINK1 (N34S gene polymorphism. IVS1−37T>C polymorphism shows linkage with 101A>G. 300 chromosomes belonging to the CFTR subgroup exhibited minor allele frequency of 0.04, 0.03, 0.03, 0.013, 0.006, and 0.02 for DF508, G452X, G551D, S549N, R117H, and IVS8 T5, respectively. Except for R117H and IVS8 T5 polymorphisms, all other mutations showed significant variation. Conclusion. Analysis of potential susceptibility variants is needed to support nature of the genes and environment in pancreatitis. This data may help establish genetic screening and prenatal setup for Indian population.

  1. Nasal Potential Difference in Cystic Fibrosis considering Severe CFTR Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The gold standard for diagnosing cystic fibrosis (CF) is a sweat chloride value above 60 mEq/L. However, this historical and important tool has limitations; other techniques should be studied, including the nasal potential difference (NPD) test. CFTR gene sequencing can identify CFTR mutations, but this method is time-consuming and too expensive to be used in all CF centers. The present study compared CF patients with two classes I-III CFTR mutations (10 patients) (G1), CF patients with class...

  2. Mutations in CFTR gene and clinical correlation in Argentine patients with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens Correlación de las características clínicas con mutaciones del gen CFTR en pacientes argentinos con ausencia bilateral congénita de vasos deferentes

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Estrella M; Patricia Granados; Vanesa Rawe; Santiago Brugo Olmedo; María C Luna; Eduardo Cafferata; Omar H Pivetta

    2004-01-01

    Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) is a form of male infertility in which mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have been identified. Here we identify different mutations of CFTR and the poly-T variant of intron 8 (IVS8) in Argentine patients and analyze sweat test values and clinical characteristic related to Cystic Fibrosis (CF). For counseling purposes the two most frequent mutations in Argentine CF population: DF508 and G542...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance... DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5900 Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR... intended as an aid in confirmatory diagnostic testing of individuals with suspected cystic fibrosis...

  4. Nasal Potential Difference in Cystic Fibrosis considering Severe CFTR Mutations

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    Ronny Tah Yen Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard for diagnosing cystic fibrosis (CF is a sweat chloride value above 60 mEq/L. However, this historical and important tool has limitations; other techniques should be studied, including the nasal potential difference (NPD test. CFTR gene sequencing can identify CFTR mutations, but this method is time-consuming and too expensive to be used in all CF centers. The present study compared CF patients with two classes I-III CFTR mutations (10 patients (G1, CF patients with classes IV-VI CFTR mutations (five patients (G2, and 21 healthy subjects (G3. The CF patients and healthy subjects also underwent the NPD test. A statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, χ2, and Fisher’s exact tests, α=0.05. No differences were observed between the CF patients and healthy controls for the PDMax, Δamiloride, and Δchloride + free + amiloride markers from the NPD test. For the finger value, a difference between G2 and G3 was described. The Wilschanski index values were different between G1 and G3. In conclusion, our data showed that NPD is useful for CF diagnosis when classes I-III CFTR mutations are screened. However, if classes IV-VI are considered, the NPD test showed an overlap in values with healthy subjects.

  5. Generation of KCL021 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a ΔF508 mutation in the CFTR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL021 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried a ΔF508 mutation affecting the CFTR gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345808

  6. Novel CFTR missense mutations in Brazilian patients with congenital absence of vas deferens: counseling issues Mutações novas no gene CFTR de pacientes brasileiros portadores de agenesia dos vasos deferentes: dificuldades no aconselhamento

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    Patricia de Campos Pieri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Screening for mutations in the entire Cystic Fibrosis gene (CFTR of Brazilian infertile men with congenital absence of vas deferens, in order to prevent transmission of CFTR mutations to offspring with the use of assisted reproductive technologies. METHOD: Specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR primers were designed to each of the 27 exons and splicing sites of interest followed by single strand conformational polymorphism and Heteroduplex Analysis (SSCP-HA in precast 12.5% polyacrylamide gels at 7ºC and 20ºC. Fragments with abnormal SSCP migration pattern were sequenced. RESULTS: Two novel missense mutations (S753R and G149W were found in three patients (two brothers together with the IVS8-5T allele in hetrozygosis. CONCLUSION: The available screenings for CF mutations do not include the atypical mutations associated to absence of vas deferens and thus, when these tests fail to find mutations, there is still a genetic risk of affected children with the help of assisted reproduction. We recommend the screening of the whole CFTR gene for these infertile couples, as part of the work-up before assisted reproduction.OBJETIVO: Pesquisar mutações em toda a extensão do gene que causa a Fibrose Cística (CFTR de homens brasileiros inférteis por agenesia congênita dos vasos deferentes, com a finalidade de prevenir a transmissão de mutações em CFTR à prole com o uso das tecnologias de reprodução assistida. MÉTODOS: Foram desenhados oligonucleotídeos específicos para realização de reação de polimerização em cadeia (PCR para cada um dos 27 exons e sítios de processamento de interesse no gene CFTR. O PCR foi seguido pela técnica de SSCP-HA (polimorfismos de conformação no DNA de fita simples e na formação de heteroduplexes em géis pré-fabricados de poliacrilamida a 12,5% em duas temperaturas, 7ºC e 20ºC. Os fragmentos com padrão alterado na migração do SSCP foram submetidos a seqüenciamento automatizado

  7. CFTR Mutations in Congenital Absence of Vas Deferens

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    Ramin Radpour

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A qualitative diagnosis of infertility requires attention to female and male physical abnormalities,endocrine anomalies and genetic conditions that interfere with reproduction. Many genes arelikely to be involved in the complex process of reproduction. Cystic fibrosis (CF incidence variesin different White people populations (a higher incidence of CF is observed in northern–westernEuropean populations than in southern European populations, and therefore the incidence ofcongenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD may also vary in different Whitepeople populations. As CF is mainly observed in White people, hardly any data are available ofCBAVD in non-White people, but frequent polymorphisms such as 5T are observed in mostpopulations. The spectrum and distribution of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductanceregulator gene (CFTR mutations differs between CBAVD and CF patients, and even comparedwith control individuals. Combinations of particular alleles at several polymorphic loci yieldinsufficient functional CFTR. The combination of the 5T allele in one copy of the CFTR genewith a cystic fibrosis mutation in the other copy is the most common cause of CBAVD in Iran.Because of techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, CBAVD patients are nowable to father children, however such couples have an increased risk of having a child with cysticfibrosis, and therefore genetic testing and counseling should be provided. Around 10% ofobstructive azoospermia is congenital and is due to mutations the CF gene. This paper reviews therelationship of mutations in the CFTR gene with CBAVD.

  8. The analysis of some CFTR gene mutations in a small group of cf patients from southern part of Romania

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    Lucian GAVRILA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is the most common hereditary disease in European descendant populations, with prevalencedepending on ethnic groups studied. In contrast to other European countries, there is little information regarding the frequency ofCFTR mutations for the Southern part of Romania. The aim of this study was to test the presence of nine CFTR mutations in CFpatients from the Southern part of Romania, using complementary analysis methods. We investigated a group of unrelated CFpatients (n=19 and, when possible, their voluntary parents (n=15. We observed that the most frequently worldwide CF mutation,delta F508, was present in 17 of our patients (89.5% in homozygous (n=7 or heterozygous (n=10 condition and absent in 2 cases(10.5%. This mutation was also detected in ten parents, seven of them (100% have homozygous children and three (37.5%have heterozygous children for delta F508 mutation. None of the G542X, S549N, G551D, R553X, R560T, S1255X, W1282X andN1303K mutations have been detected in the samples from patients or parents. Our results are partially similar with those reportedin neighbouring countries where the delta F508 is the most common mutation detected and the frequency of R560T, S549N, G551D andS1255X mutations is near zero. The enlargement of this study could give a better result regarding the spectrum of CFTR mutationsin Romanian patients with CF.

  9. [Reliability of the Search for 19 Common Mutations in the CFTR Gene in Russian Cystic Fibrosis Patients and the Calculated Frequency of the Disease in Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, A A; Krasovsky, S A; Polyakov, A V

    2016-02-01

    A study of Russian cystic fibrosis (CF) patient DNA was conducted to assess the incidence frequency of 19 mutations, namely CFTRdele2,3(21kb), F508del, I507del, 1677delTA, 2143delT, 2184insA, 394delTT, 3821delT, L138ins, 604insA, 3944delGT, G542X, W128X, N1303K, R334W, and 3849+10kbC>T, S1196X, 621+1g>t, and E92K of the CFTR gene. We also sought to determine the estimated CF frequency in Russian Federation. In addition, we determined the total information content of the approach for 19 common mutations registration in the CFTR gene, 84.6%, and the allelic frequencies of the examined mutations: three mutations were observed with a frequency exceeding 5% (F508del, 53.98%, E92K, 6.47%, CFTRdele2,3(21kb), 5.35%); other mutations were observed with frequencies ranging from 0.13% to 3.0%. The CF population carrier frequency was 1 in 38 subjects, while the predicted CF frequency was 1 in 5776 newborns. PMID:27215038

  10. Conservation of CFTR codon frequency through primates suggests synonymous mutations could have a functional effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Lucilla; Iriarte, Andrés; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando; Marín, Mónica

    2015-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system, with a prevalence of about 1:3000 people. Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in CFTR gene, which lead to a defective function of the chloride channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Up-to-date, more than 1900 mutations have been reported in CFTR. However for an important proportion of them, their functional effects and the relation to disease are still not understood. Many of these mutations are silent (or synonymous), namely they do not alter the encoded amino acid. These synonymous mutations have been considered as neutral to protein function. However, more recent evidence in bacterial and human proteins has put this concept under revision. With the aim of understanding possible functional effects of synonymous mutations in CFTR, we analyzed human and primates CFTR codon usage and divergence patterns. We report the presence of regions enriched in rare and frequent codons. This spatial pattern of codon preferences is conserved in primates, but this cannot be explained by sequence conservation alone. In sum, the results presented herein suggest a functional implication of these regions of the gene that may be maintained by purifying selection acting to preserve a particular codon usage pattern along the sequence. Overall these results support the idea that several synonymous mutations in CFTR may have functional importance, and could be involved in the disease.

  11. Transcriptional networks driving enhancer function in the CFTR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Jenny L; Harris, Ann

    2012-09-01

    A critical cis-regulatory element for the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene is located in intron 11, 100 kb distal to the promoter, with which it interacts. This sequence contains an intestine-selective enhancer and associates with enhancer signature proteins, such as p300, in addition to tissue-specific TFs (transcription factors). In the present study we identify critical TFs that are recruited to this element and demonstrate their importance in regulating CFTR expression. In vitro DNase I footprinting and EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) identified four cell-type-selective regions that bound TFs in vitro. ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) identified FOXA1/A2 (forkhead box A1/A2), HNF1 (hepatocyte nuclear factor 1) and CDX2 (caudal-type homeobox 2) as in vivo trans-interacting factors. Mutation of their binding sites in the intron 11 core compromised its enhancer activity when measured by reporter gene assay. Moreover, siRNA (small interfering RNA)-mediated knockdown of CDX2 caused a significant reduction in endogenous CFTR transcription in intestinal cells, suggesting that this factor is critical for the maintenance of high levels of CFTR expression in these cells. The ChIP data also demonstrate that these TFs interact with multiple cis-regulatory elements across the CFTR locus, implicating a more global role in intestinal expression of the gene.

  12. A novel CFTR mutation found in a Chinese patient with cystic fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) is rare in Chinese. We investigated the mutations in the gene of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in a Chinese CF patient and reviewed the clinical features, gene mutations in Chinese CF cases. Methods Blood samples were collected from a previously reported CF girl and her parents. The 24 coding exons of CFTR of the proband were amplified and sequenced. Results A Chinese girl of 16 years old was diagnosed as CF at the age of 14. She had recurrent productive cough with bronchiectasis in bilateral upper lobes, parasinusitis and otitis media, but without pancreatic involvement. Her sweat chloride was (108.9 ±3.3) mmol/L. A heterozygous novel missense mutation of 699 C→A which results in the amino acid change of N189K was identified in exon 5. In addition, a heterozygous 3821-3823 delT mutation in exon 19 was found in CFTR. The mutation 699C→A was inherited from her father, and the 3821-3823delT mutation was from her mother. Twenty patients with CF in Chinese reported from 1974 to 2004 were also reviewed. DelF508 mutation was not found in the nine cases whose CFTR mutations were analyzed. Conclusions The CF proband carries two heterozygous mutations (699C→A and 3821-3823delT) in CFTR. 699C→A mutation is a novel mutation which is not reported previously. Review of reported Chinese cases suggests that the genotype of Chinese CF may be different from those of white cases. More studies are needed to understand the spectra of CFTR and clinical CF features in Chinese.

  13. Targeted Correction and Restored Function of the CFTR Gene in Cystic Fibrosis Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Crane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed reprogramming and genome editing technologies make possible the derivation of corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cell sources—potentially useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Starting with skin fibroblasts from patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, we derived and characterized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines. We then utilized zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs, designed to target the endogenous CFTR gene, to mediate correction of the inherited genetic mutation in these patient-derived lines via homology-directed repair (HDR. We observed an exquisitely sensitive, homology-dependent preference for targeting one CFTR allele versus the other. The corrected cystic fibrosis iPSCs, when induced to differentiate in vitro, expressed the corrected CFTR gene; importantly, CFTR correction resulted in restored expression of the mature CFTR glycoprotein and restoration of CFTR chloride channel function in iPSC-derived epithelial cells.

  14. The Impact on Genetic Testing of Mutational Patterns of CFTR Gene in Different Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina M; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Testino, Giancarlo; Truglio, Gessica; Strom, Roberto; Quattrucci, Serena

    2016-07-01

    More than 2000 sequence variations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene are known. The marked genetic heterogeneity, poor functional characterization of the vast majority of sequence variations, and an uncertain genotype-phenotype relationship complicate the definition of mutational search strategies. We studied the effect of the marked genetic heterogeneity detected in a case series comprising 610 patients of cystic fibrosis (CF), grouped in different clinical macrocategories, on the operative characteristics of the genetic test designed to fully characterize CF patients. The detection rate in each clinical macrocategory and at each mutational step was found to be influenced by genetic heterogeneity. The definition of a single mutational panel that is suitable for all clinical macrocategories proved impossible. Only for classic CF with pancreas insufficiency did a reduced number of mutations yield a detection rate of diagnostic value. All other clinical macrocategories required an extensive genetic search. The search for specific mutational classes appears to be useful only in specific CF clinical forms. A flowchart defining a mutational search that may be adopted for different CF clinical forms, optimized in respect to those already available, is proposed. The findings also have consequences for carrier screening strategies.

  15. Ivacaftor treatment in patients with cystic fibrosis and the G551D-CFTR mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Sermet-Gaudelus

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is an autosomal recessive lethal disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene that encodes for CFTR, an epithelial cell-surface expressed protein responsible for the transport of chloride (Cl-. Gating mutations associated with defective conductance can be modulated by CFTR potentiators. Ivacaftor is a CFTR potentiator approved for the treatment of CF patients >6 yrs of age with at least one copy of the G551D-CFTR mutation. Herein, the clinical trial development programme for ivacaftor will be reviewed, including two pivotal studies in adolescents/adults and in children. These studies report sustained improvements in lung function and sweat chloride concentrations, and a reduction in pulmonary exacerbations over a 48-week treatment period. In the era of personalised medicine, ivacaftor offers an effective and well-tolerated treatment for the clinical management of CF patients with the G551D mutation. A long-term, open-label study will report the effects of ivacaftor over a further 48 weeks.

  16. The Novel CFTR Mutation A457P in a Male with a Delayed Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zuckerman, Jonathan B.; Yarmus, Lonny B.; Sosnay, Patrick R.; Cole, Kate H.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease that may be caused by more than 1000 different mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. We describe the case of a CF patient who was initially diagnosed at 16 years of age after presenting with mild respiratory compromise and pancreatic sufficiency. When genetic testing was first performed using a CF mutation panel, only a single F508del CFTR allele was identified. We subsequently performed testing...

  17. Independent orgins of cystic ribrosis mutations R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{yields}T provide evidence of mutation recurrence in the CFTR gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morral, N.; Llevadot, R.; Casals, T.; Estivill, X. [Hospital Duran i Reynals, Barcelona (Spain); Gasparini, P. [Servizio di Genetica Medica, Foggia (Italy); Macek, M. Jr. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States); Doerk, T.

    1994-11-01

    Microsatellite analysis of chromosomes carrying particular cystic fibrosis mutations has shown different haplotypes in four cases: R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{yields}T. To investigate the possibility of recurrence of these mutations, analysis of intra- and extragenic markers flanking these mutations has been performed. Recurrence is the most plausible explanation, as it becomes necessary to postulate either double recombinations or single recombinations in conjunction with slippage at one or more microsatellite loci, to explain the combination of mutations and microsatellites if the mutations arose only once. Also in support of recurrence, mutations R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{yields}T involve CpG dinucleotides, which are known to have an increased mutation rate. Although only 15.7% of point mutations in the coding sequence of CFTR have occurred at CpG dinucleotides, approximately half of these CpG sites have mutated at least once. Specific nucleotide positions of the coding region of CFTR, distinct from CpG sequences, also seem to have a higher mutation rate, and so it is possible that the mutations observed are recurrent. G{yields}A transitions are the most common change found in those positions involved in more than one mutational event in CFTR. 65 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  18. Detection of Five Common CFTR Mutations by Rapid-Cycle Real-Time Amplification Refractory Mutation System PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Dempsey, Eugene; Barton, Davis; Ryan, Fergus X.

    2004-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive disease in Caucasian populations and has a carrier frequency of 1 in 25 (1 ). The gene involved codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a membrane-associated protein involved in ion transport across the plasma membrane of epithelial cells. To date more than 1000 mutations have been described in this gene, and most are rare (2 ). By focusing on five common mutations it is possible to detect the diseasecaus...

  19. Rare large homozygous CFTR gene deletion in an Iranian patient with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Farjadian, Shirin; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Zuntini, Roberta; Ferrari, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis, a common autosomal recessive genetic disorder among Caucasians, is caused by defects in the transmembrane conductance regulatory (CFTR) gene. The analysis of CFTR gene mutations is useful to better characterize the disease, and for preconceptional screening, prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Here we report the results of a genetic analysis in a 16-year-old boy from southwestern Iran diagnosed as having cystic fibrosis in infancy based on gastrointestinal and pul...

  20. Functional analysis of a promoter variant identified in the CFTR gene in cis of a frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viart, Victoria; Des Georges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Taulan, Magali

    2012-02-01

    In monogenic diseases, the presence of several sequence variations in the same allele may complicate our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. We described new alterations identified in a cystic fibrosis (CF) patient harboring a 48C>G promoter sequence variation associated in cis of a 3532AC>GTA mutation and in trans with the F508del mutation. Functional analyses including in vitro experiments confirmed the deleterious effect of the 3532GTA frameshift mutation through the creation of a premature termination codon. The analyses also revealed that the 48G promoter variant has a negative effect on both transcription and mRNA level, thus demonstrating the importance of analyzing all mutations or sequence variations with potential impact on CF transmembrane conductance regulator processing, even when the two known disease-causing mutations have already been detected. Our results emphasize the need to perform, wherever possible, functional studies that may greatly assist the interpretation of the disease-causing potential of rare mutation-associated sequence variations.

  1. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Gajbhiye

    2016-01-01

    Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T, four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD. The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings.

  2. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) expression in the developing human brain: comparative immunohistochemical study between patients with normal and mutated CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Uguen, Arnaud; Ledé, Françoise; Férec, Claude; Laquerrière, Annie

    2014-11-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein has recently been shown to be expressed in the human adult central nervous system (CNS). As CFTR expression has also been documented during embryonic development in several organs, such as the respiratory tract, the intestine and the male reproductive system, suggesting a possible role during development we decided to investigate the expression of CFTR in the human developing CNS. In addition, as some, although rare, neurological symptoms have been reported in patients with CF, we compared the expression of normal and mutated CFTR at several fetal stages. Immunohistochemistry was performed on brain and spinal cord samples of foetuses between 13 and 40 weeks of gestation and compared with five patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) of similar ages. We showed in this study that CFTR is only expressed in neurons and has an early and widespread distribution during development. Although we did not observe any cerebral abnormality in patients with CF, we observed a slight delay in the maturation of several brain structures. We also observed different expression and localization of CFTR depending on the brain structure or the cell maturation stage. Our findings, along with a literature review on the neurological phenotypes of patients with CF, suggest that this gene may play previously unsuspected roles in neuronal maturation or function.

  3. The CFTR frameshift mutation 3905insT and its effect at transcript and protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Javier; von Känel, Thomas; Schneider, Mircea; Steiner, Bernhard; Schaller, André; Gallati, Sabina

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common genetic diseases in the Caucasian population and is characterized by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and elevation of sodium and chloride concentrations in the sweat and infertility in men. The disease is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes a protein that functions as chloride channel at the apical membrane of different epithelia. Owing to the high genotypic and phenotypic disease heterogeneity, effects and consequences of the majority of the CFTR mutations have not yet been studied. Recently, the frameshift mutation 3905insT was identified as the second most frequent mutation in the Swiss population and found to be associated with a severe phenotype. The frameshift mutation produces a premature termination codon (PTC) in exon 20, and transcripts bearing this PTC are potential targets for degradation through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and/or for exon skipping through nonsense-associated alternative splicing (NAS). Using RT-PCR analysis in lymphocytes and different tissue types from patients carrying the mutation, we showed that the PTC introduced by the mutation does neither elicit a degradation of the mRNA through NMD nor an alternative splicing through NAS. Moreover, immunocytochemical analysis in nasal epithelial cells revealed a significantly reduced amount of CFTR at the apical membrane providing a possible molecular explanation for the more severe phenotype observed in F508del/3905insT compound heterozygotes compared with F508del homozygotes. However, further experiments are needed to elucidate the fate of the 3905insT CFTR in the cell after its biosynthesis.

  4. Relationships among CFTR expression, HCO3- secretion, and host defense may inform gene- and cell-based cystic fibrosis therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Viral S; Ernst, Sarah; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Karp, Philip H; Parker, Connor P; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-05-10

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. Airway disease is the major source of morbidity and mortality. Successful implementation of gene- and cell-based therapies for CF airway disease requires knowledge of relationships among percentages of targeted cells, levels of CFTR expression, correction of electrolyte transport, and rescue of host defense defects. Previous studies suggested that, when ∼10-50% of airway epithelial cells expressed CFTR, they generated nearly wild-type levels of Cl(-) secretion; overexpressing CFTR offered no advantage compared with endogenous expression levels. However, recent discoveries focused attention on CFTR-mediated HCO3 (-) secretion and airway surface liquid (ASL) pH as critical for host defense and CF pathogenesis. Therefore, we generated porcine airway epithelia with varying ratios of CF and wild-type cells. Epithelia with a 50:50 mix secreted HCO3 (-) at half the rate of wild-type epithelia. Likewise, heterozygous epithelia (CFTR(+/-) or CFTR(+/∆F508)) expressed CFTR and secreted HCO3 (-) at ∼50% of wild-type values. ASL pH, antimicrobial activity, and viscosity showed similar relationships to the amount of CFTR. Overexpressing CFTR increased HCO3 (-) secretion to rates greater than wild type, but ASL pH did not exceed wild-type values. Thus, in contrast to Cl(-) secretion, the amount of CFTR is rate-limiting for HCO3 (-) secretion and for correcting host defense abnormalities. In addition, overexpressing CFTR might produce a greater benefit than expressing CFTR at wild-type levels when targeting small fractions of cells. These findings may also explain the risk of airway disease in CF carriers. PMID:27114540

  5. SNaPshot assay for the detection of the most common CFTR mutations in infertile men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Noveski

    Full Text Available Congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD is the most common CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD that explains about 1-2% of the male infertility cases. Controversial data have been published regarding the involvement of CFTR mutations in infertile men with non-obstructive azoospermia and oligozoospermia. Here, we describe single base extension (SNaPshot assay for detection of 11 common CFTR mutations: F508del, G542X, N1303K, 621+1G->T, G551D, R553X, R1162X, W1282X, R117H, 2184insA and 1717-1G->A and IVS8polyT variants. The assay was validated on 50 previously genotyped samples and was used to screen a total of 369 infertile men with different impairment of spermatogenesis and 136 fertile controls. Our results show that double heterozygosity of cystic fibrosis (CF and CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD mutations are found in a high percentage (22.7% of infertile men with obstructive azoospermia, but not in other studied groups of infertile men. The SNaPshot assay described here is an inexpensive, fast and robust method for primary screening of the most common CFTR mutations both in patients with classical CF and CFTR-RD. It can contribute to better understanding of the role of CFTR mutations in impaired spermatogenesis, ultimately leading to improved management of infertile men.

  6. SNaPshot Assay for the Detection of the Most Common CFTR Mutations in Infertile Men

    OpenAIRE

    Predrag Noveski; Svetlana Madjunkova; Marija Mircevska; Toso Plaseski; Vanja Filipovski; Dijana Plaseska-Karanfilska

    2014-01-01

    Congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD) is the most common CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD) that explains about 1-2% of the male infertility cases. Controversial data have been published regarding the involvement of CFTR mutations in infertile men with non-obstructive azoospermia and oligozoospermia. Here, we describe single base extension (SNaPshot) assay for detection of 11 common CFTR mutations: F508del, G542X, N1303K, 621+1G->T, G551D, R553X, R1162X, W1282X, R117H, 2184insA an...

  7. Distribution of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR Mutations in a Cohort of Patients Residing in Palestine.

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    Issa Siryani

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is an autosomal recessive inherited life-threatening disorder that causes severe damage to the lungs and the digestive system. In Palestine, mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator gene (CFTR that contributes to the clinical presentation of CF are ill defined. A cohort of thirty three clinically diagnosed CF patients from twenty one different Palestinian families residing in the central and southern part of Palestine were incorporated in this study. Sweat chloride testing was performed using the Sweat Chek Conductivity Analyzer (ELITECH Group, France to confirm the clinical diagnosis of CF. In addition, nucleic acid from the patients' blood samples was extracted and the CFTR mutation profiles were assessed by direct sequencing of the CFTR 27 exons and the intron-exon boundaries. For patient's DNA samples where no homozygous or two heterozygous CFTR mutations were identified by exon sequencing, DNA samples were tested for deletions or duplications using SALSA MLPA probemix P091-D1 CFTR assay. Sweat chloride testing confirmed the clinical diagnosis of CF in those patients. All patients had NaCl conductivity >60 mmol/l. In addition, nine different CFTR mutations were identified in all 21 different families evaluated. These mutations were c.1393-1G>A, F508del, W1282X, G85E, c.313delA, N1303K, deletion exons 17a-17b-18, deletion exons 17a-17b and Q1100P. c.1393-1G>A was shown to be the most frequent occurring mutation among tested families. We have profiled the underling mutations in the CFTR gene of a cohort of 21 different families affected by CF. Unlike other studies from the Arab countries where F508del was reported to be the most common mutation, in southern/central Palestine, the c.1393-1G>A appeared to be the most common. Further studies are needed per sample size and geographic distribution to account for other possible CFTR genetic alterations and their frequencies. Genotype

  8. Mutations in CFTR gene and clinical correlation in Argentine patients with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens Correlación de las características clínicas con mutaciones del gen CFTR en pacientes argentinos con ausencia bilateral congénita de vasos deferentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrella M Levy

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD is a form of male infertility in which mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene have been identified. Here we identify different mutations of CFTR and the poly-T variant of intron 8 (IVS8 in Argentine patients and analyze sweat test values and clinical characteristic related to Cystic Fibrosis (CF. For counseling purposes the two most frequent mutations in Argentine CF population: DF508 and G542X were screened in wives. In all cases, it was possible to reduce the risk of CF/CBAVD descendants in these couples because none of the mutation were found in the 36 samples. Eight patients (23% showed abnormal chloride values (> 60 mmol/l. A second group of 6 patients (18% had borderline values of sweat chloride (40-59 mmol/l. We defined another group with 6 patients (18%, with normal sweat chloride levels (30-39 mmo/l and a fourth group of 14 (41% patients with sweat chloride below 30 mmol/l. DF508, the most frequent CF mutation in the Argentine population, was found on 15 of the 72 chromosomes (21%, R117H mutation was detected on 2 of 62 chromosomes (3%. Only one R347P allele was found on 28 chromosomes analyzed (2%. On a sample of 27 patients, IVS8 analysis showed a frequency of 6/56 chromosomes (11% of 5T allele. Even though these findings present an improvement in the detection of mutations related to clinical correlations in Argentine CBAVD population, the search for other common and uncommon mutations should be continued.La ausencia bilateral congénita de vasos deferentes (CBAVD es una forma de infertilidad masculina en la que se han identificado mutaciones en el gen de la conductancia transmembrana de la fibrosis quística (CFTR. Hemos estudiado en pacientes argentinos diferentes mutaciones en el CFTR y la variante poli T del intron 8 (IVS8 y analizado los valores de test del sudor y las características clínicas relacionadas a la Fibrosis Qu

  9. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Methods: Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings. PMID:27488005

  10. Impact of heterozygote CFTR Mutations in COPD patients with Chronic Bronchitis

    OpenAIRE

    Raju, S. Vamsee; Tate, Jody H; Peacock, Sandra KG; Fang, Ping; Oster, Robert A.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Steven M Rowe

    2014-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking causes Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the 3rd leading cause of death in the U.S. CFTR ion transport dysfunction has been implicated in COPD pathogenesis, and is associated with chronic bronchitis. However, susceptibility to smoke induced lung injury is variable and the underlying genetic contributors remain unclear. We hypothesized that presence of CFTR mutation heterozygosity may alter susceptibility to cigarette smoke induced CFTR dysfunction. Con...

  11. Restoration of CFTR function in patients with cystic fibrosis carrying the F508del-CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, Daniela; Villella, Valeria R; Esposito, Speranza; Tosco, Antonella; Sepe, Angela; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Salvadori, Laura; Grassia, Rosa; Leone, Carlo A; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Maiuri, Maria C; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Guido, Stefano; Bossi, Anna; Zolin, Anna; Venerando, Andrea; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Mehta, Anil; Bona, Gianni; Kroemer, Guido; Maiuri, Luigi; Raia, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of BECN1/Beclin 1-dependent autophagy and depletion of SQSTM1/p62 by genetic manipulation or autophagy-stimulatory proteostasis regulators, such as cystamine, have positive effects on mouse models of human cystic fibrosis (CF). These measures rescue the functional expression of the most frequent pathogenic CFTR mutant, F508del, at the respiratory epithelial surface and reduce lung inflammation in Cftr(F508del) homozygous mice. Cysteamine, the reduced form of cystamine, is an FDA-approved drug. Here, we report that oral treatment with cysteamine greatly reduces the mortality rate and improves the phenotype of newborn mice bearing the F508del-CFTR mutation. Cysteamine was also able to increase the plasma membrane expression of the F508del-CFTR protein in nasal epithelial cells from F508del homozygous CF patients, and these effects persisted for 24 h after cysteamine withdrawal. Importantly, this cysteamine effect after washout was further sustained by the sequential administration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea flavonoid, both in vivo, in mice, and in vitro, in primary epithelial cells from CF patients. In a pilot clinical trial involving 10 F508del-CFTR homozygous CF patients, the combination of cysteamine and EGCG restored BECN1, reduced SQSTM1 levels and improved CFTR function from nasal epithelial cells in vivo, correlating with a decrease of chloride concentrations in sweat, as well as with a reduction of the abundance of TNF/TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor) and CXCL8 (chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 8) transcripts in nasal brushing and TNF and CXCL8 protein levels in the sputum. Altogether, these results suggest that optimal schedules of cysteamine plus EGCG might be used for the treatment of CF caused by the F508del-CFTR mutation.

  12. Detection of the mutation of all the exons of the CFTR gene in Chinese men with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens%中国先天性双侧输精管缺如患者CFTR基因全部外显子突变检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜强; 方媛媛; 潘永峰; 潘伯臣; 宋永胜; 吴斌

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨我国先天性双侧输精管缺如患者CFTR基因检测的必要性. 方法:采用PCR技术结合DNA直接测序的方法检测9例先天性双侧输精管缺如患者CFTR基因全部外显子的突变情况,并在NCBI和Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database在线比对. 结果:除非编码区突变和已经报道的SNP位点之外,9例先天性双侧输精管缺如患者中4例新发现4种不同于西方人已知突变类型的外显子区突变,均为杂合子错义突变. 结论:中国先天性双侧输精管缺如患者CFTR基因外显子区存在不同于西方人的突变,有必要对中国先天性双侧输精管缺如患者进行CFTR基因突变检测.%To assess the necessity of detecting the gene of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator factor ( CFTR) in Chinese men with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD). Methods : We detected the mutation of all the 27 exons of the CFTR gene in 9 patients with CBAVD by DNA sequencing, and compared the results using NCBI and Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database. Results: Four novel missense mutations / variants were found in the CFTR gene of the CBAVD patients, which were submitted and accepted in the Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database. Conclusion: There are mutations or variants in the CFTR gene in Chinese men with CBAVD, and the mutational distribution is different from that in Westerners.

  13. Relating the disease mutation spectrum to the evolution of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Rishishwar

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, and accordingly the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR protein has perhaps the best characterized disease mutation spectrum with more than 1,500 causative mutations having been identified. In this study, we took advantage of that wealth of mutational information in an effort to relate site-specific evolutionary parameters with the propensity and severity of CFTR disease-causing mutations. To do this, we devised a scoring scheme for known CFTR disease-causing mutations based on the Grantham amino acid chemical difference matrix. CFTR site-specific evolutionary constraint values were then computed for seven different evolutionary metrics across a range of increasing evolutionary depths. The CFTR mutational scores and the various site-specific evolutionary constraint values were compared in order to evaluate which evolutionary measures best reflect the disease-causing mutation spectrum. Site-specific evolutionary constraint values from the widely used comparative method PolyPhen2 show the best correlation with the CFTR mutation score spectrum, whereas more straightforward conservation based measures (ConSurf and ScoreCons show the greatest ability to predict individual CFTR disease-causing mutations. While far greater than could be expected by chance alone, the fraction of the variability in mutation scores explained by the PolyPhen2 metric (3.6%, along with the best set of paired sensitivity (58% and specificity (60% values for the prediction of disease-causing residues, were marginal. These data indicate that evolutionary constraint levels are informative but far from determinant with respect to disease-causing mutations in CFTR. Nevertheless, this work shows that, when combined with additional lines of evidence, information on site-specific evolutionary conservation can and should be used to guide site-directed mutagenesis experiments by more narrowly

  14. Relationships among CFTR expression, HCO3− secretion, and host defense may inform gene- and cell-based cystic fibrosis therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Viral S.; Ernst, Sarah; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Karp, Philip H.; Parker, Connor P.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. Airway disease is the major source of morbidity and mortality. Successful implementation of gene- and cell-based therapies for CF airway disease requires knowledge of relationships among percentages of targeted cells, levels of CFTR expression, correction of electrolyte transport, and rescue of host defense defects. Previous studies suggested that, when ∼10–50% of airway epithelial cells expressed CFTR, they generated nearly wild-type levels of Cl− secretion; overexpressing CFTR offered no advantage compared with endogenous expression levels. However, recent discoveries focused attention on CFTR-mediated HCO3− secretion and airway surface liquid (ASL) pH as critical for host defense and CF pathogenesis. Therefore, we generated porcine airway epithelia with varying ratios of CF and wild-type cells. Epithelia with a 50:50 mix secreted HCO3− at half the rate of wild-type epithelia. Likewise, heterozygous epithelia (CFTR+/− or CFTR+/∆F508) expressed CFTR and secreted HCO3− at ∼50% of wild-type values. ASL pH, antimicrobial activity, and viscosity showed similar relationships to the amount of CFTR. Overexpressing CFTR increased HCO3− secretion to rates greater than wild type, but ASL pH did not exceed wild-type values. Thus, in contrast to Cl− secretion, the amount of CFTR is rate-limiting for HCO3− secretion and for correcting host defense abnormalities. In addition, overexpressing CFTR might produce a greater benefit than expressing CFTR at wild-type levels when targeting small fractions of cells. These findings may also explain the risk of airway disease in CF carriers. PMID:27114540

  15. The Novel CFTR Mutation A457P in a Male with a Delayed Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate H. Cole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is an autosomal recessive disease that may be caused by more than 1000 different mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. We describe the case of a CF patient who was initially diagnosed at 16 years of age after presenting with mild respiratory compromise and pancreatic sufficiency. When genetic testing was first performed using a CF mutation panel, only a single F508del CFTR allele was identified. We subsequently performed testing, which revealed a previously unreported mutation: A457P (p.Ala457Pro, c.1369G>C. The patient's clinical course through adulthood is described, and genotype-phenotype correlation is discussed. The A457P mutation appears to confer a relatively mild phenotype, as is usually observed with CFTR class IV–VI defects. With the advent of more comprehensive and widely available genetic testing techniques, identification of CF genotypes in patients with milder disease variants may help stratify patients for targeted therapy and prevent late complications of the disease.

  16. 先天性单侧输精管缺如患者CFTR基因突变研究%Study of CFTR gene mutation in Chinese CUAVD patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾国华; 梅骅; 庄广伦; 李满

    2000-01-01

    目的 探讨囊性纤维跨膜转运调节物(cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR)基因在中国人先天性单侧输精管缺如(congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens, CUAVD)患者中的突变频率及热点.方法 应用聚合酶链反应-单链构象多态(PCR-SSCP)、银染技术及PCR产物直接序列测定的方法检测了15例CUAVD患者CFTR基因第2,3,4,5,6a,8,10,11,12,13,15A,17b,19A,20,21,23外显子区域上的突变情况.结果 1例存在PCR-SSCP电泳带异常,经测序确认了CFTR突变的性质.它位于17b号外显子区域,其第3295个核苷酸由C颠换成A(3295C→A),形成了Leu1055Ile的错义突变.结论 中国人CUAVD患者存在着CFTR突变,Leu1055Ile错义突变可能为1个新的CFTR基因突变.

  17. Reduced expression of Tis7/IFRD1 protein in murine and human cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell models homozygous for the F508del-CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Elise; Marie, Solenne; Riffault, Laure; Bonora, Monique; Tabary, Olivier; Clement, Annick; Jacquot, Jacky

    2011-08-01

    12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate-induced sequence 7/interferon related development regulator 1 (Tis7/IFRD1) has been recently identified as a modifier gene in lung inflammatory disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), based upon its capacity to regulate inflammatory activities in neutrophils. In CF patients, the F508del mutation in the Cftr gene encoding a chloride channel, the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells results in an exaggerated inflammatory response of these cells. At present, it is unknown whether the Tis7/IFRD1 gene product is expressed in airway epithelial cells. We therefore investigated the possibility there is an intrinsic alteration in Tis7/IFRD1 protein level in cells lacking CFTR function in tracheal homogenates of F508del-CFTR mice and in a F508del-CFTR human bronchial epithelial cell line (CFBE41o(-) cells). When Tis7/IFRD1 protein was detectable, trachea from F508del-CFTR mice showed a reduction in the level of Tis7/IFRD1 protein compared to wild-type control littermates. A significant reduction of IFRD1 protein level was found in CFBE41o(-) cells compared to normal bronchial epithelial cells 16HBE14o(-). Surprisingly, messenger RNA level of IFRD1 in CFBE41o(-) cells was found elevated. Treating CFBE41o(-) cells with the antioxidant glutathione rescued the IFRD1 protein level closer to control level and also reduced the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 release. This work provides evidence for the first time of reduced level of IFRD1 protein in murine and human F508del-CFTR airway epithelial cell models, possibly mediated in response to oxidative stress which might contribute to the exaggerated inflammatory airway response observed in CF patients homozygous for the F508del mutation.

  18. From CFTR biology toward combinatorial pharmacotherapy: expanded classification of cystic fibrosis mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Gudio; Avramescu, Radu G; Chiang, Annette N; Houck, Scott A; Cai, Zhiwei; Peters, Kathryn W; Hong, Jeong S; Pollard, Harvey B; Guggino, William B; Balch, William E; Skach, William R; Cutting, Garry R; Frizzell, Raymond A; Sheppard, David N; Cyr, Douglas M; Sorscher, Eric J; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2016-02-01

    More than 2000 mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been described that confer a range of molecular cell biological and functional phenotypes. Most of these mutations lead to compromised anion conductance at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia and cause cystic fibrosis (CF) with variable disease severity. Based on the molecular phenotypic complexity of CFTR mutants and their susceptibility to pharmacotherapy, it has been recognized that mutations may impose combinatorial defects in CFTR channel biology. This notion led to the conclusion that the combination of pharmacotherapies addressing single defects (e.g., transcription, translation, folding, and/or gating) may show improved clinical benefit over available low-efficacy monotherapies. Indeed, recent phase 3 clinical trials combining ivacaftor (a gating potentiator) and lumacaftor (a folding corrector) have proven efficacious in CF patients harboring the most common mutation (deletion of residue F508, ΔF508, or Phe508del). This drug combination was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for patients homozygous for ΔF508. Emerging studies of the structural, cell biological, and functional defects caused by rare mutations provide a new framework that reveals a mixture of deficiencies in different CFTR alleles. Establishment of a set of combinatorial categories of the previously defined basic defects in CF alleles will aid the design of even more efficacious therapeutic interventions for CF patients.

  19. Partial correction of the CFTR-dependent ABPA mouse model with recombinant adeno-associated virus gene transfer of truncated CFTR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian; Torrez, Daniel; Braag, Sofia; Martino, Ashley; Clarke, Tracy; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Flotte, Terence R

    2008-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a model of airway inflammation in a CFTR knockout mouse utilizing Aspergillus fumigatus crude protein extract (Af-cpe) to mimic allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) 1, an unusual IgE-mediated hypersensitivity syndrome seen in up to 15% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and rarely elsewhere. We hypothesized that replacement of CFTR via targeted gene delivery to airway epithelium would correct aberrant epithelial cytokine signaling and ameliorate the ABPA phenotype in CFTR-deficient (CFTR 489X - /-, FABP-hCFTR + / +) mice. CFTR knockout mice underwent intra-tracheal (IT) delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (rAAV5Delta-264CFTR) or rAAV5-GFP at 2.58 x 10(12) viral genomes/mouse. All mice were then sensitized with two serial injections (200 microg) of crude Af antigen via the intra-peritoneal (IP) route. Untreated mice were sensitized without virus exposure. Challenges were performed 2 weeks after final sensitization, using a 0.25% solution containing Aspergillus fumigatus crude protein extract delivered by inhalation on three consecutive days. The rAAV5Delta-264CFTR-treated mice had lower total serum IgE levels (172513 ng/ml +/- 1312) than rAAV5-GFP controls (26 892 ng/ml +/- 3715) (p = 0.037) and non-treated, sensitized controls (24 816 +/- 4219 ng/ml). Serum IgG1 levels also were lower in mice receiving the CFTR vector. Interestingly, splenocytes from rAAV5Delta-264CFTR-treated mice secreted less IL-13, INFg, TNFa, RANTES and GM-CSF after ConA stimulation. Gene therapy with rAAV5Delta-264CFTR attenuated the hyper-IgE response in this reproducible CF mouse model of ABPA, with systemic effects also evident in the cytokine response of stimulated splenocytes. PMID:18023072

  20. 先天性双侧输精管缺如患者囊性纤维化跨膜传导调节因子基因的检测%CFTR gene mutation in patients with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢少明; 王来诚; 张浩波; 李晓; 刘蛟龙; 崔延义; 陈子江

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the frequency of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator(CFTR)mutations in patients with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens(CBAVD).Methods Eighty-five CBAVD patients were collected from May 2007 to May 2009.The diagnosis of CBAVD included azoospermia,normal of 4 sex hormone items,absence of seminal vesicle,normal volume of testicular and epididymis dilated siltation.And 85 normal fertile men served as controls.Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood.The mutations of CFTR exons 10,11 were detected by PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism,and direct sequencing was performed on 85 cases of CBAVD and the control males.Results Of the 85 CBAVD,10 cases(11.8%)exhibited an abnormal CFTR gene mutation,with 4 cases I556V,2 cases M469V,and 1 case of E527N,A F508,L558S,S485C.No mutations were detected in 85 controls.There was a significant difference between the 2 groups(x2 =8.606,P =0.003).Conclusions CBAVD might be caused by the CFTR mutations.The frequencies and the spectrum of CFTR mutations might be different from those Caucasian population in the west country.%目的 探讨先天性双侧输精管缺如(CBAVD)患者与囊性纤维化跨膜传导调节因子(CFTR)基因突变的关系. 方法 收集2007年5月至2009年5月85例CBAVD患者.CBAVD诊断依据:无精子;性激素4项正常;双侧输精管未触及;双睾丸体积正常,附睾饱满淤积.另设健康已生育男性85例作为对照.抽取外周血,应用聚合酶链反应-单链构象多态及PCR产物直接序列测定法检测患者及对照组CFTR基因第10,11外显子,比较两组的突变情况. 结果 CBAVD组85例,CFTR基因突变10例,占11.8%,分别是I556V突变4例,M469V突变2例,E527N、△F508、L558S、S485C各1例.对照组85例均未见突变.两组间比较差异有统计学意义(x2=8.606,P=0.003).结论 CBAVD主要由CFTR基因突变引起,CFTR基因突变的位点与频率与西方白种人有所不同.

  1. The Delta F508 mutation shortens the biochemical half-life of plasma membrane CFTR in polarized epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heda, G D; Tanwani, M; Marino, C R

    2001-01-01

    Although the biosynthetic arrest of the DeltaF508 mutant of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be partially reversed by physical and chemical means, recent evidence suggests that the functional stability of the mutant protein after reaching the cell surface is compromised. To understand the molecular basis for this observation, the current study directly measured the half-life of Delta F508 and wild-type CFTR at the cell surface of transfected LLC-PK(1) cells. Plasma membrane CFTR expression over time was characterized biochemically and functionally in these polarized epithelial cells. Surface biotinylation, streptavidin extraction, and quantitative immunoblot analysis determined the biochemical half-life of plasma membrane DeltaF508 CFTR to be approximately 4 h, whereas the plasma membrane half-life of wild-type CFTR exceeded 48 h. This difference in biochemical stability correlated with CFTR-mediated transport function. These findings indicate that the Delta F508 mutation decreases the biochemical stability of CFTR at the cell surface. We conclude that the Delta F508 mutation triggers more rapid internalization of CFTR and/or its preferential sorting to a pathway of rapid degradation. PMID:11121388

  2. Lumacaftor alone and combined with ivacaftor: preclinical and clinical trial experience of F508del CFTR correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewington, John J; McPhail, Gary L; Clancy, John P

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR), leading to significant morbidity and mortality. CFTR is a chloride and bicarbonate channel at the epithelial cell membrane. The most common CFTR mutation is F508del, resulting in minimal CFTR at the plasma membrane. Current disease management is supportive, whereas an ultimate goal is to develop therapies to restore CFTR activity. We summarize experience with lumacaftor, a small molecule that increases F508del-CFTR levels at the plasma membrane. Lumacaftor in combination with ivacaftor, a modulator of CFTR gating defects, improves clinical outcome measures in patients homozygous for the F508del mutation. Lumacaftor represents a significant advancement in the treatment of biochemical abnormalities in CF. Further development of CFTR modulators will improve upon current therapies, although it remains unclear whether this approach will provide therapies for all CFTR mutations. PMID:26581802

  3. Analysis of the CFTR gene in Venezuelan cystic fibrosis patients, identification of six novel cystic fibrosis-causing genetic variants

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez K; de Mendonca E; Matute X; Chaustre I; Villalón M; Takiff H

    2016-01-01

    Karen Sánchez,1 Elizabeth de Mendonca,1 Xiorama Matute,2 Ismenia Chaustre,2 Marlene Villalón,3 Howard Takiff4 1Unit of Genetic and Forensic Studies, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), 2Hospital JM de los Ríos, 3Hospital José Ignacio Baldo, Algodonal, National Reference Unit, 4Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), Caracas, Venezuela. Abstract: The mutations in the CFTR gene found in patients with cy...

  4. Analysis of the CFTR gene in Venezuelan cystic fibrosis patients, identification of six novel cystic fibrosis-causing genetic variants

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Karen Sánchez,1 Elizabeth de Mendonca,1 Xiorama Matute,2 Ismenia Chaustre,2 Marlene Villalón,3 Howard Takiff4 1Unit of Genetic and Forensic Studies, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), 2Hospital JM de los Ríos, 3Hospital José Ignacio Baldo, Algodonal, National Reference Unit, 4Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), Caracas, Venezuela. Abstract: The mutations in the CFTR gene found in ...

  5. Proteomic identification of calumenin as a G551D-CFTR associated protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Teng

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disease in the Caucasian population. It is due to mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. To date, over 1910 mutations have been identified in the CFTR gene. Among these mutations, the CF-causing missense mutation G551D-CFTR (approx. 5% of cases encodes for a CFTR chloride channel with normal expression on the cell surface. Nevertheless, it is associated with severe disease due to its altered channel activation. The aim of the present study was to identify specific interacting proteins of G551D-CFTR. Co-immunoprecipitated proteins with G551D-CFTR were resolved by 2D-gel electrophoresis (2-DE. Mass Spectrometry revealed that calumenin was present in the protein complex linked to G551D-CFTR. Despite its basal expression was not modified in G551D-CFTR expressing cells when compared to Wt-CFTR expressing cells, it was more abundant in the G551D-CFTR complex detected by immunoprecipitation. The calumenin-CFTR interaction was also shown by Surface Plasmon Resonance and further confirmed by computational analysis of the predicted calumenin's partners. Because in our cellular model calumenin was found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER by immunofluorescence experiments, we suggest that calumenin is likely involved in the mutated CFTR's maturation. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that calumenin binds to CFTR and that it is increased in the G551D-CFTR complex. We suggest that it may be involved in the physiopathology of G551D-CFTR and that G551D-CFTR may follow a specific maturation and trafficking pathway. We also hypothesize that UPR may be triggered independently of the retention of G551D-CFTR in the ER because Grp78/Bip expression is increased in the cells. Finally, we propose here that Calumenin is a new CFTR chaperone.

  6. Proteomic identification of calumenin as a G551D-CFTR associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ling; Kerbiriou, Mathieu; Taiya, Mehdi; Le Hir, Sophie; Mignen, Olivier; Benz, Nathalie; Trouvé, Pascal; Férec, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disease in the Caucasian population. It is due to mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. To date, over 1910 mutations have been identified in the CFTR gene. Among these mutations, the CF-causing missense mutation G551D-CFTR (approx. 5% of cases) encodes for a CFTR chloride channel with normal expression on the cell surface. Nevertheless, it is associated with severe disease due to its altered channel activation. The aim of the present study was to identify specific interacting proteins of G551D-CFTR. Co-immunoprecipitated proteins with G551D-CFTR were resolved by 2D-gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass Spectrometry revealed that calumenin was present in the protein complex linked to G551D-CFTR. Despite its basal expression was not modified in G551D-CFTR expressing cells when compared to Wt-CFTR expressing cells, it was more abundant in the G551D-CFTR complex detected by immunoprecipitation. The calumenin-CFTR interaction was also shown by Surface Plasmon Resonance and further confirmed by computational analysis of the predicted calumenin's partners. Because in our cellular model calumenin was found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by immunofluorescence experiments, we suggest that calumenin is likely involved in the mutated CFTR's maturation. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that calumenin binds to CFTR and that it is increased in the G551D-CFTR complex. We suggest that it may be involved in the physiopathology of G551D-CFTR and that G551D-CFTR may follow a specific maturation and trafficking pathway. We also hypothesize that UPR may be triggered independently of the retention of G551D-CFTR in the ER because Grp78/Bip expression is increased in the cells. Finally, we propose here that Calumenin is a new CFTR chaperone.

  7. Evaluation of potential regulatory elements identified as DNase I hypersensitive sites in the CFTR gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phylactides, M.; Rowntree, R.; Nuthall, H.;

    2002-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene shows a complex pattern of expression, with temporal and spatial regulation that is not accounted for by elements in the promoter. One approach to identifying the regulatory elements for CFTR is the mapping of DNase I...... hypersensitive sites (DHS) within the locus. We previously identified at least 12 clusters of DHS across the CFTR gene and here further evaluate DHS in introns 2,3,10,16,17a, 18, 20 and 21 to assess their functional importance in regulation of CFTR gene expression. Transient transfections of enhancer....../reporter constructs containing the DHS regions showed that those in introns 20 and 21 augmented the activity of the CFTR promoter. Structural analysis of the DNA sequence at the DHS suggested that only the one intron 21 might be caused by inherent DNA structures. Cell specificity of the DHS suggested a role for the...

  8. G551D-CFTR needs more bound actin than wild-type CFTR to maintain its presence in plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouvé, Pascal; Kerbiriou, Mathieu; Teng, Ling; Benz, Nathalie; Taiya, Mehdi; Le Hir, Sophie; Férec, Claude

    2015-08-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is due to mutations in the CFTR gene. The missense mutation G551D (approx. 5% of cases) encodes a CFTR chloride channel with normal cell surface expression but with an altered chloride channel activity, leading to a severe phenotype. Our aim was to identify specific interacting proteins of G551D-CFTR which could explain the channel defect. Wild-type CFTR (Wt-CFTR) was co-immunoprecipitated from stably transfected HeLa cells and resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis. Among the detected spots, one was expressed at a high level. Mass Spectrometry revealed that it corresponded to actin which is known to be involved in the CFTR's channel function. To assess whether actin could be involved in the altered G551D-CFTR function, its basal expression was studied. Because actin expression was the same in wt- and in G551D-CFTR expressing cells, its interaction with both wt- and G551D-CFTR was studied by co-immunoprecipitation, and we found that a higher amount of actin was bound onto G551D-CFTR than onto Wt-CFTR. The role of actin upon wt- and G551D-CFTR function was further studied by patch-clamp experiments after cytochalasin D treatment of the cells. We found a decrease of the very weak currents in G551D-CFTR expressing cells. Because a higher amount of actin is bound onto G551D-CFTR than onto Wt-CFTR, it is likely to be not involved in the mutated CFTR's defect. Nevertheless, because actin is necessary to maintain the very weak global currents observed in G551D-CFTR expressing HeLa cells, we conclude that more actin is necessary to maintain G551D-CFTR in the plasma membrane than for Wt-CFTR.

  9. Optimizing nasal potential difference analysis for CFTR modulator development: assessment of ivacaftor in CF subjects with the G551D-CFTR mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Rowe

    Full Text Available Nasal potential difference (NPD is used as a biomarker of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC activity. We evaluated methods to detect changes in chloride and sodium transport by NPD based on a secondary analysis of a Phase II CFTR-modulator study. Thirty-nine subjects with CF who also had the G551D-CFTR mutation were randomized to receive ivacaftor (Kalydeco™; also known as VX-770 in four doses or placebo twice daily for at least 14 days. All data were analyzed by a single investigator who was blinded to treatment assignment. We compared three analysis methods to determine the best approach to quantify changes in chloride and sodium transport: (1 the average of both nostrils; (2 the most-polarized nostril at each visit; and (3 the most-polarized nostril at screening carried forward. Parameters of ion transport included the PD change with zero chloride plus isoproterenol (CFTR activity, the basal PD, Ringer's PD, and change in PD with amiloride (measurements of ENaC activity, and the delta NPD (measuring CFTR and ENaC activity. The average and most-polarized nostril at each visit were most sensitive to changes in chloride and sodium transport, whereas the most-polarized nostril at screening carried forward was less discriminatory. Based on our findings, NPD studies should assess both nostrils rather than a single nostril. We also found that changes in CFTR activity were more readily detected than changes in ENaC activity, and that rigorous standardization was associated with relatively good within-subject reproducibility in placebo-treated subjects (± 2.8 mV. Therefore, we have confirmed an assay of reasonable reproducibility for detecting chloride-transport improvements in response to CFTR modulation.

  10. Personalized medicine in cystic fibrosis: genistein supplementation as a treatment option for patients with a rare S1045Y-CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Kavisha; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Zhang, Weiqiang; Moon, ChangSuk; Bouquet, Erin; Srinivasan, Saumini; Li, Chunying; Stokes, Dennis C; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease caused by the mutations that generate nonfunctional CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. A rare serine-to-tyrosine (S1045Y) CFTR mutation was earlier reported to result in CF-associated fatality. We identified an African-American patient with the S1045Y mutation in CFTR, as well as a stop-codon mutation, who has a mild CF phenotype. The underlying mechanism of CF caused by S1045Y-CFTR has not been elucidated. In this study, we determined that S1045Y-CFTR exhibits twofold attenuated function compared with wild-type (WT)-CFTR. We report that serine-to-tyrosine mutation leads to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of S1045Y-CFTR, followed by recruitment and binding of E3-ubiquitin ligase c-cbl, resulting in enhanced ubiquitination and passage of S1045Y-CFTR in the endosome/lysosome degradative compartments. We demonstrate that inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation partially rescues S1045Y-CFTR surface expression and function. Based on our findings, it could be suggested that consuming genistein (a tyrosine phosphorylation inhibitor) would likely ameliorate CF symptoms in individuals with S1045Y-CFTR, providing a unique personalized therapy for this rare CF mutation. PMID:27261451

  11. Function and regulation of TRPM7, as well as intracellular magnesium content, are altered in cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR and G551D-CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, F; Calvez, M L; Benz, N; Le Hir, S; Mignen, O; Buscaglia, P; Horgen, F D; Férec, C; Kerbiriou, M; Trouvé, P

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common fatal hereditary disorders, is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The CFTR gene product is a multidomain adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) protein that functions as a chloride (Cl(-)) channel that is regulated by intracellular magnesium [Mg(2+)]i. The most common mutations in CFTR are a deletion of a phenylalanine residue at position 508 (ΔF508-CFTR, 70-80 % of CF phenotypes) and a Gly551Asp substitution (G551D-CFTR, 4-5 % of alleles), which lead to decreased or almost abolished Cl(-) channel function, respectively. Magnesium ions have to be finely regulated within cells for optimal expression and function of CFTR. Therefore, the melastatin-like transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7), which is responsible for Mg(2+) entry, was studies and [Mg(2+)]i measured in cells stably expressing wildtype CFTR, and two mutant proteins (ΔF508-CFTR and G551D-CFTR). This study shows for the first time that [Mg(2+)]i is decreased in cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR and G551D-CFTR mutated proteins. It was also observed that the expression of the TRPM7 protein is increased; however, membrane localization was altered for both ΔF508del-CFTR and G551D-CFTR. Furthermore, both the function and regulation of the TRPM7 channel regarding Mg(2+) is decreased in the cells expressing the mutated CFTR. Ca(2+) influx via TRPM7 were also modified in cells expressing a mutated CFTR. Therefore, there appears to be a direct involvement of TRPM7 in CF physiopathology. Finally, we propose that the TRPM7 activator Naltriben is a new potentiator for G551D-CFTR as the function of this mutant increases upon activation of TRPM7 by Naltriben.

  12. Acute Pancreatitis in Association with Campylobacter jejuni- Associated Diarrhea in a 15-Year-Old with CFTR Mutations: Is There a Link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Kandula

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Context: Acute pancreatitis has occasionally been reported in association with Campylobacter jejuni infection in humans. However, the mechanism linking Campylobacter jejuni infection and pancreatitis isunclear. Acute pancreatitis in association with an infectious illness may be related to underlying genetic mutations. For instance, studies show that mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene increase the susceptibility for acute and chronic pancreatitis. Case report :We describe a patient with Campylobacter jejuni infection who developed acute pancreatitis in the setting of an underlying cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutation. Discussion :In this patient with an underlying mutation in the CFTR gene, we propose that the interaction between the mutant gene and an environmental factor, Campylobacter jejuni infection, resulted in pancreatitis.

  13. Heterogeneity of phenotype in two cystic fibrosis patients homozygous for the CFTR exon 11 mutation G551D.

    OpenAIRE

    Parad, R B

    1996-01-01

    In the heterozygous state, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exon 11 mutation G551D has been described as "severe," causing pancreatic insufficiency. Two cystic fibrosis (CF) patients homozygous for this mutation showed a mild rather than severe pancreatic phenotype and a variable pulmonary phenotype.

  14. Adeno-associated virus–targeted disruption of the CFTR gene in cloned ferrets

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xingshen; Yan, Ziying; Yi, Yaling; Li, Ziyi; Lei, Diana; Rogers, Christopher S.; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Yulong; Welsh, Michael J.; Leno, Gregory H.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Somatic cell gene targeting combined with nuclear transfer cloning presents tremendous potential for the creation of new, large-animal models of human diseases. Mouse disease models often fail to reproduce human phenotypes, underscoring the need for the generation and study of alternative disease models. Mice deficient for CFTR have been poor models for cystic fibrosis (CF), lacking many aspects of human CF lung disease. In this study, we describe the production of a CFTR gene–deficient model...

  15. Multi-physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T CFTR mutation revealed by clinical and cellular investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Raed; El-Seedy, Ayman; El-Moussaoui, Kamal; Pasquet, Marie-Claude; Adolphe, Catherine; Bieth, Eric; Languepin, Jeanne; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Kitzis, Alain; Ladevèze, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    This study combines a clinical approach and multiple level cellular analyses to determine the physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T (p.Lys464Asn) CFTR exon 10 mutation, detected in a CF patient with a frameshift deletion in trans and a TG(11)T(5) in cis. Minigene experiment, with different TG(m)T(n) alleles, and nasal cell mRNA extracts were used to study the impact of c.1392G>T on splicing in both in cellulo and in vivo studies. The processing and localization of p.Lys464Asn protein were evaluated, in cellulo, by western blotting analyses and confocal microscopy. Clinical and channel exploration tests were performed on the patient to determine the exact CF phenotype profile and the CFTR chloride transport activity. c.1392G>T affects exon 10 splicing by inducing its complete deletion and encoding a frameshift transcript. The polymorphism TG(11)T(5) aggravates the effects of this mutation on aberrant splicing. Analysis of mRNA obtained from parental airway epithelial cells confirmed these in cellulo results. At the protein level the p.Lys464Asn protein showed neither maturated form nor membrane localization. Furthermore, the in vivo channel tests confirmed the absence of CFTR activity. Thus, the c.1392G>T mutation alone or in association with the TG repeats and the poly T tract revealed obvious impacts on splicing and CFTR protein processing and functionality. The c.[T(5); 1392G>T] complex allele contributes to the CF phenotype by affecting splicing and inducing a severe misprocessing defect. These results demonstrate that the classical CFTR mutations classification is not sufficient: in vivo and in cellulo studies of a possible complex allele in a patient are required to provide correct CFTR mutation classification, adequate medical counseling, and adapted therapeutic strategies.

  16. Plasma membrane CFTR regulates RANTES expression via its C-terminal PDZ-interacting motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estell, Kim; Braunstein, Gavin; Tucker, Torry; Varga, Karoly; Collawn, James F; Schwiebert, Lisa M

    2003-01-01

    Despite the identification of 1,000 mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene product CFTR, there remains discordance between CFTR genotype and lung disease phenotype. The study of CFTR, therefore, has expanded beyond its chloride channel activity into other possible functions, such as its role as a regulator of gene expression. Findings indicate that CFTR plays a role in the expression of RANTES in airway epithelia. RANTES is a chemokine that has been implicated in the regulation of mucosal immunity and the pathogenesis of airway inflammatory diseases. Results demonstrate that CFTR triggers RANTES expression via a mechanism that is independent of CFTR's chloride channel activity. Neither pharmacological inhibition of CFTR nor activation of alternative chloride channels, including hClC-2, modulated RANTES expression. Through the use of CFTR disease-associated and truncation mutants, experiments suggest that CFTR-mediated transcription factor activation and RANTES expression require (i) insertion of CFTR into the plasma membrane and (ii) an intact CFTR C-terminal PDZ-interacting domain. Expression of constructs encoding wild-type or dominant-negative forms of the PDZ-binding protein EBP50 suggests that EBP50 may be involved in CFTR-dependent RANTES expression. Together, these data suggest that CFTR modulates gene expression in airway epithelial cells while located in a macromolecular signaling complex at the plasma membrane. PMID:12509457

  17. Lack of association between UGT1A7, UGT1A9, ARP, SPINK1 and CFTR gene polymorphisms and pancreatic cancer in Italian patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ada Piepoli; Annamaria Gentile; Maria Rosa Valvano; Daniela Barana; Cristina Oliani; Rosa Cotugno; Michele Quitadamo; Angelo Andriulli; Francesco Perri

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate simultaneously UGT1A7, UGT1A9,ARP, SPINK and CFTR genes to verify whether genetic polymorphisms predispose to the development of pancreatic cancer (PC).METHODS: Genomic DNA of 61 pancreatic cancer patients and 105 healthy controls (HC) were analyzed.UGT1,47 genotyping was determined by PCR-RFLP analysis. Specific PCR and sequencing were used to analyze genetic variants of UGT1A9, ARP, SPINK1 and CFTR genes.RESULTS: Four different alleles (*1: WT;*2: N129Kand R131K;*3: N129K, R131K, and W208R;and *4:W208R) in UGT1A7 and three different alleles (*1: WT;*4: Y242X;and *5: D256N) in UGT1A9 were detected.All UGT1A polymorphisms were observed at similar frequency in PC patients and HC. Seven different alleles in ARP were found in PC patients and HC at similar frequency. The SPINK1 mutations N34S and P55Soccurred in five PC patients with a prevalence (4.1%) not significantly different from that observed (2.0%) in HC.The only CFTR ΔF508 mutation was recognized in three PC patients with a prevalence (4.9%) similar to HC.CONCLUSION: UGT1A7, UGT1A9, ARP, SPINK1 and CFTR gene polymorphisms are not associated with PC in Italian patients.

  18. Cystic fibrosis gene mutations: evaluation and assessment of disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallières E

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Emilie Vallières, Joseph Stuart ElbornCystic Fibrosis and Airways Microbiology Research Group, Queens University Belfast, Belfast, UKAbstract: The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene encodes an ion channel transporter, the CFTR protein. Since its identification in 1989, more than 1,900 sequence variants have been reported, resulting in a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Cystic fibrosis (CF is associated with many CFTR mutants and there is a continuum of disease severity observed. Recent advances in fundamental research have increased our understanding of the consequent molecular defect arising from CF mutations. This knowledge has resulted in the development of CF-specific therapies, targeting either the genetic or the molecular defect. CF care, previously focused on symptom control, is therefore moving toward a "stratified" or "precision" therapeutic approach. This review outlines normal CFTR physiology, the proposed pathologic mechanism underlying CF associated-lung injury, classification of CF mutations, and the CF-specific therapies recently approved or in clinical trials.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, gene mutations, disease severity, evaluation, assessment

  19. CFTR: A New Horizon in the Pathomechanism and Treatment of Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis, and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking, or bile acids, strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:26856995

  20. A novel treatment of cystic fibrosis acting on-target: cysteamine plus epigallocatechin gallate for the autophagy-dependent rescue of class II-mutated CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, A; De Gregorio, F; Esposito, S; De Stefano, D; Sana, I; Ferrari, E; Sepe, A; Salvadori, L; Buonpensiero, P; Di Pasqua, A; Grassia, R; Leone, C A; Guido, S; De Rosa, G; Lusa, S; Bona, G; Stoll, G; Maiuri, M C; Mehta, A; Kroemer, G; Maiuri, L; Raia, V

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that the combination of two safe proteostasis regulators, cysteamine and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), can be used to improve deficient expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in patients homozygous for the CFTR Phe508del mutation. Here we provide the proof-of-concept that this combination treatment restored CFTR function and reduced lung inflammation (Ptreatment in vitro. We assessed individual responses to cysteamine plus EGCG in a single-centre, open-label phase-2 trial. The combination treatment decreased sweat chloride from baseline, increased both CFTR protein and function in nasal cells, restored autophagy in such cells, decreased CXCL8 and TNF-α in the sputum, and tended to improve respiratory function. These positive effects were particularly strong in patients carrying Phe508del CFTR mutations in homozygosity or heterozygosity. However, a fraction of patients bearing other CFTR mutations failed to respond to therapy. Importantly, the same patients whose primary nasal brushed cells did not respond to cysteamine plus EGCG in vitro also exhibited deficient therapeutic responses in vivo. Altogether, these results suggest that the combination treatment of cysteamine plus EGCG acts 'on-target' because it can only rescue CFTR function when autophagy is functional (in mice) and improves CFTR function when a rescuable protein is expressed (in mice and men). These results should spur the further clinical development of the combination treatment. PMID:27035618

  1. The ΔF508-CFTR mutation inhibits wild-type CFTR processing and function when co-expressed in human airway epithelia and in mouse nasal mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucker Torry A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rescue or correction of CFTR function in native epithelia is the ultimate goal of CF therapeutics development. Wild-type (WT CFTR introduction and replacement is also of particular interest. Such therapies may be complicated by possible CFTR self-assembly into an oligomer or multimer. Results Surprisingly, functional CFTR assays in native airway epithelia showed that the most common CFTR mutant, ΔF508-CFTR (ΔF-CFTR, inhibits WT-CFTR when both forms are co-expressed. To examine more mechanistically, both forms of CFTR were transfected transiently in varying amounts into IB3-1 CF human airway epithelial cells and HEK-293 human embryonic kidney cells null for endogenous CFTR protein expression. Increasing amounts of ΔF-CFTR inhibited WT-CFTR protein processing and function in CF human airway epithelial cells but not in heterologous HEK-293 cells. Stably expressed ΔF-CFTR in clones of the non-CF human airway epithelial cell line, CALU-3, also showed reduction in cAMP-stimulated anion secretion and in WT-CFTR processing. An ultimate test of this dominant negative-like effect of ΔF-CFTR on WT-CFTR was the parallel study of two different CF mouse models: the ΔF-CFTR mouse and the bitransgenic CFTR mouse corrected in the gut but null in the lung and airways. WT/ΔF heterozygotes had an intermediate phenotype with regard to CFTR agonist responses in in vivo nasal potential difference (NPD recordings and in Ussing chamber recordings of short-circuit current (ISC in vitro on primary tracheal epithelial cells isolated from the same mice. In contrast, CFTR bitransgenic +/− heterozygotes had no difference in their responses versus +/+ wild-type mice. Conclusions Taken altogether, these data suggest that ΔF-CFTR and WT-CFTR co-assemble into an oligomeric macromolecular complex in native epithelia and share protein processing machinery and regulation at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. As a consequence, ΔF-CFTR slows WT-CFTR

  2. Acute administration of ivacaftor to people with cystic fibrosis and a G551D-CFTR mutation reveals smooth muscle abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Ryan J.; Hisert, Katherine B.; Dodd, Jonathan D.; Grogan, Brenda; Launspach, Janice L.; Barnes, Janel K.; Gallagher, Charles G.; Sieren, Jered P.; Gross, Thomas J.; Fischer, Anthony J.; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Welsh, Michael J.; McKone, Edward F.; Stoltz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Airflow obstruction is common in cystic fibrosis (CF), yet the underlying pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. People with CF often exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness, CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is present in airway smooth muscle (ASM), and ASM from newborn CF pigs has increased contractile tone, suggesting that loss of CFTR causes a primary defect in ASM function. We hypothesized that restoring CFTR activity would decrease smooth muscle tone in people with CF. METHODS. To increase or potentiate CFTR function, we administered ivacaftor to 12 adults with CF with the G551D-CFTR mutation; ivacaftor stimulates G551D-CFTR function. We studied people before and immediately after initiation of ivacaftor (48 hours) to minimize secondary consequences of CFTR restoration. We tested smooth muscle function by investigating spirometry, airway distensibility, and vascular tone. RESULTS. Ivacaftor rapidly restored CFTR function, indicated by reduced sweat chloride concentration. Airflow obstruction and air trapping also improved. Airway distensibility increased in airways less than 4.5 mm but not in larger-sized airways. To assess smooth muscle function in a tissue outside the lung, we measured vascular pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index, which both decreased following CFTR potentiation. Finally, change in distensibility of <4.5-mm airways correlated with changes in PWV. CONCLUSIONS. Acute CFTR potentiation provided a unique opportunity to investigate CFTR-dependent mechanisms of CF pathogenesis. The rapid effects of ivacaftor on airway distensibility and vascular tone suggest that CFTR dysfunction may directly cause increased smooth muscle tone in people with CF and that ivacaftor may relax smooth muscle. FUNDING. This work was funded in part from an unrestricted grant from the Vertex Investigator-Initiated Studies Program. PMID:27158673

  3. Activation of G551D-CFTR by Bicyclooctane Compounds Is cAMP-dependent and Exhibits Low Sensitivity to Thiazolidinone CFTR Inhibitor CFTRinh-172

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; ZHAO Lu; HE Cheng-yan; XU Li-na; YANG Hong

    2005-01-01

    The G551D-CFTR mutation causing cystic fibrosis (CF) results from a missense mutation at codon 551(G551D) in the gene encoding of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The G551D mutation in CFTR results in a reduced functional channel but G551D-CFTR is appropriately inserted in the apical membrane. In previous studies we discovered a class of high-affinity bicyclooctane (BCO)G551D-CFTR activators(G551DBCOs) with Kd down to 1μmol/L. In this study, we analyzed the pharmacological activation of G551D-CFTR by the G551DBcos by means of short circuit current analysis and cell-based fluorescence quenching assay. The G551DBCOs-induced G551D-CFTR activation is cAMP-dependent and is less sensitive to thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172. These data suggest that (1) the phosphorylation of G551D-CFTR by protein kinase A is required for the activation by G551DBcos; (2) G551DBCos and CFTRinh-172 may act at the same site on the G551D-CFTR molecule.

  4. Hypertension-linked mutation of α-adducin increases CFTR surface expression and activity in HEK and cultured rat distal convoluted tubule cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mondini

    Full Text Available The CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator activity and localization are influenced by the cytoskeleton, in particular by actin and its polymerization state. In this study we investigated whether the expression of the hypertensive mutations of α-adducin (G460W-S586C in humans, F316Y in rats, an actin capping protein, led to a functional modification of CFTR activity and surface expression. The experiments were performed on HEK293 T cells cotransfected with CFTR and the human wild type (WT or G460W mutated α-adducin. In whole-cell patch-clamp experiments, both the CFTR chloride current and the slope of current activation after forskolin addition were significantly higher in HEK cells overexpressing the G460W adducin. A higher plasma membrane density of active CFTR channels was confirmed by cell-attached patch-clamp experiments, both in HEK cells and in cultured primary DCT cells, isolated from MHS (Milan Hypertensive Strain, a Wistar rat (Rattus norvegicus hypertensive model carrying the F316Y adducin mutation, compared to MNS (Milan Normotensive Strain rats. Western blot experiments demonstrated an increase of the plasma membrane CFTR protein expression, with a modification of the channel glycosylation state, in the presence of the mutated adducin. A higher retention of CFTR protein in the plasma membrane was confirmed both by FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching and photoactivation experiments. The present data indicate that in HEK cells and in isolated DCT cells the presence of the G460W-S586C hypertensive variant of adducin increases CFTR channel activity, possibly by altering its membrane turnover and inducing a retention of the channel in the plasmamembrane. Since CFTR is known to modulate the activity of many others transport systems, the increased surface expression of the channel could have consequences on the whole network of transport in kidney cells.

  5. Development of allele-specific multiplex PCR to determine the length of poly-T in intron 8 of CFTR

    OpenAIRE

    Neng Chen; Prada, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation analysis has been implemented for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) carrier screening, and molecular diagnosis of CF and congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD). Although poly-T allele analysis in intron 8 of CFTR is required when a patient is positive for R117H, it is not recommended for routine carrier screening. Therefore, commercial kits for CFTR mutation analysis were designed either to mask the poly-T allele re...

  6. Analysis of gene repair tracts from Cas9/gRNA double-stranded breaks in the human CFTR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollywood, Jennifer A; Lee, Ciaran M; Scallan, Martina F; Harrison, Patrick T

    2016-01-01

    To maximise the efficiency of template-dependent gene editing, most studies describe programmable and/or RNA-guided endonucleases that make a double-stranded break at, or close to, the target sequence to be modified. The rationale for this design strategy is that most gene repair tracts will be very short. Here, we describe a CRISPR Cas9/gRNA selection-free strategy which uses deep sequencing to characterise repair tracts from a donor plasmid containing seven nucleotide differences across a 216 bp target region in the human CFTR gene. We found that 90% of the template-dependent repair tracts were >100 bp in length with equal numbers of uni-directional and bi-directional repair tracts. The occurrence of long repair tracts suggests that a single gRNA could be used with variants of the same template to create or correct specific mutations within a 200 bp range, the size of ~80% of human exons. The selection-free strategy used here also allowed detection of non-homologous end joining events in many of the homology-directed repair tracts. This indicates a need to modify the donor, possibly by silent changes in the PAM sequence, to prevent creation of a second double-stranded break in an allele that has already been correctly edited by homology-directed repair. PMID:27557525

  7. Apparent Homozygosity of p.Phe508del in CFTR due to a Large Gene Deletion of Exons 4–11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassos Neocleous

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a classic cystic fibrosis (CF boy with a large deletion of exons 4–11 in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene on one allele and p.Phe508del in exon 10 on the second allele. Both parents of Georgian and Ukrainian background had no personal or family history of the disease. The initial molecular diagnostic investigation identified the patient as homozygous for the p.Phe508del and not compatible with his parent’s genetic status. The possibility of nonpaternity or uniparental disomy (UPD7 was investigated and excluded using microsatellite analysis of highly polymorphic markers on chromosome 7. Array-CGH was also performed on the patient and revealed a male profile with a subtle deletion within the CFTR gene on the long arm (q-arm of chromosome 7 (7q31.2. The deletion was confirmed by MLPA extending from probe L02380 to probe L14978 (28.7 kb and that was inherited from his father, while p.PheF508del was inherited from his mother. These data highlight the need for additional testing for large deletions in patients with apparent homozygosity for a mutated CFTR allele that do not match the carrier status of the parents. Not testing can lead to misdiagnosis and misinterpretation of mutation carrier status and the expected penetrance of the disorder.

  8. An image analysis method to quantify CFTR subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Lucilla; Fariello, María Inés; Lepanto, Paola; Aguilar, Pablo S; Kierbel, Arlinet

    2014-08-01

    Aberrant protein subcellular localization caused by mutation is a prominent feature of many human diseases. In Cystic Fibrosis (CF), a recessive lethal disorder that results from dysfunction of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR), the most common mutation is a deletion of phenylalanine-508 (pF508del). Such mutation produces a misfolded protein that fails to reach the cell surface. To date, over 1900 mutations have been identified in CFTR gene, but only a minority has been analyzed at the protein level. To establish if a particular CFTR variant alters its subcellular distribution, it is necessary to quantitatively determine protein localization in the appropriate cellular context. To date, most quantitative studies on CFTR localization have been based on immunoprecipitation and western blot. In this work, we developed and validated a confocal microscopy-image analysis method to quantitatively examine CFTR at the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Polarized MDCK cells transiently transfected with EGFP-CFTR constructs and stained for an apical marker were used. EGFP-CFTR fluorescence intensity in a region defined by the apical marker was normalized to EGFP-CFTR whole cell fluorescence intensity, rendering "apical CFTR ratio". We obtained an apical CFTR ratio of 0.67 ± 0.05 for wtCFTR and 0.11 ± 0.02 for pF508del. In addition, this image analysis method was able to discriminate intermediate phenotypes: partial rescue of the pF508del by incubation at 27 °C rendered an apical CFTR ratio value of 0.23 ± 0.01. We concluded the method has a good sensitivity and accurately detects milder phenotypes. Improving axial resolution through deconvolution further increased the sensitivity of the system as rendered an apical CFTR ratio of 0.76 ± 0.03 for wild type and 0.05 ± 0.02 for pF508del. The presented procedure is faster and simpler when compared with other available methods and it is therefore suitable as a screening method to identify

  9. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Gabriel Valdivieso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR. Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the diverse mitochondrial changes found, some authors proposed that the affected gene should codify for a mitochondrial protein. Later, the CFTR cloning and the demonstration of its chloride channel activity turned the mitochondrial, lysosomal and cytosolic hypotheses obsolete. However, in recent years, using new approaches, several investigators reported similar or new alterations of mitochondrial functions in Cystic Fibrosis, thus rediscovering a possible role of mitochondria in this disease. Here, we review these CFTR-driven mitochondrial defects, including differential gene expression, alterations in oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, apoptosis and innate immune response, which might explain some characteristics of the complex CF phenotype and reveals potential new targets for therapy.

  10. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required.

  11. Osteoblast CFTR inactivation reduces differentiation and osteoprotegerin expression in a mouse model of cystic fibrosis-related bone disease.

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    Michael S Stalvey

    Full Text Available Low bone mass and increased fracture risk are recognized complications of cystic fibrosis (CF. CF-related bone disease (CFBD is characterized by uncoupled bone turnover--impaired osteoblastic bone formation and enhanced osteoclastic bone resorption. Intestinal malabsorption, vitamin D deficiency and inflammatory cytokines contribute to CFBD. However, epidemiological investigations and animal models also support a direct causal link between inactivation of skeletal cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR, the gene that when mutated causes CF, and CFBD. The objective of this study was to examine the direct actions of CFTR on bone. Expression analyses revealed that CFTR mRNA and protein were expressed in murine osteoblasts, but not in osteoclasts. Functional studies were then performed to investigate the direct actions of CFTR on osteoblasts using a CFTR knockout (Cftr-/- mouse model. In the murine calvarial organ culture assay, Cftr-/- calvariae displayed significantly less bone formation and osteoblast numbers than calvariae harvested from wildtype (Cftr+/+ littermates. CFTR inactivation also reduced alkaline phosphatase expression in cultured murine calvarial osteoblasts. Although CFTR was not expressed in murine osteoclasts, significantly more osteoclasts formed in Cftr-/- compared to Cftr+/+ bone marrow cultures. Indirect regulation of osteoclastogenesis by the osteoblast through RANK/RANKL/OPG signaling was next examined. Although no difference in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (Rankl mRNA was detected, significantly less osteoprotegerin (Opg was expressed in Cftr-/- compared to Cftr+/+ osteoblasts. Together, the Rankl:Opg ratio was significantly higher in Cftr-/- murine calvarial osteoblasts contributing to a higher osteoclastogenesis potential. The combined findings of reduced osteoblast differentiation and lower Opg expression suggested a possible defect in canonical Wnt signaling. In fact, Wnt3a and PTH-stimulated canonical Wnt

  12. Haplotype identity between individuals who share a CFTR mutation allele 'identical by descent': Demonstration of the usefulness of the haplotype-sharing concept for gene mapping in real populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. de Vries (Hendrik); M.A. van der Meulen (Martin); R. Rozen (Rima); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); H. Scheffer (Hans); L.P. ten Kate; C.H.C.M. Buys; G.J. Te Meerman (Gerard)

    1996-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with the A455E mutation, in both the French Canadian and the Dutch population, share a common haplotype over distances of up to 25 cM. French Canadian patients with the 621+1G→T mutation share a common haplotype of more than 14 cM. In contras

  13. Expandiendo el espectro mutacional en pacientes chilenos con fibrosis quística Expanding the CFTR mutation spectrum in Chilean patients with cystic fibrosis

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    Marcos Vásquez D

    2012-06-01

    -9000 newborns in Chile. More than 1,800 different mutations have been identified in CFTR gene. The available molecular diagnosis analyzes the 36 most frequent mutations in Caucasian population, with an overall detection rate of80-85%, but with a much lower detection rate in Chilean patients of 42%. To analyze which other mutations are present in Chilean patients, we conducted an extensive analysis by direct DNA sequencing of coding sequences of the CFTR gene. Methods: Forty eight Chilean patients with clinical diagnosis of CF and one mutated allele in the CFTR gene identified, were studied by direct sequence analysis of exons 6, 7, 14, 19 and 20 of the CFTR gene. Results: We found 3 different mutations in 14 cases that had not been previously identified in Chilean patients. Four patients have a deletion of two nucleotides (c.2462_2463delGT/p.Ser821ArgfsX4 in exon 14, which is predicted to cause a frameshift and a premature stop codon. Eight patients have c.3196C>T mutation in the exon 20 and 2 cases has c.3039delC mutation in the exon 19. Both mutations had been previously described in other populations. Discussion: The identification of these mutations has notably increased the detection rate in our patients. Adapting the molecular diagnosis method by including these three mutations should increase the CF detection rate in Chilean patients. This analysis will improve CF diagnosis and allow an adequate genetic counseling to the families.

  14. Targeting the intracellular environment in cystic fibrosis: restoring autophagy as a novel strategy to circumvent the CFTR defect

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    Valeria Rachela Villella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF patients harboring the most common deletion mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, F508del, are poor responders to potentiators of CFTR channel activity which can be used to treat a small subset of CF patients who genetically carry plasma membrane-resident CFTR mutants. The misfolded F508del-CFTR protein is unstable in the plasma membrane even if rescued by pharmacological agents that prevent its intracellular retention and degradation. CF is a conformational disease in which defective CFTR induces an impressive derangement of general proteostasis resulting from disabled autophagy. In this review, we discuss how rescuing Beclin 1 (BECN1, a major player of autophagosome formation, either by means of direct gene transfer or indirectly by administration of proteostasis regulators, could stabilize F508del-CFTR at the plasma membrane. We focus on the relationship between the improvement of peripheral proteostasis and CFTR plasma membrane stability in F508del-CFTR homozygous bronchial epithelia or mouse lungs. Moreover, this article reviews recent preclinical evidence indicating that targeting the intracellular environment surrounding the misfolded mutant CFTR instead of protein itself could constitute an attractive therapeutic option to sensitize patients carrying the F508del-CFTR mutation to the beneficial action of CFTR potentiators on lung inflammation.

  15. Targeting the Intracellular Environment in Cystic Fibrosis: Restoring Autophagy as a Novel Strategy to Circumvent the CFTR Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villella, Valeria Rachela; Esposito, Speranza; Bruscia, Emanuela M; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Raia, Valeria; Kroemer, Guido; Maiuri, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients harboring the most common deletion mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), F508del, are poor responders to potentiators of CFTR channel activity which can be used to treat a small subset of CF patients who genetically carry plasma membrane (PM)-resident CFTR mutants. The misfolded F508del-CFTR protein is unstable in the PM even if rescued by pharmacological agents that prevent its intracellular retention and degradation. CF is a conformational disease in which defective CFTR induces an impressive derangement of general proteostasis resulting from disabled autophagy. In this review, we discuss how rescuing Beclin 1 (BECN1), a major player of autophagosome formation, either by means of direct gene transfer or indirectly by administration of proteostasis regulators, could stabilize F508del-CFTR at the PM. We focus on the relationship between the improvement of peripheral proteostasis and CFTR PM stability in F508del-CFTR homozygous bronchial epithelia or mouse lungs. Moreover, this article reviews recent pre-clinical evidence indicating that targeting the intracellular environment surrounding the misfolded mutant CFTR instead of protein itself could constitute an attractive therapeutic option to sensitize patients carrying the F508del-CFTR mutation to the beneficial action of CFTR potentiators on lung inflammation. PMID:23346057

  16. Targeted therapies to improve CFTR function in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodlie, Malcolm; Haq, Iram J; Roberts, Katie; Elborn, J Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common genetically determined, life-limiting disorder in populations of European ancestry. The genetic basis of cystic fibrosis is well established to be mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that codes for an apical membrane chloride channel principally expressed by epithelial cells. Conventional approaches to cystic fibrosis care involve a heavy daily burden of supportive treatments to combat lung infection, help clear airway secretions and maintain nutritional status. In 2012, a new era of precision medicine in cystic fibrosis therapeutics began with the licensing of a small molecule, ivacaftor, which successfully targets the underlying defect and improves CFTR function in a subgroup of patients in a genotype-specific manner. Here, we review the three main targeted approaches that have been adopted to improve CFTR function: potentiators, which recover the function of CFTR at the apical surface of epithelial cells that is disrupted in class III and IV genetic mutations; correctors, which improve intracellular processing of CFTR, increasing surface expression, in class II mutations; and production correctors or read-through agents, which promote transcription of CFTR in class I mutations. The further development of such approaches offers great promise for future therapeutic strategies in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26403534

  17. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  18. A Non-Invasive Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR Assay to Detect Paternal CFTR Mutations in the Cell-Free Fetal DNA (cffDNA of Three Pregnancies at Risk of Cystic Fibrosis via Compound Heterozygosity.

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    Emmanuel Debrand

    Full Text Available Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD makes use of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA in the mother's bloodstream as an alternative to invasive sampling methods such as amniocentesis or CVS, which carry a 0.5-1% risk of fetal loss. We describe a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR assay designed to inform the testing options for couples whose offspring are at risk of suffering from cystic fibrosis via compound heterozygosity. By detecting the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the cffDNA, it is possible to predict whether the fetus will be an unaffected carrier (absence or whether further invasive testing is indicated (presence.We selected a family in which the parents were known to carry different mutated CFTR alleles as our test system. NIPD was performed for three of their pregnancies during the first trimester (at around 11-12 weeks of gestation. Taqman probes were designed against an amplicon in exon 11 of the CFTR gene, to quantify the proportion of mutant (ΔF508-MUT; FAM and normal (ΔF508-NOR; VIC alleles at position c.1521_1523 of the CFTR gene.The assay correctly and unambiguously recognized the ΔF508-MUT CFTR allele in the cffDNA of all three proband fetuses and none of the six unaffected control fetuses. In conclusion, the Bio-Rad QX100 was found to be a cost-effective and technically undemanding platform for designing bespoke NIPD assays.

  19. A Non-Invasive Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) Assay to Detect Paternal CFTR Mutations in the Cell-Free Fetal DNA (cffDNA) of Three Pregnancies at Risk of Cystic Fibrosis via Compound Heterozygosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrand, Emmanuel; Lykoudi, Alexandra; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Allen, Stephanie K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) makes use of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in the mother’s bloodstream as an alternative to invasive sampling methods such as amniocentesis or CVS, which carry a 0.5–1% risk of fetal loss. We describe a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay designed to inform the testing options for couples whose offspring are at risk of suffering from cystic fibrosis via compound heterozygosity. By detecting the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the cffDNA, it is possible to predict whether the fetus will be an unaffected carrier (absence) or whether further invasive testing is indicated (presence). Methods We selected a family in which the parents were known to carry different mutated CFTR alleles as our test system. NIPD was performed for three of their pregnancies during the first trimester (at around 11–12 weeks of gestation). Taqman probes were designed against an amplicon in exon 11 of the CFTR gene, to quantify the proportion of mutant (ΔF508-MUT; FAM) and normal (ΔF508-NOR; VIC) alleles at position c.1521_1523 of the CFTR gene. Discussion The assay correctly and unambiguously recognized the ΔF508-MUT CFTR allele in the cffDNA of all three proband fetuses and none of the six unaffected control fetuses. In conclusion, the Bio-Rad QX100 was found to be a cost-effective and technically undemanding platform for designing bespoke NIPD assays. PMID:26561302

  20. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is expressed in maturation stage ameloblasts, odontoblasts and bone cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bronckers; L. Kalogeraki; H.J.N. Jorna; M. Wilke; T.J. Bervoets; D.M. Lyaruu; B. Zandieh-Doulabi; P. Denbesten; H. de Jonge

    2010-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have mild defects in dental enamel. The gene mutated in these patients is CFTR, a Cl− channel involved in transepithelial salt and water transport and bicarbonate secretion. We tested the hypothesis that Cftr channels are present and operating in the plasma membran

  1. Determination of CFTR densities in erythrocyte plasma membranes using recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, Andreas; Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Nikova, Dessy; Lange, Tobias; Bruns, Reimer; Oberleithner, Hans; Schillers, Hermann [Institute of Physiology II, University of Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Haeberle, Johannes; Falk, Sabine; Duebbers, Angelika [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals of Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: schille@uni-muenster.de

    2008-09-24

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl{sup -}) channel that plays an important role in salt and fluid movement across epithelia. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR. The most predominant mutation, F508del, disturbs CFTR protein trafficking, resulting in a reduced number of CFTR in the plasma membrane. Recent studies indicate that CFTR is not only found in epithelia but also in human erythrocytes. Although considerable attempts have been made to quantify CFTR in cells, conclusions on numbers of CFTR molecules localized in the plasma membrane have been drawn indirectly. AFM has the power to provide the needed information, since both sub-molecular spatial resolution and direct protein recognition via antibody-antigen interaction can be observed. We performed a quantification study of the CFTR copies in erythrocyte membranes at the single molecule level, and compared the difference between healthy donors and CF patients. We detected that the number of CFTR molecules is reduced by 70% in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.

  2. Determination of CFTR densities in erythrocyte plasma membranes using recognition imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Andreas; Nikova, Dessy; Lange, Tobias; Häberle, Johannes; Falk, Sabine; Dübbers, Angelika; Bruns, Reimer; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Schillers, Hermann

    2008-09-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl-) channel that plays an important role in salt and fluid movement across epithelia. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR. The most predominant mutation, F508del, disturbs CFTR protein trafficking, resulting in a reduced number of CFTR in the plasma membrane. Recent studies indicate that CFTR is not only found in epithelia but also in human erythrocytes. Although considerable attempts have been made to quantify CFTR in cells, conclusions on numbers of CFTR molecules localized in the plasma membrane have been drawn indirectly. AFM has the power to provide the needed information, since both sub-molecular spatial resolution and direct protein recognition via antibody-antigen interaction can be observed. We performed a quantification study of the CFTR copies in erythrocyte membranes at the single molecule level, and compared the difference between healthy donors and CF patients. We detected that the number of CFTR molecules is reduced by 70% in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.

  3. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists activate CFTR in intestinal organoids and subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijftigschild, Lodewijk A W; Berkers, Gitte; Dekkers, Johanna F; Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D; Matthes, Elizabeth; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; Hensen, Chantal E; Heida-Michel, Sabine; Geerdink, Margot; Janssens, Hettie M; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Bronsveld, Inez; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Jonge, Hugo R; Hanrahan, John W; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that people with cystic fibrosis (CF) who express CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene mutations associated with residual function may benefit from G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-targeting drugs that can activate and enhance CFTR function.We used intestinal organoids to screen a GPCR-modulating compound library and identified β2-adrenergic receptor agonists as the most potent inducers of CFTR function.β2-Agonist-induced organoid swelling correlated with the CFTR genotype, and could be induced in homozygous CFTR-F508del organoids and highly differentiated primary CF airway epithelial cells after rescue of CFTR trafficking by small molecules. The in vivo response to treatment with an oral or inhaled β2-agonist (salbutamol) in CF patients with residual CFTR function was evaluated in a pilot study. 10 subjects with a R117H or A455E mutation were included and showed changes in the nasal potential difference measurement after treatment with oral salbutamol, including a significant improvement of the baseline potential difference of the nasal mucosa (+6.35 mV, pCFTR activation when administered ex vivo to organoids.This proof-of-concept study suggests that organoids can be used to identify drugs that activate CFTR function in vivo and to select route of administration. PMID:27471203

  4. Differential expression of CFTR gene in the mouse intestinal tissues%CFTR 基因在小鼠肠道组织中的差异表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王月影; 韩莹倩; 查光明; 汪新建; 李和平

    2014-01-01

    Object This experiment was conducted to study the relationship between CFTR gene expression in the intestinal tissues and secretory diarrhea.Methods Twenty-four Kunming mice were selected, half male and half female, and were randomly divided into 3 groups ( n=8 in each group):control group with intraperitoneal injection of 0.2 mL nor-mal saline, and the experimental group of mice by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide(LPS) (6 mg/kg· bw). The mental state and intestinal morphology of the mice at 1 h and 8 h after LPS injection were observed to assess whether the secretory diarrhea model was successfully established.The expression of CFTR gene segments of intestine tissue was de-tected by fluorescence quantitative PCR.Results LPS induced secretory diarrhea.CFTR gene was expressed in the mouse duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon tissues with different expression abundance.It was highest in the colon, but the difference was not significant between intestinal segments.Compared with the control group, LPS up-regulated the tran-scription level of CFTR gene in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum, and down-regulated the transcription of CFTR gene in the colon.Conclusions The results of our study suggest that the changes of the transcriptional level of CFTR gene are closely related with the diarrhea induced by LPS and the effects in different intestinal segments on the diarrhea is different. The jejunum plays a crucial role and the colon plays a least role in the Cl-secretion.%目的:研究肠道组织CFTR基因表达与分泌性腹泻发生的关系。方法选取KM小鼠24只,雌雄各半,随机分为3组(每组8只):对照组经小鼠腹腔注射0.2 mL生理盐水,实验组小鼠经腹腔注射LPS[6 mg/(kg· bw)]分别作用1 h、8 h,于注射后通过小鼠精神状态、肠道组织形态学判定分泌性腹泻模型的建立,利用荧光定量PCR法检测各段肠道组织CFTR基因的表达。结果 LPS成功诱导小鼠发生了分泌

  5. Capturing the Direct Binding of CFTR Correctors to CFTR by Using Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Chandrima; Zhang, Weiqiang; Moon, Chang Suk; Actis, Marcelo; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Arora, Kavisha; Woodroofe, Koryse; Clancy, John P; Lin, Songbai; Ziady, Assem G; Frizzell, Raymond; Fujii, Naoaki; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-09-21

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disease caused by the loss or dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. F508del is the most prevalent mutation of the CFTR gene and encodes a protein defective in folding and processing. VX-809 has been reported to facilitate the folding and trafficking of F508del-CFTR and augment its channel function. The mechanism of action of VX-809 has been poorly understood. In this study, we sought to answer a fundamental question underlying the mechanism of VX-809: does it bind CFTR directly in order to exert its action? We synthesized two VX-809 derivatives, ALK-809 and SUL-809, that possess an alkyne group and retain the rescue capacity of VX-809. By using Cu(I) -catalyzed click chemistry, we provide evidence that the VX-809 derivatives bind CFTR directly in vitro and in cells. Our findings will contribute to the elucidation of the mechanism of action of CFTR correctors and the design of more potent therapeutics to combat CF.

  6. A novel fluorescent sensor for measurement of CFTR function by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijftigschild, Lodewijk A W; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause cystic fibrosis. CFTR-dependent iodide transport measured by fluorescent quenching of ectopically expressed halide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is widely being used to study CFTR function by microscopy or plate readers. Since YFP fluorescence in these systems is dependent on YFP expression levels and iodide concentration, differences in sensor expression level between experimental units are normalized at the start of each experiment. To allow accurate measurement of CFTR function by flow cytometry, we reasoned that co-expression of an iodide insensitive fluorescent protein would allow for normalization of sensor expression levels and more accurate quantification of CFTR function. Our data indicated that dsRed and mKate fluorescence are iodide insensitive, and we determined an optimal format for co-expression of these fluorescent proteins with halide-sensitive YFP. We showed using microscopy that ratiometric measurement (YFP/mKate) corrects for differences in sensor expression levels. Ratiometric measurements were essential to accurately measure CFTR function by flow cytometry that we here describe for the first time. Mixing of wild type or mutant CFTR expressing cells indicated that addition of approximately 10% of wild type CFTR expressing cells could be distinguished by ratiometric YFP quenching. Flow cytometric ratiometric YFP quenching also allowed us to study CFTR mutants associated with differential residual function upon ectopic expression. Compared with conventional plate-bound CFTR function assays, the flow cytometric approach described here can be used to study CFTR function in suspension cells. It may be further adapted to study CFTR function in heterologous cell populations using cell surface markers and selection of cells that display high CFTR function by cell sorting.

  7. The "Goldilocks Effect" in Cystic Fibrosis: identification of a lung phenotype in the cftr knockout and heterozygous mouse

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    Bates Jason HT

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic Fibrosis is a pleiotropic disease in humans with primary morbidity and mortality associated with a lung disease phenotype. However, knockout in the mouse of cftr, the gene whose mutant alleles are responsible for cystic fibrosis, has previously failed to produce a readily, quantifiable lung phenotype. Results Using measurements of pulmonary mechanics, a definitive lung phenotype was demonstrated in the cftr-/- mouse. Lungs showed decreased compliance and increased airway resistance in young animals as compared to cftr+/+ littermates. These changes were noted in animals less than 60 days old, prior to any long term inflammatory effects that might occur, and are consistent with structural differences in the cftr-/- lungs. Surprisingly, the cftr+/- animals exhibited a lung phenotype distinct from either the homozygous normal or knockout genotypes. The heterozygous mice showed increased lung compliance and decreased airway resistance when compared to either homozygous phenotype, suggesting a heterozygous advantage that might explain the high frequency of this mutation in certain populations. Conclusions In the mouse the gene dosage of cftr results in distinct differences in pulmonary mechanics of the adult. Distinct phenotypes were demonstrated in each genotype, cftr-/-, cftr +/-, and cftr+/+. These results are consistent with a developmental role for CFTR in the lung.

  8. [Cystic fibrosis: new treatments targeting the CFTR protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajac, I; Sermet-Gaudelus, I

    2013-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive genetic disease due to mutations in the (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) CFTR gene. The CFTR protein is a chloride channel expressed at the surface of several epithelial cells. Defective function of the CFTR protein leads to a severe disease in which lung disease is the leading cause of death. Current treatments are symptomatic. Nevertheless, with specialist and holistic care in dedicated cystic fibrosis centres, the median survival has improved. But the average age of death remains 29 years. Innovative molecules aiming to correct the CFTR protein itself are under development. These will be personalised treatments depending on the genotype or the type of CFTR dysfunction. The first molecule, ivacaftor, has just been approved in Europe and the USA. Adults and children treated with ivacaftor in clinical trials had a 10% improvement in FEV1 that was maintained for more than a year. Although at present ivacaftor is approved for only a small percentage of patients, the therapeutic strategy of correcting CFTR protein has been proved a valid approach. Other molecules targeting other defects in the CFTR protein are under evaluation.

  9. Impact of the CFTR-potentiator ivacaftor on airway microbiota in cystic fibrosis patients carrying a G551D mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Bernarde

    Full Text Available Airway microbiota composition has been clearly correlated with many pulmonary diseases, and notably with cystic fibrosis (CF, an autosomal genetic disorder caused by mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Recently, a new molecule, ivacaftor, has been shown to re-establish the functionality of the G551D-mutated CFTR, allowing significant improvement in lung function.The purpose of this study was to follow the evolution of the airway microbiota in CF patients treated with ivacaftor, using quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons, in order to identify quantitative and qualitative changes in bacterial communities. Three G551D children were followed up longitudinally over a mean period of more than one year covering several months before and after initiation of ivacaftor treatment.129 operational taxonomy units (OTUs, representing 64 genera, were identified. There was no significant difference in total bacterial load before and after treatment. Comparison of global community composition found no significant changes in microbiota. Two OTUs, however, showed contrasting dynamics: after initiation of ivacaftor, the relative abundance of the anaerobe Porphyromonas 1 increased (p<0.01 and that of Streptococcus 1 (S. mitis group decreased (p<0.05, possibly in relation to the anti-Gram-positive properties of ivacaftor. The anaerobe Prevotella 2 correlated positively with the pulmonary function test FEV-1 (r=0.73, p<0.05. The study confirmed the presumed positive role of anaerobes in lung function.Several airway microbiota components, notably anaerobes (obligate or facultative anaerobes, could be valuable biomarkers of lung function improvement under ivacaftor, and could shed light on the pathophysiology of lung disease in CF patients.

  10. Manipulating proteostasis to repair the F508del-CFTR defect in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Speranza; Tosco, Antonella; Villella, Valeria R; Raia, Valeria; Kroemer, Guido; Maiuri, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal monogenic disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that entails the (diagnostic) increase in sweat electrolyte concentrations, progressive lung disease with chronic inflammation and recurrent bacterial infections, pancreatic insufficiency, and male infertility. Therapies aimed at restoring the CFTR defect have emerged. Thus, a small molecule which facilitates chloride channel opening, the potentiator Ivacaftor, has been approved for the treatment of CF patients bearing a particular class of rare CFTR mutations. However, small molecules that directly target the most common misfolded CFTR mutant, F508del, and improve its intracellular trafficking in vitro, have been less effective than expected when tested in CF patients, even in combination with Ivacaftor. Thus, new strategies are required to circumvent the F508del-CFTR defect. Airway and intestinal epithelial cells from CF patients bearing the F508del-CFTR mutation exhibit an impressive derangement of cellular proteostasis, with oxidative stress, overactivation of the tissue transglutaminase (TG2), and disabled autophagy. Proteostasis regulators such as cysteamine can rescue and stabilize a functional F508del-CFTR protein through suppressing TG2 activation and restoring autophagy in vivo in F508del-CFTR homozygous mice, in vitro in CF patient-derived cell lines, ex vivo in freshly collected primary patient's nasal cells, as well as in a pilot clinical trial involving homozygous F508del-CFTR patients. Here, we discuss how the therapeutic normalization of defective proteostasis can be harnessed for the treatment of CF patients with the F508del-CFTR mutation. PMID:26976279

  11. RNA Interference Screen to Identify Kinases That Suppress Rescue of ΔF508-CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzcińska-Daneluti, Agata M; Chen, Anthony; Nguyen, Leo; Murchie, Ryan; Jiang, Chong; Moffat, Jason; Pelletier, Lawrence; Rotin, Daniela

    2015-06-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). ΔF508-CFTR, the most common disease-causing CF mutant, exhibits folding and trafficking defects and is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is targeted for proteasomal degradation. To identify signaling pathways involved in ΔF508-CFTR rescue, we screened a library of endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNAs (esiRNAs) that target ∼750 different kinases and associated signaling proteins. We identified 20 novel suppressors of ΔF508-CFTR maturation, including the FGFR1. These were subsequently validated by measuring channel activity by the YFP halide-sensitive assay following shRNA-mediated knockdown, immunoblotting for the mature (band C) ΔF508-CFTR and measuring the amount of surface ΔF508-CFTR by ELISA. The role of FGFR signaling on ΔF508-CFTR trafficking was further elucidated by knocking down FGFRs and their downstream signaling proteins: Erk1/2, Akt, PLCγ-1, and FRS2. Interestingly, inhibition of FGFR1 with SU5402 administered to intestinal organoids (mini-guts) generated from the ileum of ΔF508-CFTR homozygous mice resulted in a robust ΔF508-CFTR rescue. Moreover, combination of SU5402 and VX-809 treatments in cells led to an additive enhancement of ΔF508-CFTR rescue, suggesting these compounds operate by different mechanisms. Chaperone array analysis on human bronchial epithelial cells harvested from ΔF508/ΔF508-CFTR transplant patients treated with SU5402 identified altered expression of several chaperones, an effect validated by their overexpression or knockdown experiments. We propose that FGFR signaling regulates specific chaperones that control ΔF508-CFTR maturation, and suggest that FGFRs may serve as important targets for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of CF.

  12. Simple image-based no-wash method for quantitative detection of surface expressed CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Mads Breum; Hu, Jennifer; Frizzell, Raymond A; Watkins, Simon C

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal genetic disease among Caucasians. It is caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes an apical membrane anion channel that is required for regulating the volume and composition of epithelial secretions. The most common CFTR mutation, present on at least one allele in >90% of CF patients, deletes phenylalanine at position 508 (F508del), which causes the protein to misfold. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control elicits the degradation of mutant CFTR, compromising its trafficking to the epithelial cell apical membrane. The absence of functional CFTR leads to depletion of airway surface liquid, impaired clearance of mucus and bacteria from the lung, and predisposes to recurrent infections. Ultimately, respiratory failure results from inflammation and bronchiectasis. Although high throughput screening has identified small molecules that can restore the anion transport function of F508del CFTR, they correct less than 15% of WT CFTR activity, yielding insufficient clinical benefit. To date, most primary CF drug discovery assays have employed measurements of CFTR's anion transport function, a method that depends on the recruitment of a functional CFTR to the cell surface, involves multiple wash steps, and relies on a signal that saturates rapidly. Screening efforts have also included assays for detection of extracellularly HA-tagged or HRP-tagged CFTR, which require multiple washing steps. We have recently developed tools and cell lines that report the correction of mutant CFTR trafficking by currently available small molecules, and have extended this assay to the 96-well format. This new and simple no-wash assay of F508del CFTR at the cell surface may permit the discovery of more efficacious drugs, and hopefully thereby prevent the catastrophic effects of this disease. In addition, the modular design of this platform should make it useful for other diseases where loss

  13. The mitochondrial complex I activity is reduced in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel G Valdivieso

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease. It results from different possible mutations in the CFTR gene, which encodes the CFTR chloride channel. We have previously studied the differential expression of genes in CF and CF corrected cell lines, and found a reduced expression of MTND4 in CF cells. MTND4 is a mitochondrial gene encoding the MTND4 subunit of the mitochondrial Complex I (mCx-I. Since this subunit is essential for the assembly and activity of mCx-I, we have now studied whether the activity of this complex was also affected in CF cells. By using Blue Native-PAGE, the in-gel activity (IGA of the mCx-I was found reduced in CFDE and IB3-1 cells (CF cell lines compared with CFDE/6RepCFTR and S9 cells, respectively (CFDE and IB3-1 cells ectopically expressing wild-type CFTR. Moreover, colon carcinoma T84 and Caco-2 cells, which express wt-CFTR, either treated with CFTR inhibitors (glibenclamide, CFTR(inh-172 or GlyH101 or transfected with a CFTR-specific shRNAi, showed a significant reduction on the IGA of mCx-I. The reduction of the mCx-I activity caused by CFTR inhibition under physiological or pathological conditions may have a profound impact on mitochondrial functions of CF and non-CF cells.

  14. miR-16 rescues F508del-CFTR function in native cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Bhattacharyya, S; Peters, K W; Glover, M L; Sen, A; Cox, R T; Kundu, S; Caohuy, H; Frizzell, R A; Pollard, H B; Biswas, R

    2015-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is due to mutations in the CFTR gene, which prevents correct folding, trafficking and function of the mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The dysfunctional effect of CFTR mutations, principally the F508del-CFTR mutant, is further manifested by hypersecretion of the pro-inflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 into the airway lumen, which further contributes to morbidity and mortality. We have hypothesized that microRNA (miR)-based therapeutics could rescue the dysfunctional consequences of mutant CFTR. Here we report that a miR-16 mimic can effectively rescue F508del-CFTR protein function in airway cell lines and primary cultures, of differentiated human bronchial epithelia from F508del homozygotes, which express mutant CFTR endogenously. We also identify two other miRs, miR-1 and miR-302a, which are also active. Although miR-16 is expressed at basal comparable levels in CF and control cells, miR-1 and miR-302a are undetectable. When miR mimics are expressed in CF lung or pancreatic cells, the expression of the F508del-CFTR protein is significantly increased. Importantly, miR-16 promotes functional rescue of the cyclic AMP-activated apical F508del-CFTR chloride channel in primary lung epithelial cells from CF patients. We interpret these findings to suggest that these miRs may constitute novel targets for CF therapy. PMID:26133785

  15. miR-16 rescues F508del-CFTR function in native cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Bhattacharyya, S; Peters, K W; Glover, M L; Sen, A; Cox, R T; Kundu, S; Caohuy, H; Frizzell, R A; Pollard, H B; Biswas, R

    2015-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is due to mutations in the CFTR gene, which prevents correct folding, trafficking and function of the mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The dysfunctional effect of CFTR mutations, principally the F508del-CFTR mutant, is further manifested by hypersecretion of the pro-inflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 into the airway lumen, which further contributes to morbidity and mortality. We have hypothesized that microRNA (miR)-based therapeutics could rescue the dysfunctional consequences of mutant CFTR. Here we report that a miR-16 mimic can effectively rescue F508del-CFTR protein function in airway cell lines and primary cultures, of differentiated human bronchial epithelia from F508del homozygotes, which express mutant CFTR endogenously. We also identify two other miRs, miR-1 and miR-302a, which are also active. Although miR-16 is expressed at basal comparable levels in CF and control cells, miR-1 and miR-302a are undetectable. When miR mimics are expressed in CF lung or pancreatic cells, the expression of the F508del-CFTR protein is significantly increased. Importantly, miR-16 promotes functional rescue of the cyclic AMP-activated apical F508del-CFTR chloride channel in primary lung epithelial cells from CF patients. We interpret these findings to suggest that these miRs may constitute novel targets for CF therapy.

  16. Tgf-β1 inhibits Cftr biogenesis and prevents functional rescue of ΔF508-Cftr in primary differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Snodgrass

    Full Text Available CFTR is an integral transmembrane glycoprotein and a cAMP-activated Cl(- channel. Mutations in the CFTR gene lead to Cystic Fibrosis (CF-an autosomal recessive disease with majority of the morbidity and mortality resulting from airway infection, inflammation, and fibrosis. The most common disease-associated mutation in the CFTR gene-deletion of Phe508 (ΔF508 leads to a biosynthetic processing defect of CFTR. Correction of the defect and delivery of ΔF508-CFTR to the cell surface has been highly anticipated as a disease modifying therapy. Compared to promising results in cultured cell this approach was much less effective in CF patients in an early clinical trial. Although the cause of failure to rescue ΔF508-CFTR in the clinical trial has not been determined, presence of factor(s that interfere with the rescue in vivo could be considered. The cytokine TGF-β1 is frequently elevated in CF patients. TGF-β1 has pleiotropic effects in different disease models and genetic backgrounds and little is known about TGF-β1 effects on CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Moreover, there are no published studies examining TGF-β1 effects on the functional rescue of ΔF508-CFTR. Here we found that TGF-β1 inhibits CFTR biogenesis by reducing mRNA levels and protein abundance in primary differentiated human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells from non-CF individuals. TGF-β1 inhibits CFTR biogenesis without compromising the epithelial phenotype or integrity of HBE cells. TGF-β1 also inhibits biogenesis and impairs the functional rescue of ΔF508-CFTR in HBE cells from patients homozygous for the ΔF508 mutation. Our data indicate that activation of TGF-β1 signaling may inhibit CFTR function in non-CF individuals and may interfere with therapies directed at correcting the processing defect of ΔF508-CFTR in CF patients.

  17. Endocytic Trafficking of CFTR in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ameen, Nadia; Silvis, Mark; Bradbury, Neil A.

    2006-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a Cl-selective anion channel expressed in epithelial tissues. Mutations in CFTR lead to the debilitating genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Within each epithelial cell, CFTR interacts with a large number of transient macromolecular complexes, many of which are involved in the trafficking and targeting of CFTR. Understanding how these complexes regulate the trafficking and fate of CFTR, provides a singular insight not only in...

  18. The CF-modifying gene EHF promotes p.Phe508del-CFTR residual function by altering protein glycosylation and trafficking in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Frauke; van Barneveld, Andrea; Hedtfeld, Silke; Wölfl, Stefan; Becker, Tim; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2014-05-01

    The three-base-pair deletion c.1521_1523delCTT (p.Phe508del, F508del) in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the most frequent disease-causing lesion in cystic fibrosis (CF). The CFTR gene encodes a chloride and bicarbonate channel at the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Altered ion transport of CFTR-expressing epithelia can be used to differentiate manifestations of the so-called CF basic defect. Recently, an 11p13 region has been described as a CF modifier by the North American CF Genetic Modifier Study Consortium. Selecting the epithelial-specific transcription factor EHF (ets homologous factor) as the likely candidate gene on 11p13, we have genotyped two intragenic microsatellites in EHF to replicate the 11p13 finding in the patient cohort of the European CF Twin and Sibling Study. We could observe an association of rare EHF haplotypes among homozygotes for c.1521_1523delCTT in CFTR, which exhibit a CF-untypical manifestation of the CF basic defect such as CFTR-mediated residual chloride secretion and low response to amiloride. We have reviewed transcriptome data obtained from intestinal epithelial samples of homozygotes for c.1521_1523delCTT in CFTR, which were stratified for their EHF genetic background. Transcripts that were upregulated among homozygotes for c.1521_1523delCTT in CFTR, who carry two rare EHF alleles, were enriched for genes that alter protein glycosylation and trafficking, both mechanisms being pivotal for the effective targeting of fully functional p.Phe508del-CFTR to the apical membrane of epithelial cells. We conclude that EHF modifies the CF phenotype by altering capabilities of the epithelial cell to correctly process the folding and trafficking of mutant p.Phe508del-CFTR.

  19. Signalling pathways in cystic fibrosis: a cross talk between CFTR trafficking and inflammation mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, João Pedro Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Bioquímica (Bioquímica), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2015 Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal autosomic recessive disease among the Caucasians. The disease is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene, that encodes a chloride channel expressed at the apical membrane of epithelial cells. CFTR dysfunction causes the electrolyte unbalance found in exocrine epithelia, leading to mucus thickening and bacteria entrapment in the lung. The inflammatory re...

  20. A truncated CFTR protein rescues endogenous ΔF508-CFTR and corrects chloride transport in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Jeong S Hong; Berdiev, Bakhram K.; James A Fortenberry; Rennolds, Jessica; Clancy, J. P.; Benos, Dale J.; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Sorscher, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is most frequently associated with deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508) in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The ΔF508-CFTR mutant protein exhibits a folding defect that affects its processing and impairs chloride-channel function. This study aimed to determine whether CFTR fragments approximately half the size of wild-type CFTR and complementary to the portion of CFTR bearing the mutation can specifically rescue the processing of end...

  1. Biophysical characterisation of calumenin as a charged F508del-CFTR folding modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Rashmi; Benz, Nathalie; Culleton, Bridget; Trouvé, Pascal; Férec, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic-AMP dependent chloride channel expressed at the apical surface of epithelial cells lining various organs such as the respiratory tract. Defective processing and functioning of this protein caused by mutations in the CFTR gene results in loss of ionic balance, defective mucus clearance, increased proliferation of biofilms and inflammation of human airways observed in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The process by which CFTR folds and matures under the influence of various chaperones in the secretory pathway remains incompletely understood. Recently, calumenin, a secretory protein, belonging to the CREC family of low affinity calcium binding proteins has been identified as a putative CFTR chaperone whose biophysical properties and functions remain uncharacterized. We compared hydropathy, instability, charge, unfoldability, disorder and aggregation propensity of calumenin and other CREC family members with CFTR associated chaperones and calcium binding proteins, wild-type and mutant CFTR proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). We observed that calumenin, along with other CREC proteins, was significantly more charged and less folded compared to CFTR associated chaperones. Moreover like IDPs, calumenin and other CREC proteins were found to be less hydrophobic and aggregation prone. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close link between calumenin and other CREC proteins indicating how evolution might have shaped their similar biophysical properties. Experimentally, calumenin was observed to significantly reduce F508del-CFTR aggregation in a manner similar to AavLEA1, a well-characterized IDP. Fluorescence microscopy based imaging analysis also revealed altered trafficking of calumenin in bronchial cells expressing F508del-CFTR, indicating its direct role in the pathophysiology of CF. In conclusion, calumenin is characterized as a charged protein exhibiting close similarity with IDPs and is

  2. First functional polymorphism in CFTR promoter that results in decreased transcriptional activity and Sp1/USF binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing evidences show that functionally relevant polymorphisms in various promoters alter both transcriptional activity and affinities of existing protein-DNA interactions, and thus influence disease progression in humans. We previously reported the -94G>T CFTR promoter variant in a female CF patient in whom any known disease-causing mutation has been detected. To investigate whether the -94G>T could be a regulatory variant, we have proceeded to in silico analyses and functional studies including EMSA and reporter gene assays. Our data indicate that the promoter variant decreases basal CFTR transcriptional activity in different epithelial cells and alters binding affinities of both Sp1 and USF nuclear proteins to the CFTR promoter. The present report provides evidence for the first functional polymorphism that negatively affects the CFTR transcriptional activity and demonstrates a cooperative role of Sp1 and USF transcription factors in transactivation of the CFTR gene promoter

  3. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  4. Repeated nebulisation of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, Eric W F W; Armstrong, David K; Ashby, Deborah; Bayfield, Katie J; Bilton, Diana; Bloomfield, Emily V; Boyd, A Christopher; Brand, June; Buchan, Ruaridh; Calcedo, Roberto; Carvelli, Paula; Chan, Mario; Cheng, Seng H; Collie, D David S; Cunningham, Steve; Davidson, Heather E; Davies, Gwyneth; Davies, Jane C; Davies, Lee A; Dewar, Maria H; Doherty, Ann; Donovan, Jackie; Dwyer, Natalie S; Elgmati, Hala I; Featherstone, Rosanna F; Gavino, Jemyr; Gea-Sorli, Sabrina; Geddes, Duncan M; Gibson, James S R; Gill, Deborah R; Greening, Andrew P; Griesenbach, Uta; Hansell, David M; Harman, Katharine; Higgins, Tracy E; Hodges, Samantha L; Hyde, Stephen C; Hyndman, Laura; Innes, J Alastair; Jacob, Joseph; Jones, Nancy; Keogh, Brian F; Limberis, Maria P; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Maclean, Alan W; Manvell, Michelle C; McCormick, Dominique; McGovern, Michael; McLachlan, Gerry; Meng, Cuixiang; Montero, M Angeles; Milligan, Hazel; Moyce, Laura J; Murray, Gordon D; Nicholson, Andrew G; Osadolor, Tina; Parra-Leiton, Javier; Porteous, David J; Pringle, Ian A; Punch, Emma K; Pytel, Kamila M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Rivellini, Gina; Saunders, Clare J; Scheule, Ronald K; Sheard, Sarah; Simmonds, Nicholas J; Smith, Keith; Smith, Stephen N; Soussi, Najwa; Soussi, Samia; Spearing, Emma J; Stevenson, Barbara J; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Turkkila, Minna; Ureta, Rosa P; Waller, Michael D; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Wilson, James M; Wolstenholme-Hogg, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Lung delivery of plasmid DNA encoding the CFTR gene complexed with a cationic liposome is a potential treatment option for patients with cystic fibrosis. We aimed to assess the efficacy of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis. Methods We did this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial in two cystic fibrosis centres with patients recruited from 18 sites in the UK. Patients (aged ≥12 years) with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 50–90% predicted and any combination of CFTR mutations, were randomly assigned, via a computer-based randomisation system, to receive 5 mL of either nebulised pGM169/GL67A gene–liposome complex or 0·9% saline (placebo) every 28 days (plus or minus 5 days) for 1 year. Randomisation was stratified by % predicted FEV1 (<70 vs ≥70%), age (<18 vs ≥18 years), inclusion in the mechanistic substudy, and dosing site (London or Edinburgh). Participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was the relative change in % predicted FEV1. The primary analysis was per protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621867. Findings Between June 12, 2012, and June 24, 2013, we randomly assigned 140 patients to receive placebo (n=62) or pGM169/GL67A (n=78), of whom 116 (83%) patients comprised the per-protocol population. We noted a significant, albeit modest, treatment effect in the pGM169/GL67A group versus placebo at 12 months' follow-up (3·7%, 95% CI 0·1–7·3; p=0·046). This outcome was associated with a stabilisation of lung function in the pGM169/GL67A group compared with a decline in the placebo group. We recorded no significant difference in treatment-attributable adverse events between groups. Interpretation Monthly application of the pGM169/GL67A gene therapy formulation was associated with a significant, albeit modest, benefit in FEV1 compared with placebo at 1 year, indicating a stabilisation of

  5. Unravelling druggable signalling networks that control F508del-CFTR proteostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Ramanath Narayana; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Iorio, Francesco; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Capuani, Fabrizio; Carissimo, Annamaria; Carrella, Diego; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Subramanian, Advait; Bounti, Laura; Persico, Maria; Carlile, Graeme; Galietta, Luis; Thomas, David Y; Di Bernardo, Diego; Luini, Alberto

    2015-12-23

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The most frequent mutation (F508del-CFTR) results in altered proteostasis, that is, in the misfolding and intracellular degradation of the protein. The F508del-CFTR proteostasis machinery and its homeostatic regulation are well studied, while the question whether 'classical' signalling pathways and phosphorylation cascades might control proteostasis remains barely explored. Here, we have unravelled signalling cascades acting selectively on the F508del-CFTR folding-trafficking defects by analysing the mechanisms of action of F508del-CFTR proteostasis regulator drugs through an approach based on transcriptional profiling followed by deconvolution of their gene signatures. Targeting multiple components of these signalling pathways resulted in potent and specific correction of F508del-CFTR proteostasis and in synergy with pharmacochaperones. These results provide new insights into the physiology of cellular proteostasis and a rational basis for developing effective pharmacological correctors of the F508del-CFTR defect.

  6. Investigating CFTR and KCa3.1 Protein/Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hélène; Abu-Arish, Asmahan; Trinh, Nguyen Thu Ngan; Luo, Yishan; Wiseman, Paul W; Hanrahan, John W; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Sauvé, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    In epithelia, Cl- channels play a prominent role in fluid and electrolyte transport. Of particular importance is the cAMP-dependent cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel (CFTR) with mutations of the CFTR encoding gene causing cystic fibrosis. The bulk transepithelial transport of Cl- ions and electrolytes needs however to be coupled to an increase in K+ conductance in order to recycle K+ and maintain an electrical driving force for anion exit across the apical membrane. In several epithelia, this K+ efflux is ensured by K+ channels, including KCa3.1, which is expressed at both the apical and basolateral membranes. We show here for the first time that CFTR and KCa3.1 can physically interact. We first performed a two-hybrid screen to identify which KCa3.1 cytosolic domains might mediate an interaction with CFTR. Our results showed that both the N-terminal fragment M1-M40 of KCa3.1 and part of the KCa3.1 calmodulin binding domain (residues L345-A400) interact with the NBD2 segment (G1237-Y1420) and C- region of CFTR (residues T1387-L1480), respectively. An association of CFTR and F508del-CFTR with KCa3.1 was further confirmed in co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrating the formation of immunoprecipitable CFTR/KCa3.1 complexes in CFBE cells. Co-expression of KCa3.1 and CFTR in HEK cells did not impact CFTR expression at the cell surface, and KCa3.1 trafficking appeared independent of CFTR stimulation. Finally, evidence is presented through cross-correlation spectroscopy measurements that KCa3.1 and CFTR colocalize at the plasma membrane and that KCa3.1 channels tend to aggregate consequent to an enhanced interaction with CFTR channels at the plasma membrane following an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Altogether, these results suggest 1) that the physical interaction KCa3.1/CFTR can occur early during the biogenesis of both proteins and 2) that KCa3.1 and CFTR form a dynamic complex, the formation of which depends on

  7. Facilitating Structure-Function Studies of CFTR Modulator Sites with Efficiencies in Mutagenesis and Functional Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinski, Steven V; Ahmadi, Saumel; Hung, Maurita; Bear, Christine E

    2015-12-01

    There are nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene associated with cystic fibrosis disease, and to date, the only approved drug, Kalydeco, has been effective in rescuing the functional expression of a small subset of these mutant proteins with defects in channel activation. However, there is currently an urgent need to assess other mutations for possible rescue by Kalydeco, and further, definition of the binding site of such modulators on CFTR would enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of such therapeutics. Here, we describe a simple and rapid one-step PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis method to generate mutations in the CFTR gene. This method was used to generate CFTR mutants bearing deletions (p.Gln2_Trp846del, p.Ser700_Asp835del, p.Ile1234_Arg1239del) and truncation with polyhistidine tag insertion (p.Glu1172-3Gly-6-His*), which either recapitulate a disease phenotype or render tools for modulator binding site identification, with subsequent evaluation of drug responses using a high-throughput (384-well) membrane potential-sensitive fluorescence assay of CFTR channel activity within a 1 wk time frame. This proof-of-concept study shows that these methods enable rapid and quantitative comparison of multiple CFTR mutants to emerging drugs, facilitating future large-scale efforts to stratify mutants according to their "theratype" or most promising targeted therapy.

  8. Facilitating Structure-Function Studies of CFTR Modulator Sites with Efficiencies in Mutagenesis and Functional Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinski, Steven V; Ahmadi, Saumel; Hung, Maurita; Bear, Christine E

    2015-12-01

    There are nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene associated with cystic fibrosis disease, and to date, the only approved drug, Kalydeco, has been effective in rescuing the functional expression of a small subset of these mutant proteins with defects in channel activation. However, there is currently an urgent need to assess other mutations for possible rescue by Kalydeco, and further, definition of the binding site of such modulators on CFTR would enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of such therapeutics. Here, we describe a simple and rapid one-step PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis method to generate mutations in the CFTR gene. This method was used to generate CFTR mutants bearing deletions (p.Gln2_Trp846del, p.Ser700_Asp835del, p.Ile1234_Arg1239del) and truncation with polyhistidine tag insertion (p.Glu1172-3Gly-6-His*), which either recapitulate a disease phenotype or render tools for modulator binding site identification, with subsequent evaluation of drug responses using a high-throughput (384-well) membrane potential-sensitive fluorescence assay of CFTR channel activity within a 1 wk time frame. This proof-of-concept study shows that these methods enable rapid and quantitative comparison of multiple CFTR mutants to emerging drugs, facilitating future large-scale efforts to stratify mutants according to their "theratype" or most promising targeted therapy. PMID:26385858

  9. Trimethylangelicin promotes the functional rescue of mutant F508del CFTR protein in cystic fibrosis airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favia, Maria; Mancini, Maria T; Bezzerri, Valentino; Guerra, Lorenzo; Laselva, Onofrio; Abbattiscianni, Anna C; Debellis, Lucantonio; Reshkin, Stephan J; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio; Casavola, Valeria

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) carrying the F508del mutation is retained in endoplasmic reticulum and fails to traffic to the cell surface where it functions as a protein kinase A (PKA)-activated chloride channel. Pharmacological correctors that rescue the trafficking of F508del CFTR may overcome this defect; however, the rescued F508del CFTR still displays reduced chloride permeability. Therefore, a combined administration of correctors and potentiators of the gating defect is ideal. We recently found that 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin (TMA), besides inhibiting the expression of the IL-8 gene in airway cells in which the inflammatory response was challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also potentiates the cAMP/PKA-dependent activation of wild-type CFTR or F508del CFTR that has been restored to the plasma membrane. Here, we demonstrate that long preincubation with nanomolar concentrations of TMA is able to effectively rescue both F508del CFTR-dependent chloride secretion and F508del CFTR cell surface expression in both primary or secondary airway cell monolayers homozygous for F508del mutation. The correction effect of TMA seems to be selective for CFTR and persisted for 24 h after washout. Altogether, the results suggest that TMA, besides its anti-inflammatory and potentiator activities, also displays corrector properties.

  10. Survey of CF mutations in the clinical laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Myers Angela; Nersesian Rhea; Mirkovic Borka; Huber Klaus; Saiki Randall; Bauer Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Since it is impossible to sequence the complete CFTR gene routinely, clinical laboratories must rely on test systems that screen for a panel of the most frequent mutations causing disease in a high percentage of patients. Thus, in a cohort of 257 persons that were referred to our laboratory for analysis of CF gene mutations, reverse line probe assays for the most common CF mutations were performed. These techniques were evaluated as routine first-line analyses of the CFTR ...

  11. Regulation of Plasma Membrane Recycling by CFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Neil A.; Jilling, Tamas; Berta, Gabor; Sorscher, Eric J.; Bridges, Robert J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    1992-04-01

    The gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is defective in patients with cystic fibrosis. Although the protein product of the CFTR gene has been proposed to function as a chloride ion channel, certain aspects of its function remain unclear. The role of CFTR in the adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent regulation of plasma membrane recycling was examined. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate is known to regulate endocytosis and exocytosis in chloride-secreting epithelial cells that express CFTR. However, mutant epithelial cells derived from a patient with cystic fibrosis exhibited no cAMP-dependent regulation of endocytosis and exocytosis until they were transfected with complementary DNA encoding wild-type CFTR. Thus, CFTR is critical for cAMP-dependent regulation of membrane recycling in epithelial tissues, and this function of CFTR could explain in part the pleiotropic nature of cystic fibrosis.

  12. Correlation of the level of full-length CFTR transcript with pulmonary phenotype in patients carrying R117H and 1342-1,-2delAG mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamosh, A.; Cutting, G.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Balitmore, MD (United States); Oates, R.; Amos, J. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The R117H mutation occurs on two chromosome backgrounds, one associated with a 7 thymidine tract (7T-R11H) in the splice-acceptor site of intron 8, the other with a 5 thymidine tract (5T-R117H). We examined exon 9 splicing efficiency in 5 patients of genotype R117H/{delta}F508 and one carrying 1342-1,-2delAG{delta}F508, an obligate exon 9 slice site mutation. Four patients carried R117H on a 7T background -- three adult men with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens and one adolescent female with pancreatitis and borderline sweat chloride concentration. The patient with R117H on a 5T background had pancreatic sufficient CF (PS-CF). The 1342-1,-2delAG patient has classic pancreatic insufficient CF (PI-CF). cDNA was synthesized from total RNA extracted from nasal epithlial cells and analyzed for CFTR splicing by 35 cycle PCR using primers in exon 7 and 11. The quantity of full length transcript derived from the R117H or {delta}F508 alleles was assessed by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. While 91.4% of transcript from the 5T-R117H allele was full-length, only 42.2% of CFTR transcript from the 5T-R117H allele was full length. Since CBAVD patients have no lung disease and PS-CF patients do, this indicates that the threshold of developing CF lung disease is crossed when the amount of CFTR transcript bearing R117H is reduced by half. Interestingly, 17.1% of transcript derived from the 1342-1,-2delAG allele (or 8.6% of total CFTR transcript) was normal and full length. This suggests that up to 9% of full length wild-type CFTR transcript may be inadequate to escape the lung disease of CF and that a 9 thymidine tract followed by AAC (the result of the AG deletion) can be used as a splice donor with 2-9% efficiency.

  13. CFTR Modulators: Shedding Light on Precision Medicine for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening monogenic disease afflicting Caucasian people. It affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, glandular and reproductive systems. The major cause of morbidity and mortality in CF is the respiratory disorder caused by a vicious cycle of obstruction of the airways, inflammation and infection that leads to epithelial damage, tissue remodeling and end-stage lung disease. Over the past decades, life expectancy of CF patients has increased due to early diagnosis and improved treatments; however, these patients still present limited quality of life. Many attempts have been made to rescue CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression, function and stability, thereby overcoming the molecular basis of CF. Gene and protein variances caused by CFTR mutants lead to different CF phenotypes, which then require different treatments to quell the patients’ debilitating symptoms. In order to seek better approaches to treat CF patients and maximize therapeutic effects, CFTR mutants have been stratified into six groups (although several of these mutations present pleiotropic defects). The research with CFTR modulators (read-through agents, correctors, potentiators, stabilizers and amplifiers) has achieved remarkable progress, and these drugs are translating into pharmaceuticals and personalized treatments for CF patients. This review summarizes the main molecular and clinical features of CF, emphasizes the latest clinical trials using CFTR modulators, sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying these new and emerging treatments, and discusses the major breakthroughs and challenges to treating all CF patients. PMID:27656143

  14. Defective CFTR induces aggresome formation and lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis through ROS-mediated autophagy inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Alessandro; Villella, Valeria Rachela; Esposito, Speranza; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Medina, Diego; Settembre, Carmine; Gavina, Manuela; Pulze, Laura; Giardino, Ida; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; D'Apolito, Maria; Guido, Stefano; Masliah, Eliezer; Spencer, Brian; Quaratino, Sonia; Raia, Valeria; Ballabio, Andrea; Maiuri, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    Accumulation of unwanted/misfolded proteins in aggregates has been observed in airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), a life-threatening genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Here we show how the defective CFTR results in defective autophagy and decreases the clearance of aggresomes. Defective CFTR-induced upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and tissue transglutaminase (TG2) drive the crosslinking of beclin 1, leading to sequestration of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI(3)K) complex III and accumulation of p62, which regulates aggresome formation. Both CFTR knockdown and the overexpression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged-CFTR(F508del) induce beclin 1 downregulation and defective autophagy in non-CF airway epithelia through the ROS-TG2 pathway. Restoration of beclin 1 and autophagy by either beclin 1 overexpression, cystamine or antioxidants rescues the localization of the beclin 1 interactome to the endoplasmic reticulum and reverts the CF airway phenotype in vitro, in vivo in Scnn1b-transgenic and Cftr(F508del) homozygous mice, and in human CF nasal biopsies. Restoring beclin 1 or knocking down p62 rescued the trafficking of CFTR(F508del) to the cell surface. These data link the CFTR defect to autophagy deficiency, leading to the accumulation of protein aggregates and to lung inflammation.

  15. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination for cystic fibrosis patients homozygous for Phe508del-CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y H; Strokes, D C; Naren, A P

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening inherited disease caused by the loss or dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel activity resulting from mutations in the CFTR gene. Phe508del is the most prevalent mutation, with approximately 90% of all CF patients carrying it on at least one allele. Over the past two or three decades, significant progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of CF, and in the development of effective CF therapies. The approval of Orkambi® (lumacaftor/ivacaftor) marks another milestone in CF therapeutics development, which, with the advent of personalized medicine, could potentially revolutionize CF care and management. This article reviews the rationale, progress and future direction in the development of lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination to treat CF patients homozygous for the Phe508del-CFTR mutation.

  16. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination for cystic fibrosis patients homozygous for Phe508del-CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y H; Strokes, D C; Naren, A P

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening inherited disease caused by the loss or dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel activity resulting from mutations in the CFTR gene. Phe508del is the most prevalent mutation, with approximately 90% of all CF patients carrying it on at least one allele. Over the past two or three decades, significant progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of CF, and in the development of effective CF therapies. The approval of Orkambi® (lumacaftor/ivacaftor) marks another milestone in CF therapeutics development, which, with the advent of personalized medicine, could potentially revolutionize CF care and management. This article reviews the rationale, progress and future direction in the development of lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination to treat CF patients homozygous for the Phe508del-CFTR mutation. PMID:27252987

  17. Aggregates of mutant CFTR fragments in airway epithelial cells of CF lungs: new pathologic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kai; Karp, Philip H; Ackerley, Cameron; Zabner, Joseph; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in a loss of Cl(-) channel function, disrupting ion and fluid homeostasis, leading to severe lung disease with airway obstruction due to mucus plugging and inflammation. The most common CFTR mutation, F508del, occurs in 90% of patients causing the mutant CFTR protein to misfold and trigger an endoplasmic reticulum based recycling response. Despite extensive research into the pathobiology of CF lung disease, little attention has been paid to the cellular changes accounting for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Here we report a novel finding of intracellular retention and accumulation of a cleaved fragment of F508del CFTR in concert with autophagic like phagolysosomes in the airway epithelium of patients with F508del CFTR. Aggregates consisting of poly-ubiquitinylated fragments of only the N-terminal domain of F508del CFTR but not the full-length molecule accumulate to appreciable levels. Importantly, these undegraded intracytoplasmic aggregates representing the NT-NBD1 domain of F508del CFTR were found in ciliated, in basal, and in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. Aggregates were found in both native lung tissues and ex-vivo primary cultures of bronchial epithelial cells from CF donors, but not in normal control lungs. Our findings present a new, heretofore, unrecognized innate CF gene related cell defect and a potential contributing factor to the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Mutant CFTR intracytoplasmic aggregates could be analogous to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in other degenerative disorders and in pulmonary "conformational protein-associated" diseases. Consequently, potential alterations to the functional integrity of airway epithelium and regenerative capacity may represent a critical new element in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease.

  18. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  19. Effect of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutation on male fertility%囊性纤维变性跨膜调节器基因突变对男性生殖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晨曦; 王曦; 王子栋; 黄宜定

    2001-01-01

    Large number of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductanceregulator (CFTR) gene mutations are responsible for a wide spectrum of disease expressions in CF (cystic fibrosis). They includs not only the malfunction of the lung and pancreas, intestinal obstruction, and incapable of salt reabsorption, but also some kinds of male infertility, such as congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD),poor sperm quality, the obstruction and agenesis of the epididymis. More recent studies have indicated that CFTR gene mutations have a far-reaching effect on human reproduction.

  20. Evidence that CFTR is expressed in rat tracheal smooth muscle cells and contributes to bronchodilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mettey Yvette

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The airway functions are profoundly affected in many diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and cystic fibrosis (CF. CF the most common lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease is caused by mutations of the CFTR gene, which normally encodes a multifunctional and integral membrane protein, the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR expressed in airway epithelial cells. Methods To demonstrate that CFTR is also expressed in tracheal smooth muscle cells (TSMC, we used iodide efflux assay to analyse the chloride transports in organ culture of rat TSMC, immunofluorescence study to localize CFTR proteins and isometric contraction measurement on isolated tracheal rings to observe the implication of CFTR in the bronchodilation. Results We characterized three different pathways stimulated by the cAMP agonist forskolin and the isoflavone agent genistein, by the calcium ionophore A23187 and by hypo-osmotic challenge. The pharmacology of the cAMP-dependent iodide efflux was investigated in detail. We demonstrated in rat TSMC that it is remarkably similar to that of the epithelial CFTR, both for activation (using three benzo [c]quinolizinium derivatives and for inhibition (glibenclamide, DPC and CFTRinh-172. Using rat tracheal rings, we observed that the activation of CFTR by benzoquinolizinium derivatives in TSMC leads to CFTRinh-172-sensitive bronchodilation after constriction with carbachol. An immunolocalisation study confirmed expression of CFTR in tracheal myocytes. Conclusion Altogether, these observations revealed that CFTR in the airways of rat is expressed not only in the epithelial cells but also in tracheal smooth muscle cells leading to the hypothesis that this ionic channel could contribute to bronchodilation.

  1. Measurements of CFTR-Mediated Cl− Secretion in Human Rectal Biopsies Constitute a Robust Biomarker for Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis and Prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Marisa; Servidoni, Maria F; Vinagre, Adriana M.; Ramalho, Anabela S; Bonadia, Luciana C.; Felício, Verónica; Ribeiro, Maria A..; Uliyakina, Inna; Marson A, Fernando; Kmit, Arthur; Cardoso, Silvia R.; Ribeiro, José D; Carmen S. Bertuzzo; Sousa, Lisete; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is caused by ∼1,900 mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding for a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl(-)) channel expressed in several epithelia. Clinical features are dominated by respiratory symptoms, but there is variable organ involvement thus causing diagnostic dilemmas, especially for non-classic cases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further establish measurement of CFTR function as a sensitive and robust biomarker fo...

  2. Applicability and Efficiency of NGS in Routine Diagnosis: In-Depth Performance Analysis of a Complete Workflow for CFTR Mutation Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Pagin

    Full Text Available Actually, about 2000 sequence variations have been documented in the CFTR gene requiring extensive and multi-step genetic testing in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and CFTR-related disorders. We present a two phases study, with validation and performance monitoring, of a single experiment methodology based on multiplex PCR and high throughput sequencing that allows detection of all variants, including large rearrangements, affecting the coding regions plus three deep intronic loci.A total of 340 samples, including 257 patients and 83 previously characterized control samples, were sequenced in 17 MiSeq runs and analyzed with two bioinformatic pipelines in routine diagnostic conditions. We obtained 100% coverage for all the target regions in every tested sample.We correctly identified all the 87 known variants in the control samples and successfully confirmed the 62 variants identified among the patients without observing false positive results. Large rearrangements were identified in 18/18 control samples. Only 17 patient samples showed false positive signals (6.6%, 12 of which showed a borderline result for a single amplicon. We also demonstrated the ability of the assay to detect allele specific dropout of amplicons when a sequence variation occurs at a primer binding site thus limiting the risk for false negative results.We described here the first NGS workflow for CFTR routine analysis that demonstrated equivalent diagnostic performances compared to Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. This study illustrates the advantages of NGS in term of scalability, workload reduction and cost-effectiveness in combination with an improvement of the overall data quality due to the simultaneous detection of SNVs and large rearrangements.

  3. Insulin gene mutations and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Masahiro; Nanjo, Kishio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Some mutations of the insulin gene cause hyperinsulinemia or hyperproinsulinemia. Replacement of biologically important amino acid leads to defective receptor binding, longer half‐life and hyperinsulinemia. Three mutant insulins have been identified: (i) insulin Chicago (F49L or PheB25Leu); (ii) insulin Los Angeles (F48S or PheB24Ser); (iii) and insulin Wakayama (V92L or ValA3Leu). Replacement of amino acid is necessary for proinsulin processing results in hyperproinsulinemia. Four t...

  4. Detection of CFTR protein in human leukocytes by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jan; Vezzalini, Marzia; Verzè, Genny; Caldrer, Sara; Bolognin, Silvia; Buffelli, Mario; Bellisola, Giuseppe; Tridello, Gloria; Assael, Baroukh Maurice; Melotti, Paola; Sorio, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    Leukocytes have previously been shown to express detectable levels of the protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This study aims to evaluate the application of flow cytometric (FC) analysis to detect CFTR expression, and changes thereof, in these cells. Aliquots (200 μL) of peripheral whole blood from 12 healthy control volunteers (CTRLs), 12 carriers of a CFTR mutation (CFC), and 40 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) carrying various combinations of CFTR mutations were incubated with specific fluorescent probes recognizing CFTR protein expressed on the plasma membrane of leukocytes. FC was applied to analyze CFTR expression in monocytes, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. CFTR protein was detected in monocytes and lymphocytes, whereas inconclusive results were obtained from the analysis of PMN cells. Mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) ratio value and %CFTR-positive cells above a selected threshold were the two parameters selected to quantify CFTR expression in cells. Lowest variability and the highest reproducibility were obtained when analyzing monocytes. ANOVA results indicated that both parameters were able to discriminate monocytes of healthy controls and CF individuals according to CFTR mutation classes with high accuracy. Significantly increased MFI ratio values were recorded in CFTR-defective cells that were also able to improve CFTR function after ex vivo treatment with PTC124 (Ataluren), an investigative drug designed to permit the ribosome to read through nonsense CFTR mutations. The method described is minimally invasive and may be used in the monitoring of responses to drugs whose efficacy can depend on increased CFTR protein expression levels. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  5. Pharmacological correctors of mutant CFTR mistrafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta ePedemonte

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The lack of phenylalanine 508 (∆F508 mutation in the CFTR Cl- channel represents the most frequent cause of cystic fibrosis (CF, a genetic disease affecting multiple organs such lung, pancreas, and liver. ∆F508 causes instability and misfolding of CFTR protein leading to early degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum and accelerated removal from the plasma membrane. Pharmacological correctors of mutant CFTR protein have been identified by high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries, by in silico docking of virtual compounds on CFTR structure models, or by using compounds that affect the whole proteome (e.g. histone deacetylase inhibitors or a single CFTR-interacting protein. The presence of multiple defects caused at the CFTR protein level by ∆F508 mutation and the redundancy of quality control mechanisms detecting ∆F508-CFTR as a defective protein impose a ceiling to the maximal effect that a single compound (corrector may obtain. Therefore, treatment of patients with the most frequent CF mutation may require the optimized combination of two drugs having additive or synergic effects.

  6. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator intracellular processing, trafficking, and opportunities for mutation-specific treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rogan, Mark P

    2012-02-01

    Recent advances in basic science have greatly expanded our understanding of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the chloride and bicarbonate channel that is encoded by the gene, which is mutated in patients with CF. We review the structure, function, biosynthetic processing, and intracellular trafficking of CFTR and discuss the five classes of mutations and their impact on the CF phenotype. The therapeutic discussion is focused on the significant progress toward CFTR mutation-specific therapies. We review the results of encouraging clinical trials examining orally administered therapeutics, including agents that promote read-through of class I mutations (premature termination codons); correctors, which overcome the CFTR misfolding that characterizes the common class II mutation F508del; and potentiators, which enhance the function of class III or IV mutated CFTR at the plasma membrane. Long-term outcomes from successful mutation-specific treatments could finally answer the question that has been lingering since and even before the CFTR gene discovery: Will therapies that specifically restore CFTR-mediated chloride secretion slow or arrest the deleterious cascade of events leading to chronic infection, bronchiectasis, and end-stage lung disease?

  7. Phosphorylation of CFTR and other membrane proteins: a role in biogenesis and traffic?

    OpenAIRE

    Romeiras, Francisco Maria de Sousa de Macedo Malta, 1986-

    2009-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Bioquímica (Bioquímica Médica), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2009 Cystic Fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR). With more than 1600 mutations reported, a single mutation– the deletion of phenylalanine residue at position 508 – accounts for more than 70% of chromosomes worldwide. The presence of ...

  8. Characterizing responses to CFTR-modulating drugs using rectal organoids derived from subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Berkers, Gitte; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; de Jonge, Hugo R; Janssens, Hettie M; Bronsveld, Inez; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Houwen, Roderick H J; Vleggaar, Frank P; Escher, Johanna C; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-22

    Identifying subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) who may benefit from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-modulating drugs is time-consuming, costly, and especially challenging for individuals with rare uncharacterized CFTR mutations. We studied CFTR function and responses to two drugs-the prototypical CFTR potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor/KALYDECO) and the CFTR corrector VX-809 (lumacaftor)-in organoid cultures derived from the rectal epithelia of subjects with CF, who expressed a broad range of CFTR mutations. We observed that CFTR residual function and responses to drug therapy depended on both the CFTR mutation and the genetic background of the subjects. In vitro drug responses in rectal organoids positively correlated with published outcome data from clinical trials with VX-809 and VX-770, allowing us to predict from preclinical data the potential for CF patients carrying rare CFTR mutations to respond to drug therapy. We demonstrated proof of principle by selecting two subjects expressing an uncharacterized rare CFTR genotype (G1249R/F508del) who showed clinical responses to treatment with ivacaftor and one subject (F508del/R347P) who showed a limited response to drug therapy both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that in vitro measurements of CFTR function in patient-derived rectal organoids may be useful for identifying subjects who would benefit from CFTR-correcting treatment, independent of their CFTR mutation. PMID:27334259

  9. Testing gene therapy vectors in human primary nasal epithelial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huibi; Ouyang, Hong; Ip, Wan; Du, Kai; Duan, Wenming; Avolio, Julie; Wu, Jing; Duan, Cathleen; Yeger, Herman; Bear, Christine E; Gonska, Tanja; Hu, Jim; Moraes, Theo J

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which codes for a chloride/bicarbonate channel in the apical epithelial membranes. CFTR dysfunction results in a multisystem disease including the development of life limiting lung disease. The possibility of a cure for CF by replacing defective CFTR has led to different approaches for CF gene therapy; all of which ultimately have to be tested in preclinical model systems. Primary human nasal epithelial cultures (HNECs) derived from nasal turbinate brushing were used to test the efficiency of a helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector expressing CFTR. HD-Ad-CFTR transduction resulted in functional expression of CFTR at the apical membrane in nasal epithelial cells obtained from CF patients. These results suggest that HNECs can be used for preclinical testing of gene therapy vectors in CF. PMID:26730394

  10. Rb1 GENE MUTATIONS IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Ji-bin; SONG Yue; WANG Yi; SHI Yu-yuan

    1999-01-01

    @@ Genetic alternations, such as mutations caused inactivities of tumor suppressor gene, have been identified in a wide variety of tumors, including osteosarcoma. Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumor that occurs in the extremities of young adolescents in most cases. Because of the high frequent occurrence of this type of tumor in hereditary retinoblastoma patients, involvement of the Rb1 gene mutations was suspected in the development of osteosarcoma, and a few reports have shown alternations of the Rb1 gene in osteosarcoma. We studied Rb1 gene mutations in 9 osteosarcoma samples and one cell line (OS 732) to explore the types and mechanism of Rb1 gene mutations in osteosarcoma.

  11. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali J Vetter

    Full Text Available The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  12. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Ali J; Karamyshev, Andrey L; Patrick, Anna E; Hudson, Henry; Thomas, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  13. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Ali J; Karamyshev, Andrey L; Patrick, Anna E; Hudson, Henry; Thomas, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein. PMID:27182737

  14. Mutation update for the PORCN gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardi, Maria Paola; Bulk, Saskia; Celli, Jacopo;

    2011-01-01

    , the pentalogy of Cantrell and Limb-Body Wall Complex. Here we present a review of the published mutations in the PORCN gene to date and report on seven new mutations together with the corresponding clinical data. Based on the review we have created a Web-based locus-specific database that lists all...

  15. CFTR and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in lung development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Love Damon

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR was shown previously to modify stretch induced differentiation in the lung. The mechanism for CFTR modulation of lung development was examined by in utero gene transfer of either a sense or antisense construct to alter CFTR expression levels. The BAT-gal transgenic reporter mouse line, expressing β-galactosidase under a canonical Wnt/β-catenin-responsive promoter, was used to assess the relative roles of CFTR, Wnt, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP in lung organogenesis. Adenoviruses containing full-length CFTR, a short anti-sense CFTR gene fragment, or a reporter gene as control were used in an intra-amniotic gene therapy procedure to transiently modify CFTR expression in the fetal lung. Results A direct correlation between CFTR expression levels and PTHrP levels was found. An inverse correlation between CFTR and Wnt signaling activities was demonstrated. Conclusion These data are consistent with CFTR participating in the mechanicosensory process essential to regulate Wnt/β-Catenin signaling required for lung organogenesis.

  16. Characterizing responses to CFTR-modulating drugs using rectal organoids derived from subjects with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Berkers, Gitte; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; de Jonge, Hugo R; Janssens, Hettie M; Bronsveld, Inez; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Houwen, Roderick H J; Vleggaar, Frank P; Escher, Johanna C; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Identifying subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) who may benefit from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-modulating drugs is time-consuming, costly, and especially challenging for individuals with rare uncharacterized CFTR mutations. We studied CFTR function and responses to tw

  17. An unexpected effect of TNF-α on F508del-CFTR maturation and function [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5tv

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    Sara Bitam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multifactorial disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR, which encodes a cAMP-dependent Cl- channel. The most frequent mutation, F508del, leads to the synthesis of a prematurely degraded, otherwise partially functional protein. CFTR is expressed in many epithelia, with major consequences in the airways of patients with CF, characterized by both fluid transport abnormalities and persistent inflammatory responses. The relationship between the acute phase of inflammation and the expression of wild type (WT CFTR or F508del-CFTR is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate this effect. The results show that 10 min exposure to TNF-alpha (0.5-50ng/ml of F508del-CFTR-transfected HeLa cells and human bronchial cells expressing F508del-CFTR in primary culture (HBE leads to the maturation of F508del-CFTR and induces CFTR chloride currents. The enhanced CFTR expression and function upon TNFα is sustained, in HBE cells, for at least 24 h. The underlying mechanism of action involves a protein kinase C (PKC signaling pathway, and occurs through insertion of vesicles containing F508del-CFTR to the plasma membrane, with TNFα behaving as a corrector molecule. In conclusion, a novel and unexpected action of TNFα has been discovered and points to the importance of systematic studies on the roles of inflammatory mediators in the maturation of abnormally folded proteins in general and in the context of CF in particular.

  18. An unexpected effect of TNF-α on F508del-CFTR maturation and function [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5jf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bitam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multifactorial disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR, which encodes a cAMP-dependent Cl- channel. The most frequent mutation, F508del, leads to the synthesis of a prematurely degraded, otherwise partially functional protein. CFTR is expressed in many epithelia, with major consequences in the airways of patients with CF, characterized by both fluid transport abnormalities and persistent inflammatory responses. The relationship between the acute phase of inflammation and the expression of wild type (WT CFTR or F508del-CFTR is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate this effect. The results show that 10 min exposure to TNF-alpha (0.5-50ng/ml of F508del-CFTR-transfected HeLa cells and human bronchial cells expressing F508del-CFTR in primary culture (HBE leads to the maturation of F508del-CFTR and induces CFTR chloride currents. The enhanced CFTR expression and function upon TNFα is sustained, in HBE cells, for at least 24 h. The underlying mechanism of action involves a protein kinase C (PKC signaling pathway, and occurs through insertion of vesicles containing F508del-CFTR to the plasma membrane, with TNFα behaving as a corrector molecule. In conclusion, a novel and unexpected action of TNFα has been discovered and points to the importance of systematic studies on the roles of inflammatory mediators in the maturation of abnormally folded proteins in general and in the context of CF in particular.

  19. Regulation of CFTR Expression and Arginine Vasopressin Activity Are Dependent on Polycystin-1 in Kidney-Derived Cells

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    Carolina Monteiro de Lemos Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is characterized by the development of multiple, progressive, fluid-filled renal cysts that distort the renal parenchyma, leading to end-stage renal failure, mainly after the fifth decade of life. ADPKD is caused by a mutation in the PKD1 or PKD2 genes that encode polycystin-1 (PC-1 and polycystin-2 (PC-2, respectively. PC-1 is an important regulator of several signaling pathways and PC-2 is a nonselective calcium channel. The CFTR chloride channel is responsible for driving net fluid secretion into the cysts, promoting cyst growth. Arginine vasopressin hormone (AVP, in turn, is capable of increasing cystic intracellular cAMP, contributing to cell proliferation, transepithelial fluid secretion, and therefore to disease progression. The aim of this study was to assess if AVP can modulate CFTR and whether PC-1 plays a role in this potential modulation. Methods: M1 cells, derived from mouse cortical collecting duct, were used in the current work. The cells were treated with 10-7 M AVP hormone and divided into two main groups: transfected cells superexpressing PC-1 (Transf and cells not transfected (Ctrl. CFTR expression was assessed by immunodetection, CFTR mRNA levels were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and CFTR net ion transport was measured using the Ussing chamber technique. Results: AVP treatment increased the levels of CFTR protein and mRNA. CFTR short-circuit currents were also increased. However, when PC-1 was overexpressed in M1 cells, no increase in any of these parameters was detected. Conclusions: CFTR chloride channel expression is increased by AVP in M1 cells and PC-1 is capable of regulating this modulation.

  20. Ribosomal Stalk Protein Silencing Partially Corrects the ΔF508-CFTR Functional Expression Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Guido; Oliver, Kathryn; Apaja, Pirjo M; Perdomo, Doranda; Bidaud-Meynard, Aurélien; Lin, Sheng-Ting; Guo, Jingyu; Icyuz, Mert; Sorscher, Eric J; Hartman Iv, John L; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2016-05-01

    The most common cystic fibrosis (CF) causing mutation, deletion of phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508 or Phe508del), results in functional expression defect of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) at the apical plasma membrane (PM) of secretory epithelia, which is attributed to the degradation of the misfolded channel at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Deletion of phenylalanine 670 (ΔF670) in the yeast oligomycin resistance 1 gene (YOR1, an ABC transporter) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenocopies the ΔF508-CFTR folding and trafficking defects. Genome-wide phenotypic (phenomic) analysis of the Yor1-ΔF670 biogenesis identified several modifier genes of mRNA processing and translation, which conferred oligomycin resistance to yeast. Silencing of orthologues of these candidate genes enhanced the ΔF508-CFTR functional expression at the apical PM in human CF bronchial epithelia. Although knockdown of RPL12, a component of the ribosomal stalk, attenuated the translational elongation rate, it increased the folding efficiency as well as the conformational stability of the ΔF508-CFTR, manifesting in 3-fold augmented PM density and function of the mutant. Combination of RPL12 knockdown with the corrector drug, VX-809 (lumacaftor) restored the mutant function to ~50% of the wild-type channel in primary CFTRΔF508/ΔF508 human bronchial epithelia. These results and the observation that silencing of other ribosomal stalk proteins partially rescue the loss-of-function phenotype of ΔF508-CFTR suggest that the ribosomal stalk modulates the folding efficiency of the mutant and is a potential therapeutic target for correction of the ΔF508-CFTR folding defect.

  1. Ribosomal Stalk Protein Silencing Partially Corrects the ΔF508-CFTR Functional Expression Defect.

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    Guido Veit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The most common cystic fibrosis (CF causing mutation, deletion of phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508 or Phe508del, results in functional expression defect of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR at the apical plasma membrane (PM of secretory epithelia, which is attributed to the degradation of the misfolded channel at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Deletion of phenylalanine 670 (ΔF670 in the yeast oligomycin resistance 1 gene (YOR1, an ABC transporter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenocopies the ΔF508-CFTR folding and trafficking defects. Genome-wide phenotypic (phenomic analysis of the Yor1-ΔF670 biogenesis identified several modifier genes of mRNA processing and translation, which conferred oligomycin resistance to yeast. Silencing of orthologues of these candidate genes enhanced the ΔF508-CFTR functional expression at the apical PM in human CF bronchial epithelia. Although knockdown of RPL12, a component of the ribosomal stalk, attenuated the translational elongation rate, it increased the folding efficiency as well as the conformational stability of the ΔF508-CFTR, manifesting in 3-fold augmented PM density and function of the mutant. Combination of RPL12 knockdown with the corrector drug, VX-809 (lumacaftor restored the mutant function to ~50% of the wild-type channel in primary CFTRΔF508/ΔF508 human bronchial epithelia. These results and the observation that silencing of other ribosomal stalk proteins partially rescue the loss-of-function phenotype of ΔF508-CFTR suggest that the ribosomal stalk modulates the folding efficiency of the mutant and is a potential therapeutic target for correction of the ΔF508-CFTR folding defect.

  2. Ribosomal Stalk Protein Silencing Partially Corrects the ΔF508-CFTR Functional Expression Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Guido; Oliver, Kathryn; Apaja, Pirjo M; Perdomo, Doranda; Bidaud-Meynard, Aurélien; Lin, Sheng-Ting; Guo, Jingyu; Icyuz, Mert; Sorscher, Eric J; Hartman Iv, John L; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2016-05-01

    The most common cystic fibrosis (CF) causing mutation, deletion of phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508 or Phe508del), results in functional expression defect of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) at the apical plasma membrane (PM) of secretory epithelia, which is attributed to the degradation of the misfolded channel at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Deletion of phenylalanine 670 (ΔF670) in the yeast oligomycin resistance 1 gene (YOR1, an ABC transporter) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenocopies the ΔF508-CFTR folding and trafficking defects. Genome-wide phenotypic (phenomic) analysis of the Yor1-ΔF670 biogenesis identified several modifier genes of mRNA processing and translation, which conferred oligomycin resistance to yeast. Silencing of orthologues of these candidate genes enhanced the ΔF508-CFTR functional expression at the apical PM in human CF bronchial epithelia. Although knockdown of RPL12, a component of the ribosomal stalk, attenuated the translational elongation rate, it increased the folding efficiency as well as the conformational stability of the ΔF508-CFTR, manifesting in 3-fold augmented PM density and function of the mutant. Combination of RPL12 knockdown with the corrector drug, VX-809 (lumacaftor) restored the mutant function to ~50% of the wild-type channel in primary CFTRΔF508/ΔF508 human bronchial epithelia. These results and the observation that silencing of other ribosomal stalk proteins partially rescue the loss-of-function phenotype of ΔF508-CFTR suggest that the ribosomal stalk modulates the folding efficiency of the mutant and is a potential therapeutic target for correction of the ΔF508-CFTR folding defect. PMID:27168400

  3. CFTR depletion results in changes in fatty acid composition and promotes lipogenesis in intestinal Caco 2/15 cells.

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    Geneviève Mailhot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormal fatty acid composition (FA in plasma and tissue lipids frequently occurs in homozygous and even in heterozygous carriers of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mutations. The mechanism(s underlying these abnormalities remained, however, poorly understood despite the potentially CFTR contributing role. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of CFTR depletion on FA uptake, composition and metabolism using the intestinal Caco-2/15 cell line. shRNA-mediated cftr gene silencing induced qualitative and quantitative modifications in FA composition in differentiated enterocytes as determined by gas-liquid chromatography. With the cftr gene disruption, there was a 1,5 fold increase in the total FA amount, largely attributable to monounsaturated and saturated FA compared to controls. The activity of delta-7 desaturase, estimated by the 16:1(n-7/16:0, was significantly higher in knockdown cells and consistent with the striking elevation of the n-7 FA family. When incubated with [14C]-oleic acid, CFTR-depleted cells were capable of quick incorporation and export to the medium concomitantly with the high protein expression of L-FABP known to promote intracellular FA trafficking. Accordingly, lipoprotein vehicles (CM, VLDL, LDL and HDL, isolated from CFTR knockdown cells, exhibited higher levels of radiolabeled FA. Moreover, in the presence of [14C]-acetate, knockdown cells exhibited enhanced secretion of newly synthesized phospholipids, triglycerides, cholesteryl esters and free FA, thereby suggesting a stimulation of the lipogenic pathway. Conformably, gene expression of SREBP-1c, a key lipogenic transcription factor, was increased while protein expression of the phosphorylated and inactive form of acetylCoA carboxylase was reduced, confirming lipogenesis induction. Finally, CFTR-depleted cells exhibited lower gene expression of transcription factors (PPARalpha

  4. Thermal stability of purified and reconstituted CFTR in a locked open channel conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, Luba A; Jensen, Timothy J; Cui, Liying; Kousouros, Joseph N; He, Lihua; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Riordan, John R

    2015-12-01

    CFTR is unique among ABC transporters as the only one functioning as an ion channel and from a human health perspective because mutations in its gene cause cystic fibrosis. Although considerable advances have been made towards understanding CFTR's mechanism of action and the impact of mutations, the lack of a high-resolution 3D structure has hindered progress. The large multi-domain membrane glycoprotein is normally present at low copy number and when over expressed at high levels it aggregates strongly, limiting the production of stable mono-disperse preparations. While the reasons for the strong self-association are not fully understood, its relatively low thermal stability seems likely to be one. The major CF causing mutation, ΔF508, renders the protein very thermally unstable and therefore a great deal of attention has been paid to this property of CFTR. Multiple second site mutations of CFTR in NBD1 where F508 normally resides and small molecule binders of the domain increase the thermal stability of the mutant. These manipulations also stabilize the wild-type protein. Here we have applied ΔF508-stabilizing changes and other modifications to generate wild-type constructs that express at much higher levels in scaled-up suspension cultures of mammalian cells. After purification and reconstitution into liposomes these proteins are active in a locked-open conformation at temperatures as high as 50 °C and remain monodisperse at 4 °C in detergent or lipid for at least a week. The availability of adequate amounts of these and related stable active preparations of homogeneous CFTR will enable stalled structural and ligand binding studies to proceed.

  5. Measurements of CFTR-Mediated Cl− Secretion in Human Rectal Biopsies Constitute a Robust Biomarker for Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis and Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Adriana M.; Ramalho, Anabela S.; Bonadia, Luciana C.; Felício, Verónica; Ribeiro, Maria A.; Uliyakina, Inna; Marson, Fernando A.; Kmit, Arthur; Cardoso, Silvia R.; Ribeiro, José D.; Bertuzzo, Carmen S.; Sousa, Lisete; Kunzelmann, Karl; Ribeiro, Antônio F.; Amaral, Margarida D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is caused by ∼1,900 mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding for a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl−) channel expressed in several epithelia. Clinical features are dominated by respiratory symptoms, but there is variable organ involvement thus causing diagnostic dilemmas, especially for non-classic cases. Methodology/Principal Findings To further establish measurement of CFTR function as a sensitive and robust biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of CF, we herein assessed cholinergic and cAMP-CFTR-mediated Cl− secretion in 524 freshly excised rectal biopsies from 118 individuals, including patients with confirmed CF clinical diagnosis (n = 51), individuals with clinical CF suspicion (n = 49) and age-matched non-CF controls (n = 18). Conclusive measurements were obtained for 96% of cases. Patients with “Classic CF”, presenting earlier onset of symptoms, pancreatic insufficiency, severe lung disease and low Shwachman-Kulczycki scores were found to lack CFTR-mediated Cl− secretion (<5%). Individuals with milder CF disease presented residual CFTR-mediated Cl− secretion (10–57%) and non-CF controls show CFTR-mediated Cl− secretion ≥30–35% and data evidenced good correlations with various clinical parameters. Finally, comparison of these values with those in “CF suspicion” individuals allowed to confirm CF in 16/49 individuals (33%) and exclude it in 28/49 (57%). Statistical discriminant analyses showed that colonic measurements of CFTR-mediated Cl− secretion are the best discriminator among Classic/Non-Classic CF and non-CF groups. Conclusions/Significance Determination of CFTR-mediated Cl− secretion in rectal biopsies is demonstrated here to be a sensitive, reproducible and robust predictive biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of CF. The method also has very high potential for (pre-)clinical trials of CFTR-modulator therapies. PMID:23082198

  6. Measurements of CFTR-mediated Cl- secretion in human rectal biopsies constitute a robust biomarker for Cystic Fibrosis diagnosis and prognosis.

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    Marisa Sousa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic Fibrosis (CF is caused by ∼1,900 mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene encoding for a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl(- channel expressed in several epithelia. Clinical features are dominated by respiratory symptoms, but there is variable organ involvement thus causing diagnostic dilemmas, especially for non-classic cases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further establish measurement of CFTR function as a sensitive and robust biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of CF, we herein assessed cholinergic and cAMP-CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion in 524 freshly excised rectal biopsies from 118 individuals, including patients with confirmed CF clinical diagnosis (n=51, individuals with clinical CF suspicion (n=49 and age-matched non-CF controls (n=18. Conclusive measurements were obtained for 96% of cases. Patients with "Classic CF", presenting earlier onset of symptoms, pancreatic insufficiency, severe lung disease and low Shwachman-Kulczycki scores were found to lack CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion (<5%. Individuals with milder CF disease presented residual CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion (10-57% and non-CF controls show CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion ≥ 30-35% and data evidenced good correlations with various clinical parameters. Finally, comparison of these values with those in "CF suspicion" individuals allowed to confirm CF in 16/49 individuals (33% and exclude it in 28/49 (57%. Statistical discriminant analyses showed that colonic measurements of CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion are the best discriminator among Classic/Non-Classic CF and non-CF groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Determination of CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion in rectal biopsies is demonstrated here to be a sensitive, reproducible and robust predictive biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of CF. The method also has very high potential for (pre-clinical trials of CFTR-modulator therapies.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers CFTR-mediated airway surface liquid secretion in swine trachea

    OpenAIRE

    Luan, Xiaojie; Campanucci, Verónica A; Nair, Manoj; YILMAZ, Orhan; Belev, George; Machen, Terry E.; Chapman, Dean; Ianowski, Juan P.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Several organs are affected in CF, but most of the morbidity and mortality comes from lung disease caused by the failure to clear bacteria. Bacterial clearance depends on a layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) covering the airways, rich in antimicrobial compounds and mucins, that removes bacteria from the airway through mucocilia...

  8. Increased efficacy of VX-809 in different cellular systems results from an early stabilization effect of F508del-CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinha, Carlos M; Sousa, Marisa; Canato, Sara; Schmidt, André; Uliyakina, Inna; Amaral, Margarida D

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common recessive autosomal disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The most common mutation, F508del, leads to CFTR impaired plasma membrane trafficking. Therapies modulating CFTR basic defect are emerging, such as VX-809, a corrector of F508del-CFTR traffic which just succeeded in a Phase III clinical trial. We recently showed that VX-809 is additive to two other correctors (VRT-325 and compound 4a). Here, we aimed to determine whether the differential rescuing by these compounds results from cell-specific factors or rather from distinct effects at the early biogenesis and/or processing. The rescuing efficiencies of the above three correctors were first compared in different cellular models (primary respiratory cells, cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial and baby hamster kidney [BHK] cell lines) by functional approaches: micro-Ussing chamber and iodide efflux. Next, biochemical methods (metabolic labeling, pulse-chase and immunoprecipitation) were used to determine their impact on CFTR biogenesis / processing. Functional analyses revealed that VX-809 has the greatest rescuing efficacy and that the relative efficiencies of the three compounds are essentially maintained in all three cellular models tested. Nevertheless, biochemical data show that VX-809 significantly stabilizes F508del-CFTR immature form, an effect that is not observed for C3 nor C4. VX-809 and C3 also significantly increase accumulation of immature CFTR. Our data suggest that VX-809 increases the stability of F508del-CFTR immature form at an early phase of its biogenesis, thus explaining its increased efficacy when inducing its rescue. PMID:26171232

  9. Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks.

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    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor-target gene interactions but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive. In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence.

  10. Divergent signaling via SUMO modification: potential for CFTR modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahner, Annette; Gong, Xiaoyan; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2016-02-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is generally responsible for the cAMP/PKA regulated anion conductance at the apical membranes of secretory epithelial cells. Mutations in CFTR underlie cystic fibrosis (CF), in which the most common variant, F508del, causes protein misfolding and its proteasome-mediated degradation. A new pathway that contributes to mutant CFTR degradation is mediated by the small heat shock protein, Hsp27, which cooperates with Ubc9, the E2 enzyme for SUMOylation, to selectively conjugate mutant CFTR with SUMO-2/3. This SUMO paralog can form polychains, which are recognized by the ubiquitin E3 enzyme, RNF4, leading to CFTR ubiquitylation and recognition by the proteasome. We found also that F508del CFTR could be modified by SUMO-1, a paralog that does not support SUMO polychain formation. The use of different SUMO paralogs to modify and target a single substrate for divergent purposes is not uncommon. In this short review we discuss the possibility that conjugation with SUMO-1 could protect mutant CFTR from disposal by RNF4 and similar ubiquitin ligases. We hypothesize that such a pathway could contribute to therapeutic efforts to stabilize immature mutant CFTR and thereby enhance the action of therapeutics that correct CFTR trafficking to the apical membranes.

  11. Mechanistic Approaches to Improve Correction of the Most Common Disease-Causing Mutation in Cystic Fibrosis.

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    Vedrana Bali

    Full Text Available The most common mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene leads to deletion of the phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508 in the CFTR protein and causes multiple folding and functional defects. Contrary to large-scale efforts by industry and academia, no significant therapeutic benefit has been achieved with a single "corrector". Therefore, investigations concentrate on drug combinations. Orkambi (Vertex Pharmaceuticals, the first FDA-approved drug for treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF caused by this mutation, is a combination of a corrector (VX-809 that facilitates ΔF508 CFTR biogenesis and a potentiator (VX-770, which improves its function. Yet, clinical trials utilizing this combination showed only modest therapeutic benefit. The low efficacy Orkambi has been attributed to VX-770-mediated destabilization of VX-809-rescued ΔF508 CFTR. Here we report that the negative effects of VX-770 can be reversed by increasing the half-life of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER form (band B of ΔF508 CFTR with another corrector (Corr-4a. Although Corr-4a alone has only minimal effects on ΔF508 CFTR rescue, it increases the half-life of ΔF508 CFTR band B when it is present during half-life measurements. Our data shows that stabilization of band B ΔF508 CFTR with Corr-4a and simultaneous rescue with VX-809, leads to a >2-fold increase in cAMP-activated, CFTRinh-172-inhibited currents compared to VX-809 alone, or VX-809+VX-770. The negative effects of VX-770 and the Corr-4a protection are specific to the native I507-ATT ΔF508 CFTR without affecting the inherently more stable, synonymous variant I507-ATC ΔF508 CFTR. Our studies emphasize that stabilization of ΔF508 CFTR band B in the ER might improve its functional rescue by Orkambi.

  12. Mechanistic Approaches to Improve Correction of the Most Common Disease-Causing Mutation in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Vedrana; Lazrak, Ahmed; Guroji, Purushotham; Matalon, Sadis; Bebok, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    The most common mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene leads to deletion of the phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508) in the CFTR protein and causes multiple folding and functional defects. Contrary to large-scale efforts by industry and academia, no significant therapeutic benefit has been achieved with a single "corrector". Therefore, investigations concentrate on drug combinations. Orkambi (Vertex Pharmaceuticals), the first FDA-approved drug for treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) caused by this mutation, is a combination of a corrector (VX-809) that facilitates ΔF508 CFTR biogenesis and a potentiator (VX-770), which improves its function. Yet, clinical trials utilizing this combination showed only modest therapeutic benefit. The low efficacy Orkambi has been attributed to VX-770-mediated destabilization of VX-809-rescued ΔF508 CFTR. Here we report that the negative effects of VX-770 can be reversed by increasing the half-life of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) form (band B) of ΔF508 CFTR with another corrector (Corr-4a.) Although Corr-4a alone has only minimal effects on ΔF508 CFTR rescue, it increases the half-life of ΔF508 CFTR band B when it is present during half-life measurements. Our data shows that stabilization of band B ΔF508 CFTR with Corr-4a and simultaneous rescue with VX-809, leads to a >2-fold increase in cAMP-activated, CFTRinh-172-inhibited currents compared to VX-809 alone, or VX-809+VX-770. The negative effects of VX-770 and the Corr-4a protection are specific to the native I507-ATT ΔF508 CFTR without affecting the inherently more stable, synonymous variant I507-ATC ΔF508 CFTR. Our studies emphasize that stabilization of ΔF508 CFTR band B in the ER might improve its functional rescue by Orkambi. PMID:27214033

  13. Targeted gene mutation in Phytophthora spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamour, K.H.; Finley, L.; Hurtado-Gonzales, O.; Gobena, D.; Tierney, M.; Meijer, H.J.G.

    2006-01-01

    The genus Phytophthora belongs to the oomycetes and is composed of plant pathogens. Currently, there are no strategies to mutate specific genes for members of this genus. Whole genome sequences are available or being prepared for Phytophthora sojae, P. ramorum, P. infestans, and P. capsici and the d

  14. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

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    Pławski Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families.

  15. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks in the prefrontal cortex area of the brain. ... of spontaneous mutations in genes that form a network in the front region of the brain. The ...

  16. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiators protect G551D but not ΔF508 CFTR from thermal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuehong; Dawson, David C

    2014-09-01

    The G551D cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation is associated with severe disease in ∼5% of cystic fibrosis patients worldwide. This amino acid substitution in NBD1 results in a CFTR chloride channel characterized by a severe gating defect that can be at least partially overcome in vitro by exposure to a CFTR potentiator. In contrast, the more common ΔF508 mutation is associated with a severe protein trafficking defect, as well as impaired channel function. Recent clinical trials demonstrated a beneficial effect of the CFTR potentiator, Ivacaftor (VX-770), on lung function of patients bearing at least one copy of G551D CFTR, but no comparable effect on ΔF508 homozygotes. This difference in efficacy was not surprising in view of the established difference in the molecular phenotypes of the two mutant channels. Recently, however, it was shown that the structural defect introduced by the deletion of F508 is associated with the thermal instability of ΔF508 CFTR channel function in vitro. This additional mutant phenotype raised the possibility that the differences in the behavior of ΔF508 and G551D CFTR, as well as the disparate efficacy of Ivacaftor, might be a reflection of the differing thermal stabilities of the two channels at 37 °C. We compared the thermal stability of G551D and ΔF508 CFTR in Xenopus oocytes in the presence and absence of CTFR potentiators. G551D CFTR exhibited a thermal instability that was comparable to that of ΔF508 CFTR. G551D CFTR, however, was protected from thermal instability by CFTR potentiators, whereas ΔF508 CFTR was not. These results suggest that the efficacy of VX-770 in patients bearing the G551D mutation is due, at least in part, to the ability of the small molecule to protect the mutant channel from thermal instability at human body temperature.

  17. Mechanisms of CFTR functional variants that impair regulated bicarbonate permeation and increase risk for pancreatitis but not for cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica LaRusch; Jinsei Jung; General, Ignacio J.; Lewis, Michele D; Hyun Woo Park; Brand, Randall E.; Andres Gelrud; Anderson, Michelle A.; Banks, Peter A; Darwin Conwell; Christopher Lawrence; Joseph Romagnuolo; John Baillie; Samer Alkaade; Gregory Cote

    2014-01-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev ) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize tha...

  18. Mutation scanning of peach floral genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilde H Dayton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutation scanning technology has been used to develop crop species with improved traits. Modifications that improve screening throughput and sensitivity would facilitate the targeted mutation breeding of crops. Technical innovations for high-resolution melting (HRM analysis are enabling the clinic-based screening for human disease gene polymorphism. We examined the application of two HRM modifications, COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR, to the mutation scanning of genes in peach, Prunus persica. The targeted genes were the putative floral regulators PpAGAMOUS and PpTERMINAL FLOWER I. Results HRM analysis of PpAG and PpTFL1 coding regions in 36 peach cultivars found one polymorphic site in each gene. PpTFL1 and PpAG SNPs were used to examine approaches to increase HRM throughput. Cultivars with SNPs could be reliably detected in pools of twelve genotypes. COLD-PCR was found to increase the sensitivity of HRM analysis of pooled samples, but worked best with small amplicons. Examination of QMC-PCR demonstrated that primary PCR products for further analysis could be produced from variable levels of genomic DNA. Conclusions Natural SNPs in exons of target peach genes were discovered by HRM analysis of cultivars from a southeastern US breeding program. For detecting natural or induced SNPs in larger populations, HRM efficiency can be improved by increasing sample pooling and template production through approaches such as COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR. Technical advances developed to improve clinical diagnostics can play a role in the targeted mutation breeding of crops.

  19. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  20. A conservative assessment of the major genetic causes of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis: data from a comprehensive analysis of PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR genes in 253 young French patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Masson

    Full Text Available Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP has traditionally been defined as chronic pancreatitis in the absence of any obvious precipitating factors (e.g. alcohol abuse and family history of the disease. Studies over the past 15 years have revealed that ICP has a highly complex genetic architecture involving multiple gene loci. Here, we have attempted to provide a conservative assessment of the major genetic causes of ICP in a sample of 253 young French ICP patients. For the first time, conventional types of mutation (comprising coding sequence variants and variants at intron/exon boundaries and gross genomic rearrangements were screened for in all four major pancreatitis genes, PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR. For the purposes of the study, synonymous, intronic and 5'- or 3'-untranslated region variants were excluded from the analysis except where there was persuasive evidence of functional consequences. The remaining sequence variants/genotypes were classified into causative, contributory or neutral categories by consideration of (i their allele frequencies in patient and normal control populations, (ii their presumed or experimentally confirmed functional effects, (iii the relative importance of their associated genes in the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis and (iv gene-gene interactions wherever applicable. Adoption of this strategy allowed us to assess the pathogenic relevance of specific variants/genotypes to their respective carriers to an unprecedented degree. The genetic cause of ICP could be assigned in 23.7% of individuals in the study group. A strong genetic susceptibility factor was also present in an additional 24.5% of cases. Taken together, up to 48.2% of the studied ICP patients were found to display evidence of a genetic basis for their pancreatitis. Whereas these particular proportions may not be extrapolable to all ICP patients, the approach employed should serve as a useful framework for acquiring a better understanding of the

  1. Rattlesnake Phospholipase A2 Increases CFTR-Chloride Channel Current and Corrects ∆F508CFTR Dysfunction: Impact in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Grazyna; Bakouh, Naziha; Lourdel, Stéphane; Odolczyk, Norbert; Premchandar, Aiswarya; Servel, Nathalie; Hatton, Aurélie; Ostrowski, Maciej K; Xu, Haijin; Saul, Frederick A; Moquereau, Christelle; Bitam, Sara; Pranke, Iwona; Planelles, Gabrielle; Teulon, Jacques; Herrmann, Harald; Roldan, Ariel; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Dadlez, Michal; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Ollero, Mario; Corringer, Pierre-Jean; Edelman, Aleksander

    2016-07-17

    Deletion of Phe508 in the nucleotide binding domain (∆F508-NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR; a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel) is the most frequent mutation associated with cystic fibrosis. This mutation affects the maturation and gating of CFTR protein. The search for new high-affinity ligands of CFTR acting as dual modulators (correctors/activators) presents a major challenge in the pharmacology of cystic fibrosis. Snake venoms are a rich source of natural multifunctional proteins, potential binders of ion channels. In this study, we identified the CB subunit of crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus as a new ligand and allosteric modulator of CFTR. We showed that CB interacts with NBD1 of both wild type and ∆F508CFTR and increases their chloride channel currents. The potentiating effect of CB on CFTR activity was demonstrated using electrophysiological techniques in Xenopus laevis oocytes, in CFTR-HeLa cells, and ex vivo in mouse colon tissue. The correcting effect of CB was shown by functional rescue of CFTR activity after 24-h ΔF508CFTR treatments with CB. Moreover, the presence of fully glycosylated CFTR was observed. Molecular docking allowed us to propose a model of the complex involving of the ABCβ and F1-like ATP-binding subdomains of ΔF508-NBD1. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange analysis confirmed stabilization in these regions, also showing allosteric stabilization in two other distal regions. Surface plasmon resonance competition studies showed that CB disrupts the ∆F508CFTR-cytokeratin 8 complex, allowing for the escape of ∆F508CFTR from degradation. Therefore CB, as a dual modulator of ΔF508CFTR, constitutes a template for the development of new anti-CF agents. PMID:27241308

  2. 先天性双侧输精管缺如患者CFTR基因启动子区域基因突变检测%Detection of promoter region of CFTR gene in Chinese congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓; 张炎; 杨晓健; 陈石涛; 袁萍; 张滨

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨先天性双侧输精管缺如患者囊性纤维化跨膜转导因子(CFTR)基因启动子区域的基因突变情况.方法 采用PCR技术结合DNA直接测序的方法检测2013年5月至2015年1月于中山大学附属第三医院诊断明确的11例先天性双侧输精管缺如汉族患者及50名健康已生育汉族男性的CFTR基因5'端ATG上游3.8 kb的启动子区域的突变情况,并在NCBI和Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database在线比对,利用Transfac在线预测及系统发生足迹法联合已经报道的转录因子作用元件,探讨所检测之碱基变异与启动子调控作用的关系.结果 11例汉族先天性双侧输精管缺如患者中发现c.-8G>C(1例)、c.-966T> G(7例)2个已知CFTR启动子区域的多态性位点及c.-195C>A(1例)1个单核苷酸位点变异,其中,c.-195C>A位于物种间启动子保守区域.结论 除外多态性位点,在中国汉族先天性双侧输精管缺如患者CFTR基因启动子区域检测到一个单核苷酸变异,其与疾病发生的关系仍需进一步行生物学实验验证.%Objective To detect the variants in the promoter region of the CFTR gene in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD).Methods A total of 11 CBAVD patients and 50 healthy men as control were enrolled in the study from May 2013 to January 2015.Sanger sequencing was performed in the promoter region of 3.8 kb of the CFTR gene on the PCR products.The genome sequence of the CFTR gene was compared and analyzed with the website of NCBI and Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database.Also,Transfac and phylogenetic footprinting method was used to investigate the relationship between the promoter region variants and the transcription factors function components.Results SNP of c.-8G > C (n =1) and c.-966T > G(n =7),as well as one single nucleotide variant of c.-195C > A (n =1) were identified in the promoter region of the CBAVD patients,of which c.-195C > A was in the conserved domains of the promoter

  3. Development of allele-specific multiplex PCR to determine the length of poly-T in intron 8 of CFTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neng Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutation analysis has been implemented for Cystic Fibrosis (CF carrier screening, and molecular diagnosis of CF and congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD. Although poly-T allele analysis in intron 8 of CFTR is required when a patient is positive for R117H, it is not recommended for routine carrier screening. Therefore, commercial kits for CFTR mutation analysis were designed either to mask the poly-T allele results, unless a patient is R117H positive, or to have the poly-T analysis as a standalone reflex test using the same commercial platform. There are other standalone assays developed to detect poly-T alleles, such as heteroduplex analysis, High Resolution Melting (HRM curve analysis, allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR and Sanger sequencing. In this report, we developed a simple and easy-to-implement multiplex AS-PCR assay using unlabeled standard length primers, which can be used as a reflex or standalone test for CFTR poly-T track analysis. Out of 115 human gDNA samples tested, results from our new AS-PCR matched to the previous known poly-T results or results from Sanger sequencing.

  4. The CFTR polymorphisms poly-T, TG-repeats and M470V in Chinese males with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Hua Ni; Lei Jiang; Qian-Jin Fei; Jian-Yuan Jin; Xu Yang; Xue-Feng Huang

    2012-01-01

    Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) is a frequent cause of obstructive azoospermia,and mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have also been frequently identified in patients with CBAVD.However,the distribution of the CFTR polymorphisms M470V,poly-T,TG-repeats and F508del mutation in the Chinese CBAVD population with presumed low cystic fibrosis (CF) frequency remains to be evaluated.Samples obtained from 109 Chinese infertile males with CBAVD and 104 normal controls were analyzed for the presence of CFTR (TG)m(T)n,M470V and F508del by PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing.Our study showed that the F508del mutation was not found in our patients.The 5T mutation was present with high frequency in Chinese CBAVD patients and IVS8-5T linked to either 12 or 13 TG repeats was highly prevalent among CBAVD patients (97.22% of 72 cases and 96.91% of 97 alleles with IVS8-5T).Moreover,a statistically significant relationship between TG12-5T-V470 haplotype and CBAVD was detected.This study indicated that the CFTR polymorphisms poly-T,TG-repeats and M470V might affect the process of CBAVD in the Chinese population.

  5. Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A New Source for Hepatocyte-Like Cells and Induction of CFTR Expression by Coculture with Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Paracchini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a monogenic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene, with lung and liver manifestations. Because of pitfalls of gene therapy, novel approaches for reconstitution of the airway epithelium and CFTR expression should be explored. In the present study, human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs were isolated from term placentas and characterized for expression of phenotypic and pluripotency markers, and for differentiation potential towards mesoderm (osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. Moreover, hAMSCs were induced to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, as demonstrated by mixed function oxidase activity and expression of albumin, alpha1-antitrypsin, and CK19. We also investigated the CFTR expression in hAMSCs upon isolation and in coculture with CF airway epithelial cells. Freshly isolated hAMSCs displayed low levels of CFTR mRNA, which even decreased with culture passages. Following staining with the vital dye CM-DiI, hAMSCs were mixed with CFBE41o- respiratory epithelial cells and seeded onto permeable filters. Flow cytometry demonstrated that 33–50% of hAMSCs acquired a detectable CFTR expression on the apical membrane, a result confirmed by confocal microscopy. Our data show that amniotic MSCs have the potential to differentiate into epithelial cells of organs relevant in CF pathogenesis and may contribute to partial correction of the CF phenotype.

  6. Potentiators exert distinct effects on human, murine, and Xenopus CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guiying; Khazanov, Netaly; Stauffer, Brandon B; Infield, Daniel T; Imhoff, Barry R; Senderowitz, Hanoch; McCarty, Nael A

    2016-08-01

    VX-770 (Ivacaftor) has been approved for clinical usage in cystic fibrosis patients with several CFTR mutations. Yet the binding site(s) on CFTR for this compound and other small molecule potentiators are unknown. We hypothesize that insight into this question could be gained by comparing the effect of potentiators on CFTR channels from different origins, e.g., human, mouse, and Xenopus (frog). In the present study, we combined this comparative molecular pharmacology approach with that of computer-aided drug discovery to identify and characterize new potentiators of CFTR and to explore possible mechanism of action. Our results demonstrate that 1) VX-770, NPPB, GlyH-101, P1, P2, and P3 all exhibited ortholog-specific behavior in that they potentiated hCFTR, mCFTR, and xCFTR with different efficacies; 2) P1, P2, and P3 potentiated hCFTR in excised macropatches in a manner dependent on the degree of PKA-mediated stimulation; 3) P1 and P2 did not have additive effects, suggesting that these compounds might share binding sites. Also 4) using a pharmacophore modeling approach, we identified three new potentiators (IOWH-032, OSSK-2, and OSSK-3) that have structures similar to GlyH-101 and that also exhibit ortholog-specific potentiation of CFTR. These could potentially serve as lead compounds for development of new drugs for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. The ortholog-specific behavior of these compounds suggest that a comparative pharmacology approach, using cross-ortholog chimeras, may be useful for identification of binding sites on human CFTR. PMID:27288484

  7. ∆F508 CFTR interactome remodelling promotes rescue of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, Sandra; Bamberger, Casimir; Calzolari, Diego; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Balch, William E; Yates, John R

    2015-12-24

    Deletion of phenylalanine 508 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (∆F508 CFTR) is the major cause of cystic fibrosis, one of the most common inherited childhood diseases. The mutated CFTR anion channel is not fully glycosylated and shows minimal activity in bronchial epithelial cells of patients with cystic fibrosis. Low temperature or inhibition of histone deacetylases can partly rescue ∆F508 CFTR cellular processing defects and function. A favourable change of ∆F508 CFTR protein-protein interactions was proposed as a mechanism of rescue; however, CFTR interactome dynamics during temperature shift and inhibition of histone deacetylases are unknown. Here we report the first comprehensive analysis of the CFTR and ∆F508 CFTR interactome and its dynamics during temperature shift and inhibition of histone deacetylases. By using a novel deep proteomic analysis method, we identify 638 individual high-confidence CFTR interactors and discover a ∆F508 deletion-specific interactome, which is extensively remodelled upon rescue. Detailed analysis of the interactome remodelling identifies key novel interactors, whose loss promote ∆F508 CFTR channel function in primary cystic fibrosis epithelia or which are critical for CFTR biogenesis. Our results demonstrate that global remodelling of ∆F508 CFTR interactions is crucial for rescue, and provide comprehensive insight into the molecular disease mechanisms of cystic fibrosis caused by deletion of F508.

  8. Optimal correction of distinct CFTR folding mutants in rectal cystic fibrosis organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Gogorza Gondra, Ricardo A; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte M; Janssens, Hettie M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    Small-molecule therapies that restore defects in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gating (potentiators) or trafficking (correctors) are being developed for cystic fibrosis (CF) in a mutation-specific fashion. Options for pharmacological correction of CFTR-p.Phe508del (F508del) are being extensively studied but correction of other trafficking mutants that may also benefit from corrector treatment remains largely unknown.We studied correction of the folding mutants CFTR-p.Phe508del, -p.Ala455Glu (A455E) and -p.Asn1303Lys (N1303K) by VX-809 and 18 other correctors (C1-C18) using a functional CFTR assay in human intestinal CF organoids.Function of both CFTR-p.Phe508del and -p.Ala455Glu was enhanced by a variety of correctors but no residual or corrector-induced activity was associated with CFTR-p.Asn1303Lys. Importantly, VX-809-induced correction was most dominant for CFTR-p.Phe508del, while correction of CFTR-p.Ala455Glu was highest by a subgroup of compounds called bithiazoles (C4, C13, C14 and C17) and C5.These data support the development of mutation-specific correctors for optimal treatment of different CFTR trafficking mutants, and identify C5 and bithiazoles as the most promising compounds for correction of CFTR-p.Ala455Glu. PMID:27103391

  9. Pathogenic mutations of nuclear genes associated with mitochondrial disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyu Zhu; Xuerui Peng; Min-Xin Guan; Qingfeng Yan

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinical phenotypes associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, which can be caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or nuclear genes. In this review, we summarized the pathogenic mutations of nuclear genes associated with mitochondrial disorders. These nuclear genes encode, components of mitochondrial translational machinery and structural subunits and assembly factors of the oxidative phosphorylation, that complex. The molecular mechanisms, that nuclear modifier genes modulate the phenotypic expression of mtDNA mutations, are discussed in detail.

  10. THE ANALYSIS OF NF2 GENE MUTATION IN SPORADIC SCHWANNOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞留贯; 孙青芳; 沈建康; 赵卫国; 罗其中

    2002-01-01

    Objective To analyze the mutation of NF2 gene (exon 2,4,6 and 13) in schwannomas. Methods The NF2 gene mutation in 36 schwannomas were observed by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequence. The proliferative index of schwannoma was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results We found 13 mutations in 36 schwannomas, including 6 deletion or insertion resulting in a frameshift, 2 nonsense mutations, 2 missense mutations, and 3 alterations affecting acceptor or donor of splicing sites in E4,E6,E13. The proliferative index of schwannomas with mutation were significantly higher than those without mutation (P< 0.05). Conclusion NF2 gene mutation is the frequent event in the tumorigenesis of schwannomas, and there is some correlation between the mutation and clinical behavior(tumor proliferation).

  11. Targeting F508del-CFTR to develop rational new therapies for cystic fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-wei CAI; Jia LIU; Hong-yu LI; David N SHEPPARD

    2011-01-01

    The mutation F508del is the commonest cause of the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). CF disrupts the function of many organs in the body, most notably the lungs, by perturbing salt and water transport across epithelial surfaces. F508del causes harm in two principal ways. First,the mutation prevents delivery of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to its correct cellular location,the apical(lumen-facing) membrane of epithelial cells. Second, F508del perturbs the Cl- channel function of CFTR by disrupting channel gating. Here, we discuss the development of rational new therapies for CF that target F508del-CFTR.We highlight how structural studies provide new insight into the role of F508 in the regulation of channel gating by cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis. We emphasize the use of high-throughput screening to identify lead compounds for therapy development.These compounds include CFTR correctors that restore the expression of F508del-CFTR at the apical membrane of epithelial cells and CFTR potentiators that rescue the F508del-CFTR gating defect. Initial results from clinical trials of CFTR correctors and potentiators augur well for the development of small molecule therapies that target the root cause of CF: mutations in CFTR.

  12. Regulated trafficking of the CFTR chloride channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, L.J.; Kleizen, B.; Jonge, H.R. de

    2000-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the ABC transporter encoded by the cystic fibrosis gene, is localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells where it functions as a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel and as a regulator of other ion channels and transporters. Wh

  13. Mechanosensitive activation of CFTR by increased cell volume and hydrostatic pressure but not shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitzthum, Constanze; Clauss, Wolfgang G; Fronius, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a Cl(-) channel that is essential for electrolyte and fluid homeostasis. Preliminary evidence indicates that CFTR is a mechanosensitive channel. In lung epithelia, CFTR is exposed to different mechanical forces such as shear stress (Ss) and membrane distention. The present study questioned whether Ss and/or stretch influence CFTR activity (wild type, ∆F508, G551D). Human CFTR (hCFTR) was heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes and the response to the mechanical stimulus and forskolin/IBMX (FI) was measured by two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments. Ss had no influence on hCFTR activity. Injection of an intracellular analogous solution to increase cell volume alone did not affect hCFTR activity. However, hCFTR activity was augmented by injection after pre-stimulation with FI. The response to injection was similar in channels carrying the common mutations ∆F508 and G551D compared to wild type hCFTR. Stretch-induced CFTR activation was further assessed in Ussing chamber measurements using Xenopus lung preparations. Under control conditions increased hydrostatic pressure (HP) decreased the measured ion current including activation of a Cl(-) secretion that was unmasked by the CFTR inhibitor GlyH-101. These data demonstrate activation of CFTR in vitro and in a native pulmonary epithelium in response to mechanical stress. Mechanosensitive regulation of CFTR is highly relevant for pulmonary physiology that relies on ion transport processes facilitated by pulmonary epithelial cells. PMID:26357939

  14. Genetic Inhibition of the Ubiquitin Ligase Rnf5 Attenuates Phenotypes Associated to F508del Cystic Fibrosis Mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Tomati (Valeria); E. Sondo (Elvira); A. Armirotti (Andrea); E. Caci (Emanuela); E. Pesce (Emanuela); M. Marini (Monica); A. Gianotti (Ambra); Y. Ju Jeon (Young); M. Cilli (Michele); A. Pistorio (Angela); L. Mastracci (Luca); R. Ravazzolo (Roberto); B.J. Scholte (Bob); Z. Ronai (Ze'ev); L.J.V. Galietta (Luis J. V.); N. Pedemonte (Nicoletta)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CFTR chloride channel. Deletion of phenylalanine 508 (F508del), the most frequent CF mutation, impairs CFTR trafficking and gating. F508del-CFTR mistrafficking may be corrected by acting directly on mutant CFTR itself or by modulating ex

  15. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR allelic variants relate to shifts in faecal microbiota of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Schippa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In this study we investigated the effects of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR gene variants on the composition of faecal microbiota, in patients affected by Cystic Fibrosis (CF. CFTR mutations (F508del is the most common lead to a decreased secretion of chloride/water, and to mucus sticky secretions, in pancreas, respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Intestinal manifestations are underestimated in CF, leading to ileum meconium at birth, or small bowel bacterial overgrowth in adult age. METHODS: Thirty-six CF patients, fasting and under no-antibiotic treatment, were CFTR genotyped on both alleles. Faecal samples were subjected to molecular microbial profiling through Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis and species-specific PCR. Ecological parameters and multivariate algorithms were employed to find out if CFTR variants could be related to the microbiota structure. RESULTS: Patients were classified by two different criteria: 1 presence/absence of F508del mutation; 2 disease severity in heterozygous and homozygous F508del patients. We found that homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients exhibited an enhanced dysbiotic faecal microbiota composition, even within the CF cohort itself, with higher biodiversity and evenness. We also found, by species-specific PCR, that potentially harmful species (Escherichia coli and Eubacterium biforme were abundant in homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients, while beneficial species (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium limosum were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report that establishes a link among CFTR variants and shifts in faecal microbiota, opening the way to studies that perceive CF as a 'systemic disease', linking the lung and the gut in a joined axis.

  16. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators. PMID:27226582

  17. Stimulation of Airway and Intestinal Mucosal Secretion by Natural Coumarin CFTR Activators

    OpenAIRE

    Hong eYang; Lina eXu; Yujie eSui; Xin eLiu; Chengyan eHe; Rouyu eFang; Jia eLiu; Feng eHao; Tong-Hui eMa

    2011-01-01

    Mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause lethal hereditary disease cystic fibrosis (CF) that involves extensive destruction and dysfunction of serous epithelium. Possible pharmacological therapy includes correction of defective intracellular processing and abnormal channel gating. In a previous study, we identified five natural coumarin potentiators of Δ508-CFTR including osthole, imperatorin, isopsoralen, praeruptorin A and scoparone. The present study wa...

  18. Mechanism-based corrector combination restores Delta F508-CFTR folding and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Veit, Guido; Dekkers, Johanna F.; Bagdany, Miklos; Soya, Naoto; Xu, Haijin; Roldan, Ariel; Verkman, Alan S.; Kurth, Mark; Simon, Agnes; Hegedus, Tamas; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Lukacs, Gergely L.

    2013-01-01

    The most common cystic fibrosis mutation, Delta F508 in nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1), impairs cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-coupled domain folding, plasma membrane expression, function and stability. VX-809, a promising investigational corrector of Delta F508-CFTR

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers CFTR-mediated airway surface liquid secretion in swine trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xiaojie; Campanucci, Verónica A; Nair, Manoj; Yilmaz, Orhan; Belev, George; Machen, Terry E; Chapman, Dean; Ianowski, Juan P

    2014-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Several organs are affected in CF, but most of the morbidity and mortality comes from lung disease. Recent data show that the initial consequence of CFTR mutation is the failure to eradicate bacteria before the development of inflammation and airway remodeling. Bacterial clearance depends on a layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) consisting of both a mucus layer that traps, kills, and inactivates bacteria and a periciliary liquid layer that keeps the mucus at an optimum distance from the underlying epithelia, to maximize ciliary motility and clearance of bacteria. The airways in CF patients and animal models of CF demonstrate abnormal ASL secretion and reduced antimicrobial properties. Thus, it has been proposed that abnormal ASL secretion in response to bacteria may facilitate the development of the infection and inflammation that characterize CF airway disease. Whether the inhalation of bacteria triggers ASL secretion, and the role of CFTR, have never been tested, however. We developed a synchrotron-based imaging technique to visualize the ASL layer and measure the effect of bacteria on ASL secretion. We show that the introduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria into the lumen of intact isolated swine tracheas triggers CFTR-dependent ASL secretion by the submucosal glands. This response requires expression of the bacterial protein flagellin. In patients with CF, the inhalation of bacteria would fail to trigger ASL secretion, leading to infection and inflammation. PMID:25136096

  20. Contribution of casein kinase 2 and spleen tyrosine kinase to CFTR trafficking and protein kinase A-induced activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Simão; Kongsuphol, Patthara; Mendes, Ana Isabel; Romeiras, Francisco; Sousa, Marisa; Schreiber, Rainer; Matos, Paulo; Jordan, Peter; Mehta, Anil; Amaral, Margarida D; Kunzelmann, Karl; Farinha, Carlos M

    2011-11-01

    Previously, the pleiotropic "master kinase" casein kinase 2 (CK2) was shown to interact with CFTR, the protein responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Moreover, CK2 inhibition abolished CFTR conductance in cell-attached membrane patches, native epithelial ducts, and Xenopus oocytes. CFTR possesses two CK2 phosphorylation sites (S422 and T1471), with unclear impact on its processing and trafficking. Here, we investigated the effects of mutating these CK2 sites on CFTR abundance, maturation, and degradation coupled to effects on ion channel activity and surface expression. We report that CK2 inhibition significantly decreased processing of wild-type (wt) CFTR, with no effect on F508del CFTR. Eliminating phosphorylation at S422 and T1471 revealed antagonistic roles in CFTR trafficking: S422 activation versus T1471 inhibition, as evidenced by a severe trafficking defect for the T1471D mutant. Notably, mutation of Y512, a consensus sequence for the spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) possibly acting in a CK2 context adjacent to the common CF-causing defect F508del, had a strong effect on both maturation and CFTR currents, allowing the identification of this kinase as a novel regulator of CFTR. These results reinforce the importance of CK2 and the S422 and T1471 residues for regulation of CFTR and uncover a novel regulation of CFTR by SYK, a recognized controller of inflammation.

  1. PET neuroimaging and mutations in the DJ-1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, MCJ; Eshuis, SA; Maguire, RP; Veenma-van der Duijn, L; Pruim, J; Oostra, BA; van Duijn, CM; Leenders, KL

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the DJ-1 gene lead to autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism. We performed F-DOPA and FDG PET neuroimaging in two parkinsonism patients homozygous for DJ-1 mutations, three relatives heterozygous for a DJ-1 mutation and one non-carrier, all from the originally described kindred fr

  2. CFTR: a hub for kinases and crosstalk of cAMP and Ca2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, Karl; Mehta, Anil

    2013-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The resulting disease is pleiotropic consistent with the idea that CFTR acts as a node within a network of signalling proteins. CFTR is not only a regulator of multiple transport proteins and controlled by numerous kinases but also participates in many signalling pathways that are disrupted after expression of its commonest mutant (F508del-CFTR). It operates in membrane compartments creating a scaffold for cytoskeletal elements, surface receptors, kinases and phosphodiesterases. CFTR is exposed to membrane-local second messengers such that a CFTR-interacting, low cellular energy sensor kinase (AMP- and ADP-activated kinase, AMPK) signals through a high energy phosphohistidine protein kinase (nucleoside diphosphate kinase, NDPK). CFTR also translocates a Ca(2+)-dependent adenylate cyclase to its proximity so that a rigid separation between cAMP-dependent and Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of Cl(-) transport becomes obsolete. In the presence of wild-type CFTR, parallel activation of CFTR and outwardly rectifying anoctamin 6 Cl(-) channels is observed, while the Ca(2+)-activated anoctamin 1 Cl(-) channel is inhibited. In contrast, in CF cells, CFTR is missing/mislocalized and the outwardly rectifying chloride channel is attenuated while Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion (anoctamin 1) appears upregulated. Additionally, we consider the idea that F508del-CFTR when trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum augments IP3-mediated Ca(2+) release by providing a shunt pathway for Cl(-). CFTR and the IP3 receptor share the characteristic that they both assemble their partner proteins to increase the plasticity of their hub responses. In CF, the CFTR hub fails to form at the plasma membrane, with widespread detrimental consequences for cell signalling.

  3. Aneuploidy vs. gene mutation hypothesis of cancer: Recent study claims mutation but is found to support aneuploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ruhong; Sonik, Arvind; Stindl, Reinhard; Rasnick, David; Duesberg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    For nearly a century, cancer has been blamed on somatic mutation. But it is still unclear whether this mutation is aneuploidy, an abnormal balance of chromosomes, or gene mutation. Despite enormous efforts, the currently popular gene mutation hypothesis has failed to identify cancer-specific mutations with transforming function and cannot explain why cancer occurs only many months to decades after mutation by carcinogens and why solid cancers are aneuploid, although conventional mutation does...

  4. Preliminary Report of Molecular Detection of Retinoblastoma Gene Mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    To develop gene diagnosis for retinoblastoma predisposition, it is necessary to disclose the retinoblastoma gene mutations or deletions in detail. Genomic DNA from tumor and peripheral white blood cells in 33 patients with retinoblastoma was detected with 3.8kb probe derived from 3' end of retinoblastoma gene cDNA. The gene abnormalities, including deletion, partial deletion and rearrangement, were found in 18 patients. Further research will be aimed at microdeletions or mutations for those patients wti...

  5. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation...... to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations...

  6. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 enhances the protein expression of CFTR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Won Lee

    Full Text Available Low levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 have been observed in the serum of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. However, the effects of low serum IGF-1 on the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, whose defective function is the primary cause of cystic fibrosis, have not been studied. Here, we show in human cells that IGF-1 increases the steady-state levels of mature wildtype CFTR in a CFTR-associated ligand (CAL- and TC10-dependent manner; moreover, IGF-1 increases CFTR-mediated chloride transport. Using an acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay, we have confirmed the binding of CAL and CFTR in the Golgi. We also show that CAL overexpression inhibits forskolin-induced increases in the cell-surface expression of CFTR. We found that IGF-1 activates TC10, and active TC10 alters the functional association between CAL and CFTR. Furthermore, IGF-1 and active TC10 can reverse the CAL-mediated reduction in the cell-surface expression of CFTR. IGF-1 does not increase the expression of ΔF508 CFTR, whose processing is arrested in the ER. This finding is consistent with our observation that IGF-1 alters the functional interaction of CAL and CFTR in the Golgi. However, when ΔF508 CFTR is rescued with low temperature or the corrector VRT-325 and proceeds to the Golgi, IGF-1 can increase the expression of the rescued ΔF508 CFTR. Our data support a model indicating that CAL-CFTR binding in the Golgi inhibits CFTR trafficking to the cell surface, leading CFTR to the degradation pathway instead. IGF-1-activated TC10 changes the interaction of CFTR and CAL, allowing CFTR to progress to the plasma membrane. These findings offer a potential strategy using a combinational treatment of IGF-1 and correctors to increase the post-Golgi expression of CFTR in cystic fibrosis patients bearing the ΔF508 mutation.

  7. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) enhances the protein expression of CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Won; Cheng, Jie; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark; Guggino, William B

    2013-01-01

    Low levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) have been observed in the serum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, the effects of low serum IGF-1 on the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), whose defective function is the primary cause of cystic fibrosis, have not been studied. Here, we show in human cells that IGF-1 increases the steady-state levels of mature wildtype CFTR in a CFTR-associated ligand (CAL)- and TC10-dependent manner; moreover, IGF-1 increases CFTR-mediated chloride transport. Using an acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay, we have confirmed the binding of CAL and CFTR in the Golgi. We also show that CAL overexpression inhibits forskolin-induced increases in the cell-surface expression of CFTR. We found that IGF-1 activates TC10, and active TC10 alters the functional association between CAL and CFTR. Furthermore, IGF-1 and active TC10 can reverse the CAL-mediated reduction in the cell-surface expression of CFTR. IGF-1 does not increase the expression of ΔF508 CFTR, whose processing is arrested in the ER. This finding is consistent with our observation that IGF-1 alters the functional interaction of CAL and CFTR in the Golgi. However, when ΔF508 CFTR is rescued with low temperature or the corrector VRT-325 and proceeds to the Golgi, IGF-1 can increase the expression of the rescued ΔF508 CFTR. Our data support a model indicating that CAL-CFTR binding in the Golgi inhibits CFTR trafficking to the cell surface, leading CFTR to the degradation pathway instead. IGF-1-activated TC10 changes the interaction of CFTR and CAL, allowing CFTR to progress to the plasma membrane. These findings offer a potential strategy using a combinational treatment of IGF-1 and correctors to increase the post-Golgi expression of CFTR in cystic fibrosis patients bearing the ΔF508 mutation.

  8. A High-affinity Activator of G551D-CFTR Chloride Channel Identified By High Throughput Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lu; HE Cheng-yan; LIU Yan-li; ZHOU Hong-lan; ZHOU Jin-song; SHANG De-jing; YANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    A stably transfected CHO cell line coexpressing G551D-CFTR and iodide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein mutant EYFP-H148Q-I152L was successfully established and used as assay model to identify small-molecule activators of G551D-CFTR chloride channel from 100000 diverse combinatorial compounds by high throughput screening on a customized Beckman robotic system. A bicyclooctane compound was identified to activate G551D-CFTR chloride channel with high-affinity(Kd=1.8 μmol/L). The activity of the bicyclooctane compound is G551D-CFTR-specific, reversible and non-toxic. The G551D-CFTR activator may be useful as a tool to study the mutant G551D-CFTR chloride channel structure and transport properties and as a candidate drug to cure cystic fibrosis caused by G551D-CFTR mutation.

  9. Novel recurrently mutated genes and a prognostic mutation signature in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Wu, William K K; Li, Xiangchun; He, Jun; Li, Xiao-Xing; Ng, Simon S M; Yu, Chang; Gao, Zhibo; Yang, Jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Qiaoxiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Pan, Yi; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka F; Wong, Nathalie; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Jie; Lu, Youyong; Lai, Paul B S; Chan, Francis K L; Li, Yingrui; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterisation of colorectal cancer (CRC) genomes by next-generation sequencing has led to the discovery of novel recurrently mutated genes. Nevertheless, genomic data has not yet been used for CRC prognostication. Objective To identify recurrent somatic mutations with prognostic significance in patients with CRC. Method Exome sequencing was performed to identify somatic mutations in tumour tissues of 22 patients with CRC, followed by validation of 187 recurrent and pathway-related genes using targeted capture sequencing in additional 160 cases. Results Seven significantly mutated genes, including four reported (APC, TP53, KRAS and SMAD4) and three novel recurrently mutated genes (CDH10, FAT4 and DOCK2), exhibited high mutation prevalence (6–14% for novel cancer genes) and higher-than-expected number of non-silent mutations in our CRC cohort. For prognostication, a five-gene-signature (CDH10, COL6A3, SMAD4, TMEM132D, VCAN) was devised, in which mutation(s) in one or more of these genes was significantly associated with better overall survival independent of tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging. The median survival time was 80.4 months in the mutant group versus 42.4 months in the wild type group (p=0.0051). The prognostic significance of this signature was successfully verified using the data set from the Cancer Genome Atlas study. Conclusions The application of next-generation sequencing has led to the identification of three novel significantly mutated genes in CRC and a mutation signature that predicts survival outcomes for stratifying patients with CRC independent of TNM staging. PMID:24951259

  10. Applications of homemade kit in mutation detection of genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunxia; XU Guowang; SHI Xianzhe; MA Jianmei; ZHANG Yan; L(U) Shen; YANG Qing

    2004-01-01

    Several methods of mutation detection, such as single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), tandem SSCP/heteroduplex analysis and SNaPshot analysis were developed using homemade kit on ABI 310 genetic analyzer, and were successfully applied to mutation detection of 31 colorectal tumor samples. The sieving capability of homemade kit and commercial kit were compared, results demonstrate that homemade kit has higher resolution and shorter analysis time. In clinical tumor samples, 26% K-ras (exon 1) and 24% p53 (exons 7-8) were found to have mutations, and all mutations were single point variations. A majority of mutations occurred in one gene, only 1 tumor contained alterations in the two genes, which indicates that development of colorectal cancer lies on alternate pathways, and may correlate with different gene mutations.

  11. Lumacaftor-Ivacaftor in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Homozygous for Phe508del CFTR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wainwright, Claire E; Elborn, J Stuart; Ramsey, Bonnie W;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting disease that is caused by defective or deficient cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity. Phe508del is the most common CFTR mutation. METHODS: We conducted two phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo......-controlled studies that were designed to assess the effects of lumacaftor (VX-809), a CFTR corrector, in combination with ivacaftor (VX-770), a CFTR potentiator, in patients 12 years of age or older who had cystic fibrosis and were homozygous for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. In both studies, patients were randomly......-ivacaftor and placebo groups. The rate of discontinuation due to an adverse event was 4.2% among patients who received lumacaftor-ivacaftor versus 1.6% among those who received placebo. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that lumacaftor in combination with ivacaftor provided a benefit for patients with cystic fibrosis...

  12. Molecular analysis using DHPLC of cystic fibrosis: increase of the mutation detection rate among the affected population in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardone Anna

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystem disorder characterised by mutations of the CFTR gene, which encodes for an important component in the coordination of electrolyte movement across of epithelial cell membranes. Symptoms are pulmonary disease, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, male infertility and elevated sweat concentrations. The CFTR gene has numerous mutations (>1000 and functionally important polymorphisms (>200. Early identification is important to provide appropriate therapeutic interventions, prognostic and genetic counselling and to ensure access to specialised medical services. However, molecular diagnosis by direct mutation screening has proved difficult in certain ethnic groups due to allelic heterogeneity and variable frequency of causative mutations. Methods We applied a gene scanning approach using DHPLC system for analysing specifically all CFTR exons and characterise sequence variations in a subgroup of CF Italian patients from the Lazio region (Central Italy characterised by an extensive allelic heterogeneity. Results We have identified a total of 36 different mutations representing 88% of the CF chromosomes. Among these are two novel CFTR mutations, including one missense (H199R and one microdeletion (4167delCTAAGCC. Conclusion Using this approach, we were able to increase our standard power rate of mutation detection of about 11% (77% vs. 88%.

  13. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR in the kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MORALES MARCELO M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR is a Cl- channel. Mutations of this transporter lead to a defect of chloride secretion by epithelial cells causing the Cystic Fibrosis disease (CF. In spite of the high expression of CFTR in the kidney, patients with CF do not show major renal dysfunction, but it is known that both the urinary excretion of drugs and the renal capacity to concentrate and dilute urine is deficient. CFTR mRNA is expressed in all nephron segments and its protein is involved with chloride secretion in the distal tubule, and the principal cells of the cortical (CCD and medullary (IMCD collecting ducts. Several studies have demonstrated that CFTR does not only transport Cl- but also secretes ATP and, thus, controls other conductances such as Na+ (ENaC and K+ (ROMK2 channels, especially in CCD. In the polycystic kidney the secretion of chloride through CFTR contributes to the cyst enlargement. This review is focused on the role of CFTR in the kidney and the implications of extracellular volume regulators, such as hormones, on its function and expression.

  14. Comparison of somatic mutation frequency among immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, N; Miwa, T; Suzuki, Y; Okada, H; Azuma, T

    1994-02-01

    We analyzed the frequency of somatic mutation in immunoglobulin genes from hybridomas that secrete anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl (NP) monoclonal antibodies. A high frequency of mutation (3.3-4.4%) was observed in both the rearranged VH186.2 and V lambda 1 genes, indicating that somatic mutation occurs with similar frequency in these genes in spite of the absence of an intron enhancer in lambda 1 chain genes. In contrast to the high frequency in J-C introns, only two nucleotide substitutions occurred at positions -462 and -555 in the 5' noncoding region in one of the lambda 1-chain genes and in none of the other three so far studied. Since a similar low frequency of somatic mutation was observed in the 5' noncoding region of inactive lambda 2-chain genes rendered inactive because of incorrect rearrangement, this region may not be a target or alternatively, may be protected from the mutator system. We observed a low frequency of nucleotide substitution in unrearranged V lambda 1 genes (approximately 1/15 that of rearranged genes). Together with previous results (Azuma T., N. Motoyama, L. Fields, and D. Loh, 1993. Int. Immunol. 5:121), these findings suggest that the 5' noncoding region, which contains the promoter element, provides a signal for the somatic mutator system and that rearrangement, which brings the promoter into close proximity to the enhancer element, should increase mutation efficiency.

  15. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  16. Mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis of EXT1 gene mutations in Chinese patients with multiple osteochondromas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hai-yan; HU Ya-li; YANG Ying; WU Xing; ZHU Rui-fang; ZHU Xiang-yu; DUAN Hong-lei; ZHANG Ying; ZHOU Jin-yong

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple osteochondromas (MO), an inherited autosomal dominant disorder, is characterized by the presence of multiple exostoses on the long bones. MO is caused by mutations in the EXT1 or EXT2 genes which encode glycosyltransferases implicated in heparin sulfate biosynthesis.Methods In this study, efforts were made to identify the underlying disease-causing mutations in patients from two MO families in China.Results Two novel EXT1 gene mutations were identified and no mutation was found in EXT2 gene. The mutation c.497T>A in exon 1 of the EXT1 gene was cosegregated with the disease phenotype in family 1 and formed a stop codon at amino acid site 166. The fetus of the proband was diagnosed negative. In family 2, the mutation c. 1430-1431delCC in exon 6 of the EXT1 gene would cause frameshift and introduce a premature stop codon after the reading frame being open for 42 amino acids. The fetus of this family inherited this mutation from the father.Conclusions Mutation analysis of two MO families in this study demonstrates its further application in MO genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.

  17. PARK1 gene mutation of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ligang Jiang; Guohua Hu; Qiuhui Chen; Ying Zhang; Xinyu Hu; Jia Fan; Lifeng Liu; Rui Guo; Yajuan Sun; Yixhi Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that PARK1 gene is associated with the autosomal dominant inheritance of Parkinson's disease.PARK1 gene contains two mutation sites, namely Ala30Pro and AIa53Thr, which are located on exons 3 and 4, respectively.However, the genetic loci of the pathogenic genes remain unclear.In this study, blood samples were collected from 11 members of a family with high prevalence of Parkinson's disease, including four affected cases, five suspected cases,and two non-affected cases.Point mutation screening of common mutation sites on PARK1 gene exon 4 was conducted using PCR, to determine the genetic loci of the causative gene for Parkinson's disease.Gene identification and sequencing results showed that a T base deletion mutation was observed in the PARK1 gene exon 4 of all 11 collected samples.It was confirmed that the PARKf gene exon 4 gene mutation is an important pathogenic mutation for Parkinson's disease.

  18. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. PMID:21913285

  19. Discovery of novel potent ΔF508-CFTR correctors that target the nucleotide binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odolczyk, Norbert; Fritsch, Janine; Norez, Caroline; Servel, Nathalie; da Cunha, Melanie Faria; Bitam, Sara; Kupniewska, Anna; Wiszniewski, Ludovic; Colas, Julien; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Tondelier, Danielle; Roldan, Ariel; Saussereau, Emilie L; Melin-Heschel, Patricia; Wieczorek, Grzegorz; Lukacs, Gergely L; Dadlez, Michal; Faure, Grazyna; Herrmann, Harald; Ollero, Mario; Becq, Frédéric; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Edelman, Aleksander

    2013-10-01

    The deletion of Phe508 (ΔF508) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR is the most common mutation associated with cystic fibrosis. The ΔF508-CFTR mutant is recognized as improperly folded and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Based on molecular dynamics simulation results, we hypothesized that interaction between ΔF508-NBD1 and housekeeping proteins prevents ΔF508-CFTR delivery to the plasma membrane. Based on this assumption we applied structure-based virtual screening to identify new low-molecular-weight compounds that should bind to ΔF508-NBD1 and act as protein-protein interaction inhibitors. Using different functional assays for CFTR activity, we demonstrated that in silico-selected compounds induced functional expression of ΔF508-CFTR in transfected HeLa cells, human bronchial CF cells in primary culture, and in the nasal epithelium of homozygous ΔF508-CFTR mice. The proposed compounds disrupt keratin8-ΔF508-CFTR interaction in ΔF508-CFTR HeLa cells. Structural analysis of ΔF508-NBD1 in the presence of these compounds suggests their binding to NBD1. We conclude that our strategy leads to the discovery of new compounds that are among the most potent correctors of ΔF508-CFTR trafficking defect known to date.

  20. Synonymous codon usage affects the expression of wild type and F508del CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kalpit; Cheng, Yi; Hahn, Brian; Bridges, Robert; Bradbury, Neil A; Mueller, David M

    2015-03-27

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel composed of 1480 amino acids. The major mutation responsible for cystic fibrosis results in loss of amino acid residue, F508 (F508del). Loss of F508 in CFTR alters the folding pathway resulting in endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation. This study investigates the role of synonymous codon in the expression of CFTR and CFTR F508del in human HEK293 cells. DNA encoding the open reading frame (ORF) for CFTR containing synonymous codon replacements was expressed using a heterologous vector integrated into the genome. The results indicate that the codon usage greatly affects the expression of CFTR. While the promoter strength driving expression of the ORFs was largely unchanged and the mRNA half-lives were unchanged, the steady-state levels of the mRNA varied by as much as 30-fold. Experiments support that this apparent inconsistency is attributed to nonsense mediated decay independent of exon junction complex. The ratio of CFTR/mRNA indicates that mRNA containing native codons was more efficient in expressing mature CFTR as compared to mRNA containing synonymous high-expression codons. However, when F508del CFTR was expressed after codon optimization, a greater percentage of the protein escaped endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation resulting in considerable levels of mature F508del CFTR on the plasma membrane, which showed channel activity. These results indicate that codon usage has an effect on mRNA levels and protein expression, for CFTR, and likely on chaperone-assisted folding pathway, for F508del CFTR.

  1. Mitochondrial gene mutations and type 2 diabetes in Chinese families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-zhen; YU De-min; YU Pei; LIU De-min; WANG Kun; TANG Xin-zhi

    2008-01-01

    Background Numerous mitochondrial DNA mutations are significantly correlated with development of diabetes. This study investigated mitochondrial gene, point mutations in patients with type 2 diabetes and their families. Methods Unrelated patients with type 2 diabetes(n=826)were randomly recruited; unrelated and nondiabetic subjects (n=637)served as controls. The clinical and biochemical data of the participants were collected. Total genome was extracted from peripheral leucocytes. Polymerase chain reaction, restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)and clonig techniques were used to screen mitochondrial genes including np3316,np3394 and np3426 in the ND1 region and np3243 in the tRNALeu (UUR). Results In 39 diabetics with one or more mitochondrial gene point mutations, the prevalence(4.7%,39/826)of mtDNA mutations was higher than that(0.7%,5/637)in the controls. The identical mutation was found in 23 of 43 tested members from three pedigrees. Affected family members presented with variable clinical features ranging from normal glucose tolerance to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)(n=2),impaired fasting glucose(IFG)(n=1)to type 2 diabetes (n=13)with 3 family members suffering from hearing loss. Conclusions Type 2 diabetes in China is associated with several mitochondrial gene mutations. Aged patients with diabetic family history had a higher prevalence of mutation and various clinical pictures. Mitochondrial gene mutation might be one of the genetic factors contributing to diabetic familial clustering.

  2. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Screening of Mutation in Amelogenin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Veronese Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to report the clinical findings and the screening of mutations of amelogenin gene of a 7-year-old boy with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI. The genomic DNA was extracted from saliva of patient and his family, followed by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. The c.261C>T mutation was found in samples of mother, father, and brother, but the mutation was not found in the sequence of the patient. This mutation is a silent mutation and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs2106416. Thus, it is suggested that the mutation found was not related to the clinical presence of AI. Further research is necessary to examine larger number of patients and genes related to AI.

  3. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  4. Ferredoxin Gene Mutation in Iranian Trichomonas Vaginalis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soudabeh Heidari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trichomonas vaginalis causes trichomoniasis and metronidazole is its chosen drug for treatment. Ferredoxin has role in electron transport and carbohydrate metabolism and the conversion of an inactive form of metronidazole (CO to its active form (CPR. Ferredoxin gene mutations reduce gene expression and increase its resistance to metronidazole. In this study, the frequency of ferredoxin gene mutations in clinical isolates of T.vaginalis in Tehran has been studied.Methods: Forty six clinical T. vaginalis isolates of vaginal secretions and urine sediment were collected from Tehran Province since 2011 till 2012. DNA was extracted and ferredoxin gene was amplified by PCR technique. The ferredoxin gene PCR products were sequenced to determine gene mutations.Results: In four isolates (8.69% point mutation at nucleotide position -239 (the translation start codon of the ferredoxin gene were detected in which adenosine were converted to thymine.Conclusion: Mutation at nucleotide -239 ferredoxin gene reduces translational regulatory protein’s binding affinity which concludes reduction of ferredoxin expression. For this reduction, decrease in activity and decrease in metronidazole drug delivery into the cells occur. Mutations in these four isolates may lead to resistance of them to metronidazole.

  5. CHD6 regulates the topological arrangement of the CFTR locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Ana; Li, SiDe; Paul, Thankam; Zhang, Fan; Aguilo, Francesca; Vashisht, Ajay; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Leleiko, Neal S; Suchy, Frederick J; Wohlschlegel, James A; Zhang, Weijia; Walsh, Martin J

    2015-05-15

    The control of transcription is regulated through the well-coordinated spatial and temporal interactions between distal genomic regulatory elements required for specialized cell-type and developmental gene expression programs. With recent findings CFTR has served as a model to understand the principles that govern genome-wide and topological organization of distal intra-chromosomal contacts as it relates to transcriptional control. This is due to the extensive characterization of the DNase hypersensitivity sites, modification of chromatin, transcription factor binding sites and the arrangement of these sites in CFTR consistent with the restrictive expression in epithelial cell types. Here, we identified CHD6 from a screen among several chromatin-remodeling proteins as a putative epigenetic modulator of CFTR expression. Moreover, our findings of CTCF interactions with CHD6 are consistent with the role described previously for CTCF in CFTR regulation. Our results now reveal that the CHD6 protein lies within the infrastructure of multiple transcriptional complexes, such as the FACT, PBAF, PAF1C, Mediator, SMC/Cohesion and MLL complexes. This model underlies the fundamental role CHD6 facilitates by tethering cis-acting regulatory elements of CFTR in proximity to these multi-subunit transcriptional protein complexes. Finally, we indicate that CHD6 structurally coordinates a three-dimensional stricture between intragenic elements of CFTR bound by several cell-type specific transcription factors, such as CDX2, SOX18, HNF4α and HNF1α. Therefore, our results reveal new insights into the epigenetic regulation of CFTR expression, whereas the manipulation of CFTR gene topology could be considered for treating specific indications of cystic fibrosis and/or pancreatitis.

  6. CFTR and Ca2+ signaling in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice eAntigny

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the diverse physiological functions exerted by calcium signaling in living cells, its role in the regulation of protein biogenesis and trafficking remains incompletely understood. In cystic fibrosis (CF disease the most common CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator mutation, F508del-CFTR generates a misprocessed protein that is abnormally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER compartment, rapidly degraded by the ubiquitine/proteasome pathway and hence absent at the plasma membrane of CF epithelial cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that intracellular calcium signals consequent to activation of apical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs by different agonists are increased in CF airway epithelia. Moreover, the regulation of various intracellular calcium storage compartments, such as ER is also abnormal in CF cells. Although the molecular mechanism to explain this increase remains puzzling in epithelial cells, the F508del-CFTR mutation is proposed to be the origin of abnormal Ca2+ influx linking the calcium signaling to CFTR pathobiology. This article reviews the relationships between CFTR and calcium signaling in the context of the genetic disease cystic fibrosis.

  7. Analysis of conventional and unconventional trafficking of CFTR and other membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Heon Yung; Kim, Joo Young; Lee, Min Goo

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a polytopic transmembrane protein that functions as a cAMP-activated anion channel at the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Mutations in CFTR cause cystic fibrosis and are also associated with monosymptomatic diseases in the lung, pancreas, intestines, and vas deferens. Many disease-causing CFTR mutations, including the deletion of a single phenylalanine residue at position 508 (ΔF508-CFTR), result in protein misfolding and trafficking defects. Therefore, intracellular trafficking of wild-type and mutant CFTR has been studied extensively, and results from these studies significantly contribute to our general understanding of mechanisms involved in the cell-surface trafficking of membrane proteins. CFTR is a glycoprotein that undergoes complex N-glycosylation as it passes through Golgi-mediated conventional exocytosis. Interestingly, results from recent studies revealed that CFTR and other membrane proteins can reach the plasma membrane via an unconventional alternative route that bypasses Golgi in specific cellular conditions. Here, we describe methods that have been used to investigate the conventional and unconventional surface trafficking of CFTR. With appropriate modifications, the protocols described in this chapter can also be applied to studies investigating the intracellular trafficking of other plasma membrane proteins.

  8. Defective CFTR-dependent CREB activation results in impaired spermatogenesis and azoospermia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ming Xu

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common life-limiting recessive genetic disease among Caucasians caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR with over 95% male patients infertile. However, whether CFTR mutations could affect spermatogenesis and result in azoospermia remains an open question. Here we report compromised spermatogenesis, with significantly reduced testicular weight and sperm count, and decreased cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB expression in the testes of CFTR knockout mice. The involvement of CFTR in HCO(3 (- transport and the expression of the HCO(3 (- sensor, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, are demonstrated for the first time in the primary culture of rat Sertoli cells. Inhibition of CFTR or depletion of HCO(3 (- could reduce FSH-stimulated, sAC-dependent cAMP production and phosphorylation of CREB, the key transcription factor in spermatogenesis. Decreased CFTR and CREB expression are also observed in human testes with azoospermia. The present study reveals a previously undefined role of CFTR and sAC in regulating the cAMP-CREB signaling pathway in Sertoli cells, defect of which may result in impaired spermatogenesis and azoospermia. Altered CFTR-sAC-cAMP-CREB functional loop may also underline the pathogenesis of various CF-related diseases.

  9. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  10. Recognizable cerebellar dysplasia associated with mutations in multiple tubulin genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Oegema (Renske); T.D. Cushion (Thomas); I.G. Phelps (Ian G.); S.-K. Chung (Seo-Kyung); J.C. Dempsey (Jennifer C.); S. Collins (Sarah); J.G.L. Mullins (Jonathan G.L.); T. Dudding (Tracy); H. Gill (Harinder); A.J. Green (Andrew J.); W.B. Dobyns (William); G.E. Ishak (Gisele E.); M.I. Rees (Mark); D. Doherty (Dan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMutations in alpha- and beta-tubulins are increasingly recognized as a major cause of malformations of cortical development (MCD), typically lissencephaly, pachygyria and polymicrogyria; however, sequencing tubulin genes in large cohorts of MCD patients has detected tubulin mutations in

  11. Simulation of gene evolution under directional mutational pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Kowalczuk, Maria; Mackiewicz, Dorota; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Polak, Natalia; Smolarczyk, Kamila; Banaszak, Joanna; R. Dudek, Mirosław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    2004-05-01

    The two main mechanisms generating the genetic diversity, mutation and recombination, have random character but they are biased which has an effect on the generation of asymmetry in the bacterial chromosome structure and in the protein coding sequences. Thus, like in a case of two chiral molecules-the two possible orientations of a gene in relation to the topology of a chromosome are not equivalent. Assuming that the sequence of a gene may oscillate only between certain limits of its structural composition means that the gene could be forced out of these limits by the directional mutation pressure, in the course of evolution. The probability of the event depends on the time the gene stays under the same mutation pressure. Inversion of the gene changes the directional mutational pressure to the reciprocal one and hence it changes the distance of the gene to its lower and upper bound of the structural tolerance. Using Monte Carlo methods we were able to simulate the evolution of genes under experimentally found mutational pressure, assuming simple mechanisms of selection. We found that the mutation and recombination should work in accordance to lower their negative effects on the function of the products of coding sequences.

  12. Keratin 9 gene mutations in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, A; Hennies, H C; Langbein, L; Digweed, M; Mischke, D; Drechsler, M; Schröck, E; Royer-Pokora, B; Franke, W W; Sperling, K

    1994-02-01

    We have isolated the gene for human type I keratin 9 (KRT9) and localised it to chromosome 17q21. Patients with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK), an autosomal dominant skin disease, were investigated. Three KRT9 mutations, N160K, R162Q, and R162W, were identified. All the mutations are in the highly conserved coil 1A of the rod domain, thought to be important for heterodimerisation. R162W was detected in five unrelated families and affects the corresponding residue in the keratin 14 and keratin 10 genes that is also altered in cases of epidermolysis bullosa simplex and generalised epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, respectively. These findings provide further evidence that mutations in keratin genes may cause epidermolysis and hyperkeratosis and that hyperkeratosis of palms and soles may be caused by different mutations in the KRT9 gene.

  13. Androgen receptor gene mutations in 46, XY females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Davood Omrani

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The androgen insensitivity syndrome is a heterogeneous disorder with a wide spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities, ranging from complete female to ambiguous forms that more closely resemble males. The primary abnormality is a defective androgen receptor protein due to a mutation of the androgen receptor gene. This prevents normal androgen action and thus leads to impaired virilization. A point mutation of the androgen receptor gene affecting two siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome is described. On examination they both had normal external female genitalia. Genomic DNA was extracted from EDTA-preserved blood samples and isolated according to standard procedures. The androgen receptor gene was screened for mutations using an automated sequence analyzer (ABI Prism 310. Both girls possess one substitutions (G>A at position 2086 in exon 4, leading to D695N mutation. Mother was found to be a heterozygous carrier for this mutation. GTG banded karyotype of the girls showed they both have male karyotype (46, XY. In addition, the SRY gene screening showed they both have intact SRY gene. The labioscrotal folds contained palpable gonads measuring 1.5 cm in largest diameter. Ultrasound examination of the pelvis revealed absence of the uterus. Serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and testosterone values were higher than normal range. To our knowledge this is the first confirmed instance of AIS due to an AR mutation occurring in familial cases in this country. Furthermore, the phenotype has complete association with this mutation. KEY WORDS: Androgen insensitivity syndrome, androgen receptor

  14. Mutations in the AXIN1 gene in advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yardy, George W; Bicknell, David C; Wilding, Jennifer L;

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt signalling pathway directs aspects of embryogenesis and is thought to contribute to maintenance of certain stem cell populations. Disruption of the pathway has been observed in many different tumour types. In bowel, stomach, and endometrial cancer, this is usually due to mutation of genes...... encoding Wnt pathway components APC or beta-catenin. Such mutations are rare in hepatocellular carcinomas and medulloblastomas with Wnt pathway dysfunction, and there, mutation in genes for other Wnt molecules, such as Axin, is more frequently found....

  15. Side chain and backbone contributions of Phe508 to CFTR folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Thomas, Philip J. (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-12-07

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an integral membrane protein, cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common CF-causing mutant, deletion of Phe508, fails to properly fold. To elucidate the role Phe508 plays in the folding of CFTR, missense mutations at this position were generated. Only one missense mutation had a pronounced effect on the stability and folding of the isolated domain in vitro. In contrast, many substitutions, including those of charged and bulky residues, disrupted folding of full-length CFTR in cells. Structures of two mutant nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) reveal only local alterations of the surface near position 508. These results suggest that the peptide backbone plays a role in the proper folding of the domain, whereas the side chain plays a role in defining a surface of NBD1 that potentially interacts with other domains during the maturation of intact CFTR.

  16. Parkin gene mutations in younger onset Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piu Chan; Hua Bai; Rong Chen; J Willian Langston

    2000-01-01

    Objective': To screen for exonic and point mutations in the Parkin gene in both Chinese and American Caucasian younger onset Parkinson's disease (YOPD) patients.Background: Recently, the Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP) gene was first mapped to chromosome 6q25.2-27 and was late cloned and designated as Parkin. A wide variety of mutations, including homozygous exonic deletions and point mutations,have been found in at least more than 50 ARJP families of Japanese, European and Jewish origins. However, the distribution of Parkin gene mutations is not known in the Chinese and American Caucasians, It is also not clear how frequent the Parkin gene mutations occur in YOPD patients. Method and Material: Twenty-one Chinese subjects were selected from 121 Chinese PD inpatients who were admitted to the Xuanwu Hospital in Beijing between August of 1998 and April of 1999 and had an onset before age 51. Thirty-eight American subjects were PD patients with an onset before age 41 from the Tissue Bank of the Parkinson′s Institute at California. Homozygous exonic deletion and point mutations in all 12 exons of the Parkin gene were screened using PCR, SSCP and direct sequencing methods. Mutations identified by sequencing were further confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion. Results: Five different types of homozygous deletion mutations (exons 1, 4, 6, 7 and 12) were found in 7 out of 21 Chinese cases but none of the 37 American Caucasian patients in all 12 exons of Parkin gene. One novel and four polymorphic mutationswere found in the American Caucasian YOPD cases.Conclusion: our results suggest that homozygous exonic deletions in the Parkin gene may account for a significant amount of YOPD in the Chinese but not in the American Caucasian YOPD.

  17. Screening and validation of specific zinc finger nucleases targeted pig CFTR gene%猪CFTR基因特异性锌指核酸酶的筛选与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞; 王令; 林娟; 张存芳; 张智英

    2012-01-01

    【目的】获得靶向猪囊性纤维化跨膜传导调节因子(Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator,CFTR)基因的特异锌指核酸酶(Zinc finger nuclease,ZFN),为建立CFTR基因敲除猪细胞系提供技术支持。【方法】通过开源式(Oligomerized pool engineering,OPEN)方法筛选,首先以已知三锌指蛋白为框架,随机突变单个锌指关键位点氨基酸编码序列,建立人工三锌指蛋白随机库;然后应用细菌双杂交技术,从库中筛选出能够结合CFTR基因靶位点的三锌指蛋白;最后将获得的锌指蛋白与非限制性核酸内切酶FokⅠ组装成特异ZFN,通过酵母验证体系,检测ZFN靶向切割其识别序列的效率。【结果】获得3个人工三锌指蛋白随机库,每个库约含有2×106个单克隆,通过2轮细菌双杂交筛选,分别获得48个针对CFTR基因左右两侧靶位点的三锌指蛋白。ZFN活性验证结果表明,约90%的ZFN能够在酵母细胞内实现靶向切割,获得了高效特异的ZFN。【结论】获得了猪CFTR基因高效特异的ZFN。%【Objective】Specific zinc finger nucleases(ZFN)were screened to target pig cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator(CFTR)gene for the preparation of generating CFTR gene knockout pig cell line.【Method】Upon the oligomerized pool engineering(OPEN)strategy,firstly,three libraries of 3-zinc finger proteins were constructed.The DNA sequences of recognition amino acid residues of a finger motif were randomized by cassette mutagenesis.Secondly,bacterial twohybrid(B2H)system was used to screen for ZFPs from the three zinc finger protein libraries.Finally,selected ZFPs were fused to FokⅠdomain to generate specific ZFN for subsequent validation of ZFN cleavage activity in yeast.【Result】Three artificial randomly libraries of 3-zinc finger proteins were obtained,and each contained about 2×106 colonies.The three zinc finger random libraries were used

  18. Involvement of CFTR in Uterine Bicarbonate Secretion and the Fertilizing Capacity of Sperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangXiao,Fei; ZhouChen-Xi; ShiQi-Xian; YuanYu-Ying; YuMei-Kuen; LouisChukwuemekaAjonuma

    2005-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFFR)is a cAMP-activated chloride channel expressed in a wide variety of epithelial cells,mutations of which are responsible for the hallmark defective chloride secretion observed in cystic fibrosis(CF).Although CFTR has been implicated in bicarbonate secretion,its ability to directly mediate bicarbonate secretion of any physiological significance has not been shown.We demonstrate here that endometriaI epithelial ceils possess a CFTR-mediated bicarbonate transport mechanism.Co-culture of sperm with endometrial ceils treated with antisense oligonucleotide against CFTR,or with bicarbonate secretion-defective CF epithelial cells,resulted in lower sperm capacitation and egg-fertilizing ability.These results are consistent with a critical role of CFTR in controlling uterine bicarbonate secretion and the fertilizing capacity of sperm,providing a link between defective CFTR and lower female fertility in CF.

  19. APPLICATION OF GENETIC DEAFNESS GENE CHIP FOR DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION OF DEAFNESS IN PREGNANT WOMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Liang; ZHONG Su; ZHAO Nan; LIU Ping; ZHAO Yangyu; QIAO Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study is to identify the carrier rate of common deafness mutation in Chinese pregnant women via detecting deafness gene mutations with gene chip. Methods The pregnant women in obstetric clinic without hearing impairment and hearing disorders family history were selected. The informed consent was signed. Peripheral blood was taken to extract genom-ic DNA. Application of genetic deafness gene chip for detecting 9 mutational hot spot of the most common 4 Chinese deafness genes, namely GJB2 (35delG,176del16bp, 235delC, 299delAT), GJB3 (C538T) ,SLC26A4 ( IVS72A>G, A2168G) and mito-chondrial DNA 12S rRNA (A1555G, C1494T) . Further genetic testing were provided to the spouses and newborns of the screened carriers. Results Peripheral blood of 430 pregnant women were detected,detection of deafness gene mutation carri-ers in 24 cases(4.2%), including 13 cases of the GJB2 heterozygous mutation, 3 cases of SLC26A4 heterozygous mutation, 1 cases of GJB3 heterozygous mutation, and 1 case of mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. 18 spouses and 17 newborns took fur-ther genetic tests, and 6 newborns inherited the mutation from their mother. Conclusion The common deafness genes muta-tion has a high carrier rate in pregnant women group,235delC and IVS7-2A>G heterozygous mutations are common.

  20. Poly-l-aspartic Acid Enhances and Prolongs Gentamicin-mediated Suppression of the CFTR-G542X Mutation in a Cystic Fibrosis Mouse Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Ming; Keeling, Kim M.; Fan, Liming; Liu, Xiaoli; Bedwell, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Aminoglycosides such as gentamicin have the ability to suppress translation termination at premature stop mutations, leading to a partial restoration of protein expression and function. This observation led to studies showing that this approach may provide a viable treatment for patients with genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis that are caused by premature stop mutations. Although aminoglycoside treatment is sometimes associated with harmful side effects, several ...

  1. A novel PTEN gene promoter mutation and untypical Cowden syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Liu; Guangbing Li; Rongrong Chen; Xiaobo Yang; Xue Zhao; Haitao Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS),an autosomal dominant disorder,is one of a spectrum of clinical disorders that have been linked to germline mutations in the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene.Although 70-80% of patients with CS have an identifiable germline PTEN mutation,the clinical diagnosis presents many challenges because of the phenotypic and genotypic variations.In the present study,we sequenced the exons and the promoter of PTEN gene,mutations and variations in the promoter and exons were identified,and a PTEN protein expression negative region was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC).In conclusion,a novel promoter mutation we found in PTEN gene may turn off PTEN protein expression occasionally,leading to the disorder of PTEN and untypical CS manifestations.

  2. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  3. Disrupted interaction between CFTR and AF-6/afadin aggravates malignant phenotypes of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ting Ting; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Hong; Xiao, Hu Zhang; Xiang, Juan Juan; Zhang, Jie Ting; Yu, Siu Bun Sydney; Martin, Tracey Amanda; Ye, Lin; Tsang, Lai Ling; Jiang, Wen Guo; Xiaohua, Jiang; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2014-03-01

    How mutations or dysfunction of CFTR may increase the risk of malignancies in various tissues remains an open question. Here we report the interaction between CFTR and an adherens junction molecule, AF-6/afadin, and its involvement in the development of colon cancer. We have found that CFTR and AF-6/afadin are co-localized at the cell-cell contacts and physically interact with each other in colon cancer cell lines. Knockdown of CFTR results in reduced epithelial tightness and enhanced malignancies, with increased degradation and reduced stability of AF-6/afadin protein. The enhanced invasive phenotype of CFTR-knockdown cells can be completely reversed by either AF-6/afadin over-expression or ERK inhibitor, indicating the involvement of AF-6/MAPK pathway. More interestingly, the expression levels of CFTR and AF-6/afadin are significantly downregulated in human colon cancer tissues and lower expression of CFTR and/or AF-6/afadin is correlated with poor prognosis of colon cancer patients. The present study has revealed a previously unrecognized interaction between CFTR and AF-6/afadin that is involved in the pathogenesis of colon cancer and indicated the potential of the two as novel markers of metastasis and prognostic predictors for human colon cancer.

  4. Identifying cancer genes from cancer mutation profiles by cancer functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YanHui; GUO Zheng; PENG ChunFang; LIU Qing; MA WenCai; WANG Jing; YAO Chen; ZHANG Min; ZHU Jing

    2008-01-01

    It is of great importance to identify new cancer genes from the data of large scale genome screenings of gene mutations in cancers. Considering the alternations of some essential functions are indispensable for oncogenesis, we define them as cancer functions and select, as their approximations, a group of detailed functions in GO (Gene Ontology) highly enriched with known cancer genes. To evaluate the efficiency of using cancer functions as features to identify cancer genes, we define, in the screened genes, the known protein kinase cancer genes as gold standard positives and the other kinase genes as gold standard negatives. The results show that cancer associated functions are more efficient in identifying cancer genes than the selection pressure feature. Furthermore, combining cancer functions with the number of non-silent mutations can generate more reliable positive predictions. Finally, with precision 0.42, we suggest a list of 46 kinase genes as candidate cancer genes which are annotated to cancer functions and carry at least 3 non-silent mutations.

  5. Hemochromatosis (HFE gene mutations in Brazilian chronic hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Perícole

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI have reduced hemoglobin levels, mostly as a result of decreased kidney production of erythropoietin, but the relation between renal insufficiency and the magnitude of hemoglobin reduction has not been well defined. Hereditary hemochromatosis is an inherited disorder of iron metabolism. The importance of the association of hemochromatosis with treatment for anemia among patients with CRI has not been well described. We analyzed the frequency of the C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene in 201 Brazilian individuals with CRI undergoing hemodialysis. The analysis of the effects of HFE mutations on iron metabolism and anemia with biochemical parameters was possible in 118 patients of this study (hemoglobin, hematocrit, ferritin levels, transferrin saturation, and serum iron. A C282Y heterozygous mutation was found in 7/201 (3.4% and H63D homozygous and heterozygous mutation were found in 2/201 (1.0% and 46/201 (22.9%, respectively. The allelic frequencies of the HFE mutations (0.017 for C282Y mutation and 0.124 for H63D mutation did not differ between patients with CRI and healthy controls. Regarding the biochemical parameters, no differences were observed between HFE heterozygous and mutation-negative patients, although ferritin levels were not higher among patients with the H63D mutation (P = 0.08. From what we observed in our study, C282Y/H63D HFE gene mutations are not related to degrees of anemia or iron stores in CRI patients receiving intravenous iron supplementation (P > 0.10. Nevertheless, the present data suggest that the H63D mutation may have an important function as a modulating factor of iron overload in these patients.

  6. Mutation analysis of the preproghrelin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lesli H; Gjesing, Anette P; Sørensen, Thorkild I A;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the preproghrelin gene for variants and their association with obesity and type 2 diabetes.......To investigate the preproghrelin gene for variants and their association with obesity and type 2 diabetes....

  7. Potentiation of ΔF508- and G551D-CFTR-Mediated Cl- Current by Novel Hydroxypyrazolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinhong; Khloya, Poonam; Seo, Yohan; Kumar, Satish; Lee, Ho K; Jeon, Dong-Kyu; Jo, Sungwoo; Sharma, Pawan K; Namkung, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The most common mutation of CFTR, affecting approximately 90% of CF patients, is a deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (F508del, ΔF508). Misfolding of ΔF508-CFTR impairs both its trafficking to the plasma membrane and its chloride channel activity. To identify small molecules that can restore channel activity of ΔF508-CFTR, we synthesized and evaluated eighteen novel hydroxypyrazoline analogues as CFTR potentiators. To elucidate potentiation activities of hydroxypyrazolines for ΔF508-CFTR, CFTR activity was measured using a halide-sensitive YFP assay, Ussing chamber assay and patch-clamp technique. Compounds 7p, 7q and 7r exhibited excellent potentiation with EC50 value <10 μM. Among the compounds, 7q (a novel CFTR potentiator, CP7q) showed the highest potentiation activity with EC50 values of 0.88 ± 0.11 and 4.45 ± 0.31 μM for wild-type and ΔF508-CFTR, respectively. In addition, CP7q significantly potentiated chloride conductance of G551D-CFTR, a CFTR gating mutant; its maximal potentiation activity was 1.9 fold higher than the well-known CFTR potentiator genistein. Combination treatment with CP7q and VX-809, a corrector of ΔF508-CFTR, significantly enhanced functional rescue of ΔF508-CFTR compared with VX-809 alone. CP7q did not alter the cytosolic cAMP level and showed no cytotoxicity at the concentration showing maximum efficacy. The hydroxypyrazolines may be potential development candidates for drug therapy of cystic fibrosis. PMID:26863533

  8. Potentiation of ΔF508- and G551D-CFTR-Mediated Cl- Current by Novel Hydroxypyrazolines.

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    Jinhong Park

    Full Text Available The most common mutation of CFTR, affecting approximately 90% of CF patients, is a deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (F508del, ΔF508. Misfolding of ΔF508-CFTR impairs both its trafficking to the plasma membrane and its chloride channel activity. To identify small molecules that can restore channel activity of ΔF508-CFTR, we synthesized and evaluated eighteen novel hydroxypyrazoline analogues as CFTR potentiators. To elucidate potentiation activities of hydroxypyrazolines for ΔF508-CFTR, CFTR activity was measured using a halide-sensitive YFP assay, Ussing chamber assay and patch-clamp technique. Compounds 7p, 7q and 7r exhibited excellent potentiation with EC50 value <10 μM. Among the compounds, 7q (a novel CFTR potentiator, CP7q showed the highest potentiation activity with EC50 values of 0.88 ± 0.11 and 4.45 ± 0.31 μM for wild-type and ΔF508-CFTR, respectively. In addition, CP7q significantly potentiated chloride conductance of G551D-CFTR, a CFTR gating mutant; its maximal potentiation activity was 1.9 fold higher than the well-known CFTR potentiator genistein. Combination treatment with CP7q and VX-809, a corrector of ΔF508-CFTR, significantly enhanced functional rescue of ΔF508-CFTR compared with VX-809 alone. CP7q did not alter the cytosolic cAMP level and showed no cytotoxicity at the concentration showing maximum efficacy. The hydroxypyrazolines may be potential development candidates for drug therapy of cystic fibrosis.

  9. A novel mutation of the fibrillin gene causing Ectopia lentis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loennqvist, L.; Kainulainen, K.; Puhakka, L.; Peltonen, L. (National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland)); Child, A. (St. George' s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom)); Peltonen, L. (Duncan Guthrie Institute, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom))

    1994-02-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL), a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder, has been genetically linked to the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) in earlier studies. Here, the authors report the first EL mutation in the FBN1 gene confirming that EL is caused by mutations of this gene. So far, several mutations in the FBN1 gene have been reported in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). EL and MFS are clinically related but distinct conditions with typical manifestations in the ocular and skeletal systems, the fundamental difference between them being the absence of cardiovascular involvement in EL. They report a point mutation, cosegregating with the disease in the described family, that displays EL over four generations. The mutation changes a conserved glutamic acid residue in an EGF-like motif, which is the major structural component of the fibrillin and is repeated throughout the polypeptide. In vitro mutagenetic studies have demonstrated the necessity of an analogous glutamic acid residue for calcium binding in an EGF-like repeat of human factor IX. This provides a possible explanation for the role of this mutation in the disease pathogenesis. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Thyroglobulin Gene Mutation with Cold Nodule on Thyroid Scintigraphy

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    Toshio Kahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroglobulin gene mutation is a rare cause of congenital hypothyroidism, but thyroglobulin gene mutations are thought to be associated with thyroid cancer development. A 21-year-old Japanese man treated with levothyroxine for congenital hypothyroidism had an enlarged thyroid gland with undetectable serum thyroglobulin despite elevated serum TSH level. The patient was diagnosed with thyroglobulin gene mutation, with compound heterozygosity for Gly304Cys missense mutation and Arg432X nonsense mutation. Ultrasonography showed a hypovascular large tumor in the left lobe that appeared as a cold nodule on thyroid scintigraphy. He underwent total thyroidectomy, but pathological study did not reveal findings of thyroid carcinoma, but rather a hyperplastic nodule with hemorrhage. Strong cytoplasmic thyroglobulin immunostaining was observed, but sodium iodide symporter immunostaining was hardly detected in the hyperplastic nodule. The clinical characteristics of patients with thyroglobulin gene mutations are diverse, and some patients are diagnosed by chance on examination of goiter in adults. The presence of thyroid tumors that appear as cold nodules on thyroid scintigraphy should consider the potential for thyroid carcinoma, if the patient has relatively low serum thyroglobulin concentration in relation to the degree of TSH without thyroglobulin autoantibody.

  11. The novel complex allele [A238V;F508del] of the CFTR gene: clinical phenotype and possible implications for cystic fibrosis etiological therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Anna; Polizzi, Angela Maria; Santostasi, Teresa; Ratclif, Luigi; Pantaleo, Maria Giuseppina; Leonetti, Giuseppina; Iusco, Danila Rosa; Gallo, Crescenzio; Conese, Massimo; Manca, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Few mutations in cis have been annotated for F508del homozygous patients. Southern Italy patients who at a first analysis appeared homozygous for the F508del mutation (n=63) or compound heterozygous for the F508del and another mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (n=155) were searched for the A238V mutation in exon 6. The allelic frequency of the complex allele [A238V;F508del] was 0.04. When the whole data set was used (comprised also of 56 F508del/F508del and 34 F508del/other mutation controls), no differences reached the statistical significance in the clinical parameters, except chloride concentrations which were lower in [A238V;F508del]/other mutation compared with F508del/other mutation (P=0.03). The two study groups presented less complications than the control groups. Within the minimal data set (34 F508del/F508del, 27 F508del/other mutation, 4 [A238V;F508del]/F508del cases and 5 [A238V;F508del]/other mutation cases); that is, presenting all the variables in each patient, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity presented a trend to lower levels in the study groups in comparison with the F508del/F508del group, and C-reactive protein approximated statistically significant higher levels in the [A238V;F508del]/other mutation as compared with F508del/F508del patients (P=0.09). The analysis of statistical dependence among the variables showed a significant anticorrelation between chloride and body mass index in the [A238V;F508del]/other mutation group. In conclusion, the complex allele [A238V;F508del] seems to be associated with less general complications than in the control groups, on the other hand possibly giving a worse pulmonary phenotype and higher systemic/local inflammatory response. These findings have implications for the correct recruitment and clinical response of F508del patients in the clinical trials testing the new etiological drugs for cystic fibrosis. PMID:26911355

  12. Profiling critical cancer gene mutations in clinical tumor samples.

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    Laura E MacConaill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Detection of critical cancer gene mutations in clinical tumor specimens may predict patient outcomes and inform treatment options; however, high-throughput mutation profiling remains underdeveloped as a diagnostic approach. We report the implementation of a genotyping and validation algorithm that enables robust tumor mutation profiling in the clinical setting. METHODOLOGY: We developed and implemented an optimized mutation profiling platform ("OncoMap" to interrogate approximately 400 mutations in 33 known oncogenes and tumor suppressors, many of which are known to predict response or resistance to targeted therapies. The performance of OncoMap was analyzed using DNA derived from both frozen and FFPE clinical material in a diverse set of cancer types. A subsequent in-depth analysis was conducted on histologically and clinically annotated pediatric gliomas. The sensitivity and specificity of OncoMap were 93.8% and 100% in fresh frozen tissue; and 89.3% and 99.4% in FFPE-derived DNA. We detected known mutations at the expected frequencies in common cancers, as well as novel mutations in adult and pediatric cancers that are likely to predict heightened response or resistance to existing or developmental cancer therapies. OncoMap profiles also support a new molecular stratification of pediatric low-grade gliomas based on BRAF mutations that may have immediate clinical impact. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the clinical feasibility of high-throughput mutation profiling to query a large panel of "actionable" cancer gene mutations. In the future, this type of approach may be incorporated into both cancer epidemiologic studies and clinical decision making to specify the use of many targeted anticancer agents.

  13. A Class of High-affinity Bicyclooctane G551D-CFTR Activators Identified by High Throughput Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Cheng-yan; ZHAO Lu; LIU Yan-li; XU Li-na; SHANG De-jing; YANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    The glycine-to-aspartic acid missense mutation at the codon 551(G551D) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator(CFTR) is one of the five most frequent cystic fibrosis(CF) mutations associated with a severe CF phenotype. To explore the feasibility of pharmacological correction of disrupted activation of CFTR chloride channel caused by G551D mutation, we developed a halide-sensitive fluorescence miniassay for G551D-CFTR in Fisher rat thyroid(FRT) epithelial cells for the discovery of novel activators of G551D-CFTR. A class of bicyclooctane small molecule compounds that efficiently stimulate G551D-CFTR chloride channel activity was identified by high throughput screening via the FRT cell-based assay. This class of compounds selectively activates G551D-CFTR with a high affinity, whereas little effect of the compounds on wildtype CFTR can be seen. The discovery of a class of bicyclooctane G551D-CFTR activators will permit the analysis of structure-activity relationship of the compounds to identify ideal leads for in vivo therapeutic studies.

  14. [Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sumangali Chandra; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Bygum, Anette

    2011-02-14

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is a common genetic skin disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1:250 caused by mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin. This disorder manifests itself within the first year of life and is clinically characterized by dry, scaly skin, keratosis pilaris, palmar hyperlinearity and atopic manifestations. Patients with a severe phenotype are homozygous or compound heterozygous for the mutations, whereas heterozygous patients show mild disease, suggesting semidominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. We present a patient with classic severe ichthyosis vulgaris, atopic eczema and two loss-of-function mutations.

  15. TINF2 Gene Mutation in a Patient with Pulmonary Fibrosis

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    T. W. Hoffman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis is a frequent manifestation of telomere syndromes. Telomere gene mutations are found in up to 25% and 3% of patients with familial disease and sporadic disease, respectively. The telomere gene TINF2 encodes an eponymous protein that is part of the shelterin complex, a complex involved in telomere protection and maintenance. A TINF2 gene mutation was recently reported in a family with pulmonary fibrosis. We identified a heterozygous Ser245Tyr mutation in the TINF2 gene of previously healthy female patient that presented with progressive cough due to pulmonary fibrosis as well as panhypogammaglobulinemia at age 52. Retrospective multidisciplinary evaluation classified her as a case of possible idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Telomere length-measurement indicated normal telomere length in the peripheral blood compartment. This is the first report of a TINF2 mutation in a patient with sporadic pulmonary fibrosis, which represents another association between TINF2 mutations and this disease. Furthermore, this case underlines the importance of telomere dysfunction and not telomere length alone in telomere syndromes and draws attention to hypogammaglobulinemia as a manifestation of telomere syndromes.

  16. Gene-specific function prediction for non-synonymous mutations in monogenic diabetes genes.

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    Quan Li

    Full Text Available The rapid progress of genomic technologies has been providing new opportunities to address the need of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY molecular diagnosis. However, whether a new mutation causes MODY can be questionable. A number of in silico methods have been developed to predict functional effects of rare human mutations. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of different bioinformatics methods in the functional prediction of nonsynonymous mutations in each MODY gene, and provides reference matrices to assist the molecular diagnosis of MODY. Our study showed that the prediction scores by different methods of the diabetes mutations were highly correlated, but were more complimentary than replacement to each other. The available in silico methods for the prediction of diabetes mutations had varied performances across different genes. Applying gene-specific thresholds defined by this study may be able to increase the performance of in silico prediction of disease-causing mutations.

  17. Detection of Rare Beta Globin Gene Mutations in Northwestern Iran

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    M Haghi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent molecular studies on Iranian β-thalassemia genes revealed the presence of eight common mutations associated with thalassemia. Although these mutations are frequent, there are other rare and unknown mutations that can create large problems in designing preventive programs. We detected and explained the common mutations in north-western Iran previously and detection of the rare and unknown mutations could be useful in diagnosis and design of future preventive programs. Methods: In this study, 5ml peripheral blood from 20 Azari- β-thalassemia patients whose mutation was not revealed in the previous study was collected and DNA extraction was done by isopropanol and proteinase k method. Initially, samples were examined for the rare mutations: Codon6, Codon16, Codon41/42, Codon36/37, -88 and Codon22 by ARMS – PCR techniques and then the unknown cases were directly sequenced. Results: According to our results, Codon15(TGG-TGA, Codon16(-C, Codon36/37(-T, IVSII-848(C-A, IVSII-745(C-G, -28(A-C( and Codon25/26(+T were recognized and added to the spectrom of beta globin gene mutations in Azerbaijan and Iran. Also, we detected four SNP sites: 5’UTR+20(C-T, Codon2 (CAC-CAT , IVSII-16(C-G and IVSII-666(T-C in β-thalassemia genes. Conclusion: Our results could be useful for developing molecular screening plans and help prenatal diagnosis of beta thalassemia in Azerbaijan , Iran and other neighboring countries.

  18. Mutations in the perform gene in children with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Gen; XIE Zheng-de; SHEN Kun-ling; YE Ling-jun; WU Run-hui; LIU Chun-yan; JIN Ying-kang; YANG Shuang

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent studies have reported germline mutations in the perforin gene (PRF1) in some types of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). However, the prevalence of PRF1 mutations in HLH in Chinese pediatric patients has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of mutations and sequence variations in the PRF1 gene in Chinese pediatric patients with HLH.Methods Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed with five pairs of primers for the coding exons and the flanking intron sequences of PRF1. Sequencing of PCR products was subsequently applied in 30 pediatric patients with HLH and in 50 controls.Results Three heterozygous mutations in a coding region were found, which resulted in amino acid changes (C102F, S108N and T450M) in three patients. These mutations were not detected in control subjects. One patient had compound heterozygous mutations (S108N and T450M) in PRF1 as the background defect, and documented familial HLH type 2 (FHL2). One synonymous sequence variant (Q540Q) was observed in one patient but not in the controls. Two SNPs (A274A, H300H) in the coding region were detected in HLH patients and controls, but without differences in the heterozygosity rate between the two groups (P>0.05 for all comparisons).Conclusions We have identified three patients with three heterozygous missense mutations in PRF1; two of those three mutations (C102F and S108N) have so far been found only from Chinese patients. These findings are useful in evaluating the prevalence of PRF1 mutations in Chinese pediatric patients with HLH, and to correlate their genotype with phenotype. Some patients without familial history probably have primary HLH, which should be suspected even beyond the usual age range.

  19. Phenotypic variability of R117H-CFTR expression within monozygotic twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Michael D; Simmonds, Nicholas J

    2016-08-01

    Whilst cystic fibrosis is a monogenic condition, variation in phenotype exists for the same CFTR genotype, which is influenced by multiple genetic and non-genetic (environmental) factors. The R117H-CFTR mutation has variability directly relating to in cis poly-thymidine alleles, producing a differing spectrum of disease. This paper provides evidence of extreme phenotype variability - including fertility status - in the context of male monogenetic twins, discussing mechanisms and highlighting the diagnostic and treatment challenges. PMID:27364092

  20. Rescue of NBD2 mutants N1303K and S1235R of CFTR by small-molecule correctors and transcomplementation.

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    Daniele Rapino

    Full Text Available Although, the most common Cystic Fibrosis mutation, ΔF508, in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator. (CFTR, is located in nucleotide binding domain (NBD1, disease-causing mutations also occur in NBD2. To provide information on potential therapeutic strategies for mutations in NBD2, we studied, using a combination of biochemical approaches and newly created cell lines, two disease-causing NBD2 mutants, N1303K and S1235R. Surprisingly, neither was rescued by low temperature. Inhibition of proteasomes with MG132 or aggresomes with tubacin rescued the immature B and mature C bands of N1303K and S1235R, indicating that degradation occurs via proteasomes and aggresomes. We found no effect of the lysosome inhibitor E64. Thus, our results show that these NBD2 mutants are processing mutants with unique characteristics. Several known correctors developed to rescue ΔF508-CFTR, when applied either alone or in combination, significantly increased the maturation of bands B and C of both NBD 2 mutants. The best correction occurred with the combinations of C4 plus C18 or C3 plus C4. Co-transfection of truncated CFTR (∆27-264 into stably transfected cells was also able to rescue them. This demonstrates for the first time that transcomplementation with a truncated version of CFTR can rescue NBD2 mutants. Our results show that the N1303K mutation has a more profound effect on NBD2 processing than S1235R and that small-molecule correctors increase the maturation of bands B and C in NBD2 mutants. In addition, ∆27-264 was able to transcomplement both NDB2 mutants. We conclude that differences and similarities occur in the impact of mutations on NBD2 when compared to ΔF508-CFTR suggesting that individualized strategies may be needed to restore their function. Finally our results are important because they suggest that gene or corrector molecule therapies either alone or in combination individualized for NBD2 mutants may be beneficial for patients bearing

  1. Rescue of F508del-CFTR by RXR motif inactivation triggers proteome modulation associated with the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Alves, Patrícia; Couto, Francisco; Pesquita, Cátia; Coelho, Ana V; Penque, Deborah

    2010-04-01

    F508del-CFTR, the most common mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, disrupts intracellular trafficking leading to cystic fibrosis (CF). The trafficking defect of F508del-CFTR can be rescued by simultaneous inactivation of its four RXR motifs (4RK). Proteins involved in the F508del-CFTR trafficking defect and/or rescue are therefore potential CF therapeutic targets. We sought to identify these proteins by investigating differential proteome modulation in BHK cells over-expressing wt-CFTR, F508del-CFTR or the revertant F508del/4RK-CFTR. By 2-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics and western blot approaches we demonstrated that over-expression of F508del/4RK-CFTR modulates the expression of a large number of proteins, many of which are reported interactors of CFTR and/or 14-3-3 with potential roles in CFTR trafficking. GRP78/BiP, a marker of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), is up-regulated in cells over-expressing either F508del-CFTR or F598del/4RK-CFTR. However, over-expression of F508del/4RK-CFTR induces the up-regulation of many other UPR-associated proteins (e.g. GRP94, PDI, GRP75/mortalin) and, interestingly, the down-regulation of proteasome components associated with CFTR degradation, such as the proteasome activator PA28 (PSME2) and COP9 signalosome (COPS5/CSN5). Moreover, the F508del-CFTR-induced proteostasis imbalance, which involves some heat shock chaperones (e.g. HSP72/Hpa2), ER-EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding proteins (calumenin) and the proteasome activator PA28 (PSME2), tends to be 'restored', i.e., in BHK cells over-expressing F508del/4RK-CFTR those proteins tend to have expression levels similar to the wild-type ones. These findings indicate that a particular cellular environment orchestrated by the UPR contributes to and/or is compatible with F508del/4RK-CFTR rescue.

  2. Rescue of F508del-CFTR by RXR motif inactivation triggers proteome modulation associated with the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Alves, Patrícia; Couto, Francisco; Pesquita, Cátia; Coelho, Ana V; Penque, Deborah

    2010-04-01

    F508del-CFTR, the most common mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, disrupts intracellular trafficking leading to cystic fibrosis (CF). The trafficking defect of F508del-CFTR can be rescued by simultaneous inactivation of its four RXR motifs (4RK). Proteins involved in the F508del-CFTR trafficking defect and/or rescue are therefore potential CF therapeutic targets. We sought to identify these proteins by investigating differential proteome modulation in BHK cells over-expressing wt-CFTR, F508del-CFTR or the revertant F508del/4RK-CFTR. By 2-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics and western blot approaches we demonstrated that over-expression of F508del/4RK-CFTR modulates the expression of a large number of proteins, many of which are reported interactors of CFTR and/or 14-3-3 with potential roles in CFTR trafficking. GRP78/BiP, a marker of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), is up-regulated in cells over-expressing either F508del-CFTR or F598del/4RK-CFTR. However, over-expression of F508del/4RK-CFTR induces the up-regulation of many other UPR-associated proteins (e.g. GRP94, PDI, GRP75/mortalin) and, interestingly, the down-regulation of proteasome components associated with CFTR degradation, such as the proteasome activator PA28 (PSME2) and COP9 signalosome (COPS5/CSN5). Moreover, the F508del-CFTR-induced proteostasis imbalance, which involves some heat shock chaperones (e.g. HSP72/Hpa2), ER-EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding proteins (calumenin) and the proteasome activator PA28 (PSME2), tends to be 'restored', i.e., in BHK cells over-expressing F508del/4RK-CFTR those proteins tend to have expression levels similar to the wild-type ones. These findings indicate that a particular cellular environment orchestrated by the UPR contributes to and/or is compatible with F508del/4RK-CFTR rescue. PMID:20044041

  3. Survey of CF mutations in the clinical laboratory

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    Myers Angela

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since it is impossible to sequence the complete CFTR gene routinely, clinical laboratories must rely on test systems that screen for a panel of the most frequent mutations causing disease in a high percentage of patients. Thus, in a cohort of 257 persons that were referred to our laboratory for analysis of CF gene mutations, reverse line probe assays for the most common CF mutations were performed. These techniques were evaluated as routine first-line analyses of the CFTR gene status. Methods DNA from whole blood specimens was extracted and subjected to PCR amplification of 9 exons and 6 introns of the CFTR gene. The resulting amplicons were hybridised to probes for CF mutations and polymorphisms, immobilised on membranes supplied by Roche Molecular Systems, Inc. and Innogenetics, Inc.. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing of suspicious fragments indicating mutations were done with CF exon and intron specific primers. Results Of the 257 persons tested over the last three years (referrals based on 1 clinical symptoms typical for/indicative of CF, 2 indication for in vitro fertilisation, and 3 gene status determination because of anticipated parenthood and partners or relatives affected by CF, the reverse line blots detected heterozygote or homozygote mutations in the CFTR gene in 68 persons (26%. Eighty-three percent of those affected were heterozygous (47 persons or homozygous (10 persons for the ΔF508 allele. The only other CF-alleles that we found with these tests were the G542X allele (3 persons, the G551D allele (3 persons, the 3849+10kb C-T allele (2 persons the R117H allele (2 persons and the 621+1G-T allele (1 person. Of the fifteen IVS8-5T-polymorphisms detected in intron 8, seven (47% were found in males referred to us from IVF clinics. These seven 5T-alleles were all coupled with a heterozygous ΔF508 allele, they make up 35% of the males with fertility problems (20 men referred to us. Conclusions

  4. Altered Chromosomal Positioning, Compaction, and Gene Expression with a Lamin A/C Gene Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuisneineh, Fida; Fahrenbach, John P.; Zhang, Yuan; MacLeod, Heather; Dellefave, Lisa; Pytel, Peter; Selig, Sara; Labno, Christine M.; Reddy, Karen; Singh, Harinder; McNally, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. Methods/Findings To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. Conclusions These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered. PMID:21179469

  5. Altered chromosomal positioning, compaction, and gene expression with a lamin A/C gene mutation.

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    Stephanie K Mewborn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. METHODS/FINDINGS: To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. CONCLUSIONS: These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered.

  6. Mutation of RET gene in Chinese patients with Hirschsprung's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Cheng Li; Shi-Ping Ding; Ying Song; Min-Ju Li

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathogenic mechanism of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) at the molecular level and to elucidate the relationship between RET oncogene and Chinese patients with HD.METHODS: Exon 13 of RET oncogene from 20 unrelated HD patients was analyzed with polymerase chain reactionsingle strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). The positive amplifying products were then sequenced. According to the results of SSCP and DNA sequence, SSCP was done as well for the samples from the family other members of some cases with mutated RET gene.RESULTS: SSCP analysis indicated that mobility abnormality existed in 4 unrelated HD patients. Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a missense mutation, T to G at the nucleotide 18 888 and a frameshift mutation at the nucleotide 18 926 insG. In a HD family, the sicked child and his father were the same heterozygous missense mutation (T to G at nucleotide 18 888).CONCLUSION: Among Chinese HD patients, RET gene mutations may exist in considerable proportion with different patterns. These new discoveries indicate that RET mutations may play an important role in the pathogenesis of unrelated HD in the Chinese population. PCR-SSCP combined with DNA sequence can be used as a tool in the genetic diagnosis of HD.

  7. The K+ channel opener 1-EBIO potentiates residual function of mutant CFTR in rectal biopsies from cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva K Roth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of strategies to improve mutant CFTR function remains a key priority in the development of new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF. Previous studies demonstrated that the K⁺ channel opener 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolone (1-EBIO potentiates CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ secretion in cultured cells and mouse colon. However, the effects of 1-EBIO on wild-type and mutant CFTR function in native human colonic tissues remain unknown. METHODS: We studied the effects of 1-EBIO on CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ secretion in rectal biopsies from 47 CF patients carrying a wide spectrum of CFTR mutations and 57 age-matched controls. Rectal tissues were mounted in perfused micro-Ussing chambers and the effects of 1-EBIO were compared in control tissues, CF tissues expressing residual CFTR function and CF tissues with no detectable Cl⁻ secretion. RESULTS: Studies in control tissues demonstrate that 1-EBIO activated CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ secretion in the absence of cAMP-mediated stimulation and potentiated cAMP-induced Cl⁻ secretion by 39.2±6.7% (P<0.001 via activation of basolateral Ca²⁺-activated and clotrimazole-sensitive KCNN4 K⁺ channels. In CF specimens, 1-EBIO potentiated cAMP-induced Cl⁻ secretion in tissues with residual CFTR function by 44.4±11.5% (P<0.001, but had no effect on tissues lacking CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ conductance. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that 1-EBIO potentiates Cl⁻secretion in native CF tissues expressing CFTR mutants with residual Cl⁻ channel function by activation of basolateral KCNN4 K⁺ channels that increase the driving force for luminal Cl⁻ exit. This mechanism may augment effects of CFTR correctors and potentiators that increase the number and/or activity of mutant CFTR channels at the cell surface and suggests KCNN4 as a therapeutic target for CF.

  8. Nanoparticles that deliver triplex-forming peptide nucleic acid molecules correct F508del CFTR in airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeer, Nicole Ali; Anandalingam, Kavitha; Fields, Rachel J; Caputo, Christina; Kopic, Sascha; Gupta, Anisha; Quijano, Elias; Polikoff, Lee; Kong, Yong; Bahal, Raman; Geibel, John P; Glazer, Peter M; Saltzman, W Mark; Egan, Marie E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disorder most commonly caused by the F508del mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. It is not readily amenable to gene therapy because of its systemic nature and challenges including in vivo gene delivery and transient gene expression. Here we use triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids and donor DNA in biodegradable polymer nanoparticles to correct F508del. We confirm modification with sequencing and a functional chloride efflux assay. In vitro correction of chloride efflux occurs in up to 25% of human cells. Deep-sequencing reveals negligible off-target effects in partially homologous sites. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticles in CF mice produces changes in the nasal epithelium potential difference assay, consistent with corrected CFTR function. Also, gene correction is detected in the nasal and lung tissue. This work represents facile genome engineering in vivo with oligonucleotides using a nanoparticle system to achieve clinically relevant levels of gene editing without off-target effects. PMID:25914116

  9. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  10. Thyroglobulin gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuyun; Chen, Rongyu; Fu, Chunyun; Fan, Xin; Wang, Jin; Qian, Jiale; Yi, Shang; Li, Chuan; Luo, Jingsi; Su, Jiasun; Zhang, Shujie; Xie, Bobo; Zheng, Haiyang; Lai, Yunli; Chen, Yun; Li, Hongdou; Gu, Xuefan; Chen, Shaoke; Shen, Yiping

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in Thyroglobulin (TG) are common genetic causes of congenital hypothyroidism (CH). But the TG mutation spectrum and its frequency in Chinese CH patients have not been investigated. Here we conducted a genetic screening of TG gene in a cohort of 382 Chinese CH patients. We identified 22 rare non-polymorphic variants including six truncating variants and 16 missense variants of unknown significance (VUS). Seven patients carried homozygous pathogenic variants, and three patients carried homozygous or compound heterozygous VUS. 48 out of 382 patients carried one of 18 heterozygous VUS which is significantly more often than their occurrences in control cohort (P G variant is the most common pathogenic variant with an allele frequency of 0.021. The prevalence of CH due to TG gene defect in Chinese population was estimated to be approximately 1/101,000. Our study uncovered ethnicity specific TG mutation spectrum and frequency. PMID:26777470

  11. DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION IN SPUTUM OF LUNG CANCER PATIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG He-long; WANG Wen-liang; CUI Da-xiang

    1999-01-01

    @@ Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor, which has ahigh incidence and mortality rate. Therefore, it is necessary to seek a new method for the diagnosis, especially the early diagnosis of lung cancer. The development of molecular biology makes the gene diagnosis of lung cancer possible.PCR-SSCP was applied to detect p53 gene mutation of lung cancer patients' sputum cells and we have achieved good results.

  12. EDA Gene Mutations Underlie Non-syndromic Oligodontia

    OpenAIRE

    Song, S.; Han, D; Qu, H.; Gong, Y; Wu, H.; Zhang, X; Zhong, N.; H. Feng

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have detected mutations in the EDA gene, previously identified as causing X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), in two families with X-linked non-syndromic hypodontia. Notably, all affected males in both families exhibited isolated oligodontia, while almost all female carriers showed a milder or normal phenotype. We hypothesized that the EDA gene could be responsible for sporadic non-syndromic oligodontia in affected males. In this study, we examined 15 unrelated ...

  13. Common filaggrin gene mutations and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Sørensen, Erik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations may have a compromised cervical mucosal barrier against human papillomavirus infection, our primary objective was to study their risk of cervical cancer. METHODS: We genotyped 586 cervical cancer patients for the two most common FLG mutati...

  14. Mutations in the pericentrin (PCNT) gene cause primordial dwarfism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauch, Anita; Thiel, Christian T.; Schindler, Detlev; Wick, Ursula; Crow, Yanick J.; Ekici, Arif B.; van Essen, Anthonie J.; Goecke, Timm O.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H.; Zweier, Christiane; Brunner, Han G.; Becker, Kristin; Curry, Cynthia J.; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Devriendt, Koenraad; Doerfler, Arnd; Kinning, Esther; Megarbane, Andre; Meinecke, Peter; Semple, Robert K.; Spranger, Stephanie; Toutain, Annick; Trembath, Richard C.; Voss, Egbert; Wilson, Louise; Hennekam, Raoul; de Zegher, Francis; Doerr, Helmuth-Guenther; Reis, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental processes influencing human growth can be revealed by studying extreme short stature. Using genetic linkage analysis, we find that biallelic loss- of- function mutations in the centrosomal pericentrin ( PCNT) gene on chromosome 21q22.3 cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarf

  15. Mutations in the pericentrin (PCNT) gene cause primordial dwarfism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauch, A.; Thiel, C.T.; Schindler, D.; Wick, U.; Crow, Y.J.; Ekici, A.B.; Essen, A.J. van; Goecke, T.O.; Al-Gazali, L.; Chrzanowska, K.H.; Zweier, C.; Brunner, H.G.; Becker, K.; Curry, C.J.; Dallapiccola, B.; Devriendt, K.; Dorfler, A.; Kinning, E.; Megarbane, A.; Meinecke, P.; Semple, R.K.; Spranger, S.; Toutain, A.; Trembath, R.C.; Voss, E.; Wilson, L.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Zegher, F. de; Dorr, H.G.; Reis, A.

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental processes influencing human growth can be revealed by studying extreme short stature. Using genetic linkage analysis, we find that biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the centrosomal pericentrin (PCNT) gene on chromosome 21q22.3 cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism

  16. Specific gene mutations induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes our heavy-ion research rationale, progress, and plans for the near future. The major project involves selecting a group of maize Adh1 mutants induced by heavy ions and correlating their altered behavior with altered DNA nucleotide sequences and sequence arrangements. This research requires merging the techniques of classical genetics and recombinant DNA technology. Our secondary projects involve (1) the use of the Adh gene in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, as a second system with which to quantify the sort of specific gene mutants induced by heavy ions as compared to x rays, and (2) the development of a maize Adh1 pollen in situ monitor for environmental mutagens

  17. The human CFTR protein expressed in CHO cells activates aquaporin-3 in a cAMP-dependent pathway: study by digital holographic microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Jourdain, P.

    2013-12-11

    The transmembrane water movements during cellular processes and their relationship to ionic channel activity remain largely unknown. As an example, in epithelial cells it was proposed that the movement of water could be directly linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity through a cAMP-stimulated aqueous pore, or be dependent on aquaporin. Here, we used digital holographic microscopy (DHM) an interferometric technique to quantify in situ the transmembrane water fluxes during the activity of the epithelial chloride channel, CFTR, measured by patch-clamp and iodide efflux techniques. We showed that the water transport measured by DHM is fully inhibited by the selective CFTR blocker CFTRinh172 and is absent in cells lacking CFTR. Of note, in cells expressing the mutated version of CFTR (F508del-CFTR), which mimics the most common genetic alteration encountered in cystic fibrosis, we also show that the water movement is profoundly altered but restored by pharmacological manipulation of F508del-CFTR-defective trafficking. Importantly, whereas activation of this endogenous water channel required a cAMP-dependent stimulation of CFTR, activation of CFTR or F508del-CFTR by two cAMP-independent CFTR activators, genistein and MPB91, failed to trigger water movements. Finally, using a specific small-interfering RNA against the endogenous aquaporin AQP3, the water transport accompanying CFTR activity decreased. We conclude that water fluxes accompanying CFTR activity are linked to AQP3 but not to a cAMP-stimulated aqueous pore in the CFTR protein.

  18. The human CFTR protein expressed in CHO cells activates aquaporin-3 in a cAMP-dependent pathway: study by digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Pascal; Becq, Frédéric; Lengacher, Sylvain; Boinot, Clément; Magistretti, Pierre J; Marquet, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    The transmembrane water movements during cellular processes and their relationship to ionic channel activity remain largely unknown. As an example, in epithelial cells it was proposed that the movement of water could be directly linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity through a cAMP-stimulated aqueous pore, or be dependent on aquaporin. Here, we used digital holographic microscopy (DHM) an interferometric technique to quantify in situ the transmembrane water fluxes during the activity of the epithelial chloride channel, CFTR, measured by patch-clamp and iodide efflux techniques. We showed that the water transport measured by DHM is fully inhibited by the selective CFTR blocker CFTRinh172 and is absent in cells lacking CFTR. Of note, in cells expressing the mutated version of CFTR (F508del-CFTR), which mimics the most common genetic alteration encountered in cystic fibrosis, we also show that the water movement is profoundly altered but restored by pharmacological manipulation of F508del-CFTR-defective trafficking. Importantly, whereas activation of this endogenous water channel required a cAMP-dependent stimulation of CFTR, activation of CFTR or F508del-CFTR by two cAMP-independent CFTR activators, genistein and MPB91, failed to trigger water movements. Finally, using a specific small-interfering RNA against the endogenous aquaporin AQP3, the water transport accompanying CFTR activity decreased. We conclude that water fluxes accompanying CFTR activity are linked to AQP3 but not to a cAMP-stimulated aqueous pore in the CFTR protein.

  19. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  20. Induced marker gene mutations in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Non-fluorescent root mutants in soybean are useful as markers in genetic studies. 13 such mutants were detected among more than 150 000 seedlings derived from soybean lines treated with 6 mutagens. One of them, derived from variety 'Williams' treated with 20 kR gamma rays, did not correspond to the already known spontaneous non-fluorescent mutants. It was assigned the identification no. T285 and the gene symbol fr5. The other mutants corresponded with known loci fr1, fr2 or fr4. (author)

  1. [Driver gene mutation and targeted therapy of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    Although cancers may have many genetic alterations, there are only a few mutations actually associated with essential traits of cancer cells such as cell proliferation or evasion from apoptosis. Because cancer cells are "addicted" to these "drive genes" , pharmacologic inhibition of these gene function is highly effective. Epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor(TKI)(such as gefitinib or erlotinib)treatment of lung cancer harboring EGFR gene mutation is one of the prototypes of such therapies. Several clinical trials clearly demonstrated that progression-free survival of patients treated with EGFR-TKI is significantly longer than that of those treated by conventional platinum doublet chemotherapy. EGFR-TKI therapy dramatically changed the paradigm of lung cancer treatment. Furthermore, in 2012, crizotinib was approved for lung cancer treatment with anaplastic lymphoma kinase(ALK)gene translocation. Targeted therapies for lung cancers "addicted" to other driver gene mutations including ROS1, RET or HER2 are also under development. Through these personalized approaches, lung cancer is changing from an acute fatal disease to a more chronic disease, and eventually we might be able to cure it. PMID:23507588

  2. AID-initiated purposeful mutations in immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Myron F; Scharff, Matthew D; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2007-01-01

    Exposure brings risk to all living organisms. Using a remarkably effective strategy, higher vertebrates mitigate risk by mounting a complex and sophisticated immune response to counter the potentially toxic invasion by a virtually limitless army of chemical and biological antagonists. Mutations are almost always deleterious, but in the case of antibody diversification there are mutations occurring at hugely elevated rates within the variable (V) and switch regions (SR) of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes that are responsible for binding to and neutralizing foreign antigens throughout the body. These mutations are truly purposeful. This chapter is centered on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). AID is required for initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the V regions and class switch recombination (CSR) in the SR portions of Ig genes. By converting C --> U, while transcription takes place, AID instigates a cascade of mutational events involving error-prone DNA polymerases, base excision and mismatch repair enzymes, and recombination pathways. Together, these processes culminate in highly mutated antibody genes and the B cells expressing antibodies that have achieved optimal antigenic binding undergo positive selection in germinal centers. We will discuss the biological role of AID in this complex process, primarily in terms of its biochemical properties in relation to SHM in vivo. The chapter also discusses recent advances in experimental methods to characterize antibody dynamics as a function of SHM to help elucidate the role that the AID-induced mutations play in tailoring molecular recognition. The emerging experimental techniques help to address long-standing conundrums concerning evolution-imposed constraints on antibody structure and function. PMID:17560274

  3. EDA Gene Mutations Underlie Non-syndromic Oligodontia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S.; Han, D.; Qu, H.; Gong, Y.; Wu, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhong, N.; Feng, H.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have detected mutations in the EDA gene, previously identified as causing X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), in two families with X-linked non-syndromic hypodontia. Notably, all affected males in both families exhibited isolated oligodontia, while almost all female carriers showed a milder or normal phenotype. We hypothesized that the EDA gene could be responsible for sporadic non-syndromic oligodontia in affected males. In this study, we examined 15 unrelated males with non-syndromic oligodontia. Three novel EDA mutations (p.Ala259Glu, p.Arg289Cys, and p.Arg334His) were identified in four individuals (27%). A genetic defect in the EDA gene could result in non-syndromic oligodontia in affected males. PMID:19278982

  4. Ileal mucosal bile acid absorption is increased in Cftr knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somasundaram Sivagurunathan

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive loss of bile acids in stool has been reported in patients with cystic fibrosis. Some data suggest that a defect in mucosal bile acid transport may be the mechanism of bile acid malabsorption in these individuals. However, the molecular basis of this defect is unknown. This study examines the expression of the ileal bile acid transporter protein (IBAT and rates of diffusional (sodium independent and active (sodium dependent uptake of the radiolabeled bile acid taurocholate in mice with targeted disruption of the cftr gene. Methods Wild-type, heterozygous cftr (+/- and homozygous cftr (-/- mice were studied. Five one-cm segments of terminal ileum were excised, everted and mounted onto thin stainless steel rods and incubated in buffer containing tracer 3H-taurocholate. Simultaneously, adjacent segments of terminal ileum were taken and processed for immunohistochemistry and Western blots using an antibody against the IBAT protein. Results In all ileal segments, taurocholate uptake rates were fourfold higher in cftr (-/- and two-fold higher in cftr (+/- mice compared to wild-type mice. Passive uptake was not significantly higher in cftr (-/- mice than in controls. IBAT protein was comparably increased. Immuno-staining revealed that the greatest increases occurred in the crypts of cftr (-/- animals. Conclusions In the ileum, IBAT protein densities and taurocholate uptake rates are elevated in cftr (-/- mice > cftr (+/- > wild-type mice. These findings indicate that bile acid malabsorption in cystic fibrosis is not caused by a decrease in IBAT activity at the brush border. Alternative mechanisms are proposed, such as impaired bile acid uptake caused by the thick mucus barrier in the distal small bowel, coupled with a direct negative regulatory role for cftr in IBAT function.

  5. Analysis of gene mutations and clinical features in elderly patients with melanoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王轩

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the gene mutation status in Chinese elderly patients with melanoma and to explore the correlation of gene mutation with clinical characteristics and prognosis.Methods Melanoma tissue samples from Chinese elderly patients were analyzed for gene mutations of KIT,BRAF and NRAS in genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and Sanger sequencing.The correlations of gene mutations with clinicopathologic features and prognosis were statistically

  6. ホスファチジン酸による CFTR の細胞内輸送制御機構および CFTR 機能破綻により生じる掻痒病態発症機構の解明

    OpenAIRE

    橋本, 泰明; ハシモト, ヤスアキ; Hashimoto, Yasuaki

    2008-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in which mutation isthe cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) is a polytopic integral membrane protein that mediatestransepithelial chloride transport across epithelial cells in airways, pancreas, intestines andsweat glands. In addition, CFTR also regulates other various molecules (ion channels andreceptors) such as ENaC by forming multimolecular complex called “Transportsome”.Therefore, CFTR molecule is an extremely important molecule fo...

  7. Filaggrin Gene Mutations and Risk of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Jesper Rabølle; Thyssen, J P; Johansen, J D;

    2013-01-01

    ) . Mice with knockdown of filaggrin, or lack of functional histidase, show decreased epidermal trans-UCA levels and increased UVB-induced skin damage (5) . FLG mutation carriers also have 10% increased serum vitamin D levels suggesting increased penetration of UVB (6) . We evaluated the prevalence of FLG......Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is prevalent in lightly-pigmented Europeans. While ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important risk factor, genetic predispositions to BCC have also been identified (1) . Atopic dermatitis (AD), a condition with a heritability that reaches 71-84%, might increase the risk...... of BCC (2) . Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are observed in approximately 10% of Northern Europeans and are strongly associated with AD (3) . FLG mutations lead to reduced epidermal filaggrin protein and metabolite levels, including the chromophore trans-urocanic acid (UCA) (4...

  8. Heterogeneous AVPR2 gene mutations in congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildin, R.S.; Antush, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Schoof, J.M.; Scott, C.R. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Mutations in the AVPR2 gene encoding the receptor for arginine vasopressin in the kidney (V2 ADHR) have been reported in patients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, a predominantly X-linked disorder of water homeostasis. The authors have used restriction-enzyme analysis and direct DNA sequencing of genomic PCR product to evaluate the AVPR2 gene in 11 unrelated affected males. Each patient has a different DNA sequence variation, and only one matches a previously reported mutation. Cosegregation of the variations with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated for two families, and a de novo mutation was accomplished in one family. All the variations predict frameshifts, truncations, or nonconservative amino acid substitutions in evolutionarily conserved positions in the V2 ADHR and related receptors. Of interest, a 28-bp deletion is found in one patient, while another, unrelated patient has a tandem duplication of the same 28-bp segment, suggesting that both resulted from the same unusual unequal crossing-over mechanism facilitated by 9-mer direct sequence repeats. Since the V2 ADHR is a member of the seven-transmembrane-domain, G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, the loss-of-function mutations from this study and others provide important clues to the structure-function relationship of this and related receptors. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Computational design of a PDZ domain peptide inhibitor that rescues CFTR activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle E Roberts

    Full Text Available The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR is an epithelial chloride channel mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The most prevalent CFTR mutation, ΔF508, blocks folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Recent work has shown that some ΔF508-CFTR channel activity can be recovered by pharmaceutical modulators ("potentiators" and "correctors", but ΔF508-CFTR can still be rapidly degraded via a lysosomal pathway involving the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL, which binds CFTR via a PDZ interaction domain. We present a study that goes from theory, to new structure-based computational design algorithms, to computational predictions, to biochemical testing and ultimately to epithelial-cell validation of novel, effective CAL PDZ inhibitors (called "stabilizers" that rescue ΔF508-CFTR activity. To design the "stabilizers", we extended our structural ensemble-based computational protein redesign algorithm K* to encompass protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions. The computational predictions achieved high accuracy: all of the top-predicted peptide inhibitors bound well to CAL. Furthermore, when compared to state-of-the-art CAL inhibitors, our design methodology achieved higher affinity and increased binding efficiency. The designed inhibitor with the highest affinity for CAL (kCAL01 binds six-fold more tightly than the previous best hexamer (iCAL35, and 170-fold more tightly than the CFTR C-terminus. We show that kCAL01 has physiological activity and can rescue chloride efflux in CF patient-derived airway epithelial cells. Since stabilizers address a different cellular CF defect from potentiators and correctors, our inhibitors provide an additional therapeutic pathway that can be used in conjunction with current methods.

  10. Molecular screening of pituitary adenomas for gene mutations and rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, V.; Drazin, N.Z.; Gonskey, R.; Melmed, S. (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Although pituitary tumors arise as benign monoclonal neoplasms, genetic alterations have not readily been identified in these adenomas. The authors studied restriction fragment abnormalities involving the GH gene locus, and mutations in the p53 and H-, K-, and N-ras genes in 22 human GH cell adenomas. Twenty two nonsecretory adenomas were also examined for p53 and ras gene mutations. Seven prolactinoma DNA samples were tested for deletions in the multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN-1) locus, as well as for rearrangements in the hst gene, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. In DNA from GH-cell adenomas, identical GH restriction patterns were detected in both pituitary and lymphocyte DNA in all patients and in one patient with a mixed GH-TSH cell adenoma. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, no mutations were detected in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the p53 gene in GH cell adenomas nor in 22 nonsecretory adenomas. Codons 12/13 and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras genes were also intact on GH cell adenomas and in nonsecretory adenomas. Site-specific probes for chromosome 11q13 including, PYGM, D11S146, and INT2 were used in 7 sporadic PRL-secreting adenomas to detect deletions of the MEN-1 locus on chromosome 11. One patient was identified with a loss of 11p, and the remaining 6 patients did not demonstrate loss of heterozygosity in the pituitary 11q13 locus, compared to lymphocyte DNA. None of these patients demonstrated hst gene rearrangements which also maps to this locus. These results show that p53 and ras gene mutations are not common events in the pathogenesis of acromegaly and nonsecretory tumors. Although hst gene rearrangements and deletions of 11q13 are not associated with sporadic PRl-cell adenoma formation, a single patient was detected with a partial loss of chromosome 11, including the putative MEN-1 site. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Hereditary pancreatitis and mutation of the trypsinogen gene

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, P; Keim, V; Zimmer, K.

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic recurrent pancreatitis. A family, in which 11 members had chronic pancreatitis, five had diabetes, and two had pancreatic cancer, was studied, and hereditary pancreatitis was diagnosed in all patients by demonstrating the mutation in exon 3 of the cationic trypsinogen gene (R117H). The clinical implications of genotypic analysis in hereditary pancreatitis are discussed.



  12. Relationship between the Mutation of IRS-1 Gene and β3-adrenergic Receptor Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁国宪; 沈捷; 陈家伟

    2001-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between the mutation of Insulin receptor substrate-1 ( IRS-1) gene and β3-adrenergic receptor (β3-AR) gene associated with insulin resistance, to further elucidate the etiology and pathogenesis of type 2 DM, hypertension and coronary heart disease. Methods 281 Chinese subjects are divided into three groups according to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), The subjects were genotyped for the codon 64 of β3-AR gene, the codon 972 of IRS-1 gene polymorphisms by applying polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction fragment-length polymorphisms (RFLP) screening. Results Our study found that there was significantly increased frequency of IRS-1 gene mutation in IGT subjects and type 2 DM patients (P<0.05, 0.01, respectively), increased frequency of β3-AR gene mutation in type 2 DM patients (P<0.01), compared with NGT subjects. After adjusted for age, sex and plasma glucose, the level of insulin was significantly correlated with polymorphism of IRS-1 gene and β3-AR gene (P<0.001 in all ) by multiple regression analysis. In the models of Logistic regression, type 2 DM is closely related to age and family history (OR=3.1966, 1.4670; P=0.0272, 0.009; respectively), and to the polymorphism of β3-AR gene (OR=1.7380, P=0.0356), but not related to the polymorphism of IRS-1 gene. Conclusions These results suggest that mutation of IRS-1 gene may be the risk factor for insulin resistance, whereas mutation of β3-AR gene may be a common risk factor for insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 DM and hypertension.

  13. Driver Gene Mutations in Stools of Colorectal Carcinoma Patients Detected by Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengol, Gemma; Sarhadi, Virinder K; Ghanbari, Reza; Doghaei-Moghaddam, Masoud; Ansari, Reza; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kokkola, Arto; Malekzadeh, Reza; Knuutila, Sakari

    2016-07-01

    Detection of driver gene mutations in stool DNA represents a promising noninvasive approach for screening colorectal cancer (CRC). Amplicon-based next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a good option to study mutations in many cancer genes simultaneously and from a low amount of DNA. Our aim was to assess the feasibility of identifying mutations in 22 cancer driver genes with Ion Torrent technology in stool DNA from a series of 65 CRC patients. The assay was successful in 80% of stool DNA samples. NGS results showed 83 mutations in cancer driver genes, 29 hotspot and 54 novel mutations. One to five genes were mutated in 75% of cases. TP53, KRAS, FBXW7, and SMAD4 were the top mutated genes, consistent with previous studies. Of samples with mutations, 54% presented concomitant mutations in different genes. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway genes were mutated in 70% of samples, with 58% having alterations in KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF. Because mutations in these genes can compromise the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor blockade in CRC patients, identifying mutations that confer resistance to some targeted treatments may be useful to guide therapeutic decisions. In conclusion, the data presented herein show that NGS procedures on stool DNA represent a promising tool to detect genetic mutations that could be used in the future for diagnosis, monitoring, or treating CRC. PMID:27155048

  14. CFTR suppresses tumor progression through miR-193b targeting urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, C; Jiang, X H; Zhang, J T; Sun, T T; Dong, J D; Sanders, A J; Diao, R Y; Wang, Y; Fok, K L; Tsang, L L; Yu, M K; Zhang, X H; Chung, Y W; Ye, L; Zhao, M Y; Guo, J H; Xiao, Z J; Lan, H Y; Ng, C F; Lau, K M; Cai, Z M; Jiang, W G; Chan, H C

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is expressed in the epithelial cells of a wide range of organs/tissues from which most cancers are derived. Although accumulating reports have indicated the association of cancer incidence with genetic variations in CFTR gene, the exact role of CFTR in cancer development and the possible underlying mechanism have not been elucidated. Here, we report that CFTR expression is significantly decreased in both prostate cancer cell lines and human prostate cancer tissue samples. Overexpression of CFTR in prostate cancer cell lines suppresses tumor progression (cell growth, adhesion and migration), whereas knockdown of CFTR leads to enhanced malignancies both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that CFTR knockdown-enhanced cell proliferation, cell invasion and migration are significantly reversed by antibodies against either urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) or uPA receptor (uPAR), which are known to be involved in various malignant traits of cancer development. More interestingly, overexpression of CFTR suppresses uPA by upregulating the recently described tumor suppressor microRNA-193b (miR-193b), and overexpression of pre-miR-193b significantly reverses CFTR knockdown-enhanced malignant phenotype and abrogates elevated uPA activity in prostate cancer cell line. Finally, we show that CFTR gene transfer results in significant tumor repression in prostate cancer xenografts in vivo. Taken together, the present study has demonstrated a previously undefined tumor-suppressing role of CFTR and its involvement in regulation of miR-193b in prostate cancer development. PMID:22797075

  15. Mechanisms of CFTR functional variants that impair regulated bicarbonate permeation and increase risk for pancreatitis but not for cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica LaRusch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF, a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002. Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005 and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001. WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in

  16. CFTR Deletion in Mouse Testis Induces VDAC1 Mediated Inflammatory Pathway Critical for Spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijuan, Liao; Jiang, Xie; Ming, Yang; Huaqin, Sun; Wenming, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common genetic disease among Caucasians and affects tissues including lung, pancreas and reproductive tracts. It has been shown that Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress and heat shock response are two major deregulated functional modules related to CFTR dysfunction. To identify the impact of CFTR deletion during spermatogenesis, we examined the expression of spermiogenesis-related genes in the testis of CFTR mutant mice (CF mice). We confirmed expression changes of MSY2, a germ cell specific RNA binding protein, resulting from deletion of CFTR in testis. Furthermore, real time PCR and Western blot results showed that an inflammatory response was activated in CF mice testis, as reflected by the altered expression of cytokines. We demonstrate for the first time that expression of MSY2 is decreased in CF mice. Our results suggest that CFTR deletion in testis influences inflammatory responses and these features are likely to be due to the unique environment of the seminiferous tubule during the spermatogenesis process. The current study also suggests avenues to understand the pathophysiology of CFTR during spermatogenesis and provides targets for the possible treatment of CFTR-related infertility. PMID:27483469

  17. CFTR Deletion in Mouse Testis Induces VDAC1 Mediated Inflammatory Pathway Critical for Spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chen; Lang, Qin; Huijuan, Liao; Jiang, Xie; Ming, Yang; Huaqin, Sun; Wenming, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common genetic disease among Caucasians and affects tissues including lung, pancreas and reproductive tracts. It has been shown that Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress and heat shock response are two major deregulated functional modules related to CFTR dysfunction. To identify the impact of CFTR deletion during spermatogenesis, we examined the expression of spermiogenesis-related genes in the testis of CFTR mutant mice (CF mice). We confirmed expression changes of MSY2, a germ cell specific RNA binding protein, resulting from deletion of CFTR in testis. Furthermore, real time PCR and Western blot results showed that an inflammatory response was activated in CF mice testis, as reflected by the altered expression of cytokines. We demonstrate for the first time that expression of MSY2 is decreased in CF mice. Our results suggest that CFTR deletion in testis influences inflammatory responses and these features are likely to be due to the unique environment of the seminiferous tubule during the spermatogenesis process. The current study also suggests avenues to understand the pathophysiology of CFTR during spermatogenesis and provides targets for the possible treatment of CFTR-related infertility. PMID:27483469

  18. HFE gene mutations and iron status of Brazilian blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C.J.L. Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the HFE and TFR2 genes have been associated with iron overload. HFE and TFR2 mutations were assessed in blood donors, and the relationship with iron status was evaluated. Subjects (N = 542 were recruited at the Hemocentro da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Iron status was not influenced by HFE mutations in women and was independent of blood donation frequency. In contrast, men carrying the HFE 282CY genotype had lower total iron-binding capacity (TIBC than HFE 282CC genotype carriers. Men who donated blood for the first time and were carriers of the HFE 282CY genotype had higher transferrin saturation values and lower TIBC concentrations than those with the homozygous wild genotype for the HFE C282Y mutation. Moreover, in this group of blood donors, carriers of HFE 63DD plus 63HD genotypes had higher serum ferritin values than those with the homozygous wild genotype for HFE H63D mutation. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that HFE 282CY leads to a 17.21% increase (P = 0.018 and a 83.65% decrease (P = 0.007 in transferrin saturation and TIBC, respectively. In addition, serum ferritin is influenced by age (3.91%, P = 0.001 and the HFE 63HD plus DD genotype (55.84%, P = 0.021. In conclusion, the HFE 282Y and 65C alleles were rare, while the HFE 63D allele was frequent in Brazilian blood donors. The HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were associated with alterations in iron status in blood donors in a gender-dependent manner.

  19. Combining gene mutation with gene expression data improves outcome prediction in myelodysplastic syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstung, Moritz; Pellagatti, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Porta, Matteo G Della; Jädersten, Martin; Dolatshad, Hamid; Verma, Amit; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Vyas, Paresh; Killick, Sally; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cazzola, Mario; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J.; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease, but two patients rarely have identical genotypes. Similarly, patients differ in their clinicopathological parameters, but how genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity are interconnected is not well understood. Here we build statistical models to disentangle the effect of 12 recurrently mutated genes and 4 cytogenetic alterations on gene expression, diagnostic clinical variables and outcome in 124 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Overall, one or more genetic lesions correlate with expression levels of ~20% of all genes, explaining 20–65% of observed expression variability. Differential expression patterns vary between mutations and reflect the underlying biology, such as aberrant polycomb repression for ASXL1 and EZH2 mutations or perturbed gene dosage for copy-number changes. In predicting survival, genomic, transcriptomic and diagnostic clinical variables all have utility, with the largest contribution from the transcriptome. Similar observations are made on the TCGA acute myeloid leukaemia cohort, confirming the general trends reported here. PMID:25574665

  20. The significance of haemochromatosis gene mutations in the general population: implications for screening

    OpenAIRE

    Burt, M; George, P.; Upton, J; Collett, J.; Frampton, C.; Chapman, T; Walmsley, T.; Chapman, B.

    1998-01-01

    Background—Haemochromatosis is associated with mutations in the HFE gene but the significance of these mutations in the general population is unknown. 
Aims—To determine the frequency of HFE gene mutations in the general population, their effect on serum iron indexes, and their role in screening for haemochromatosis. 
Methods—Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from 1064 randomly selected subjects was analysed for the C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene. Serum iron, transferrin ...

  1. Screening of sarcomere gene mutations in young athletes with abnormal findings in electrocardiography: identification of a MYH7 mutation and MYBPC3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Chika; Arimura, Takuro; Hayashi, Takeharu; Naruse, Taeko K; Kawai, Sachio; Kimura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    There is an overlap between the physiological cardiac remodeling associated with training in athletes, the so-called athlete's heart, and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common hereditary cardiac disease. HCM is often accompanied by unfavorable outcomes including a sudden cardiac death in the adolescents. Because one of the initial signs of HCM is abnormality in electrocardiogram (ECG), athletes may need to monitor for ECG findings to prevent any unfavorable outcomes. HCM is caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins, but there is no report on the systematic screening of gene mutations in athletes. One hundred and two genetically unrelated young Japanese athletes with abnormal ECG findings were the subjects for the analysis of four sarcomere genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3. We found that 5 out of 102 (4.9%) athletes carried mutations: a heterozygous MYH7 Glu935Lys mutation, a heterozygous MYBPC3 Arg160Trp mutation and another heterozygous MYBPC3 Thr1046Met mutation, all of which had been reported as HCM-associated mutations, in 1, 2 and 2 subjects, respectively. This is the first study of systematic screening of sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of athletes with abnormal ECG, demonstrating the presence of sarcomere gene mutations in the athlete's heart. PMID:26178432

  2. Obligate coupling of CFTR pore opening to tight nucleotide-binding domain dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihályi, Csaba; Töröcsik, Beáta; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    In CFTR, the chloride channel mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, ATP-binding-induced dimerization of two cytosolic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) opens the pore, and dimer disruption following ATP hydrolysis closes it. Spontaneous openings without ATP are rare in wild-type CFTR, but in certain CF mutants constitute the only gating mechanism, stimulated by ivacaftor, a clinically approved CFTR potentiator. The molecular motions underlying spontaneous gating are unclear. Here we correlate energetic coupling between residues across the dimer interface with spontaneous pore opening/closure in single CFTR channels. We show that spontaneous openings are also strictly coupled to NBD dimerization, which may therefore occur even without ATP. Coordinated NBD/pore movements are therefore intrinsic to CFTR: ATP alters the stability, but not the fundamental structural architecture, of open- and closed-pore conformations. This explains correlated effects of phosphorylation, mutations, and drugs on ATP-driven and spontaneous activity, providing insights for understanding CF mutation and drug mechanisms. PMID:27328319

  3. Dysferlin Gene Mutation Spectrum in a Large Cohort of Chinese Patients with Dysferlinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Qin Jin

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: DYSF mutations in Chinese patients clustered in the N-terminal region of the gene. Exonic rearrangements were found in 23% of patients with only one pathogenic mutation identified by Sanger sequencing or NGS. The novel mutations found in this study greatly expanded the mutational spectrum of dysferlinopathy.

  4. Simultaneous mutation detection of three homoeologous genes in wheat by High Resolution Melting analysis and Mutation Surveyor®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Kate

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes is a powerful tool for reverse genetics, combining traditional chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput PCR-based mutation detection to discover induced mutations that alter protein function. The most popular mutation detection method for TILLING is a mismatch cleavage assay using the endonuclease CelI. For this method, locus-specific PCR is essential. Most wheat genes are present as three similar sequences with high homology in exons and low homology in introns. Locus-specific primers can usually be designed in introns. However, it is sometimes difficult to design locus-specific PCR primers in a conserved region with high homology among the three homoeologous genes, or in a gene lacking introns, or if information on introns is not available. Here we describe a mutation detection method which combines High Resolution Melting (HRM analysis of mixed PCR amplicons containing three homoeologous gene fragments and sequence analysis using Mutation Surveyor® software, aimed at simultaneous detection of mutations in three homoeologous genes. Results We demonstrate that High Resolution Melting (HRM analysis can be used in mutation scans in mixed PCR amplicons containing three homoeologous gene fragments. Combining HRM scanning with sequence analysis using Mutation Surveyor® is sensitive enough to detect a single nucleotide mutation in the heterozygous state in a mixed PCR amplicon containing three homoeoloci. The method was tested and validated in an EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate-treated wheat TILLING population, screening mutations in the carboxyl terminal domain of the Starch Synthase II (SSII gene. Selected identified mutations of interest can be further analysed by cloning to confirm the mutation and determine the genomic origin of the mutation. Conclusion Polyploidy is common in plants. Conserved regions of a gene often represent functional domains and have high sequence

  5. Channel Gating Regulation by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) First Cytosolic Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Chung, W Joon; Pyle, Louise C; Wang, Wei; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Mulvihill, Cory M; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Hong, Jeong; Velu, Sadanandan E; Lewis, Hal A; Atwell, Shane; Aller, Steve; Bear, Christine E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Kirk, Kevin L; Sorscher, Eric J

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present data indicating a robust and specific domain interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) first cytosolic loop (CL1) and nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) that allows ion transport to proceed in a regulated fashion. We used co-precipitation and ELISA to establish the molecular contact and showed that binding kinetics were not altered by the common clinical mutation F508del. Both intrinsic ATPase activity and CFTR channel gating were inhibited severely by CL1 peptide, suggesting that NBD1/CL1 binding is a crucial requirement for ATP hydrolysis and channel function. In addition to cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acquired rhinosinusitis, pancreatitis, and lethal secretory diarrhea (e.g. cholera). On the basis of clinical relevance of the CFTR as a therapeutic target, a cell-free drug screen was established to identify modulators of NBD1/CL1 channel activity independent of F508del CFTR and pharmacologic rescue. Our findings support a targetable mechanism of CFTR regulation in which conformational changes in the NBDs cause reorientation of transmembrane domains via interactions with CL1 and result in channel gating.

  6. Functional reconstitution and channel activity measurements of purified wildtype and mutant CFTR protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2015-03-09

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates.

  7. Molecular basis of human CD36 gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Poncyljusz, Wojciech

    2007-01-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the class B scavenger receptor family. The CD36 gene is located on chromosome 7 q11.2 and is encoded by 15 exons. Defective CD36 is a likely candidate gene for impaired fatty acid metabolism, glucose intolerance, atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, Alzheimer disease, and modification of the clinical course of malaria. Contradictory data concerning the effects of antiatherosclerotic drugs on CD36 expression indicate that further investigation of the role of CD36 in the development of atherosclerosis may be important for the prevention and treatment of this disease. This review summarizes current knowledge of CD36 gene structure, splicing, and mutations and the molecular, metabolic, and clinical consequences of these phenomena. PMID:17673938

  8. Data mining approach to predict BRCA1 gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olegas Niakšu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent women cancer form and one of the leading mortality causes among women around the world. Patients with pathological mutation of a BRCA gene have 65% lifelong breast cancer probability. It is known that such patients have different cause of illness. In this study, we have proposed a new approach for the prediction of BRCA mutation carriers by methodically applying knowledge discovery steps and utilizing data mining methods. An alternative BRCA risk assessment model has been created utilizing decision tree classifier model. The biggest challenge was a very small size and imbalanced nature of the initial dataset, which have been collected by clinicians during 4 years of clinical trial. Iterative optimization of initial dataset, optimal algorithms selection and their parameterization have resulted in higher classifier model performance, with acceptable prediction accuracy for the clinical usage. In this study, three data mining problems have been analyzed using eleven data mining algorithms.

  9. [Cytogenetic abnormalities and gene mutations in myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoko; Kitamura, Toshio

    2009-10-01

    Myeloid leukemia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. Cytogenetic studies have revealed specific chromosomal abnormalities, such as translocations, and inversions. Fusion proteins derived from these abnormalities were identified in various subtypes of leukemia. Because most of these fusion proteins were not sufficient to induce leukemia by themselves in mouse models, additional oncogenic events have been thought to be necessary for leukemogenesis. Recently, a hypothesis called "two-hit model" for leukemia has been proposed. Two broad classes of mutations that proliferative or survival advantage of hematopoietic progenitors and impaired differentiation are required for inducing leukemia. In this article, we summarize some typical chromosomal abnormalities or gene mutations associated with myeloid leukemia on the basis of this hypothesis.

  10. Mutation Analysis of the LH Receptor Gene in Leydig Cell Adenoma and Hyperplasia and Functional and Biochemical Studies of Activating Mutations of the LH Receptor Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, Annemieke M.; Lumbroso, Serge; Verhoef-Post, Miriam; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Looijenga, Leendert H. J.; Funaro, Ada; Beishuizen, Auke; van Marle, Andre; Drop, Stenvert L. S.; Themmen, Axel P. N.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Germline and somatic activating mutations in the LH receptor (LHR) gene have been reported. Objective: Our objective was to perform mutation analysis of the LHR gene of patients with Leydig cell adenoma or hyperplasia. Functional studies were conducted to compare the D578H-LHR mutant with t

  11. Identification of Gene Mutations and Fusion Genes in Patients with Sézary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Aparna; Rabionet, Raquel; Espinet, Blanca; Zapata, Luis; Puiggros, Anna; Melero, Carme; Puig, Anna; Sarria-Trujillo, Yaris; Ossowski, Stephan; Garcia-Muret, Maria P; Estrach, Teresa; Servitje, Octavio; Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Gallardo, Fernando; Pujol, Ramon M; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Sézary syndrome is a leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with an aggressive clinical course. The genetic etiology of the disease is poorly understood, with chromosomal abnormalities and mutations in some genes being involved in the disease. The goal of our study was to understand the genetic basis of the disease by looking for driver gene mutations and fusion genes in 15 erythrodermic patients with circulating Sézary cells, 14 of them fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Sézary syndrome. We have discovered genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of Sézary syndrome. Some of the genes that are affected by somatic point mutations include ITPR1, ITPR2, DSC1, RIPK2, IL6, and RAG2, with some of them mutated in more than one patient. We observed several somatic copy number variations shared between patients, including deletions and duplications of large segments of chromosome 17. Genes with potential function in the T-cell receptor signaling pathway and tumorigenesis were disrupted in Sézary syndrome patients, for example, CBLB, RASA2, BCL7C, RAMP3, TBRG4, and DAD1. Furthermore, we discovered several fusion events of interest involving RASA2, NFKB2, BCR, FASN, ZEB1, TYK2, and SGMS1. Our work has implications for the development of potential therapeutic approaches for this aggressive disease. PMID:27039262

  12. Mutations of p53 gene exons 4-8 in human esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ya Li; Jin-Tian Tang; Li-Qun Jia; Pei-Wen Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the tumor suppressor gene p53 mutations in exon 4, esophageal cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues.METHODS: We performed p53 (exons 4-8) gene mutation analysis on 24 surgically resected human esophageal cancer specimens by PCR, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and DNA sequencing. RESULTS: p53 gene mutations were detected in 9 of 22 (40.9%) esophageal cancer specimens and 10 of 17 (58.8%) adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Eight of sixteen (50.0%) point mutations detected were G-A transitions and 9 of 18 (50.0%) p53 gene mutations occurred in exon 4 in esophageal cancer specimens. Only 1 of 11 mutations detected was G-A transition and 4 of 11 (36.4%) p53 gene mutations occurred in exon 4 in adjacent non-cancerous tissues.CONCLUSION: Mutation of p53 gene in exon 4 may play an important role in development of esophageal cancer. The observation of p53 gene mutation in adjacent noncancerous tissues suggests that p53 gene mutation may be an early event in esophageal carcinogenesis. Some clinical factors, including age, sex, pre-operation therapy and location of tumors, do not influence p53 gene mutation rates.

  13. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in seven Danish Wolfram syndrome families; four new mutations identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Eiberg, Hans Rudolf Lytchoff; Barrett, Timothy;

    2005-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a neuro-degenerative autosomal recessive (AR) disorder (OMIM #222300) caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene on 4p16.1. More than 120 mutations have been identified in WFS1 associated with AR WS, as well as autosomal dominant nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing...

  14. Diaphanous gene mutation affects spiral cleavage and chirality in snails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Reiko; Fujikura, Kohei; Abe, Masanori; Hosoiri, Yuji; Asakawa, Shuichi; Shimizu, Miho; Umeda, Shin; Ichikawa, Futaba; Takahashi, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    L-R (left and right) symmetry breaking during embryogenesis and the establishment of asymmetric body plan are key issues in developmental biology, but the onset including the handedness-determining gene locus still remains unknown. Using pure dextral (DD) and sinistral (dd) strains of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis as well as its F2 through to F10 backcrossed lines, the single handedness-determining-gene locus was mapped by genetic linkage analysis, BAC cloning and chromosome walking. We have identified the actin-related diaphanous gene Lsdia1 as the strongest candidate. Although the cDNA and derived amino acid sequences of the tandemly duplicated Lsdia1 and Lsdia2 genes are very similar, we could discriminate the two genes/proteins in our molecular biology experiments. The Lsdia1 gene of the sinistral strain carries a frameshift mutation that abrogates full-length LsDia1 protein expression. In the dextral strain, it is already translated prior to oviposition. Expression of Lsdia1 (only in the dextral strain) and Lsdia2 (in both chirality) decreases after the 1-cell stage, with no asymmetric localization throughout. The evolutionary relationships among body handedness, SD/SI (spiral deformation/spindle inclination) at the third cleavage, and expression of diaphanous proteins are discussed in comparison with three other pond snails (L. peregra, Physa acuta and Indoplanorbis exustus). PMID:27708420

  15. Somatic mutations of APC gene in carcinomas from hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Huang; Shu Zheng; Shen-Hang Jin; Su-Zhan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mutational features of adenomatous polyposis coii (APC) gene and its possible arising mechanism in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC).METHODS: PCR-based In Vitro Synthesized Protein Test (IVSP) assay and sequencing analysis were used to confirm somatic mutations of whole APC gene in 19 HNPCC cases. RESULTS: Eleven cases with 13 mutations were determined to harbor APC mutations. The prevalence of APC mutation was 58%(11/19). The mutations consisted of 9 frameshift and 4 nonsense ones, indicating that there were more frameshift mutations (69%). The frameshift mutations allexhibited deletion or insertion of 1-2 bp and most of them (7/9) happened at simple nucleotide repeat sequences, particularly within (A)n tracts (5/9). All point mutations presented C-to-T transitions at CpG sites. CONCLUSION: Mutations of APC gene were detected in more than half of HNPCC, indicating that its mutation was a common molecular event and might play an important role in the tumorigenesis of HNPCC. Locations of frameshift mutations at simple nucleotide repeat sequences and point mutations at CpG sites suggested that many mutations probably derived from endogenous processes including mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. Defective MMR might affect the nature of APC mutations in HNPCC and likely occur earlier than APC mutational inactivation in some patients.

  16. Novel chloride channel gene mutations in two unrelated Chinese families with myotonia congenita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Feng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Myotonia congenita (MC is a genetic disease characterized by mutations in the muscle chloride channel gene (CLCN1. To date, approximately 130 different mutations on the CLCN1 gene have been identified. However, most of the studies have focused on Caucasians, and reports on CLCN1 mutations in Chinese population are rare. This study investigated the mutation of CLCN1 in two Chinese families with MC. Direct sequencing of the CLCN1 gene revealed a heterozygous mutation (892G>A, resulting in A298T in one family and a compound heterozygous mutations (782A>G, resulting in Y261C; 1679T>C, resulting in M560T in the other family, None of the 100 normal controls had these mutations. Our findings add more to the available information on the CLCN1 mutation spectrum, and provide a valuable reference for studying the mutation types and inheritance pattern of CLCN1 in the Chinese population.

  17. Three charged amino acids in extracellular loop 1 are involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guiying; Rahman, Kazi S; Infield, Daniel T; Kuang, Christopher; Prince, Chengyu Z; McCarty, Nael A

    2014-08-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bears six extracellular loops (ECL1-6); ECL1 is the site of several mutations associated with CF. Mutation R117H has been reported to reduce current amplitude, whereas D110H, E116K, and R117C/L/P may impair channel stability. We hypothesized that these amino acids might not be directly involved in ion conduction and permeation but may contribute to stabilizing the outer vestibule architecture in CFTR. We used cRNA injected oocytes combined with electrophysiological techniques to test this hypothesis. Mutants bearing cysteine at these sites were not functionally modified by extracellular MTS reagents and were blocked by GlyH-101 similarly to WT-CFTR. These results suggest that these three residues do not contribute directly to permeation in CFTR. In contrast, mutants D110R-, E116R-, and R117A-CFTR exhibited instability of the open state and significantly shortened burst duration compared with WT-CFTR and failed to be locked into the open state by AMP-PNP (adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido) triphosphate); charge-retaining mutants showed mainly the full open state with comparably longer open burst duration. These interactions suggest that these ECL1 residues might be involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR. A CFTR homology model suggested that E116 interacts with R104 in both the closed and open states, D110 interacts with K892 in the fully closed state, and R117 interacts with E1126 in the open state. These interactions were confirmed experimentally. The results suggest that D110, E116, and R117 may contribute to stabilizing the architecture of the outer pore of CFTR by interactions with other charged residues. PMID:25024266

  18. PROMISES FOR TREATING COLON CANCER PATIENTS WITH BRAF GENE MUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer represents a heterogenous disease group, which differ by cancerogenesis mechanisms, molecular alterations, prognosis and treatment possibilities. In modern clinical practice assessment of KRAS and NRAS genes status is already necessary in order to prescribe anti-EGFR treatment for metastatic disease. A separate poor prognosis group are patients with BRAF mutation. In this review we will focus on biological features of BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer, its epidemiology, clinical features on different stages, treatment choice and promising new treatment possibilities.

  19. Potentiators of Defective ΔF508-CFTR Gating that Do Not Interfere with Corrector Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuan, Puay-Wah; Veit, Guido; Tan, Joseph A; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Verkman, A S

    2015-10-01

    Combination drug therapies under development for cystic fibrosis caused by the ∆F508 mutation in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) include a "corrector" to improve its cellular processing and a "potentiator" to improve its chloride channel function. Recently, it was reported that the approved potentiator N-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (Ivacaftor) reduces ∆F508-CFTR cellular stability and the efficacy of investigational correctors, including 3-(6-[([1-(2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)cyclopropyl]carbonyl) amino]-3-methyl-2-pyridinyl)-benzoic acid and 1-(2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-N-(1-[(2R)-2,3-dihydroxypropyl]-6-fluoro-2-(2-hydroxy-1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-indol-5-yl), which might contribute to the modest reported efficacy of combination therapy in clinical trials. Here, we report the identification and characterization of potentiators that do not interfere with ∆F508-CFTR stability or corrector action. High-throughput screening and structure-activity analysis identified several classes of potentiators that do not impair corrector action, including tetrahydrobenzothiophenes, thiooxoaminothiazoles, and pyrazole-pyrrole-isoxazoles. The most potent compounds have an EC(50) for ∆F508-CFTR potentiation down to 18 nM and do not reduce corrector efficacy in heterologous ∆F508-CFTR-expressing cells or primary cultures of ∆F508/∆F508 human bronchial epithelia. The ΔF508-CFTR potentiators also activated wild-type and G551D CFTR, albeit weakly. The efficacy of combination therapy for cystic fibrosis caused by the ∆F508 mutation may be improved by replacement of Ivacaftor with a potentiator that does not interfere with corrector action. PMID:26245207

  20. Mutation spectrum of the TYR and SLC45A2 genes in patients with oculocutaneous albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Jung Min; YANG, JUNG-AH; Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kim, Hyon-Ju

    2012-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a group of inherited disorders characterized by defective melanin biosynthesis. OCA1, the most common and severe form, is caused by mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. OCA4, caused by mutations in the SLC45A2 gene, has frequently been reported in the Japanese population. To determine the mutational spectrum in Korean OCA patients, 12 patients were recruited. The samples were first screened for TYR mutations, and negative samples were screened for SLC45A2 m...

  1. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. M. J. van der Knijff-van Dortmont

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour.

  2. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  3. MAST205 competes with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-associated ligand for binding to CFTR to regulate CFTR-mediated fluid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Aixia; Zhang, Weiqiang; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Sinha, Chandrima; Arora, Kavisha; Moon, Chang-Suk; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2013-04-26

    The PDZ (postsynaptic density-95/discs large/zona occludens-1) domain-based interactions play important roles in regulating the expression and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Several PDZ domain-containing proteins (PDZ proteins for short) have been identified as directly or indirectly interacting with the C terminus of CFTR. To better understand the regulation of CFTR processing, we conducted a genetic screen and identified MAST205 (a microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase with a molecular mass of 205 kDa) as a new CFTR regulator. We found that overexpression of MAST205 increased the expression of CFTR and augmented CFTR-mediated fluid transport in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, knockdown of MAST205 inhibited CFTR function. The PDZ motif of CFTR is required for the regulatory role of MAST205 in CFTR expression and function. We further demonstrated that MAST205 and the CFTR-associated ligand competed for binding to CFTR, which facilitated the processing of CFTR and consequently up-regulated the expression and function of CFTR at the plasma membrane. More importantly, we found that MAST205 could facilitate the processing of F508del-CFTR mutant and augment its quantity and channel function at the plasma membrane. Taken together, our data suggest that MAST205 plays an important role in regulating CFTR expression and function. Our findings have important clinical implications for treating CFTR-associated diseases such as cystic fibrosis and secretory diarrheas.

  4. Mutations in the gene region of hepatitis B virus genotype in Turkish patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Özaslan; Ersan Özaslan; Arzu Barsgan; Mehmet Koruk

    2007-12-01

    The gene region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for the expression of surface antigens and includes the ‘a’-determinant region. Thus, mutation(s) in this region would afford HBV variants a distinct survival advantage, permitting the mutant virus to escape from the immune system. The aim of this study was to search for mutations of the gene region in different patient groups infected with genotype variants of HBV, and to analyse the biological significance of these mutations. Moreover, we investigated gene mutation inductance among family members. Forty HBV-DNA-positive patients were determined among 132 hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) carriers by the first stage of seminested PCR. Genotypes and subtypes were established by sequencing of the amplified S gene regions. Variants were compared with original sequences of these serotypes, and mutations were identified. All variants were designated as genotype and subtype ayw3. Ten kinds of point mutations were identified within the region. The highest rates of mutation were found in chronic hepatitis patients and their family members. The amino acid mutations 125 (M → T) and 127 (T → P) were found on the first loop of ‘a’-determinant. The other consequence was mutation inductance in a family member. We found some mutations in the S gene region known to be stable and observed that some of these mutations affected gene expression.

  5. GJB2 (Cx26) gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital sensorineural deafness and a report of one novel mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖自安; 谢鼎华

    2004-01-01

    Background Mutations in GJB2 gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive congenital hearing loss and the cause in some rare cases of the autosomal dominant form. The purpose of This study was to investigate the frequency and the features of GJB2 mutations in the Chinese patients with congenital sensorineural deafness. Methods Using PCR amplifying the entire coding region of GJB2 gene and direct DNA sequencing to analyze mutations in this gene among unrelated 69 cases with autosomal recessive congenital nonsyndromic deafness and 27 cases of dominant congenital deafness and 35 sporadic cases. We also detected mutations in GJB2 in 100 control subjects with normal hearing.Results 17.4% (12/69) of the probands in the autosomal recessive, 7.4% (2/27) of dominant families and 5.7% (2/35) of the sporadic congenital deafness patients had deafness-causing mutations in GJB2, respectively. Nine types of the mutations in GJB2 were detected in the recessive and sporadic group. They consisted of five types of polymorphism, and four types of deafness-causing mutation with homozygous 35delG in 1 sporadic (1/35), and 235delC frameshift mutation in 1 sporadic (homozygotes) and 10 recessive patients (2 heterozygotes and 8 homozygotes), and homozygous 442G→A missense mutation and homozygous 465T→A nonsense mutation in 1 different recessive proband, respectively. The 465T→A that related to recessive deafness was a novel mutation found by this study. The homozygous (10/69, 14.5%) and the heterozygous (2/69, 2.9%) GJB2 mutation in the recessive patients (12/69, 17.4%) and the homozygotes in the sporadic patient (2/35, 5.7%) all had congenital severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. 511G→A missense mutation and 299-300delAT frameshift mutation were found in two autosomal dominant congenital deafness families (2/27, 7.4%). The total mutation frequency of GJB2 was 12.2% (16/131) in the Chinese patients with congenital sensorineural deafness and 235delC was the most common

  6. GNAS gene mutation may be present only transiently during colorectal tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauber, Peter; Marotta, Stephen P; Sabbath-Solitare, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the gene GNAS have been shown to activate the adenylate cyclase gene and lead to constitutive cAMP signaling. Several preliminary reports have suggested a role for GNAS gene mutations during colorectal carcinogenesis, particularly mucinous carcinomas. The aim of this study was to clarify the incidence of GNAS mutations in adenomas (tubular, tubulovillous, and villous), carcinomas with residual adenoma, and carcinomas, and to relate these findings to mutations of the KRAS gene and to the mucinous status of the tumors. We used standard PCR techniques and direct gene sequencing to evaluate tumors for gene mutations. No GNAS mutations were identified in 25 tubular adenomas, but were present in 6.4% of tubulovillous adenomas and 11.2% of villous adenomas. A GNAS mutation was found in 9.7% of the benign portion of carcinoma with residual adenoma, but in none of 86 carcinomas. A similar trend was seen for KRAS mutation across the five groups of tumors. GNAS mutations may function as an important driver mutation during certain phases of colorectal carcinogenesis, but may then be lost once the biological advantage gained by the mutated gene is no longer necessary to sustain or advance tumor development. PMID:27186325

  7. Combining gene mutation with gene expression data improves outcome prediction in myelodysplastic syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    GERSTUNG, MORITZ; Pellagatti, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Porta, Matteo G Della; Jädersten, Martin; Dolatshad, Hamid; Verma, Amit; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Vyas, Paresh; Killick, Sally; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cazzola, Mario; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease, but two patients rarely have identical genotypes. Similarly, patients differ in their clinicopathological parameters, but how genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity are interconnected is not well understood. Here we build statistical models to disentangle the effect of 12 recurrently mutated genes and 4 cytogenetic alterations on gene expression, diagnostic clinical variables and outcome in 124 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Overall, one or more genetic ...

  8. COMMD1-mediated ubiquitination regulates CFTR trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Drévillon

    Full Text Available The CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein is a large polytopic protein whose biogenesis is inefficient. To better understand the regulation of CFTR processing and trafficking, we conducted a genetic screen that identified COMMD1 as a new CFTR partner. COMMD1 is a protein associated with multiple cellular pathways, including the regulation of hepatic copper excretion, sodium uptake through interaction with ENaC (epithelial sodium channel and NF-kappaB signaling. In this study, we show that COMMD1 interacts with CFTR in cells expressing both proteins endogenously. This interaction promotes CFTR cell surface expression as assessed by biotinylation experiments in heterologously expressing cells through regulation of CFTR ubiquitination. In summary, our data demonstrate that CFTR is protected from ubiquitination by COMMD1, which sustains CFTR expression at the plasma membrane. Thus, increasing COMMD1 expression may provide an approach to simultaneously inhibit ENaC absorption and enhance CFTR trafficking, two major issues in cystic fibrosis.

  9. VAMP-associated Proteins (VAP) as Receptors That Couple Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Proteostasis with Lipid Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Wayne L; Shome, Kuntala; Wu, Christine C; Gong, Xiaoyan; Frizzell, Raymond A; Aridor, Meir

    2016-03-01

    Unesterified cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes in cells expressing the misfolded cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or general activation of ER stress led to dynein-mediated clustering of cholesterol-loaded late endosomes at the Golgi region, a process regulated by ER-localized VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs). We hypothesized that VAPs serve as intracellular receptors that couple lipid homeostasis through interactions with two phenylalanines in an acidic track (FFAT) binding signals (found in lipid sorting and sensing proteins, LSS) with proteostasis regulation. VAPB inhibited the degradation of ΔF508-CFTR. The activity was mapped to the ligand-binding major sperm protein (MSP) domain, which was sufficient in regulating CFTR biogenesis. We identified mutations in an unstructured loop within the MSP that uncoupled VAPB-regulated CFTR biogenesis from basic interactions with FFAT. Using this information, we defined functional and physical interactions between VAPB and proteostasis regulators (ligands), including the unfolded protein response sensor ATF6 and the ER degradation cluster that included FAF1, VCP, BAP31, and Derlin-1. VAPB inhibited the degradation of ΔF508-CFTR in the ER through interactions with the RMA1-Derlin-BAP31-VCP pathway. Analysis of pseudoligands containing tandem FFAT signals supports a competitive model for VAP interactions that direct CFTR biogenesis. The results suggest a model in which VAP-ligand binding couples proteostasis and lipid homeostasis leading to observed phenotypes of lipid abnormalities in protein folding diseases.

  10. Missense mutations of the fibrillin-1 gene in two Chinese patients with severe Marfan syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To describe two Chinese patients with severe forms of Marfan syndrome and to report findings of mutational analysis of the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene.Methods Two Chinese patients were studied, one suffering from Marfan syndrome of infantile onset and the other of neonatal onset. Their clinical features were described. Mutational analysis of the FBN1 gene was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique and direct sequencing of exons 23 - 32,where the mutational hotspots for severe forms of Marfan syndrome are located.Results Two missense mutations were successfully identified, a G3037A transition and an A3083T transversion, the latter being an unreported mutation.Conclusion Taking advantage of the clustering phenomenon of mutations in severe forms of Marfan syndrome, one can identify FBN1 mutations in these patients by first screening the mutational hotspots,thus reducing the effort that would otherwise be much greater because of the size of the gene.

  11. CFTR, PRSS1 und SPINK1 Varianten bei chronischer Pankreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rosendahl, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is defined as a continuing or relapsing inflammatory disease of the pancreas, leading to endocrine and/or exocrine insufficiency and irreversible morphological changes. Currently, it is thought that the imbalance of pancreatic proteases and their inhibitors results in the development of chronic pancreatitis. Until now, genetic variations of four genes have been associated to chronic pancreatitis: PRSS1, PRSS2, SPINK1 and CFTR. Since direct DNA-sequencing has becom...

  12. Relationship between mutations of mitochondrial DNA ND1 gene and type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于珮; 于德民; 刘德敏; 王琨; 汤新之

    2004-01-01

    Background Recent studies have indicated that many mutations in mitochondrial (mt)DNA NDI gene region are related to diabetes mellitus. In this study we explored the relationship between various mtDNA ND1 gene mutations and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) among Chinese. Methods Using PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and gene sequencing, 4 spots of mtDNA (nt3243, nt3316, nt3394, nt3426) were screened in 478 diabetics and 430 non-diabetic subjects.Results In diabetic group, there were 13 carriers (2.72%)of 3316 G→A mutation,12 (2.51%) of 3394 T→C mutation and 2 (0.42%) of 3426A→G mutation. In controls, only 3394 T→C mutation was observed in 2 subjects (0.47%). There was significant difference in the frequency of 3316 and 3394 mutation between two groups (P<0.05, respectively). More subjects with mitochondrial DNA ND1 gene mutations had DM family history and greater tendency of maternal inheritance when compared to those patients without mutation in diabetic group(P<0.01). A 3426 mutation diabetic pedigree was studied, and we found 12 maternal members in the family had the same mutation. Conclusion mtDNA ND1 gene mutations at nt3316 (G→A), nt3394 (T→C) and 3426 (A→G) might contribute to the pathogenesis of DM with other genetic factors and environment factors.

  13. Critical Role of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulation(CFTR)in Female Reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsiao Chang CHAN

    2003-01-01

    @@ Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-activated Cl- channel, mutations of which are responsible for defective Cl- and/or HCO-3 secretions seen in cystic fibrosis (CF), a common lethal genetic disease affecting most exocrine glands/organs, including the lungs, intestine, pancreas and reproductive tracts of both sexes.

  14. Mutation Analysis in the BRCA1 Gene in Chinese Breast Cancer Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUZhengyan; ZHENLinlin; FANPing

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the mutation of BRCA1 gene in Chinese breast cancer families. Methods:Fifteen families were selected, involving 41 members, consisting of 23 breast cancer patients. Using poly-merase chain reaction and single stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), and subsequent DNA sequencing, the mutation of BRCA1 genes were analyzed. Results: Four mutations were found in all fam-ilies, and the proportion of mutation was 26.7% (4/15) in breast cancer families. One of the 4 mutations was 2228 insC, resulting in chain termination at codon 711. The remaining 3 mutations were 1884A→T and 3232A→G, resulting in single amino acid change respectively. Conclusion: BRCA1 is a breast cancer susceptibility gene. The relatively low proportion and frequency of BRCA1 mutations in our study hints additional BRCA genes existed.

  15. Detection of ATP2C1 Gene Mutation in Familial Benign Chronic Pemphigus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The ATP2C1 gene mutation in one case of familial benign chronic pemphigus was investigated.One patient was diagnosed as familial benign chronic pemphigus by pathology, ultrastructral examination and clinical features. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples. Mutation of ATP2C1 gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The results showed that deletion mutation was detected in ATP2C1 gene in this patient, which was 2374delTTTG. No mutation was found in the family members and normal individuals. It was concluded that the 2374delTTTG mutation in ATP2C1 gene was the specific mutation for the clinical phenotype for this patient and was a de novo mutation.

  16. A study on sodium iodide symporter gene mutation in congenital hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the mutation of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene in the patients with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) in Tianjin area. Methods: Total genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 18 patients with CH and 35 normal subjects randomly selected. All 15 exons of NIS gene were individually amplified. Mutation was detected by single-strand conformational polymorphism(SSCP) technique and confirmed with direct sequencing. Results: Exons of NIS gene of all the subjects were successfully amplified by polymerase chain reaction. SSCP analysis displayed no abnormality. No mutation was found in these patients Conclusion: The CH in Tianjin urban area had no mutation of NIS gene. (authors)

  17. Functional interaction between CFTR and the sodium-phosphate co-transport type 2a in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naziha Bakouh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A growing number of proteins, including ion transporters, have been shown to interact with Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR. CFTR is an epithelial chloride channel that is involved in Cystic Fibrosis (CF when mutated; thus a better knowledge of its functional interactome may help to understand the pathophysiology of this complex disease. In the present study, we investigated if CFTR and the sodium-phosphate co-transporter type 2a (NPT2a functionally interact after heterologous expression of both proteins in Xenopus laevis oocytes. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: NPT2a was expressed alone or in combination with CFTR in X. laevis oocytes. Using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, the inorganic phosphate-induced current (IPi was measured and taken as an index of NPT2a activity. The maximal IPi for NPT2a substrates was reduced when CFTR was co-expressed with NPT2a, suggesting a decrease in its expression at the oolemna. This was consistent with Western blot analysis showing reduced NPT2a plasma membrane expression in oocytes co-expressing both proteins, whereas NPT2a protein level in total cell lysate was the same in NPT2a- and NPT2a+CFTR-oocytes. In NPT2a+CFTR- but not in NPT2a-oocytes, IPi and NPT2a surface expression were increased upon PKA stimulation, whereas stimulation of Exchange Protein directly Activated by cAMP (EPAC had no effect. When NPT2a-oocytes were injected with NEG2, a short amino-acid sequence from the CFTR regulatory domain that regulates PKA-dependent CFTR trafficking to the plasma membrane, IPi values and NPT2a membrane expression were diminished, and could be enhanced by PKA stimulation, thereby mimicking the effects of CFTR co-expression. CONCLUSION/PERSPECTIVES: We conclude that when both CFTR and NPT2a are expressed in X. laevis oocytes, CFTR confers to NPT2a a cAMPi-dependent trafficking to the membrane. This functional interaction raises the hypothesis that CFTR may play a role in

  18. 'A variant of uncertain significance' and the proliferation of human disease gene databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson David R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rapid accumulation of mutation data has led to the creation of nearly 300 locus-specific mutation databases. These sites may contain a few dozen to almost 20,000 mutations for a given gene. Many of the mutations are uncharacterised and have no known effects on the gene product, the 'variant of uncertain significance'. Here, the statistics of mutation distribution are examined for six different gene databases: BRCA1 and BRCA2, haemoglobin-beta (HBB, HPRT1, CFTR and TP53. The percentage of all possible point mutations for a protein (the mutation space is calculated for each gene and the question 'How much mutation data is enough?' is raised.

  19. Murine muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 (Lama2) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M;

    1994-01-01

    The classic murine muscular dystrophy strain, dy, was first described almost 40 years ago. We have identified the molecular basis of an allele of dy, called dy2J, by detecting a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene--the first identified mutation in laminin-2. The G to A mutation in a splice...

  20. Emerging Trend of Mutation Profile of rpoB Gene in MDR Tuberculosis, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makadia, Jemil S; Jain, Anju; Patra, Surajeet Kumar; Sherwal, B L; Khanna, Ashwani

    2012-10-01

    The present study was conducted on North Indian population to observe rpoB gene mutation profile in multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This was an observational study. 30 cases of MDR-TB proven by culture and drug sensitivity were selected. DNA sequencing of 81 bp (codon 507-533) long RRDR of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was done to detect the sites of mutation. Out of 30 cases, 24 showed a single mutation in the RRDR region of rpoB gene in which 16 (53.33 %) showed mutation in codon 531(TCG→TTG), 5 cases (16.66 %) showed mutation in codon 526(CAC→TAC), mutation in codon 516(GAC→GTC, AAC) was present in 3 cases (10 %). It was also observed that mutation in more than one codon was present in 4 cases (13.33 %), which included deletion at codon 509(AGC→-GC), mutation at 513(CAA→CTA), 516, 526, 529(CGA→CTA) and 531. No mutation was detected in RRDR in 2 cases (6.66 %). Our finding of 13.33 % cases with multiple sites of mutation in RRDR region is in contrast to earlier studies done in North India which showed single mutation detected in RRDR of rpoB gene that highlights the emerging change in the trend of mutation profile of rpoB gene in rifampicin resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:24082462

  1. Laminin 5 genes and Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa: novel mutations and polymorphisms in the LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes. Mutations in brief no. 190. Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, A; Pulkkinen, L; Hara, M; Tamai, K; Tagami, H; Hashimoto, I; Uitto, J

    1998-01-01

    Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB; OMIM #226700) is a lethal, autosomal recessive blistering disorder characterized by fragility of the skin and other specialized epithelia. Previously, mutations in the laminin 5 genes (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) have been disclosed, most of them in LAMB3. In this study, we have examined the genetic basis of H-JEB in three families utilizing heteroduplex analysis and automated nucleotide sequencing. In one family, the proband was compound heterozygote for previously unpublished LAMB3 mutations, 1482delC and W95X. In two other families, the probands were found to be homozygous for novel nonsense mutations C553X and K822X in the LAMC2 gene. These mutations result in premature termination codons and predict truncation of the corresponding polypeptides. Also, during the search of laminin 5 mutations, 18 LAMB3 and LAMC2 polymorphisms were discovered, 9 of them being previously undescribed. Delineation of novel homozygous nonsense mutations in the LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes, with previous demonstrations of LAMA3 mutations, re-emphasizes the concept that stop codon mutations in both alleles of any of the three laminin 5 genes result in the severe H-JEB phenotype. PMID:10660342

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reduces VX-809 Stimulated F508del-CFTR Chloride Secretion by Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A Stanton

    Full Text Available P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the lungs of 85% of adult patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF. Previously, we demonstrated that P. aeruginosa reduced wt-CFTR Cl secretion by airway epithelial cells. Recently, a new investigational drug VX-809 has been shown to increase F508del-CFTR Cl secretion in human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells, and, in combination with VX-770, to increase FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second by an average of 3-5% in CF patients homozygous for the F508del-CFTR mutation. We propose that P. aeruginosa infection of CF lungs reduces VX-809 + VX-770- stimulated F508del-CFTR Cl secretion, and thereby reduces the clinical efficacy of VX-809 + VX-770.F508del-CFBE cells and primary cultures of CF-HBE cells (F508del/F508del were exposed to VX-809 alone or a combination of VX-809 + VX-770 for 48 hours and the effect of P. aeruginosa on F508del-CFTR Cl secretion was measured in Ussing chambers. The effect of VX-809 on F508del-CFTR abundance was measured by cell surface biotinylation and western blot analysis. PAO1, PA14, PAK and 6 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa (3 mucoid and 3 non-mucoid significantly reduced drug stimulated F508del-CFTR Cl secretion, and plasma membrane F508del-CFTR.The observation that P. aeruginosa reduces VX-809 and VX-809 + VX-770 stimulated F508del CFTR Cl secretion may explain, in part, why VX-809 + VX-770 has modest efficacy in clinical trials.

  3. Serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 1 (SGK1) increases the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells by phosphorylating Shank2E protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppen, Katja; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Madden, Dean R; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-06-13

    The glucocorticoid dexamethasone increases cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) abundance in human airway epithelial cells by a mechanism that requires serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 1 (SGK1) activity. The goal of this study was to determine whether SGK1 increases CFTR abundance by phosphorylating Shank2E, a PDZ domain protein that contains two SGK1 phosphorylation consensus sites. We found that SGK1 phosphorylates Shank2E as well as a peptide containing the first SGK1 consensus motif of Shank2E. The dexamethasone-induced increase in CFTR abundance was diminished by overexpression of a dominant-negative Shank2E in which the SGK1 phosphorylation sites had been mutated. siRNA-mediated reduction of Shank2E also reduced the dexamethasone-induced increase in CFTR abundance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the glucocorticoid-induced increase in CFTR abundance requires phosphorylation of Shank2E at an SGK1 consensus site.

  4. Identification of a novel lethal fibrillin-1 gene mutation in a Chinese Marfan family and correlation of 3'fibrillin-1 gene mutations with phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ling-gen; ZHANG Lin; SONG Lei; WANG Hu; CHANG Qian; WU Yong-bo; HUI Ru-tai; ZHOU Xian-liang

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene have been identified in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). This study aimed to identify the molecular defects in the fibrillin-1 gene in a Chinese family with Marfan syndrome, accompanied by aortic aneurysms/dissection.Methods Two patients and one non-carrier in the family underwent complete physical, ophthalmic, and cardiovascular examinations. Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of venous blood of these individuals in the family as well as 50 healthy normal controls. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all 65 coding exons of fibrillin-1 gene were analyzed.Results We found a novel mutation (c.8547T>G, p. Tyr2849X) in exon 65 of fibrillin-1 gene in a Chinese proband with Marfan syndrome, accompanied by aortic aneurysms/dissection. Sudden death at a young age of affected members was seen due to aortic aneurysms/dissection. By evaluating genotype-phenotype correlations of patients with mutations in the 3'end of fibrillin-1 gene (exons 64 and 65), we also found that the presence of nonsense mutations occurring in exons 64 and 65 appeared to be an indicator of early-onset aortic risk and sudden death.Conclusions These results expand the mutation spectrum of fibrillin-1 gene and help in the study of the molecular pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome, indicating that mutations occurring in the 3' end of fibrillin-1 gene may play an independent functional role in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome.

  5. Pathophysiologic consequences following inhibition of a CFTR-dependent developmental cascade in the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larson Janet E

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Examination of late gestation developmental genes in vivo may be limited by early embryonic lethality and compensatory mechanisms. This problem is particularly apparent in evaluating the developmental role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene in the cystic fibrosis (CF phenotype. A previously described transient in utero knockout (TIUKO technology was used to address the developmental role of CFTR in the rat lung. Results Rat fetuses transiently treated with antisense cftr in utero developed pathology that replicated aspects of the human CF phenotype. The TIUKO CF rat developed lung fibrosis, chronic inflammation, reactive airway disease, and the CF Antigen (MRP8/14, a marker for CF in human patients, was expressed. Conclusions The transient in utero antisense technology can be used to evaluate genes that exhibit either early lethality or compensating gene phenotypes. In the lung CFTR is part of a developmental cascade for normal secretory cell differentiation. Absence of CFTR results in a constitutive inflammatory process that is involved in some aspects of CF pathophysiology.

  6. The role of the ND5 gene in LHON: characterization of a new, heteroplasmic LHON mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorov, Vladimir; Biousse, Valerie; Newman, Nancy J; Brown, Michael D

    2005-11-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes central vision loss from bilateral optic neuropathy. Although 13 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are strongly associated with LHON, only three account for roughly 90% of cases and thus are found in multiple independent LHON families. The remaining LHON mutations are rare. Here, we describe the clinical and genetic characterization of a new LHON mtDNA mutation. The 12848T mutation alters a highly conserved amino acid in the ND5 complex I gene, is not found in controls, and is heteroplasmic. Despite ND5 being the largest of the mtDNA complex I genes, ND5 mutations are quite rare in LHON.

  7. Important role of platelets in modulating endotoxin-induced lung inflammation in CFTR-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiqi Zhao

    Full Text Available Mutation of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator leads to cystic fibrosis (CF. Patients with CF develop abnormalities of blood platelets and recurrent lung inflammation. However, whether CFTR-mutated platelets play a role in the development of lung inflammation is elusive. Therefore, we intratracheally challenged wildtype and F508del (a common type of CFTR mutation mice with LPS to observe changes of F508del platelets in the peripheral blood and indexes of lung inflammation (BAL neutrophils and protein levels. Furthermore, we investigated whether or not and how F508del platelets modulate the LPS-induced acute lung inflammation by targeting anti-platelet aggregation, depletion of neutrophils, reconstitution of bone marrow or neutrophils, blockade of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1, platelet activating factor (PAF, and correction of mutated CFTR trafficking. We found that LPS-challenged F508del mice developed severe thrombocytopenia and had higher levels of plasma TXB2 coincided with neutrophilic lung inflammation relative to wildtype control. Inhibition of F508del platelet aggregation or depletion of F508del neutrophils diminished the LPS-induced lung inflammation in the F508del mice. Moreover, wildtype mice reconstituted with either F508del bone marrow or neutrophils developed worse thrombocytopenia. Blocking PSGL-1, platelet activating factor (PAF, or rectifying trafficking of mutated CFTR in F508del mice diminished and alveolar neutrophil transmigration in the LPS-challenged F508del mice. These findings suggest that F508del platelets and their interaction with neutrophils are requisite for the development of LPS-induced lung inflammation and injury. As such, targeting platelets might be an emerging strategy for dampening recurrent lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients.

  8. Mutation analysis of codons 345 and 347 of rhodopsin gene in Indian retinitis pigmentosa patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhurima Dikshit; Rakhi Agarwal

    2001-08-01

    More than 100 mutations have been reported till date in the rhodopsin gene in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. The present study was undertaken to detect the reported rhodopsin gene point mutations in Indian retinitis pigmentosa patients. We looked for presence or absence of codon 345 and 347 mutations in exon 5 of the gene using the technique of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction by designing primers for each mutation. We have examined 100 patients from 76 families irrespective of genetic categories. Surprisingly, in our sample the very widely reported highly frequent mutations of codon 347 (P → S/A/R/Q/L/T) were absent while the codon 345 mutation V → M was seen in three cases in one family (autosomal dominant form) and in one sporadic case (total two families). This is the first report on codon 345 and 347 mutation in Indian retinitis pigmentosa subjects.

  9. The GAP Portion of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Type III Secreted Toxin ExoS Upregulates Total and Surface Levels of Wild Type CFTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali N. Tukaye

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA infections account for a large percentage of fatal hospital acquired pneumonias. One of the PA Type III secreted toxin (TTST ExoS, a bifunctional protein with N-terminal GTPase activating protein (GAP and C-terminal ADP rybosyl transferase (ADPRT activities, significantly contributes to PA virulence by targeting small molecular weight G-proteins (SMWGP. In this study, we have looked at one of the mechanisms by which the GAP portion of ExoS (ExoS-GAP mediates cellular toxicity. Methods: The effects of ExoS-GAP on CFTR trafficking were studied in CFBE41o- Kir 2.2 and MDCK cell lines stably expressing CFTR using a transient transfection system. Results: Transient transfection of ExoS-GAP increased the total and surface protein levels of mature wild type CFTR in epithelial cells stably expressing wild type (WT CFTR. The effect of ExoS-GAP was specific to CFTR in bronchial epithelial cells since it did not affect the total protein levels of Na+/K+ATPase, another membrane protein. A point mutation in the ExoS GAP domain (R146K, known to disrupt its catalytic GAP activity, abolished the effect of ExoS-GAP on WT CFTR. Lysosomal inhibition studies with Bafilomycin A1 indicate that ExoS-GAP decreased lysosomal degradation of the mature WT CFTR with concomitant increase in the total levels of mature WT CFTR. However, ExoS-GAP did not increase the total protein levels of ∆F508CFTR. Conclusion: The GAP portion of the PA TTST ExoS increases the total and surface levels of wild type CFTR in vitro mammalian cell system. The effect of ExoS-GAP on WT CFTR total protein levels provides new insight into understanding the virulent pathophysiology of PA infections.

  10. CFTR protein expression in human primary cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meegen, M.A. van

    2016-01-01

    Subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) display a great variability in clinical manifestations, even when they share the same cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) genotype. CFTR genotyping has enabled the stratification of subjects associated with mild or severe CF disease. However,

  11. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF RADIATION-INDUCED MUTATION IN EXON 7/8 OF RAT HPRT GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任晓庆; 黄定九; 黄钢; 王利民

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the radiation dose and the HPRT gene locus mutation in rat smooth muscle cells, and provide the molecular basis for prevention of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA).MethodsThe smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro were irradiated by radionuclide 188Re in different doses. HPRT gene mutation colonies were selected and isolated by 6 thioguanine. Analysis of mutation in exon 7/8 of HPRT gene were accomplished by polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformation polymorphism.ResultsThe HPRT gene mutation frequency of rat smooth muscle cells that were irradiated by radionuclide 188Re ranged from 5.5×10-6 to 13×10-6. Of 91 HPRT gene mutation colonies, 13(14.3%) contained exon 7/8 deletion and 15(16.5%) had point mutation. The exon 7/8 mutation frequency was 30.8%. There were significant relationships between radiation dose and mutation frequency of HPRT gene and exon 7/8.ConclusionThe DNA damage and gene mutation induced by radiation has positive relationship with radiation dose, and is a basis of proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of smooth muscle cells.

  12. Point Mutations Effects on Charge Transport Properties of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene p53

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Chi-Tin; Roche, Stephan; Römer, Rudolf A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of point mutations effects on charge transfer properties in the DNA sequence of the tumor-suppressor p53 gene. On the basis of effective single-strand or double-strand tight-binding models which simulate hole propagation along the DNA, a statistical analysis of charge transmission modulations associated with all possible point mutations is performed. We find that in contrast to non-cancerous mutations, mutation hotspots tend to result in significantly weaker {...

  13. Mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase gene of Pneumocystis jiroveci isolates from Portuguese patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M C; Helweg-Larsen, J; Lundgren, Bettina;

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of mutations of the P. jiroveci dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene in an immunocompromised Portuguese population and to investigate the possible association between DHPS mutations and sulpha exposure. In the studied population, DHPS gene...... mutations were not significantly more frequent in patients exposed to sulpha drugs compared with patients not exposed (P=0.390). The results of this study suggest that DHPS gene mutations are frequent in the Portuguese immunocompromised population but do not seem associated with previous sulpha exposure...

  14. Mutational screening of the USH2A gene in Spanish USH patients reveals 23 novel pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz-Llopis Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Usher Syndrome type II (USH2 is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Among the three genes implicated, mutations in the USH2A gene account for 74-90% of the USH2 cases. Methods To identify the genetic cause of the disease and determine the frequency of USH2A mutations in a cohort of 88 unrelated USH Spanish patients, we carried out a mutation screening of the 72 coding exons of this gene by direct sequencing. Moreover, we performed functional minigene studies for those changes that were predicted to affect splicing. Results As a result, a total of 144 DNA sequence variants were identified. Based upon previous studies, allele frequencies, segregation analysis, bioinformatics' predictions and in vitro experiments, 37 variants (23 of them novel were classified as pathogenic mutations. Conclusions This report provide a wide spectrum of USH2A mutations and clinical features, including atypical Usher syndrome phenotypes resembling Usher syndrome type I. Considering only the patients clearly diagnosed with Usher syndrome type II, and results obtained in this and previous studies, we can state that mutations in USH2A are responsible for 76.1% of USH2 disease in patients of Spanish origin.

  15. [Mutation analysis of the pathogenic gene in a Chinese family with hereditary hemochromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuanfeng, Li; Hongxing, Zhang; Haitao, Zhang; Xiaobo, Peng; Lili, Bai; Fuchu, He; Zewu, Qiu; Gangqiao, Zhou

    2014-11-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. We recruited a consanguineous Chinese family including the proband with HHC and other four members without HHC. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified two homozygous mutations (c.G18C [p.Q6H] and c.GC962_963AA [p.C321X]) in the hemojuvelin gene (HJV) in the proband with HHC. No mutation was found in other four previously identified HHC related genes, HAMP, TFR2, FPN and HFE. The functional impact of p.Q6H mutation is weak whereas p.C321X, a premature termination mutation, results in a truncated HJV protein, which lacks the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor domain. In addition to the mutations in HJV, other 12 homozygous mutations were identified in this patient. However, none of these mutations showed strong damaging impact and the mutated genes are not related to iron metabolism. Our in-house data further demonstrated that p.C321X is absent in the general Chinese population, suggesting that the homozygous mutation p.C321X in HJV is causative in the patient with HHC. Accordingly, all of the four members without HHC from the same family carried wild-type alleles or heterozygous mutations, but not the homozygous mutation in this site. Thus, we found for the first time that the homozygous mutation p.C321X in HJV can result in HHC, which will help genetic diagnosis and prenatal counseling for HHC.

  16. New mutations in the PKD1 gene in Czech population with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merta Miroslav

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is the most common hereditary renal disease. The disease is caused by mutations of the PKD1 (affecting roughly 85% of ADPKD patients and PKD2 (affecting roughly 14% of ADPKD patients genes, although in several ADPKD families, the PKD1 and/or PKD2 linkage was not found. Mutation analysis of the PKD1 gene is complicated by the presence of highly homologous genomic duplications of the first two thirds of the gene. Methods The direct detection of mutations in the non-duplicated region of the PKD1 gene was performed in 90 unrelated individuals, consisting of 58 patients with end-stage renal failure (manifesting before their 50th year of life and 32 individuals from families where the disease was clearly linked to the PKD1 gene. Mutation screening was performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. DNA fragments showing an aberrant electrophoretic banding pattern were sequenced. Results In the non-duplicated region of the PKD1 gene, 19 different likely pathogenic germline sequence changes were identified in 19 unrelated families/individuals. Fifteen likely pathogenic sequence changes are unique for the Czech population. The following probable mutations were identified: 9 nonsense mutations, 6 likely pathogenic missense mutations, 2 frameshifting mutations, one in-frame deletion and probable splice site mutation. In the non-duplicated region of the PKD1 gene, 16 different polymorphisms or unclassified variants were detected. Conclusion Twenty probable mutations of the PKD1 gene in 90 Czech individuals (fifteen new probable mutations were detected. The establishment of localization and the type of causal mutations and their genotype – phenotype correlation in ADPKD families will improve DNA diagnosis and could help in the assessment of the clinical prognosis of ADPKD patients.

  17. Alleged Detrimental Mutations in the SMPD1 Gene in Patients with Niemann-Pick Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cosima Rhein; Christiane Mühle; Johannes Kornhuber; Martin Reichel

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) gene are associated with decreased catalytic activity of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and are the cause of the autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) types A and B. Currently, >100 missense mutations in SMPD1 are listed in the Human Gene Mutation Database. However, not every sequence variation in SMPD1 is detrimental and gives rise to NPD. We have analysed several alleged SMPD1 mis...

  18. Gonadal Function in 15 Patients Associated with WT1 Gene Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Maesaka, Akiko; Higuchi, Asako; Kotoh, Shinobu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Ikeda, Masahiro; Shishido, Seiichirou; Honda, Masataka

    2006-01-01

    Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS) and Frasier syndrome (FS) are caused by mutations of the WT1 gene. These disorders are characterized by renal disease, abnormality of male sex differentiation, and Wilms’ tumor and gonadoblastoma. There have been few reports on gonadal function in a large series of patients with mutations of the WT1 gene. Here, we evaluated the relation between gonadal function and the phenotype of external genitalia in 15 Japanese patients with WT1 mutations. We confirmed three set...

  19. Identification of Novel Mutations in HEXA Gene in Children Affected with Tay Sachs Disease from India

    OpenAIRE

    Mehul Mistri; Tamhankar, Parag M; Frenny Sheth; Daksha Sanghavi; Pratima Kondurkar; Swapnil Patil; Susan Idicula-Thomas; Sarita Gupta; Jayesh Sheth

    2012-01-01

    Tay Sachs disease (TSD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to β-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thala...

  20. Prevalence of pathogenic mutations in cancer predisposition genes among pancreatic cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Chunling; Steven N Hart; William R Bamlet; Moore, Raymond M.; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Bruce W Eckloff; Lee, Yean K.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Robert R McWilliams; Couch, Fergus J.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of germline pathogenic mutations in a comprehensive panel of cancer predisposition genes is not well defined for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). To estimate the frequency of mutations in a panel of 22 cancer predisposition genes, 96 patients unselected for a family history of cancer who were recruited to the Mayo Clinic Pancreatic Cancer patient registry over a 12 month period were screened by next-generation sequencing. Fourteen pathogenic mutations in 1...

  1. FK506 binding protein 8 peptidylprolyl isomerase activity manages a late stage of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) folding and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, Darren M; Roth, Daniela Martino; Chalfant, Monica A; Youker, Robert T; Matteson, Jeanne; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Balch, William E

    2012-06-22

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the apical chloride channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) with 90% of patients carrying at least one deletion of the F508 (ΔF508) allele. This mutant form of CFTR is characterized by a folding and trafficking defect that prevents exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. We previously reported that ΔF508 CFTR can be recovered in a complex with Hsp90 and its co-chaperones as an on-pathway folding intermediate, suggesting that Δ508 CF disease arises due to a failure of the proteostasis network (PN), which manages protein folding and degradation in the cell. We have now examined the role of FK506-binding protein 8 (FKBP8), a component of the CFTR interactome, during the biogenesis of wild-type and ΔF508 CFTR. FKBP8 is a member of the peptidylprolyl isomerase family that mediates the cis/trans interconversion of peptidyl prolyl bonds. Our results suggest that FKBP8 is a key PN factor required at a post-Hsp90 step in CFTR biogenesis. In addition, changes in its expression level or alteration of its activity by a peptidylprolyl isomerase inhibitor alter CFTR stability and transport. We propose that CF is caused by the sequential failure of the prevailing PN pathway to stabilize ΔF508-CFTR for endoplasmic reticulum export, a pathway that can be therapeutically managed.

  2. Pathogen and autoantigen homologous regions within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein suggest an autoimmune treatable component of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris J

    2011-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel provides the glutathione and hypochlorous acid necessary for bactericidal/viricidal actions. CFTR mutations block these effects, diminishing pathogen defence and allowing extracellular pathogen accumulation, where antibody encounter is likely. KEGG pathway analysis of the CFTR interactome shows that CFTR is involved in pathogen entry pathways and immune defence as well as in pathways relevant to comorbid conditions (diabetes, cardiomyopathies and sexual organ development). Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus infections decrease the lifespan of cystic fibrosis patients and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia colonization is increased. Autoantibodies, targeting myeloperoxidase, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and calgranulin may further compromise pathogen defence. Short consensus sequences, within immunogenic extracellular regions of the CFTR protein, are homologous to proteins expressed by P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and S. maltophilia, and to several autoantigens, with a universal overlap between autoantigen/pathogen/CFTR consensi. Antibodies to pathogens are thus likely responsible for the creation of these autoantibodies, which, with pathogen antibodies, may target the CFTR protein acting as antagonists, further compromising its function. This creates a feedforward cycle, diminishing the function of the CFTR protein and increasing the probability of pathogen accumulation and antibody production at every turn. Interruption of this cycle by antibody adsorption or immunosuppressant therapy may be beneficial in cystic fibrosis.

  3. [Parkinson's disease associated with a mutation in the PARK2 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasinen, Valtteri; Hietala, Marja; Kuoppamäki, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    The most common cause of monogenic hereditary Parkinson's disease is a mutation in the PARK2 gene. Early onset, slow progression, dystonia, and good response to levodopa are typical of the disease phenotype. Finnish PARK2 patients have not been described previously. We describe two patients, in whom pathogenic mutations in the PARK2 gene were the cause of parkinsonism. PMID:26245049

  4. Clinical course of cone dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPGR gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Soerjoesing, G.G.; Florijn, R.J.; Tjiam, A.G.; Hollander, A.I. den; Born, L.I. van den; Riemslag, F.C.; Bergen, A.A.B.; Klaver, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the RPGR gene predominantly cause rod photoreceptor disorders with a large variability in clinical course. In this report, we describe two families with mutations in this gene and cone involvement. METHODS: We investigated an X-linked cone dystrophy family (1) with 25 affect

  5. Novel heterozygous nonsense mutation of the OPTN gene segregating in a Danish family with ALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Gredal, Ole;

    2012-01-01

    , mutations of the optineurin gene (OPTN), which is involved in open-angle glaucoma, were identified in 3 Japanese patients/families with ALS, and subsequently in a few FALS patients of European descent. We found a heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.493C>T, p.Gln165X, exon 6) in the OPTN gene in a Danish...

  6. All azoospermic males should be screened for cystic fibrosis mutations before intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mocanu, Edgar

    2012-02-01

    We assessed the frequency of CFTR mutations in groups with varying degrees of sub-fertility and compared these groups to a fertile male group with proven paternity. Screening for CFTR mutations should be routine for all azoospermic males, irrespective of obstructive or non-obstructive etiology, prior to proposing ICSI treatment. CFTR testing has no value in the investigation of non-azoospermic infertile males.

  7. All azoospermic males should be screened for cystic fibrosis mutations before intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mocanu, Edgar

    2010-11-01

    We assessed the frequency of CFTR mutations in groups with varying degrees of sub-fertility and compared these groups to a fertile male group with proven paternity. Screening for CFTR mutations should be routine for all azoospermic males, irrespective of obstructive or non-obstructive etiology, prior to proposing ICSI treatment. CFTR testing has no value in the investigation of non-azoospermic infertile males.

  8. Clinical study of DMD gene point mutation causing Becker muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-qing CAO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  DMD gene point mutation, mainly nonsense mutation, always cause the most severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. However, we also observed some cases of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD carrying DMD point mutation. This paper aims to explore the mechanism of DMD point mutation causing BMD, in order to enhance the understanding of mutation types of BMD.  Methods  Sequence analysis was performed in 11 cases of BMD confirmed by typical clinical manifestations and muscle biopsy. The exon of DMD gene was detected non-deletion or duplication by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA.  Results  Eleven patients carried 10 mutation types without mutational hotspot. Six patients carried nonsense mutations [c.5002G>T, p.(Glu1668X; c.1615C > T, p.(Arg539X; c.7105G > T, p.(Glu2369X; c.5287C > T, p.(Arg1763X; c.9284T > G, p.(Leu3095X]. One patient carried missense mutation [c.5234G > A, p.(Arg1745His]. Two patients carried frameshift mutations (c.10231dupT, c.10491delC. Two patients carried splicing site mutations (c.4518 + 3A > T, c.649 + 2T > C.  Conclusions  DMD gene point mutation may result in BMD with mild clinical symptoms. When clinical manifestations suggest the possibility of BMD and MLPA reveals non?deletion or duplication mutation of DMD gene, BMD should be considered. Study on the mechanism of DMD point mutation causing BMD is very important for gene therapy of DMD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.06.005

  9. Association of PAX2 and Other Gene Mutations with the Clinical Manifestations of Renal Coloboma Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Okumura

    Full Text Available Renal coloboma syndrome (RCS is characterized by renal anomalies and optic nerve colobomas. PAX2 mutations contribute to RCS. However, approximately half of the patients with RCS have no mutation in PAX2 gene.To investigate the incidence and effects of mutations of PAX2 and 25 candidate genes, patient genes were screened using next-generation sequence analysis, and candidate mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The correlation between mutations and clinical manifestation was evaluated.Thirty patients, including 26 patients (two families of five and two, 19 sporadic cases with RCS, and 4 optic nerve coloboma only control cases were evaluated in the present study. Six PAX2 mutations in 21 probands [28%; two in family cohorts (n = 5 and n = 2 and in 4 out of 19 patients with sporadic disease] including four novel mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Moreover, four other sequence variants (CHD7, SALL4, KIF26B, and SIX4 were also confirmed, including a potentially pathogenic novel KIF26B mutation. Kidney function and proteinuria were more severe in patients with PAX2 mutations than in those without the mutation. Moreover, the coloboma score was significantly higher in patients with PAX2 gene mutations. Three out of five patients with PAX2 mutations had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS diagnosed from kidney biopsies.The results of this study identify several new mutations of PAX2, and sequence variants in four additional genes, including a novel potentially pathogenic mutation in KIF26B, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of RCS.

  10. Dysferlin Gene Mutation Spectrum in a Large Cohort of Chinese Patients with Dysferlinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Su-Qin; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Wei; Lyu, He; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhao-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dysferlinopathy is caused by mutations in the dysferlin (DYSF) gene. Here, we described the genetic features of a large cohort of Chinese patients with this disease. Methods: Eighty-nine index patients were included in the study. DYSF gene analysis was performed by Sanger sequencing in 41 patients and targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) in 48 patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was performed to detect exon duplication/deletion in patients with only one pathogenic mutation. Results: Among the 89 index patients, 79 patients were demonstrated to carry two disease-causing (73 cases) or possibly disease-causing mutations (6 cases), including 26 patients with homozygous mutations. We identified 105 different mutations, including 59 novel ones. Notably, in 13 patients in whom only one pathogenic mutation was initially found by Sanger sequencing or NGS, 3 were further identified to carry exon deletions by MLPA. The mutations identified in this study appeared to cluster in the N-terminal region. Mutation types included missense mutations (30.06%), nonsense mutations (17.18%), frameshift mutations (30.67%), in-frame deletions (2.45%), intronic mutations (17.79%), and exonic rearrangement (1.84%). No genotype-phenotype correlation was identified. Conclusions: DYSF mutations in Chinese patients clustered in the N-terminal region of the gene. Exonic rearrangements were found in 23% of patients with only one pathogenic mutation identified by Sanger sequencing or NGS. The novel mutations found in this study greatly expanded the mutational spectrum of dysferlinopathy. PMID:27647186

  11. Mutation analysis of presenilin-1 gene in Alzheimer’s disease patients and the effects of its mutation on expression of presenilin-1 and amyloid precursor protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓雄

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the presenilin-1(PS-1) gene mutations in Alzheimer’s disease(AD) patients and investigate the influence of the initiation codon mutation on the mRNA expression of PS-1 and amyloid precursor protein

  12. Restoration of R117H CFTR folding and function in human airway cells through combination treatment with VX-809 and VX-770.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentzsch, Martina; Ren, Hong Y; Houck, Scott A; Quinney, Nancy L; Cholon, Deborah M; Sopha, Pattarawut; Chaudhry, Imron G; Das, Jhuma; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Randell, Scott H; Cyr, Douglas M

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal recessive genetic disease caused primarily by the F508del mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The potentiator VX-770 was the first CFTR modulator approved by the FDA for treatment of CF patients with the gating mutation G551D. Orkambi is a drug containing VX-770 and corrector VX809 and is approved for treatment of CF patients homozygous for F508del, which has folding and gating defects. At least 30% of CF patients are heterozygous for the F508del mutation with the other allele encoding for one of many different rare CFTR mutations. Treatment of heterozygous F508del patients with VX-809 and VX-770 has had limited success, so it is important to identify heterozygous patients that respond to CFTR modulator therapy. R117H is a more prevalent rare mutation found in over 2,000 CF patients. In this study we investigated the effectiveness of VX-809/VX-770 therapy on restoring CFTR function in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells from R117H/F508del CF patients. We found that VX-809 stimulated more CFTR activity in R117H/F508del HBEs than in F508del/F508del HBEs. R117H expressed exclusively in immortalized HBEs exhibited a folding defect, was retained in the ER, and degraded prematurely. VX-809 corrected the R117H folding defect and restored channel function. Because R117 is involved in ion conductance, VX-770 acted additively with VX-809 to restore CFTR function in chronically treated R117H/F508del cells. Although treatment of R117H patients with VX-770 has been approved, our studies indicate that Orkambi may be more beneficial for rescue of CFTR function in these patients. PMID:27402691

  13. Three charged amino acids in extracellular loop 1 are involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Guiying; Rahman, Kazi S.; Infield, Daniel T.; Kuang, Christopher; Prince, Chengyu Z.; McCarty, Nael A.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bears six extracellular loops (ECL1–6); ECL1 is the site of several mutations associated with CF. Mutation R117H has been reported to reduce current amplitude, whereas D110H, E116K, and R117C/L/P may impair channel stability. We hypothesized that these amino acids might not be directly involved in ion conduction and permeation but may contribute to stabilizing the outer vestibule architecture in CFTR. We used cRNA injected oo...

  14. Profile of TP53 gene mutations in sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Bornholdt, Jette; Suitiala, Tuula;

    2010-01-01

    %) frameshift or nonsense mutations, and 36 (23%) intronic or silent mutations. In coding region, the most common base change detected was C-->T transition (43/125; 34% of base changes in the coding region). G-->T transversions occurred at a frequency of 10% (12/125), which is less than reported in mutation...

  15. De novo mutation of keratin 9 gene in two Taiwanese patients with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei-Hui; Lee, Julia Yu-Yun; Lin, Jeng-Hsien; Chao, Sheau-Chiou

    2003-07-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is an autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of keratinization. Recent molecular studies have shown that EPPK is caused by mutations in keratin 9 gene (K9). We report 2 unrelated sporadic cases of EPPK in Taiwanese, confirmed by histopathology and electron microscopy. A de novo mutation with a C to T transition at the first nucleotide of codon 162 in K9 was detected in both patients, but not in their parents. The mutation is expected to result in an arginine to tryptophan substitution (R162W) in the beginning region of the alpha-helical 1A domain of K9. Mutations in this region could disrupt keratin filament assembly, leading to degeneration or cytolysis of keratinocytes. Mutations of this arginine codon (R162W, R162Q) are common in pedigrees with EPPK. Our mutation analysis suggests that codon 162 in K9 gene is an important hot spot for mutation in EPPK.

  16. Applications of homemade kit in mutation detection of genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Chunxia

    2004-01-01

    [1]Orita, M., Iwahana, H., Kanazawa, H. et al., Detection of poly morphisms of human DNA by gel electrophoresis as single-strand conformation polymorphisms, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 1989, 86:2766-2770.[2]Hongyo, T., Buzard, G. S., Calvert, R. J. et al., Cold SSCP: a simple, rapid and non-radioactive method for optimized single-strand conformation polymorphism analyses, Nucleic Acids Res., 1993, 21: 3637-3642.[3]Kutach, L. S., Bolshakov, S., Ananthaswamy, H. N., Detection of mutations and polymorphisms in the p53 tumor suppressor gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, Electrophoresis, 1999, 20: 1204-1210.[4]Kozlowski, P., Krzyzosiak, W. J., Combined SSCP/duplex analysis by capillary electrophoresis for more efficient mutation detection, Nucleic Acids Res., 2001, 29( 14): E71.[5]Turner, D., Choudhury, F., Reynard, M. et al., Typing of multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in cytokine and receptor genes using SNaPshot, Human Immunology, 2002, 63: 508-513.[6]Sudor, J., Barbier, V., Thirot, S. et al., New block-copolymer thermoassociating matrices for DNA sequencing: Effect of molecular sreucture on rheology and resolution, Electrophoresis, 2001, 22: 720-728.[7]Barbier, V., Viovy, J. L., Advanced polymers for DNA separation, Curr. Opin. Biotechnol., 2003, 14: 51-57.[8]Ugaz, V. M., Lin, R., Srivastava, N. et al., A versatile microfabri cated platform for electrophoresis of double- and single-stranded DNA, Electrophoresis, 2003, 24:151-157.[9]Lassiter, S. J., Stryjewski, W., Owens, C. V. et al., Optimization of sequencing conditions using near-infrared lifetime identification methods in capillary gel electrophoresis, Electrophoresis, 2002, 23: 1480-1489.[10]Chang, H. T., Yeung, E. S., Poly(ethyleneoxide) for high-resolution and high-speed separation of DNA by capillary electrophoresis, J. Chromatogr. B, 1995, 669: 113-123.[11]Gao, Q., Yeung, E. S., A matrix for DNA separation: genotyping and sequencing using

  17. Exome sequencing reveals AMER1 as a frequently mutated gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Paré-Brunet, Laia; Lázaro, Kira; Bellido, Fernando; Alonso, M. Henar; Aussó, Susanna; Guinó, Elisabet; Beltrán, Sergi; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Gut, Marta; Sanjuan, Xavier; Closa, Adria; Cordero, David; Morón-Duran, Francisco D.; Soriano, Antonio; Salazar, Ramón; Valle, Laura; Moreno, Victor

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Somatic mutations occur at early stages of adenoma and accumulate throughout colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutational landscape of stage II tumors and to search for novel recurrent mutations likely implicated in CRC tumorigenesis. DESIGN The exomic DNA of 42 stage II, microsatellite stable, colon tumors and their paired mucosae were sequenced. Other molecular data available in the discovery dataset (gene expression, methylation, and CNV) was used to further characterize these tumors. Additional datasets comprising 553 CRC samples were used to validate the discovered mutations. RESULTS As a result, 4,886 somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were found. Almost all SNVs were private changes, with few mutations shared by more than one tumor, thus revealing tumor-specific mutational landscapes. Nevertheless, these diverse mutations converged into common cellular pathways such as cell cycle or apoptosis. Among this mutational heterogeneity, variants resulting in early stop-codons in the AMER1 (also known as FAM123B or WTX) gene emerged as recurrent mutations in CRC. Loses of AMER1 by other mechanisms apart from mutations such as methylation and copy number aberrations were also found. Tumors lacking this tumor suppressor gene exhibited a mesenchymal phenotype characterized by inhibition of the canonical Wnt pathway. CONCLUSION In silico and experimental validation in independent datasets confirmed the existence of functional mutations in AMER1 in approximately 10% of analyzed CRC tumors. Moreover, these tumors exhibited a characteristic phenotype. PMID:26071483

  18. Analysis of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 gene mutations in neonates with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X H; Sun, Y F; Cui, M; Wang, J B; Han, S Z; Miao, J

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to analyze uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene mutations in neonates with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, from two different ethnic groups. Polymerase chain reaction and gene sequencing were used to analyze the differences in genotypes and allele frequencies of different gene mutations among the ethnic groups; this was followed by checking their correlation with the serum bilirubin level and the occurrence of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in neonates. Our results reveal that the UGT1A1 mutant genotype, 211G>A, is distributed differently in the case vs control groups, as well as in the Zhuang vs Han ethnic groups. Moreover, this difference is statistically significant (P levels in patients carrying the single homozygous mutation, 211G>A, were markedly higher than that in patients without the mutation (P levels were significantly different between patients carrying single or compound 211G>A heterozygous mutation, (TA)6/7, and 1941C>G/2042C>G heterozygous mutation, and patients without mutation (P > 0.05). Our findings suggest that the 211G>A mutation in the first exon may be a risk factor for unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in Zhuang and Han neonates. The serum bilirubin levels seem to be affected by the homozygosity or heterozygosity of the UGT1A1 gene mutation; 211G>A homozygous mutation is an important factor that causes a rise in bilirubin in neonates with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:27323053

  19. IL7R and RAG1/2 Genes Mutations/Polymorphisms in Patients SCID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Safaei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available SCID disorder is major failure of the immune system, usually genetic. The aim of this study was on mutations detection of RAG1, RAG2, and IL7RG genes in SCID cases. Mutation detection was performed by PCR sequencing.Our results  indicated  that 13  mutations  were found  through  cases which  include 4 mutations in IL7R gene (T661I, I138V, T56A, C57W, 7 mutations in RAG1 (W896X, W204R, M324V, T731I, M1006V, K820R, and R249H, and 2 mutations in RAG2 gene (R229W, ΔT251.

  20. A missense mutation (Q279R in the Fumarylacetoacetate Hydrolase gene, responsible for hereditary tyrosinemia, acts as a splicing mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baklouti Faouzi

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tyrosinemia type I, the most severe disease of the tyrosine catabolic pathway is caused by a deficiency in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH. A patient showing few of the symptoms associated with the disease, was found to be a compound heterozygote for a splice mutation, IVS6-1g->t, and a putative missense mutation, Q279R. Analysis of FAH expression in liver sections obtained after resection for hepatocellular carcinoma revealed a mosaic pattern of expression. No FAH was found in tumor regions while a healthy region contained enzyme-expressing nodules. Results Analysis of DNA from a FAH expressing region showed that the expression of the protein was due to correction of the Q279R mutation. RT-PCR was used to assess if Q279R RNA was produced in the liver cells and in fibroblasts from the patient. Normal mRNA was found in the liver region where the mutation had reverted while splicing intermediates were found in non-expressing regions suggesting that the Q279R mutation acted as a splicing mutation in vivo. Sequence of transcripts showed skipping of exon 8 alone or together with exon 9. Using minigenes in transfection assays, the Q279R mutation was shown to induce skipping of exon 9 when placed in a constitutive splicing environment. Conclusion These data suggest that the putative missense mutation Q279R in the FAH gene acts as a splicing mutation in vivo. Moreover FAH expression can be partially restored in certain liver cells as a result of a reversion of the Q279R mutation and expansion of the corrected cells.

  1. DETECTION OF p53 GENE MUTATION OF BRONCHOSCOPIC SAMPLIES IN THE PATIENTS SUSPECTED TO LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of detecting p53 gene mutations for early diagnosis of lung cancer using the samples from bronchoscopic examination. Methods: Point mutations of the exon 5-8 of p53 gene were detected in 85 bronchoscopic samples of 35 patients suspected to be lung cancer using silver staining PCR-SSCP. Results: p53 gene mutations were founded in 10 of 35 patients(28.6%). The incidence of p53 gene mutations (14.9%) was obviously higher than the cytological positive incidence(2.9%) in samples of sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage and brush, especially for the sputum(27.7%). In the bronchoscopic biopsy specimens, the incidence of p53 gene mutations (12.5%) was lower than that of pathologic positive result (50.0%). However, in view of all the bronchoscopic samples, there was no statistically difference between cytopathologic positive results (11.8%) and the incidence of p53 gene mutations (14.1%). Although the p53 mutations were most common in the samples from the patients bronchoscopically manifested as neoplasm compared with other manifestations, there was no statistical difference. It is valuable to notice that 3 patients with p53 gene mutation merely presented as bronchial inflammation in bronchoscope. Conclusion: Results indicated that the value of detecting p53 gene mutation for the diagnosis of lung cancer using the bronchoscopic samples was more superior to cytological examination and detection of p53 gene mutations in post-bronchoscopic sputum was easy and effective, may be used as a valuable method for early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  2. Transmission of the P250R mutation of the FGFR3 gene in four generations with highly variable phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Hanne Buciek; Dunø, Morten; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette;

    Transmission of the P250R mutation of the FGFR3 gene in four generations with highly variable phenotype.......Transmission of the P250R mutation of the FGFR3 gene in four generations with highly variable phenotype....

  3. CFTR delivery to 25% of surface epithelial cells restores normal rates of mucus transport to human cystic fibrosis airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Zhang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of CFTR in cystic fibrosis (CF airway epithelium perturbs the normal regulation of ion transport, leading to a reduced volume of airway surface liquid (ASL, mucus dehydration, decreased mucus transport, and mucus plugging of the airways. CFTR is normally expressed in ciliated epithelial cells of the surface and submucosal gland ductal epithelium and submucosal gland acinar cells. Critical questions for the development of gene transfer strategies for CF airway disease are what airway regions require CFTR function and how many epithelial cells require CFTR expression to restore normal ASL volume regulation and mucus transport to CF airway epithelium? An in vitro model of human CF ciliated surface airway epithelium (CF HAE was used to test whether a human parainfluenza virus (PIV vector engineered to express CFTR (PIVCFTR could deliver sufficient CFTR to CF HAE to restore mucus transport, thus correcting the CF phenotype. PIVCFTR delivered CFTR to >60% of airway surface epithelial cells and expressed CFTR protein in CF HAE approximately 100-fold over endogenous levels in non-CF HAE. This efficiency of CFTR delivery fully corrected the basic bioelectric defects of Cl(- and Na(+ epithelial ion transport and restored ASL volume regulation and mucus transport to levels approaching those of non-CF HAE. To determine the numbers of CF HAE surface epithelial cells required to express CFTR for restoration of mucus transport to normal levels, different amounts of PIVCFTR were used to express CFTR in 3%-65% of the surface epithelial cells of CF HAE and correlated to increasing ASL volumes and mucus transport rates. These data demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that restoration of normal mucus transport rates in CF HAE was achieved after CFTR delivery to 25% of surface epithelial cells. In vivo experimentation in appropriate models will be required to determine what level of mucus transport will afford clinical benefit to CF patients

  4. Eicosanoid release is increased by membrane destabilization and CFTR inhibition in Calu-3 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Borot

    Full Text Available The antiinflammatory protein annexin-1 (ANXA1 and the adaptor S100A10 (p11, inhibit cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2alpha by direct interaction. Since the latter is responsible for the cleavage of arachidonic acid at membrane phospholipids, all three proteins modulate eicosanoid production. We have previously shown the association of ANXA1 expression with that of CFTR, the multifactorial protein mutated in cystic fibrosis. This could in part account for the abnormal inflammatory status characteristic of this disease. We postulated that CFTR participates in the regulation of eicosanoid release by direct interaction with a complex containing ANXA1, p11 and cPLA2alpha. We first analyzed by plasmon surface resonance the in vitro binding of CFTR to the three proteins. A significant interaction between p11 and the NBD1 domain of CFTR was found. We observed in Calu-3 cells a rapid and partial redistribution of all four proteins in detergent resistant membranes (DRM induced by TNF-alpha. This was concomitant with increased IL-8 synthesis and cPLA2alpha activation, ultimately resulting in eicosanoid (PGE2 and LTB4 overproduction. DRM destabilizing agent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin induced further cPLA2alpha activation and eicosanoid release, but inhibited IL-8 synthesis. We tested in parallel the effect of short exposure of cells to CFTR inhibitors Inh172 and Gly-101. Both inhibitors induced a rapid increase in eicosanoid production. Longer exposure to Inh172 did not increase further eicosanoid release, but inhibited TNF-alpha-induced relocalization to DRM. These results show that (i CFTR may form a complex with cPLA2alpha and ANXA1 via interaction with p11, (ii CFTR inhibition and DRM disruption induce eicosanoid synthesis, and (iii suggest that the putative cPLA2/ANXA1/p11/CFTR complex may participate in the modulation of the TNF-alpha-induced production of eicosanoids, pointing to the importance of membrane composition and CFTR function in the

  5. Splicing mutation of a gene within the Duchenne muscular dystrophy family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y B; Gan, J H; Luo, J W; Zheng, X Y; Wei, S C; Hu, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mutation site and phenotype of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene in a DMD family. The DMD gene is by far the largest known gene in humans. Up to 34% of the point mutations reported to date affect splice sites of the DMD gene. However, no hotspot mutation has been reported. Capture sequencing of second-generation exons was used to investigate the DMD gene in a proband. Sanger sequencing was performed for mutation scanning in eight family members. Scale-invariant feature transform and PolyPhen were applied to predict the functional impact of protein mutations. A hemizygous splicing mutation IVS44ds +1G-A (c.6438 +1G>A) that induces abnormal splicing variants during late transcription and produces abnormal proteins was located in intron 44. Four missense mutations (p.Arg2937Gln, p.Asp882Gly, p.Lys2366Gln, and p.Arg1745His) that are known multiple-polymorphic sites were found in the coding region of the DMD gene. A heterozygous c.6438+1G>A mutation was detected on the X chromosome of the proband's mother and maternal grandmother. PMID:27421007

  6. "Deafness –Associated Connexin 26 Gene (GJB2) Mutations in Iranian Population"

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemzadeh Chaleshtori, M.; DD Farhud; Taylor, R.; V Hadavi; MA Patton; AR Afzal

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 are associated with autosomal recessive non syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in many populations. A single mutation, at position 35 (35delG) accounts for approximately 30-63% of mutations in white populations with a carrier frequency of 1.5-2.5% in most European, North American and Mediterranean populations. In this study we have investigated the prevalence of the GJB2 gene mutations using direct sequencing in 43 presumed ARNSHL...

  7. Nonsense mutations in the human beta-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Baserga, S J; Benz, E J

    1988-01-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human alpha- and beta-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with beta zero-thalassemia have shown that for both the beta-17 and the beta-39 mutations less than normal levels of beta-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human beta-globin mRNA.) In vitro studies usi...

  8. Meta-Prediction of MTHFR Gene Polymorphism Mutations and Associated Risk for Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shiao, S. P. K.; Yu, C H

    2016-01-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is one of the most investigated of the genes associated with chronic human diseases because of its associations with hyperhomocysteinemia and toxicity. It has been proposed as a prototype gene for the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). The major objectives of this meta-analysis were to examine the polymorphism-mutation patterns of MTHFR and their associations with risk for CRC as well as potential contributing factors for mutations and ...

  9. Amelogenin signal peptide mutation: Correlation between mutations in the amelogenin gene (AMGX) and manifestations of X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerstroem-Fermer, M.; Nilsson, M.; Pettersson, U. [Univ. of Uppsala (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Formation of tooth enamel is a poorly understood biological process. In this study the authors describe a 9-bp deletion in exon 2 of the amelogenin gene (AMGX) causing X-linked hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta, a disease characterized by defective enamel. The mutation results in the loss of 3 amino acids and exchange of 1 in the signal peptide of the amelogenin protein. This deletion in the signal peptide probably interferes with translocation of the amelogenin protein during synthesis, resulting in the thin enamel observed in affected members of the family. The authors compare this mutation to a previously reported mutation in the amelogenin gene that causes a different disease phenotype. The study illustrates that molecular analysis can help explain the various manifestations of a tooth disorder and thereby provide insights into the mechanisms of tooth enamel formation. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. IL8 gene as modifier of cystic fibrosis: unraveling the factors which influence clinical variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Larissa Lazzarini; Marson, Fernando Augusto Lima; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia; Salomão Junior, João Batista; Souza, Dorotéia Rossi Silva

    2016-08-01

    The severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with classes of mutations in the CFTR gene (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator), physical environment and modifier genes interaction. The IL8 gene (interleukin 8), according to its respective polymorphisms, influences inflammatory responses. This study analyzed IL8 gene polymorphisms (rs4073, rs2227306 and rs2227307), by means of PCR/RFLP, and their association with pulmonary function markers and clinical severity scores in 186 patients with CF, considering the CFTR genotype. There was an association between rs2227307 and precocity of the disease. The severity of lung disease was associated with the following markers: transcutaneous arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SaO2) (regardless of CFTR genotype, for the polymorphisms rs4073, rs2227306 and rs2227307); mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa (regardless of CFTR genotype, for the polymorphisms rs2227306 and rs2227307). Pulmonary function markers (SaO2 and spirometric variables) and clinical severity scores were also associated with IL8 gene polymorphisms. This study identified the IL8 gene, represented by rs4073 and rs2227306 polymorphisms, and particularly the rs2227307 polymorphism, as potentiating factors for the degree of variability in the severity of CF, especially in pulmonary clinical manifestation correlated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:27209008

  11. A novel gene delivery method transduces porcine pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M A; Restrepo, M S; Abu-El-Haija, M; Wallen, T; Buchanan, E; Rokhlina, T; Chen, Y H; McCray, P B; Davidson, B L; Divekar, A; Uc, A

    2014-02-01

    Gene therapy offers the possibility to treat pancreatic disease in cystic fibrosis (CF), caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene; however, gene transfer to the pancreas is untested in humans. The pancreatic disease phenotype is very similar between humans and pigs with CF; thus, CF pigs create an excellent opportunity to study gene transfer to the pancreas. There are no studies showing efficient transduction of pig pancreas with gene-transfer vectors. Our objective is to develop a safe and efficient method to transduce wild-type (WT) porcine pancreatic ducts that express CFTR. We catheterized the umbilical artery of WT newborn pigs and delivered an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 vector expressing green-fluorescent protein (AAV9CMV.sceGFP) or vehicle to the celiac artery, the vessel that supplies major branches to the pancreas. This technique resulted in stable and dose-dependent transduction of pancreatic duct epithelial cells that expressed CFTR. Intravenous (IV) injection of AAV9CMV.sceGFP did not transduce the pancreas. Our technique offers an opportunity to deliver the CFTR gene to the pancreas of CF pigs. The celiac artery can be accessed via the umbilical artery in newborns and via the femoral artery at older ages--delivery approaches that can be translated to humans. PMID:24257348

  12. Mutation spectrum of the TYR and SLC45A2 genes in patients with oculocutaneous albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min; Yang, Jung-Ah; Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kim, Hyon-Ju

    2012-04-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a group of inherited disorders characterized by defective melanin biosynthesis. OCA1, the most common and severe form, is caused by mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. OCA4, caused by mutations in the SLC45A2 gene, has frequently been reported in the Japanese population. To determine the mutational spectrum in Korean OCA patients, 12 patients were recruited. The samples were first screened for TYR mutations, and negative samples were screened for SLC45A2 mutations. OCA1 was confirmed in 8 of 12 (66.7%) patients, and OCA4 was diagnosed in 1 (8.3%) patient. In the OCA1 patients, a total of 6 distinct TYR mutations were found in 15 of 16 (93.8%) alleles, all of which had been previously reported. Out of the 6 alleles, c.929insC was the most frequently detected (31.3%), and was mainly associated with OCA1A phenotypes. Other TYR mutations identified included c.1037-7T>A/c.1037-10delTT, p.D383N, p.R77Q and p.R299H. These largely overlapped with mutations found in Japanese and Chinese patients. The SLC45A2 gene analysis identified 1 novel mutation, p.D93N, in 1 patient. This study has provided information on the mutation spectrum in Korean OCA patients, and allows us to estimate the relative frequencies of OCA1 and OCA4 in Korea.

  13. Effects of a Mutation in the gyrA Gene on the Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez-Céspedes, Javier; Sáez-López, Emma; Frimodt-Møller, N;

    2015-01-01

    - and topoisomerase IV-encoding genes and mutations in regulatory genes affecting different efflux systems, among others. We studied the role of the acquisition of a mutation in the gyrA gene in the virulence and protein expression of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). The HC14366M strain carrying a mutation...

  14. Activation of CFTR-mediated Cl- Transport by Magnolin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Ling-ling; LIU Xin; SUN Yan; LIN Sen; ZHOU Na; XU Li-na; YU BO; HOU Shu-guang; YANG Hong

    2008-01-01

    Magnolin is a herbal compound from Magnolia biondii Pamp.It possesses numerous biological activities.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator(CFTR)is all epithelial chloride channel that plays a key role in the fluid secretion of various exocrine organs.In the present study,the activation of CFTR-mediated chloride transport by magnolin is indentified and characterized.In CFTR stably trailsfected FRT cells.magnolin increases CFTR Cl- currents in a concentration-dependent manner.The activation of magnolin on CFTR is rapid,reversible,and cAMP-dependent.Magnolin does not elevate cellular cAMP level.indicating that it activates CFTR by direct binding and interaction with CFTR protein.Magnolin selectively activates wildtype CFTR rather than mutant CFTIL Magnolin may present a novel class of therapeutic lead compound for the treatment of diseases associated with reduced CFTR function such as keratoconjunctivitis sicca,idiopathic chronic pancreatiti,and chromc constipation.

  15. Mutations in genes involved in nonsense mediated decay ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber stop mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubert Sylvie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presenilin proteins are part of a complex of proteins that can cleave many type I transmembrane proteins, including Notch Receptors and the Amyloid Precursor Protein, in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Dominant mutations in the human presenilin genes PS1 and PS2 lead to Familial Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-12 presenilin gene cause a highly penetrant egg-laying defect due to reduction of signalling through the lin-12/Notch receptor. Mutations in six spr genes (for suppressor of presenilin are known to strongly suppress sel-12. Mutations in most strong spr genes suppress sel-12 by de-repressing the transcription of the largely functionally equivalent hop-1 presenilin gene. However, how mutations in the spr-2 gene suppress sel-12 is unknown. Results We show that spr-2 mutations increase the levels of sel-12 transcripts with Premature translation Termination Codons (PTCs in embryos and L1 larvae. mRNA transcripts from sel-12 alleles with PTCs undergo degradation by a process known as Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD. However, spr-2 mutations do not appear to affect NMD. Mutations in the smg genes, which are required for NMD, can restore sel-12(PTC transcript levels and ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber PTCs. However, the phenotypic suppression of sel-12 by smg genes is nowhere near as strong as the effect of previously characterized spr mutations including spr-2. Consistent with this, we have identified only two mutations in smg genes among the more than 100 spr mutations recovered in genetic screens. Conclusion spr-2 mutations do not suppress sel-12 by affecting NMD of sel-12(PTC transcripts and appear to have a novel mechanism of suppression. The fact that mutations in smg genes can ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 alleles with amber PTCs suggests that some read-through of sel-12(amber alleles occurs in smg backgrounds.

  16. Mutational scanning of large genes by extensive PCR multiplexing and two-dimensional electrophoresis : Application to the RB1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanOrsouw, NJ; Li, DZ; vanderVlies, P; Scheffer, H; Eng, C; Buys, CHCM; Li, FP; Vijg, J

    1996-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of identified human disease genes, the development of accurate and cost-efficient mutation tests has become opportune. Here we present a combination of extensive PCR multiplexing and two dimensional (2-D) DNA electrophoresis to screen for mutations in 26 exons o

  17. Functional features of gene expression profiles differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumours according to KIT mutations and expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) represent a heterogeneous group of tumours of mesenchymal origin characterized by gain-of-function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family. Although mutations in either receptor are thought to drive an early oncogenic event through similar pathways, two previous studies reported the mutation-specific gene expression profiles. However, their further conclusions were rather discordant. To clarify the molecular characteristics of differentially expressed genes according to GIST receptor mutations, we combined microarray-based analysis with detailed functional annotations. Total RNA was isolated from 29 frozen gastric GISTs and processed for hybridization on GENECHIP® HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays (Affymetrix). KIT and PDGFRA were analyzed by sequencing, while related mRNA levels were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Fifteen and eleven tumours possessed mutations in KIT and PDGFRA, respectively; no mutation was found in three tumours. Gene expression analysis identified no discriminative profiles associated with clinical or pathological parameters, even though expression of hundreds of genes differentiated tumour receptor mutation and expression status. Functional features of genes differentially expressed between the two groups of GISTs suggested alterations in angiogenesis and G-protein-related and calcium signalling. Our study has identified novel molecular elements likely to be involved in receptor-dependent GIST development and allowed confirmation of previously published results. These elements may be potential therapeutic targets and novel markers of KIT mutation status

  18. DETECTION OF p53 GENE MUTATION IN PLASMA OF PATIENTS WITH GASTRIC CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏鹏程; 李子禹; 张连海; 万文徽; 任晖; 张桂国; 王怡; 邓国仁; 季加孚

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigated p53 gene mutation in plasma of gastric cancer patients. Methods: DNA extracted from plasma and matched tumor and tumor-adjacent non-cancerous tissues of 96 gastric cancer patients, and DNA from 20 healthy volunteers were studied. Exon 5, 6, 7, and 8 of p53 were amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The mutation status was analyzed by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), followed by direct sequencing of cases with aberrant chromatographic patterns. Results: Heterozygous mutations of p53 gene were detected in 19.9% (19/96) of primary tumor tissues and 5.2% (5/96) of corresponding plasma. All p53 gene mutations detected in plasma DNA consisted with mutations in the matched primary tumor samples. Neither the tumor-adjacent gastric mucosa tissues nor control plasma from healthy volunteers showed p53 gene mutation. No correlation was found between p53 mutation status and clinicopathological features of gastric cancer patients. Conclusion: p53 gene mutation in plasma can be detected in tissues and plasma of gastric cancer patients, which could be applied in screening and surveillance of this disease.

  19. LHON/MELAS overlap syndrome associated with a mitochondrial MTND1 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Emma L; de Silva, Rajith; King, Andrew; Schwarzer, Verena; Harrower, Tim; Dawidek, Gervase; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W

    2005-05-01

    Pathogenic point mutations in the mitochondrial MTND1 gene have previously been described in association with two distinct clinical phenotypes -- Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). Here we report the first heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutation (3376G>A) in the MTND1 gene associated with an overlap syndrome comprising the clinical features of both LHON and MELAS. Muscle histochemistry revealed subtle mitochondrial abnormalities, while biochemical analysis showed an isolated complex I deficiency. Our findings serve to highlight the growing importance of mutations in mitochondrial complex I structural genes in MELAS and its associated overlap syndromes.

  20. Association of mutations in the hemochromatosis gene with shorter life expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bathum, L; Christiansen, L; Nybo, H;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate whether the frequency of carriers of mutations in the HFE gene associated with hereditary hemochromatosis diminishes with age as an indication that HFE mutations are associated with increased mortality. It is of value in the debate concerning screening for hereditary...... hemochromatosis to determine the significance of heterozygosity. METHODS: Genotyping for mutations in exons 2 and 4 of the HFE gene using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in 1784 participants aged 45 to 100 years from 4 population-based studies: all 183 centenarians from the Danish Centenarian Study, 601...... heterozygotes for the C282Y mutation-the mutation most often associated with hereditary hemochromatosis-was found. This was significant for the whole population (P=.005) and for women (P=.004) but not for men (P=.26). A group of 599 participants was screened for mutations in exon 2, and there was no variation...

  1. Detection of V617F mutation of gene jak2 at patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliuta S. S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to create a protocol for detecting the V617F mutation of the gene jak2 in samples of patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm which is necessary to unify the procedures of the analysis of blood samples according to WHO criteria for this group of diseases. Methods. Mutation was revealed using reverse transcriptase PCR and direct sequencing of PCR products. Results. Six samples of blood of patients with polycythemia vera were analyzed and the mutation V617F was detected in all six cases. This mutation was not detected in any of RNA samples of healthy donors. A case of simultaneous detection of mutations V617F and fused bcr/abl gene in CML patient was described. Conclusions. The proposed method for detecting the V617F mutation allows molecular genetic differential diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm as well

  2. ANALYSIS OF C-HA-RAS GENE AMPLIFICATION AND MUTATION IN LARYNGEAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘世喜; 林代诚; 洪邦泰; 黄光琦

    1995-01-01

    In order to study the ahered molecular events during laryngeal carcinogenesis and elucidate the role of Ha-ras oncogene amplification and mutation, we have examined their profile by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and selective oligonucleoride hybridization. We analyzed the mutational status of codon 12 of Ha-ras in 22 laryngeal carcinomas and 10 normal tissues, and found that 7 of 22 laryngeal carcinomas con-tained a Ha-ras mutation at codon 12. The frequency of mutation was 32%. None of the normal tissues re-vealed mutation. Moreover, no amplification was found in cancers when compared to the normal. Our findings indicated that the aefivmed Ha-ras gene existed in laryngeal carcinoma, and activation of the Ha-ras gene by mutation at codon 12 might play a key role in laryngeal carcinogenesis.

  3. Keratin 9 gene mutational heterogeneity in patients with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennies, H C; Zehender, D; Kunze, J; Küster, W; Reis, A

    1994-06-01

    Mutations in the human keratin 9 gene have recently been shown to be involved in the etiology of palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK). We have investigated eleven unrelated German kindreds with the epidermolytic variant of PPK (EPPK) for mutations in the keratin 9 gene. We have identified two novel mutations, M156V and Q171P, both in the coil 1A segment of keratin 9. Mutation M156V was detected in two unrelated patients with EPPK, and mutation Q171P was shown to cosegregate with the disease in a large four-generation family. These findings confirm the functional importance of coil 1A integrity for heterodimerisation in keratins and for intermediate filament assembly. Our results provide further evidence for mutational heterogeneity in EPPK, and for the involvement of keratins in diseases of hyperkeratinisation and epidermolysis.

  4. Identification of gene mutation in patients with osteogenesis imperfect using high resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhai; Ren, Xiuzhi; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Tianke; Wang, Yi; Li, Keqiu; Li, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a congenital bone disorder, is caused by mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes, leading to deficiency of type I collagen. The high resolution melting (HRM) analysis has been used for detecting mutations, polymorphisms and epigenetic alteration in double-stranded DNAs. This study was to evaluate the potential application of HRM analysis for identifying gene mutations in patients with OI. This study included four children with OI and their parents and fifty normal people as controls. Blood samples were collected for HRM analysis of PCR-amplified exons and flanking DNA sequences of COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. Direct gene sequencing was performed to validate HRM-identified gene mutations. As compared to controls, HRM analysis of samples form children with OI showed abnormal melting curves in exons 11 and 33-34 of the COL1A1 gene and exons 19 and 48 of the COL1A2 gene, which indicates the presence of heterozygous mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. In addition to two known mutations in the COL1A2 gene, c.982G > A and c.3197G > T, sequencing analysis identified two novel mutations in the COL1A1 gene, c.2321delC and c.768dupC mutations, which function as premature stop codons. These results support future studies of applying HRM analysis as a diagnostic approach for OI. PMID:26307460

  5. Extending the mutation spectrum for Galloway-Mowat syndrome to include homozygous missense mutations in the WDR73 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosti, Rasim O; Dikoglu, Esra; Zaki, Maha S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Makhseed, Nawal; Sese, Jordan C; Musaev, Damir; Rosti, Basak; Harbert, Mary J; Jones, Marilyn C; Vaux, Keith K; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-04-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder classically described as the combination of microcephaly and nephrotic syndrome. Recently, homozygous truncating mutations in WDR73 (WD repeat domain 73) were described in two of 31 unrelated families with Galloway-Mowat syndrome which was followed by a report of two sibs in an Egyptian consanguineous family. In this report, seven affecteds from four families showing biallelic missense mutations in WDR73 were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed to follow a recessive model of inheritance. Three-dimensional modeling predicted conformational alterations as a result of the mutation, supporting pathogenicity. An additional 13 families with microcephaly and renal phenotype were negative for WDR73 mutations. Missense mutations in the WDR73 gene are reported for the first time in Galloway-Mowat syndrome. A detailed phenotypic comparison of all reported WDR73-linked Galloway-Mowat syndrome patients with WDR73 negative patients showed that WDR73 mutations are limited to those with classical Galloway-Mowat syndrome features, in addition to cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, brain stem hypoplasia, occasional coarse face, late-onset and mostly slow progressive nephrotic syndrome, and frequent epilepsy. PMID:27001912

  6. Spectrum of NSD1 gene mutations in southern Chinese patients with Sotos syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tony M.F. Tong; Edgar W.L. Hau; Ivan F.M. Lo; Daniel H.C. Chan; Stephen T.S. Lam

    2005-01-01

    Background Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome with characteristic facial gestalt and mental retardation of variable severity. Haploinsufficiency of the NSD1 gene has been implicated as the major cause of Sotos syndrome, with a predominance of microdeletions reported in Japanese patients. This study was conducted to investigate into the spectrum of NSD1 gene mutations in southern Chinese patients with Sotos syndrome. Methods Thirty-six Chinese patients with Sotos syndrome and two patients with Weaver syndrome were subject to molecular testing. Results NSD1 gene mutations were detected in 26 (72%) Sotos patients. Microdeletion was found in only 3 patients, while the other 23 had point mutations (6 frameshift, 8 nonsense, 2 spice site, and 7 missense). Of these, 19 mutations were never reported. NSD1 gene mutations were not found in the two patients with Weaver syndrome. Conclusions Most cases of Sotos syndrome are caused by NSD1 gene defects, but the spectrum of mutations is different from that of Japanese patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation showed that patients with microdeletions might be more prone to congenital heart disease but less likely to have somatic overgrowth. The two patients with Weaver syndrome were not found to have NSD1 gene mutations, but the number was too small for any conclusion to be drawn.

  7. Prevalence of pathogenic mutations in cancer predisposition genes among pancreatic cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunling; Hart, Steven N.; Bamlet, William R.; Moore, Raymond M.; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Eckloff, Bruce W.; Lee, Yean K.; Petersen, Gloria M.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of germline pathogenic mutations in a comprehensive panel of cancer predisposition genes is not well defined for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). To estimate the frequency of mutations in a panel of 22 cancer predisposition genes, 96 patients unselected for a family history of cancer who were recruited to the Mayo Clinic Pancreatic Cancer patient registry over a 12 month period were screened by next-generation sequencing. Fourteen pathogenic mutations in 13 patients (13.5%) were identified in eight genes: four in ATM, two in BRCA2, CHEK2, and MSH6, and one in BARD1, BRCA1, FANCM, and NBN. These included nine mutations (9.4%) in established pancreatic cancer genes. Three mutations were found in patients with a first degree relative with PDAC, and 10 mutations were found in patients with first or second-degree relatives with breast, pancreas, colorectal, ovarian, or endometrial cancer. These results suggest that a substantial proportion of patients with PDAC carry germline mutations in predisposition genes associated with other cancers, and that a better understanding of pancreatic cancer risk will depend on evaluation of families with broad constellations of tumors. These findings highlight the need for recommendations governing germline gene-panel testing of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:26483394

  8. Development of rAAV2-CFTR: History of the First rAAV Vector Product to be Used in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, Heather S; ElMallah, Mai K; Flotte, Terence R

    2016-04-01

    The first human gene therapy trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors were performed in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Over 100 CF patients were enrolled in 5 separate trials of rAAV2-CFTR administration via nasal, endobronchial, maxillary sinus, and aerosol delivery. Recombinant AAV vectors were designed to deliver the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene and correct the basic CFTR defect by restoring chloride transport and reverting the upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. However, vector DNA expression was limited in duration because of the low incidence of integration and natural airway epithelium turnover. In addition, repeated administration of AAV-CFTR vector resulted in a humoral immune response that prevented effective gene transfer from subsequent doses of vector. AAV serotype 2 was used in human trials before the comparison with other serotypes and determination that serotypes 1 and 5 not only possess higher tropism for the airway epithelium, but also are capable of bypassing the binding and trafficking processes-both were important hindrances to the effectiveness of rAAV2. Although rAAV-CFTR gene therapy does not appear likely to supplant newer small-molecule CFTR modulators in the near future, early work with rAAV-CFTR provided an important foundation for later use of rAAV in humans. PMID:26895204

  9. APC and K-ras gene mutation in aberrant crypt foci of human colon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Yuan; Meng Hong Sun; Jin Sheng Zhang; Xiong Zeng Zhu; Da Ren Shi

    2001-01-01

    AIM To study the genetic alteration in ACF andto define the possibility that ACF may be a veryearly morphological lesion with molecularchanges, and to explore the relationshipbetween ACF and colorectal adenoma evencarcinoma.METHODS DNA from 35 CRC, 15 adenomas, 34ACF and 10 normal mucus was isolated by meansof microdissection. Direct gene sequencing of K-ras gene including codon 12, 13 and 61 as well asthe mutation cluster region (MCR) of APC genewas performed.RESULTS K-ras gene mutation frequency inACF, adenoma and carcinoma was 17.6% (6/34), 13.3% (2/ 15), and 14.3% (5/ 35)respectively, showing no difference ( P > 0.05)in K-fas gene mutation among three pathologicprocedures. The K-ras gene mutation inadenoma, carcinoma and 4 ACF restricted incodon 12 (GGT→GAT), but the other 2 mutationsfrom ACF located in codon 13 (GGC→GAC). K-res gene mutation was found more frequently inolder patients and patients with polypoidcancer. No mutation in codon 61 was found in thethree tissue types. Mutation rate of APO gene inadenoma and carcinoma was 22.9% (8/35) and26.7% (4/ 15), which was higher than ACF(2.9%) (P < 0.05). APC gene mutation incarcinoma was not correlated with age ofpatients, location, size and differentiation oftumor.CONCLUSION ACF might be a very earlymorphological lesion in the tumorogenesis ofcolorectal tumor. The morphological feature andgene mutation status was different in ACF andadenoma. ACF is possibly putative"microadenoma" that might be the precursor ofadenoma. In addition, the development of asubgroup of colorectal carcinomas mightundergo a way of "normal epithelium→ ACF→carcinomas".

  10. Novel mutations of PRSS1 gene in patients with pancreatic cancer among Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Kai; LIU Qi-cai; LIN Jian-hua; LIN Xin-hua; ZHUANG Ze-hao; GAO Feng; OU Qi-shui

    2011-01-01

    Background A high mortality rate of pancreatic cancer becomes a bottleneck for further treatment with long-term efficacy. It is urgent to find a new mean to predict the early onset of pancreatic cancer accurately. The authors hypothesized that genetic variants of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene could affect trypsin expression/function and result in abnormal activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), then lead to pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to elaborate some novel mutations of PRSS1 gene in the patients with pancreatic cancer.Methods Totally 156 patients with pancreatic cancer and 220 unrelated individuals as controls were enrolled in this study. The mutations of PRSS1 gene were analyzed by direct sequencing. K-ras Mutation Detection Kit was used to find the general k-ras gene disorder in the pancreatic cancer tissue. Then the clinical data were collected and analyzed simultaneously.Results There were two patients who carried novel mutations which was IVS 3 +157 G>C of PRSS1 gene in peripheral blood specimens and pancreatic cancer tissue. What's more, it was surprising to find a novel complicated mutation of exon 3 in PRSS1 gene (c.409 A>G and c.416 C>T) in another young patient. The complicated mutation made No. 135 and No.137 amino acid transfer from Thr to Ala and Thr to Met respectively. No any mutation was found in the normal controls while no mutations of k-ras gene were detected in the three patients.Conclusion Mutations of PRSS1 gene may be an important factor of pancreatic cancer.

  11. A Common Founder Mutation in the EDA-A1 Gene in X-Linked Hypodontia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurban, Mazen; Michailidis, Eleni; Wajid, Muhammad; Shimomura, Yutaka; Christiano, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Background X-linked recessive hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED; OMIM 305100) is a rare genodermatosis characterized clinically by developmental abnormalities affecting the teeth, hair and sweat glands. Mutations in the EDA-A1 gene have been associated with XLHED. Recently, mutations in the EDA-A1 gene have also been implicated in isolated X-linked recessive hypodontia (XLRH; OMIM 313500). Methods We analyzed the DNA from members of 3 unrelated Pakistani families with XLRH for mutations in the EDA-A1 gene through direct sequencing and performed haplotype analysis. Results We identified a common missense mutation in both families designated c.1091T→C (p.M364T). Haplotype analysis revealed that this is a founder mutation in the 3 families. Conclusion XLHED is a syndrome with variable clinical presentations that contain a spectrum of findings, including hypodontia. We suggest that XLRH should be grouped under XLHED as both share several phenotypic and genotypic similarities. PMID:20628232

  12. De novo mutations in synaptic transmission genes including DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke Steensbjerre

    2014-01-01

    an identifiable causal de novo mutation. Strikingly, 75% of mutations in these probands are predicted to disrupt a protein involved in regulating synaptic transmission, and there is a significant enrichment of de novo mutations in genes in this pathway in the entire cohort as well. These findings emphasize...... an important role for synaptic dysregulation in epileptic encephalopathies, above and beyond that caused by ion channel dysfunction....

  13. Hereditary and acquired p53 gene mutations in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Felix, C A; Nau, M M; Takahashi, T.; Mitsudomi, T.; Chiba, I.; Poplack, D G; Reaman, G H; Cole, D E; Letterio, J J; Whang-Peng, J

    1992-01-01

    The p53 gene was examined in primary lymphoblasts of 25 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia by the RNase protection assay and by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 23 of 25 cases. p53 mutations were found to occur, but at a low frequency (4 of 25). While all four mutations were identified by single strand conformation polymorphism, the comparative sensitivity of RNase protection was 50% (2 of 4). Heterozygosity was retained at mutated codons in 3 of 4 cases. ...

  14. CFTR mutations have no effect on results of ICSI in congenital obstructive azoospermia patients%CFTR突变基因l不影响先天性梗阻性无精子症患者ICSI治疗的成功率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾国华; 吴开俊; 梅骅; 庄广伦

    2001-01-01

    为探讨囊性纤维化跨膜转运调节物(Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator,CFTR)基因突变是否影响先天性梗阻性无精子症患者单精子卵浆内注射(Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection,ICSI)治疗的成功率,本文对3例先天性梗阻性无精子症CFTR突变基因携带者和18例CFTR突变基因非携带者进行了ICSI的治疗.结果表明:先天性梗阻性无精子症CFTR突变基因携带者与CFIR突变基因非携带者ICSI治疗时受精率、卵裂率和妊娠率无显著性差异.结论:CFTR突变基因并不影响先天性梗阻性无精子症患者ICSI治疗的成功率,故这些患者在ICSI治疗前夫妻双方更有必要行CFTR突变基因的筛查.

  15. Consequences of Marfan mutations to expression of fibrillin gene and to the structure of microfibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltonen, L.; Karttunen, L.; Rantamaeki, T. [NPHI, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder which is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1). Over 40 family-specific FBN1 mutations have been identified. We have characterized 18 different heterozygous mutations including amino acid substitutions, premature stop, and splicing defects leading to deletions or one insertion, and one compound heterozygote with two differently mutated FBN1 alleles inherited from his affected parents. To unravel the consequences of FBN1 mutations to the transcription of FBN1 gene, we have measured the steady state levels of mRNA transcribed from the normal and mutated alleles. The missense mutations do not affect the transcription of the allele while the nonsense mutation leads to lower steady state amount of mutated allele. For the dissection of molecular pathogenesis of FBN1 mutations we have performed rotary shadowing of the microfibrils produced by the cell cultures from MFS patients. The cells from the neonatal patients with established mutations produced only disorganized fibrillin aggregates but no clearly defined microfibrils could be detected, suggesting a major role of this gene region coding for exons 24-26 in stabilization and organization of the bead structure of microfibrils. From the cells of a rare compound heterozygote case carrying two different mutations, no detectable microfibrils could be detected whereas the cells of his parents with heterozygous mutations were able to form identifiable but disorganized microfibrils. In the cells of an MFS case caused by a premature stop removing the C-terminus of fibrillin, the microfibril assembly takes place but the appropriate packing of the microfibrils is disturbed suggesting that C-terminae are actually located within the interbead domain of the microfibrils.

  16. CFTR mediates bicarbonate-dependent activation of miR-125b in preimplantation embryo development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Chao Lu; Alvin Chun Hang Ma; Anskar Yu Hung Leung; He Feng Huang; Hsiao Chang Chan; Hui Chen; Kin Lam Fok; Lai Ling Tsang; Mei Kuen Yu; Xiao Hu Zhang; Jing Chen; Xiaohua Jiang; Yiu Wa Chung

    2012-01-01

    Although HCO3-is known to be required for early embryo development,its exact role remains elusive.Here we report that HCO3-acts as an environmental cue in regulating miR-125b expression through CFTR-mediated influx during preimplantation embryo development.The results show that the effect of HCO3-on preimplantation embryo development can be suppressed by interfering the function of a HCO3--conducting channel,CFTR,by a specific inhibitor or gene knockout.Removal of extracellular HCO3-or inhibition of CFTR reduces miR-125b expression in 2 cell-stage mouse embryos.Knockdown of miR-125b mimics the effect of HCO3-removal and CFTR inhibition,while injection of miR-125b precursor reverses it.Downregulation of miR-125b upregulates p53 cascade in both human and mouse embryos.The activation of miR-125b is shown to be mediated by sAC/PKA-dependent nuclear shuttling of NF-KB.These results have revealed a critical role of CFTR in signal transduction linking the environmental HCO3-to activation of miR-125b during preimplantation embryo development and indicated the importance of ion channels in regulation of miRNAs.

  17. Lack of CFTR in skeletal muscle predisposes to muscle wasting and diaphragm muscle pump failure in cystic fibrosis mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Divangahi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF patients often have reduced mass and strength of skeletal muscles, including the diaphragm, the primary muscle of respiration. Here we show that lack of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR plays an intrinsic role in skeletal muscle atrophy and dysfunction. In normal murine and human skeletal muscle, CFTR is expressed and co-localized with sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated proteins. CFTR-deficient myotubes exhibit augmented levels of intracellular calcium after KCl-induced depolarization, and exposure to an inflammatory milieu induces excessive NF-kB translocation and cytokine/chemokine gene upregulation. To determine the effects of an inflammatory environment in vivo, sustained pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was produced, and under these conditions diaphragmatic force-generating capacity is selectively reduced in Cftr(-/- mice. This is associated with exaggerated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression as well as upregulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1 and atrogin-1 involved in muscle atrophy. We conclude that an intrinsic alteration of function is linked to the absence of CFTR from skeletal muscle, leading to dysregulated calcium homeostasis, augmented inflammatory/atrophic gene expression signatures, and increased diaphragmatic weakness during pulmonary infection. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for CFTR in skeletal muscle function that may have major implications for the pathogenesis of cachexia and respiratory muscle pump failure in CF patients.

  18. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L; Witzenrath, Martin; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-03-31

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes pulmonary ventilation-perfusion matching in regional hypoxia, but promotes pulmonary hypertension in global hypoxia. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is a major cause of hypoxemia in cystic fibrosis. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may be critical in HPV, potentially by modulating the response to sphingolipids as mediators of HPV. HPV and ventilation-perfusion mismatch were analyzed in isolated mouse lungs or in vivo. Ca(2+) mobilization and transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) translocation were studied in human pulmonary (PASMCs) or coronary (CASMCs) artery smooth muscle cells. CFTR inhibition or deficiency diminished HPV and aggravated ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In PASMCs, hypoxia caused CFTR to interact with TRPC6, whereas CFTR inhibition attenuated hypoxia-induced TRPC6 translocation to caveolae and Ca(2+) mobilization. Ca(2+) mobilization by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was also attenuated by CFTR inhibition in PASMCs, but amplified in CASMCs. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) blocked HPV, whereas exogenous nSMase caused TRPC6 translocation and vasoconstriction that were blocked by CFTR inhibition. nSMase- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, yet not TRPC6 translocation, were blocked by inhibition or deficiency of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) or antagonism of S1P receptors 2 and 4 (S1P2/4). S1P and nSMase had synergistic effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction that involved TRPC6, phospholipase C, and rho kinase. Our findings demonstrate a central role of CFTR and sphingolipids in HPV. Upon hypoxia, nSMase triggers TRPC6 translocation, which requires its interaction with CFTR. Concomitant SphK1-dependent formation of S1P and activation of S1P2/4 result in phospholipase C-mediated TRPC6 and rho kinase activation, which conjointly trigger vasoconstriction. PMID:25829545

  19. "Deafness –Associated Connexin 26 Gene (GJB2 Mutations in Iranian Population"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hashemzadeh Chaleshtori

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 are associated with autosomal recessive non syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL in many populations. A single mutation, at position 35 (35delG accounts for approximately 30-63% of mutations in white populations with a carrier frequency of 1.5-2.5% in most European, North American and Mediterranean populations. In this study we have investigated the prevalence of the GJB2 gene mutations using direct sequencing in 43 presumed ARNSHL subjects from 34 families in an Iranian population. Eleven different genetic variants were identified. GJB2-related deafness mutations (35delG, 235delC, W24X, R184P and IVS1+1G>A were found in 9 of 34 families (26.5%. The 35delG was the most common mutation found in 5 of 34 families (14.7%. We found one novel variant (–3517G>A in the upstream region to the gene. The mutation frequency found in this study is lower than other ethnic groups with European ancestry, but it is indicating that mutation in GJB2 in Iranian population has contribution to ARNSHL. We have also developed a simple and accurate nested PCR assay to screen the 35delG mutation in 250 unrelated unaffected Iranian individual (controls. No 35delG heterozygous was found in the control population.

  20. Chromosomal Instability, Aneuploidy, and Gene Mutations in Human Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Giaretti

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether in vivo specific gene mutations lead to chromosomal instability (CIN and aneuploidy or viceversa is so far not proven. We hypothesized that aneuploidy among human sporadic colorectal adenomas and KRAS2 and APC mutations were not independent. Additionally, we investigated if 1p34–36 deletions by dual target FISH were associated with aneuploidy. Among 116 adenomas, 29 were DNA aneuploid by flow cytometry (25% and 29 were KRAS2 mutated (25%. KRAS2 mutations were associated with aneuploidy (P=0.02. However, while G–C and G–T transversions were strongly associated with DNA aneuploidy (P=0.007, G–A transitions were not. Within a second series of 61 adenomas, we found, instead, that APC mutational status and aneuploidy by flow cytometry were not associated. However, a statistically significant association was found with specific APC mutations, i.e., occurring in the mutation cluster region (MCR, codons 1200–1500 or downstream (P=0.016. Finally, the correlation of 1p34–36 deletions with flow cytometric and FISH detected aneuploidy was also significant (P=0.01. Specific KRAS2 and APC mutations and loss of genes in the 1p34–36 region appear associated with aneuploidy suggesting that these events are not independent and may cooperate in inducing human sporadic colorectal adenomas. A cause effect relationship between gene mutations and aneuploidy remains, however, to be demonstrated.

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR 3 GENE MUTATIONS IN ACTINIC CHEILITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Annie; Dekker, Nusi; Jordan, Richard C.K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Activating mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene are responsible for several craniosynostosis and chondrodysplasia syndromes as well as some human cancers including bladder and cervical carcinoma. Despite a high frequency in some benign skin disorders, FGFR3 mutations have not been reported in cutaneous malignancies. Actinic cheilitis (AC) is a sun-induced premalignancy affecting the lower lip that frequently progresses to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The objective of this study was to determine if FGFR3 gene mutations are present in AC and SCC of the lip. Study Design DNA was extracted and purified from micro-dissected, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 20 cases of AC and SCC arising in AC. Exons 7, 15, and 17 were PCR amplified and direct sequenced. Results Four novel somatic mutations in the FGFR3 gene were identified: exon 7 mutation 742C→T (amino acid change R248C), exon 15 mutations 1850A→G (D617G) and 1888G→A (V630M), and exon 17 mutation 2056G→A (E686K). Grade of dysplasia did not correlate with presence of mutations. Conclusion The frequency of FGFR3 receptor mutations suggests a functional role for the FGFR3 receptor in the development of epithelial disorders and perhaps a change may contribute to the pathogenesis of some AC and SCC. PMID:19327639

  2. Confirmation of the mitochondrial ND1 gene mutation G3635A as a primary LHON mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juhua; Zhu, Yihua; Tong, Yi; Chen, Lu; Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Dinggou; Qiu, Wentong; Zhuang, Shuliu; Ma, Xu

    2009-08-14

    We report the clinical and genetic characterization of two Chinese LHON families who do not carry the primary LHON-mutations. Mitochondrial genome sequence analysis revealed the presence of a homoplasmic ND1 G3635A mutation in both families. In Family LHON-001, 31 other variants belonging to the East Asian haplogroup R11a were identified and in Family LHON-019, 37 other variants belonging to the East Asian haplogroup D4g were determined. The ND1 G3635A mutation changes the conversed serine110 residue to asparagine. This mutation has been previously described in a single Russian LHON family and has been suggested to contribute to increased LHON expressivity. In addition, a mutation in cytochrome c oxidase subunit II at C7868T (COII/L95F) may act in synergy with G3635A, increasing LHON expressivity in Family LHON-001, which had a higher level of LHON penetrance than Family LHON-019. In summary, the G3635A mutation is confirmed as a rare primary pathogenic mutation for LHON.

  3. The homeobox gene MEIS1 is methylated in BRAFp.V600E mutated colon tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Dihal (Ashwin); A. Boot (Arnoud); E.H.J. van Roon (Eddy); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Fariña-Sarasqueta (Arantza); M. Fiocco (Marta); E.C.M. Zeestraten (Eliane); P.J.K. Kuppen (Peter); H. Morreau (Hans); T. van Wezel (Tom); J.M. Boer (Judith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment of colorectal cancer (CRC) can occur both via gene mutations in tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, as well as via epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation. Site-specific methylation in CRC regulates expression of tumor-associated genes. Right-sided colon tumors more f

  4. An Undergraduate Laboratory Class Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology to Mutate Drosophila Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Vanesa; Chapapas, Holly; Cisneros, Marilyn; Deaton, Carol; Deichmann, Sophia; Gadek, Chauncey; Lovato, TyAnna L.; Chechenova, Maria B.; Guerin, Paul; Cripps, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology is used in the manipulation of genome sequences and gene expression. Because of the ease and rapidity with which genes can be mutated using CRISPR/Cas9, we sought to determine if a single-semester undergraduate class could be successfully taught, wherein students isolate mutants for specific genes using…

  5. [Mutational analysis of the MECP2 gene by direct sequencing in Hungarian patients with Rett syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karteszi, J.; Hollody, K.; Bene, J.; Morava, E.; Hadzsiev, K.; Czako, M.; Melegh, B.; Kosztolanyi, G.Y.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rett syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by loss of acquired skills and stereotypical hand movements. Mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 have been identified as cause of Rett syndrome in 1999. AIM: The authors initialized mutation

  6. Mutation of the BRAF Genes in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin HUANG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available BRAF mutations have been found to be a driver mutation and maybe a therapy target in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. This article reviews the current understanding of BRAF gene, its structure, expression, the signal pathway, as well as its relationship with cancer especially the targeted therapies for non-small cell lung cancer.

  7. Association Between Factor V Leiden Gene Mutation and Systemic Involvement in Behcet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Cebeci

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Behcet’s disease is a chronic, multisystem inflammatory disease of unknown origin characterized mainly by recurrent oral aphthous ulceration, genital ulceration, skin lesions and uveitis. Thrombophilic defects, such as factor V Leiden (FVL gene mutation may play a role in the pathogenesis of thrombosis in Behcet’s disease (BD. Recently, an association of FVL mutation with thrombosis and ocular involvement in BD has been reported. The object of this present study was to investigate an association between systemic involvement and the presence of the FVL gene mutation in BD patients.Material and Method: One-hundred six patients with BD and 70 healthy subjects were included in the study. FVL gene mutation was determined by polymerase chain reaction.Results: The FVL mutation was detected in 20.8% of the BD patients (22/106 compared with 8.5% of the control subjects (6/71. The difference was not statistically significant (p=0.027. Systemic involvement were observed in 45 (42.4% patients. No statistically significant association was found between patients with systemic involvement (26.7% and without systemic involvement (16.4% with respect to FVL gene mutation (p=0.197. All of the patients and controls tested positive were heterozygous for the mutation.Conclusion: Further studies in larger patients series with systemic involvement are needed to determine the prevalence of this mutation in BD with systemic involvement.

  8. A novel mutation of the fibrillin-1 gene in a newborn with severe Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochilas, L; Gundogan, F; Atalay, M; Bliss, J M; Vatta, M; Pena, L S; Abuelo, D

    2008-04-01

    Marfan syndrome in the neonatal age represents a severe early and commonly lethal manifestation of Marfan syndrome, which is caused by mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1). Here, we report a newborn with severe Marfan syndrome and a novel mutation involving cysteine substitution within one of the epidermal growth factor-like domains of FBN1.

  9. Mutations in genes encoding subunits of RNA polymerases I and III cause Treacher Collins syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwerse, J.G.; Dixon, J.; Seland, S.; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; Haeringen, A. van; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Peters, D.J.; Boers, A.C.; Daumer-Haas, C.; Maiwald, R.; Zweier, C.; Kerr, B.; Cobo, A.M.; Toral, J.F.; Hoogeboom, A.J.M.; Lohmann, D.R.; Hehr, U.; Dixon, M.J.; Breuning, M.H.; Wieczorek, D.

    2011-01-01

    We identified a deletion of a gene encoding a subunit of RNA polymerases I and III, POLR1D, in an individual with Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). Subsequently, we detected 20 additional heterozygous mutations of POLR1D in 252 individuals with TCS. Furthermore, we discovered mutations in both allele

  10. Detection of KRAS gene mutation and its clinical significance in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晨

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical significance of KRAS mutation detection in colorectal adenocarcinoma. Methods Paraffin-embedded tissue specimens were obtained from 440 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. The genomic DNA was extracted. Mutations of exon 2 of KRAS gene were examined by PCR and

  11. A mutational hot spot in the KCNQ4 gene responsible for autosomal dominant hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, G. van; Coucke, P.J.; Akita, J.; Fransen, E.; Abe, S.; Leenheer, E. de; Huygen, P.L.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Usami, S.

    2002-01-01

    Several different mutations in the KCNQ4 K+ channel gene are responsible for autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing impairment (DFNA2). Here we describe two additional families originating from Europe and Japan with a KCNQ4 missense mutation (W276S) that was previously found in one European family.

  12. A Novel Elastin Gene Mutation in a Vietnamese Patient with Cutis Laxa

    OpenAIRE

    Siefring, Mark L.; Lawrence, Elizabeth C.; Nguyen, Tom C.; Lu, Doanh; Pham, Giang; Lorenchick, Christa; Levine, Kara L.; Urban, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    We report a 3-year-old girl from Vietnam with severe congenital cutis laxa, no cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological or visceral involvement and no family history of cutis laxa. Mutational analysis of the elastin (ELN) gene identified heterozygosity for a previously unreported, de novo c.2184delT mutation in exon 30, not present in either parent.

  13. Genetic basis of cystinosis in Tunisian patients: Identification of novel mutation in CTNS gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa Chkioua

    2015-09-01

    This study expands the mutational and population spectrum of NC, representing the first molecular diagnosis of NC in Tunisian population. The mutation screening of the CTNS gene was used for prenatal diagnosis to prevent and/or limit this inheritable disease in our country where the families are particularly large and have a high rate of consanguinity.

  14. Nonsense mutations in the human β-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human α- and β-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with β0-thalassemia have shown that for both the β-17 and the β-39 mutations less than normal levels of β-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human β-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned β-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human β-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation

  15. Red blood cell PK deficiency: An update of PK-LR gene mutation database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, Giulia; De Bonis, Maria; Minucci, Angelo; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2016-03-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is known as being the most common cause of chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA). Clinical PK deficiency is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, that can segregate neither in homozygous or in a compound heterozygous modality, respectively. Two PK genes are present in mammals: the pyruvate kinase liver and red blood cells (PK-LR) and the pyruvate kinase muscle (PK-M), of which only the first encodes for the isoenzymes normally expressed in the red blood cells (R-type) and in the liver (L-type). Several reports have been published describing a large variety of genetic defects in PK-LR gene associated to CNSHA. Herein, we present a review of about 250 published mutations and six polymorphisms in PK-LR gene with the corresponding clinical and molecular data. We consulted the PubMed website for searching mutations and papers, along with two main databases: the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD, https://grenada.lumc.nl/LOVD2/mendelian_genes/home.php?select_db=PKLR) and Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD, http://www.hgmd.cf.ac.uk/ac/gene.php?gene=PKLR) for selecting, reviewing and listing the annotated PK-LR gene mutations present in literature. This paper is aimed to provide useful information to clinicians and laboratory professionals regarding overall reported PK-LR gene mutations, also giving the opportunity to harmonize data regarding PK-deficient individuals. PMID:26832193

  16. KRAS Gene Mutations and Gender Differences in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy I. Vodolazhskiy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and spectrum of KRAS mutations in men and women with colorectal cancer (CRC, and an impact of KRAS-mutation status on the clinical and morphological features of CRC. The study included 303 patients (168/55.4% women and 135/44.6% men with CRC T2-4N0-2M0-1. We defined 7 KRAS SNP-mutations (G12D, G12A, G12R, G12C, G12S, G12V and G13D located within codons 12 and 13 using Bio-Rad real-time thermal cyclers CFX96 and Real-Time-PCR- KRAS-7M Kit. The frequency of KRAS mutations was 35.6% in the CRC patients with a predominant presence of G>A transitions. The KRAS codon 12 and 13 mutations are predictive of poor prognosis The KRAS-mutated CRC has clinical features in view of the gender differences. KRAS-mutation status is a promising predictive biomarker of personalized treatment.

  17. First report of c. 1499G>C mutation in a 6-month-child with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Sahami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, more than 1800 mutations identified in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. In this case report, we presented first report of c. 1499G>C mutation in a 6-month-old girl with cystic fibrosis (CF diagnosis. A 6-month-old girl with weakness and meconium Ileus referred to the pediatric clinic in Ilam, in the west of Iran. Patient′s skin was dark and suffered from bronchiectasis. The sweat test was performed, and the concentration of chloride and sodium in patient′s sweat was 130-135 mmol/L and 125-128 mmol/L, respectively. The exon 10 mutation analysis of a CF patient was performed. CFTR mutation analysis revealed the identification of 2 mutations in patient, the mutations were p.F508del (ΔF508 and c. 1499G>C (cd500, respectively. The mutation c. 1499G>C (cd500 were found for the first time in the world. Assessing this mutation in future study and genetic investigation is recommended.

  18. Dystrophin gene mutation location and the risk of cognitive impairment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Taylor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A significant component of the variation in cognitive disability that is observed in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is known to be under genetic regulation. In this study we report correlations between standardised measures of intelligence and mutational class, mutation size, mutation location and the involvement of dystrophin isoforms. METHODS AND RESULTS: Sixty two male subjects were recruited as part of a study of the cognitive spectrum in boys with DMD conducted at the Sydney Children's Hospital (SCH. All 62 children received neuropsychological testing from a single clinical psychologist and had a defined dystrophin gene (DMD mutation; including DMD gene deletions, duplications and DNA point mutations. Full Scale Intelligence Quotients (FSIQ in unrelated subjects with the same mutation were found to be highly correlated (r = 0.83, p = 0.0008, in contrast to results in previous publications. In 58 cases (94% it was possible to definitively assign a mutation as affecting one or more dystrophin isoforms. A strong association between the risk of cognitive disability and the involvement of groups of DMD isoforms was found. In particular, improvements in the correlation of FSIQ with mutation location were identified when a new classification system for mutations affecting the Dp140 isoform was implemented. SIGNIFICANCE: These data represent one of the largest studies of FSIQ and mutational data in DMD patients and is among the first to report on a DMD cohort which has had both comprehensive mutational analysis and FSIQ testing through a single referral centre. The correlation between FSIQ results with the location of the dystrophin gene mutation suggests that the risk of cognitive deficit is a result of the cumulative loss of central nervous system (CNS expressed dystrophin isoforms, and that correct classification of isoform involvement results in improved estimates of risk.

  19. HFE Gene Mutation Among Turkish Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Erdem Akbal; Fahri Güneş; Mehmet Aşık; Mustafa Özbek; Kemal Üreten; Mustafa Altınbaş

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disease with autosomal recessive trait. Recent studies demonstrated the importance of C282Y gene mutation in the aetiology of HH. Free iron accumulating in pancreas deteriorates insulin secretion and synthesis which can lead to insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in patients with HH. There has been no study determining the prevalence of haemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutations and HH in diabetic patients...

  20. Phenotypic heterogeneity in British patients with a founder mutation in the FHL1 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkozy, Anna; Windpassinger, Christian; Hudson, Judith; Dougan, Charlotte F; Lecky, Bryan; Hilton-Jones, David; Eagle, Michelle; Charlton, Richard; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) gene, which encodes a 280-amino-acid protein containing four LIM domains and a single zinc-finger domain in the N-terminal region, have been associated with a broad clinical spectrum of X-linked muscle diseases encompassing a variety of different phenotypes. Patients might present with a scapuloperoneal myopathy, a myopathy with postural muscle atrophy and generalized hypertrophy, an Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, or an early onset myopathy with reducing bodies. It has been proposed that the phenotypic variability is related to the position of the mutation within the FHL1 gene. Here, we report on three British families with a heterogeneous clinical presentation segregating a single FHL1 gene mutation and haplotype, suggesting that this represents a founder mutation. The underlying FHL1 gene mutation was detected by direct sequencing and the founder effect was verified by haplotype analysis of the FHL1 gene locus. A 3-bp insertion mutation (p.Phe127_Thr128insIle) within the second LIM domain of the FHL1 gene was identified in all available affected family members of the three families. Haplotype analysis of the FHL1 region on Xq26 revealed that the families shared a common haplotype. The p.Phe127_Thr128insIle mutation in the FHL1 gene therefore appears to be a British founder mutation and FHL1 gene screening, in particular of exon 6, should therefore be indicated in British patients with a broad phenotypic spectrum of X-linked muscle diseases. PMID:21629301

  1. Analysis of hemochromatosis gene mutations in 52 consecutive patients with polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; de Matteis, Giovanna; Federici, Francesca; Solero, Pietro; Veneri, Dino

    2004-01-01

    A literature review reports increased erythrocyte indices [hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), MCH concentration] in subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). We, therefore, screened 52 consecutive patients with polycythemia vera for 12 HH gene mutations, comparing iron status and red cell parameters between patients positive or negative for HH gene mutations. Our results support the evidence that there is no association between these two conditions.

  2. Adverse events in families with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy and mutations in the MYBPC3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrke Stephanie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in MYBPC3 encoding myosin binding protein C belong to the most frequent causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM and may also lead to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. MYBPC3 mutations initially were considered to cause a benign form of HCM. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical outcome of patients and their relatives with 18 different MYBPC3 mutations. Methods 87 patients with HCM and 71 patients with DCM were screened for MYBPC3 mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing. Close relatives of mutation carriers were genotyped for the respective mutation. Relatives with mutation were then evaluated by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. A detailed family history regarding adverse clinical events was recorded. Results In 16 HCM (18.4% and two DCM (2.8% index patients a mutation was detected. Seven mutations were novel. Mutation carriers exhibited no additional mutations in genes MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3, ACTC and TPM1. Including relatives of twelve families, a total number of 42 mutation carriers was identified of which eleven (26.2% had at least one adverse event. Considering the twelve families and six single patients with mutations, 45 individuals with cardiomyopathy and nine with borderline phenotype were identified. Among the 45 patients, 23 (51.1% suffered from an adverse event. In eleven patients of seven families an unexplained sudden death was reported at the age between 13 and 67 years. Stroke or a transient ischemic attack occurred in six patients of five families. At least one adverse event occurred in eleven of twelve families. Conclusion MYBPC3 mutations can be associated with cardiac events such as progressive heart failure, stroke and sudden death even at younger age. Therefore, patients with MYBPC3 mutations require thorough clinical risk assessment.

  3. First report of a de novo germline mutation in the MLH1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rein P Stulp; Yvonne J Vos; Bart Mol; Arend Karrenbeld; Monique de Raad; Huub JC van der Mijle; Rolf H Sijmons

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC)is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with colorectal and endometrial cancer and a range of other tumor types. Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, particularly MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6, underlie this disorder. The vast majority of these HNPCC-associated mutations have been proven,or assumed, given the family history of cancer, to be transmitted through several generations. To the best of our knowledge, only a single case of a de novo germline MMR gene mutation (in MSH2) has been reported till now. Here, we report a patient with a de novo mutation in MLH1. We identified a MLH1 Q701X truncating mutation in the blood lymphocytes of a male who had been diagnosed with rectal cancer at the age of 35. His family history of cancer was negative for the first- and second-degree relatives. The mutation could not be detected in the patient's parents and sibling and paternity was confirmed with a set of highly polymorphic markers. Non-penetrance and small family size is the common explanation of verified negative family histories of cancer in patients with a germline MMR gene mutation. However, in addition to some cases explained by non-paternity, de novo germline mutations should be considered as a possible explanation as well. As guidelines that stress not to restrict MMR gene mutation testing to patients with a positive family history are more widely introduced, more cases of de novo MMR gene germline mutations may be revealed.

  4. Utilization of Gene Mapping and Candidate Gene Mutation Screening for Diagnosing Clinically Equivocal Conditions:A Norrie Disease Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasiliki Chini; Danai Stambouli; Florina Mihaela Nedelea; George Alexandru Filipescu; Diana Mina; Marios Kambouris; Hatem El-Shanti

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis was requested for an undiagnosed eye disease showing X-linked inheritance in a family. No medical records existed for the affected family members..Mapping of the X chromosome and candidate gene mutation screening i-dentified a c.C267A[p.F89L] mutation in NPD previously de-scribed as possibly causing Norrie disease..The detection of the c.C267A[p.F89L] variant in another unrelated family con-firms the pathogenic nature of the mutation for the Norrie dis-ease phenotype. Gene mapping, haplotype analysis, and can-didate gene screening have been previously utilized in research applications but were applied here in a diagnostic setting due to the scarcity of available clinical information..The clinical diagnosis and mutation identification were critical for provid-ing proper genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for this family.

  5. A little CFTR goes a long way: CFTR-dependent sweat secretion from G551D and R117H-5T cystic fibrosis subjects taking ivacaftor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Char

    Full Text Available To determine if oral dosing with the CFTR-potentiator ivacaftor (VX-770, Kalydeco improves CFTR-dependent sweating in CF subjects carrying G551D or R117H-5T mutations, we optically measured sweat secretion from 32-143 individually identified glands in each of 8 CF subjects; 6 F508del/G551D, one G551D/R117H-5T, and one I507del/R117H-5T. Two subjects were tested only (- ivacaftor, 3 only (+ ivacaftor and 3 (+/- ivacaftor (1-5 tests per condition. The total number of gland measurements was 852 (- ivacaftor and 906 (+ ivacaftor. A healthy control was tested 4 times (51 glands. For each gland we measured both CFTR-independent (M-sweat and CFTR-dependent (C-sweat; C-sweat was stimulated with a β-adrenergic cocktail that elevated [cAMP]i while blocking muscarinic receptors. Absent ivacaftor, almost all CF glands produced M-sweat on all tests, but only 1/593 glands produced C-sweat (10 tests, 5 subjects. By contrast, 6/6 subjects (113/342 glands produced C-sweat in the (+ ivacaftor condition, but with large inter-subject differences; 3-74% of glands responded with C/M sweat ratios 0.04%-2.57% of the average WT ratio of 0.265. Sweat volume losses cause proportionally larger underestimates of CFTR function at lower sweat rates. The losses were reduced by measuring C/M ratios in 12 glands from each subject that had the highest M-sweat rates. Remaining losses were estimated from single channel data and used to correct the C/M ratios, giving estimates of CFTR function (+ ivacaftor  = 1.6%-7.7% of the WT average. These estimates are in accord with single channel data and transcript analysis, and suggest that significant clinical benefit can be produced by low levels of CFTR function.

  6. Mutational Analysis of the TYR and OCA2 Genes in Four Chinese Families with Oculocutaneous Albinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    Full Text Available Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA is an autosomal recessive disorder. The most common type OCA1 and OCA2 are caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the tyrosinase gene (TYR and OCA2 gene, respectively.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism in four Chinese families.Four non-consanguineous OCA families were included in the study. The TYR and OCA2 genes of all individuals were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, sequenced and compared with a reference database.Four patients with a diagnosis of oculocutaneous albinism, presented with milky skin, white or light brown hair and nystagmus. Genetic analyses demonstrated that patient A was compound heterozygous for c.1037-7T.A, c.1037-10_11delTT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene; patient B was heterozygous for c.593C>T and c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene, patients C and D were compound heterozygous mutations in the TYR gene (c.549_550delGT and c.896G>A, c.832C>T and c.985T>C, respectively. The heterozygous c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG alleles in the TYR gene were two novel mutations. Interestingly, heterozygous members in these pedigrees who carried c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene or c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene presented with blond or brown hair and pale skin, but no ocular disorders when they were born; the skin of these patients accumulated pigment over time and with sun exposure.This study expands the mutation spectrum of oculocutaneous albinism. It is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, to report that c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene were associated with OCA. The two mutations (c.1114delG in the TYR gene and c.1426A>G in the OCA2 gene may be responsible for partial clinical manifestations of OCA.

  7. Three novel PHEX gene mutations in four Chinese families with X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Qing-lin [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Xu, Jia [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu province 215000 (China); Zhang, Zeng [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); He, Jin-wei [Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Lu, Lian-song [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu province 215000 (China); Fu, Wen-zhen [Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Zhang, Zhen-lin, E-mail: zzl2002@medmail.com.cn [Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In our study, all of the patients were of Han Chinese ethnicity, which were rarely reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified three novel PHEX gene mutations in four unrelated families with XLH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the relationship between the phenotype and genotype of the PHEX gene was not invariant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that two PHEX gene sites, p.534 and p.731, were conserved. -- Abstract: Background: X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), the most common form of inherited rickets, is a dominant disorder that is characterized by renal phosphate wasting with hypophosphatemia, abnormal bone mineralization, short stature, and rachitic manifestations. The related gene with inactivating mutations associated with XLH has been identified as PHEX, which is a phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome. In this study, a variety of PHEX mutations were identified in four Chinese families with XLH. Methods: We investigated four unrelated Chinese families who exhibited typical features of XLH by using PCR to analyze mutations that were then sequenced. The laboratory and radiological investigations were conducted simultaneously. Results: Three novel mutations were found in these four families: one frameshift mutation, c.2033dupT in exon 20, resulting in p.T679H; one nonsense mutation, c.1294A > T in exon 11, resulting in p.K432X; and one missense mutation, c.2192T > C in exon 22, resulting in p.F731S. Conclusions: We found that the PHEX gene mutations were responsible for XLH in these Chinese families. Our findings are useful for understanding the genetic basis of Chinese patients with XLH.

  8. New mutation detection system of repackaged λ gt11 DNA containing LacZ gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong; CAO Jia; WU Tao; YANG Lu-jun; SUN Hua-ming; YANG Ming-jie; QIAN Ping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To establish a reformative detection system which has sound ability of providing information on molecular mutagenesis spectrum and the specificity of detection system of repackaged λ phage.Methods: LacZ gene, as mutational target gene and reporter gene, was applied into the detection system.The λ gt11 DNA treated with ENU (1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea) and 9-AA (9-aminoacridine) was repackaged in vitro. The packaged λ phage was then grown in E. coli Y1090 on a selective plate containing X-gel and IPTG. The survival and mutation frequencies were determined by counting the clear-plaque and blue-plaque,and the molecular mutation mechanism was studied by extracting and sequencing the LacZ gene of mutants.Results: The survival of repackaged λ phages treated with 9-AA and ENU apparently decreased in consistent dose-dependence. The mutation frequency of clear-plaque mutants showed a linear dose-related increase. The predominant mutations induced by 9-AA were ±1 frameshift mutation, and 9-AA induced -1 frameshift was much more effective than induced + 1 frameshift. 9-AA also induced substitutions with transversions more common. ENU-induced mutations were chiefly occurred at G: C sites. Substitutions induced by ENU were mainly G: C→A: T, G: C→C: G and A: T→T: A transversion. Conclusion: Mutation detection system of λgt11 DNA containing LacZ gene is proven better than that of λDNA without LacZ gene. The combination of survival, mutant frequency and sequence spectrum can not only increase the sensitivity and specificity of the new method, but also provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of mutation for ultimate extrapolation to risk assessment.

  9. NMD Microarray Analysis for Rapid Genome-Wide Screen of Mutated Genes in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Wolf

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene mutations play a critical role in cancer development and progression, and their identification offers possibilities for accurate diagnostics and therapeutic targeting. Finding genes undergoing mutations is challenging and slow, even in the post-genomic era. A new approach was recently developed by Noensie and Dietz to prioritize and focus the search, making use of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD inhibition and microarray analysis (NMD microarrays in the identification of transcripts containing nonsense mutations. We combined NMD microarrays with array-based CGH (comparative genomic hybridization in order to identify inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in cancer. Such a “mutatomics” screening of prostate cancer cell lines led to the identification of inactivating mutations in the EPHB2 gene. Up to 8% of metastatic uncultured prostate cancers also showed mutations of this gene whose loss of function may confer loss of tissue architecture. NMD microarray analysis could turn out to be a powerful research method to identify novel mutated genes in cancer cell lines, providing targets that could then be further investigated for their clinical relevance and therapeutic potential.

  10. Rescue of Murine F508del CFTR Activity in Native Intestine by Low Temperature and Proteasome Inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Wilke (Martina); A.G. Bot (Alice); H. Jorna (Huub); B.J. Scholte (Bob); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMost patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) carry at least one allele with the F508del mutation, resulting in a CFTR chloride channel protein with a processing, gating and stability defect, but with substantial residual activity when correctly sorted to the apical membranes of epithelial cel

  11. Identification of 28 novel mutations in the Bardet-Biedl syndrome genes: the burden of private mutations in an extensively heterogeneous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jean; Stoetzel, C; Vincent, M C; Leitch, C C; Laurier, V; Danse, J M; Hellé, S; Marion, V; Bennouna-Greene, V; Vicaire, S; Megarbane, A; Kaplan, J; Drouin-Garraud, V; Hamdani, M; Sigaudy, S; Francannet, C; Roume, J; Bitoun, P; Goldenberg, A; Philip, N; Odent, S; Green, J; Cossée, M; Davis, E E; Katsanis, N; Bonneau, D; Verloes, A; Poch, O; Mandel, J L; Dollfus, H

    2010-03-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), an emblematic disease in the rapidly evolving field of ciliopathies, is characterized by pleiotropic clinical features and extensive genetic heterogeneity. To date, 14 BBS genes have been identified, 3 of which have been found mutated only in a single BBS family each (BBS11/TRIM32, BBS13/MKS1 and BBS14/MKS4/NPHP6). Previous reports of systematic mutation detection in large cohorts of BBS families (n > 90) have dealt only with a single gene, or at most small subsets of the known BBS genes. Here we report extensive analysis of a cohort of 174 BBS families for 12/14 genes, leading to the identification of 28 novel mutations. Two pathogenic mutations in a single gene have been found in 117 families, and a single heterozygous mutation in 17 families (of which 8 involve the BBS1 recurrent mutation, M390R). We confirm that BBS1 and BBS10 are the most frequently mutated genes, followed by BBS12. No mutations have been found in BBS11/TRIM32, the identification of which as a BBS gene only relies on a single missense mutation in a single consanguineous family. While a third variant allele has been observed in a few families, they are in most cases missenses of uncertain pathogenicity, contrasting with the type of mutations observed as two alleles in a single gene. We discuss the various strategies for diagnostic mutation detection, including homozygosity mapping and targeted arrays for the detection of previously reported mutations. PMID:20177705

  12. Identification of 28 novel mutations in the Bardet–Biedl syndrome genes: the burden of private mutations in an extensively heterogeneous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoetzel, C.; Vincent, M. C.; Leitch, C. C.; Laurier, V.; Danse, J. M.; Hellé, S.; Marion, V.; Bennouna-Greene, V.; Vicaire, S.; Megarbane, A.; Kaplan, J.; Drouin-Garraud, V.; Hamdani, M.; Sigaudy, S.; Francannet, C.; Roume, J.; Bitoun, P.; Goldenberg, A.; Philip, N.; Odent, S.; Green, J.; Cossée, M.; Davis, E. E.; Katsanis, N.; Bonneau, D.; Verloes, A.; Poch, O.; Mandel, J. L.; Dollfus, H.

    2013-01-01

    Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS), an emblematic disease in the rapidly evolving field of ciliopathies, is characterized by pleiotropic clinical features and extensive genetic heterogeneity. To date, 14 BBS genes have been identified, 3 of which have been found mutated only in a single BBS family each (BBS11/TRIM32, BBS13/MKS1 and BBS14/MKS4/NPHP6). Previous reports of systematic mutation detection in large cohorts of BBS families (n > 90) have dealt only with a single gene, or at most small subsets of the known BBS genes. Here we report extensive analysis of a cohort of 174 BBS families for 12/14 genes, leading to the identification of 28 novel mutations. Two pathogenic mutations in a single gene have been found in 117 families, and a single heterozygous mutation in 17 families (of which 8 involve the BBS1 recurrent mutation, M390R). We confirm that BBS1 and BBS10 are the most frequently mutated genes, followed by BBS12. No mutations have been found in BBS11/TRIM32, the identification of which as a BBS gene only relies on a single missense mutation in a single consanguineous family. While a third variant allele has been observed in a few families, they are in most cases missenses of uncertain pathogenicity, contrasting with the type of mutations observed as two alleles in a single gene. We discuss the various strategies for diagnostic mutation detection, including homozygosity mapping and targeted arrays for the detection of previously reported mutations. PMID:20177705

  13. Meta-analysis of clinical characteristics of 299 carriers of LMNA gene mutations : do lamin A/C mutations portend a high risk of sudden death?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogt, WG; van der Kooi, AJ; van Tintelen, JP; Bonne, G; Ben Yaou, R; Duboc, D; Rossenbacker, T; Heidbuchel, H; de Visser, M; Crijns, HJGM; Pinto, YM; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated common clinical characteristics of patients with lamin A/C gene mutations that cause either isolated dilated cardiornyopathy or dilated cardiomyopathy in association with skeletal muscular dystrophy. We pooled clinical data of all published carriers of lamin A/C gene mutations a

  14. Frequent mutation of histone-modifying genes in non-Hodgkin lymphoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Nature article, Morin et al. uncovered a novel role for chromatin modification in driving the progression of two non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs), follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Through DNA and RNA sequencing of 117 tumor samples and 10 assorted cell lines, the authors identified and validated 109 genes with multiple mutations in these B-cell NHLs. Of the 109 genes, several genes not previously linked to lymphoma demonstrated positive selection for mutation including two genes involved in histone modification, MLL2 and MEF2B.

  15. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation. PMID:17960613

  16. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielly Beraldo dos Santos Silva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51 which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candidaspecies known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei - A497C (Y166S and G1570A (G524R. The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. kruseidemands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates.

  17. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-03-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candida species known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei--A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. krusei demands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates. PMID:26982177

  18. Expression and clinical significance of genes frequently mutated in small cell lung cancers defined by whole exome/RNA sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Iwakawa, Reika; Kohno, Takashi; Totoki, Yasushi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Mimaki, Sachiyo; Tsuta, Koji; NARITA, Yoshitaka; Nishikawa, Ryo; Noguchi, Masayuki; Harris, Curtis C.; Robles, Ana I.; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We identified the TMEM132D, SPTA1 and VPS13B genes as frequently mutated and expressed in any progression stage of SCLC, in addition to known tumor suppressor genes, TP53, RB1 and PTEN. These genes could be involved in SCLC development, and their mutated gene products will be promising therapeutic targets in SCLC patients.

  19. Mutation analysis of cathepsin C gene in a Chinese patient with pre-pubertal periodontitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yuan; BAI Xiao-wen; SONG Shu-juan; GE Li-hong; CAO Cai-fang

    2005-01-01

    @@ Pre-pubertal periodontitis (PPP) is a rare and rapidly progressive form of early onset periodontitis resulting in premature tooth loss of primary and permanent dentitions. Mutations in cathepsin C (CTSC) gene have been found in patients with pre-pubertal periodontitis and Papillon-Lefevre syndrome which also characterized with severe periodontitis and palmoplantar hyperkera-tosis.1-3 To date, more than 40 mutations of CTSC gene have been identified in ethnically diverse people worldwide.4 However, there is no such genetic analysis in China. In the present study, we report the mutation analysis of a Chinese patient with PPP.

  20. Antithrombin gene Arg197Stop mutation-associated venous sinus thrombosis in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ang Li; Dexin Wang; Qiming Xue; Baoen Wang; Tianhui Liu; Zhandong Liu; Jimei Li; Chunling Zhang; Jun Chen; Jinmei Sun; YanfeiHan; Lili Wang

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to elucidate the genetic correlation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis caused by a hereditary antithrombin deficiency in a Chinese family, at the genetic and protein levels. A nonsense mutation from C to T on locus 6431 in exon 3B of the antithrombin gene was observed,leading to an arginine (CGA) to stop codon (TGA) change in the protein. This is the first report of this mutation in China. Ineffective heparin therapy in the propositus patient is associated with a lack of heparin binding sites after antithrombin gene mutation. Characteristic low intracranial pressure in the acute phase might be specific to this patient with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

  1. Cx32 gene mutation associated with X-linked recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy that maps to Xq13 is X-linked dominant, or X-linked intermediate. Heterozygous females are more mildly affected than hemizygous males. It has been known that this type of CMT is caused by mutations of connexin32 (Cx32) gene. A typical X-linked recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth Chinese family was analyzed with single strand conformation polymorphism method. A Cx32 gene point mutation, Arg15Gln, in exon 2 was identified in all affected family members, suggesting that this mutation is responsible for the CMT incidence of this family.

  2. Tyrosinase gene mutations in the Chinese Han population with OCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Kong, Xiang Dong; Shi, Hui Rong; Wu, Qing Hua; Jiang, Miao

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive genetic disorder that affects melanin synthesis. OCA results in reduced or absent pigmentation in the hair, skin and eyes. Type 1 OCA (OCA1) is the result of tyrosinase (TYR) gene mutations and is a severe disease type. This study investigated TYR mutations in a Chinese cohort with OCA1. This study included two parts: patient genetic study and prenatal genetic diagnosis. A total of 30 OCA1 patients were subjected to TYR gene mutation analysis. Ten pedigrees were included for prenatal genetic diagnosis. A total of 100 unrelated healthy Chinese individuals were genotyped for controls. The coding sequence and the intron/exon junctions of TYR were analysed by bidirectional DNA sequencing. In this study, 20 mutations were identified, four of which were novel. Of these 30 OCA1 patients, 25 patients were TYR compound heterozygous; two patients carried homozygous TYR mutations; and three were heterozygous. Among the ten prenatally genotyped fetuses, three fetuses carried compound heterozygous mutations and seven carried no mutation or only one mutant allele of TYR and appeared normal at birth. In conclusion, we identified four novel TYR mutations and showed that molecular-based prenatal screening to detect TYR mutations in a fetus at risk for OCA1 provided essential information for genetic counselling of couples at risk. PMID:25577957

  3. A high frequency of distinct ATM gene mutations in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J.; Teraoka, S.; Concannon, P. [Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The clinical features of the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) include a progressive cerebellar ataxia, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and an increased susceptibility to malignancies. Epidemiological studies have suggested that AT heterozygotes may also be at increased risk for malignancy, possibly as a consequence of radiation exposure. A gene mutated in AT patients (ATM) has recently been isolated, making mutation screening in both patients and the general population possible. Because of the relatively large size of the ATM gene, the design of screening programs will depend on the types and distribution of mutations in the general population. In this report, we describe 30 mutations identified in a panel of unrelated AT patients and controls. Twenty-five of the 30 were distinct, and most patients were compound heterozygotes. The most frequently detected mutation was found in three different families and had previously been reported in five others. This corresponds to a frequency of 8% of all reported ATM mutations. Twenty-two of the alterations observed would be predicted to lead to protein truncation at sites scattered throughout the molecule. Two fibroblast cell lines, which displayed normal responses to ionizing radiation, also proved to be heterozygous for truncation mutations of ATM. These observations suggest that the carrier frequency of ATM mutations may be sufficiently high to make population screening practical. However, such screening may need to be done prospectively, that is, by searching for new mutations rather than by screening for just those already identified in AT families. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. A novel mutation in the DSPP gene associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S-K; Lee, K-E; Jeon, D; Lee, G; Lee, H; Shin, C-U; Jung, Y-J; Lee, S-H; Hahn, S-H; Kim, J-W

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary dentin defects are divided into dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia. We identified a family segregating severe dentinogenesis imperfecta. The kindred spanned four generations and showed an autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance. The proband was a child presenting with a severely affected primary dentition, with wide-open pulp chambers and multiple pulp exposures, resembling a DGI type III (DGI-III) pattern. We hypothesized that a mutation in the DSPP gene is responsible for this severe phenotype. Mutational analyses revealed a novel mutation (c.53T>A, p.V18D) near the intron-exon boundary in the third exon of the DSPP gene. We analyzed the effect of the mutation by means of an in vitro splicing assay, which revealed that the mutation did not affect pre-mRNA splicing. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the nature of the disease and the development of an appropriate treatment strategy.

  5. [Some behavioral features in Drosophila melanogaster lines carrying a flamenco gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subocheva, E A; Romanova, L G; Romanova, N I; Kim, A I

    2001-11-01

    Olfactory sensitivity and locomotor activity was assayed in Drosophila melanogaster strains carrying a mutation of the flamenco gene, which controls transposition of the mobile genetic element 4 (MGE4) retrotransposon the gypsy mobile element. A change in olfactory sensitivity was detected. The reaction to the odor of acetic acid was inverted in flies of the mutator strain (MS), which carried the flam mutation and active MGE4 copies and were characterized by genetic instability. Flies of the genetically unstable strains displayed a lower locomotor activity. The behavioral changes in MS flies can be explained by the pleiotropic effect of the flam mutation or by insertion mutations which arise in behavior genes as a result of genome destabilization by MGE4. PMID:11771305

  6. Clinical impact of recurrently mutated genes on lymphoma diagnostics: state-of-the-art and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenquist, Richard; Rosenwald, Andreas; Du, Ming-Qing; Gaidano, Gianluca; Groenen, Patricia; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Ghia, Paolo; Gaulard, Philippe; Campo, Elias; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2016-09-01

    Similar to the inherent clinical heterogeneity of most, if not all, lymphoma entities, the genetic landscape of these tumors is markedly complex in the majority of cases, with a rapidly growing list of recurrently mutated genes discovered in recent years by next-generation sequencing technology. Whilst a few genes have been implied to have diagnostic, prognostic and even predictive impact, most gene mutations still require rigorous validation in larger, preferably prospective patient series, to scrutinize their potential role in lymphoma diagnostics and patient management. In selected entities, a predominantly mutated gene is identified in almost all cases (e.g. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and hairy-cell leukemia), while for the vast majority of lymphomas a quite diverse mutation pattern is observed, with a limited number of frequently mutated genes followed by a seemingly endless tail of genes with mutations at a low frequency. Herein, the European Expert Group on NGS-based Diagnostics in Lymphomas (EGNL) summarizes the current status of this ever-evolving field, and, based on the present evidence level, segregates mutations into the following categories: i) immediate impact on treatment decisions, ii) diagnostic impact, iii) prognostic impact, iv) potential clinical impact in the near future, or v) should only be considered for research purposes. In the coming years, coordinated efforts aiming to apply targeted next-generation sequencing in large patient series will be needed in order to elucidate if a particular gene mutation will have an immediate impact on the lymphoma classification, and ultimately aid clinical decision making. PMID:27582569

  7. A mutation in the mitochondrial fission gene Dnm1l leads to cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houman Ashrafian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in a number of genes have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. However, such mutations account for only a small proportion of the clinical cases emphasising the need for alternative discovery approaches to uncovering novel pathogenic mutations in hitherto unidentified pathways. Accordingly, as part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Python, which develops DCM. We demonstrate that the Python phenotype is attributable to a dominant fully penetrant mutation in the dynamin-1-like (Dnm1l gene, which has been shown to be critical for mitochondrial fission. The C452F mutation is in a highly conserved region of the M domain of Dnm1l that alters protein interactions in a yeast two-hybrid system, suggesting that the mutation might alter intramolecular interactions within the Dnm1l monomer. Heterozygous Python fibroblasts exhibit abnormal mitochondria and peroxisomes. Homozygosity for the mutation results in the death of embryos midway though gestation. Heterozygous Python hearts show reduced levels of mitochondria enzyme complexes and suffer from cardiac ATP depletion. The resulting energy deficiency may contribute to cardiomyopathy. This is the first demonstration that a defect in a gene involved in mitochondrial remodelling can result in cardiomyopathy, showing that the function of this gene is needed for the maintenance of normal cellular function in a relatively tissue-specific manner. This disease model attests to the importance of mitochondrial remodelling in the heart; similar defects might underlie human heart muscle disease.

  8. Identification of candidate genes for lung cancer somatic mutation test kits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, mortality from lung cancer has sharply and continuously increased in China, ascending to the first cause of death among all types of cancer. The ability to identify the actual sequence of gene mutations may help doctors determine which mutations lead to precancerous lesions and which produce invasive carcinomas, especially using next-generation sequencing (NGS technology. In this study, we analyzed the latest lung cancer data in the COSMIC database, in order to find genomic "hotspots" that are frequently mutated in human lung cancer genomes. The results revealed that the most frequently mutated lung cancer genes are EGFR, KRAS and TP53.In recent years, EGFR and KRAS lung cancer test kits have been utilized for detecting lung cancer patients, but they presented many disadvantages, as they proved to be of low sensitivity, labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, we constructed a more complete catalogue of lung cancer mutation events including 145 mutated genes. With the genes of this list it may be feasible to develop a NGS kit for lung cancer mutation detection.

  9. Mutational analyses of the BRAF, KRAS, and PIK3CA genes in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckman, Karl C.; Schönleben, Frank; Qiu, Wanglong; Woo, Victoria L.; Su, Gloria H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a complex, multistep process. To date, numerous oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes have been implicated in oral carcinogenesis. Of particular interest in this regard are genes involved in cell cycling and apoptosis, such BRAF, KRAS, and PIK3CA genes. STUDY DESIGN Mutations of BRAF, KRAS, and PIK3CA were evaluated by direct genomic sequencing of exons 1 of KRAS, 11 and 15 of BRAF, and 9 and 20 of PIK3CA in OSCC specimens. RESULTS Both BRAF and KRAS mutations were detected with a mutation frequency of 2% (1/42). PIK3CA mutations were detected at 3% (1/35). CONCLUSIONS This is the first report implicating BRAF mutation in OSCC. Our study supports that mutations in the BRAF, KRAS, and PIK3CA genes make at least a minor contribution to OSCC tumorigenesis, and pathway-specific therapies targeting these two pathways should be considered for OSCC in a subset of patients with these mutations. PMID:20813562

  10. Chronic Pancreatitis Associated with the p.G208A Variant of PRSS1 Gene in a European Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Hegyi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context The major etiologic factor of chronic pancreatitis in adults is excessive alcohol consumption, whereas among Children structural anomalies, systemic and metabolic disorders, and genetic factors are prevalent. Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1 cause hereditary pancreatitis, while mutations in serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and chymotrypsin C (CTRC genes have been shown to associate with chronic pancreatitis as independent risk factors. Case report We present a case of 13-year-old boy with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Given the unexplained attacks of pancreatitis since early childhood and despite the negative family history, molecular-genetic analysis of four pancreatitis susceptibility genes (PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR was performed. The boy was found to carry the c.623G>C (p.G208A mutation of the PRSS1 gene and the c.180C>T (p.G60G mutation of the CTRC gene, both in heterozygous state. These mutations are considered as contributing risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. Conclusions In children with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis genetic causes should be considered, even in absence of positive family history. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a European patient with chronic pancreatitis associated with the p.G208A mutation of PRSS1 gene. This mutation was previously reported only in Asian subjects and is thought to be a unique genetic cause of pancreatitis in Asia.

  11. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Martini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR to the affected organ (lung. Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

  12. A novel heterozygous missense mutation in the UMOD gene responsible for Familial Juvenile Hyperuricemic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Carla

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Juvenile Hyperuricemic Nephropathy is an autosomal dominant nephropathy, characterized by decreased urate excretion and progressive interstitial nephritis. Mutations in the uromodulin coding UMOD gene have been found responsible for the disease in some families. Case presentation We here describe a novel heterozygous p.K307T mutation in an affected female with hyperuricemia, renal cysts and renal failure. The proband's only son is also affected and the mutation was found to segregate with the disease. Conclusions This mutation is the fourth reported in exon 5. Initial studies identified a mutation clustering in exon 4 and it has been recommended that sequencing this exon alone should be the first diagnostic test in patients with chronic interstitial nephritis with gout or hyperuricemia. However, regarding the increasing number of mutations being reported in exon 5, we now suggest that sequencing exon 5 should also be performed.

  13. Mutations in TP53 tumor suppressor gene in wood dust-related sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Bornholdt, Jette; Heikkilä, Pirjo;

    2010-01-01

    The causal role of work-related exposure to wood dust in the development of sinonasal cancer has long been established by numerous epidemiologic studies. To study molecular changes in these tumors, we analyzed TP53 gene mutations in 358 sinonasal cancer cases with or without occupational exposure...... occurred in all histologies, with an overall frequency of 77%. TP53 mutation positive status was most common in adenocarcinoma (OR 2.0, 95% CI, 1.1-3.7; compared with squamous cell carcinoma), and muta