WorldWideScience

Sample records for cetaceans

  1. Cetacean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.; Lammers, Marc O.

    The mammalian order cetacea consist of dolphins and whales, animals that are found in all the oceans and seas of the world. A few species even inhabit fresh water lakes and rivers. A list of 80 species of cetaceans in a convenient table is presented by Ridgway [20.1]. These mammals vary considerably in size, from the largest living mammal, the large blue whale (balaenoptera musculus), to the very small harbor porpoise (phocoena phocoena) and Commerson's dolphin (cephalorhynchus commersonnii), which are typically slightly over a meter in length.

  2. Cortical complexity in cetacean brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, Patrick R; Chanis, Rebecca; Marino, Lori

    2005-11-01

    Cetaceans (dolphins, whales, and porpoises) have a long, dramatically divergent evolutionary history compared with terrestrial mammals. Throughout their 55-60 million years of evolution, cetaceans acquired a compelling set of characteristics that include echolocation ability (in odontocetes), complex auditory and communicative capacities, and complex social organization. Moreover, although cetaceans have not shared a common ancestor with primates for over 90 million years, they possess a set of cognitive attributes that are strikingly convergent with those of many primates, including great apes and humans. In contrast, cetaceans have evolved a highly unusual combination of neurobiological features different from that of primates. As such, cetacean brains offer a critical opportunity to address questions about how complex behavior can be based on very different neuroanatomical and neurobiological evolutionary products. Cetacean brains and primate brains are arguably most meaningfully conceived as alternative evolutionary routes to neurobiological and cognitive complexity. In this article, we summarize data on brain size and hemisphere surface configuration in several cetacean species and present an overview of the cytoarchitectural complexity of the cerebral cortex of the bottlenose dolphin.

  3. Reconstructing cetacean brain evolution using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Lori; Uhen, Mark D; Pyenson, Nicholas D; Frohlich, Bruno

    2003-05-01

    Until recently, there have been relatively few studies of brain mass and morphology in fossil cetaceans (dolphins, whales, and porpoises) because of difficulty accessing the matrix that fills the endocranial cavity of fossil cetacean skulls. As a result, our knowledge about cetacean brain evolution has been quite limited. By applying the noninvasive technique of computed tomography (CT) to visualize, measure, and reconstruct the endocranial morphology of fossil cetacean skulls, we can gain vastly more information at an unprecedented rate about cetacean brain evolution. Here, we discuss our method and demonstrate it with several examples from our fossil cetacean database. This approach will provide new insights into the little-known evolutionary history of cetacean brain evolution.

  4. Reproductive Physiology in Cetaceans (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews some works on reproductive physiology in cetaceans with special reference to dolphins from the following aspects: estrous cycle in female dolphins, hormonal profiles during pregnancy, testosterone levels and seasonality in testicular activity, ovulation induction and sperm collection and freezing.

  5. Cetacean Social Behavioral Response to Sonar Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Cetacean social behavioral response to sonar exposure Dr...TERM GOALS The goal of this effort is to investigate cetacean social behavioral response to sonar signals. OBJECTIVES The scientific objectives...of this effort are to determine: 1) social behavioral responses of cetaceans to sonar and to tagging, to investigate the biological relevance and

  6. Cetacean vocal learning and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Vincent M

    2014-10-01

    The cetaceans are one of the few mammalian clades capable of vocal production learning. Evidence for this comes from synchronous changes in song patterns of baleen whales and experimental work on toothed whales in captivity. While baleen whales like many vocal learners use this skill in song displays that are involved in sexual selection, toothed whales use learned signals in individual recognition and the negotiation of social relationships. Experimental studies demonstrated that dolphins can use learned signals referentially. Studies on wild dolphins demonstrated how this skill appears to be useful in their own communication system, making them an interesting subject for comparative communication studies.

  7. Lift and drag of cetacean flippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mark; Weber, Paul; Howle, Laurens; Fish, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Field observation and collection of biological samples has resulted in cetacean (whales, dolphins and porpoises) flipper geometry being known for most species. However, the hydrodynamic properties of cetacean flippers have not been rigorously tested and thus their performance characteristics are unknown. Here, conducting water tunnel testing using scale models of cetacean flippers derived via computed tomography (CT) scans, as well as computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, we present a baseline work to determine the hydrodynamic characteristics of cetacean flippers. We found that flippers of similar planform shape had similar hydrodynamic performance characteristics. Furthermore, one group of flippers of planform shape similar to a modern swept wing was found to have lift coefficient versus angle of attack curves that were biphasic rather than linear in nature, which was caused by the onset of vortex-dominated lift. Drag coefficient versus angle of attack curves were found to be less dependant on planform shape.

  8. Cetacean Abundance Survey (DE0410, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The right whale and cetacean survey primarily focuses on right whales in the coastal and continental shelf areas, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better...

  9. Biologically Important Areas for Cetaceans within U.S. Waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cetacean Density and Distribution Mapping Working Group identified Biologically Important Areas (BIAs) for 24 cetacean species, stocks, or populations in seven...

  10. Determining Baseline Stress-Related Hormone Values in Large Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Large Cetaceans Stephen J. Trumble and Sascha Usenko Baylor University One Bear Place #97388 Waco, Texas 76706 phone: (254) 710-2128 fax... cetacean stress research. The results of this study will contribute to improving mitigation strategies through improved assessments of the potential...impacts of anthropogenic activity. OBJECTIVES Historically, whale earplugs have been used to age large cetaceans . This rudimentary technique which

  11. Quantifying the Effects of Propagation on Classification of Cetacean Vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    of Cetacean Vocalizations Paul C. Hines Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 5269 Morris St. Morray Building, Room 200 PO Box...of cetacean species in diverse ocean environments. OBJECTIVES In previous work as part of ONR grant N000141210139 a unique automatic classifier...successfully classify anthropogenic transients, and vocalizations from five cetacean species. Although this is a significant achievement, successful

  12. Identification of Novel Cetacean Poxviruses in Cetaceans Stranded in South West England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, James; Dastjerdi, Akbar; Davison, Nick; Deaville, Rob; Everest, David; Peake, Julie; Finnegan, Christopher; Jepson, Paul; Steinbach, Falko

    2015-01-01

    Poxvirus infections in marine mammals have been mainly reported through their clinical lesions and electron microscopy (EM). Poxvirus particles in association with such lesions have been demonstrated by EM and were previously classified as two new viruses, cetacean poxvirus 1 (CePV-1) and cetacean poxvirus 2 (CePV-2). In this study, epidermal pox lesions in cetaceans stranded in South West England (Cornwall) between 2008 and 2012 were investigated by electron microscopy and molecular analysis. PCR and sequencing of a highly conserved region within the viral DNA polymerase gene ruled out both parapox- and orthopoxviruses. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of the PCR product clustered the sequences with those previously described as cetacean poxviruses. However, taking the close genetic distance of this gene fragment across the family of poxviridae into account, it is reasonable to postulate further, novel cetacean poxvirus species. The nucleotide similarity within each cluster (tentative species) detected ranged from 98.6% to 100%, whilst the similarity between the clusters was no more than 95%. The detection of several species of poxvirus in different cetacean species confirms the likelihood of a heterogeneous cetacean poxvirus genus, comparable to the heterogeneity observed in other poxvirus genera.

  13. Identification of Novel Cetacean Poxviruses in Cetaceans Stranded in South West England.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Barnett

    Full Text Available Poxvirus infections in marine mammals have been mainly reported through their clinical lesions and electron microscopy (EM. Poxvirus particles in association with such lesions have been demonstrated by EM and were previously classified as two new viruses, cetacean poxvirus 1 (CePV-1 and cetacean poxvirus 2 (CePV-2. In this study, epidermal pox lesions in cetaceans stranded in South West England (Cornwall between 2008 and 2012 were investigated by electron microscopy and molecular analysis. PCR and sequencing of a highly conserved region within the viral DNA polymerase gene ruled out both parapox- and orthopoxviruses. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of the PCR product clustered the sequences with those previously described as cetacean poxviruses. However, taking the close genetic distance of this gene fragment across the family of poxviridae into account, it is reasonable to postulate further, novel cetacean poxvirus species. The nucleotide similarity within each cluster (tentative species detected ranged from 98.6% to 100%, whilst the similarity between the clusters was no more than 95%. The detection of several species of poxvirus in different cetacean species confirms the likelihood of a heterogeneous cetacean poxvirus genus, comparable to the heterogeneity observed in other poxvirus genera.

  14. Identification of Novel Cetacean Poxviruses in Cetaceans Stranded in South West England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, James; Dastjerdi, Akbar; Davison, Nick; Deaville, Rob; Everest, David; Peake, Julie; Finnegan, Christopher; Jepson, Paul; Steinbach, Falko

    2015-01-01

    Poxvirus infections in marine mammals have been mainly reported through their clinical lesions and electron microscopy (EM). Poxvirus particles in association with such lesions have been demonstrated by EM and were previously classified as two new viruses, cetacean poxvirus 1 (CePV-1) and cetacean poxvirus 2 (CePV-2). In this study, epidermal pox lesions in cetaceans stranded in South West England (Cornwall) between 2008 and 2012 were investigated by electron microscopy and molecular analysis. PCR and sequencing of a highly conserved region within the viral DNA polymerase gene ruled out both parapox- and orthopoxviruses. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of the PCR product clustered the sequences with those previously described as cetacean poxviruses. However, taking the close genetic distance of this gene fragment across the family of poxviridae into account, it is reasonable to postulate further, novel cetacean poxvirus species. The nucleotide similarity within each cluster (tentative species) detected ranged from 98.6% to 100%, whilst the similarity between the clusters was no more than 95%. The detection of several species of poxvirus in different cetacean species confirms the likelihood of a heterogeneous cetacean poxvirus genus, comparable to the heterogeneity observed in other poxvirus genera. PMID:26046847

  15. Surgical procedures in pinniped and cetacean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Jennifer L; Hendrickson, Dean A

    2013-12-01

    Significant advances in veterinary diagnostic and surgical techniques have been made over the past several decades. Many of these advances, however, have not reached the field of marine mammal medicine. A number of limitations exist: risks of anesthesia, anatomical challenges, difficulties with wound closure, environmental constraints, equipment limitations, and perceived risks. Despite these limitations, surgical treatments have been successfully utilized in marine mammals. While surgery is performed in pinnipeds more frequently than in cetaceans, studies conducted in the 1960s and 1970s on dolphin sleep and hearing demonstrated that general anesthesia can be successfully induced in cetaceans. Since this pioneering work, a small number of successful surgeries have been performed in dolphins under both general anesthesia and heavy sedation. While these surgical procedures in pinnipeds and cetaceans have typically been limited to wound management, dentistry, ophthalmic procedures, fracture repair, and superficial biopsy, a number of abdominal surgeries have also been performed. Recently there have been pioneering successes in the application of minimally invasive surgery in marine mammals. Many of the anatomical challenges that almost prohibit traditional laparotomies in cetacean species and present challenges in pinnipeds can be overcome through the use of laparoscopic techniques. Due to the limited number of pinnipeds and cetaceans in captivity and, thus, the limited case load for veterinarians serving marine mammal species, it is vital for knowledge of surgical procedures to be shared among those in the field. This paper reviews case reports of surgical procedures, both traditional and laparoscopic, in pinnipeds and cetaceans. Limitations to performing surgical procedures in marine mammals are discussed and surgical case reports analyzed in an effort to determine challenges that must be overcome in order to make surgery a more feasible diagnostic and treatment

  16. Cetacean brains: how aquatic are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Lori

    2007-06-01

    The adaptation of cetaceans to a fully aquatic lifestyle represents one of the most dramatic transformations in mammalian evolutionary history. Two of the most salient features of modern cetaceans are their fully aquatic lifestyle and their large brains. This review article will offer an overview of comparative neuroanatomical research on aquatic mammals, including analyses of odontocete cetacean, sirenian, pinniped, and fossil archaeocete brains. In particular, the question of whether a relationship exists between being fully aquatic and having a large brain is addressed. It has been hypothesized that the large, well-developed cetacean brain is a direct product of adaptation to a fully aquatic lifestyle. The current consensus is that the paleontological evidence on brain size evolution in cetaceans is not consistent with this hypothesis. Cetacean brain enlargement took place millions of years after adaptation to a fully aquatic existence. Neuroanatomical comparisons with sirenians and pinnipeds provide no evidence for the idea that the odontocete's large brain, high encephalization level, and extreme neocortical gyrification is an adaptation to a fully aquatic lifestyle. Although echolocation has been suggested as a reason for the high encephalization level in odontocetes, it should be noted that not all aquatic mammals echolocate and echolocating terrestrial mammals (e.g., bats) are not particularly highly encephalized. Echolocation is not a requirement of a fully aquatic lifestyle and, thus, cannot be considered a sole effect of aquaticism on brain enlargement. These results indicate that the high encephalization level of odontocetes is likely related to their socially complex lifestyle patterns that transcend the influence of an aquatic environment.

  17. Sisters of the sinuses: cetacean air sacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidenberg, Joy S; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2008-11-01

    This overview assesses some distinguishing features of the cetacean (whale, dolphin, porpoise) air sac system that may relate to the anatomy and function of the paranasal sinuses in terrestrial mammals. The cetacean respiratory tract has been modified through evolution to accommodate living in water. Lack of paranasal sinuses in modern cetaceans may be a diving adaptation. Bone-enclosed air chambers are detrimental, as their rigid walls may fracture during descent/ascent due to contracting/re-expanding air volumes. Flexible-walled "sinuses" (extracranial diverticula) are a logical adaptation to diving. Odontocetes (toothed whales) exhibit several pairs of paranasal air sacs. Although fossil evidence indicates that paranasal sinuses occur in archaeocetes (ancestors/relatives of living cetaceans), it is not known whether the paranasal sacs derive from these sinuses. Sac pigmentation indicates that they derived from invaginations of the integument. Unlike sinuses, paranasal sacs are not circumferentially enclosed in bone, and therefore can accommodate air volume changes that accompany diving pressure changes. Paired pterygoid sacs, located ventrally along the cetacean skull, connect the pharynx and middle ear cavities. Mysticetes (baleen whales) have a large midline laryngeal sac. Although cetacean air sacs do not appear to be homologous to paranasal sinuses, they may serve some analogous respiratory, vocal, or structural functions. For example, these sacs may participate in gas exchange, thermoregulation, resonance, and skeletal pneumatization. In addition, they may subserve unique aquatic functions, such as increasing inspiratory volume, mitigating pressure-induced volume change, air shunting to reduce respiratory dead space, and facilitating underwater sound production and transmission.

  18. Modeling the impacts of cetacean-focused tourism in Taiwan: observations from cetacean watching boats: 2002-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yung-Ping; Huang, Yu-Chin; Kyle, Gerard T; Yang, Ming-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Cetacean-focused tourism in Taiwan has grown rapidly since 1997. This development, measured in terms of both number of tour boats and visitors, has resulted in many resource management challenges stemming from the absence of regulation and scientific data. To fill this void in empirical evidence, we used 464 sighting records from 2002 to 2005 to model the impact of cetacean-focused tourism. Cox proportional hazard analysis indicated cetacean avoidance responses to cetacean watching boats were strongly associated with pod size, mother-calf pairs, and cetacean-vessel distances. Mother-calf pairs abandoned their avoidance tactic by 55% compared to noncalf groups when tour boats approached. Second, the hazard ratio of abundance was 0.996, suggesting that the odds of encountering avoidance responses by the cetaceans decreased by 42% for every 100-member increase in the cetacean pod size. Last, distances maintained by boats from the cetaceans was positively related to avoidance responses (i.e., less avoidance behavior with closer interaction). Based on our findings, we have the following recommendations: (a) limit vessels from approaching mothers with calves, (b) limit vessels from approaching small groups of cetaceans, (c) reduced avoidance behavior to boat traffic may be a red flag for potential long-term disturbance, and (d) apply the "precautionary principle" based on the best scientific information available in cetacean-based tourism in Taiwan. These recommendations will help contribute to the sustainable development of cetacean-focused tourism in Taiwan.

  19. Modeling the Impacts of Cetacean-Focused Tourism in Taiwan: Observations from Cetacean Watching Boats: 2002-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yung-Ping; Huang, Yu-Chin; Kyle, Gerard T.; Yang, Ming-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Cetacean-focused tourism in Taiwan has grown rapidly since 1997. This development, measured in terms of both number of tour boats and visitors, has resulted in many resource management challenges stemming from the absence of regulation and scientific data. To fill this void in empirical evidence, we used 464 sighting records from 2002 to 2005 to model the impact of cetacean-focused tourism. Cox proportional hazard analysis indicated cetacean avoidance responses to cetacean watching boats were strongly associated with pod size, mother-calf pairs, and cetacean-vessel distances. Mother-calf pairs abandoned their avoidance tactic by 55% compared to noncalf groups when tour boats approached. Second, the hazard ratio of abundance was 0.996, suggesting that the odds of encountering avoidance responses by the cetaceans decreased by 42% for every 100-member increase in the cetacean pod size. Last, distances maintained by boats from the cetaceans was positively related to avoidance responses (i.e., less avoidance behavior with closer interaction). Based on our findings, we have the following recommendations: (a) limit vessels from approaching mothers with calves, (b) limit vessels from approaching small groups of cetaceans, (c) reduced avoidance behavior to boat traffic may be a red flag for potential long-term disturbance, and (d) apply the "precautionary principle" based on the best scientific information available in cetacean-based tourism in Taiwan. These recommendations will help contribute to the sustainable development of cetacean-focused tourism in Taiwan.

  20. Cetacean Morbillivirus: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Françoise Van Bressem

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV and the diagnosis and pathogenesis of associated disease, with six different strains detected in cetaceans worldwide. CeMV has caused epidemics with high mortality in odontocetes in Europe, the USA and Australia. It represents a distinct species within the Morbillivirus genus. Although most CeMV strains are phylogenetically closely related, recent data indicate that morbilliviruses recovered from Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus, from Western Australia, and a Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis, from Brazil, are divergent. The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM cell receptor for CeMV has been characterized in cetaceans. It shares higher amino acid identity with the ruminant SLAM than with the receptors of carnivores or humans, reflecting the evolutionary history of these mammalian taxa. In Delphinidae, three amino acid substitutions may result in a higher affinity for the virus. Infection is diagnosed by histology, immunohistochemistry, virus isolation, RT-PCR, and serology. Classical CeMV-associated lesions include bronchointerstitial pneumonia, encephalitis, syncytia, and lymphoid depletion associated with immunosuppression. Cetaceans that survive the acute disease may develop fatal secondary infections and chronic encephalitis. Endemically infected, gregarious odontocetes probably serve as reservoirs and vectors. Transmission likely occurs through the inhalation of aerosolized virus but mother to fetus transmission was also reported.

  1. Cetacean morbillivirus: current knowledge and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bressem, Marie-Françoise; Duignan, Pádraig J; Banyard, Ashley; Barbieri, Michelle; Colegrove, Kathleen M; De Guise, Sylvain; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Dobson, Andrew; Domingo, Mariano; Fauquier, Deborah; Fernandez, Antonio; Goldstein, Tracey; Grenfell, Bryan; Groch, Kátia R; Gulland, Frances; Jensen, Brenda A; Jepson, Paul D; Hall, Ailsa; Kuiken, Thijs; Mazzariol, Sandro; Morris, Sinead E; Nielsen, Ole; Raga, Juan A; Rowles, Teresa K; Saliki, Jeremy; Sierra, Eva; Stephens, Nahiid; Stone, Brett; Tomo, Ikuko; Wang, Jianning; Waltzek, Thomas; Wellehan, James F X

    2014-12-22

    We review the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) and the diagnosis and pathogenesis of associated disease, with six different strains detected in cetaceans worldwide. CeMV has caused epidemics with high mortality in odontocetes in Europe, the USA and Australia. It represents a distinct species within the Morbillivirus genus. Although most CeMV strains are phylogenetically closely related, recent data indicate that morbilliviruses recovered from Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus), from Western Australia, and a Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis), from Brazil, are divergent. The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) cell receptor for CeMV has been characterized in cetaceans. It shares higher amino acid identity with the ruminant SLAM than with the receptors of carnivores or humans, reflecting the evolutionary history of these mammalian taxa. In Delphinidae, three amino acid substitutions may result in a higher affinity for the virus. Infection is diagnosed by histology, immunohistochemistry, virus isolation, RT-PCR, and serology. Classical CeMV-associated lesions include bronchointerstitial pneumonia, encephalitis, syncytia, and lymphoid depletion associated with immunosuppression. Cetaceans that survive the acute disease may develop fatal secondary infections and chronic encephalitis. Endemically infected, gregarious odontocetes probably serve as reservoirs and vectors. Transmission likely occurs through the inhalation of aerosolized virus but mother to fetus transmission was also reported.

  2. Modular organizations of novel cetacean papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschling, Marc; Bravo, Ignacio G; Schulz, Eric; Bracho, Maria A; Deaville, Rob; Jepson, Paul D; Van Bressem, Marie-Françoise; Stockfleth, Eggert; Nindl, Ingo

    2011-04-01

    The phylogenetic position of cetacean papillomaviruses (PVs: Omikron-PVs and Upsilon-PVs) varies depending on the region of the genome analysed. They cluster together with Alpha-PVs when analysing early genes and with Xi-PVs and Phi-PVs when analysing late genes. We cloned and sequenced the complete genomes of five novel PVs, sampled from genital and oesophageal lesions of free-ranging cetaceans: Delphinus delphis (DdPV1), Lagenorhynchus acutus (TtPV3 variant), and Phocoena phocoena (PphPV1, PphPV2, and PphPV3). Using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian approaches, all cetacean PVs constituted a monophyletic group with Alpha-, Omega-, and Dyodelta-PVs as inferred from E1-E2 early genes analyses, thus matching the shared phenotype of mucosal tropism. However, cetacean PVs, with the exception of PphPV3, were the closest relatives of Xi-PVs and Phi-PVs in L2-L1 late genes analyses, isolated from cow and goat, thus reflecting the close relationship between Cetacea and Artiodactyla. Our results are compatible with a recombination between ancestral PVs infecting the Cetartiodactyla lineage. Our study supports a complex evolutionary scenario with multiple driving forces for PV diversification, possibly including recombination and also interspecies transmission.

  3. Cetacean Morbillivirus: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bressem, Marie-Françoise; Duignan, Pádraig J.; Banyard, Ashley; Barbieri, Michelle; Colegrove, Kathleen M; De Guise, Sylvain; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Dobson, Andrew; Domingo, Mariano; Fauquier, Deborah; Fernandez, Antonio; Goldstein, Tracey; Grenfell, Bryan; Groch, Kátia R.; Gulland, Frances; Jensen, Brenda A; Jepson, Paul D; Hall, Ailsa; Kuiken, Thijs; Mazzariol, Sandro; Morris, Sinead E; Nielsen, Ole; Raga, Juan A; Rowles, Teresa K; Saliki, Jeremy; Sierra, Eva; Stephens, Nahiid; Stone, Brett; Tomo, Ikuko; Wang, Jianning; Waltzek, Thomas; Wellehan, James FX

    2014-01-01

    We review the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) and the diagnosis and pathogenesis of associated disease, with six different strains detected in cetaceans worldwide. CeMV has caused epidemics with high mortality in odontocetes in Europe, the USA and Australia. It represents a distinct species within the Morbillivirus genus. Although most CeMV strains are phylogenetically closely related, recent data indicate that morbilliviruses recovered from Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus), from Western Australia, and a Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis), from Brazil, are divergent. The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) cell receptor for CeMV has been characterized in cetaceans. It shares higher amino acid identity with the ruminant SLAM than with the receptors of carnivores or humans, reflecting the evolutionary history of these mammalian taxa. In Delphinidae, three amino acid substitutions may result in a higher affinity for the virus. Infection is diagnosed by histology, immunohistochemistry, virus isolation, RT-PCR, and serology. Classical CeMV-associated lesions include bronchointerstitial pneumonia, encephalitis, syncytia, and lymphoid depletion associated with immunosuppression. Cetaceans that survive the acute disease may develop fatal secondary infections and chronic encephalitis. Endemically infected, gregarious odontocetes probably serve as reservoirs and vectors. Transmission likely occurs through the inhalation of aerosolized virus but mother to fetus transmission was also reported. PMID:25533660

  4. A review of cetacean lung morphology and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Marina A; Raverty, Stephen A; Lillie, Margo A; Shadwick, Robert E

    2013-12-01

    Cetaceans possess diverse adaptations in respiratory structure and mechanics that are highly specialized for an array of surfacing and diving behaviors. Some of these adaptations and air management strategies are still not completely understood despite over a century of study. We have compiled the historical and contemporary knowledge of cetacean lung anatomy and mechanics in regards to normal lung function during ventilation and air management while diving. New techniques are emerging utilizing pulmonary mechanics to measure lung function in live cetaceans. Given the diversity of respiratory adaptations in cetaceans, interpretations of these results should consider species-specific anatomy, mechanics, and behavior.

  5. Elastic modulus of cetacean auditory ossicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubelli, Andrew A; Zosuls, Aleks; Ketten, Darlene R; Mountain, David C

    2014-05-01

    In order to model the hearing capabilities of marine mammals (cetaceans), it is necessary to understand the mechanical properties, such as elastic modulus, of the middle ear bones in these species. Biologically realistic models can be used to investigate the biomechanics of hearing in cetaceans, much of which is currently unknown. In the present study, the elastic moduli of the auditory ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes) of eight species of cetacean, two baleen whales (mysticete) and six toothed whales (odontocete), were measured using nanoindentation. The two groups of mysticete ossicles overall had lower average elastic moduli (35.2 ± 13.3 GPa and 31.6 ± 6.5 GPa) than the groups of odontocete ossicles (53.3 ± 7.2 GPa to 62.3 ± 4.7 GPa). Interior bone generally had a higher modulus than cortical bone by up to 36%. The effects of freezing and formalin-fixation on elastic modulus were also investigated, although samples were few and no clear trend could be discerned. The high elastic modulus of the ossicles and the differences in the elastic moduli between mysticetes and odontocetes are likely specializations in the bone for underwater hearing.

  6. Lift and drag performance of odontocete cetacean flippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Paul W; Howle, Laurens E; Murray, Mark M; Fish, Frank E

    2009-07-01

    Cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) have evolved flippers that aid in effective locomotion through their aquatic environments. Differing evolutionary pressures upon cetaceans, including hunting and feeding requirements, and other factors such as animal mass and size have resulted in flippers that are unique among each species. Cetacean flippers may be viewed as being analogous to modern engineered hydrofoils, which have hydrodynamic properties such as lift coefficient, drag coefficient and associated efficiency. Field observations and the collection of biological samples have resulted in flipper geometry being known for most cetacean species. However, the hydrodynamic properties of cetacean flippers have not been rigorously examined and thus their performance properties are unknown. By conducting water tunnel testing using scale models of cetacean flippers derived via computed tomography (CT) scans, as well as computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, we present a baseline work to describe the hydrodynamic properties of several cetacean flippers. We found that flippers of similar planform shape had similar hydrodynamic performance properties. Furthermore, one group of flippers of planform shape similar to modern swept wings was found to have lift coefficients that increased with angle of attack nonlinearly, which was caused by the onset of vortex-dominated lift. Drag coefficient versus angle of attack curves were found to be less dependent on planform shape. Our work represents a step towards the understanding of the association between performance, ecology, morphology and fluid mechanics based on the three-dimensional geometry of cetacean flippers.

  7. Cetacean distribution and relative abundance in offshore Gabonese waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de M.N.

    2010-01-01

    nformation on cetaceans off Gabon in tropical West Africa is summarized from boat-based surveys carried out between 7 March and 7 August 2009. Thirteen cetacean species were positively identified comprising two baleen whale species, one sperm whale species and ten species of delphinid. Bryde's whale

  8. Cetaceans stranded in the Netherlands in 2008-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijl, Guido; Begeman, L.; Hiemstra, S.; IJsseldijk, L.L.; Kamminga, Pepijn

    2016-01-01

    We present a validated list of cetaceans stranded from 2008 up to and including 2014. A total of 4406 cetaceans was found on the Dutch coast during this period, comprising 4346 harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) (98.6% of all strandings) and 59 individuals of twelve other species. The next most n

  9. Cetacean strandings along the coast of Izmir Bay, Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guclusoy, H.; Veryeri, N.; Cirik, S.

    2004-01-01

    The present paper provides information on the stranding of cetaceans in Izmir Bay, Aegean Sea, between 1992 and 2004. The data were collected opportunistically during sightings and stranding data collection for Monk Seals. A total of 12 cetaceans, namely Bottle-nosed Dolphin, Tursiops truncatus (n=6

  10. Cheap DECAF: Density Estimation for Cetaceans from Acoustic Fixed Sensors Using Separate, Non-Linked Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Cheap DECAF: Density Estimation for Cetaceans from... cetaceans using passive fixed acoustics rely on large, dense arrays of cabled hydrophones and/or auxiliary information from animal tagging projects...estimating cetacean density. Therefore, the goal of Cheap DECAF is to focus on the development of cetacean density estimation methods using sensors that

  11. Brown adipose tissue in cetacean blubber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Hashimoto

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT plays an important role in thermoregulation in species living in cold environments, given heat can be generated from its chemical energy reserves. Here we investigate the existence of BAT in blubber in four species of delphinoid cetacean, the Pacific white-sided and bottlenose dolphins, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens and Tursiops truncates, and Dall's and harbour porpoises, Phocoenoides dalli and Phocoena phocoena. Histology revealed adipocytes with small unilocular fat droplets and a large eosinophilic cytoplasm intermingled with connective tissue in the innermost layers of blubber. Chemistry revealed a brown adipocyte-specific mitochondrial protein, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1, within these same adipocytes, but not those distributed elsewhere throughout the blubber. Western blot analysis of extracts from the inner blubber layer confirmed that the immunohistochemical positive reaction was specific to UCP1 and that this adipose tissue was BAT. To better understand the distribution of BAT throughout the entire cetacean body, cadavers were subjected to computed tomography (CT scanning. Resulting imagery, coupled with histological corroboration of fine tissue structure, revealed adipocytes intermingled with connective tissue in the lowest layer of blubber were distributed within a thin, highly dense layer that extended the length of the body, with the exception of the rostrum, fin and fluke regions. As such, we describe BAT effectively enveloping the cetacean body. Our results suggest that delphinoid blubber could serve a role additional to those frequently attributed to it: simple insulation blanket, energy storage, hydrodynamic streamlining or contributor to positive buoyancy. We believe delphinoid BAT might also function like an electric blanket, enabling animals to frequent waters cooler than blubber as an insulator alone might otherwise allow an animal to withstand, or allow animals to maintain body temperature in cool

  12. Brown adipose tissue in cetacean blubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Ohtsuki, Hirofumi; Kakizaki, Takehiko; Amou, Kento; Sato, Ryo; Doi, Satoru; Kobayashi, Sara; Matsuda, Ayaka; Sugiyama, Makoto; Funaba, Masayuki; Matsuishi, Takashi; Terasawa, Fumio; Shindo, Junji; Endo, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermoregulation in species living in cold environments, given heat can be generated from its chemical energy reserves. Here we investigate the existence of BAT in blubber in four species of delphinoid cetacean, the Pacific white-sided and bottlenose dolphins, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens and Tursiops truncates, and Dall's and harbour porpoises, Phocoenoides dalli and Phocoena phocoena. Histology revealed adipocytes with small unilocular fat droplets and a large eosinophilic cytoplasm intermingled with connective tissue in the innermost layers of blubber. Chemistry revealed a brown adipocyte-specific mitochondrial protein, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), within these same adipocytes, but not those distributed elsewhere throughout the blubber. Western blot analysis of extracts from the inner blubber layer confirmed that the immunohistochemical positive reaction was specific to UCP1 and that this adipose tissue was BAT. To better understand the distribution of BAT throughout the entire cetacean body, cadavers were subjected to computed tomography (CT) scanning. Resulting imagery, coupled with histological corroboration of fine tissue structure, revealed adipocytes intermingled with connective tissue in the lowest layer of blubber were distributed within a thin, highly dense layer that extended the length of the body, with the exception of the rostrum, fin and fluke regions. As such, we describe BAT effectively enveloping the cetacean body. Our results suggest that delphinoid blubber could serve a role additional to those frequently attributed to it: simple insulation blanket, energy storage, hydrodynamic streamlining or contributor to positive buoyancy. We believe delphinoid BAT might also function like an electric blanket, enabling animals to frequent waters cooler than blubber as an insulator alone might otherwise allow an animal to withstand, or allow animals to maintain body temperature in cool waters during

  13. Computational acoustic modeling of cetacean vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Michael Dixon

    A framework for computational acoustic modeling of hypothetical vocal production mechanisms in cetaceans is presented. As a specific example, a model of a proposed source in the larynx of odontocetes is developed. Whales and dolphins generate a broad range of vocal sounds, but the exact mechanisms they use are not conclusively understood. In the fifty years since it has become widely accepted that whales can and do make sound, how they do so has remained particularly confounding. Cetaceans' highly divergent respiratory anatomy, along with the difficulty of internal observation during vocalization have contributed to this uncertainty. A variety of acoustical, morphological, ethological and physiological evidence has led to conflicting and often disputed theories of the locations and mechanisms of cetaceans' sound sources. Computational acoustic modeling has been used to create real-time parametric models of musical instruments and the human voice. These techniques can be applied to cetacean vocalizations to help better understand the nature and function of these sounds. Extensive studies of odontocete laryngeal morphology have revealed vocal folds that are consistently similar to a known but poorly understood acoustic source, the ribbon reed. A parametric computational model of the ribbon reed is developed, based on simplified geometrical, mechanical and fluid models drawn from the human voice literature. The physical parameters of the ribbon reed model are then adapted to those of the odontocete larynx. With reasonable estimates of real physical parameters, both the ribbon reed and odontocete larynx models produce sounds that are perceptually similar to their real-world counterparts, and both respond realistically under varying control conditions. Comparisons of acoustic features of the real-world and synthetic systems show a number of consistencies. While this does not on its own prove that either model is conclusively an accurate description of the source, it

  14. Brucella ceti and brucellosis in cetaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo eMoreno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the first case of brucellosis detected in a dolphin aborted fetus, an increasing number of Brucella ceti isolates has been reported in members of the two suborders of cetaceans: Mysticeti and Odontoceti. Serological surveys have shown that cetacean brucellosis may be distributed worldwide in the oceans. Although all B. ceti isolates have been included within the same species, three different groups have been recognized according to their preferred host, bacteriological properties and distinct genetic traits: B. ceti dolphin type, B. ceti porpoise type and B. ceti human type. It seems that B. ceti porpoise type is more closely related to B. ceti human isolates and B. pinnipedialis group, while B. ceti dolphin type seems ancestral to them. Based on comparative phylogenetic analysis, it is feasible that the B. ceti ancestor radiated in a terrestrial artiodactyl host close to the Raoellidae family about 58 million years ago. The more likely mode of transmission of B. ceti seems to be through sexual intercourse, maternal feeding, aborted fetuses, placental tissues, vertical transmission from mother to the fetus or through fish or helminth reservoirs. The B. ceti dolphin and porpoise types seem to display variable virulence in land animal models and low infectivity for humans. However, brucellosis in some dolphins and porpoises has been demonstrated to be a severe chronic disease, displaying significant clinical and pathological signs related to abortions, male infertility, neurobrucellosis, cardiopathies, bone and skin lesions, strandings and death.

  15. Sexual selection targets cetacean pelvic bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dines, James P; Otárola-Castillo, Erik; Ralph, Peter; Alas, Jesse; Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-11-01

    Male genitalia evolve rapidly, probably as a result of sexual selection. Whether this pattern extends to the internal infrastructure that influences genital movements remains unknown. Cetaceans (whales and dolphins) offer a unique opportunity to test this hypothesis: since evolving from land-dwelling ancestors, they lost external hind limbs and evolved a highly reduced pelvis that seems to serve no other function except to anchor muscles that maneuver the penis. Here, we create a novel morphometric pipeline to analyze the size and shape evolution of pelvic bones from 130 individuals (29 species) in the context of inferred mating system. We present two main findings: (1) males from species with relatively intense sexual selection (inferred by relative testes size) tend to evolve larger penises and pelvic bones compared to their body length, and (2) pelvic bone shape has diverged more in species pairs that have diverged in inferred mating system. Neither pattern was observed in the anterior-most pair of vertebral ribs, which served as a negative control. This study provides evidence that sexual selection can affect internal anatomy that controls male genitalia. These important functions may explain why cetacean pelvic bones have not been lost through evolutionary time.

  16. Evolution of hyperphalangy and digit reduction in the cetacean manus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lisa Noelle; Berta, Annalisa; Dawson, Susan D; Reidenberg, Joy S

    2007-06-01

    Cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) have a soft tissue flipper that encases most of the forelimb, and elongated digits with an increased number of phalanges (hyperphalangy). In addition, some cetaceans exhibit a reduction in digit number. Although toothed cetaceans (odontocetes) are pentadactylous, most baleen whales (mysticetes) are tetradactylous and also lack a metacarpal. This study conducts a survey of cetacean metacarpal and phalangeal morphologies, traces the evolution of hyperphalangy in a phylogenetic context, optimizes characters onto previously published cetacean phylogenies, and tests various digit loss hypotheses. Dissections were performed on 16 cetacean flippers representing 10 species (8 mysticetes, 2 odontocetes). Phalangeal count data were derived from forelimb radiographs (36 odontocetes, 5 mysticetes), osteological specimens of articulated forelimbs (8 mysticetes), and were supplemented with published counts. Modal phalangeal counts were coded as ordered and unpolarized characters and optimized onto two known cetacean phylogenies. Results indicate that digital ray I is reduced in many cetaceans (except Globicephala) and all elements of digital ray I were lost in tetradactylous mysticetes. Fossil evidence indicates this ray may have been lost approximately 14 Ma. Most odontocetes also reduce the number of phalangeal elements in digit V, while mysticetes typically retain the plesiomorphic condition of three phalanges. Results from modal phalangeal counts show the greatest degree of hyperphalangy in digits II and III in odontocetes and digits III and IV in mysticetes. Fossil evidence indicates cetacean hyperphalangy evolved by at least 7-8 Ma. Digit loss and digit positioning may underlie disparate flipper shapes, with narrow, elongate flippers facilitating fast swimming and broad flippers aiding slow turns. Hyperphalangy may help distribute leading edge forces, and multiple interphalangeal joints may smooth leading edge flipper contour.

  17. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P

    2013-01-01

    of Mbs is not significantly different among mammals (with typical oxygenation constants of ∼0.8-1.2 µM(-1)), folding stabilities of cetacean Mbs are ∼2-4 kcal/mol higher than for terrestrial Mbs. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and Bayesian tests to describe the evolution...... of cetacean Mbs, and experimentally calibrated computation of stability effects of mutations, we observe accelerated evolution in cetaceans and identify seven positively selected sites in Mb. Overall, these sites contribute to Mb stabilization with a conditional probability of 0.8. We observe a correlation...

  18. AFSC/NMML: Southeast Alaska Cetacean Vessel Surveys, 1991 - 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1991, NMML initiated cetacean studies with vessel coverage throughout inland waters of Southeast Alaska. Between 1991 and 1993, line-transect methodology was used...

  19. Biologically Important Areas for Cetaceans within U.S. Waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biologically important areas (BIAs) for cetaceans were defined by compiling the best available information from scientific literature (including books, peer-reviewed...

  20. Northern Right Whale and Cetacean Survey (DE0108, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The right whale and cetacean survey primarily focuses on right whales in the coastal and continental shelf areas, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better...

  1. Digeneans of cetaceans: taxonomy, evolutionary history and host specificity.

    OpenAIRE

    Fraija Fernández, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Parasitism is an extremely successful lifestyle among animals. In fact, every free-living organism is believed to harbour at least a parasite species, and cetaceans are not the exception. Host-parasite systems offer a suitable model for studying systematics, evolution, biogeography and ecology because the evolutionary fate of parasites is linked to that of their hosts. In particular, present-day associations between cetaceans and their parasites have been shaped by unique historical events. T...

  2. Comparison of real and idealized cetacean flippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mark; Weber, Paul; Howle, Laurens; Fish, Frank

    2009-11-01

    We explored the consequences of the idealization process by creating exact scale models of cetacean flippers using CT scans, creating corresponding idealized versions, then determining the hydrodynamic characteristics of the models via water tunnel testing. We found that the majority of the idealized models did not exhibit fluid dynamic properties that were drastically different from those of the real models, although multiple consequences resulting from the idealization process were evident. Drag performance was significantly improved by idealization. Overall, idealization is an excellent way to capture the relevant effects of a phenomena found in nature, which spares the researcher from having to painstakingly create exact models, although we have found that there are situations where idealization may have unintended consequences such as one model that exhibited a decrease in lift performance.

  3. Synchronous behaviour of cetaceans observed with active acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godø, Olav Rune; Sivle, Lise Doksæter; Patel, Ruben; Torkelsen, Terje

    2013-12-01

    Scientific split-beam echosounders are sensitive instruments for observing biomass densities and individual behaviour. Earlier studies have demonstrated that these instruments can be used to study diving behaviour of cetaceans. In this paper, we go into more detail about the recorded signal to see if and how acoustic split-beam data can be used to extract information about synchronous behaviour and other species related characteristics. Data of several cetacean individuals were collected by a moored echosounder pinging upwards from about 900 m in the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone. In this paper, we discuss methodological issues associated with using split-beam tracking of large marine animals. Further we demonstrate that target tracking of cetaceans can be used to study solo dives as well as behavioural synchrony. We also show that paired signals can easily be interpreted as false synchrony due to the size of the animals. In such cases a rough estimate of the diameter, and hence size, of the animals can be estimated. We emphasise on four examples that clarify methodological challenges including synchronous swimmers as well as large single cetaceans that might be interpreted as two synchronous swimmers. The applied technology requires that the animals remain in a narrow acoustic beam for long enough time to extract behavioural information. The technology can be improved by developing automatic tracking of cetaceans with a steerable transducer. This will substantially increase the search volume and enable tracking of cetaceans over longer periods and thus, produce more realistic information about the whale behaviour.

  4. [Analysis of auditory information in the brain of the cetacean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Ia

    2006-01-01

    The cetacean brain specifics involve an exceptional development of the auditory neural centres. The place of projection sensory areas including the auditory that in the cetacean brain cortex is essentially different from that in other mammals. The EP characteristics indicated presence of several functional divisions in the auditory cortex. Physiological studies of the cetacean auditory centres were mainly performed using the EP technique. Of several types of the EPs, the short-latency auditory EP was most thoroughly studied. In cetacean, it is characterised by exceptionally high temporal resolution with the integration time about 0.3 ms which corresponds to the cut-off frequency 1700 Hz. This much exceeds the temporal resolution of the hearing in terranstrial mammals. The frequency selectivity of hearing in cetacean was measured using a number of variants of the masking technique. The hearing frequency selectivity acuity in cetacean exceeds that of most terraneous mammals (excepting the bats). This acute frequency selectivity provides the differentiation among the finest spectral patterns of auditory signals.

  5. Rod monochromacy and the coevolution of cetacean retinal opsins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Meredith

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cetaceans have a long history of commitment to a fully aquatic lifestyle that extends back to the Eocene. Extant species have evolved a spectacular array of adaptations in conjunction with their deployment into a diverse array of aquatic habitats. Sensory systems are among those that have experienced radical transformations in the evolutionary history of this clade. In the case of vision, previous studies have demonstrated important changes in the genes encoding rod opsin (RH1, short-wavelength sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1, and long-wavelength sensitive opsin (LWS in selected cetaceans, but have not examined the full complement of opsin genes across the complete range of cetacean families. Here, we report protein-coding sequences for RH1 and both color opsin genes (SWS1, LWS from representatives of all extant cetacean families. We examine competing hypotheses pertaining to the timing of blue shifts in RH1 relative to SWS1 inactivation in the early history of Cetacea, and we test the hypothesis that some cetaceans are rod monochomats. Molecular evolutionary analyses contradict the "coastal" hypothesis, wherein SWS1 was pseudogenized in the common ancestor of Cetacea, and instead suggest that RH1 was blue-shifted in the common ancestor of Cetacea before SWS1 was independently knocked out in baleen whales (Mysticeti and in toothed whales (Odontoceti. Further, molecular evidence implies that LWS was inactivated convergently on at least five occasions in Cetacea: (1 Balaenidae (bowhead and right whales, (2 Balaenopteroidea (rorquals plus gray whale, (3 Mesoplodon bidens (Sowerby's beaked whale, (4 Physeter macrocephalus (giant sperm whale, and (5 Kogia breviceps (pygmy sperm whale. All of these cetaceans are known to dive to depths of at least 100 m where the underwater light field is dim and dominated by blue light. The knockout of both SWS1 and LWS in multiple cetacean lineages renders these taxa rod monochromats, a condition previously unknown among

  6. Rod monochromacy and the coevolution of cetacean retinal opsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Robert W; Gatesy, John; Emerling, Christopher A; York, Vincent M; Springer, Mark S

    2013-04-01

    Cetaceans have a long history of commitment to a fully aquatic lifestyle that extends back to the Eocene. Extant species have evolved a spectacular array of adaptations in conjunction with their deployment into a diverse array of aquatic habitats. Sensory systems are among those that have experienced radical transformations in the evolutionary history of this clade. In the case of vision, previous studies have demonstrated important changes in the genes encoding rod opsin (RH1), short-wavelength sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1), and long-wavelength sensitive opsin (LWS) in selected cetaceans, but have not examined the full complement of opsin genes across the complete range of cetacean families. Here, we report protein-coding sequences for RH1 and both color opsin genes (SWS1, LWS) from representatives of all extant cetacean families. We examine competing hypotheses pertaining to the timing of blue shifts in RH1 relative to SWS1 inactivation in the early history of Cetacea, and we test the hypothesis that some cetaceans are rod monochomats. Molecular evolutionary analyses contradict the "coastal" hypothesis, wherein SWS1 was pseudogenized in the common ancestor of Cetacea, and instead suggest that RH1 was blue-shifted in the common ancestor of Cetacea before SWS1 was independently knocked out in baleen whales (Mysticeti) and in toothed whales (Odontoceti). Further, molecular evidence implies that LWS was inactivated convergently on at least five occasions in Cetacea: (1) Balaenidae (bowhead and right whales), (2) Balaenopteroidea (rorquals plus gray whale), (3) Mesoplodon bidens (Sowerby's beaked whale), (4) Physeter macrocephalus (giant sperm whale), and (5) Kogia breviceps (pygmy sperm whale). All of these cetaceans are known to dive to depths of at least 100 m where the underwater light field is dim and dominated by blue light. The knockout of both SWS1 and LWS in multiple cetacean lineages renders these taxa rod monochromats, a condition previously unknown among

  7. Development and evolution of the unique cetacean dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armfield, Brooke A; Zheng, Zhengui; Bajpai, Sunil; Vinyard, Christopher J; Thewissen, Jgm

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary success of mammals is rooted in their high metabolic rate. A high metabolic rate is sustainable thanks to efficient food processing and that in turn is facilitated by precise occlusion of the teeth and the acquisition of rhythmic mastication. These major evolutionary innovations characterize most members of the Class Mammalia. Cetaceans are one of the few groups of mammals in which precise occlusion has been secondarily lost. Most toothed whales have an increased number of simple crowned teeth that are similar along the tooth row. Evolution toward these specializations began immediately after the time cetaceans transitioned from terrestrial-to-marine environments. The fossil record documents the critical aspects of occlusal evolution of cetaceans, and allows us to pinpoint the evolutionary timing of the macroevolutionary events leading to their unusual dental morphology among mammals. The developmental controls of tooth differentiation and tooth number have been studied in a few mammalian clades, but nothing is known about how these controls differ between cetaceans and mammals that retain functional occlusion. Here we show that pigs, a cetacean relative with regionalized tooth morphology and complex tooth crowns, retain the typical mammalian gene expression patterns that control early tooth differentiation, expressing Bmp4 in the rostral (mesial, anterior) domain of the jaw, and Fgf8 caudally (distal, posterior). By contrast, dolphins have lost these regional differences in dental morphology and the Bmp4 domain is extended into the caudal region of the developing jaw. We hypothesize that the functional constraints underlying mammalian occlusion have been released in cetaceans, facilitating changes in the genetic control of early dental development. Such major developmental changes drive morphological evolution and are correlated with major shifts in diet and food processing during cetacean evolution.

  8. Development and evolution of the unique cetacean dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke A. Armfield

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary success of mammals is rooted in their high metabolic rate. A high metabolic rate is sustainable thanks to efficient food processing and that in turn is facilitated by precise occlusion of the teeth and the acquisition of rhythmic mastication. These major evolutionary innovations characterize most members of the Class Mammalia. Cetaceans are one of the few groups of mammals in which precise occlusion has been secondarily lost. Most toothed whales have an increased number of simple crowned teeth that are similar along the tooth row. Evolution toward these specializations began immediately after the time cetaceans transitioned from terrestrial-to-marine environments. The fossil record documents the critical aspects of occlusal evolution of cetaceans, and allows us to pinpoint the evolutionary timing of the macroevolutionary events leading to their unusual dental morphology among mammals. The developmental controls of tooth differentiation and tooth number have been studied in a few mammalian clades, but nothing is known about how these controls differ between cetaceans and mammals that retain functional occlusion. Here we show that pigs, a cetacean relative with regionalized tooth morphology and complex tooth crowns, retain the typical mammalian gene expression patterns that control early tooth differentiation, expressing Bmp4 in the rostral (mesial, anterior domain of the jaw, and Fgf8 caudally (distal, posterior. By contrast, dolphins have lost these regional differences in dental morphology and the Bmp4 domain is extended into the caudal region of the developing jaw. We hypothesize that the functional constraints underlying mammalian occlusion have been released in cetaceans, facilitating changes in the genetic control of early dental development. Such major developmental changes drive morphological evolution and are correlated with major shifts in diet and food processing during cetacean evolution.

  9. Cetacean habitat in the northern oceanic Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Randall W.; Ortega-Ortiz, Joel G.; Ribic, Christine A.; Evans, William E.; Biggs, Douglas C.; Ressler, Patrick H.; Cady, Robert B.; Leben, Robert R.; Mullin, Keith D.; Würsig, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Cetaceans (whales and dolphins) are diverse and abundant upper trophic level predators in the Gulf of Mexico, a semi-enclosed, intercontinental sea with a total area of about 1.5 million km 2. The objectives of this study were to better define the habitat of cetaceans in the northern oceanic Gulf of Mexico. An integrated methodology was used that included visual surveys and hydrographic collections from ships. Near real-time sea surface altimetry from the TOPEX/POSEIDON and ERS satellites was used during ship surveys to determine the location of hydrographic features (e.g., cyclones, anticyclones and confluence zones). Archival satellite sea surface altimetry data were also used to retrospectively determine the location of hydrographic features for analysis with earlier cetacean sightings. We estimated zooplankton and micronekton biomass using both net and acoustic sampling to indicate the amount of potential food available for higher trophic level foraging by cetaceans. Nineteen cetacean species were identified during ship surveys. Cetaceans were concentrated along the continental slope in or near cyclones and the confluence of cyclone-anticyclone eddy pairs, mesoscale features with locally concentrated zooplankton and micronekton stocks that appear to develop in response to increased nutrient-rich water and primary production in the mixed layer. A significant relationship existed between integrated zooplankton biomass and integrated cephalopod paralarvae numbers, indicating that higher zooplankton and micronekton biomass may correlate with higher concentrations of cetacean prey. In the north-central Gulf, an additional factor affecting cetacean distribution may be the narrow continental shelf south of the Mississippi River delta. Low salinity, nutrient-rich water may occur over the continental slope near the mouth of the Mississippi (MOM) River or be entrained within the confluence of a cyclone-anticyclone eddy pair and transported beyond the continental slope

  10. 50 CFR 229.31 - Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction... Regulations § 229.31 Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction Plan. (a) Purpose and scope. The purpose of this section is to implement the Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction Plan. Paragraphs (b) through (d)...

  11. Cetacean morbillivirus in coastal Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Nahiid; Duignan, Pádraig J; Wang, Jianning; Bingham, John; Finn, Hugh; Bejder, Lars; Patterson, Anthony P; Holyoake, Carly

    2014-04-01

    Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) has caused several epizootics in multiple species of cetaceans globally and is an emerging disease among cetaceans in Australia. We detected CeMV in 2 stranded coastal Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in Western Australia. Preliminary phylogenetic data suggest that this virus variant is divergent from known strains.

  12. Mitogenomic analyses provide new insights into cetacean origin and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Ulfur; Gullberg, Anette; Janke, Axel

    2004-05-26

    The evolution of the order Cetacea (whales, dolphins, porpoises) has, for a long time, attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists. Here we examine cetacean phylogenetic relationships on the basis of analyses of complete mitochondrial genomes that represent all extant cetacean families. The results suggest that the ancestors of recent cetaceans had an explosive evolutionary radiation 30-35 million years before present. During this period, extant cetaceans divided into the two primary groups, Mysticeti (baleen whales) and Odontoceti (toothed whales). Soon after this basal split, the Odontoceti diverged into the four extant lineages, sperm whales, beaked whales, Indian river dolphins and delphinoids (iniid river dolphins, narwhals/belugas, porpoises and true dolphins). The current data set has allowed test of two recent morphological hypotheses on cetacean origin. One of these hypotheses posits that Artiodactyla and Cetacea originated from the extinct group Mesonychia, and the other that Mesonychia/Cetacea constitutes a sister group to Artiodactyla. The current results are inconsistent with both these hypotheses. The findings suggest that the claimed morphological similarities between Mesonychia and Cetacea are the result of evolutionary convergence rather than common ancestry.

  13. Comparison of real and idealized cetacean flippers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P W; Howle, L E [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Box 90300, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Murray, M M [Department of Mechanical Engineering, United States Naval Academy, 590 Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Fish, F E, E-mail: laurens.howle@duke.ed [Department of Biology, West Chester University, 750 S Church Street, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    When a phenomenon in nature is mimicked for practical applications, it is often done so in an idealized fashion, such as representing the shape found in nature with convenient, piece-wise smooth mathematical functions. The aim of idealization is to capture the advantageous features of the natural phenomenon without having to exactly replicate it, and it is often assumed that the idealization process does in fact capture the relevant geometry. We explored the consequences of the idealization process by creating exact scale models of cetacean flippers using CT scans, creating corresponding idealized versions and then determining the hydrodynamic characteristics of the models via water tunnel testing. We found that the majority of the idealized models did not exhibit fluid dynamic properties that were drastically different from those of the real models, although multiple consequences resulting from the idealization process were evident. Drag performance was significantly improved by idealization. Overall, idealization is an excellent way to capture the relevant effects of a phenomenon found in nature, which spares the researcher from having to painstakingly create exact models, although we have found that there are situations where idealization may have unintended consequences such as one model that exhibited a decrease in lift performance.

  14. Modular evolution of the Cetacean vertebral column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholtz, Emily A

    2007-01-01

    Modular theory predicts that hierarchical developmental processes generate hierarchical phenotypic units that are capable of independent modification. The vertebral column is an overtly modular structure, and its rapid phenotypic transformation in cetacean evolution provides a case study for modularity. Terrestrial mammals have five morphologically discrete vertebral series that are now known to be coincident with Hox gene expression patterns. Here, I present the hypothesis that in living Carnivora and Artiodactyla, and by inference in the terrestrial ancestors of whales, the series are themselves components of larger precaudal and caudal modular units. Column morphology in a series of fossil and living whales is used to predict the type and sequence of developmental changes responsible for modification of that ancestral pattern. Developmental innovations inferred include independent meristic additions to the precaudal column in basal archaeocetes and basilosaurids, stepwise homeotic reduction of the sacral series in protocetids, and dissociation of the caudal series into anterior tail and fluke subunits in basilosaurids. The most dramatic change was the novel association of lumbar and anterior caudal vertebrae in a module that crosses the precaudal/caudal boundary. This large unit is defined by shared patterns of vertebral morphology, count, and size in all living whales (Neoceti).

  15. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Since divergence ∼50 Ma ago from their terrestrial ancestors, cetaceans underwent a series of adaptations such as a ∼10-20 fold increase in myoglobin (Mb) concentration in skeletal muscle, critical for increasing oxygen storage capacity and prolonging dive time. Whereas the O2-binding affinity of Mbs is not significantly different among mammals (with typical oxygenation constants of ∼0.8-1.2 µM(-1)), folding stabilities of cetacean Mbs are ∼2-4 kcal/mol higher than for terrestrial Mbs. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and bayesian tests to describe the evolution of cetacean Mbs, and experimentally calibrated computation of stability effects of mutations, we observe accelerated evolution in cetaceans and identify seven positively selected sites in Mb. Overall, these sites contribute to Mb stabilization with a conditional probability of 0.8. We observe a correlation between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected sites that occur later act against other destabilizing mutations to maintain stability across the clade, except for the shallow divers, where late stability relaxation occurs, probably due to the shorter aerobic dive limits of these species. The three main positively selected sites 66, 5, and 35 undergo changes that favor hydrophobic folding, structural integrity, and intra-helical hydrogen bonds.

  16. Cetacean sleep: an unusual form of mammalian sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyamin, Oleg I; Manger, Paul R; Ridgway, Sam H; Mukhametov, Lev M; Siegel, Jerome M

    2008-10-01

    Our knowledge of the form of lateralized sleep behavior, known as unihemispheric slow wave sleep (USWS), seen in all members of the order Cetacea examined to date, is described. We trace the discovery of this phenotypically unusual form of mammalian sleep and highlight specific aspects that are different from sleep in terrestrial mammals. We find that for cetaceans sleep is characterized by USWS, a negligible amount or complete absence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and a varying degree of movement during sleep associated with body size, and an asymmetrical eye state. We then compare the anatomy of the mammalian somnogenic system with what is known in cetaceans, highlighting areas where additional knowledge is needed to understand cetacean sleep. Three suggested functions of USWS (facilitation of movement, more efficient sensory processing and control of breathing) are discussed. Lastly, the possible selection pressures leading to this form of sleep are examined, leading us to the suggestion that the selection pressure necessitating the evolution of cetacean sleep was most likely the need to offset heat loss to the water from birth and throughout life. Aspects such as sentinel functions and breathing are likely to be proximate evolutionary phenomenon of this form of sleep.

  17. Cetaceans stranded in the Netherlands from 1998 to 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camphuysen, C.J.; Smeenk, C.; Addink, M.; Jansen, O.E.

    2008-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2007, 2063 cetaceans were found stranded in the Netherlands, representing at least 14 species. Two species, humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) and Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris), are additions to the Dutch list. Apart from the first humpback whales, relativ

  18. Cetaceans stranded in the Netherlands from 1998 to 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camphuysen, C.J.; Smeenk, C.; Addink, M.; Grouw, van H.; Jansen, O.E.

    2008-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2007, 2063 cetaceans were found stranded in the Netherlands, representing at least 14 species. Two species, humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) and Blainville's beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris), are additions to the Dutch list. Apart from the first humpback whales, relativ

  19. Initial characterization of novel beaked whale morbillivirus in Hawaiian cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jessica M; West, Kristi L; Levine, Gregg; Sanchez, Susan; Jensen, Brenda A

    2016-01-13

    Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) is a causative factor in epizootics that have resulted in thousands of deaths throughout the Atlantic and Mediterranean since 1987, but less is known of its presence and significance in the Pacific. The first case of CeMV reported in Hawai'i was in a Longman's beaked whale that stranded in 2010. The initial CeMV sequence from this individual indicated the possibility of a novel strain. To address this, archived samples from cetaceans that stranded in Hawai'i between 1997 and 2014 were screened for CeMV. The beaked whale morbillivirus (BWMV) was detected in 15 individuals representing 12 different species (24% of Code 1 and 2 stranded cetaceans). The earliest detected case was a humpback whale that stranded in 1998. Sequence comparisons of a 2.2 kb sequence spanning the phosphoprotein (P) and nucleocapsid (N) genes strongly suggest that the BWMV represents a novel strain of CeMV present in Hawai'i and the Central Pacific. In contrast to recently reported isolates from Brazil and Australia that may represent a distinct clade, BWMV appears to be more closely related to known strains of CeMV (dolphin morbillivirus; porpoise morbillivirus; and pilot whale morbillivirus). Detection rates with repeat sampling of positive lymph nodes were between 2 and 61%, illustrating the extreme heterogeneity that can occur in affected tissues. Taken together, these results suggest that BWMV may be common and established in Hawaiian cetacean populations. BWMV will be important for understanding CeMV and health threats in the relatively understudied cetaceans of the Pacific.

  20. Cetacean diversity on the Parnaiba Delta, Maranhão state, northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, F A; Tosi, C H; Garri, R G; Chellappa, S; Silva, F L

    2008-08-01

    The increase in the research of cetacean surveys on the Brazilian coast has brought new data on the distribution of species never reported before. The present work reviews the current knowledge on cetaceans species and extends this knowledge with an analysis of cetaceans stranded in the Parnaiba Delta, on the coast of Maranhão State, Brazil. The studies on cetacean diversity on the coast of the Parnaíba Delta were made from August 2004 to August 2006. Fourteen strandings were reported, representing six distinct species, such as the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis), humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), Bryde's whales (Balaenoptera edeni), dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), pigmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata), sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) and two specimens which have not yet been identified. The significant degree of cetacean diversity in the region shows that the Parnaíba Delta is, possibly, of an important area for cetacean studies in Brasil.

  1. Cetacean diversity on the Parnaiba Delta, Maranhão state, northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FA. Magalhães

    Full Text Available The increase in the research of cetacean surveys on the Brazilian coast has brought new data on the distribution of species never reported before. The present work reviews the current knowledge on cetaceans species and extends this knowledge with an analysis of cetaceans stranded in the Parnaiba Delta, on the coast of Maranhão State, Brazil. The studies on cetacean diversity on the coast of the Parnaíba Delta were made from August 2004 to August 2006. Fourteen strandings were reported, representing six distinct species, such as the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis, humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae, Bryde's whales (Balaenoptera edeni, dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata, pigmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata, sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus and two specimens which have not yet been identified. The significant degree of cetacean diversity in the region shows that the Parnaíba Delta is, possibly, of an important area for cetacean studies in Brasil.

  2. Submarine canyons as important habitat for cetaceans, with special reference to the Gully: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moors-Murphy, Hilary B.

    2014-06-01

    There has been much research interest in the use of submarine canyons by cetaceans, particularly beaked whales (family Ziphiidae), which appear to be especially attracted to canyon habitats in some areas. However, not all submarine canyons are associated with large numbers of cetaceans and the mechanisms through which submarine canyons may attract cetaceans are not clearly understood. This paper reviews some of the cetacean associations with submarine canyons that have been anecdotally described or presented in scientific literature and discusses the physical, oceanographic and biological mechanisms that may lead to enhanced cetacean abundance around these canyons. Particular attention is paid to the Gully, a large submarine canyon and Marine Protected Area off eastern Canada for which there exists some of the strongest evidence available for submarine canyons as important cetacean habitat. Studies demonstrating increased cetacean abundance in the Gully and the processes that are likely to attract cetaceans to this relatively well-studied canyon are discussed. This review provides some limited evidence that cetaceans are more likely to associate with larger canyons; however, further studies are needed to fully understand the relationship between the physical characteristics of canyons and enhanced cetacean abundance. In general, toothed whales (especially beaked whales and sperm whales) appear to exhibit the strongest associations with submarine canyons, occurring in these features throughout the year and likely attracted by concentrating and aggregating processes. By contrast, baleen whales tend to occur in canyons seasonally and are most likely attracted to canyons by enrichment and concentrating processes. Existing evidence thus suggests that at least some submarine canyons are important foraging areas for cetaceans, and should be given special consideration for cetacean conservation and protection.

  3. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Cetacean Head Tissue Peter H. Rogers & Michael D. Gray G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta...demonstrate a system for non-invasive in vivo measurement of the complex elastic moduli (stiffnesses and loss factors) of cetacean head soft tissues. This...objective of this project is to develop an ultrasound-based system for non-invasive determination of in vivo shear and bulk properties of cetacean soft

  4. Cetacean Density Estimation from Novel Acoustic Datasets by Acoustic Propagation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Cetacean Density Estimation from Novel Acoustic Datasets...OBJECTIVES The objectives of this research are to apply existing methods for cetacean density estimation from passive acoustic recordings made by single...sensors, to novel data sets and cetacean species, as well as refine the existing techniques in order to develop a more generalized model that can be

  5. An examination of cetacean brain structure with a novel hypothesis correlating thermogenesis to the evolution of a big brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, Paul R

    2006-05-01

    This review examines aspects of cetacean brain structure related to behaviour and evolution. Major considerations include cetacean brain-body allometry, structure of the cerebral cortex, the hippocampal formation, specialisations of the cetacean brain related to vocalisations and sleep phenomenology, paleoneurology, and brain-body allometry during cetacean evolution. These data are assimilated to demonstrate that there is no neural basis for the often-asserted high intellectual abilities of cetaceans. Despite this, the cetaceans do have volumetrically large brains. A novel hypothesis regarding the evolution of large brain size in cetaceans is put forward. It is shown that a combination of an unusually high number of glial cells and unihemispheric sleep phenomenology make the cetacean brain an efficient thermogenetic organ, which is needed to counteract heat loss to the water. It is demonstrated that water temperature is the major selection pressure driving an altered scaling of brain and body size and an increased actual brain size in cetaceans. A point in the evolutionary history of cetaceans is identified as the moment in which water temperature became a significant selection pressure in cetacean brain evolution. This occurred at the Archaeoceti - modern cetacean faunal transition. The size, structure and scaling of the cetacean brain continues to be shaped by water temperature in extant cetaceans. The alterations in cetacean brain structure, function and scaling, combined with the imperative of producing offspring that can withstand the rate of heat loss experienced in water, within the genetic confines of eutherian mammal reproductive constraints, provides an explanation for the evolution of the large size of the cetacean brain. These observations provide an alternative to the widely held belief of a correlation between brain size and intelligence in cetaceans.

  6. Analysis of the FGF gene family provides insights into aquatic adaptation in cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kiwoong; Lee, Kyeong Won; Chung, Oksung; Yim, Hyung-Soon; Cha, Sun-Shin; Lee, Sae-Won; Jun, JeHoon; Cho, Yun Sung; Bhak, Jong; Magalhães, João Pedro de; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Jeong, Jae-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    Cetacean body structure and physiology exhibit dramatic adaptations to their aquatic environment. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of essential factors that regulate animal development and physiology; however, their role in cetacean evolution is not clearly understood. Here, we sequenced the fin whale genome and analysed FGFs from 8 cetaceans. FGF22, a hair follicle-enriched gene, exhibited pseudogenization, indicating that the function of this gene is no longer necessary in cetaceans that have lost most of their body hair. An evolutionary analysis revealed signatures of positive selection for FGF3 and FGF11, genes related to ear and tooth development and hypoxia, respectively. We found a D203G substitution in cetacean FGF9, which was predicted to affect FGF9 homodimerization, suggesting that this gene plays a role in the acquisition of rigid flippers for efficient manoeuvring. Cetaceans utilize low bone density as a buoyancy control mechanism, but the underlying genes are not known. We found that the expression of FGF23, a gene associated with reduced bone density, is greatly increased in the cetacean liver under hypoxic conditions, thus implicating FGF23 in low bone density in cetaceans. Altogether, our results provide novel insights into the roles of FGFs in cetacean adaptation to the aquatic environment. PMID:28074842

  7. 3D Kinematics and Hydrodynamic Analysis of Freely Swimming Cetacean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yan; Sheinberg, Dustin; Liu, Geng; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank; Javed, Joveria

    2015-11-01

    It's widely thought that flexibility and the ability to control flexibility are crucial elements in determining the performance of animal swimming. However, there is a lack of quantification of both span-wise and chord-wise deformation of Cetacean's flukes and associated hydrodynamic performance during actively swimming. To fill this gap, we examined the motion and flexure of both dolphin fluke and orca fluke in steady swimming using a combined experimental and computational approach. It is found that the fluke surface morphing can effectively modulate the flow structures and influence the propulsive performance. Findings from this work are fundamental for understanding key kinematic features of effective Cetacean propulsors, and for quantifying the hydrodynamic force production that naturally occurs during different types of swimming. This work is supported by ONR MURI N00014-14-1-0533 and NSF CBET-1313217.

  8. Quantifying the Effects of Propagation on Classification of Cetacean Vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Acoustic Measurements, Kos, Greece, (2011). [8] Stefan Murphy and Paul C. Hines, “Examining the robustness of automated aural classification of active ... Classification of Cetacean Vocalizations Paul C. Hines Dalhousie University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 5269 Morris St. Morray...a classification system capable of operating in many environments one must understand the role of propagation on the classifier. A prototype aural

  9. Neuromuscular anatomy and evolution of the cetacean forelimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lisa Noelle; Dawson, Susan D; Reidenberg, Joy S; Berta, Annalisa

    2007-09-01

    The forelimb of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) has been radically modified during the limb-to-flipper transition. Extant cetaceans have a soft tissue flipper encasing the manus and acting as a hydrofoil to generate lift. The neuromuscular anatomy that controls flipper movement, however, is poorly understood. This study documents flipper neuromuscular anatomy and tests the hypothesis that antebrachial muscle robustness is related to body size. Data were gathered during dissections of 22 flippers, representing 15 species (7 odontocetes, 15 mysticetes). Results were compared with published descriptions of both artiodactyls and secondarily aquatic vertebrates. Results indicate muscle robustness is best predicted by taxonomic distribution and is not a function of body size. All cetaceans have atrophied triceps muscles, an immobile cubital joint, and lack most connective tissue structures and manus muscles. Forelimbs retain only three muscle groups: triceps (only the scapular head is functional as the humeral heads are vestigal), and antebrachial extensors and flexors. Well-developed flexor and extensor muscles were found in mysticetes and basal odontocetes (i.e., physeterids, kogiids, and ziphiids), whereas later diverging odontocetes (i.e., monodontids, phocoenids, and delphinids) lack or reduce these muscles. Balaenopterid mysticetes (e.g., fin and minke whales) may actively change flipper curvature, while basal odontocetes (e.g., sperm and beaked whales) probably stiffen the flipper through isometric contraction. Later diverging odontocetes lack musculature supporting digital movements and are unable to manipulate flipper curvature. Cetacean forelimbs are unique in that they have lost agility and several soft tissue structures, but retain sensory innervations.

  10. Cetacean Bioacoustics with Emphasis on Recording and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Tomonari

    More than 80 cetacean species live in oceans, lakes, and rivers. For underwater navigation and recognition, whales and dolphins have developed unique sensory systems using acoustic signals. Toothed whales, such as dolphins and porpoises, have sonar using ultrasonic pulse trains called echolocations (Au, 1993). As top predators in the water, dolphins and porpoises rely on accurate and long-range sensory systems for catching prey. Dolphins have another type of vocalization called a whistle that is narrowband with a long duration.

  11. Blind river dolphin: first side-swimming cetacean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herald, E S; Brownell, R L; Frye, F L; Morris, E J; Evans, W E; Scott, A B

    1969-12-12

    The blind river dolphin (Platanista gangetica), first written about by Pliny the Elder in A.D. 72, was found (10 November 1968) to be the first known side-swimming cetacean. The rudimentary eye lacks the lens, but anatomical evidence suggests that the eye may serve as a light sensor. The underwater sound emissions of this species, although similar to those of the Amazon River dolphin (Inia geoffrensis), appear to be produced constantly.

  12. Cetaceans and fisheries in Kenya coastal waters: a preliminary study.

    OpenAIRE

    Omondi, E.

    1995-01-01

    Of all marine resources characteristic of the Kenyan coast, marine mammals are least studied singly or in association with other resources. In this paper, available records on cetacean catches by district between 1978-1991 inclusive were used to assess the status and trend of their fishery, distribution, and interaction with sharks, clupeids and tuna landings. Spartial and temporal variations in takes were evident. The Mombasa district led in total catch (62.2 tons) while the Tana River distr...

  13. Cetacean strandings in Costa Rica (1966-1999)

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Fonseca, Javier; Cubero-Pardo,Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    Cetacean strandings in Costa Rica are reported for a period of 33 years, with a total of 35 strandings, 13 species and 247 individuals involved. The vast majority of documented strandings occurred on the Pacific coast and correspond to single individuals (32 and 28 strandings respectively). The highest stranding number was in the period from 1990 to 1999 (n=24). Physeter catodon (cachalot or sperm whale) is the species with the highest frequency of strandings (n=8) and the family Delphinidae ...

  14. Observations of shifts in cetacean distribution in the Norwegian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eNøttestad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess possible shifts in distributional patterns of cetaceans residing in the Norwegian Sea, and if possible relate the distribution to their feeding ecology during the summer seasons of 2009, 2010 and 2012. During this same period, historically large abundances in the order of 15 million tonnes pelagic planktivorous fish such as Norwegian spring-spawning herring (Clupea harengus, northeast Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus and blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou, have been reported feeding in the Norwegian Sea during the summer. There is also observed elevated average surface temperatures and a reduction in zooplankton biomasses. Such changes might influence species composition, distribution patterns and feeding preferences of cetaceans residing the region. Our results show higher densities of toothed whales, killer whales (Orcinus orca and pilot whales (Globicephala melas, than the previous norm for these waters. Baleen whales, such as minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata and fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus, which is often associated with zooplankton, displayed a distribution overlap with pelagic fish abundances. Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae were observed in low numbers, indicating shift in habitat preference, compared to sighting data collected only few years earlier. Our study illustrate that both small and large cetaceans that reside in the Norwegian Sea have the capability to rapidly perform shifts in distribution and abundance patterns dependent of the access to different types and behaviour of prey species.

  15. The evolutionary history of cetacean brain and body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stephen H; Geisler, Jonathan H; McGowen, Michael R; Fox, Charlotte; Marino, Lori; Gatesy, John

    2013-11-01

    Cetaceans rival primates in brain size relative to body size and include species with the largest brains and biggest bodies to have ever evolved. Cetaceans are remarkably diverse, varying in both phenotypes by several orders of magnitude, with notable differences between the two extant suborders, Mysticeti and Odontoceti. We analyzed the evolutionary history of brain and body mass, and relative brain size measured by the encephalization quotient (EQ), using a data set of extinct and extant taxa to capture temporal variation in the mode and direction of evolution. Our results suggest that cetacean brain and body mass evolved under strong directional trends to increase through time, but decreases in EQ were widespread. Mysticetes have significantly lower EQs than odontocetes due to a shift in brain:body allometry following the divergence of the suborders, caused by rapid increases in body mass in Mysticeti and a period of body mass reduction in Odontoceti. The pattern in Cetacea contrasts with that in primates, which experienced strong trends to increase brain mass and relative brain size, but not body mass. We discuss what these analyses reveal about the convergent evolution of large brains, and highlight that until recently the most encephalized mammals were odontocetes, not primates.

  16. Metazoan parasites of cetaceans off the northeastern coast of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Vitor Luz; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal; Iñiguez, Alena Mayo; Mathews-Cascon, Helena; Ribeiro, Felipe Bezerra; Pessoa, Lourdes Marina Bezerra; de Meirelles, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Borges, João Carlos Gomes; Marigo, Juliana; Soares, Laiza; de Lima Silva, Flávio José

    2010-10-11

    This study represents the first survey of the parasitic fauna of cetaceans off the northeastern coast of Brazil. Parasites were collected from 82 animals rescued from the states of Ceará to Bahia, including the archipelago of Fernando de Noronha. A total of 14 species of cetaceans were evaluated: Sotalia guianensis, Stenella sp., Stenella clymene, Stenella longirostris, Stenella coeruleoalba, Stenella frontalis, Megaptera novaeangliae, Peponocephala electra, Steno bredanensis, Kogia breviceps, Kogia sima, Globicephala macrorhynchus, Tursiops truncatus, Physeter macrocephalus and Lagenodelphis hosei. The parasites were fixed and preserved in 70% ethanol or alcohol-formalin-acetic acid solution (AFA), clarified in phenol and mounted on slides for morphological identification. In total, 11 species and 8 genera of endo- and ectoparasites were identified: Halocercus brasiliensis, Halocercus kleinenbergi, Stenurus globicephalae, Halocercus sp., Anisakis sp., Crassicauda sp. (Nematoda), Phyllobothrium delphini, Monorygma grimaldii, Scolex pleuronectis, Strobicephalus triangularis, Tetrabothrius forsteri, Tetrabothrius sp., Trigonocotyle sp., Diphyllobothrium sp. (Cestoda), Campula sp. (Trematoda), Bolbosoma sp. (Acanthocephala), Cyamus boopis, Syncyamus pseudorcae and Xenobalanus globicipitis (Crustacea). The identification of some species represented novel records for the country and increased the occurrence of some parasites to new hosts. The use of standardized methodologies for collecting and evaluating a larger number of animals is essential for a better understanding of host-parasite relationships in cetaceans and their use as biological indicators in the region.

  17. Contaminants in cetaceans from UK waters: status as assessed within the Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme from 1990 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Robin J; Barry, Jon; Barber, Jonathan L; Bersuder, Philippe; Deaville, Rob; Reid, Robert J; Brownlow, Andrew; Penrose, Rod; Barnett, James; Loveridge, Jan; Smith, Brian; Jepson, Paul D

    2012-07-01

    Since 1990, tissue samples from UK-stranded and -bycaught cetaceans have been available for study of contaminant burdens. These have been used to study spatial and temporal trends in concentrations in UK waters, and to investigate potential associations between contaminants and health status. We describe the current status of cetaceans (primarily harbour porpoises, Phocoena phocoena) in UK waters in relation to pollution. Concentrations of BDEs, HBCD, and the organochlorine pesticides are declining. In contrast, concentrations of CBs have plateaued following earlier reductions due to regulation of use, and further reductions are likely to take decades. Blubber PCB concentrations are still at toxicologically significant levels in many harbour porpoises and regularly occur at even higher levels in bottlenose dolphins and killer whales due to their higher trophic level in marine food chains. Further reductions in PCB inputs into the marine environment are needed to mitigate risk from PCB exposure in these species.

  18. eDNA Barcoding: Using Next-Generation Sequencing of Environmental DNA for Detection and Identification of Cetacean Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Environmental DNA for Detection and Identification of Cetacean Species Scott Baker Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center Newport...identification of cetaceans using environmental (e)DNA collected from seawater. Referred to here as ‘(e)DNA barcoding’, this new methodology can be used...to [a] detect and identify the presence of (non-vocal) cetaceans in the field and [b] identify the species of unknown cetacean vocalizations to

  19. Cetacean surveys in the Southern Ocean using icebreaker-supported helicopters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheidat, M.; Friedlaender, A.; Kock, K.H.; Lehnert, L.; Boebel, O.; Roberts, J.; Williams, R.

    2011-01-01

    Cetaceans in the Southern Ocean are potentially impacted by anthropogenic activities, such as direct hunting or through indirect effects of a reduced sea ice due to climate change. Knowledge on the distribution of cetacean species in this area is important for conservation, but the remoteness of the

  20. Parasitism as a factor (?) in single strandings of southern California cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, M D; Walker, W A

    1978-08-01

    From 1970 to 1976 a total of 91 cetaceans was examined for parasites and associated pathology. Sixty of the animals were found stranded along a 100-mile section of southern California coastline while 31 were taken at sea. Parasites from 5 species of cetaceans are reported along with their possible role as a contributing factor in stranding behavior.

  1. Towards a new paradigm of non-captive research on cetacean cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Lori; Frohoff, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary knowledge of impressive neurophysiology and behavior in cetaceans, combined with increasing opportunities for studying free-ranging cetaceans who initiate sociable interaction with humans, are converging to highlight serious ethical considerations and emerging opportunities for a new era of progressive and less-invasive cetacean research. Most research on cetacean cognition has taken place in controlled captive settings, e.g., research labs, marine parks. While these environments afford a certain amount of experimental rigor and logistical control they are fraught with limitations in external validity, impose tremendous stress on the part of the captive animals, and place burdens on populations from which they are often captured. Alternatively, over the past three decades, some researchers have sought to focus their attention on the presence of free-ranging cetacean individuals and groups who have initiated, or chosen to participate in, sociable interactions with humans in the wild. This new approach, defined as Interspecies Collaborative Research between cetacean and human, involves developing novel ways to address research questions under natural conditions and respecting the individual cetacean's autonomy. It also offers a range of potential direct benefits to the cetaceans studied, as well as allowing for unprecedented cognitive and psychological research on sociable mysticetes. Yet stringent precautions are warranted so as to not increase their vulnerability to human activities or pathogens. When conducted in its best and most responsible form, collaborative research with free-ranging cetaceans can deliver methodological innovation and invaluable new insights while not necessitating the ethical and scientific compromises that characterize research in captivity. Further, it is representative of a new epoch in science in which research is designed so that the participating cetaceans are the direct recipients of the benefits.

  2. Development of a Colloidal Gold-based Immunochromatographic Test Strip for Detection of Cetacean Myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kun-Wei; Lo, Chieh; Chu, Chi-Shih; Chin, Li-Te; Wang, Yu-Ting; Yang, Wei-Cheng

    2016-07-13

    This protocol describes the development of a colloidal gold immunochromatographic test strip based on the sandwich format that can be used to differentiate the myoglobin (Mb) of cetaceans from that of seals and other animals. The strip provides rapid and on-the-spot screening for cetacean meat, thereby restraining its illegal trade and consumption. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with reactivity toward the Mb of cetaceans were developed. The amino acid sequences of Mb antigenic reactive regions from various animals were analyzed in order to design two synthetic peptides (a general peptide and a specific peptide) and thereafter raise the mAbs (subclass IgG1). The mAbs were selected from hybridomas screened by indirect ELISA, western blot and dot blot. CGF5H9 was specific to the Mbs of rabbits, dogs, pigs, cows, goats, and cetaceans while it showed weak to no affinity to the Mbs of chickens, tuna and seals. CSF1H13 can bind seals and cetaceans with strong affinity but showed no affinity to other animals. Cetacean samples from four families (Balaenopteridae, Delphinidae, Phocoenidae and Kogiidae) were used in this study, and the results indicated that these two mAbs have broad binding ability to Mbs from different cetaceans. These mAbs were applied on a sandwich-type colloidal gold immunochromatographic test strip. CGF5H9, which recognizes many species, was colloid gold-labeled and used as the detection antibody. CSF1H13, which was coated on the test zone, detected the presence of cetacean and seal Mbs. Muscle samples from tuna, chicken, seal, five species of terrestrial mammals and 15 species of cetaceans were tested in triplicate. All cetacean samples showed positive results and all the other samples showed negative results.

  3. Towards a new paradigm of non-captive research on cetacean cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Marino

    Full Text Available Contemporary knowledge of impressive neurophysiology and behavior in cetaceans, combined with increasing opportunities for studying free-ranging cetaceans who initiate sociable interaction with humans, are converging to highlight serious ethical considerations and emerging opportunities for a new era of progressive and less-invasive cetacean research. Most research on cetacean cognition has taken place in controlled captive settings, e.g., research labs, marine parks. While these environments afford a certain amount of experimental rigor and logistical control they are fraught with limitations in external validity, impose tremendous stress on the part of the captive animals, and place burdens on populations from which they are often captured. Alternatively, over the past three decades, some researchers have sought to focus their attention on the presence of free-ranging cetacean individuals and groups who have initiated, or chosen to participate in, sociable interactions with humans in the wild. This new approach, defined as Interspecies Collaborative Research between cetacean and human, involves developing novel ways to address research questions under natural conditions and respecting the individual cetacean's autonomy. It also offers a range of potential direct benefits to the cetaceans studied, as well as allowing for unprecedented cognitive and psychological research on sociable mysticetes. Yet stringent precautions are warranted so as to not increase their vulnerability to human activities or pathogens. When conducted in its best and most responsible form, collaborative research with free-ranging cetaceans can deliver methodological innovation and invaluable new insights while not necessitating the ethical and scientific compromises that characterize research in captivity. Further, it is representative of a new epoch in science in which research is designed so that the participating cetaceans are the direct recipients of the benefits.

  4. Towards a New Paradigm of Non-Captive Research on Cetacean Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Lori; Frohoff, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary knowledge of impressive neurophysiology and behavior in cetaceans, combined with increasing opportunities for studying free-ranging cetaceans who initiate sociable interaction with humans, are converging to highlight serious ethical considerations and emerging opportunities for a new era of progressive and less-invasive cetacean research. Most research on cetacean cognition has taken place in controlled captive settings, e.g., research labs, marine parks. While these environments afford a certain amount of experimental rigor and logistical control they are fraught with limitations in external validity, impose tremendous stress on the part of the captive animals, and place burdens on populations from which they are often captured. Alternatively, over the past three decades, some researchers have sought to focus their attention on the presence of free-ranging cetacean individuals and groups who have initiated, or chosen to participate in, sociable interactions with humans in the wild. This new approach, defined as Interspecies Collaborative Research between cetacean and human, involves developing novel ways to address research questions under natural conditions and respecting the individual cetacean's autonomy. It also offers a range of potential direct benefits to the cetaceans studied, as well as allowing for unprecedented cognitive and psychological research on sociable mysticetes. Yet stringent precautions are warranted so as to not increase their vulnerability to human activities or pathogens. When conducted in its best and most responsible form, collaborative research with free-ranging cetaceans can deliver methodological innovation and invaluable new insights while not necessitating the ethical and scientific compromises that characterize research in captivity. Further, it is representative of a new epoch in science in which research is designed so that the participating cetaceans are the direct recipients of the benefits. PMID:21915286

  5. Cetacean strandings in Costa Rica (1966-1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fonseca, J; Cubero-Pardo, P

    2001-06-01

    Cetacean strandings in Costa Rica are reported for a period of 33 years, with a total of 35 strandings, 13 species and 247 individuals involved. The vast majority of documented strandings occurred on the Pacific coast and correspond to single individuals (32 and 28 strandings respectively). The highest stranding number was in the period from 1990 to 1999 (n = 24). Physeter catodon (cachalot or sperm whale) is the species with the highest frequency of strandings (n = 8) and the family Delphinidae has the majority of species (n = 8) and strandings (n = 22). No other general tendencies were determined with the existing data.

  6. Evolution of Digestive Enzymes and RNASE1 Provides Insights into Dietary Switch of Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengfei; Xu, Shixia; Du, Kexing; Huang, Fang; Chen, Zhuo; Zhou, Kaiya; Ren, Wenhua; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Although cetaceans (whales, porpoises, and dolphins) have multi-chambered stomachs, feeding habits of modern cetaceans have dramatically changed from herbivorous to carnivorous. However, the genetic basis underlying this dietary switch remains unexplored. Here, we present the first systematic investigation of 10 digestive enzymes genes (i.e., CYP7A1, CTRC, LIPC, LIPF, PNLIP, PGC, PRSS1, SI, SLC5A1, and TMPRSS15) of representative cetaceans, and the evolutionary trajectory of RNASE1 in cetartiodactylans. Positive selections were detected with proteinases (i.e., CTRC, PRSS1, and TMPRSS15) and lipases (i.e., CYP7A1, LIPF, and PNLIP) suggesting that cetaceans have evolved an enhanced digestion capacity for proteins and lipids, the major nutritional components of their prey (fishes and invertebrates). In addition, it was found that RNASE1 gene duplicated after the cetartiodactylan speciation and two independent gene duplication events took place in Camelidae and Ruminantia. Positive selection was detected with RNASE1 of Camelidae and Bovidae, suggesting enhanced digestive efficiency in the ruminants. Remarkably, even though the ancestors of cetaceans were terrestrial artiodactyls that are herbivorous, modern cetaceans lost the pancreatic RNASE1 copy with digestive function, which is in accordance with the dietary change from herbivorous to carnivorous. In sum, this is the first study that provides new insights into the evolutionary mechanism of dietary switch in cetaceans. PMID:27651393

  7. Cetacean occurrence near an offshore oil platform in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Jussara Cremer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Information about cetaceans in offshore Brazilian waters is scarce, and oil-rigs could provide an important opportunity to obtain new data. The present work was conducted on the P-XIV oil-rig (Petrobrás (26o46’02.2”S; 46o47’02.15”W, located on the border of the continental slope, in an area of 200m depth. In the period between July 2000 and August 2002, 75 sightings of cetaceans were recorded during 38 days of effort. Among the species identified, Tursiops truncatus was the most common, corresponding to 53.3% of the records. Among the misticets, only Balaenoptera acutorostrata was identified with accuracy, with 4 records (5.3%. These were the only species that approached and stayed close to the oil-rig. Many records were made at night, when the gas burner illuminated the area around the oil-rig. We recorded an aggressive interaction involving T. truncatus and B. acutorostrata.

  8. Review of the cetacean nose: form, function, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Annalisa; Ekdale, Eric G; Cranford, Ted W

    2014-11-01

    The cetacean nose presents a unique suite of anatomical modifications. Key among these is posterior movement of the external nares from the tip of the rostrum to the top of the head. Concomitant with these anatomical changes are functional changes including the evolution of echolocation in odontocetes, and reduction of olfaction in Neoceti (crown odontocetes and mysticetes). Anatomical and embryological development of the nose in crown cetaceans is reviewed as well as their functional implications. A sequence of evolutionary transformations of the nose is proposed in the transition from a terrestrial to an aquatic lifestyle made by whales. Basilosaurids and all later whales reduce the nasal turbinates. The next stage characterizes Neoceti which exhibit reduction of the major olfactory structures, i.e. the ethmoturbinates, cribriform plate and maxilloturbinates with further reduction and subsequent loss in odontocetes. These anatomical modifications reflect underlying genetic changes such as the reduction of olfactory receptor genes, although mysticetes retain some olfactory abilities. Modifications of the facial and nasal region of odontocetes reflect specialization for biosonar sound production.

  9. Sequence polymorphism and evolution of three cetacean MHC genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shi Xia; Ren, Wen Hua; Li, Shu Zhen; Wei, Fu Wen; Zhou, Kai Ya; Yang, Guang

    2009-09-01

    Sequence variability at three major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes (DQB, DRA, and MHC-I) of cetaceans was investigated in order to get an overall understanding of cetacean MHC evolution. Little sequence variation was detected at the DRA locus, while extensive and considerable variability were found at the MHC-I and DQB loci. Phylogenetic reconstruction and sequence comparison revealed extensive sharing of identical MHC alleles among different species at the three MHC loci examined. Comparisons of phylogenetic trees for these MHC loci with the trees reconstructed only based on non-PBR sites revealed that allelic similarity/identity possibly reflected common ancestry and were not due to adaptive convergence. At the same time, trans-species evolution was also evidenced that the allelic diversity of the three MHC loci clearly pre-dated species divergence events according to the relaxed molecular clock. It may be the forces of balancing selection acting to maintain the high sequence variability and identical alleles in trans-specific manner at the MHC-I and DQB loci.

  10. A claim in search of evidence: reply to Manger's thermogenesis hypothesis of cetacean brain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Lori; Butti, Camilla; Connor, Richard C; Fordyce, R Ewan; Herman, Louis M; Hof, Patrick R; Lefebvre, Louis; Lusseau, David; McCowan, Brenda; Nimchinsky, Esther A; Pack, Adam A; Reidenberg, Joy S; Reiss, Diana; Rendell, Luke; Uhen, Mark D; Van der Gucht, Estelle; Whitehead, Hal

    2008-11-01

    In a recent publication in Biological Reviews, Manger (2006) made the controversial claim that the large brains of cetaceans evolved to generate heat during oceanic cooling in the Oligocene epoch and not, as is the currently accepted view, as a basis for an increase in cognitive or information-processing capabilities in response to ecological or social pressures. Manger further argued that dolphins and other cetaceans are considerably less intelligent than generally thought. In this review we challenge Manger's arguments and provide abundant evidence that modern cetacean brains are large in order to support complex cognitive abilities driven by social and ecological forces.

  11. Global coverage of cetacean line-transect surveys: status quo, data gaps and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschner, Kristin; Quick, Nicola J; Jewell, Rebecca; Williams, Rob; Harris, Catriona M

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of abundance, trends and distribution of cetacean populations is needed to inform marine conservation efforts, ecosystem models and spatial planning. We compiled a geo-spatial database of published data on cetacean abundance from dedicated visual line-transect surveys and encoded >1100 abundance estimates for 47 species from 430 surveys conducted worldwide from 1975-2005. Our subsequent analyses revealed large spatial, temporal and taxonomic variability and gaps in survey coverage. With the exception of Antarctic waters, survey coverage was biased toward the northern hemisphere, especially US and northern European waters. Overall, cetacean conservation efforts.

  12. A comparative study of the inner ear structures of artiodactyls and early cetaceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingshirn, M.A. [Ashland Univ., OH (United States); Luo, Z. [College of Charleston, SC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    It has been suggested that the order Cetacea (whales and porpoises) are closely related to artiodactyls, even-hoofed ungulate mammals such as the pig and cow. Paleontological and molecular data strongly supports this concept of phylogenetic relationships. In a study of DNA sequences of two mitochondrial ribosomal gene segments of cetaceans, the artiodactyls were found to be closest related to Cetaceans. These well accepted studies on the phylogenetic affinities of artiodactyls and cetaceans cause us to conduct a comparative study of the bony structure of the inner ear of these two taxa.

  13. GLOBEC NEP Northern California Current Cetacean Survey Data, NH0005, 0007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GLOBEC (GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics) NEP (Northeast Pacific) Northern California Current Cetacean Survey Data from R/V New Horizon cruises NH0005 and 0007....

  14. AFSC/NMML: Cetacean line-transect survey in the Gulf of Alaska, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Three marine mammal observers participated on a cetacean survey from 26 June to 15 July 2003, aboard the NOAA ship Miller Freeman as a piggyback project during a...

  15. Climate, critters, and cetaceans: Cenozoic drivers of the evolution of modern whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Felix G; Uhen, Mark D

    2010-02-19

    Modern cetaceans, a poster child of evolution, play an important role in the ocean ecosystem as apex predators and nutrient distributors, as well as evolutionary "stepping stones" for the deep sea biota. Recent discussions on the impact of climate change and marine exploitation on current cetacean populations may benefit from insights into what factors have influenced cetacean diversity in the past. Previous studies suggested that the rise of diatoms as dominant marine primary producers and global temperature change were key factors in the evolution of modern whales. Based on a comprehensive diversity data set, we show that much of observed cetacean paleodiversity can indeed be explained by diatom diversity in conjunction with variations in climate as indicated by oxygen stable isotope records (delta18O).

  16. AFSC/NMML: Cetacean Assessment and Ecology Program Humpback Whale Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Since 1980, the Cetacean Assessment and Ecology Program of the National Marine Mammal Laboratory has been collecting photos of humpback whales (Megaptera...

  17. Cetacean response to summer maritime traffic in the Western Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, I; Crosti, R; Angeletti, D; Carosso, L; David, L; Di-Méglio, N; Moulins, A; Rosso, M; Tepsich, P; Arcangeli, A

    2015-08-01

    Maritime traffic is one of many anthropogenic pressures threatening the marine environment. This study was specifically designed to investigate the relationship between vessels presence and cetacean sightings in the high sea areas of the Western Mediterranean Sea region. We recorded and compared the total number of vessels in the presence and absence of cetacean sightings using data gathered during the summer season (2009-2013) along six fixed transects repeatedly surveyed. In locations with cetacean sightings (N = 2667), nautical traffic was significantly lower, by 20%, compared to random locations where no sightings occurred (N = 1226): all cetacean species, except bottlenose dolphin, were generally observed in locations with lower vessel abundance. In different areas the species showed variable results likely influenced by a combination of biological and local environmental factors. The approach of this research helped create, for the first time, a wide vision of the different responses of animals towards a common pressure.

  18. Evaluation of cetacean exposure to organotin compounds in Brazilian waters through hepatic total tin concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorneles, Paulo R. [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos (MAQUA), Faculdade de Oceanografia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: dornelespr@gmail.com; Lailson-Brito, Jose [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos (MAQUA), Faculdade de Oceanografia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: lailson@uerj.br; Fernandez, Marcos A.S. [Laboratorio de Oceanografia Quimica, Faculdade de Oceanografia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: hallfz@uerj.br; Vidal, Lara G. [Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos (MAQUA), Faculdade de Oceanografia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: vidallara@yahoo.com.br; Barbosa, Lupercio A. [Instituto ORCA, Vila Velha, ES (Brazil)], E-mail: lupercio@orca.org.br; Azevedo, Alexandre F. [Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos (MAQUA), Faculdade de Oceanografia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: alexandre.maqua@gmail.com; Fragoso, Ana B.L. [Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos (MAQUA), Faculdade de Oceanografia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: abfragoso@gmail.com; Torres, Joao P.M. [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: jptorres@biof.ufrj.br; Malm, Olaf [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: olaf@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    In Brazil, there is no restriction to the use of organotins (OTs). Previous investigations have shown that hepatic {sigma}Sn in cetaceans is predominantly organic. Hepatic {sigma}Sn concentrations were determined by GFAAS in 67 cetaceans (13 species) that stranded on Rio de Janeiro (RJ) and Espirito Santo (ES) states. Concentrations (in ng/g wet wt.) of marine tucuxis (n = 20) from the highly contaminated Guanabara Bay (in RJ) varied from 1703 to 9638. Concentrations of three marine tucuxi foetuses and one newborn calf (all from Guanabara Bay) varied between 431 and 2107. Contrastingly, the maximum level among 19 oceanic dolphins was 346, and 15 out of these 19 specimens presented concentrations below detection limit. The levels of Sn in six marine tucuxis from a less contaminated area (ES) varied from below detection limit to 744. Comparing to the literature, coastal cetaceans from Brazil appear to be highly exposed to OTs. - Cetaceans from Brazil are highly exposed to organotin compounds.

  19. Cetacean Ecology Survey at North Western Hawaiian Islands (SE1303, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goal of the cruise was to collect data on the abundance, distribution, stock structure, and habitat of cetaceans in the Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National...

  20. Right Whale and Cetacean Abundance Spring Survey (AL0404, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The right whale and cetacean survey primarily focuses on right whales in the coastal and continental shelf areas, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better...

  1. SWFSC/MMTD/PI: Pacific Islands Cetacean Ecosystem Assessment Survey (PICEAS) 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PICEAS (Pacific Islands Cetacean Ecosystem Assessment Survey) 2005 was an ecosystem survey in the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) waters of Palmyra and Johnston...

  2. Cetacean Community Ecology in the Waters of Sri Lanka and the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    cetaceans. In addition to shelf, slope, and oceanic habitats, there are regions dominated by the input of fresh water (e.g., Bay of Bengal), by... evaporation and low river runoff (e.g., Arabian Sea), as well as coastal currents, eddy activity, and large-scale oceanic currents. Moreover, the Arabian...However, very little is known of the distribution, abundance, or behavior of cetaceans in the oceanic waters of the Bay of Bengal. What little

  3. Rapid immune colloidal gold strip for cetacean meat restraining illegal trade and consumption: implications for conservation and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chieh; Chin, Li-Te; Chu, Chi-Shih; Wang, Yu-Ting; Chan, Kun-Wei; Yang, Wei-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of cetacean meat is geographically common and often of undetermined sustainability. Besides, it can expose humans to contaminants and zoonotic pathogens. The illegality of possessing cetacean meat was likely under-reported in some countries due to lack of attention paid by the officials although DNA analysis of market products helped to show such practices. We developed two monoclonal antibodies against synthetic peptides of myoglobin (Mb) for constructing a rapid immune colloidal gold strip. Only cetacean Mb is capable of binding to both antibodies and presents positive signal while the Mb from other animals can bind only 1 of the antibodies and presents negative result. The strip for cetacean meat would be an applicable and cost-effective test for field inspectors and even the general public. It contributes to increase the reporting capacity and coverage of illegal cetacean meat possession, which has implications for global cetacean conservation and public health.

  4. Enamel ultrastructure in fossil cetaceans (Cetacea: Archaeoceti and Odontoceti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Loch

    Full Text Available The transition from terrestrial ancestry to a fully pelagic life profoundly altered the body systems of cetaceans, with extreme morphological changes in the skull and feeding apparatus. The Oligocene Epoch was a crucial time in the evolution of cetaceans when the ancestors of modern whales and dolphins (Neoceti underwent major diversification, but details of dental structure and evolution are poorly known for the archaeocete-neocete transition. We report the morphology of teeth and ultrastructure of enamel in archaeocetes, and fossil platanistoids and delphinoids, ranging from late Oligocene (Waitaki Valley, New Zealand to Pliocene (Caldera, Chile. Teeth were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned in cross and longitudinal planes, polished, etched, and coated with gold palladium for scanning electron microscopy (SEM observation. SEM images showed that in archaeocetes, squalodontids and Prosqualodon (taxa with heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont teeth, the inner enamel was organized in Hunter-Schreger bands (HSB with an outer layer of radial enamel. This is a common pattern in most large-bodied mammals and it is regarded as a biomechanical adaptation related to food processing and crack resistance. Fossil Otekaikea sp. and delphinoids, which were polydont and homodont, showed a simpler structure, with inner radial and outer prismless enamel. Radial enamel is regarded as more wear-resistant and has been retained in several mammalian taxa in which opposing tooth surfaces slide over each other. These observations suggest that the transition from a heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont dentition in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to homodont and polydont teeth in crownward odontocetes, was also linked to a marked simplification in the enamel Schmelzmuster. These patterns probably reflect functional shifts in food processing from shear-and-mastication in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to pierce-and-grasp occlusion in crownward

  5. Enamel ultrastructure in fossil cetaceans (Cetacea: Archaeoceti and Odontoceti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Carolina; Kieser, Jules A; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2015-01-01

    The transition from terrestrial ancestry to a fully pelagic life profoundly altered the body systems of cetaceans, with extreme morphological changes in the skull and feeding apparatus. The Oligocene Epoch was a crucial time in the evolution of cetaceans when the ancestors of modern whales and dolphins (Neoceti) underwent major diversification, but details of dental structure and evolution are poorly known for the archaeocete-neocete transition. We report the morphology of teeth and ultrastructure of enamel in archaeocetes, and fossil platanistoids and delphinoids, ranging from late Oligocene (Waitaki Valley, New Zealand) to Pliocene (Caldera, Chile). Teeth were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned in cross and longitudinal planes, polished, etched, and coated with gold palladium for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. SEM images showed that in archaeocetes, squalodontids and Prosqualodon (taxa with heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont teeth), the inner enamel was organized in Hunter-Schreger bands (HSB) with an outer layer of radial enamel. This is a common pattern in most large-bodied mammals and it is regarded as a biomechanical adaptation related to food processing and crack resistance. Fossil Otekaikea sp. and delphinoids, which were polydont and homodont, showed a simpler structure, with inner radial and outer prismless enamel. Radial enamel is regarded as more wear-resistant and has been retained in several mammalian taxa in which opposing tooth surfaces slide over each other. These observations suggest that the transition from a heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont dentition in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to homodont and polydont teeth in crownward odontocetes, was also linked to a marked simplification in the enamel Schmelzmuster. These patterns probably reflect functional shifts in food processing from shear-and-mastication in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to pierce-and-grasp occlusion in crownward odontocetes, with

  6. Comparative analysis of the prion protein (PrP) gene in cetacean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acutis, Pier Luigi; Peletto, Simone; Grego, Elena; Colussi, Silvia; Riina, Maria Vittoria; Rosati, Sergio; Mignone, Walter; Caramelli, Maria

    2007-05-01

    The partial PrP gene sequence and the deduced protein of eight cetacean species, seven of which have never been reported so far, have been determined in order to extend knowledge of sequence variability of the PrP genes in different species and to aid in speculation on cetacean susceptibility to prions. Both the nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences have been analysed in comparison with some of the known mammalian PrPs. Cetacean PrPs present typical features of eutherian PrPs. The PrP gene from the species of the family Delphinidae gave identical nucleic acid sequences, while differences in the PrP gene were found in Balaenopteridae and Ziphidae. The phylogenetic tree resulting from analysis of the cetacean PrP gene sequences, together with reported sequences of some ungulates, carnivores and primates, showed that the PrP gene phylogenesis mirrors the species phylogenesis. The PrP gene of cetaceans is very close to species where natural forms of TSEs are known. From an analysis of the sequences and the phylogenesis of the PrP gene, susceptibility to or occurrence of prion diseases in cetaceans can not be excluded.

  7. Automated aural classification used for inter-species discrimination of cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Carolyn M; Hines, Paul C

    2014-04-01

    Passive acoustic methods are in widespread use to detect and classify cetacean species; however, passive acoustic systems often suffer from large false detection rates resulting from numerous transient sources. To reduce the acoustic analyst workload, automatic recognition methods may be implemented in a two-stage process. First, a general automatic detector is implemented that produces many detections to ensure cetacean presence is noted. Then an automatic classifier is used to significantly reduce the number of false detections and classify the cetacean species. This process requires development of a robust classifier capable of performing inter-species classification. Because human analysts can aurally discriminate species, an automated aural classifier that uses perceptual signal features was tested on a cetacean data set. The classifier successfully discriminated between four species of cetaceans-bowhead, humpback, North Atlantic right, and sperm whales-with 85% accuracy. It also performed well (100% accuracy) for discriminating sperm whale clicks from right whale gunshots. An accuracy of 92% and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.97 were obtained for the relatively challenging bowhead and humpback recognition case. These results demonstrated that the perceptual features employed by the aural classifier provided powerful discrimination cues for inter-species classification of cetaceans.

  8. 'Obesity' is healthy for cetaceans? Evidence from pervasive positive selection in genes related to triacylglycerol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengfei; Chen, Zhuo; Xu, Shixia; Ren, Wenhua; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2015-09-18

    Cetaceans are a group of secondarily adapted marine mammals with an enigmatic history of transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic habitat and subsequent adaptive radiation in waters around the world. Numerous physiological and morphological cetacean characteristics have been acquired in response to this drastic habitat transition; for example, the thickened blubber is one of the most striking changes that increases their buoyancy, supports locomotion, and provides thermal insulation. However, the genetic basis underlying the blubber thickening in cetaceans remains poorly explored. Here, 88 candidate genes associated with triacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in representative cetaceans and other mammals to test whether the thickened blubber matched adaptive evolution of triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes. Positive selection was detected in 41 of the 88 candidate genes, and functional characterization of these genes indicated that these are involved mainly in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipolysis processes. In addition, some essential regulatory genes underwent significant positive selection in cetacean-specific lineages, whereas no selection signal was detected in the counterpart terrestrial mammals. The extensive occurrence of positive selection in triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes is suggestive of their essential role in secondary adaptation to an aquatic life, and further implying that 'obesity' might be an indicator of good health for cetaceans.

  9. Navy sonar, cetaceans and the US Supreme Court: a review of cetacean mitigation and litigation in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirbel, K; Balint, P; Parsons, E C M

    2011-01-01

    One source of anthropogenic noise in the oceans which has attracted much concern is naval sonar. As a result of possible impacts of such sonar, several environmental NGOs have pursued legal cases in the United States criticizing environmental assessments conducted prior to exercises and proposed mitigation measures. Cases have been brought using the US National Environmental Protection Act, Marine Mammal Protection Act, Endangered Species Act, Coastal Zone Management Act and other statutes. This paper reviews the chronology and results of these various cases. During the G.W. Bush presidential administration, the legal battle went to the US Supreme Court in the case Winter vs. Natural Resources Defense Council. This case however, did not address the potential impacts of sonar on cetaceans or the effectiveness of mitigation measures. During the Obama administration, mitigation measures for naval exercises have been revised, and working groups planned, in an attempt to resolve conflict between parties.

  10. Cetacean Presence in the Trincomalee Bay and Adjacent Waters, Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranil P. Nanayakkara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Sri Lanka thirty species of cetaceans have been recorded to date. The canyon at Trincomalee bay is a multiple submarine canyon complex and anecdotal reports suggest that the Trincomalee bay and its adjacent waters are utilised by a number of cetacean species. Though Cetaceans are known to be abundant in the waters off Trincomalee there is a dearth of research and data pertaining to the abundance and species frequenting the Trincomalee bay and its adjacent waters. As such the current study was initiated, to get a consensus of the abundance and occurrences of species in Trincomalee Bay and its adjacent waters. Field surveys were carried out for 19 months and the research platform was a 35-foot commercial fishing vessel. 177 cetacean encounters were recorded on 67 of the 75 field days. Remarkably a total of 11 species of cetaceans which composed of two species of Baleen Whales and nine species of Toothed Whales were recorded. Delphinidae was the most common family recorded, followed by Balaenopteridae, Ziphiidae, Physeteridae, and Kogiidae. Spinner Dolphins were the most abundant cetacean owing to the large pods observed and the regularity of the sightings. They were the only species seen feeding/traveling with birds and fish (tuna. Sperm Whales, Blue Whales, and Bryde’s Whales were also relatively common. Two records of interspecific association between cetaceans were recorded. The increase in the human population in the study area has resulted in the overexploitation of marine resources which has dire repercussions on the marine mammal communities found in these waters.

  11. MODELLING THE POTENTIAL DISTRIBUTION AND RICHNESS OF CETACEANS IN THE AZORES FROM FISHERIES OBSERVER PROGRAM DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tobeña

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine spatial planning and ecological research call for high-resolution species distribution data. However, those data are still not available for most marine large vertebrates. The dynamic nature of oceanographic processes and the wide-ranging behavior of many marine vertebrates create further difficulties, as distribution data must incorporate both the spatial and temporal dimensions. Cetaceans play an essential role in structuring and maintaining marine ecosystems and face increasing threats from human activities. The Azores holds a high diversity of cetaceans but the information about spatial and temporal patterns of distribution for this marine megafauna group in the region is still very limited. To tackle this issue, we created monthly predictive cetacean distribution maps for spring and summer months, using data collected by the Azores Fisheries Observer Programme between 2004 and 2009. We then combined the individual predictive maps to obtain species richness maps for the same period. Our results reflect a great heterogeneity in distribution among species and within species among different months. This heterogeneity reflects a contrasting influence of oceanographic processes on the distribution of cetacean species. However, some persistent areas of increased species richness could also be identified from our results. We argue that policies aimed at effectively protecting cetaceans and their habitats must include the principle of dynamic ocean management coupled with other area-based management such as marine spatial planning.

  12. Positive selection at the ASPM gene coincides with brain size enlargements in cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shixia; Chen, Yuan; Cheng, Yuefeng; Yang, Dan; Zhou, Xuming; Xu, Junxiao; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2012-11-07

    The enlargement of cetacean brain size represents an enigmatic event in mammalian evolution, yet its genetic basis remains poorly explored. One candidate gene associated with brain size evolution is the abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated (ASPM), as mutations in this gene cause severe reductions in the cortical size of humans. Here, we investigated the ASPM gene in representative cetacean lineages and previously published sequences from other mammals to test whether the expansion of the cetacean brain matched adaptive ASPM evolution patterns. Our analyses yielded significant evidence of positive selection on the ASPM gene during cetacean evolution, especially for the Odontoceti and Delphinoidea lineages. These molecular patterns were associated with two major events of relative brain size enlargement in odontocetes and delphinoids. It is of particular interest to find that positive selection was restricted to cetaceans and primates, two distant lineages both characterized by a massive expansion of brain size. This result is suggestive of convergent molecular evolution, although no site-specific convergence at the amino acid level was found.

  13. Pilot whales attracted to killer whale sounds: acoustically-mediated interspecific interactions in cetaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Curé

    Full Text Available In cetaceans' communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans' behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas. Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways.

  14. Cetacean behavioral responses to noise exposure generated by seismic surveys: how to mitigate better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Monaco

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cetaceans use sound in many contexts, such as in social interactions, as well as to forage and to react in dangerous situations. Little information exists to describe how they respond physically and behaviorally to intense and long-term noise levels. Effects on cetaceans from seismic survey activities need to be understood in order to determine detailed acoustic exposure guidelines and to apply appropriated mitigation measures. This study examines direct behavioral responses of cetaceans in the southern Mediterranean Sea during seismic surveys with large airgun arrays (volume up to 5200 ci used in the TOMO-ETNA active seismic experiment of summer 2014. Wide Angle Seismic and Multi-Channel Seismic surveys had carried out with refraction and reflection seismic methods, producing about 25,800 air-gun shots. Visual monitoring undertaken in the 26 daylights of seismic exploration adopted the protocol of the Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Data recorded were analyzed to examine effects on cetaceans. Sighting rates, distance and orientation from the airguns were compared for different volume categories of the airgun arrays. Results show that cetaceans can be disturbed by seismic survey activities, especially during particularly events. Here we propose many integrated actions to further mitigate this exposure and implications for management.

  15. A functional paradigm for evaluating culture: An example with cetaceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alison Linda GREGGOR

    2012-01-01

    Nonhuman culture was first considered in nonhuman primates because they are genetically similar to humans.However,evolution is not progressive and therefore many species may occupy niches that favor socially transmitted,group specific behavior.Not surprisingly,evidence for culture has accrued in several taxonomic groups,including cetaceans.If culture is an adaptation,it is imperative we understand the factors that favor its formation.Understanding the evolutionary origin of culture will allow for a wider range of species to be studied,including those that are difficult to test in the laboratory.I propose a broad-based functional paradigm for evaluating nonhuman culture; based on the idea that while not all cultural behaviors may garner fitness benefits to the individual,the ecological and social environments in which cultural behaviors evolved must have favored the physical attributes and social learning capabilities that allow for cultural formation.Specifically this framework emphasizes the relationships between social learning,ecology,social systems,and biology in relation to culture.I illustrate the utility of the functional paradigm with evidence from the ceteacean group,while setting the stage for a stringent species by species analysis.By means of contextualizing culture,the Functional Paradigm can evaluate a species' potential to exhibit culture and can investigate potentially cultural behaviors [Current Zoology 58 (2):271-286,2012].

  16. Evidence of recombination and positive selection in cetacean papillomaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio, E-mail: refugio.robles1@gmail.com [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Rivera, Rebecca, E-mail: RRivera@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Nollens, Hendrik H., E-mail: Hendrik.Nollens@SeaWorld.com [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, PO Box 110885, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); SeaWorld San Diego, 500 SeaWorld Drive, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); St Leger, Judy, E-mail: Judy.St.Leger@SeaWorld.com [SeaWorld San Diego, 500 SeaWorld Drive, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Durden, Wendy N., E-mail: WNoke@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, 3830 South Highway A1A 4-181, Melbourne Beach, FL 32951 (United States); Stolen, Megan, E-mail: MStolen@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, 3830 South Highway A1A 4-181, Melbourne Beach, FL 32951 (United States); Burchell, Jennifer, E-mail: JBurchell@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Wellehan, James F.X., E-mail: WellehanJ@ufl.edu [College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, PO Box 110885, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2012-06-05

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are small DNA viruses that have been associated with increased epithelial proliferation. Over one hundred PV types have been identified in humans; however, only three have been identified in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) to date. Using rolling circle amplification and degenerate PCR, we identified four novel PV genomes of bottlenose dolphins. TtPV4, TtPV5 and TtPV6 were identified in genital lesions while TtPV7 was identified in normal genital mucosa. Bayesian analysis of the full-length L1 genes found that TtPV4 and TtPV7 group within the Upsilonpapillomavirus genus while TtPV5 and TtPV6 group with Omikronpapillomavirus. However, analysis of the E1 gene did not distinguish these genera, implying that these genes may not share a common history, consistent with recombination. Recombination analyses identified several probable events. Signals of positive selection were found mostly in the E1 and E2 genes. Recombination and diversifying selection pressures constitute important driving forces of cetacean PV evolution.

  17. River Cetaceans and Habitat Change: Generalist Resilience or Specialist Vulnerability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available River dolphins are among the world’s most threatened mammals, and indeed the baiji (Lipotes vexillifer, a species endemic to China's Yangtze River, is likely extinct. Exploitation for products such as meat, oil, and skins has been a lesser feature in the population histories of river dolphins compared to most large mammals. Habitat factors are therefore of particular interest and concern. In this paper we attempt to describe the population-level responses of river dolphins to habitat transformation. We find circumstantial but compelling evidence supporting the view that, at a local scale, river dolphins are opportunists (generalists capable of adapting to a wide range of habitat conditions while, at a river basin scale, they are more appropriately viewed as vulnerable specialists. The same evidence implies that the distributional responses of river dolphins to basinwide ecological change can be informative about their extinction risk, while their local behaviour patterns may provide important insights about critical ecological attributes. Empirical studies are needed on the ecology of river cetaceans, both to inform conservation efforts on behalf of these threatened animals and to help address broader concerns related to biodiversity conservation and the sustainability of human use in several of the world's largest river systems.

  18. Giardia and Cryptosporidium in cetaceans on the European Atlantic coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboredo-Fernández, Aurora; Ares-Mazás, Elvira; Martínez-Cedeira, José A; Romero-Suances, Rafael; Cacciò, Simone M; Gómez-Couso, Hipólito

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was investigated in cetacean specimens stranded on the northwestern coast of Spain (European Atlantic coast) by analysis of 65 samples of large intestine from eight species. The parasites were identified by direct immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and by PCR amplification of the β-giardin gene, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and the SSU-rDNA gene of Giardia and the SSU-rDNA gene of Cryptosporidium. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in 7 (10.8 %) and 9 samples (13.8 %), respectively. In two samples, co-infection with both parasites was observed. Giardia duodenalis assemblages A, C, D and F, and Cryptosporidium parvum were identified. This is the first report of G. duodenalis in Balaenoptera acutorostrata, Kogia breviceps and Stenella coeruleoalba and also the first report of Cryptosporidium sp. in B. acutorostrata and of C. parvum in S. coeruleoalba and Tursiops truncatus. These results extend the known host range of these waterborne enteroparasites.

  19. Stomach contents of cetaceans incidentally caught along Mangalore and Chennai coasts of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Anoop A.; Yousuf, K. S.; Kumaran, P. L.; Harish, N.; Anoop, B.; Afsal, V. V.; Rajagopalan, M.; Vivekanandan, E.; Krishnakumar, P. K.; Jayasankar, P.

    2008-03-01

    The stomachs of 32 individuals of seven cetacean species incidentally caught in gill net and purseseine fisheries along Mangalore and Chennai coasts (India) between 2004 and 2006 were examined. The whole stomach (fore-gut, mid-gut and hind-gut) was examined in all cases. Prey remains (666 prey items comprising six species of teleosts, one crustacean and one squid species) were found in the stomachs of eight individuals (the remaining 24 stomachs were found to be empty). All cetaceans were found to feed mostly on teleosts with wide range of trophic levels. Based on an index that included frequency of occurrence, percentage by number and by weight, the oil sardine Sardinella longiceps was the main prey in the sample. Cetaceans appear to favour both pelagic as well as demersal prey, possibly indicating surface and benthic feeding habits.

  20. Anthropogenic and naturally occurring polybrominated phenolic compounds in the blood of cetaceans stranded along Japanese coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomiyama, Kei, E-mail: keinomi@agr.ehime-u.ac.jp [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Eguchi, Akifumi; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Ochiai, Mari; Murata, Satoko; Someya, Masayuki [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Isobe, Tomohiko [Senior Research Fellow Center, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Yamada, Tadasu K. [Department of Zoology, National Museum of Nature and Science, 3-23-1 Hyakunin-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-0073 (Japan); Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    We determined the residue levels and patterns of hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs), and related compounds, such as PBDEs, methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs), and bromophenols (BPhs) in the blood of eleven cetacean species stranded along the Japanese coasts. The dominant OH- and MeO-PBDE isomers found in all cetaceans were 6OH-BDE47 and 6MeO-BDE47. Additionally, 2,4,6-triBPh was dominant isomer in all cetaceans. In contrast, specific differences in the distribution of para- and meta- OH-PBDE isomers and some BPhs (potential PBDEs metabolites) were found among the cetaceans. Residue levels of {Sigma}MeO-PBDEs and 6OH-BDE47 + 2'OH-BDE68, and 2,4,6-triBPh and 6OH-BDE47 + 2'OH-BDE68 showed a significant positive correlation. These results may suggest that the large percentages of OH-PBDEs, MeO-PBDEs and 2,4,6-triBPh might share common source (i.e. biosynthesis by marine organisms), or metabolic pathway in cetacean species. Significant correlations were found between the concentrations of BDE99 and 2,4,5-triBPh. This result suggested that 2,4,5-triBPh in cetaceans could be a metabolite of BDE99. - Highlights: > We determined the concentrations of OH-PBDEs in the blood of cetacean species. > OH-PBDEs, MeO-PBDEs and 2,4,6-triBPh showed a significant positive correlation. > It was presumed that large percentages of OH-PBDEs were the natural origins. > Specific differences in the distribution of PBDE metabolites were found in cetaceans. > Some bromophenols in cetaceans could be a metabolite of PBDEs. - Specific differences in the distribution of anthropogenic and naturally occurring polybrominated phenolic compounds and the relationships were found among the cetacean species.

  1. Evidence of Positive Selection of Aquaporins Genes from Pontoporia blainvillei during the Evolutionary Process of Cetaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Lima São Pedro

    Full Text Available Marine mammals are well adapted to their hyperosmotic environment. Several morphological and physiological adaptations for water conservation and salt excretion are known to be present in cetaceans, being responsible for regulating salt balance. However, most previous studies have focused on the unique renal physiology of marine mammals, but the molecular bases of these mechanisms remain poorly explored. Many genes have been identified to be involved in osmotic regulation, including the aquaporins. Considering that aquaporin genes were potentially subject to strong selective pressure, the aim of this study was to analyze the molecular evolution of seven aquaporin genes (AQP1, AQP2, AQP3, AQP4, AQP6, AQP7, and AQP9 comparing the lineages of cetaceans and terrestrial mammals.Our results demonstrated strong positive selection in cetacean-specific lineages acting only in the gene for AQP2 (amino acids 23, 83, 107,179, 180, 181, 182, whereas no selection was observed in terrestrial mammalian lineages. We also analyzed the changes in the 3D structure of the aquaporin 2 protein. Signs of strong positive selection in AQP2 sites 179, 180, 181, and 182 were unexpectedly identified only in the baiji lineage, which was the only river dolphin examined in this study. Positive selection in aquaporins AQP1 (45, AQP4 (74, AQP7 (342, 343, 356 was detected in cetaceans and artiodactyls, suggesting that these events are not related to maintaining water and electrolyte homeostasis in seawater.Our results suggest that the AQP2 gene might reflect different selective pressures in maintaining water balance in cetaceans, contributing to the passage from the terrestrial environment to the aquatic. Further studies are necessary, especially those including other freshwater dolphins, who exhibit osmoregulatory mechanisms different from those of marine cetaceans for the same essential task of maintaining serum electrolyte balance.

  2. Long-Distance Travellers: Phylogeography of a Generalist Parasite, Pholeter gastrophilus, from Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Kristina; Raga, Juan Antonio; Siebert, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    We studied the phylogeography and historical demography of the most generalist digenean from cetaceans, Pholeter gastrophilus, exploring the effects of isolation by distance, ecological barriers and hosts’ dispersal ability on the population structure of this parasite. The ITS2 rDNA, and the mitochondrial COI and ND1 from 68 individual parasites were analysed. Worms were collected from seven oceanic and coastal cetacean species from the south western Atlantic (SWA), central eastern Atlantic, north eastern Atlantic (NEA), and Mediterranean Sea. Pholeter gastrophilus was considered a single lineage because reciprocal monophyly was not detected in the ML cladogram of all individuals, and sequence variability was cetaceans, with a putative secondary role, if any, of intermediate hosts. Unique haplotypes were detected in SWA and NEA, and an AMOVA revealed significant population structure associated to the genetic variation in these regions. The Equator possibly acts as a significant geographical barrier for cetacean movements, possibly limiting gene flow between northern and southern populations of P. gastrophilus. A partial Mantel tests revealed that the significant isolation of NEA populations resulted from geographic clustering. Apparently, the limited mobility of cetaceans used by P. gastrophilus as definitive hosts in this region, coupled with oceanographic barriers and a patchy distribution of potential intermediate hosts could contribute to significant ecological isolation of P. gastrophilus in NEA. Rather unexpectedly, no genetic differentiation was found in the Mediterranean samples of this parasite. Historical demographic analyses suggested a recent population expansion of P. gastrophilus in the Atlantic Ocean, perhaps linked to initial association and subsequent spreading in cetaceans. PMID:28085945

  3. Assessing Disease and Mortality among Small Cetaceans Stranded at a World Heritage Site in Southern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela G Domiciano

    Full Text Available Cetaceans are considered environmental sentinels and their health often reflects either anthropogenic or natural spatio-temporal disturbances. This study investigated the pathological findings and mortality of small cetaceans with the aim of detecting hazards and monitoring health trends in a high-biodiversity area. Between 2007 and 2012, 218 stranded cetaceans were recorded on the Paraná coast, southern Brazil. Fifty-seven (26.1% of these animals, including 50 Sotalia guianensis, 2 Pontoporia blainvillei, 2 Stenella frontalis, 1 Stenella longirostris, 1 Tursiops truncatus and 1 Globicephala melas were necropsied and samples were collected for histopathology. Causes of death were determined in 46 of the 57 (80.7% animals and most (30 or 65.2% were ascribed to anthropogenic activities, including fisheries bycatch (28/30 and trauma (2/30. The remaining 16 fatalities were considered natural, and attributed to pneumonia (10/16, emaciation (3/16, septicemia (1/16, neonatal pathology (1/16 and choking via food obstruction (1/16. Irrespective of the cause, bronchointerstitial pneumonia, associated with parasitism, lymphadenitis and membranous glomerulonephritis were common findings among all fatalities. These results suggest, that while anthropogenic activities are a leading cause of cetacean strandings in Paraná, underlying pre-existing diseases may contribute towards deaths. Although the studied area is considered a biosphere reserve by UNESCO, complex anthropogenic and natural interactions might be occurring, increasing cetacean susceptibility to hazards. This study may help facilitate developing an effective conservation plan for coastal cetaceans focusing on reducing fisheries interactions, habitat degradation and pollution as mechanisms for ultimately increasing species resilience.

  4. Review of the Effects of Offshore Seismic Surveys in Cetaceans: Are Mass Strandings a Possibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellote, Manuel; Llorens, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Displacement of cetaceans is commonly reported during offshore seismic surveys. Speculation concerning possible links between seismic survey noise and cetacean strandings is available for a dozen events but without convincing causal evidence. This lack of evidence should not be considered conclusive but rather as reflecting the absence of a comprehensive analysis of the circumstances. Current mitigation guidelines are inadequate for long-range effects such as displacements and the potential for strandings. This review presents the available information for ten documented strandings that were possibly linked to seismic surveys and recommends initial measures and actions to further evaluate this potential link.

  5. Quantifying the predation on sardine and hake by cetaceans in the Atlantic waters of the Iberian peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begoña Santos, M.; Saavedra, Camilo; Pierce, Graham J.

    2014-08-01

    Construction of ecosystem models requires detailed information on trophic interactions which may not be readily available, especially for top predators such as cetaceans. Such information can also be useful to estimate natural mortality (M) for fish stock assessments and to evaluate the potential for competition between cetaceans and fisheries. In the present paper we provide estimates and confidence limits, taking into account sampling error, for consumption of fish by the four most common cetaceans along the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula, while highlighting the uncertainties and biases inherent in the information presently available on energy requirements, diet and population size. We estimated that common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) consume around 6800 (95% CI, 4871-9476) tons of sardine (Sardina pilchardus), 8800 (6195-12,647) tons of gadids, 1100 (721-1662) tons of hake (Merluccius merluccius) and 1900 (1222-2752) tons of scads (Trachurus sp.) annually. For striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba), prey consumed were 900 (196-2661) tons of sardine, 6200 (3448-11,129) tons of gadids, 200 (11-504) tons of hake and 1600 (0-5318) tons of scads. Estimated amounts taken by harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are much lower, reflecting their low abundance in the area. Cetacean predation on sardine represents 2-8% of the current M value, indicating that cetaceans probably have little influence on sardine population dynamics. For the southern hake stock, estimated average removal by cetaceans often exceeds M. While this may indicate that both M and the consumption estimates for hake require revision it also suggests that cetaceans could have a more significant impact on hake populations. Different approaches to estimation of energy requirements of cetaceans can result in figures that differ by at least a factor of 2. The lack of good estimates of field metabolic rate for most species probably represents the most

  6. The utilization of aquatic bushmeat from small cetaceans and manatees in South America and West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mel Cosentino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic bushmeat can be defined as the products derived from wild aquatic megafauna (e.g. marine mammals that are used for human consumption and non-food purposes, including traditional medicine. It is obtained through illegal or unregulated hunts as well as from stranded (dead or alive and bycaught animals. In most South American and West African countries aquatic mammals are or have been taken for bushmeat, including 33 small cetaceans and all three manatee species. Of these, two cetacean species are listed in the IUCN red list as near threatened, and one as vulnerable, as are all manatee species. Additionally, 22 cetacean species are listed as data deficient, hence some of these species may also be at risk. No reports (recent or otherwise were found for some countries, however caution is needed in concluding that aquatic bushmeat is not utilized in these nations. Moreover, although aquatic bushmeat is mostly obtained opportunistically and was likely originally taken only for local consumption, directed catches occur in most countries and may have reached unsustainable levels in some areas. For example, in Peru and Nigeria, thousands of small cetaceans are illegally hunted annually. Reliable, recent data and a better overall understanding of the drivers of aquatic bushmeat will be essential in the development of effective mitigation measures.

  7. How to Make a Dolphin: Molecular Signature of Positive Selection in Cetacean Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana F Nery

    Full Text Available Cetaceans are unique in being the only mammals completely adapted to an aquatic environment. This adaptation has required complex changes and sometimes a complete restructuring of physiology, behavior and morphology. Identifying genes that have been subjected to selection pressure during cetacean evolution would greatly enhance our knowledge of the ways in which genetic variation in this mammalian order has been shaped by natural selection. Here, we performed a genome-wide scan for positive selection in the dolphin lineage. We employed models of codon substitution that account for variation of selective pressure over branches on the tree and across sites in a sequence. We analyzed 7,859 nuclear-coding ortholog genes and using a series of likelihood ratio tests (LRTs, we identified 376 genes (4.8% with molecular signatures of positive selection in the dolphin lineage. We used the cow as the sister group and compared estimates of selection in the cetacean genome to this using the same methods. This allowed us to define which genes have been exclusively under positive selection in the dolphin lineage. The enrichment analysis found that the identified positively selected genes are significantly over-represented for three exclusive functional categories only in the dolphin lineage: segment specification, mesoderm development and system development. Of particular interest for cetacean adaptation to an aquatic life are the following GeneOntology targets under positive selection: genes related to kidney, heart, lung, eye, ear and nervous system development.

  8. Cetacean noise criteria revisited in the light of proposed exposure limits for harbour porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tougaard, Jakob; Wright, Andrew John; Madsen, Professor Peter Teglberg

    2015-01-01

    The impact of underwater noise on marine life calls for identification of exposure criteria to inform mitigation. Here we review recent experimental evidence with focus on the high-frequency cetaceans and discuss scientifically-based initial exposure criteria. A range of new TTS experiments suggest...

  9. Cetacean abundance and distribution in European Atlantic shelf waters to inform conservation and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, P.S.; Macleod, K.; Berggren, P.; Leopold, M.F.; Scheidat, M.

    2013-01-01

    The European Union (EU) Habitats Directive requires Member States to monitor and maintain at favourable conservation status those species identified to be in need of protection, including all cetaceans. In July 2005 we surveyed the entire EU Atlantic continental shelf to generate robust estimates of

  10. The environmental history of cetaceans in Portugal: ten centuries of whale and dolphin records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Cristina; Sousa, Andreia

    2011-01-01

    The history between cetaceans and humans is documented throughout time not only in reports, descriptions, and tales but also in legal documents, laws and regulations, and tithes. This wealth of information comes from the easy spotting and identification of individuals due to their large size, surface breathing, and conspicuous above water behaviour. This work is based on historical sources and accounts accounting for cetacean presence for the period between the 12th and 17th centuries, as well as scientific articles, newspapers, illustrations, maps, non-published scientific reports, and other grey literature from the 18th century onwards. Information on whale use in Portugal's mainland has been found since as early as the 12th century and has continued to be created throughout time. No certainty can be given for medieval and earlier events, but both scavenging of stranded whales or use of captured ones may have happened. There is an increasing number of accounts of sighted, stranded, used, or captured cetaceans throughout centuries which is clearly associated with a growing effort towards the study of these animals. Scientific Latin species denominations only started to be registered from the 18th century onwards, as a consequence of the evolution of natural sciences in Portugal and increasing interest from zoologists. After the 19th century, a larger number of observations were recorded, and from the 20th century to the present day, regular scientific records have been collected. Research on the environmental history of cetaceans in Portugal shows a several-centuries-old exploitation of whales and dolphins, as resources mainly for human consumption, followed in later centuries by descriptions of natural history documenting strandings and at sea encounters. Most cetaceans species currently thought to be present in Portuguese mainland waters were at some point historically recorded.

  11. Cetacean occurrence and spatial distribution: Habitat modelling for offshore waters in the Portuguese EEZ (NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Ana M.; Tepsich, Paola; Rosso, Massimiliano; Caldeira, Rui; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel

    2015-03-01

    In the Portuguese Economic Exclusive Zone (EEZ) (NE Atlantic), little survey effort dedicated to cetacean species has been carried out in offshore waters. As a consequence, data on their occurrence, distribution and habitat preferences is scarce. In this area, 48 sea surveys along fixed transects within Continental Portugal and Madeira Island were performed in 2012 and 2013, from July to October, using platforms of opportunity. We used an environmental envelope approach and GAM habitat models to identify the role of oceanographic, topographic and geographical variables in shaping cetacean distribution. Results demonstrate the richness of offshore waters in this area as in 10,668 nmi sampled, we recorded 218 sightings from at least nine cetacean species, resulting in an overall ER of 2.04 sightings/100 nmi. The interaction of topographic and oceanographic features was shown to influence the distribution of the species/groups along the routes. Among the sighted species, only common dolphin showed a preference for coastal waters, while for all the other species high seas proved to be determinant. This result reinforces the need to address conservation issues in open ocean. This preliminary assessment showed the importance of the entire area for the distribution of different cetacean species and allowed the identification of several species/group specific potential suitable habitats. Considering the Habitats Directive resolutions, ACCOBAMS priorities, EEZ extension for the area and Maritime Spatial Planning Directive, and the urgent need for management plans, we suggest that the sampling strategy here presented is a cost-effective method to gather valuable data, to be used to improve cetacean habitat models in the area.

  12. Predicting cetacean and seabird habitats across a productivity gradient in the South Pacific gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, Laura; Catalogna, Maxime; Dorémus, Ghislain; Laran, Sophie; Lehodey, Patrick; Massart, Wendy; Monestiez, Pascal; Van Canneyt, Olivier; Watremez, Pierre; Ridoux, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Oligotrophic regions are expected to host low densities of top predators. Nevertheless, top predators with contrasting energetic costs might respond differently to the productivity of their habitats. Predators with high energetic demands might be constrained to select the most productive habitats to meet their high energetic requirements, whereas less active predators would be able to satisfy their needs by exploiting either high or low productivity habitats. Although situated in the core of the South Pacific oligotrophic gyre, French Polynesia is characterized by a fairly marked productivity gradient from the extremely oligotrophic Australs area to the more productive Marquesas area. The aim of this study was to investigate cetacean and seabird habitats in French Polynesia in light of their general energetic constraints. We collected cetacean and seabird sightings from an aerial survey across French Polynesian waters during the austral summer 2011. We classified cetaceans and seabirds into energetic guilds according to the literature. For each guild, we built generalized additive models along with static covariates and oceanographic covariates at the seasonal and climatological resolutions. We provided regional habitat predictions for Delphininae, Globicephalinae, sperm and beaked whales, tropicbirds, grey terns, noddies, white terns, boobies, petrels and shearwaters, sooty terns and frigatebirds. Explained deviances ranged from 5% to 30% for cetaceans and from 14% to 29% for seabirds. Cetaceans clearly responded to the productivity gradient, with the highest predicted densities around the productive waters of the Marquesas. However, Delphininae and Globicephalinae, characterized by higher energetic demands, depended more strongly on productivity, showing a ratio of 1-26 and 1-31 between their lowest and highest density areas respectively, compared to the less active sperm and beaked whales (showing only a ratio of 1-3.5 in predicted densities). In contrast

  13. The environmental history of cetaceans in Portugal: ten centuries of whale and dolphin records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Brito

    Full Text Available The history between cetaceans and humans is documented throughout time not only in reports, descriptions, and tales but also in legal documents, laws and regulations, and tithes. This wealth of information comes from the easy spotting and identification of individuals due to their large size, surface breathing, and conspicuous above water behaviour. This work is based on historical sources and accounts accounting for cetacean presence for the period between the 12th and 17th centuries, as well as scientific articles, newspapers, illustrations, maps, non-published scientific reports, and other grey literature from the 18th century onwards. Information on whale use in Portugal's mainland has been found since as early as the 12th century and has continued to be created throughout time. No certainty can be given for medieval and earlier events, but both scavenging of stranded whales or use of captured ones may have happened. There is an increasing number of accounts of sighted, stranded, used, or captured cetaceans throughout centuries which is clearly associated with a growing effort towards the study of these animals. Scientific Latin species denominations only started to be registered from the 18th century onwards, as a consequence of the evolution of natural sciences in Portugal and increasing interest from zoologists. After the 19th century, a larger number of observations were recorded, and from the 20th century to the present day, regular scientific records have been collected. Research on the environmental history of cetaceans in Portugal shows a several-centuries-old exploitation of whales and dolphins, as resources mainly for human consumption, followed in later centuries by descriptions of natural history documenting strandings and at sea encounters. Most cetaceans species currently thought to be present in Portuguese mainland waters were at some point historically recorded.

  14. AFSC/NMML: Cetacean line-transect survey in the eastern Bering Sea shelf; 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visual surveys for cetaceans were conducted on the eastern Bering Sea shelf along transect lines, in association with the AFSC.s echo integration trawl surveys for...

  15. Adaptive evolution of 5'HoxD genes in the origin and diversification of the cetacean flipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Yuan, Lihong; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zuo, Xueguo; Ru, Binghua; Zhong, Hui; Han, Naijian; Jones, Gareth; Jepson, Paul D; Zhang, Shuyi

    2009-03-01

    The homeobox (Hox) genes Hoxd12 and Hoxd13 control digit patterning and limb formation in tetrapods. Both show strong expression in the limb bud during embryonic development, are highly conserved across vertebrates, and show mutations that are associated with carpal, metacarpal, and phalangeal deformities. The most dramatic evolutionary reorganization of the mammalian limb has occurred in cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which the hind limbs have been lost and the forelimbs have evolved into paddle-shaped flippers. We reconstructed the phylogeny of digit patterning in mammals and inferred that digit number has changed twice in the evolution of the cetacean forelimb. First, the divergence of the early cetaceans from their even-toed relatives coincided with the reacquisition of the pentadactyl forelimb, whereas the ancestors of tetradactyl baleen whales (Mysticeti) later lost a digit again. To test whether the evolution of the cetacean forelimb is associated with positive selection or relaxation of Hoxd12 and Hoxd13, we sequenced these genes in a wide range of mammals. In Hoxd12, we found evidence of Darwinian selection associated with both episodes of cetacean forelimb reorganization. In Hoxd13, we found a novel expansion of a polyalanine tract in cetaceans compared with other mammals (17/18 residues vs. 14/15 residues, respectively), lengthening of which has previously been shown to be linked to synpolydactyly in humans and mice. Both genes also show much greater sequence variation among cetaceans than across other mammalian lineages. Our results strongly implicate 5'HoxD genes in the modulation of digit number, web forming, and the high morphological diversity of the cetacean manus.

  16. Predicting cetacean habitats from their energetic needs and the distribution of their prey in two contrasted tropical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Charlotte; Mannocci, Laura; Lehodey, Patrick; Ridoux, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    To date, most habitat models of cetaceans have relied on static and oceanographic covariates, and very few have related cetaceans directly to the distribution of their prey, as a result of the limited availability of prey data. By simulating the distribution of six functional micronekton groups between the surface and ≃1,000 m deep, the SEAPODYM model provides valuable insights into prey distributions. We used SEAPODYM outputs to investigate the habitat of three cetacean guilds with increasing energy requirements: sperm and beaked whales, Globicephalinae and Delphininae. We expected High Energy Requirements cetaceans to preferentially forage in habitats of high prey biomass and/or production, where they might easily meet their high energetic needs, and Low Energy Requirements cetaceans to forage in habitats of either high or low prey biomass and/or production. Cetacean sightings were collected from dedicated aerial surveys in the South West Indian Ocean (SWIO) and French Polynesia (FP). We examined cetacean densities in relation to simulated distributions of their potential prey using Generalised Additive Models and predicted their habitats in both regions. Results supported their known diving abilities, with Delphininae mostly related to prey present in the upper layers of the water column, and Globicephalinae and sperm and beaked whales also related to prey present in deeper layers. Explained deviances ranged from 9% for sperm and beaked whales in the SWIO to 47% for Globicephalinae in FP. Delphininae and Globicephalinae appeared to select areas where high prey biomass and/or production were available at shallow depths. In contrast, sperm and beaked whales showed less clear habitat selection. Using simulated prey distributions as predictors in cetacean habitat models is crucial to understand their strategies of habitat selection in the three dimensions of the ocean.

  17. Improving Large Cetacean Implantable Satellite Tag Designs to Maximize Tag Robustness and Minimize Health Effects to Individual Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Improving Large Cetacean Implantable Satellite Tag Designs ...robust implantable satellite tags for large cetaceans considering observed tag design flaws observed during follow-up studies conducted with Gulf of Maine... satellite tags were produced in order to match the length of and allow comparison of Mold 303B with existing dart designs used in transdermal

  18. Forty Years of Winter: Cetaceans Observed During the Southbound Migration of Gray Whales, Eschrichtius robustus, Near Granite Canyon, Central California

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    From December to February in most years from 1967 to 2007, observers counted gray whales, Eschrichtius robustus, from shore sites south of Carmel in central California. In addition to gray whales, other cetacean species were also recorded. These observations were summarized and compared among survey platforms and to ocean conditions. Eleven cetacean species were identified including eight odontocete species (killer whale, Orcinus orca; Pacific white-sided dolphin, Lagenorhynchus obliqui...

  19. Analysis of Cookiecutter shark Isistius spp. (Squaliformes; Dalatiidae bites in cetaceans (Mammalia; Cetacea on the Bahia coast, northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio L. S. Sampaio

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have registered signs of mutilation on cetaceans in Brazil, especially from shark attacks. This work describes interactions between cookiecutter sharks Isistius spp. and cetaceans through the analysis of bite records for cetacean carcasses washed ashore on the Bahia coast between 1996 and 2005. Twenty bite records were analyzed in 13 cetacean species, of which the Delphinidae family was the most frequent. After the analysis, Isistius plutodus was identified as the aggressor species on 80% of the records, followed by I. brasiliensis (20%, based on the characteristic shape of the mutilations. The areas most subject to attack in cetaceans were: flanks 40%; head and abdomen 20% each; dorsal 15%; and genital with 5%. The relatively high number of bites on the flanks was probably due to its larger area, which offered greater opportunities to the cookiecutter shark. At least three bite records were related to the possible causes of strandings in delphinids. We recommend further studies on interactions between sharks and cetaceans along the Brazilian coast.

  20. ‘Obesity’ is healthy for cetaceans? Evidence from pervasive positive selection in genes related to triacylglycerol metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengfei; Chen, Zhuo; Xu, Shixia; Ren, Wenhua; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Cetaceans are a group of secondarily adapted marine mammals with an enigmatic history of transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic habitat and subsequent adaptive radiation in waters around the world. Numerous physiological and morphological cetacean characteristics have been acquired in response to this drastic habitat transition; for example, the thickened blubber is one of the most striking changes that increases their buoyancy, supports locomotion, and provides thermal insulation. However, the genetic basis underlying the blubber thickening in cetaceans remains poorly explored. Here, 88 candidate genes associated with triacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in representative cetaceans and other mammals to test whether the thickened blubber matched adaptive evolution of triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes. Positive selection was detected in 41 of the 88 candidate genes, and functional characterization of these genes indicated that these are involved mainly in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipolysis processes. In addition, some essential regulatory genes underwent significant positive selection in cetacean-specific lineages, whereas no selection signal was detected in the counterpart terrestrial mammals. The extensive occurrence of positive selection in triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes is suggestive of their essential role in secondary adaptation to an aquatic life, and further implying that ‘obesity’ might be an indicator of good health for cetaceans. PMID:26381091

  1. Questioning the interpretations of behavioral observations of cetaceans: is there really support for a special intellectual status for this mammalian order?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, P R

    2013-10-10

    This review evaluates and contextualizes the behavioral studies undertaken on cetaceans in terms of the relationship of these behaviors to special levels of intelligence associated with these marine mammals and the evolution of their relatively and absolutely large brain size. Many believe that the large size of the cetacean brain and reported behaviors indicate the need to create a special status for these animals in terms of their intellect, positing that they are second to humans in terms of general intelligence. Cetacean brains became relatively large approximately 32millionyearsago, at the Archaeocete-Neocete faunal transition, and have since remained stable in relative size. The behaviors reported for modern cetaceans are thought to parallel those of great apes, to the exclusion of other mammals. By creating an autocatalytic model of cetacean brain evolution, the behaviors thought to be indicative of sophisticated cognitive processes can be assessed as to their potential involvement in the evolution of larger brains in cetaceans. By contextualizing these behaviors in a broader comparative framework, and not the limited cetacean - great ape comparisons mostly used, it is evident that the behaviors used to argue for high levels of intelligence in cetaceans are found commonly across mammals and other vertebrates, and are often observed in invertebrates. This contextualization indicates that cetacean intelligence is qualitatively no different to other vertebrates. In addition, the inability of cetaceans to surpass Piaget stage 4/5 on object permanence tests and to solve an "if and only if, then" abstract task indicates the possibility that their levels of general intelligence may be less than that seen in other vertebrates. Sophisticated cognitive abilities appear to play no role in the evolution of large brain size in cetaceans, indicating that alternative theories of large brain size evolution in cetaceans should be considered in more detail.

  2. Understanding the Patterns and Causes of Variability in Distribution, Habitat Use, Abundance, Survival and Reproductive Rates of Three Species of Cetacean in the Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Distribution, Habitat Use, Abundance, Survival and Reproductive Rates of Three Species of Cetacean in the Alborán Sea, Western Mediterranean...changes in distribution, habitat use, abundance, survival and reproductive rates of three species of cetacean in the Alborán Sea (western Mediterranean...Understanding the Patterns and Causes of Variability in Distribution, Habitat Use, Abundance, Survival and Reproductive Rates of Three Species of Cetacean in

  3. Prevalence of the commensal barnacle Xenobalanus globicipitis on cetacean species in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, and a review of global occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Distribution and prevalence of the phoretic barnacle Xenobalanus on cetacean species are reported for 22 cetaceans in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (21 million km2). Four cetacean species are newly reported hosts for Xenobalanus: Bryde’s whale (Balaenoptera edeni), long-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus capensis), humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), and spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris). Sightings of Xenobalanus in pelagic waters are reported for the first time, and concentr...

  4. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen.

  5. Comparative analysis of encephalization in mammals reveals relaxed constraints on anthropoid primate and cetacean brain scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddy, A M; McGowen, M R; Sherwood, C C; Grossman, L I; Goodman, M; Wildman, D E

    2012-05-01

    There is a well-established allometric relationship between brain and body mass in mammals. Deviation of relatively increased brain size from this pattern appears to coincide with enhanced cognitive abilities. To examine whether there is a phylogenetic structure to such episodes of changes in encephalization across mammals, we used phylogenetic techniques to analyse brain mass, body mass and encephalization quotient (EQ) among 630 extant mammalian species. Among all mammals, anthropoid primates and odontocete cetaceans have significantly greater variance in EQ, suggesting that evolutionary constraints that result in a strict correlation between brain and body mass have independently become relaxed. Moreover, ancestral state reconstructions of absolute brain mass, body mass and EQ revealed patterns of increase and decrease in EQ within anthropoid primates and cetaceans. We propose both neutral drift and selective factors may have played a role in the evolution of brain-body allometry.

  6. Cephalopods and cetaceans as indicators of offshore bioavailability of cadmium off Central South Brazil Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorneles, Paulo Renato [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: dorneles@biof.ufrj.br; Lailson-Brito, Jose [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: lailson@uerj.br; Aguiar dos Santos, Roberta [Centro de Pesquisa e Gestao de Recursos Pesqueiros do Litoral Sudeste e Sul, IBAMA, 88301-700 Itajai, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: gibteuthis@yahoo.com.br; Silva da Costa, Paulo Alberto [Laboratorio de Dinamica de Populacoes Marinhas, UNIRIO, 22290-240 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: pauloascosta@uol.com.br; Malm, Olaf [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: olaf@biof.ufrj.br; Azevedo, Alexandre Freitas [Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: azevedo.alex@uol.com.br; Machado Torres, Joao Paulo [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: jptorres@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-07-15

    Regarding Brazilian coast, industrial and urban developments are concentrated along Central South Brazil Bight. Samples from inshore and offshore species from the concerned area were analyzed, comprising 24 cetaceans (9 species) and 32 squids (2 species). Cadmium was determined by GFAAS and our results were in agreement with certified values (DOLT-2, NRCC). Mean cadmium concentration (in {mu}g/g, wet weight) observed in the digestive gland of sexually mature Argentine short-finned squids (Illex argentinus) was 1002.9. To our knowledge this is the highest cadmium level ever reported for a cephalopod. Concerning cetaceans, our results include one of the highest renal cadmium concentrations described for striped dolphins (71.29 {mu}g/g, wet weight). Anthropogenic action, upwelling and cannibalism of Argentine short-finned squid on the studied area are possible reasons for such remarkable cadmium concentrations. - Cd levels in ommastrephid squids from Brazil are the highest ever reported for cephalopods.

  7. Navy sonar and cetaceans: just how much does the gun need to smoke before we act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, E C M; Dolman, Sarah J; Wright, Andrew J; Rose, Naomi A; Burns, W C G

    2008-07-01

    Cetacean mass stranding events associated with naval mid-frequency sonar use have raised considerable conservation concerns. These strandings have mostly involved beaked whales, with common pathologies, including "bubble lesions" similar to decompression sickness symptoms and acoustic traumas. However, other cetacean species have also stranded coincident with naval exercises. Possible mechanisms for the strandings include a behavioral response that causes deep divers to alter their diving behavior, which then results in decompression sickness-like impacts. Current mitigation measures during military exercises are focused on preventing auditory damage (hearing loss), but there are significant flaws with this approach. Behavioral responses, which occur at lower sound levels than those that cause hearing loss, may be more critical. Thus, mitigation measures should be revised. A growing number of international bodies recognize this issue and have urged increasing scrutiny of sound-producing activities, but many national jurisdictions have resisted calls for increased protection.

  8. Comparative histology of muscle in free ranging cetaceans: shallow versus deep diving species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, E.; Fernández, A.; Espinosa de los Monteros, A.; Díaz-Delgado, J.; Bernaldo de Quirós, Y.; García-Álvarez, N.; Arbelo, M.; Herráez, P.

    2015-01-01

    Different marine mammal species exhibit a wide range of diving behaviour based on their breath-hold diving capabilities. They are classically categorized as long duration, deep-diving and short duration, shallow-diving species. These abilities are likely to be related to the muscle characteristics of each species. Despite the increasing number of publications on muscle profile in different cetacean species, very little information is currently available concerning the characteristics of other muscle components in these species. In this study, we examined skeletal muscle fiber type, fiber size (cross sectional area and lesser diameter), intramuscular substrates, and perimysium-related structures, by retrospective study in 146 stranded cetaceans involving 15 different species. Additionally, we investigated diving profile-specific histological features. Our results suggest that deep diving species have higher amount of intramyocyte lipid droplets, and evidence higher percentage of intramuscular adipose tissue, and larger fibre sizes in this group of animals. PMID:26514564

  9. Skin biopsies for cell cultures from Mediterranean free-ranging cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, L; Fossi, M C; Neri, G; Casini, S; Gardi, C; Palmeri, S; Tarquini, E; Panigada, S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a useful method for obtaining viable tissue samples for establishing cell cultures from skin biopsies of free-ranging cetaceans. The skin biopsies were performed by two methods: dart from an air gun and dart from a crossbow. The dart tip was modified to collect tissue. The tissue was kept in tissue culture medium at ambient temperature, then processed within 24 h. Many modifications in culture technique, with respect to conventional culture methods for human fibroblasts, were made. The cultures thus obtained can be used for many purposes, including genetic and toxicological studies. In toxicology they are an alternative in vitro system for studying threatened animals such as marine mammals. In particular, fibroblasts can be used to test the vulnerability of cetaceans and pinnipeds to different environmental contaminants such as organochlorine compounds, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  10. Adaptive evolution and functional constraint at TLR4 during the secondary aquatic adaptation and diversification of cetaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Tong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises are a group of adapted marine mammals with an enigmatic history of transition from terrestrial to full aquatic habitat and rapid radiation in waters around the world. Throughout this evolution, the pathogen stress-response proteins must have faced challenges from the dramatic change of environmental pathogens in the completely different ecological niches cetaceans occupied. For this reason, cetaceans could be one of the most ideal candidate taxa for studying evolutionary process and associated driving mechanism of vertebrate innate immune systems such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs, which are located at the direct interface between the host and the microbial environment, act at the first line in recognizing specific conserved components of microorganisms, and translate them rapidly into a defense reaction. Results We used TLR4 as an example to test whether this traditionally regarded pattern recognition receptor molecule was driven by positive selection across cetacean evolutionary history. Overall, the lineage-specific selection test showed that the dN/dS (ω values along most (30 out of 33 examined cetartiodactylan lineages were less than 1, suggesting a common effect of functional constraint. However, some specific codons made radical changes, fell adjacent to the residues interacting with lipopolysaccharides (LPS, and showed parallel evolution between independent lineages, suggesting that TLR4 was under positive selection. Especially, strong signatures of adaptive evolution on TLR4 were identified in two periods, one corresponding to the early evolutionary transition of the terrestrial ancestors of cetaceans from land to semi-aquatic (represented by the branch leading to whale + hippo and from semi-aquatic to full aquatic (represented by the ancestral branch leading to cetaceans habitat, and the other to the rapid diversification and radiation of oceanic dolphins. Conclusions This

  11. Evidence of Positive Selection of Aquaporins Genes from Pontoporia blainvillei during the Evolutionary Process of Cetaceans

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Lima São Pedro; João Marcelo Pereira Alves; André Silva Barreto; André Oliveira de Souza Lima

    2015-01-01

    Background Marine mammals are well adapted to their hyperosmotic environment. Several morphological and physiological adaptations for water conservation and salt excretion are known to be present in cetaceans, being responsible for regulating salt balance. However, most previous studies have focused on the unique renal physiology of marine mammals, but the molecular bases of these mechanisms remain poorly explored. Many genes have been identified to be involved in osmotic regulation, includin...

  12. 2006 progress report on acoustic and visual monitoring for cetaceans along the outer Washington Coast

    OpenAIRE

    Oleson, Erin M.; Hildebrand, John A.; Calambokidis, John; Schorr, Greg; Falcone, Erin

    2007-01-01

    An acoustic and visual monitoring effort for cetaceans was initiated within the boundaries of the proposed expansion area for the Quinault Underwater Tracking Range in July 2004. Acoustic data collection consisted of recordings at a site on the continental shelf to the west of Cape Elizabeth and another in deep water within Quinault Canyon. An analysis plan for acoustic data is included. Results for 32 visual surveys are presented as tables and charts for pinnipeds, dolphins, porpoises, an...

  13. Inter-annual and seasonal trends in cetacean distribution, density and abundance off southern California

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Funding was provided by the Chief of Naval Operations Environmental Readiness Division, the United States Navy’s Pacific Fleet, the Naval Postgraduate School Grant #N00244-11-1-027, and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Living Marine Resources Program. Trends in cetacean density and distribution off southern California were assessed through visual line-transect surveys during thirty-seven California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) cruises from July 2004–Novemb...

  14. Interspecific introgression in cetaceans: DNA markers reveal post-F1 status of a pilot whale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Miralles

    Full Text Available Visual species identification of cetacean strandings is difficult, especially when dead specimens are degraded and/or species are morphologically similar. The two recognised pilot whale species (Globicephala melas and Globicephala macrorhynchus are sympatric in the North Atlantic Ocean. These species are very similar in external appearance and their morphometric characteristics partially overlap; thus visual identification is not always reliable. Genetic species identification ensures correct identification of specimens. Here we have employed one mitochondrial (D-Loop region and eight nuclear loci (microsatellites as genetic markers to identify six stranded pilot whales found in Galicia (Northwest Spain, one of them of ambiguous phenotype. DNA analyses yielded positive amplification of all loci and enabled species identification. Nuclear microsatellite DNA genotypes revealed mixed ancestry for one individual, identified as a post-F1 interspecific hybrid employing two different Bayesian methods. From the mitochondrial sequence the maternal species was Globicephala melas. This is the first hybrid documented between Globicephala melas and G. macrorhynchus, and the first post-F1 hybrid genetically identified between cetaceans, revealing interspecific genetic introgression in marine mammals. We propose to add nuclear loci to genetic databases for cetacean species identification in order to detect hybrid individuals.

  15. Genetic Evidence Highlights Potential Impacts of By-Catch to Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Martin; Rosenbaum, Howard C.; Wells, Randall S.; Stamper, Andrew; Bordino, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Incidental entanglement in fishing gear is arguably the most serious threat to many populations of small cetaceans, judging by the alarming number of captured animals. However, other aspects of this threat, such as the potential capture of mother-offspring pairs or reproductive pairs, could be equally or even more significant but have rarely been evaluated. Using a combination of demographic and genetic data we provide evidence that i) Franciscana dolphin pairs that are potentially reproductive and mother-offspring pairs form temporal bonds, and ii) are entangled simultaneously. Our results highlight potential demographic and genetic impacts of by-catch to cetacean populations: the joint entanglement of mother-offspring or reproductive pairs, compared to random individuals, might exacerbate the demographic consequences of by-catch, and the loss of groups of relatives means that significant components of genetic diversity could be lost together. Given the social nature of many odontocetes (toothed cetaceans), we suggest that these potential impacts could be rather general to the group and therefore by-catch could be more detrimental than previously considered. PMID:21179542

  16. Epistatic interactions influence terrestrial-marine functional shifts in cetacean rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-03-15

    Like many aquatic vertebrates, whales have blue-shifting spectral tuning substitutions in the dim-light visual pigment, rhodopsin, that are thought to increase photosensitivity in underwater environments. We have discovered that known spectral tuning substitutions also have surprising epistatic effects on another function of rhodopsin, the kinetic rates associated with light-activated intermediates. By using absorbance spectroscopy and fluorescence-based retinal release assays on heterologously expressed rhodopsin, we assessed both spectral and kinetic differences between cetaceans (killer whale) and terrestrial outgroups (hippo, bovine). Mutation experiments revealed that killer whale rhodopsin is unusually resilient to pleiotropic effects on retinal release from key blue-shifting substitutions (D83N and A292S), largely due to a surprisingly specific epistatic interaction between D83N and the background residue, S299. Ancestral sequence reconstruction indicated that S299 is an ancestral residue that predates the evolution of blue-shifting substitutions at the origins of Cetacea. Based on these results, we hypothesize that intramolecular epistasis helped to conserve rhodopsin's kinetic properties while enabling blue-shifting spectral tuning substitutions as cetaceans adapted to aquatic environments. Trade-offs between different aspects of molecular function are rarely considered in protein evolution, but in cetacean and other vertebrate rhodopsins, may underlie multiple evolutionary scenarios for the selection of specific amino acid substitutions.

  17. Phylogeny and adaptive evolution of the brain-development gene microcephalin (MCPH1 in cetaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery Stephen H

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Representatives of Cetacea have the greatest absolute brain size among animals, and the largest relative brain size aside from humans. Despite this, genes implicated in the evolution of large brain size in primates have yet to be surveyed in cetaceans. Results We sequenced ~1240 basepairs of the brain development gene microcephalin (MCPH1 in 38 cetacean species. Alignments of these data and a published complete sequence from Tursiops truncatus with primate MCPH1 were utilized in phylogenetic analyses and to estimate ω (rate of nonsynonymous substitution/rate of synonymous substitution using site and branch models of molecular evolution. We also tested the hypothesis that selection on MCPH1 was correlated with brain size in cetaceans using a continuous regression analysis that accounted for phylogenetic history. Our analyses revealed widespread signals of adaptive evolution in the MCPH1 of Cetacea and in other subclades of Mammalia, however, there was not a significant positive association between ω and brain size within Cetacea. Conclusion In conjunction with a recent study of Primates, we find no evidence to support an association between MCPH1 evolution and the evolution of brain size in highly encephalized mammalian species. Our finding of significant positive selection in MCPH1 may be linked to other functions of the gene.

  18. Implementation of a method to visualize noise-induced hearing loss in mass stranded cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Maria; Brownlow, Andrew; McGovern, Barry; Raverty, Stephen A.; Shadwick, Robert E.; André, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of the impact of noise over-exposure in stranded cetaceans is challenging, as the lesions that lead to hearing loss occur at the cellular level and inner ear cells are very sensitive to autolysis. Distinguishing ante-mortem pathology from post-mortem change has been a major constraint in diagnosing potential impact. Here, we outline a methodology applicable to the detection of noise-induced hearing loss in stranded cetaceans. Inner ears from two mass strandings of long-finned pilot whales in Scotland were processed for scanning electron microscopy observation. In one case, a juvenile animal, whose ears were fixed within 4 hours of death, revealed that many sensory cells at the apex of the cochlear spiral were missing. In this case, the absence of outer hair cells would be compatible with overexposure to underwater noise, affecting the region which transduces the lowest frequencies of the pilot whales hearing spectrum. Perfusion of cochlea with fixative greatly improved preservation and enabled diagnostic imaging of the organ of Corti, even 30 hours after death. This finding supports adopting a routine protocol to detect the pathological legacy of noise overexposure in mass stranded cetaceans as a key to understanding the complex processes and implications that lie behind such stranding events. PMID:28165504

  19. Organochlorine pollutants in small cetaceans from the Pacific and south Atlantic Oceans, November 1968-June 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, T.J.; Brownell, R.L.; Clark, D.R.; Walker, W.A.; Gay, M.L.; Lamont, T.G.

    1980-01-01

    Organochlorine residues were analyzed in blubber, brain, or muscle tissues of 69 individuals representing 10 species of small cetaceans. Collections were made from November 1968 through June 1976 at localities in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and along the coasts of California, Hawaii, Japan, and Uruguay, Relations of residue concentrations between tissues are described for DDE and PCBs in two dolphin species. sigma DDT and PCB residues in blubber of most of the 19 individuals of the five southern California species sampled exceed concentrations that are associated with reproductive impairment in pinnipeds, although the nature of such associations is not well defined. The sigma DDT residue of 2,695 ppm in blubber of one California coastal Tursiops truncatus is one of the highest concentrations reported in tissues of members of any population of wild mammals. Except for one rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis) from Maui, Hawaii, all individuals from all localities surveyed were contaminated with organochlorine compounds. Seventeen different organochlorines were detected; greatest diversity occurred near Japan and California. This is the first report of several of these compounds in tissues of any species of marine mammals. The o,p'-isomers and metabolites of DDT were detected unusually frequently. Ratios of p,p'-DDT to p,p'-DDE in blubber of cetaceans from waters off countries where use of this pesticide has been relatively recent and ongoing were at least an order of magnitude higher than in cetaceans from United States waters.

  20. Implementation of a method to visualize noise-induced hearing loss in mass stranded cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Maria; Brownlow, Andrew; McGovern, Barry; Raverty, Stephen A.; Shadwick, Robert E.; André, Michel

    2017-02-01

    Assessment of the impact of noise over-exposure in stranded cetaceans is challenging, as the lesions that lead to hearing loss occur at the cellular level and inner ear cells are very sensitive to autolysis. Distinguishing ante-mortem pathology from post-mortem change has been a major constraint in diagnosing potential impact. Here, we outline a methodology applicable to the detection of noise-induced hearing loss in stranded cetaceans. Inner ears from two mass strandings of long-finned pilot whales in Scotland were processed for scanning electron microscopy observation. In one case, a juvenile animal, whose ears were fixed within 4 hours of death, revealed that many sensory cells at the apex of the cochlear spiral were missing. In this case, the absence of outer hair cells would be compatible with overexposure to underwater noise, affecting the region which transduces the lowest frequencies of the pilot whales hearing spectrum. Perfusion of cochlea with fixative greatly improved preservation and enabled diagnostic imaging of the organ of Corti, even 30 hours after death. This finding supports adopting a routine protocol to detect the pathological legacy of noise overexposure in mass stranded cetaceans as a key to understanding the complex processes and implications that lie behind such stranding events.

  1. Pathology and causes of death of stranded cetaceans in the Canary Islands (1999-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbelo, Manuel; Los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa de; Herráez, Pedro; Andrada, Marisa; Sierra, Eva; Rodríguez, Francisco; Jepson, Paul D; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-03-26

    Between 1999 and 2005, 233 stranded cetaceans (comprising 19 species) were reported in the waters of the Canary Islands. Of these, 138/233 (59.2%) were subjected to a complete or partial standardized necropsy, including 4 Balaenopteridae, 9 Physeteridae, 8 Kogiidae, 27 Ziphiidae and 90 Delphinidae. Of these, 46/138 (33.3%) cetaceans were diagnosed with anthropogenic pathological categories (i.e. the cause of death was anthropogenic). These included fishing interaction (bycatch) (19 individuals), 'atypical' mass stranding events linked to naval exercises (13), ship collisions (8) and other anthropogenic-related pathology (6). 'Natural' (i.e. non-anthropogenic) causes of death accounted for another 82/138 (59.4%) cases, including infectious and non-infectious diseases (63), neonatal pathology (8), intra- and interspecific interactions (6) and mass strandings (5). The cause(s) of death could not be determined in 10/138 (7.3%) necropsied animals. The most common causes of death were ship collisions in 6/9 (66.6%) Physeteridae, 'atypical' mass stranding linked to naval exercises in 13/27 (48.1%) Ziphiidae, and 'natural' infectious and non-infectious diseases in 55/90 (61.1%) Delphinidae. Interaction with fishing activities was established as cause of death in 15/90 (16.7%) Delphinidae. These data show that a range of anthropogenic and natural single and mass mortality events occur in multiple cetacean species stranded in the Canary Islands.

  2. Cetacean distributions relative to ocean processes in the northern California Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Cynthia T.; Ainley, David G.; Barth, John A.; Cowles, Timothy J.; Pierce, Stephen D.; Spear, Larry B.

    2005-01-01

    Associations between cetacean distributions, oceanographic features, and bioacoustic backscatter were examined during two process cruises in the northern California Current System (CCS) during late spring and summer 2000. Line-transect surveys of cetaceans were conducted across the shelf and slope, out to 150 km offshore from Newport, Oregon (44.6°N) to Crescent City, California (41.9°N), in conjunction with multidisciplinary mesoscale and fine-scale surveys of ocean and ecosystem structure. Occurrence patterns (presence/absence) of cetaceans were compared with hydrographic and ecological variables (e.g., sea surface salinity, sea surface temperature, thermocline depth, halocline depth, chlorophyll maximum, distance to the center of the equatorward jet, distance to the shoreward edge of the upwelling front, and acoustic backscatter at 38, 120, 200 and 420 kHz) derived from a towed, undulating array and a bioacoustic system. Using a multiple logistic regression model, 60.2% and 94.4% of the variation in occurrence patterns of humpback whales Megaptera novaeangliae during late spring and summer, respectively, were explained. Sea surface temperature, depth, and distance to the alongshore upwelling front were the most important environmental variables during June, when humpbacks occurred over the slope (200-2000 m). During August, when humpbacks concentrated over a submarine bank (Heceta Bank) and off Cape Blanco, sea surface salinity was the most important variable, followed by latitude and depth. Humpbacks did not occur in the lowest salinity water of the Columbia River plume. For harbor porpoise Phocoena phocoena, the model explained 79.2% and 70.1% of the variation in their occurrence patterns during June and August, respectively. During spring, latitude, sea surface salinity, and thermocline gradient were the most important predictors. During summer, latitude and distance to the inshore edge of the upwelling front were the most important variables. Typically a

  3. Quantitative analysis of neocortical gyrencephaly in African elephants (Loxodonta africana) and six species of cetaceans: comparison with other mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, Paul R; Prowse, Michelle; Haagensen, Mark; Hemingway, Jason

    2012-08-01

    This study provides quantitative data on the extent of gyrencephaly in the large-brained African elephant and several species of cetaceans (from smaller to larger brained) in comparison with other mammals. Across three mammalian orders (primates, carnivores, and artiodactyls), the species with the larger brains are more gyrencephalic with each order, exhibiting a specific negative allometry. The African elephant, with a 5-kg brain, has a gyrencephalic index (GI) of 3.89, which, though highly gyrencephalic, is not more so than would be predicted for a mammal with a 5-kg brain. The cetaceans had an average GI of 5.43, are the most gyrencephalic mammals studied to date, and are more gyrencephalic than one would predict based on comparison with other mammals. No relationship between brain mass and GI was evident in the cetaceans as seen in other mammals, with all cetaceans showing similar GIs irrespective of brain mass (range of GI 5.23-5.70, range of brain mass 577-5617 g). This is yet another parameter indicating cetaceans to be neuroanatomical outliers. Two species of pinnipeds studied had GIs that were well above those seen for terrestrial carnivores, and the aquatic manatee was close to lissencephalic. Thus, all three groups of marine mammals showed unusual extents of cortical gyrencephaly, indicating a morphological alteration of the telencephalon associated with the return to the marine environment. The analysis suggests that cortical thickness and neuronal density are important factors in determining the extent of gyrencephaly across mammalian species.

  4. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. This volume summarizes the results of the study. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  5. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 2. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. This volume summarizes the results of the study. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  6. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 3. Appendix C. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. Appendix C Part 2 contains the hydrogrpahic data collected during TIO Cruises 5-7. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  7. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 3. Appendix C. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. Appendix C Part 1 contains the hydrographic data collected during TIO Cruises 1-4. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  8. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 3. Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. Appendix B contains the hydrographic data collected during all four NMFS-SEFSC cruises. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  9. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (ΔG of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi...... that predicts multi-site ΔΔG as accurately as standard methods do for single-site mutations and reproduces trends in contemporary myoglobin stabilities. We then apply this new method to the study of the evolution of Mb stability in cetaceans: With both methods the main change in stability (about 1 kcal....../mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche...

  10. Retrospective seroepidemiological investigations against Morbillivirus, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp. in cetaceans stranded along the Italian coastline (1998-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profeta, Francesca; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Marsilio, Fulvio; Mignone, Walter; Di Nocera, Fabio; De Carlo, Esterina; Lucifora, Giuseppe; Pietroluongo, Guido; Baffoni, Marina; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Eleni, Claudia; Terracciano, Giuliana; Ferri, Nicola; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Casalone, Cristina; Pautasso, Alessandra; Mazzariol, Sandro; Centelleghe, Cinzia; Di Guardo, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    This study reports the results of seroepidemiological investigations carried out against Morbillivirus, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp. on blood serum samples collected from 70 cetacean specimens found stranded along the Italian coastline between 1998 and 2014. A total number of 23 serum samples (32.8%) obtained from Stenella coeruleoalba, Tursiops truncatus, Balaenoptera physalus and Globicephala melas harboured anti-Morbillivirus neutralizing antibodies. Ten sera (16%) collected from S. coeruleoalba and T. truncatus were found positive against T. gondii, while no antibodies against Brucella spp. were found. These data reveal that stranded cetaceans provide a unique opportunity for monitoring the health status of free-ranging animals living in the Mediterranean Sea, in order to investigate the level of exposure of cetacean populations to selected infectious agents representing a serious threat for aquatic mammals.

  11. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 3. Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. Appendix A contains: the cetacean, trutle, and bird sighting data from all shipboard and aerial visual surveys; contact data from the shipboard acoustic survey; and the cetacean environmental profiles. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  12. Line transects, environmental data and GIS: Cetacean distribution, habitat and prey selection along the Barents Sea shelf edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Skern-Mauritzen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cetacean observations obtained during sighting surveys for abundance estimation can also be used to investigate cetacean habitat and prey selection, the principal processes underlying cetacean distributions. In this paper, we investigate habitat and prey selection of minke (Balaenoptera acutorostrata, fin (B. physalus and sperm (Physeter macrocephalus whales and Lagenorhynchus (Atlantic white-sided L. acutus and white-beaked L. albirostris dolphins observed along predetermined cruise tracks along the Barents Sea shelf edge in 2000, 2001 and 2002. The observations were combined with simultaneously collected data on habitat (depth, sea surface temperature, and temperature gradients and prey (plankton, 0-group fish, capelin and herring distributions in a GeographicInformation System (GIS to investigate habitat and prey selection. Minke whales were associated with cold waters and herring, and capelin in years with low herring abundance. Fin whales were mainly associated with northern cold and deep waters, as well as capelin, 0-group fish and plankton. Lagenorhynchus dolphins were associated with capelin. Finally, sperm whales were associated with deep waters and 0-group fish. Sperm whales were probably indirectly attracted to 0-group fish through preying on predatory fish such as Sebastes spp. and the squid Gonatus spp. The cetacean species responded differently to annual variation in habitat and prey distributions. Minke and fin whale distributions and abundances remained similar between years within the study area, suggestingthat these species are generalists responding to environmental changes by switching between prey species. Conversely, Lagenorhynchus dolphins shifted northwards, likely due to tracking the shifting capelin distributions. The results are discussed in light of how such cetacean habitat and cetacean prey relationships can be valuable for the proper assessment of population sizes and trends, both through guiding the design of

  13. Global coverage of cetacean line-transect surveys: status quo, data gaps and future challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kaschner

    Full Text Available Knowledge of abundance, trends and distribution of cetacean populations is needed to inform marine conservation efforts, ecosystem models and spatial planning. We compiled a geo-spatial database of published data on cetacean abundance from dedicated visual line-transect surveys and encoded >1100 abundance estimates for 47 species from 430 surveys conducted worldwide from 1975-2005. Our subsequent analyses revealed large spatial, temporal and taxonomic variability and gaps in survey coverage. With the exception of Antarctic waters, survey coverage was biased toward the northern hemisphere, especially US and northern European waters. Overall, <25% of the world's ocean surface was surveyed and only 6% had been covered frequently enough (≥ 5 times to allow trend estimation. Almost half the global survey effort, defined as total area (km(2 covered by all survey study areas across time, was concentrated in the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP. Neither the number of surveys conducted nor the survey effort had increased in recent years. Across species, an average of 10% of a species' predicted range had been covered by at least one survey, but there was considerable variation among species. With the exception of three delphinid species, <1% of all species' ranges had been covered frequently enough for trend analysis. Sperm whales emerged from our analyses as a relatively data-rich species. This is a notoriously difficult species to survey visually, and we use this as an example to illustrate the challenges of using available data from line-transect surveys for the detection of trends or for spatial planning. We propose field and analytical methods to fill in data gaps to improve cetacean conservation efforts.

  14. Molecular characterization of poxviruses associated with tattoo skin lesions in UK cetaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Blacklaws

    Full Text Available There is increasing concern for the well-being of cetacean populations around the UK. Tattoo skin disease (characterised by irregular, grey, black or yellowish, stippled cutaneous lesions caused by poxvirus infection is a potential health indicatora potential health indicator for cetaceans. Limited sequence data indicates that cetacean poxviruses (CPVs belong to an unassigned genus of the Chordopoxvirinae. To obtain further insight into the phylogenetic relationships between CPV and other Chordopoxvirinae members we partially characterized viral DNA originating from tattoo lesions collected in Delphinidae and Phocoenidae stranded along the UK coastline in 1998-2008. We also evaluated the presence of CPV in skin lesions other than tattoos to examine specificity and sensitivity of visual diagnosis. After DNA extraction, regions of the DNA polymerase and DNA topoisomerase I genes were amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared with other isolates. The presence of CPV DNA was demonstrated in tattoos from one striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba, eight harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena and one short-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus delphis and in one 'dubious tattoo' lesion detected in one other porpoise. Seventeen of the 18 PCR positive skin lesions had been visually identified as tattoos and one as a dubious tattoo. None of the other skin lesions were PCR positive. Thus, visual identification had a 94.4% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The DNA polymerase PCR was most effective in detecting CPV DNA. Limited sequence phylogeny grouped the UK samples within the odontocete poxviruses (CPV group 1 and indicated that two different poxvirus lineages infect the Phocoenidae and the Delphinidae. The phylogenetic tree had three major branches: one with the UK Phocoenidae viruses, one with the Delphinidae isolates and one for the mysticete poxvirus (CPV group 2. This implies a radiation of poxviruses according to the host suborder and the families within

  15. Inter-annual and seasonal trends in cetacean distribution, density and abundance off southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Gregory S.; Thomas, Len; Whitaker, Katherine; Douglas, Annie B.; Calambokidis, John; Hildebrand, John A.

    2015-02-01

    Trends in cetacean density and distribution off southern California were assessed through visual line-transect surveys during thirty-seven California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) cruises from July 2004-November 2013. From sightings of the six most commonly encountered cetacean species, seasonal, annual and overall density estimates were calculated. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus), fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) and humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) were the most frequently sighted baleen whales with overall densities of 0.91/1000 km2 (CV=0.27), 2.73/1000 km2 (CV=0.19), and 1.17/1000 km2 (CV=0.21) respectively. Species specific density estimates, stratified by cruise, were analyzed using a generalized additive model to estimate long-term trends and correct for seasonal imbalances. Variances were estimated using a non-parametric bootstrap with one day of effort as the sampling unit. Blue whales were primarily observed during summer and fall while fin and humpback whales were observed year-round with peaks in density during summer and spring respectively. Short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis), Pacific white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) and Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoidesdalli) were the most frequently encountered small cetaceans with overall densities of 705.83/1000 km2 (CV=0.22), 51.98/1000 km2 (CV=0.27), and 21.37/1000 km2 (CV=0.19) respectively. Seasonally, short-beaked common dolphins were most abundant in winter whereas Pacific white-sided dolphins and Dall's porpoise were most abundant during spring. There were no significant long-term changes in blue whale, fin whale, humpback whale, short-beaked common dolphin or Dall's porpoise densities while Pacific white-sided dolphins exhibited a significant decrease in density across the ten-year study. The results from this study were fundamentally consistent with earlier studies, but provide greater temporal and seasonal resolution.

  16. Do porpoises choose their associates? A new method for analyzing social relationships among cetaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Sakai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Observing and monitoring the underwater social interactions of cetaceans is challenging. Therefore, previous cetacean studies have monitored these interactions by surface observations. However, because cetaceans spend most of their time underwater, it is important that their underwater behavior is also continuously monitored to better understand their social relationships and social structure. The finless porpoise is small and has no dorsal fin. It is difficult to observe this species in the wild, and little is known of its sociality. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The swim depths of 6 free-ranging finless porpoises were simultaneously recorded using a time-synchronized bio-logging system. Synchronous diving was used as an index of association. Two pairs, #27 (an immature female estimated to be 3.5 years old and #32 (an adult male, #28 (a juvenile male estimated to be 2 years old and #29 (an adult male, tended to participate in long periods of synchronized diving more frequently than 13 other possible pairs, indicating that the 4 porpoises chose their social partners. The adult males (#32, #29 tended to follow the immature female (#27 and juvenile male (#28, respectively. However, during synchronized diving, the role of an initiator often changed within the pair, and their body movements appeared to be non-agonistic, e.g., rubbing of bodies against one another instead of that on one-side, as observed with chasing and escaping behaviors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study employed a time-synchronized bio-logging method to observe the social relationships of free-ranging aquatic animals based on swimming depth. The results suggest that certain individuals form associations even if they are not a mother and calf pair. Long synchronized dives occurred when particular members were reunited, and this suggests that the synchronized dives were not a by-product of opportunistic aggregation.

  17. Examination of the three-dimensional geometry of cetacean flukes using computed tomography scans: hydrodynamic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Frank E; Beneski, John T; Ketten, Darlene R

    2007-06-01

    The flukes of cetaceans function in the hydrodynamic generation of forces for thrust, stability, and maneuverability. The three-dimensional geometry of flukes is associated with production of lift and drag. Data on fluke geometry were collected from 19 cetacean specimens representing eight odontocete genera (Delphinus, Globicephala, Grampus, Kogia, Lagenorhynchus, Phocoena, Stenella, Tursiops). Flukes were imaged as 1 mm thickness cross-sections using X-ray computer-assisted tomography. Fluke shapes were characterized quantitatively by dimensions of the chord, maximum thickness, and position of maximum thickness from the leading edge. Sections were symmetrical about the chordline and had a rounded leading edge and highly tapered trailing edge. The thickness ratio (maximum thickness/chord) among species increased from insertion on the tailstock to a maximum at 20% of span and then decreasing steadily to the tip. Thickness ratio ranged from 0.139 to 0.232. These low values indicate reduced drag while moving at high speed. The position of maximum thickness from the leading edge remained constant over the fluke span at an average for all species of 0.285 chord. The displacement of the maximum thickness reduces the tendency of the flow to separate from the fluke surface, potentially affecting stall patterns. Similarly, the relatively large leading edge radius allows greater lift generation and delays stall. Computational analysis of fluke profiles at 50% of span showed that flukes were generally comparable or better for lift generation than engineered foils. Tursiops had the highest lift coefficients, which were superior to engineered foils by 12-19%. Variation in the structure of cetacean flukes reflects different hydrodynamic characteristics that could influence swimming performance.

  18. Phylogeny of all major groups of cetaceans based on DNA sequences from three mitochondrial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinkovitch, M C; Meyer, A; Powell, J R

    1994-11-01

    Traditionally, living cetaceans (order Cetacea) are classified into two highly distinct suborders: the echolocating toothed whales, Odontoceti, and the filter-feeding baleen whales, Mysticeti. A molecular phylogeny based on 1,352 base pairs of two mitochondrial ribosomal gene segments and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene for all major groups of cetaceans contradicts this long-accepted taxonomic subdivision. One group of toothed whales, the sperm whales, is more closely related to the morphologically highly divergent baleen whales than to other odontocetes. This finding suggests that the suborder Odontoceti constitutes an unnatural grouping and challenges the conventional scenario of a long, independent evolutionary history of odontocetes and mysticetes. The superfamily Delphinoidea (dolphins, porpoises, and white whales) appears to be monophyletic; the Amazon River dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, is its sister species. This river dolphin is genetically more divergent from the morphologically similar marine dolphins than the sperm whales are from the morphologically dissimilar baleen whales. The phylogenetic relationships among the three families of Delphinoidea remain uncertain, and we suggest that the two cladogenetic events that generated these three clades occurred within a very short period of time. Among the baleen whales, the bowhead is basal, and the gray whale is the sister species to the rorquals (family Balaenopteridae). The phylogenetic position of beaked whales (Ziphioidea) remains weakly supported by molecular data. Based on molecular clock assumptions, the mitochondrial-DNA data suggest a more recent origin of baleen whales (approximately 25 mya) than has been previously assumed (> 40 mya). This revised phylogeny has important implications for the rate and mode of evolution of morphological and physiological innovations in cetaceans.

  19. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B. R.; Zerbini, Alexandre N.; Secchi, Eduardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  20. New-tools to assess the toxicological hazard of endocrine disruptor organoclorine contaminants in Mediterranean cetaceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Cristina Fossi; Marsili, L.; Casini, S. [Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Univ. of Siena (Italy)

    2004-09-15

    The Mediterranean top predators, and particularly cetacean odontocetes, accumulate high concentrations of organochlorine contaminants (OCs), incurring high toxicological risk. Some organochlorine compounds, now with worldwide distribution, are known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Four types of organochlorine endocrine disruptors are commonly found in Mediterranean cetaceans: (1) environmental estrogens, (2) environmental androgens, (3) anti-estrogens and (4) anti-androgens. Endocrine disruptors act by mimicking sex steroid hormones, both estrogens and androgens, by binding to hormone receptors or influencing cell pathways (environmental estrogens and androgens), or by blocking and altering hormone receptor binding (anti-estrogens, antiandrogens). Environmental estrogens are the most common and most widely studied EDCs. The relative estrogenic power of these chemicals, identified by in vitro and in vivo screening methods is rather weak (10{sup -3} or less) compared with the reference power of 17-estradiol or DES. However, the high levels of organochlorine compounds detected in marine mammals, particularly in pinnipeds and odontocetes, and consequently, the high levels of organochlorines with ED capacity, cannot be ignored. Here the hypothesis that some Mediterranean cetaceans (Stenella coeruleoalba, Delphinus delphis, Tursiops truncatus and Balaenoptera physalus) are ''potentially at risk'' due to organochlorines with endocrine disrupting capacity is investigated using new non-lethal tools. As ''diagnostic'' tool we use benzo(a)pyrene monooxygenase (CYP1A1) activity in skin biopsies (non-lethal biomarker) as a potential indicator of exposure to organochlorines, with special reference to the compounds with endocrine disrupting capacity. As ''prognostic'' tool we propose the immunofluorescence technique in fibroblast cell cultures, for a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the target

  1. Sink or swim? Bone density as a mechanism for buoyancy control in early cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Noel-Marie; Kainec, Kimberly; Madar, Sandra; Tomko, Lucas; Wolfe, Scott

    2007-06-01

    Previous analyses have shown that secondarily aquatic tetrapods, including whales, exhibit osteological adaptations to life in water as part of their complex buoyancy control systems. These structural specializations of bone span hyperostosis through osteoporosis. The past 15 years of paleontological effort has provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine the osteological transformation of whales as they make their transition to an obligate aquatic lifestyle over a 10-million-year period. It is hypothesized that whales manifest their osteological specialization in the same manner as extant semiaquatic and fully aquatic mammals. This study presents and analysis of the microstructural features of bone in early and late archaic cetaceans, and in a comparative sample of modern terrestrial, semiaquatic, and aquatic mammals. Bone histology was examined from the ribs of 10 fossilized individuals representing five early cetacean families, including Pakicetidae, Ambulocetidae, Protocetidae, Remintonocetidae, and Basilosauridae. Comparisons were then made with rib histology from nine genera of extant mammals including: Odocoileus (deer), Bos (cow), Equus (horse), Canis (dog), Lutra (river otter), Enhydra (sea otter), Choeropsis (pygmy hippo), Trichechus (sea cow), and Delphinus (dolphin). Results show that the transition from terrestrial, to semiaquatic, to obligate aquatic locomotion in archaeocetes involved a radical shift in bone function achieved by means of profound changes at the microstructural level. A surprising finding was that microstructural change predates gross anatomical shift in archaeocetes associated with swimming. Histological analysis shows that high bone density is an aquatic specialization that provides static buoyancy control (ballast) for animals living in shallow water, while low bone density is associated with dynamic buoyancy control for animals living in deep water. Thus, there was a shift from the typical terrestrial form, to osteopetrosis

  2. The role of lantern fish (Myctophidae) in the life-cycle of cetacean parasites from western Mediterranean waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu, Paula; Nardi, Valentina; Fraija-Fernández, Natalia; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Gil de Sola, Luis; Raga, Juan Antonio; Fernández, Mercedes; Aznar, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Myctophids (lantern fish) and cephalopods play a key role in trophic webs from the continental slope and oceanic waters linking the zooplankton to top predators. Many cetaceans feed on both lantern fish and cephalopods, and such prey would thus be expected to bridge the trophic gap in the life-cycles of helminths infecting cetaceans. However, information on the life-cycles of most of these helminths is extremely scanty. We examined the parasite fauna of myctophids and cephalopods in two areas from the western Mediterranean where at least 21 helminth taxa from cetaceans have been reported and both cetacean diversity and abundance is high. A total of 1012 individuals of 8 lantern fish species, namely, Ceratoscopelus maderensis, Lampanyctus crocodilus, Notoscopelus elongatus, Benthosema glaciale, Myctophum punctatum, Lobianchia dofleini, Diaphus holti and Hygophum benoiti, and 792 individuals of 2 cephalopod species, Alloteuthis media and Sepietta oweniana, were collected from the Gulf of Valencia and Alboran Sea (Spanish Mediterranean) during 2010-2012 and examined for larval helminths. All these species have been reported as prey for at least some cetacean species in the area. Only five helminth taxa were found. The nematodes Anisakis pegreffii and Anisakis physeteris were detected in N. elongatus and C. maderensis (overall prevalence for Anisakis: 8.1% and 0.5%, respectively). Their prevalence in N. elongatus was significantly higher than that from the other three myctophid species with n>50 individuals. A single individual of Hysterothylacium sp. was found in N. elongatus (prevalence: 0.5%) and Raphidascarididae gen. spp. in N. elongatus and L. crocodilus (prevalence: 20.3% and 0.7%, respectively). Juvenile didymozoid digeneans (Torticaecum type) were detected in N. elongatus and L. crocodilus (prevalence: 18.5% and 4.3%, respectively). Two unidentified cestode plerocercoids were collected from N. elongatus. Our study suggests, for the first time, that myctophids

  3. [The supra-occipital bone in cetaceans and burrowing rodents. morphological convergence induced by the post-cephalic pole?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, F; Marchand, D

    2000-02-01

    A comparative study of the cranial morphologies of cetaceans and of rodents that use their incisors for burrowing brings out morphological convergences concerning the supra-occipital bone. These phyletically very remote groups are both subject to the same mechanical constraint, viz. the need for the spinal column to be aligned with the anteroposterior axis of the skull. This constraint, which is related to swimming in cetaceans and burrowing in rodents, entails three major points of convergence: 1) a clearly backward facing foramen magnum; 2) a shortened or even greatly shortened neck, sometimes with cervical vertebrae fused together; and 3) an uprighted or even forward tilted supra-occipital bone.

  4. Hydroacoustic records of seafloor earthquakes, cryogenic sounds, and cetacean vocalizations in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chateau, R.; Royer, J.; Dziak, R. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Brandon, V.; Haxel, J. H.

    2009-12-01

    From October 2006 to January 2008, three hydrophones were deployed in the southern Indian Ocean by the CNRS/University of Brest and the NOAA/Oregon State University. These hydrophones were moored in the SOFAR channel and recorded a total of 1780 discrete acoustic events, mainly earthquakes from the mid-ocean ridges and cryogenic acoustic signals from off Antarctica (due to ice shelf creeping and iceberg breaking). The low attenuation of acoustic waves in the SOFAR channel allows for the long-range detection of low-magnitude earthquakes (body-magnitude cetacean species, including blue, fin, and Milke whales.

  5. Cetacean stranding records in the Turkish Western Black Sea coast during October 2012 - September 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda M. Tonay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Between October 2012 and September 2013, a research has been conducted on marine mammal strandings on Turkish western Black Sea coast. In total, 54 stranded cetaceans were found, which included 22 bottlenose dolphins (41%, 19 harbour porpoises (35%, 11 common dolphins (20%, and 4% unidentified individuals. Most strandings were observed in May and June. Bycaught carcases were found especially in April, June and July. The aim of the study is to collect first-hand data on the monthly stranding rates in order to understand the seasonal variation of stranding cases in a year.

  6. Cetacean strandings in Italy: an unusual mortality event along the Tyrrhenian Sea coast in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalone, Cristina; Mazzariol, Sandro; Pautasso, Alessandra; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Di Nocera, Fabio; Lucifora, Giuseppe; Ligios, Ciriaco; Franco, Alessia; Fichi, Gianluca; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Cersini, Antonella; Guercio, Annalisa; Puleio, Roberto; Goria, Maria; Podestà, Michela; Marsili, Letizia; Pavan, Gianni; Pintore, Antonio; De Carlo, Esterina; Eleni, Claudia; Caracappa, Santo

    2014-04-23

    An unusual mortality event involving cetaceans, mainly striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba (Meyen, 1833), occurred along the Tyrrhenian Sea coast of Italy during the first 3 mo of 2013. Based on post-mortem analyses carried out according to body condition on 66 dolphins (54% of stranded animals), several hypotheses to explain the causes of this mortality event were proposed. Although no definitive conclusions can be drawn, dolphin morbillivirus was deemed the most likely cause, although other infectious agents (including Photobacterium damselae damselae and herpesvirus) or environmental factors may also have contributed to this recent mortality event.

  7. Summary of recorded cetacean strandings in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenorio, M.C.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Documented strandings in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands over the past 17 years are reviewed with recorded autopsy information provided. Most of the strandings occurred on the island of Saipan, although two whales were noted to have stranded during this period on Tinian, one identified as Balaenoptera edeni, the Byrdes whale, while the other was not identified. The planned expansion of military activities in the Marianas Archipelago, particularly the use of sonar and the potential impact on cetaceans, is noted.

  8. The use of diagnostic imaging for identifying abnormal gas accumulations in cetaceans and pinnipeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eDennison

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent dogma suggested that marine mammals are not at risk of decompression sickness (DCS due to a number of evolutionary adaptations. Several proposed adaptations exist. Lung compression and alveolar collapse that terminate gas exchange before a depth is reached where supersaturation is significant and bradycardia with peripheral vasoconstriction affecting the distribution, and dynamics of blood and tissue nitrogen levels. Published accounts of gas and fat emboli and dysbaric osteonecrosis in marine mammals and theoretical modeling have challenged this view-point, suggesting that decompression-like symptoms may occur under certain circumstances, contrary to common belief. Diagnostic imaging modalities are invaluable tools for the non-invasive examination of animals for evidence of gas and have been used to demonstrate the presence of incidental decompression-related renal gas accumulations in some stranded cetaceans. Diagnostic imaging has also contributed to the recognition of clinically significant gas accumulations in live and dead cetaceans and pinnipeds. Understanding the appropriate application and limitations of the available imaging modalities is important for accurate interpretation of results. The presence of gas may be incidental and must be interpreted cautiously alongside all other available data including clinical examination, clinical laboratory testing, gas analysis, necropsy examination and histology results.

  9. Species-specific accumulation of dioxin related compounds in cetaceans collected from Japanese coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajiwara, N.; Watanabe, M.; Tanabe, S. [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime Univ. (Japan); Amano, M. [Ocean Research Inst., Univ. of Tokyo, Iwate (Japan); Yamada, T. [National Science Museum, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are extremely hazardous and persistent chemicals identified as contaminants in chlorophenols, herbicides, fly ash and other incineration products. Dioxin-like PCBs including non- and mono-ortho coplanar PCBs are referred to as dioxin related compounds and are evaluated on par with PCDD/Fs in environmental risks since they have a high toxicity, similar to that of PCDD/Fs. These congeners have a range of physicochemical characteristics, which profoundly affect their persistence, environmental distribution, and bioaccumulation in aquatic food chains. Fish-eating wildlife such as marine mammals are particularly vulnerable to such contamination given their long lives, high trophic level, relative inability to metabolize many persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and the biomagnification of these contaminants in aquatic food chains. However, most studies dealing with PCDDs and PCDFs in marine mammals have been carried out on pinnipeds, and data on PCDD/Fs levels in cetaceans are scarce. The present study is aimed at understanding the recent pattern of contamination by dioxin related compounds including non- and mono-ortho coplanar PCBs and PCDD/Fs in three cetacean species collected from Japanese coastal waters during 1998-2001, and also to discuss the factors determining the accumulation.

  10. Habitat-based cetacean density models for the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason J.; Best, Benjamin D.; Mannocci, Laura; Fujioka, Ei; Halpin, Patrick N.; Palka, Debra L.; Garrison, Lance P.; Mullin, Keith D.; Cole, Timothy V. N.; Khan, Christin B.; McLellan, William A.; Pabst, D. Ann; Lockhart, Gwen G.

    2016-03-01

    Cetaceans are protected worldwide but vulnerable to incidental harm from an expanding array of human activities at sea. Managing potential hazards to these highly-mobile populations increasingly requires a detailed understanding of their seasonal distributions and habitats. Pursuant to the urgent need for this knowledge for the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico, we integrated 23 years of aerial and shipboard cetacean surveys, linked them to environmental covariates obtained from remote sensing and ocean models, and built habitat-based density models for 26 species and 3 multi-species guilds using distance sampling methodology. In the Atlantic, for 11 well-known species, model predictions resembled seasonal movement patterns previously suggested in the literature. For these we produced monthly mean density maps. For lesser-known taxa, and in the Gulf of Mexico, where seasonal movements were less well described, we produced year-round mean density maps. The results revealed high regional differences in small delphinoid densities, confirmed the importance of the continental slope to large delphinoids and of canyons and seamounts to beaked and sperm whales, and quantified seasonal shifts in the densities of migratory baleen whales. The density maps, freely available online, are the first for these regions to be published in the peer-reviewed literature.

  11. Domoic Acid Poisoning as a Possible Cause of Seasonal Cetacean Mass Stranding Events in Tasmania, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson Nash, S M; Baddock, M C; Takahashi, E; Dawson, A; Cropp, R

    2017-01-01

    The periodic trend to cetacean mass stranding events in the Australian island state of Tasmania remains unexplained. This article introduces the hypothesis that domoic acid poisoning may be a causative agent in these events. The hypothesis arises from the previously evidenced role of aeolian dust as a vector of iron input to the Southern Ocean; the role of iron enrichment in Pseudo-nitzschia bloom proliferation and domoic acid production; and importantly, the characteristic toxicosis of domoic acid poisoning in mammalian subjects leading to spatial navigation deficits. As a pre-requisite for quantitative evaluation, the plausibility of this hypothesis was considered through correlation analyses between historical monthly stranding event numbers, mean monthly chlorophyll concentration and average monthly atmospheric dust loading. Correlation of these variables, which under the domoic acid stranding scenario would be linked, revealed strong agreement (r = 0.80-0.87). We therefore advocate implementation of strategic quantitative investigation of the role of domoic acid in Tasmanian cetacean mass stranding events.

  12. Investigation of the Role of Planform Shape and Swimming Gait in Cetacean Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayancik, Fatma; Fish, Frank E.; Moored, Keith W.

    2015-11-01

    Dolphins and whales, known as cetaceans, have morphological characteristics associated with enhanced thrust production, high propulsive efficiency and reduced drag. These animals oscillate their moderate aspect ratio flukes in a heaving and pitching motion to propel themselves through the water. Surprisingly, these animals display a large variation in their fluke shape and swimming gait. The present study aims to probe the connection between the fluke shape and swimming gait in high performance swimming. The planform shape of cetacean flukes is parameterized with a NACA-inspired function where the coefficients are fit to several species. An unsteady three-dimensional boundary element method is used to identify the thrust production, energetics and wake structure of free-swimming flukes with an added virtual body drag. The shape and gait parameters of the different species are exchanged to gain a broader understanding of the connection between shape and gait. The numerical results are compared with lunate tail theory to assess the limitations of the theory and its predictions of force and energetic scalings. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara, MURI grant number N00014-14-1-0533.

  13. Concentration of mercury and selenium in tissues of five cetacean species from Croatian coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilandžić Nina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg and selenium (Se concentrations were measured in muscle, liver, kidney, spleen and lung tissues of five cetacean species, three dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba, Tursiops truncatus and Grampus griseus and two whale species (Balaenoptera physalus and Ziphius cavirostris, stranded along the Croatian coast during the period 1999-2002. Statistically significant differences in Hg concentrations in muscle, spleen and lung, and Se in liver and lung of the different dolphin species were observed. Mercury levels in liver and spleen and Se levels in liver differed between young and adult T. truncatus species. A significant positive correlation between different tissue types for Hg and Se concentrations was observed. In all tissues tested, the lowest Hg and Se concentrations were found in B. physalus. Mercury concentrations were positively correlated with Se in all tissues. The results present one of few studies related to lung and spleen tissues in these mammals, particularly in the Adriatic Sea. Since very little data are available, this research provides new data on concentrations of Hg and Se in five cetacean species from the Adriatic Sea basin.

  14. Parasites of cetaceans stranded on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J B; Morales, J A; González-Barrientos, R C; Hernández-Gamboa, J; Hernández-Mora, G

    2011-12-15

    Information regarding parasitic fauna of cetaceans from Costa Rica is provided for the first time. A total of 25 stranded dolphins and whales were examined between 2001 and 2009, including striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) (n=19), pantropical spotted dolphin (S. attenuata) (n=2), spinner dolphin (S. longirostris) (n=1), bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) (n=1), dwarf sperm whale (Kogia sima) (n=1) and Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) (n=1). Pathological findings associated with the parasites are also presented. In the most representative dolphin species, S. coeruleoalba, the prevalence of parasites was 89.5%; moreover, all examined specimens of S. attenuata, S. longirostris, T. truncatus and Z. cavirostris presented parasites. No parasites were recovered from K. sima. Fourteen helminth taxa were identified, including six species of cestodes (Strobilocephalus triangularis, Tetrabothrius forsteri, Trigonocotyle sp., Phyllobothrium delphini, Monorygma grimaldi, Tetraphyllidea gen. sp. plerocercoid), four digeneans (Nasitrema globicephalae, Brachycladium palliatum, B. pacificum and Oschmarinella albamarina) and four nematodes (Anisakis spp., Halocercus lagenorhynchi, Halocercus sp. and Crassicauda anthonyi). A commensal crustacean, Xenobalanus globicipitis, was also identified. All identified parasites representing new geographic records for the Pacific coast of Central America and new host records are presented. Parasitological information is valuable for conservation of cetaceans in Pacific coast of Costa Rica.

  15. Divergence date estimation and a comprehensive molecular tree of extant cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowen, Michael R; Spaulding, Michelle; Gatesy, John

    2009-12-01

    Cetaceans are remarkable among mammals for their numerous adaptations to an entirely aquatic existence, yet many aspects of their phylogeny remain unresolved. Here we merged 37 new sequences from the nuclear genes RAG1 and PRM1 with most published molecular data for the group (45 nuclear loci, transposons, mitochondrial genomes), and generated a supermatrix consisting of 42,335 characters. The great majority of these data have never been combined. Model-based analyses of the supermatrix produced a solid, consistent phylogenetic hypothesis for 87 cetacean species. Bayesian analyses corroborated odontocete (toothed whale) monophyly, stabilized basal odontocete relationships, and completely resolved branching events within Mysticeti (baleen whales) as well as the problematic speciose clade Delphinidae (oceanic dolphins). Only limited conflicts relative to maximum likelihood results were recorded, and discrepancies found in parsimony trees were very weakly supported. We utilized the Bayesian supermatrix tree to estimate divergence dates among lineages using relaxed-clock methods. Divergence estimates revealed rapid branching of basal odontocete lineages near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, the antiquity of river dolphin lineages, a Late Miocene radiation of balaenopteroid mysticetes, and a recent rapid radiation of Delphinidae beginning approximately 10 million years ago. Our comprehensive, time-calibrated tree provides a powerful evolutionary tool for broad-scale comparative studies of Cetacea.

  16. Rise of oceanographic barriers in continuous populations of a cetacean : The genetic structure of harbour porpoises in Old World waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontaine, Michaël C; Baird, Stuart J E; Piry, Sylvain; Ray, Nicolas; Tolley, Krystal A; Duke, Sarah; Birkun, Alexei; Ferreira, Marisa; Jauniaux, Thierry; Llavona, Angela; Oztürk, Bayram; A Oztürk, Ayaka; Ridoux, Vincent; Rogan, Emer; Sequeira, Marina; Siebert, Ursula; Vikingsson, Gísli A; Bouquegneau, Jean-Marie; Michaux, Johan R

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Understanding the role of seascape in shaping genetic and demographic population structure is highly challenging for marine pelagic species such as cetaceans for which there is generally little evidence of what could effectively restrict their dispersal. In the present work, we applied a

  17. Inter-specific and seasonal comparison of the niches occupied by small cetaceans off north-west Iberia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Rut; MacLeod, C.D.; Pierce, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of species' ecological niches can be used to assess ecological interactions between different taxa. Sixteen species of cetaceans have been recorded in Galician waters and niche partitioning is expected to occur among these species in order to allow them to co-exist. In this study...

  18. The high fidelity of the cetacean stranding record: insights into measuring diversity by integrating taphonomy and macroecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyenson, Nicholas D

    2011-12-07

    Stranded cetaceans have long intrigued naturalists because their causation has escaped singular explanations. Regardless of cause, strandings also represent a sample of the living community, although their fidelity has rarely been quantified. Using commensurate stranding and sighting records compiled from archived datasets representing nearly every major ocean basin, I demonstrated that the cetacean stranding record faithfully reflects patterns of richness and relative abundance in living communities, especially for coastlines greater than 2000 km and latitudinal gradients greater than 4°. Live-dead fidelity metrics from seven different countries indicated that strandings were almost always richer than live surveys; richness also increased with coastline length. Most death assemblages recorded the same ranked relative abundance as living communities, although this correlation decreased in strength and significance at coastline lengths greater than 15,000 km, highlighting the importance of sampling diversity at regional scales. Rarefaction analyses indicated that sampling greater than 10 years generally enhanced the completeness of death assemblages, although protracted temporal sampling did not substitute for sampling over longer coastlines or broader latitudes. Overall, this global live-dead comparison demonstrated that strandings almost always provided better diversity information about extant cetacean communities than live surveys; such archives are therefore relevant for macroecological and palaeobiological studies of cetacean community change through time.

  19. Annotated checklist and fisheries interactions of cetaceans in Togo, with evidence of Antarctic minke whale in the Gulf of Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segniagbeto, Gabriel H; VAN Waerebeek, Koen; Bowessidjaou, Joseph E; Ketoh, Koffivi; Kpatcha, Takouda K; Okoumassou, Kotchikpa; Ahoedo, Kossi

    2014-01-01

    Based on strandings and captures, 9 cetacean species, including 6 odontocetes and 3 mysticetes, are documented (photos and specimens) in Togo's coastal waters (newly-recorded species marked with an asterisk): Antarctic minke whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis*), Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera brydei or B. edeni), humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps*), short-finned pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus*), pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata*), common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and common dolphin Delphinus sp. An anecdotal sighting record for killer whale (Orcinus orca) is considered reliable. The lack of Sousa teuszii records in Togo is consistent with its apparent contemporaneous absence in Ghana. The B. bonaerensis specimen, entangled in a purse seine set on small pelagics, is a first record for the Gulf of Guinea. The occurrence of this Southern Ocean species north of the equator underscores the severe gaps in our understanding of cetacean distribution off western Africa. The majority of artisanal fishermen operating in Togolese coastal waters are of Ghanaian origin and are thought to promote trade and consumption of cetacean bushmeat. Because captures are illegal, enforced with some success in the main fishing centers, covert landings of cetaceans are exceedingly difficult to monitor, quantify or sample. Concern is expressed about pollution of Togo's coastal waters with heavy metals due to phosphorite mining and export from the coastal basin near Hahotoé and Kpogamé.

  20. Spectral Tuning of Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Rhodopsin: Evidence for Positive Selection and Functional Adaptation in a Cetacean Visual Pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Kosyakov, Alexander; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-02-01

    Cetaceans have undergone a remarkable evolutionary transition that was accompanied by many sensory adaptations, including modification of the visual system for underwater environments. Recent sequencing of cetacean genomes has made it possible to begin exploring the molecular basis of these adaptations. In this study we use in vitro expression methods to experimentally characterize the first step of the visual transduction cascade, the light activation of rhodopsin, for the killer whale. To investigate the spectral effects of amino acid substitutions thought to correspond with absorbance shifts relative to terrestrial mammals, we used the orca gene as a background for the first site-directed mutagenesis experiments in a cetacean rhodopsin. The S292A mutation had the largest effect, and was responsible for the majority of the spectral difference between killer whale and bovine (terrestrial) rhodopsin. Using codon-based likelihood models, we also found significant evidence for positive selection in cetacean rhodopsin sequences, including on spectral tuning sites we experimentally mutated. We then investigated patterns of ecological divergence that may be correlated with rhodopsin functional variation by using a series of clade models that partitioned the data set according to phylogeny, habitat, and foraging depth zone. Only the model partitioning according to depth was significant. This suggests that foraging dives might be a selective regime influencing cetacean rhodopsin divergence, and our experimental results indicate that spectral tuning may be playing an adaptive role in this process. Our study demonstrates that combining computational and experimental methods is crucial for gaining insight into the selection pressures underlying molecular evolution.

  1. Stomach contents of cetaceans in the Alboran Sea and Gulf of Cadiz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garcia-Polo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the diet, through the analysis of stomach contents, of different species of cetaceans in Andalusian waters. Stomachs of 53 specimens, 36 striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba, 13 common dolphins (Delphinus delphis and 4 Risso's dolphins (Grampus griseus stranded in the provinces of Cadiz, Huelva, Malaga and Almeria (South Iberian Peninsula were examined. Strandings were attended by members of the official stranding network of Andalusia. Fourteen of the specimens had no food remains in the stomachs: 9 striped dolphins, 2 common dolphins and 1 Risso´s dolphin. Prey remains consisted mostly of hard structures e.g. fish otoliths, bones and eye lenses, cephalopod jaws and eye lenses and crustaceans exoskeletons. These remains were identified using published guides (e.g. Clarke, 1986; Härkonen, 1986; Xavier & Cherel, 2009 and reference material available at the Centro Oceanográfico in Vigo of the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO. Diet was characterised for each cetacean species using three standard indices, calculated for each category of prey and for group totals: the frequency of occurrence in the stomachs, the number of individuals and the reconstructed prey weight. These indices were also expressed as percentages to allow comparison between cetacean species and groups (e.g. dolphin sex and area of stranding. The results indicate that striped dolphins feed predominantly on small mesopelagic fish, mainly species of the Myctophidae family, although pearlsides (Maurolicus muelleri were also present. Significant numbers of gobies (Gobiidae were also found in the stomachs. Other prey identified were hake (Merluccius merluccius, silvery pout (Gadiculus argenteus, bogue (Boops boops and scads (Trachurus spp.. Because of the degree of erosion of some otoliths they could not be identified to species level. Cephalopods were also found in the stomachs of striped dolphins with specimens of the families Brachioteuthidae

  2. NCCOS Assessment: Predictive Mapping of Seabirds, Pinnipeds and Cetaceans off the Pacific Coast of Washington from 1995-07-21 to 2015-12-08 (NCEI Accession 0148762)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data collection comprises seasonal distribution maps and model outputs of selected seabird, pinniped and cetacean species off the Pacific coast of Washington....

  3. Southeast Alaska cetacean vessel surveys conducted by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammals Laboratory from 1991-04-20 to 2012-07-20 (NCEI Accession 0140931)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1991, NMML initiated cetacean studies with vessel coverage throughout inland waters of Southeast Alaska. Between 1991 and 1993, line-transect methodology was used...

  4. Microplastic and macroplastic ingestion by a deep diving, oceanic cetacean: the True's beaked whale Mesoplodon mirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusher, Amy L; Hernandez-Milian, Gema; O'Brien, Joanne; Berrow, Simon; O'Connor, Ian; Officer, Rick

    2015-04-01

    When mammals strand, they present a unique opportunity to obtain insights into their ecology. In May 2013, three True's beaked whales (two adult females and a female calf) stranded on the north and west coasts of Ireland and the contents of their stomachs and intestines were analysed for anthropogenic debris. A method for identifying microplastics ingested by larger marine organisms was developed. Microplastics were identified throughout the digestive tract of the single whale that was examined for the presence of microplastics. The two adult females had macroplastic items in their stomachs. Food remains recovered from the adult whales consisted of mesopelagic fish (Benthosema glaciale, Nansenia spp., Chauliodius sloani) and cephalopods, although trophic transfer has been discussed, it was not possible to ascertain whether prey were the source of microplastics. This is the first study to directly identify microplastics <5 mm in a cetacean species.

  5. Detection of pesticides unregistered in Japan, toxaphene and mirex, in the cetaceans from Japanese coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, K.; Kawakami, M.; Shimada, A.; Chikaishi, K. [Sumika Chemical Analysis Service, LTD., Niihama (Japan); Kimura, Y. [Sumika Chemical Analysis Service, LTD., Chiba (Japan); Kajiwara, N.; Tanabe, S. [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan); Yamada, T. [National Science Museum, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Toxaphene and mirex are the members of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) included in the International Treaty, the Stockholm Convention. POPs are characteristically transferred across borders and are accumulated in wildlife. Consequently, their global distribution and biological impacts are of great concern. However, there is very little information on contamination by toxaphene and mirex in the Asia-Pacific region. In Japan, scientific research focused on these two pesticides has not been conducted so far since they have never been registered there. In this study, toxaphene and mirex were determined in the blubber of cetaceans collected from various regions with a focus on Asian countries to evaluate the effects of their long-range atmospheric transport from regions where they were extensively used.

  6. Identification of a novel cetacean polyomavirus from a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) with Tracheobronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Simon J; St Leger, Judy A; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Nilson, Erica; Sanchez-Leon, Maria; Liang, Eliza; Seimon, Tracie; Jain, Komal; Karesh, William; Daszak, Peter; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W Ian

    2013-01-01

    A female short-beaked common dolphin calf was found stranded in San Diego, California in October 2010, presenting with multifocal ulcerative lesions in the trachea and bronchi. Viral particles suggestive of polyomavirus were detected by EM, and subsequently confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Full genome sequencing (Ion Torrent) revealed a circular dsDNA genome of 5,159 bp that was shown to form a distinct lineage within the genus Polyomavirus based on phylogenetic analysis of the early and late transcriptomes. Viral infection and distribution in laryngeal mucosa was characterised using in-situ hybridisation, and apoptosis observed in the virus-infected region. These results demonstrate that polyomaviruses can be associated with respiratory disease in cetaceans, and expand our knowledge of their diversity and clinical significance in marine mammals.

  7. MIDDLE PLIOCENE CETACEANS FROM MONTE VOLTRAIO (TUSCANY, ITALY. BIOSTRATIGRAPHICAL, PALEOECOLOGICAL AND PALEOCLIMATIC OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIOVANNI BIANUCCI

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The historic collection of fossil odontocetes (Cetacea from Monte Voltraio, near Volterra (Tuscany, Italy has been examined and lithostratigraphical and biostratigraphical investigations on the find locality have been carried out. The Monte Voltraio outcrop is referred to the Middle Pliocene, in particular to Globorotalia aemiliana and Discoaster tamalis zones. The odontocete remains are assigned to the families Kogiidae (Kogia pusilla and Delphinidae (Globicephala? etruriae and two indeterminate specimens which might belong to Hemisyntrachelus and Stenella giulii. The Middle Pliocene cetacean fauna from the Mediterranean basin (Monte Voltraio and Rio Stramonte associations includes extinct taxa or extant taxa no longer represented in this basin. The disappearance of these taxa may be linked with the Pliocene and/or Quaternary climatic deteriorations (e.g. the climatic crisis at about 2.6-2.4 MA. 

  8. FIRST CETACEAN FOSSIL RECORDS FROM ECUADOR, COLLECTED FROM THE MIOCENE OF ESMERALDAS PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIOVANNI BIANUCCI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Cetacean fossils from Ecuador are reported for the first time on the basis of fragmentary remains referred to odontocetes, collected during our investigations of Neogene stratigraphic sequences outcropping along the northern coast (Esmeraldas Province. One specimen was collected near Las Peñas village in the Lower-Middle Miocene sediments of the Viche Formation and consists of ear bones and mandibular fragments surely belonging to Ziphiidae. It represents the oldest record of this family in the southeastern Pacific and one of the few records of this family in South America. The other fossil was collected near Rio Verde village in the Upper Miocene sediments of the Angostura Formation and consists of an isolated tooth exhibiting some ziphiid affinities. Pdf

  9. Brief Communication: Cetaceans and tsunamis - whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, J. R.; Chagué-Goff, C.

    2009-06-01

    The composition of tsunami deposits is variable and governed by source material. Many unusual items have been recorded from tsunami deposits. For example, during the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, a dolphin was reported to have been transported 1400 m inland, a shark was found in a hotel swimming pool, and sea turtles were stranded kilometers inland. Reports and papers from early settlers and explorers have often highlighted similar unusual finds. We briefly discuss an example from New Zealand where intact cetacean skeletons were found elevated on land adjacent to the coast. The validity of this find as evidence for tsunami emplacement is considered. It is also noted that such old reports should be treated with respect and re-evaluated in the light of more recent findings.

  10. Identification of a novel cetacean polyomavirus from a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis with Tracheobronchitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Anthony

    Full Text Available A female short-beaked common dolphin calf was found stranded in San Diego, California in October 2010, presenting with multifocal ulcerative lesions in the trachea and bronchi. Viral particles suggestive of polyomavirus were detected by EM, and subsequently confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Full genome sequencing (Ion Torrent revealed a circular dsDNA genome of 5,159 bp that was shown to form a distinct lineage within the genus Polyomavirus based on phylogenetic analysis of the early and late transcriptomes. Viral infection and distribution in laryngeal mucosa was characterised using in-situ hybridisation, and apoptosis observed in the virus-infected region. These results demonstrate that polyomaviruses can be associated with respiratory disease in cetaceans, and expand our knowledge of their diversity and clinical significance in marine mammals.

  11. Trace elements in tissues of cetacean species rarely stranded along the Israeli Mediterranean coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoham-Frider, Efrat; Kerem, Dan; Roditi-Elasar, Mia; Goffman, Oz; Morick, Danny; Yoffe, Olga; Kress, Nurit

    2014-06-15

    In this paper we present the concentrations of Hg, Cd, Se, Pb, Cu, Mn, Zn and Fe in organs of 6 non-common specimens of cetaceans that were stranded along the Israeli Mediterranean coast (IMC), during 2002-2010: two fin whales, one minke whale, one Cuvier's beaked whale, one rough-toothed dolphin, and one Risso's dolphin. Most of the specimens were calves stranded by accident. Concentrations of Hg and Cd were low in tissues of the baleen whales and higher in the toothed whales, with maximum concentrations of 1067 mg kg(-1) Hg in the liver of the Risso's dolphin and 29 mg kg(-1) Cd in the kidney of the Cuvier's beaked whale. As far as we are aware, this is the first report of trace elements in baleen whales in the Eastern Mediterranean, and the first report of trace elements in minke whale and rough-toothed dolphin in the Mediterranean.

  12. Inactivation of the olfactory marker protein (OMP) gene in river dolphins and other odontocete cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2017-04-01

    Various toothed whales (Odontoceti) are unique among mammals in lacking olfactory bulbs as adults and are thought to be anosmic (lacking the olfactory sense). At the molecular level, toothed whales have high percentages of pseudogenic olfactory receptor genes, but species that have been investigated to date retain an intact copy of the olfactory marker protein gene (OMP), which is highly expressed in olfactory receptor neurons and may regulate the temporal resolution of olfactory responses. One hypothesis for the retention of intact OMP in diverse odontocete lineages is that this gene is pleiotropic with additional functions that are unrelated to olfaction. Recent expression studies provide some support for this hypothesis. Here, we report OMP sequences for representatives of all extant cetacean families and provide the first molecular evidence for inactivation of this gene in vertebrates. Specifically, OMP exhibits independent inactivating mutations in six different odontocete lineages: four river dolphin genera (Platanista, Lipotes, Pontoporia, Inia), sperm whale (Physeter), and harbor porpoise (Phocoena). These results suggest that the only essential role of OMP that is maintained by natural selection is in olfaction, although a non-olfactory role for OMP cannot be ruled out for lineages that retain an intact copy of this gene. Available genome sequences from cetaceans and close outgroups provide evidence of inactivating mutations in two additional genes (CNGA2, CNGA4), which imply further pseudogenization events in the olfactory cascade of odontocetes. Selection analyses demonstrate that evolutionary constraints on all three genes (OMP, CNGA2, CNGA4) have been greatly reduced in Odontoceti, but retain a signature of purifying selection on the stem Cetacea branch and in Mysticeti (baleen whales). This pattern is compatible with the 'echolocation-priority' hypothesis for the evolution of OMP, which posits that negative selection was maintained in the common

  13. Modelling the habitat suitability of cetaceans: Example of the sperm whale in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praca, Emilie; Gannier, Alexandre; Das, Krishna; Laran, Sophie

    2009-04-01

    Cetaceans are mobile and spend long periods underwater. Because of this, modelling their habitat could be subject to a serious problem of false absence. Furthermore, extensive surveys at sea are time and money consuming, and presence-absence data are difficult to apply. This study compares the ability of two presence-absence and two presence-only habitat modelling methods and uses the example of the sperm whale ( Physeter macrocephalus) in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The data consist of summer visual and acoustical detections of sperm whales, compiled between 1998 and 2005. Habitat maps were computed using topographical and hydrological eco-geographical variables. Four methods were compared: principal component analysis (PCA), ecological niche factor analysis (ENFA), generalized linear model (GLM) and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS). The evaluation of the models was achieved by calculating the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) of the models and their respective area under the curve (AUC). Presence-absence methods (GLM, AUC=0.70, and MARS, AUC=0.79) presented better AUC than presence-only methods (PCA, AUC=0.58, and ENFA, AUC=0.66), but this difference was not statistically significant, except between the MARS and the PCA models. The four models showed an influence of both topographical and hydrological factors, but the resulting habitat suitability maps differed. The core habitat on the continental slope was well highlighted by the four models, while GLM and MARS maps also showed a suitable habitat in the offshore waters. Presence-absence methods are therefore recommended for modelling the habitat suitability of cetaceans, as they seem more accurate to highlight complex habitat. However, the use of presence-only techniques, in particular ENFA, could be very useful for a first model of the habitat range or when important surveys at sea are not possible.

  14. Stomach anatomy and use in defining systemic relationships of the Cetacean family Ziphiidae (beaked whales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, James G

    2007-06-01

    Members of the Cetacean family Ziphiidae (Beaked whales) exhibit surprising diversity in stomach anatomy, particularly in the number of connecting chambers between the main and pyloric stomachs. Sixty-one stomachs of five beaked whale species were examined, including Berardius, Hyperoodon, Mesoplodon, Tasmacetus, and Ziphius. Specimens were obtained post mortem from beach-stranded individuals, with the exception of 30 Berardius specimens that were taken at a whaling station in Japan. Most specimens were collected by the Marine Mammal Program of the National Museum of Natural History, with the exception of one specimen of Mesoplodon steinegeri, which from the Los Angeles County Museum and one specimen of Tasmacetus from the Museum of New Zealand. Additional data are included from published accounts. A single species was examined for all of the genera but Mesoplodon, where there was material for 7 of 13 known species. The sample of Berardius bairdii was sufficient (n = 30) to determine species-specific variation in compartment counts. Chamber anatomy was explored by means of manual palpation. Results indicate that ziphiid stomachs can be separated into at least three principal groups: generalized ziphiid stomach (one main stomach, one pyloric stomach), derived stomach type I (two main stomachs, one pyloric stomach), and derived stomach type II (two main stomachs, two pyloric stomachs). Generalized stomachs are found in Hyperoodon, Tasmacetus, Ziphius, Mesoplodon densirostris, M. perrini, and M. stejnegeri. Derived stomachs of type I are found in Berardius, and of type II are found in Mesoplodon bidens, M. europaeus, and M. mirus. The ziphiids clearly form a distinct group of cetaceans in their utilization of differences in stomach morphology. These anatomical differences may serve to elucidate systematic relationships among the ziphiids. Further study is necessary to establish whether these differences correlate with specialized adaptations related to an aquatic

  15. Morbillivirus infection in cetaceans stranded along the Italian coastline: pathological, immunohistochemical and biomolecular findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guardo, Giovanni; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Eleni, Claudia; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Scholl, Francesco; Casalone, Cristina; Peletto, Simone; Mignone, Walter; Tittarelli, Cristiana; Di Nocera, Fabio; Leonardi, Leonardo; Fernández, Antonio; Marcer, Federica; Mazzariol, Sandro

    2013-02-01

    Morbilliviruses are recognized as biological agents highly impacting the health and conservation status of free-ranging cetaceans worldwide, as clearly exemplified by the two Dolphin Morbillivirus (DMV) epidemics of 1990-1992 and 2006-2008 among Mediterranean striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba). After these two epidemics, morbilliviral infection (MI) cases with peculiar neurobiological features were reported in striped dolphins stranded along the Spanish coastline. Affected cetaceans showed a subacute-to-chronic, non-suppurative encephalitis, with brain lesions strongly resembling those found in human "subacute sclerosing panencephalitis" and "old dog encephalitis". Brain was the only tissue in which morbilliviral antigen and/or genome could be detected. Beside a case of morbilliviral encephalitis in a striped dolphin's calf stranded in 2009, we observed 5 additional MI cases in 2 striped dolphins, 1 bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and 2 fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus), all stranded in 2011 along the Italian coastline. Noteworthy, 3 of these animals (2 striped dolphins and 1 bottlenose dolphin) showed immunohistochemical (IHC) and/or biomolecular (PCR) evidence of morbilliviral antigen and/or genome exclusively in their brain, with 1 striped dolphin and 1 bottlenose dolphin also exhibiting a non-suppurative encephalitis. Furthermore, simultaneous IHC and PCR evidence of a Toxoplasma gondii coinfection was obtained in 1 fin whale. The above results are consistent with those reported in striped dolphins after the two MI epidemics of 1990-92 and 2006-2008, with evidence of morbilliviral antigen and/or genome being found exclusively in the brain tissue from affected animals.

  16. An analysis of von Economo neurons in the cerebral cortex of cetaceans, artiodactyls, and perissodactyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghanti, Mary Ann; Spurlock, Linda B; Treichler, F Robert; Weigel, Sara E; Stimmelmayr, Raphaela; Butti, Camilla; Thewissen, J G M Hans; Hof, Patrick R

    2015-07-01

    Von Economo neurons (VENs) are specialized projection neurons with a characteristic spindle-shaped soma and thick basal and apical dendrites. VENs have been described in restricted cortical regions, with their most frequent appearance in layers III and V of the anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and frontopolar cortex of humans, great apes, macaque monkeys, elephants, and some cetaceans. Recently, a ubiquitous distribution of VENs was reported in various cortical areas in the pygmy hippopotamus, one of the closest living relatives of cetaceans. That finding suggested that VENs might not be unique to only a few species that possess enlarged brains. In the present analysis, we assessed the phylogenetic distribution of VENs within species representative of the superordinal clade that includes cetartiodactyls and perissodactyls, as well as afrotherians. In addition, the distribution of fork cells that are often found in close proximity to VENs was also assessed. Nissl-stained sections from the frontal pole, anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and occipital pole of bowhead whale, cow, sheep, deer, horse, pig, rock hyrax, and human were examined using stereologic methods to quantify VENs and fork cells within layer V of all four cortical regions. VENs and fork cells were found in each of the species examined here with species-specific differences in distributions and densities. The present results demonstrated that VENs and fork cells were not restricted to highly encephalized or socially complex species, and their repeated emergence among distantly related species seems to represent convergent evolution of specialized pyramidal neurons. The widespread phylogenetic presence of VENs and fork cells indicates that these neuron morphologies readily emerged in response to selective forces,whose variety and nature are yet to be identified.

  17. Development of the Effective Underwater Speaker Sound Modulated by Audible Sound Frequency Range of Large Cetaceans for Avoidance with Ship Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Yamada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The underwater speaker (UWS has been installed on high speed vessels; hydrofoils (HF with low-noise during their cruises, to avoid sudden collisions with large cetaceans, while its performance has remained uncertain because of the problem in quality of the produced sound. Thus, we developed a sound source for the UWS by modulating the sound based on the audible range of major large cetaceans so as to increase its utilities. To investigate the audible sound frequency range of cetacean, we tried two procedures, (1 indirect-estimation from relationship between cetaceans audibility and vocalization, and (2 indirect-estimation from measurements on the cochlear basal membrane. We also synthesized the two new sound sources which we can potentially expect an avoidance with large cetaceans. Through several field experiments with deploy the new sounds we reached a tentative conclusion that the new sound was effective in terms of inducing the cetaceans' avoidance reaction and would be also expected to be applied to other low-noise vessels.

  18. Cetacean beachings correlate with geomagnetic disturbances in Earth's magnetosphere: an example of how astronomical changes impact the future of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Thomas E.

    2017-04-01

    The beaching and stranding of whales and dolphins around the world has been mystifying scientists for centuries. Although many theories have been proposed, few are substantiated by unequivocal statistical evidence. Advances in the field of animal magnetoreception have established that many organisms, including cetaceans, have an internal `compass,' which they use for orientation when traveling long distances. Astrobiology involves not only the origin and distribution of life in the universe, but also the scientific study of how extraterrestrial conditions affect evolution of life on planet Earth. The focus of this study is how cetacean life is influenced by disturbances in its environment that originate from an astrological phenomenon - in the present study that involves solar flares and cetacean beachings. Solar storms are caused by major coronal eruptions on the Sun. Upon reaching Earth, they cause disturbances in Earth's normally stable magnetosphere. Unable to follow an accurate magnetic bearing under such circumstances, cetaceans lose their compass reading while travelling and, depending on their juxtaposition and nearness to land, eventually beach themselves. (1) This hypothesis was supported by six separate, independent surveys of beachings: (A) in the Mediterranean Sea, (B) the northern Gulf of Mexico, (C) the east and (D) west coasts of the USA and two surveys (E and F) from around the world. When the six surveys were pooled (1614 strandings), a highly significant correlation (R 2 = 0.981) of when strandings occurred with when major geomagnetic disturbances in Earth's magnetosphere occurred was consistent with this hypothesis. (2) Whale and dolphin strandings in the northern Gulf of Mexico and the east coast of the USA were correlated (R 2 = 0.919, R 2 = 0.924) with the number of days before and after a geomagnetic storm. (3) Yearly strandings were correlated with annual geomagnetic storm days. (4) Annual beachings of cetaceans from 1998 to 2012 were

  19. Cetacean Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Denise DelGrosso

    1991-01-01

    Suggested are activities about whales for children in schools not near the ocean. Activities designed to pique students' interest in whales and to investigate the size, breathing, buoyancy, and feeding strategies of whales are discussed. (CW)

  20. An index based on the biodiversity of cetacean species to assess the environmental status of marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzellino, Arianna; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Gaspari, Stefania; Lanfredi, Caterina; Lauriano, Giancarlo; Marsili, Letizia; Panigada, Simone; Podestà, Michela

    2014-09-01

    The Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) requires the assessment of the environmental status in relation to human pressures. In this study the biodiversity of the cetacean community is proposed as MSFD descriptor of the environmental status and its link with anthropogenic pressures is investigated. Functional groups are generally favoured over indicator species since they are thought to better reflect to anthropogenic stressors. Cetaceans are in many situations the most well known component of pelagic ecosystems. Their habitat requirements are known and can be used to evaluate the theoretical biodiversity that should be expected in a certain area. The deviations between the theoretical biodiversity and the actual biodiversity may be used to detect the impacts of human activities. Based on this analysis fishery resulted to be by far the most significant of the existing pressures. Among all the species, bottlenose dolphin was found the most correlated with the fishery sector dynamics.

  1. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Cetacean and Sound Mapping Effort: Continuing Forward with an Integrated Ocean Noise Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jolie; Ferguson, Megan; Gedamke, Jason; Hatch, Leila; Southall, Brandon; Van Parijs, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    To help manage chronic and cumulative impacts of human activities on marine mammals, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) convened two working groups, the Underwater Sound Field Mapping Working Group (SoundMap) and the Cetacean Density and Distribution Mapping Working Group (CetMap), with overarching effort of both groups referred to as CetSound, which (1) mapped the predicted contribution of human sound sources to ocean noise and (2) provided region/time/species-specific cetacean density and distribution maps. Mapping products were presented at a symposium where future priorities were identified, including institutionalization/integration of the CetSound effort within NOAA-wide goals and programs, creation of forums and mechanisms for external input and funding, and expanded outreach/education. NOAA is subsequently developing an ocean noise strategy to articulate noise conservation goals and further identify science and management actions needed to support them.

  2. Cetacean records along a coastal-offshore gradient in the Vitória-Trindade Chain, western South Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekin, L L; Rossi-Santos, M R; Baracho, C; Cypriano-Souza, A L; Simões-Lopes, P C

    2014-02-01

    Oceanic waters are difficult to assess, and there are many gaps in knowledge regarding cetacean occurrence. To fill some of these gaps, this article provides important cetacean records obtained in the winter of 2010 during a dedicated expedition to collect visual and acoustic information in the Vitória-Trindade seamounts. We observed 19 groups of cetaceans along a 1300-km search trajectory, with six species being identified: the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae, N = 9 groups), the fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus, N = 1), the Antarctic minke whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis, N = 1), the rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis, N = 1), the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus, N = 2), and the killer whale (Orcinus orca, N = 1). Most humpback whale groups (N = 7; 78%) were observed in the Vitória-Trindade seamounts, especially the mounts close to the Abrolhos Bank. Only one lone humpback whale was observed near Trindade Island after a search effort encompassing more than 520 km. From a total of 28 acoustic stations, humpback whale songs were only detected near the seamounts close to the Abrolhos Bank, where most groups of this species were visually detected (including a competitive group and groups with calves). The presence of humpback whales at the Trindade Island and surroundings is most likely occasional, with few sightings and low density. Finally, we observed a significant number of humpback whales along the seamounts close to the Abrolhos Bank, which may function as a breeding habitat for this species. We also added important records regarding the occurrence of cetaceans in these mounts and in the Western South Atlantic, including the endangered fin whale.

  3. Rise of oceanographic barriers in continuous populations of a cetacean: the genetic structure of harbour porpoises in Old World waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridoux Vincent

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the role of seascape in shaping genetic and demographic population structure is highly challenging for marine pelagic species such as cetaceans for which there is generally little evidence of what could effectively restrict their dispersal. In the present work, we applied a combination of recent individual-based landscape genetic approaches to investigate the population genetic structure of a highly mobile extensive range cetacean, the harbour porpoise in the eastern North Atlantic, with regards to oceanographic characteristics that could constrain its dispersal. Results Analyses of 10 microsatellite loci for 752 individuals revealed that most of the sampled range in the eastern North Atlantic behaves as a 'continuous' population that widely extends over thousands of kilometres with significant isolation by distance (IBD. However, strong barriers to gene flow were detected in the south-eastern part of the range. These barriers coincided with profound changes in environmental characteristics and isolated, on a relatively small scale, porpoises from Iberian waters and on a larger scale porpoises from the Black Sea. Conclusion The presence of these barriers to gene flow that coincide with profound changes in oceanographic features, together with the spatial variation in IBD strength, provide for the first time strong evidence that physical processes have a major impact on the demographic and genetic structure of a cetacean. This genetic pattern further suggests habitat-related fragmentation of the porpoise range that is likely to intensify with predicted surface ocean warming.

  4. Floating macro-litter along the Mediterranean French coast: Composition, density, distribution and overlap with cetacean range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di-Méglio, Nathalie; Campana, Ilaria

    2017-02-23

    This study investigated the composition, density and distribution of floating macro-litter along the Liguro-Provençal basin with respect to cetaceans presence. Survey transects were performed in summer between 2006 and 2015 from sailing vessels with simultaneous cetaceans observations. During 5171km travelled, 1993 floating items were recorded, widespread in the whole study area. Plastics was the predominant category, with bags/packaging always representing >45% of total items. Overall mean density (14.98 items/km(2)) was stable with significant increase reported only in 2010-2011; monthly analysis showed lower litter densities in July-September, suggesting possible seasonal patterns. Kernel density estimation for plastics revealed ubiquitous distribution rather than high accumulation areas, mainly due to the circulation dynamics of this area. The presence range of cetaceans (259 sightings, 6 species) corresponded by ~50% with plastic distribution, indicating high potential of interaction, especially in the eastern part of the area, but effective risks for marine species might be underrepresented.

  5. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper P

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (∆G of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi-site protein variants, including ancient proteins, is however hard to describe theoretically. From a compilation of experimental ∆∆G vs. ∆G we first find that protein substitutions are subject to large generic protein relaxation effects. Using this discovery, we develop a simple two-parameter model that predicts multi-site ∆∆G as accurately as standard methods do for single-site mutations and reproduces trends in contemporary myoglobin stabilities. We then apply this new method to the study of the evolution of Mb stability in cetaceans: With both methods the main change in stability (about 1kcal/mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche probably occurred already in the ancestor of contemporary baleen and toothed whales. In summary, we have discovered generic stability relaxation effects in proteins that, when incorporated into a simple model, improves the description of multi-site protein variants.

  6. Contamination by mercury and cadmium in the cetacean products from Japanese market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T; Haraguchi, K; Cipriano, F; Simmonds, M P; Hotta, Y; Sakata, M

    2004-03-01

    Cetaceans hunted coastally in Japan include several species of odontocete (dolphins, porpoises and beaked whales), and fresh and frozen red meat and blubber, as well as boiled internal organs, such as liver, lung, kidney and small intestine, are still sold for human consumption. Furthermore, red meat and blubber products originating from mysticete minke whales caught in the Antarctic and Northern Pacific are also sold for human consumption. We surveyed mercury and cadmium contamination levels in boiled liver, lung, kidney and red meat products being marketed in Japanese retail outlets. We also analyzed the DNA of these products to obtain information concerning gender and species. Total mercury (T-Hg) and methyl mercury (M-Hg) contamination levels in all the cetacean products were markedly higher in odontocete species than in mysticete species, and slightly higher in females than in males. T-Hg contamination in the organs was seen in the following order: boiled liver>boiled kidney=boiled lung>red meat. In particular, T-Hg concentrations in the boiled liver were high enough to cause acute intoxication even from a single ingestion: the mean +/-SD (range) of T-Hg was 388+/-543 (0.12-1980) microg/wetg. In contrast, although M-Hg contamination in the liver was not markedly higher than that in other organs, M-Hg contamination was in the following order: boiled liver>odontocete red meat>boiled kidney>boiled lung. The contamination levels of T-Hg and M-Hg in odontocete red meat, the most popular whale product, were 8.94+/-13.3 and 5.44+/-5.72 microg/wetg, respectively. These averages exceeded the provisional permitted levels of T-Hg (0.4 microg/wetg) and M-Hg (0.3 microg/wetg) in marine foods set by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare by 22 and 18 times, respectively, suggesting the possibility of chronic intoxication by T-Hg and M-Hg with frequent consumption of odontocete red meat. Cadmium contamination levels in boiled liver, kidney and lung were 8

  7. Estimating cetacean population density using fixed passive acoustic sensors: an example with Blainville's beaked whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Ward, Jessica; DiMarzio, Nancy; Tyack, Peter L

    2009-04-01

    Methods are developed for estimating the size/density of cetacean populations using data from a set of fixed passive acoustic sensors. The methods convert the number of detected acoustic cues into animal density by accounting for (i) the probability of detecting cues, (ii) the rate at which animals produce cues, and (iii) the proportion of false positive detections. Additional information is often required for estimation of these quantities, for example, from an acoustic tag applied to a sample of animals. Methods are illustrated with a case study: estimation of Blainville's beaked whale density over a 6 day period in spring 2005, using an 82 hydrophone wide-baseline array located in the Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas. To estimate the required quantities, additional data are used from digital acoustic tags, attached to five whales over 21 deep dives, where cues recorded on some of the dives are associated with those received on the fixed hydrophones. Estimated density was 25.3 or 22.5 animals/1000 km(2), depending on assumptions about false positive detections, with 95% confidence intervals 17.3-36.9 and 15.4-32.9. These methods are potentially applicable to a wide variety of marine and terrestrial species that are hard to survey using conventional visual methods.

  8. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlke, Julia M.; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  9. Seasonal variation of the Beaufort shelfbreak jet and its relationship to Arctic cetacean occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peigen; Pickart, Robert S.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Moore, G. W. K.; Torres, Daniel J.; Bahr, Frank; Hu, Jianyu

    2016-12-01

    Using mooring time series from September 2008 to August 2012, together with ancillary atmospheric and satellite data sets, we quantify the seasonal variations of the shelfbreak jet in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea and explore connections to the occurrences of bowhead and beluga whales. Wind patterns during the 4 year study period are different from the long-term climatological conditions that the springtime peak in easterly winds shifted from May to June and the autumn peak was limited to October instead of extending farther into the fall. These changes were primarily due to the behavior of the two regional atmospheric centers of action, the Aleutian Low and Beaufort High. The volume transport of the shelfbreak jet, which peaks in the summer, was decomposed into a background (weak wind) component and a wind-driven component. The wind-driven component is correlated to the Pt. Barrow, AK alongcoast wind speed record although a more accurate prediction is obtained when considering the ice thickness at the mooring site. An upwelling index reveals that wind-driven upwelling is enhanced in June and October when storms are stronger and longer-lasting. The seasonal variation of Arctic cetacean occurrence is dominated by the eastward migration in spring, dictated by pack-ice patterns, and westward migration in fall, coincident with the autumn peak in shelfbreak upwelling intensity.

  10. Back to Water: Signature of Adaptive Evolution in Cetacean Mitochondrial tRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelli, Stefano; Peruffo, Antonella; Patarnello, Tomaso; Cozzi, Bruno; Negrisolo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrion is the power plant of the eukaryotic cell, and tRNAs are the fundamental components of its translational machinery. In the present paper, the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs was investigated in the Cetacea, a clade of Cetartiodactyla that retuned to water and thus had to adapt its metabolism to a different medium than that of its mainland ancestors. Our analysis focussed on identifying the factors that influenced the evolution of Cetacea tRNA double-helix elements, which play a pivotal role in the formation of the secondary and tertiary structures of each tRNA and consequently manipulate the whole translation machinery of the mitochondrion. Our analyses showed that the substitution pathways in the stems of different tRNAs were influenced by various factors, determining a molecular evolution that was unique to each of the 22 tRNAs. Our data suggested that the composition, AT-skew, and GC-skew of the tRNA stems were the main factors influencing the substitution process. In particular, the range of variation and the fluctuation of these parameters affected the fate of single tRNAs. Strong heterogeneity was observed among the different species of Cetacea. Finally, it appears that the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs was also shaped by the environments in which the Cetacean taxa differentiated. This latter effect was particularly evident in toothed whales that either live in freshwater or are deep divers.

  11. Periodic variability in cetacean strandings: links to large-scale climate events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, K; Thresher, R; Warneke, R M; Bradshaw, C J A; Pook, M; Thiele, D; Hindell, M A

    2005-06-22

    Cetacean strandings elicit much community and scientific interest, but few quantitative analyses have successfully identified environmental correlates to these phenomena. Data spanning 1920-2002, involving a total of 639 stranding events and 39 taxa groups from southeast Australia, were found to demonstrate a clear 11-13- year periodicity in the number of events through time. These data positively correlated with the regional persistence of both zonal (westerly) and meridional (southerly) winds, reflecting general long-term and large-scale shifts in sea-level pressure gradients. Periods of persistent zonal and meridional winds result in colder and presumably nutrient-rich waters being driven closer to southern Australia, resulting in increased biological activity in the water column during the spring months. These observations suggest that large-scale climatic events provide a powerful distal influence on the propensity for whales to strand in this region. These patterns provide a powerful quantitative framework for testing hypotheses regarding environmental links to strandings and provide managers with a potential predictive tool to prepare for years of peak stranding activity.

  12. Novel gastric helicobacters and oral campylobacters are present in captive and wild cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Cinthia G; Matteo, Mario J; Loureiro, Julio D; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Catalano, Mariana; Heredia, Sergio Rodríguez; Mantero, Paula; Boccio, Jose R; Zubillaga, Marcela B; Cremaschi, Graciela A; Solnick, Jay V; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I; Blaser, Martin J

    2011-08-26

    The mammalian gastric and oral mucosa may be colonized by mixed Helicobacter and Campylobacter species, respectively, in individual animals. To better characterize the presence and distribution of Helicobacter and Campylobacter among marine mammals, we used PCR and 16S rDNA sequence analysis to examine gastric and oral samples from ten dolphins (Tursiops gephyreus), one killer whale (Orcinus orca), one false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens), and three wild La Plata river dolphins (Pontoporia blainvillei). Helicobacter spp. DNA was widely distributed in gastric and oral samples from both captive and wild cetaceans. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated two Helicobacter sequence clusters, one closely related to H. cetorum, a species isolated from dolphins and whales in North America. The second related cluster was to sequences obtained from dolphins in Australia and to gastric non-H. pylori helicobacters, and may represent a novel taxonomic group. Dental plaque sequences from four dolphins formed a third cluster within the Campylobacter genus that likely represents a novel species isolated from marine mammals. Identification of identical Helicobacter spp. DNA sequences from dental plaque, saliva and gastric fluids from the same hosts, suggests that the oral cavity may be involved in transmission. These results demonstrate that Helicobacter and Campylobacter species are commonly distributed in marine mammals, and identify taxonomic clusters that may represent novel species.

  13. Clinicoimmunopathologic findings in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus with positive cetacean morbillivirus antibody titers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, Gregory D; Romano, Tracy A; Peden-Adams, Margie M; Schaefer, Adam; McCulloch, Stephen; Goldstein, Juli D; Rice, Charles D; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Fair, Patricia A; Reif, John S

    2011-12-06

    Sera from free-ranging Atlantic bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus inhabiting the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida were tested for antibodies to cetacean morbilliviruses from 2003 to 2007 as part of a multidisciplinary study of individual and population health. A suite of clinicoimmunopathologic variables were evaluated in morbillivirus-seropositive dolphins (n = 14) and seronegative healthy dolphins (n = 49). Several important differences were found. Serum alkaline phosphatase, creatine phosphokinase, chloride, albumin and albumin/globulin ratios were significantly lower in seropositive dolphins. Innate immunity appeared to be upregulated with significant increases in lysozyme concentration and marginally significant increases in monocytic phagocytosis. Adaptive immunity was also impacted in dolphins with positive morbillivirus antibody titers. Mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation responses were significantly reduced in dolphins with positive morbillivirus antibody titers, and marginally significant decreases were found for absolute numbers of CD4+ lymphocytes. The findings suggest impairment of cell-mediated adaptive immunity, similar to the immunologic pattern reported with acute morbillivirus infection in other species. In contrast, dolphins with positive morbillivirus antibody titers appeared to have at least a partially upregulated humoral immune response with significantly higher levels of gamma globulins than healthy dolphins, which may represent an antibody response to morbillivirus infection or other pathogens. These data suggest that subclinical dolphin morbillivirus infection in IRL dolphins may produce clinicoimmunopathologic perturbations that impact overall health.

  14. Aerial surveys of endangered cetaceans and other marine mammals in the northwestern Gulf of Alaska and southeastern Bering Sea. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueggeman, J.J.; Green, G.A.; Grotefendt, R.A.; Chapman, D.G.

    1987-09-01

    Aerial surveys were conducted in the Northwestern Gulf of Alaska and southeastern Bering Sea to determine the abundance, distribution, and habitat use patterns of endangered cetaceans and other marine mammals. Four species of cetaceans listed by the Federal Government as endangered were observed: gray, humpback, finback, and sperm whales. Sightings were also made to seven nonendangered species of cetaceans: minke, Cuvier's beaked, Baird's beaked, belukha, and killer whales, and Dall and harbor porpoises. Results show that the project area is an important feeding ground for relatively large numbers of humpback and finback whales and lower numbers of gray whale migration route between seasonal ranges. The project area also supports a variety of other marine mammals both seasonally and annually.

  15. Research advances in Cetacean osmoregulation%鲸豚类的渗透调节研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王京真; 于学颖; 郭爱环; 郝玉江; 王丁

    2012-01-01

    As a unique clade of mammalia, Cetaceans complete all of their life activities in water. Cetaceans therefore have developed various strategies to adapt to their aquatic environments morphologically, physiologically and ecologically. Most of the Cetaceans inhabit the hyperosmotic marine environment, but a few species live in the hypoosmotic freshwater systems. However, despite the obvious differences of their living environment, both the freshwater and marine Cetaceans face the same challenge - to maintain the water balance and electrolyte homeostasis of their body. How do Cetaceans adapt to their aquatic environments? What kinds of strategies do they develop in morphology, physiology and ecology? We try to expound upon the osmoregulation process of the Cetaceans in the following aspects: source and metabolism of water/electrolytes , morphology and histology of the kidney and skin, hormone regulation, and the molecules related to osmoregulation etc. By consulting and discussing the conclusions of previous research in the past century on this issue. Moreover, future research trends and important issues in this area are also discussed and proposed.%鲸豚类作为哺乳动物长期演化中较为特殊的一支,它们所有的生命活动都在水中完成,所以它们在身体结构、生理机能以及生态习性等方面都发展形成了适用于水中生活的完善的适应策略.大部分鲸豚类动物生活在海洋中,只有少部分生活在淡水里,但不管是生活在高渗环境中的海洋鲸类还是生活在低渗环境中的淡水鲸类,维持水盐平衡以及渗透压的内稳态是它们所面临的一个共同问题.鲸豚类究竟是通过怎样的渗透调节机制来实现对不同渗透环境的适应呢?它们在身体结构、生理调节和分子机制上发展了哪些独特的适应策略?本文对近一个世纪以来有关鲸豚类渗透调节的研究成果进行了系统的归纳总结,并尝试从水盐来源、代谢途径、

  16. Genomic organization and differential signature of positive selection in the alpha and beta globin gene clusters in two cetacean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Mariana F; Arroyo, José Ignacio; Opazo, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The hemoglobin of jawed vertebrates is a heterotetramer protein that contains two α- and two β-chains, which are encoded by members of α- and β-globin gene families. Given the hemoglobin role in mediating an adaptive response to chronic hypoxia, it is likely that this molecule may have experienced a selective pressure during the evolution of cetaceans, which have to deal with hypoxia tolerance during prolonged diving. This selective pressure could have generated a complex history of gene turnover in these clusters and/or changes in protein structure themselves. Accordingly, we aimed to characterize the genomic organization of α- and β-globin gene clusters in two cetacean species and to detect a possible role of positive selection on them using a phylogenetic framework. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogeny reconstructions revealed that both cetacean species had retained a similar complement of putatively functional genes. For the α-globin gene cluster, the killer whale presents a complement of genes composed of HBZ, HBK, and two functional copies of HBA and HBQ genes, whereas the dolphin possesses HBZ, HBK, HBA and HBQ genes, and one HBA pseudogene. For the β-globin gene cluster, both species retained a complement of four genes, two early expressed genes-HBE and HBH-and two adult expressed genes-HBD and HBB. Our natural selection analysis detected two positively selected sites in the HBB gene (56 and 62) and four in HBA (15, 21, 49, 120). Interestingly, only the genes that are expressed during the adulthood showed the signature of positive selection.

  17. Cetacean distribution and abundance in relation to oceanographic domains on the eastern Bering Sea shelf: 1999-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friday, Nancy A.; Waite, Janice M.; Zerbini, Alexandre N.; Moore, Sue E.

    2012-06-01

    Visual line transect surveys for cetaceans were conducted on the eastern Bering Sea shelf in association with pollock stock assessment surveys aboard the NOAA ship Miller Freeman in June and July of 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. Transect survey effort ranged from 1188 km in 1999 to 3761 km in 2002. Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) were the most common large whale in all years except 2004 when humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) were more abundant. Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) were the most common small cetacean in all years. Abundance estimates were calculated by year for each oceanographic domain: coastal, middle, and outer/slope. The middle and outer/slope domains were divided into two strata ("north" and "south") because of variable survey effort. The distribution and abundance of baleen whales changed between the earlier (colder) and later (warmer) survey years. Fin whales consistently occupied the outer shelf and secondarily the middle shelf, and their abundance was an order of magnitude greater in cold compared to warm years. Humpback whales "lived on the margin" of the northern Alaska Peninsula, eastern Aleutian Islands and Bristol Bay; their preferred habitat is possibly associated with areas of high prey availability due to nutrient upwelling and aggregation mechanisms. Minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) occur shoreward of fin whales in the outer and middle shelf and in coastal habitats along the Alaska Peninsula. The highest abundance for this species was observed in a cold (1999) year. No clear relationship emerged for odontocetes with regard to warm and cold years. Dall's porpoise occupied both outer and middle domains and harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) were more common in middle and coastal domains. This study provided a unique, broad-scale assessment of cetacean distribution and abundance on the eastern Bering Sea shelf and a baseline for future comparisons.

  18. Identification and characterization of a tandem repeat in exon III of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene in cetaceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Line; Kinze, Carl Christian; Werge, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    , and these sequences differed by a maximum of two changes when compared to the remaining species. There was a high degree of similarity between the cetacean basic unit consensus sequences and those from members of the horse family and domestic cow, which also harbor a tandem repeat composed of 18-bp basic units...... in exon III of their DRD4 gene. Consequently, the 18-bp tandem repeat appears to have originated prior to the differentiation of hoofed mammals into odd-toed and even-toed ungulates. The composition of the tandem repeat in cetaceans differed markedly from that in primates, which is composed of 48-bp...

  19. Miocene whale-fall from California demonstrates that cetacean size did not determine the evolution of modern whale-fall communities

    OpenAIRE

    Pyenson, Nicholas D.; Haasl, David M

    2007-01-01

    Whale-fall communities support a deep-sea invertebrate assemblage that subsists entirely on the decaying carcasses of large cetaceans. The oldest whale-falls are Late Eocene in age, but these early whale-falls differ in faunal content and host cetacean size from Neogene and Recent whale-falls. Vesicomyid bivalves, for example, are major components of the sulphophilic stage in Miocene and Recent whale-fall communities, but they are absent from Palaeogene fossil whale-falls. The differences bet...

  20. Cetacean records along São Paulo state coast, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos César de Oliveira Santos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The São Paulo state (SP coast (23º18'S, 44º42'W; 25º14'S, 48º01'W is of approximately 600 km in length, bordering the Western Atlantic Ocean, in southeastern Brazil. Cetacean sightings and strandings have long been observed throughout this area. Scattered data from scientific publications, skeletal remains in museums, photographs and articles from newspaper files, universities and aquaria have been organised and updated since 1993. Field investigations on strandings and sightings have also been conducted. A total of 29 cetacean species have been recorded, including 7 baleen whales (Mysticeti and 22 toothed whales (Odontoceti, as follows: Balaenoptera physalus, B. borealis, B. edeni, B. acutorostrata, B. bonaerensis, Megaptera novaeangliae, Eubalaena australis, Physeter macrocephalus, Kogia breviceps, K. sima, Berardius arnuxii, Mesoplodon europaeus, M. mirus, Ziphius cavirostris, Orcinus orca, Feresa attenuata, Globicephala melas, G. macrorhynchus, Pseudorca crassidens, Delphinus capensis, Lagenodelphis hosei, Steno bredanensis, Tursiops truncatus, Stenella frontalis, S. longirostris, S. coeruleoalba, Lissodelphis peronii, Sotalia guianensis and Pontoporia blainvillei. Several species have been observed only once and include strays from their areas of common distribution, as well as species with known preferences for offshore distribution. Others, such as P. blainvillei and S. guianensis, are common coastal dwellers year-round. Z. cavirostris, P. crassidens and L. hosei are reported for the first time on the SP coast.A costa do Estado de São Paulo (SP (23º18'S, 44º42'O; 25º14'S, 48º01'O apresenta aproximadamente 600 km de extensão voltada para o Oceano Atlântico Ocidental no sudeste do Brasil. Registros de encalhes e de avistamentos de cetáceos vêm sendo realizados ao longo desse litoral. Desde 1993, dados obtidos em literatura científica, material osteológico encontrado em museus, fotografias e artigos de arquivos de jornais

  1. Sensory perception in cetaceans: Part II – Promising experimental approaches to study chemoreception in dolphins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee eKremers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemosensory perception in cetaceans remains an intriguing issue as morphological, neuroanatomical and genetic studies draw unclear conclusions, while behavioral data suggest that dolphins may use it for food selection or socio-sexual interactions. Experimental approaches have been scarce due to the practical difficulties of testing chemoreception in wild dolphins. Go/no-go tasks are one elegant way to investigate discrimination abilities; however, they require to train the animals, thus preventing spontaneous responses and hence the expression of preferences. Here, we aimed at testing potential spontaneous responses to chemical stimuli and developed novel procedures. First, we conducted a study to test whether captive dolphins respond to a biologically relevant smell. Therefore, we placed dead fish within an opaque barrel at the border of the pool and counted the number of respirations at proximity as an indicator of investigation. The same dead fishes were presented several times during experiments lasting three consecutive days. From the second day on (i.e. when the odor composition changed, dolphins breathed more often close to the fish-smelling barrel than close to the visually identical but empty control barrel. Second, we conducted a study to test whether dolphins are able to discriminate food flavors. Captive dolphins are commonly provided with ice cubes as a source of enrichment. We took this opportunity to provide ice cubes with different flavors and to compare the reaction to these different flavors as a measure of discrimination. Hence, we used the latency of return to the ice cube begging spot as a measure of discrimination from the previous ice cube flavor. Thus, our method used a non-invasive and easily replicable technique based on the spontaneous begging responses of dolphins toward more or less attractive items bearing biological relevance. The procedures used enabled us to show that dolphins may discriminate odors and flavors

  2. Cetacean range and climate in the eastern North Atlantic: future predictions and implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Emily; Pierce, Graham J; Hall, Karen; Brereton, Tom; Dunn, Timothy E; Wall, Dave; Jepson, Paul D; Deaville, Rob; MacLeod, Colin D

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that the distributions of a large number of species are shifting with global climate change as they track changing surface temperatures that define their thermal niche. Modelling efforts to predict species distributions under future climates have increased with concern about the overall impact of these distribution shifts on species ecology, and especially where barriers to dispersal exist. Here we apply a bio-climatic envelope modelling technique to investigate the impacts of climate change on the geographic range of ten cetacean species in the eastern North Atlantic and to assess how such modelling can be used to inform conservation and management. The modelling process integrates elements of a species' habitat and thermal niche, and employs "hindcasting" of historical distribution changes in order to verify the accuracy of the modelled relationship between temperature and species range. If this ability is not verified, there is a risk that inappropriate or inaccurate models will be used to make future predictions of species distributions. Of the ten species investigated, we found that while the models for nine could successfully explain current spatial distribution, only four had a good ability to predict distribution changes over time in response to changes in water temperature. Applied to future climate scenarios, the four species-specific models with good predictive abilities indicated range expansion in one species and range contraction in three others, including the potential loss of up to 80% of suitable white-beaked dolphin habitat. Model predictions allow identification of affected areas and the likely time-scales over which impacts will occur. Thus, this work provides important information on both our ability to predict how individual species will respond to future climate change and the applicability of predictive distribution models as a tool to help construct viable conservation and management strategies.

  3. Breaking symmetry: the marine environment, prey size, and the evolution of asymmetry in cetacean skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, C D; Reidenberg, J S; Weller, M; Santos, M B; Herman, J; Goold, J; Pierce, G J

    2007-06-01

    Skulls of odontocetes (toothed whales, including dolphins and porpoises) are typified by directional asymmetry, particularly in elements associated with the airway. Generally, it is assumed this asymmetry is related to biosonar production. However, skull asymmetry may actually be a by-product of selection pressure for an asymmetrically positioned larynx. The odontocete larynx traverses the pharynx and is held permanently in place by a ring of muscle. This allows prey swallowing while remaining underwater without risking water entering the lungs and causing injury or death. However, protrusion of the larynx through the pharynx causes a restriction around which prey must pass to reach the stomach. The larynx and associated hyoid apparatus has, therefore, been shifted to the left to provide a larger right piriform sinus (lateral pharyngeal food channel) for swallowing larger prey items. This asymmetry is reflected in the skull, particularly the dorsal openings of the nares. It is hypothesized that there is a relationship between prey size and skull asymmetry. This relationship was examined in 13 species of odontocete cetaceans from the northeast Atlantic, including four narrow-gaped genera (Mesoplodon, Ziphius, Hyperoodon, and Kogia) and eight wide-gaped genera (Phocoena, Delphinus, Stenella, Lagenorhynchus, Tursiops, Grampus, Globicephala, and Orcinus). Skulls were examined from 183 specimens to assess asymmetry of the anterior choanae. Stomach contents were examined from 294 specimens to assess prey size. Results show there is a significant positive relationship between maximum relative prey size consumed and average asymmetry relative to skull size in odontocete species (wide-gape species: R2 = 0.642, P = 0.006; narrow-gape species: R2 = 0.909, P = 0.031). This finding provides support for the hypothesis that the directional asymmetry found in odontocete skulls is related to an aquatic adaptation enabling swallowing large, whole prey while maintaining respiratory

  4. Extensively remodeled, fractured cetacean tympanic bullae show that whales can survive traumatic injury to the ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Maya; Khidas, Kamal; Pyenson, Nicholas D; Fordyce, R Ewan; Mead, James G

    2016-01-01

    Underwater human activities and anthropogenic noise in our oceans may be a major source of habitat degradation for marine life. This issue was highlighted by the opening of the United States Eastern Seaboard for seismic oil and gas exploration in 2014, which generated massive media coverage and widespread concern that seismic surveys could kill or deafen whales. We discovered 11 new specimens of fractured and healed cetacean ear bones, out of a survey of 2127 specimens housed in museum collections. This rare condition has been previously reported only in two specimens of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) from the early 1900s, summarized by Fraser & Purves (1953). All of our new specimens are represented by species for which this condition had never been reported previously, including both baleen and toothed whales. The baleen whale specimens (Balaenoptera physalus, Balaenoptera borealis, Balaenoptera acutorostrata) were collected during Canadian commercial whaling operations in the Atlantic Ocean in the 1970s; the specimens include ear bones with well-healed fractures, demonstrating that baleen whales are capable of overcoming traumatic injury to the ears. The toothed whale specimens (Delphinus sp., Berardius bairdii) were found dead on beaches in 1972 and 2001, respectively, with less remodeled fractures. Thus, ear injuries may be more lethal to the echolocating toothed whales, which rely on hearing for navigation and foraging. We explore several hypotheses regarding how these injuries could have occurred, and conclude that the most parsimonious explanations appear to be both direct and indirect effects of lytic processes from disease or calcium depletion, or damage from external pressure waves. Although further research is required to confirm whether the fractures resulted from natural or human-induced events, this study underscores the importance of museum collections and the work of stranding networks in understanding the potential effects of modern human

  5. Estimating energetics in cetaceans from respiratory frequency: why we need to understand physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fahlman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The accurate estimation of field metabolic rates (FMR in wild animals is a key component of bioenergetic models, and is important for understanding the routine limitations for survival as well as individual responses to disturbances or environmental changes. Several methods have been used to estimate FMR, including accelerometer-derived activity budgets, isotope dilution techniques, and proxies from heart rate. Counting the number of breaths is another method used to assess FMR in cetaceans, which is attractive in its simplicity and the ability to measure respiration frequency from visual cues or data loggers. This method hinges on the assumption that over time a constant tidal volume (VT and O2 exchange fraction (ΔO2 can be used to predict FMR. To test whether this method of estimating FMR is valid, we measured breath-by-breath tidal volumes and expired O2 levels of bottlenose dolphins, and computed the O2 consumption rate (V̇O2 before and after a pre-determined duration of exercise. The measured V̇O2 was compared with three methods to estimate FMR. Each method to estimate V̇O2 included variable VT and/or ΔO2. Two assumption-based methods overestimated V̇O2 by 216-501%. Once the temporal changes in cardio-respiratory physiology, such as variation in VT and ΔO2, were taken into account, pre-exercise resting V̇O2 was predicted to within 2%, and post-exercise V̇O2 was overestimated by 12%. Our data show that a better understanding of cardiorespiratory physiology significantly improves the ability to estimate metabolic rate from respiratory frequency, and further emphasizes the importance of eco-physiology for conservation management efforts.

  6. Retroposon analysis of major cetacean lineages: the monophyly of toothed whales and the paraphyly of river dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, M; Matsuno, F; Hamilton, H; Brownell, R L; Cao, Y; Ding, W; Zuoyan, Z; Shedlock, A M; Fordyce, R E; Hasegawa, M; Okada, N

    2001-06-19

    SINE (short interspersed element) insertion analysis elucidates contentious aspects in the phylogeny of toothed whales and dolphins (Odontoceti), especially river dolphins. Here, we characterize 25 informative SINEs inserted into unique genomic loci during evolution of odontocetes to construct a cladogram, and determine a total of 2.8 kb per taxon of the flanking sequences of these SINE loci to estimate divergence times among lineages. We demonstrate that: (i) Odontocetes are monophyletic; (ii) Ganges River dolphins, beaked whales, and ocean dolphins diverged (in this order) after sperm whales; (iii) three other river dolphin taxa, namely the Amazon, La Plata, and Yangtze river dolphins, form a monophyletic group with Yangtze River dolphins being the most basal; and (iv) the rapid radiation of extant cetacean lineages occurred some 28-33 million years B.P., in strong accord with the fossil record. The combination of SINE and flanking sequence analysis suggests a topology and set of divergence times for odontocete relationships, offering alternative explanations for several long-standing problems in cetacean evolution.

  7. Barcoding the largest animals on Earth: ongoing challenges and molecular solutions in the taxonomic identification of ancient cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speller, Camilla; van den Hurk, Youri; Charpentier, Anne; Rodrigues, Ana; Gardeisen, Armelle; Wilkens, Barbara; McGrath, Krista; Rowsell, Keri; Spindler, Luke; Collins, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few centuries, many cetacean species have witnessed dramatic global declines due to industrial overharvesting and other anthropogenic influences, and thus are key targets for conservation. Whale bones recovered from archaeological and palaeontological contexts can provide essential baseline information on the past geographical distribution and abundance of species required for developing informed conservation policies. Here we review the challenges with identifying whale bones through traditional anatomical methods, as well as the opportunities provided by new molecular analyses. Through a case study focused on the North Sea, we demonstrate how the utility of this (pre)historic data is currently limited by a lack of accurate taxonomic information for the majority of ancient cetacean remains. We then discuss current opportunities presented by molecular identification methods such as DNA barcoding and collagen peptide mass fingerprinting (zooarchaeology by mass spectrometry), and highlight the importance of molecular identifications in assessing ancient species’ distributions through a case study focused on the Mediterranean. We conclude by considering high-throughput molecular approaches such as hybridization capture followed by next-generation sequencing as cost-effective approaches for enhancing the ecological informativeness of these ancient sample sets. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481784

  8. Distribution of trace elements in organs of six species of cetaceans from the Ligurian Sea (Mediterranean), and the relationship with stable carbon and nitrogen ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capelli, R. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche ed Alimentari - Universita degli Studi di Genova - Via Brigata Salerno, 13 I-16147 Genova (Italy); Das, K. [MARE center, Laboratory for Oceanology, University of Liege, B6 Sart-Tilman, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Pellegrini, R. De; Drava, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche ed Alimentari - Universita degli Studi di Genova - Via Brigata Salerno, 13 I-16147 Genova (Italy); Lepoint, G. [MARE center, Laboratory for Oceanology, University of Liege, B6 Sart-Tilman, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Miglio, C. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche ed Alimentari - Universita degli Studi di Genova - Via Brigata Salerno, 13 I-16147 Genova (Italy); Minganti, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche ed Alimentari - Universita degli Studi di Genova - Via Brigata Salerno, 13 I-16147 Genova (Italy)], E-mail: minganti@dictfa.unige.it; Poggi, R. [Museo Civico di Storia Naturale ' Giacomo Doria' - Via Brigata Liguria, 9 I-16121 Genova (Italy)

    2008-02-15

    Mercury (total and organic), cadmium, lead, copper, iron, manganese, selenium and zinc concentrations were measured in different organs of 6 different cetacean species stranded in an area of extraordinary ecological interest (Cetaceans' Sanctuary of the Mediterranean Sea) along the coast of the Ligurian Sea (North-West Mediterranean). Stable-isotopes ratios of carbon ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) and nitrogen ({sup 15}N/{sup 14}N) were also measured in the muscle. A significant relationship exists between {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N, mercury concentration and the trophic level. The distribution of essential and non-essential trace elements was studied on several organs, and a significant relationship between selenium and mercury, with a molar ratio close to 1, was found in the cetaceans' kidney, liver and spleen, regardless of their species. High selenium concentrations are generally associated with a low organic to total mercury ratio. While narrow ranges of concentrations were observed for essential elements in most organs, mercury and selenium concentrations are characterised by a wide range of variation. Bio-accumulation and bio-amplification processes in cetaceans can be better understood by comparing trace element concentrations with the stable-isotopes data.

  9. Four Simple Questions: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Half-Day Community Workshops Designed to Increase Awareness of Coastal Cetacean Conservation Issues in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Gianna; Poh, Anna Norliza Zulkifli; Ngeian, Jenny; Peter, Cindy; Tuen, Andrew Alek

    2012-01-01

    Community workshops were held in coastal locations in Sarawak to raise awareness of cetacean conservation. Interviews were conducted up to 2 years later in four "workshop communities" as well as four villages where workshops were not conducted. Comparison of responses between respondents who had attended workshops (n = 127) versus those…

  10. Summer Distribution, Relative Abundance and Encounter Rates of Cetaceans in the Mediterranean Waters off Southern Italy (Western Ionian Sea and Southern Tyrrhenian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. SANTORO

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In summer 2010 and summer 2011, weekly cetacean surveys were undertaken in “passing mode”, using ferries as platform of opportunity, along the “fixed line transect” between Catania and Civitavecchia (Southern Italy. Of the 20 species of cetaceans confirmed for the Mediterranean sea, 8 were sighted within the survey period: 7 species represented by Mediterranean subpopulations (Balaenoptera physalus, Physeter macrocephalus, Stenella coeruleoalba, Delphinus delphis, Grampus griseus, Tursiops truncatus and Ziphius cavirostris and one considered visitor (Steno bredanensis. We had a total of 220 sightings during the 2010 and a total of 240 sightings in the 2011. The most frequent species was S. coeruleoalba. By the comparison of the data from the two sampling seasons, a significant increase of D. delphis sightings and a decrease of sightings of B. physalus and P. macrocephalus was observed from 2010 to 2011. While all the other species were observed in both sampling seasons, Z. cavirostris and Steno bredanensis were observed only during 2011. The presence of mixed groups of odontocetes was documented too: we sighted groups composed by S. coeruleoalba and D. delphis, by S. coeruleoalba and T. truncatus, and by S. coeruleoalba and G. griseus. The results of this research add useful information on cetacean species in a very poorly known area and highlight the need to standardize large scale and long term monitoring programs in order to detect variation in presence, abundance and distribution of cetaceans populations and understand the effect of anthropogenic factors.

  11. Using cytochrome P4501A1 expression in liver and blubber to understand effects of persistent organic pollutant exposure in stranded Pacific Island cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Melannie J; Foltz, Kerry M; Lynch, Jennifer M; West, Kristi L; Jensen, Brenda A

    2015-09-01

    Elevated levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been reported in tropical Pacific Island cetaceans and their environment. In addition, recent health concerns in cetacean populations have warranted investigation into potential physiological effects from POP exposure for this region. Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) is a candidate for examining such effects. This well-studied biomarker of exposure and effect was examined in stranded cetacean liver using immunoblot (n = 39, 16 species) and blubber using immunohistochemistry (n = 23, 10 species). Paired tissue samples allowed for CYP1A1 comparisons not only between species but also within each individual animal to examine differences between tissue types. Liver CYP1A1 expression correlated positively and significantly with blubber concentrations of all POP categories (n = 39, p 0.100). Among Stenella species, liver CYP1A1 tissue expression was correlated negatively with the sum of all blubber layer endothelial cell CYP1A1 expression (n = 14, p = 0.049). Overall, elevated expression of liver CYP1A1 confirms its use as a biomarker of POP exposure to cetaceans stranded in the tropical Pacific basin.

  12. A Bayesian uncertainty analysis of cetacean demography and bycatch mortality using age-at-death data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey E; Read, Andrew J

    2008-12-01

    fisheries mortality, prior to management to reduce bycatch, was 0.690. Our approach takes into account multiple sources of uncertainty in data and process, and it provides posterior distributions for a rich set of demographic rate parameters that are unknown for most cetaceans. This method should be easily adaptable to other taxa for which fertility and age-at-death data are available.

  13. Cetacean line-transect survey conducted in the eastern Bering Sea shelf by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from NOAA Ship Miller Freeman from 1999-07-07 to 2004-06-30 (NCEI Accession 0131862)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visual surveys for cetaceans were conducted on the eastern Bering Sea shelf along transect lines, in association with the AFSC’s echo integration trawl surveys for...

  14. The use of carcasses for the analysis of cetacean population genetic structure: a comparative study in two dolphin species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgmann, Kerstin; Möller, Luciana M; Harcourt, Robert G; Kemper, Catherine M; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2011-01-01

    Advances in molecular techniques have enabled the study of genetic diversity and population structure in many different contexts. Studies that assess the genetic structure of cetacean populations often use biopsy samples from free-ranging individuals and tissue samples from stranded animals or individuals that became entangled in fishery or aquaculture equipment. This leads to the question of how representative the location of a stranded or entangled animal is with respect to its natural range, and whether similar results would be obtained when comparing carcass samples with samples from free-ranging individuals in studies of population structure. Here we use tissue samples from carcasses of dolphins that stranded or died as a result of bycatch in South Australia to investigate spatial population structure in two species: coastal bottlenose (Tursiops sp.) and short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis). We compare these results with those previously obtained from biopsy sampled free-ranging dolphins in the same area to test whether carcass samples yield similar patterns of genetic variability and population structure. Data from dolphin carcasses were gathered using seven microsatellite markers and a fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region. Analyses based on carcass samples alone failed to detect genetic structure in Tursiops sp., a species previously shown to exhibit restricted dispersal and moderate genetic differentiation across a small spatial scale in this region. However, genetic structure was correctly inferred in D. delphis, a species previously shown to have reduced genetic structure over a similar geographic area. We propose that in the absence of corroborating data, and when population structure is assessed over relatively small spatial scales, the sole use of carcasses may lead to an underestimate of genetic differentiation. This can lead to a failure in identifying management units for conservation. Therefore, this risk should be carefully

  15. Characteristics of fishing operations, environment and life history contributing to small cetacean bycatch in the northeast Atlantic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Brown

    Full Text Available Fisheries bycatch is a key threat to cetacean species globally. Managing the impact requires an understanding of the conditions under which animals are caught and the sections of the population affected. We used observer data collected on an albacore tuna gillnet fishery in the northeast Atlantic, to assess operational and environmental factors contributing to bycatch of common and striped dolphins, using generalised linear models and model averaging. Life history demographics of the captured animals were also investigated. In both species, young males dominated the catch. The age ratio of common dolphins was significantly different from that estimated for the population in the region, based on life tables (G = 17.1, d.f. = 2, p = 0.002. Skewed age and sex ratios may reflect varying vulnerability to capture, through differences in behaviour or segregation in populations. Adult females constituted the second largest portion of the bycatch for both species, with potential consequences for population sustainability. Depth was the most important parameter influencing bycatch of both species and reflected what is known about common and striped dolphin habitat use in the region as the probability of catching common dolphins decreased, and striped dolphins increased, with increasing depth. Striped dolphin capture was similarly influenced by the extent to which operations were conducted in daylight, with the probability of capture increasing with increased operations in the pre-sunset and post-sunrise period, potentially driven by increased ability of observers to record animals during daylight operations, or by diurnal movements increasing contact with the fishery. Effort, based on net length and soak time, had little influence on the probability of capturing either species. Our results illustrate the importance of assessing the demographic of the animals captured during observer programmes and, perhaps more importantly, suggest that effort

  16. Persistent organic pollutant concentrations in blubber of 16 species of cetaceans stranded in the Pacific Islands from 1997 through 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Melannie J; Keller, Jennifer M; West, Kristi L; Jensen, Brenda A

    2014-08-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are toxic man-made chemicals that bioaccumulate and biomagnify in food webs, making them a ubiquitous threat to the marine environment. Although many studies have determined concentrations of POPs in top predators, no studies have quantified POPs in stranded cetaceans within the last 30 years around the Hawaiian Islands. A suite of POPs was measured in the blubber of 16 cetacean species that stranded in the tropical Pacific, including Hawai'i from 1997 to 2011. The sample set includes odontocetes (n=39) and mysticetes (n=3). Median (range) contaminant concentrations in ng/g lipid for the most representative species category (delphinids excluding killer whales [n=27]) are: 9650 (44.4-99,100) for ∑DDTs, 6240 (40.8-50,200) for ∑PCBs, 1380 (6.73-9520) for ∑chlordanes, 1230 (13.4-5510) for ∑toxaphenes, 269 (1.99-10,100) for ∑PBDEs, 280 (2.14-4190) for mirex, 176 (5.43-857) for HCB, 48.1 (0.063), but sex/age class influences were evident with adult males exhibiting greater contaminant loads than adult females and juveniles for ∑DDT, ∑PCBs, ∑CHLs, and mirex (p≤0.036). POP concentrations were lower in mysticetes than odontocetes for many compound classes (p≤0.003). p,p'-DDE/∑DDTs ratios were greater than 0.6 for all species except humpback whales, suggesting exposure to an old DDT source. These POP levels are high enough to warrant concern and continued monitoring.

  17. Public awareness and attitudes towards naval sonar mitigation for cetacean conservation: a preliminary case study in Fairfax County, Virginia. (the DC Metro area).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirbel, K; Balint, P; Parsons, E C M

    2011-01-01

    The potential impacts of naval sonar on cetaceans has led to a series of court cases and statements of concern by international organizations. However, there has been no research conducted on attitudes of the general public with respect to this issue. To investigate this, a preliminary public survey was conducted in Fairfax, Virginia (the Washington, DC Metro region). The majority of the public sampled believed that naval sonar impacted marine mammals (51.3%), that the US Navy should not be exempt from environmental regulations in time of peace (75.2%), and that sonar use should be moderated if it impacts cetaceans (75.8%). Individuals who were conservative, Republican, and have served in the military were more likely to believe the Navy should be exempt from marine mammal protection regulations. In addition, expert interviews were conducted to gain opinions on the potential ramifications of the recent US Supreme Court case on naval sonar mitigation.

  18. Physicochemical evolution and molecular adaptation of the cetacean osmoregulation-related gene UT-A2 and implications for functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingzhen; Yu, Xueying; Hu, Bo; Zheng, Jinsong; Xiao, Wuhan; Hao, Yujiang; Liu, Wenhua; Wang, Ding

    2015-03-12

    Cetaceans have an enigmatic evolutionary history of re-invading aquatic habitats. One of their essential adaptabilities that has enabled this process is their homeostatic strategy adjustment. Here, we investigated the physicochemical evolution and molecular adaptation of the cetacean urea transporter UT-A2, which plays an important role in urine concentration and water homeostasis. First, we cloned UT-A2 from the freshwater Yangtze finless porpoise, after which bioinformatics analyses were conducted based on available datasets (including freshwater baiji and marine toothed and baleen whales) using MEGA, PAML, DataMonkey, TreeSAAP and Consurf. Our findings suggest that the UT-A2 protein shows folding similar to that of dvUT and UT-B, whereas some variations occurred in the functional So and Si regions of the selectivity filter. Additionally, several regions of the cetacean UT-A2 protein have experienced molecular adaptations. We suggest that positive-destabilizing selection could contribute to adaptations by influencing its biochemical and conformational character. The conservation of amino acid residues within the selectivity filter of the urea conduction pore is likely to be necessary for urea conduction, whereas the non-conserved amino acid replacements around the entrance and exit of the conduction pore could potentially affect the activity, which could be interesting target sites for future mutagenesis studies.

  19. Climate-driven environmental changes around 8,200 years ago favoured increases in cetacean strandings and Mediterranean hunter-gatherers exploited them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Marcello A.; Talamo, Sahra; Tagliacozzo, Antonio; Fiore, Ivana; Nehlich, Olaf; Piperno, Marcello; Tusa, Sebastiano; Collina, Carmine; di Salvo, Rosaria; Schimmenti, Vittoria; Richards, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Cetacean mass strandings occur regularly worldwide, yet the compounded effects of natural and anthropogenic factors often complicate our understanding of these phenomena. Evidence of past stranding episodes may, thus, be essential to establish the potential influence of climate change. Investigations on bones from the site of Grotta dell’Uzzo in North West Sicily (Italy) show that the rapid climate change around 8,200 years ago coincided with increased strandings in the Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope analyses on collagen from a large sample of remains recovered at this cave indicate that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers relied little on marine resources. A human and a red fox dating to the 8.2-kyr-BP climatic event, however, acquired at least one third of their protein from cetaceans. Numerous carcasses should have been available annually, for at least a decade, to obtain these proportions of meat. Our findings imply that climate-driven environmental changes, caused by global warming, may represent a serious threat to cetaceans in the near future.

  20. Moisture content in Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) tissues: a reference base for conversion factors between dry and wet weight trace element concentrations in cetaceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jian; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki

    2003-03-01

    Conversion factors were developed for Dall's porpoise tissues to convert trace element concentrations between dry and wet weight basis. - Concentration of trace elements measured by dry weight basis has become more commonly used in recent studies on cetaceans than wet weight basis, which was used more in earlier studies. Because few authors present moisture content data in their papers, it is difficult to compare the concentrations of trace elements between various studies. Therefore, we felt that it would be useful if a reference conversion factor (CF) for tissue types could be found to convert between wet weight and dry weight data on trace element concentrations. We determined the moisture contents of 14 tissues of Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli), and then, calculated the CF values for those tissues. Because the moisture content of each tissue differs from other tissues, it is necessary to use a specific CF for each tissue rather than a general CF for several tissues. We have also found that CF values for Dall's porpoise tissues are similar to the same tissues in other cetaceans. Therefore CF values from Dall's porpoise can be reliably used to convert between wet and dry weight concentrations for other cetacean tissues as reference data.

  1. Climate-driven environmental changes around 8,200 years ago favoured increases in cetacean strandings and Mediterranean hunter-gatherers exploited them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Marcello A; Talamo, Sahra; Tagliacozzo, Antonio; Fiore, Ivana; Nehlich, Olaf; Piperno, Marcello; Tusa, Sebastiano; Collina, Carmine; Di Salvo, Rosaria; Schimmenti, Vittoria; Richards, Michael P

    2015-11-17

    Cetacean mass strandings occur regularly worldwide, yet the compounded effects of natural and anthropogenic factors often complicate our understanding of these phenomena. Evidence of past stranding episodes may, thus, be essential to establish the potential influence of climate change. Investigations on bones from the site of Grotta dell'Uzzo in North West Sicily (Italy) show that the rapid climate change around 8,200 years ago coincided with increased strandings in the Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope analyses on collagen from a large sample of remains recovered at this cave indicate that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers relied little on marine resources. A human and a red fox dating to the 8.2-kyr-BP climatic event, however, acquired at least one third of their protein from cetaceans. Numerous carcasses should have been available annually, for at least a decade, to obtain these proportions of meat. Our findings imply that climate-driven environmental changes, caused by global warming, may represent a serious threat to cetaceans in the near future.

  2. Including cetaceans in multi-species assessment models using strandings data: why, how and what can we do about it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Saavedra

    2014-07-01

    questions. Most multispecies models include interactions between commercially exploited species, since those data are more readily available. However, information is needed on at least both the main preys and predators of a selected stock. In the case of European Hake, the species we have focus our research on, cetaceans are their main predator, particularly common and bottlenose dolphins, which have been estimated to remove annually in the Atlantic shelf waters of the Iberian Peninsula, an amount similar to that caught by Spanish and Portuguese fleets (Santos et al., 2013. The European hake is one of the main fishing species of the Spanish and Portuguese fleets operating in the area, and one where more research activity has been concentrated, hence there is plenty of available biological information on growth, reproduction and trophic interactions. As a result, a population model has been built which uses trophic interactions to investigate the relationships between hake and other species. The European hake population is currently divided into two stocks, north and south. The southern hake stock, distributed along the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula, is annually assessed by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES and the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO. For the assessment of this stock, “Gadget” a multi-specific modeling framework is used. Gadget allows the building of minimum realistic models that integrating the main trophic relationships among selected species considered to reflect the main processes in the system. Modeling cetacean populations can allow us to include complex trophic relationships in multispecies models. Furthermore, it will also be a tool to help cetaceans conservation by guiding possible management measures that ensure their viability or recovery. All cetacean species are protected by national and international legislation (e.g. Habitats Directive. However, modeling cetaceans dynamics has a number of problems

  3. Review of historical unusual mortality events (UMEs) in the Gulf of Mexico (1990-2009): providing context for the multi-year northern Gulf of Mexico cetacean UME declared in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litz, Jenny A; Baran, Melody A; Bowen-Stevens, Sabrina R; Carmichael, Ruth H; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Garrison, Lance P; Fire, Spencer E; Fougeres, Erin M; Hardy, Ron; Holmes, Secret; Jones, Wanda; Mase-Guthrie, Blair E; Odell, Daniel K; Rosel, Patricia E; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Shannon, Delphine K; Shippee, Steve F; Smith, Suzanne M; Stratton, Elizabeth M; Tumlin, Mandy C; Whitehead, Heidi R; Worthy, Graham A J; Rowles, Teresa K

    2014-12-02

    An unusual mortality event (UME) was declared for cetaceans in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) for Franklin County, Florida, west through Louisiana, USA, beginning in February 2010 and was ongoing as of September 2014. The 'Deepwater Horizon' (DWH) oil spill began on 20 April 2010 in the GoM, raising questions regarding the potential role of the oil spill in the UME. The present study reviews cetacean mortality events that occurred in the GoM prior to 2010 (n = 11), including causes, durations, and some specific test results, to provide a historical context for the current event. The average duration of GoM cetacean UMEs prior to 2010 was 6 mo, and the longest was 17 mo (2005-2006). The highest number of cetacean mortalities recorded during a previous GoM event was 344 (in 1990). In most previous events, dolphin morbillivirus or brevetoxicosis was confirmed or suspected as a causal factor. In contrast, the current northern GoM UME has lasted more than 48 mo and has had more than 1000 reported mortalities within the currently defined spatial and temporal boundaries of the event. Initial results from the current UME do not support either morbillivirus or brevetoxin as primary causes of this event. This review is the first summary of cetacean UMEs in the GoM and provides evidence that the most common causes of previous UMEs are unlikely to be associated with the current UME.

  4. Coinfection by Cetacean morbillivirus and Aspergillus fumigatus in a juvenile bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassle, Stephen E; Landrau-Giovannetti, Nelmarie; Farina, Lisa L; Leone, Angelique; Wellehan, James F X; Stacy, Nicole I; Thompson, Patrick; Herring, Hada; Mase-Guthrie, Blair; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Walsh, Michael T; Waltzek, Thomas B

    2016-11-01

    A recently deceased juvenile male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) was found floating in the Gulf of Mexico, off Sand Key in Clearwater, Florida. At autopsy, we identified pneumonia and a focus of malacia in the right cerebrum. Cytologic evaluation of tissue imprints from the right cerebrum revealed fungal hyphae. Fungal cultures of the lung and brain yielded Aspergillus fumigatus, which was confirmed by amplification of a portion of the fungal nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 region sequence. Microscopic pulmonary lesions of bronchiolar epithelial cell syncytia with intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions within bronchiolar epithelial cells were suggestive of Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) infection. The occurrence of CeMV infection was supported by positive immunohistochemical staining for morbillivirus antigen. CeMV detection was confirmed by amplification and sequencing a portion of the morbilliviral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene from lung tissue. This case provides CeMV sequence data available from the Gulf of Mexico and underscores the need for genomic sequencing across diverse host, temporospatial, and population (i.e., single animal vs. mass mortality events) scales to improve our understanding of these globally emerging pathogens.

  5. Early development and orientation of the acoustic funnel provides insight into the evolution of sound reception pathways in cetaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Yamato

    Full Text Available Whales receive underwater sounds through a fundamentally different mechanism than their close terrestrial relatives. Instead of hearing through the ear canal, cetaceans hear through specialized fatty tissues leading to an evolutionarily novel feature: an acoustic funnel located anterior to the tympanic aperture. We traced the ontogenetic development of this feature in 56 fetal specimens from 10 different families of toothed (odontocete and baleen (mysticete whales, using X-ray computed tomography. We also charted ear ossification patterns through ontogeny to understand the impact of heterochronic developmental processes. We determined that the acoustic funnel arises from a prominent V-shaped structure established early in ontogeny, formed by the malleus and the goniale. In odontocetes, this V-formation develops into a cone-shaped funnel facing anteriorly, directly into intramandibular acoustic fats, which is likely functionally linked to the anterior orientation of sound reception in echolocation. In contrast, the acoustic funnel in balaenopterids rotates laterally, later in fetal development, consistent with a lateral sound reception pathway. Balaenids and several fossil mysticetes retain a somewhat anteriorly oriented acoustic funnel in the mature condition, indicating that a lateral sound reception pathway in balaenopterids may be a recent evolutionary innovation linked to specialized feeding modes, such as lunge-feeding.

  6. Monitoring winter and summer abundance of cetaceans in the Pelagos Sanctuary (northwestern Mediterranean Sea through aerial surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Panigada

    Full Text Available Systematic long-term monitoring of abundance is essential to inform conservation measures and evaluate their effectiveness. To instigate such work in the Pelagos Sanctuary in the Mediterranean, two aerial surveys were conducted in winter and summer 2009. A total of 467 (131 in winter, 336 in summer sightings of 7 species was made. Sample sizes were sufficient to estimate abundance of fin whales in summer (148; 95% CI = 87-254 and striped dolphins in winter (19,462; 95% CI = 12 939-29 273 and in summer (38 488; 95% CI = 27 447-53 968. Numbers of animals within the Sanctuary are significantly higher in summer, when human activities and thus potential population level impacts are highest. Comparisons with data from past shipboard surveys suggest an appreciable decrease in fin whales within the Sanctuary area and an appreciable increase in striped dolphins. Aerial surveys proved to be more efficient than ship surveys, allowing more robust estimates, with smaller CIs and CVs. These results provide essential baseline data for this marine protected area and continued regular surveys will allow the effectiveness of the MPA in terms of cetacean conservation to be evaluated and inform future management measures. The collected data may also be crucial in assessing whether ship strikes, one of the main causes of death for fin whales in the Mediterranean, are affecting the Mediterranean population.

  7. How much effort is enough? The power of citizen science to monitor trends in coastal cetacean species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.B. Embling

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Citizen scientists provide a cost-effective means of carrying out broad scale, long-term monitoring of the environment while fostering earth stewardship. In this study we investigate how much effort is required by citizen scientists to detect trends in the occurrence of a protected population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus. We analyse the WDC citizen science shore-based data collected over nine years (2005–2013 between April to October from within and in the vicinity of a Special Area of Conservation (SAC for bottlenose dolphins in the Moray Firth, Scotland. Watches comprised a continuous 10 minute scan of the survey area in an hour. During peak season, around 5 watches per day were required to detect annual or between-site trends of 50% in dolphin occurrence in locations where dolphins were sighted reliably (0.1 sightings per hour. Less effort was required at higher sightings rates, and it was not possible to statistically detect trends of <30%. This study highlights the importance of power analysis in designing citizen science programmes and demonstrates their effectiveness in carrying out long term shore-based monitoring of coastal cetacean species, providing a cost-effective early warning system for changes in the marine environment.

  8. From the track to the ocean: Using flow control to improve marine bio-logging tags for cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Giovani; Anderson, Erik; Garborg, C. Spencer; Murray, Mark; Johnson, Mark; Moore, Michael J.; Howle, Laurens

    2017-01-01

    Bio-logging tags are an important tool for the study of cetaceans, but superficial tags inevitably increase hydrodynamic loading. Substantial forces can be generated by tags on fast-swimming animals, potentially affecting behavior and energetics or promoting early tag removal. Streamlined forms have been used to reduce loading, but these designs can accelerate flow over the top of the tag. This non-axisymmetric flow results in large lift forces (normal to the animal) that become the dominant force component at high speeds. In order to reduce lift and minimize total hydrodynamic loading this work presents a new tag design (Model A) that incorporates a hydrodynamic body, a channel to reduce fluid speed differences above and below the housing and wing to redirect flow to counter lift. Additionally, three derivatives of the Model A design were used to examine the contribution of individual flow control features to overall performance. Hydrodynamic loadings of four models were compared using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The Model A design eliminated all lift force and generated up to ~30 N of downward force in simulated 6 m/s aligned flow. The simulations were validated using particle image velocimetry (PIV) to experimentally characterize the flow around the tag design. The results of these experiments confirm the trends predicted by the simulations and demonstrate the potential benefit of flow control elements for the reduction of tag induced forces on the animal. PMID:28196148

  9. From the track to the ocean: Using flow control to improve marine bio-logging tags for cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Giovani; Anderson, Erik; Garborg, C Spencer; Murray, Mark; Johnson, Mark; Moore, Michael J; Howle, Laurens; Shorter, K Alex

    2017-01-01

    Bio-logging tags are an important tool for the study of cetaceans, but superficial tags inevitably increase hydrodynamic loading. Substantial forces can be generated by tags on fast-swimming animals, potentially affecting behavior and energetics or promoting early tag removal. Streamlined forms have been used to reduce loading, but these designs can accelerate flow over the top of the tag. This non-axisymmetric flow results in large lift forces (normal to the animal) that become the dominant force component at high speeds. In order to reduce lift and minimize total hydrodynamic loading this work presents a new tag design (Model A) that incorporates a hydrodynamic body, a channel to reduce fluid speed differences above and below the housing and wing to redirect flow to counter lift. Additionally, three derivatives of the Model A design were used to examine the contribution of individual flow control features to overall performance. Hydrodynamic loadings of four models were compared using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The Model A design eliminated all lift force and generated up to ~30 N of downward force in simulated 6 m/s aligned flow. The simulations were validated using particle image velocimetry (PIV) to experimentally characterize the flow around the tag design. The results of these experiments confirm the trends predicted by the simulations and demonstrate the potential benefit of flow control elements for the reduction of tag induced forces on the animal.

  10. Early development and orientation of the acoustic funnel provides insight into the evolution of sound reception pathways in cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Maya; Pyenson, Nicholas D

    2015-01-01

    Whales receive underwater sounds through a fundamentally different mechanism than their close terrestrial relatives. Instead of hearing through the ear canal, cetaceans hear through specialized fatty tissues leading to an evolutionarily novel feature: an acoustic funnel located anterior to the tympanic aperture. We traced the ontogenetic development of this feature in 56 fetal specimens from 10 different families of toothed (odontocete) and baleen (mysticete) whales, using X-ray computed tomography. We also charted ear ossification patterns through ontogeny to understand the impact of heterochronic developmental processes. We determined that the acoustic funnel arises from a prominent V-shaped structure established early in ontogeny, formed by the malleus and the goniale. In odontocetes, this V-formation develops into a cone-shaped funnel facing anteriorly, directly into intramandibular acoustic fats, which is likely functionally linked to the anterior orientation of sound reception in echolocation. In contrast, the acoustic funnel in balaenopterids rotates laterally, later in fetal development, consistent with a lateral sound reception pathway. Balaenids and several fossil mysticetes retain a somewhat anteriorly oriented acoustic funnel in the mature condition, indicating that a lateral sound reception pathway in balaenopterids may be a recent evolutionary innovation linked to specialized feeding modes, such as lunge-feeding.

  11. Development of primers for detection of heat-treated cetacean materials in porcine meat and bone meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Naoki; Yoshida, Tomotaro; Kusama, Toyoko; Takagi, Masami; Onodera, Takashi; Sugiura, Katsuaki

    2009-07-01

    The feed ban introduced after the detection of the first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in 2001 in Japan has been modified to allow some of the previously prohibited animal materials to be used in animal feed. Recently, porcine materials were allowed to be used in feed for pigs, poultry, and fish. Materials from other mammals, including whales, remain prohibited. In the absence of a method to detect the prohibited whale materials in porcine materials, there is a possibility that the whale materials are being used for feed for pigs, poultry, and fish. To detect illegal use of whale materials mixed with porcine materials, we have developed PCR primers specific to a group of most cetacean species, using a computer-based method we developed previously. The primer sets were capable of detecting whale meat meal that had been autoclaved at 133 degrees C for up to 20 min. The detection limit of whale material in porcine meat and bone meal was 0.1%.

  12. Tetraphyllidean plerocercoids from Western Mediterranean cetaceans and other marine mammals around the world: a comprehensive morphological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustí, Celia; Aznar, Francisco Javier; Raga, Juan Antonio

    2005-02-01

    Tetraphyllidean plerocercoids have occasionally been reported in marine mammals, but they have rarely been described in detail, and the ecological significance of these infections is unclear. We described plerocercoids collected from the mucosa of the terminal colon and rectum, the anal crypts, and the hepatopancreatic ducts of 7 striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba, 1 Cuvier's beaked whale Ziphius cavirostris, and 3 Risso's dolphins Grampus griseus from the Spanish Mediterranean. We also examined undescribed plerocercoids from 3 cetacean species from the Atlantic and the Pacific. All plerocercoids had a lanceolate body, and a scolex with an apical sucker and 4 sessile monolocular bothridia. The bothridia had free posterior edges and an accessory sucker at their anterior end. Under light microscopy, the bothridia of some Mediterranean specimens looked bilocular without accessory suckers, but a true accessory sucker was observed in histological sections. A principal component analysis revealed 2 stable clusters of specimens along the first principal component regardless of host species. These "large" and "small" morphotypes are thought to represent early migratory stages of Phyllobothrium delphini and Monorygma grimaldii. The similarity in scolex morphology, the observation of plerocercoids buried in intestinal regions close to the sites where M. grimaldii and P. delphini occur, and the coexistence of all larval forms in the same individual hosts would support this hypothesis. Future molecular analysis may confirm it.

  13. Oil and gas exploration in the Southeastern Gulf of St. Lawrence: a review of information on pinnipeds and cetaceans in the area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammill, M.O.; Lesage, V.; Dube, Y.; Measures, L.N. [Maurice Lamontagne Inst., Mont-Joli, PQ (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    A summary of information concerning pinnipeds (seals) and cetaceans (whales) was summarized for the proposed region of oil and gas exploration, located in the southeastern part of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Marine mammals moving in and out of the Gulf of St. Lawrence utilize Cabot Strait as an important migratory route. A platform for pinnipeds reproduction is available with the seasonal ice cover. This ice cover provides a limit to access, during winter months, to marine mammals, especially cetaceans, to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Important foraging areas for cetaceans are located in the Cape Breton Trough in the vicinity of Cheticamp, as well as the large canyons in the Gulf. The four pinnipeds species most commonly found in the area are: harp, hooded, grey and harbour seals. Data on population abundance, whelping areas, distribution, and diet is generally available. Scientists require specific at sea distribution, relative abundance and local diet data for the area. On the east coast of Prince Edward Island, the seal-watching industry relies mostly on harbour seals. Of the fifteen whale species that transit through the Cabot Strait, six are regular visitors, namely: Fin, Minke, Humpback, Pilot whales, White-sided dolphins, and Harbour porpoise are seen in abundant numbers on a regular basis. Right whales pass through the area in small numbers. The whale-watching activity taking place on the western coast of Cape Breton relies mainly on Pilot Whales, for which this area has great importance. Additional data on species present, abundance, seasonal occupation, seasonal movements, and diet of whales is missing. Damage to hearing could result from seismic activity, leading to distribution changes, and increased strandings due to noise. 108 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  14. Inferring cetacean population densities from the absolute dynamic topography of the ocean in a hierarchical Bayesian framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A Pardo

    Full Text Available We inferred the population densities of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus and short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis in the Northeast Pacific Ocean as functions of the water-column's physical structure by implementing hierarchical models in a Bayesian framework. This approach allowed us to propagate the uncertainty of the field observations into the inference of species-habitat relationships and to generate spatially explicit population density predictions with reduced effects of sampling heterogeneity. Our hypothesis was that the large-scale spatial distributions of these two cetacean species respond primarily to ecological processes resulting from shoaling and outcropping of the pycnocline in regions of wind-forced upwelling and eddy-like circulation. Physically, these processes affect the thermodynamic balance of the water column, decreasing its volume and thus the height of the absolute dynamic topography (ADT. Biologically, they lead to elevated primary productivity and persistent aggregation of low-trophic-level prey. Unlike other remotely sensed variables, ADT provides information about the structure of the entire water column and it is also routinely measured at high spatial-temporal resolution by satellite altimeters with uniform global coverage. Our models provide spatially explicit population density predictions for both species, even in areas where the pycnocline shoals but does not outcrop (e.g. the Costa Rica Dome and the North Equatorial Countercurrent thermocline ridge. Interannual variations in distribution during El Niño anomalies suggest that the population density of both species decreases dramatically in the Equatorial Cold Tongue and the Costa Rica Dome, and that their distributions retract to particular areas that remain productive, such as the more oceanic waters in the central California Current System, the northern Gulf of California, the North Equatorial Countercurrent thermocline ridge, and the more

  15. Host specificity of Oschmarinella rochebruni and Brachycladium atlanticum (Digenea: Brachycladiidae) in five cetacean species from western Mediterranean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu, P; Raga, J A; Aznar, F J

    2011-03-01

    We investigated patterns of specificity of liver flukes (fam. Brachycladiidae) in a community of cetaceans from the western Mediterranean. The liver and pancreas of 103 striped dolphins, Stenella coeruleoalba, 18 Risso's dolphins, Grampus griseus, 14 bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, 8 common dolphins, Delphinus delphis, and 5 long-finned pilot whales, Globicephala melas, were analysed for brachycladiid species. Two species were found: Oschmarinella rochebruni in striped dolphins (prevalence (P): 61.2%; mean intensity (MI) (95% CI): 34.2 (25.7-45.6)), and Brachycladium atlanticum in striped dolphins (P: 39.8%; MI: 7.1 (4.8-13.1)) and a single individual of common dolphin (P: 12.5%; intensity: 19), which represents a new host record. A molecular analysis using the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of the rDNA gene confirmed that specimens of B. atlanticum were conspecific regardless of host species. Available dietary data suggest that Risso's dolphins, bottlenose dolphins and long-finned pilot whales would contact rarely, if at all, the infective stages of O. rochebruni and B. atlanticum. Neither the prevalence nor the mean abundance of B. atlanticum differed significantly between striped and common dolphins, but a principal component analysis using seven morphometric variables indicated that specimens collected from the common dolphin were stunted. These worms also had fewer eggs compared with specimens typically found in striped dolphins, although the size of the eggs was similar in both host species. Dwarfism and low fecundity have typically been found in helminths infecting unusual host species, and might reflect the lower compatibility of B. atlanticum for common dolphins. In summary, both O. rochebruni and B. atlanticum appear to exhibit a narrow specificity for striped dolphins in the western Mediterranean.

  16. Inferring cetacean population densities from the absolute dynamic topography of the ocean in a hierarchical Bayesian framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Mario A; Gerrodette, Tim; Beier, Emilio; Gendron, Diane; Forney, Karin A; Chivers, Susan J; Barlow, Jay; Palacios, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    We inferred the population densities of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) and short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) in the Northeast Pacific Ocean as functions of the water-column's physical structure by implementing hierarchical models in a Bayesian framework. This approach allowed us to propagate the uncertainty of the field observations into the inference of species-habitat relationships and to generate spatially explicit population density predictions with reduced effects of sampling heterogeneity. Our hypothesis was that the large-scale spatial distributions of these two cetacean species respond primarily to ecological processes resulting from shoaling and outcropping of the pycnocline in regions of wind-forced upwelling and eddy-like circulation. Physically, these processes affect the thermodynamic balance of the water column, decreasing its volume and thus the height of the absolute dynamic topography (ADT). Biologically, they lead to elevated primary productivity and persistent aggregation of low-trophic-level prey. Unlike other remotely sensed variables, ADT provides information about the structure of the entire water column and it is also routinely measured at high spatial-temporal resolution by satellite altimeters with uniform global coverage. Our models provide spatially explicit population density predictions for both species, even in areas where the pycnocline shoals but does not outcrop (e.g. the Costa Rica Dome and the North Equatorial Countercurrent thermocline ridge). Interannual variations in distribution during El Niño anomalies suggest that the population density of both species decreases dramatically in the Equatorial Cold Tongue and the Costa Rica Dome, and that their distributions retract to particular areas that remain productive, such as the more oceanic waters in the central California Current System, the northern Gulf of California, the North Equatorial Countercurrent thermocline ridge, and the more southern portion of the

  17. The influence of topographic and dynamic cyclic variables on the distribution of small cetaceans in a shallow coastal system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke N de Boer

    Full Text Available The influence of topographic and temporal variables on cetacean distribution at a fine-scale is still poorly understood. To study the spatial and temporal distribution of harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena and the poorly known Risso's dolphin Grampus griseus we carried out land-based observations from Bardsey Island (Wales, UK in summer (2001-2007. Using Kernel analysis and Generalized Additive Models it was shown that porpoises and Risso's appeared to be linked to topographic and dynamic cyclic variables with both species using different core areas (dolphins to the West and porpoises to the East off Bardsey. Depth, slope and aspect and a low variation in current speed (for Risso's were important in explaining the patchy distributions for both species. The prime temporal conditions in these shallow coastal systems were related to the tidal cycle (Low Water Slack and the flood phase, lunar cycle (a few days following the neap tidal phase, diel cycle (afternoons and seasonal cycle (peaking in August but differed between species on a temporary but predictable basis. The measure of tidal stratification was shown to be important. Coastal waters generally show a stronger stratification particularly during neap tides upon which the phytoplankton biomass at the surface rises reaching its maximum about 2-3 days after neap tide. It appeared that porpoises occurred in those areas where stratification is maximised and Risso's preferred more mixed waters. This fine-scale study provided a temporal insight into spatial distribution of two species that single studies conducted over broader scales (tens or hundreds of kilometers do not achieve. Understanding which topographic and cyclic variables drive the patchy distribution of porpoises and Risso's in a Headland/Island system may form the initial basis for identifying potentially critical habitats for these species.

  18. Diagnosis of Cetacean morbillivirus: A sensitive one step real time RT fast-PCR method based on SYBR(®) Green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán, Carlos; Carballo, Matilde; Muñoz, María Jesús; Bellière, Edwige Nina; Neves, Elena; Nogal, Verónica; Esperón, Fernando

    2015-12-15

    Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) (family Paramyxoviridae, genus Morbillivirus) is considered the most pathogenic virus of cetaceans. It was first implicated in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) mass stranding episode along the Northwestern Atlantic coast in the late 1980s, and in several more recent worldwide epizootics in different Odontoceti species. This study describes a new one step real-time reverse transcription fast polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-fast PCR) method based on SYBR(®) Green to detect a fragment of the CeMV fusion protein gene. This primer set also works for conventional RT-PCR diagnosis. This method detected and identified all three well-characterized strains of CeMV: porpoise morbillivirus (PMV), dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) and pilot whale morbillivirus (PWMV). Relative sensitivity was measured by comparing the results obtained from 10-fold dilution series of PMV and DMV positive controls and a PWMV field sample, to those obtained by the previously described conventional phosphoprotein gene based RT-PCR method. Both the conventional and real-time RT-PCR methods involving the fusion protein gene were 100- to 1000-fold more sensitive than the previously described conventional RT-PCR method.

  19. Habitat use and preferences of cetaceans along the continental slope and the adjacent pelagic waters in the western Ligurian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzellino, A.; Gaspari, S.; Airoldi, S.; Nani, B.

    2008-03-01

    The physical habitat of cetaceans occurring along the continental slope in the western Ligurian Sea was investigated. Data were collected from two different sighting platforms, one of the two being a whale-watching boat. Surveys, conducted from May to October and from 1996 to 2000, covered an area of approximately 3000 km 2 with a mean effort of about 10,000 km year -1. A total of 814 sightings was reported, including all the species occurring in the area: Stenella coeruleoalba, Balaenoptera physalus, Physeter macrocephalus, Globicephala melas, Grampus griseus, Ziphius cavirostris, Tursiops truncatus, Delphinus delphis. A Geographic Information System was used to integrate sighting data to a set of environmental characteristics, which included bottom gradient, area between different isobaths, and length and linearity of the isobaths within a cell unit. Habitat use was analysed by means of a multi-dimensional scaling, MDS, analysis. Significant differences were found in the habitat preference of most of the species regularly occurring in the area. Bottlenose dolphin, Risso's dolphin, sperm whale and Cuvier's beaked whale were found strongly associated to well-defined depth and slope gradient characteristics of the shelf-edge and the upper and lower slope. The hypothesis of habitat segregation was considered for Risso's dolphin, sperm whale and Cuvier's beaked whale. Canonical discriminant functions using depth and slope as predictors outlined clear and not overlapping habitat preferences for Risso's dolphin and Cuvier's beaked whale, whereas a partial overlapping of the habitat of the other two species was observed for sperm whale. Such a partitioning of the upper and lower slope area may be the result of the common feeding habits and suggests a possible competition of these three species. A temporal segregation in the use of the slope area was also observed for sperm whales and Risso's dolphins. Fin whales, and the occasionally encountered common dolphin and long

  20. Investigation of trophic level and niche partitioning of 7 cetacean species by stable isotopes, and cadmium and arsenic tissue concentrations in the western Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J-Y; Chou, L-S; Chen, M-H

    2015-04-15

    A total of 24 stranded or bycatch cetaceans, including Balaenoptera omurai, Lagenodelphis hosei, Kogia sima, Stenella attenuata, Grampus griseus, Neophocaena phocaenoides, and Sousa chinensis, were collected from 2001 to 2011 in Taiwan. Using the muscular δ(13)C and δ(15)N data, three ecological groups were identified as the oceanic baleen whale, the neritic, and the coastal toothed whale groups, coinciding with their taxonomy, feeding habits and geographical distribution. A horizontal inshore to offshore distribution was found for the sympatric neritic toothed dolphins, G. griseus, K. sima, S. attenuata, and L. hosei in the outermost offshore waters, accompanying their growth. For the first time we identify Taiwan's Chinese white dolphin, S. chinensis, as an exclusive fish eater. Cd and As bioaccumulated in the G. griseus, L. hosei and S. attenuata increase as they grow. Prey-derived As- and Cd-induced health threats were found in L. hosei, and G. griseus.

  1. Polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, tris(4-chlorophenyl)methane, and tris(4-chlorophenyl)methanol in livers of small cetaceans stranded along Florida coastal waters, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Mafumi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Takahashi, Atsushi; Loganathan, B.G.; Odell, D.K.; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Giesy, J.P.

    2000-06-01

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides were determined in the livers of bottlenose dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and pygmy sperm whales found stranded along the coastal waters of Florida, USA, during 1989 to 1994. The PCBs were the most predominant contaminants followed in order by DDTs, chlordanes, tris(4-chlorophenyl)methane (TCPMe), tris(4-chlorophenyl)methanol (TCPMOH), hexachlorobenzene, and hexachlorocyclohexane isomers. Among the cetaceans analyzed, organochlorine concentrations were greatest in bottlenose dolphins followed by Atlantic spotted dolphins and pygmy sperm whales. Hexa- and heptachlorobiphenyls were the predominant PCB congeners found in the livers of dolphins. Patterns of relative concentrations of PCB congeners varied among individual bottlenose dolphins. A few individuals contained predominant concentrations of octa- (CB-199, 196/201) and nonachlorobiphenyl (CB-206, 208) congeners, which suggested exposure to the highly chlorinated PCB formulation, Aroclor{reg_sign} 1268, a contaminant at a coastal site in Georgia bordering northern Florida. The estimated 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) of coplanar PCBs in bottlenose dolphins were 170 to 18,000 pg/g, lipid weight (mean:5,400 pg/g) with mono-ortho congeners 118, 105, and 156 contributing more than 80% of the TEQs. The ratios of CB-169 to CB-126 in cetacean livers were linearly related to total PCB concentrations, which suggested a strong induction of microsomal monooxygenase enzymes in the liver. The hepatic concentrations of TCPMe and TCPMOH in bottlenose dolphins and Atlantic spotted dolphins were greater than those in the blubber of marine mammals of various regions, which suggested the presence of sources for these chemicals along the Atlantic coast of Florida.

  2. Cetaceans occurrence visual monitoring during seismic survey in the North of Campos Basin; Monitoramento visual de ocorrencia de cetaceos durante o levantamento de dados sismicos no norte da Bacia de Campos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flor, Karina C.A.; Amaro, Thays P.C.; Carloni, Giuliano G. [Ecologus Engenharia Consultiva, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Uller, George A. [CGGVeritas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this research is to present the results of the marine biota visual monitoring developed during the seismic survey in the north area of Campos Basin. The monitoring lasted five months, between 14 February and 14 July 2007, reaching, on average, eleven hours and fifty one minutes of sign effort per day. It was conducted by fourteen marine biota catch sign, three for each period of boarding, that took over during all period of the activity. Sixty two cetaceans were registered, eight belonging to suborder Odontoceti and four belonging to suborder Mysticeti. Tursiops truncatus was the predominant species in number of registers, followed by Megaptera novaeangliae. It's important to report that during all seismic activity period there wasn't any cetacean register presenting any behavior disturbance. (author)

  3. Cetaceans trading monitoring during seismic survey in North Fluminense (Rio de Janeiro) and South Capixaba (Espirito Santo) coasts; Monitoramento de encalhe de cetaceos durante levantamento de dados sismicos na costa norte fluminense (Rio de Janeiro) e sul capixaba (Espirito Santo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, Thays P.C.; Carloni, Giuliano G.; Erber, Claudia; Sabino, Carla M. [Ecologus Engenharia Consultiva, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Uller, George A. [CGGVeritas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this research is to present the results of the cetaceans stranding monitoring developed during and after the seismic survey in the north area of Rio de Janeiro and south of Espirito Santo. The monitoring lasted six months, reaching 200 km of beaches, from the Rio de Janeiro North up to the Espirito Santo South coasts. It was conducted by 34 monitors, who covered predefined beach sections daily, registering the stranded animals. At the end of the project, 15 cetaceans stranded were registered. The species Sotalia guianensis was prevailing in number and distribution. Megaptera novaeangliae was the second specie in geographic distribution and number of registers. The other species identified were Tursiops truncatus and Peponocephala electra. (author)

  4. Cetaceans and chelonians stranding coastal monitoring: fundamental tool to mitigate impacts of seismic survey activities; Projeto de monitoramento costeiro de encalhes de cetacoes e quelonios: ferramenta fundamental para mitigacao de impactos em atividades de pesquisa sismica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, Thays P.C.; Carloni, Giuliano G.; Erber, Claudia; Sabino, Carla M. [Ecologus Engenharia Consultiva, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Uller, George A. [CGGVeritas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this research is to highlight PMVE implementation as a basic tool to conservation of marine cetaceans and turtles. These organisms are threaten to extinction and are pointed out as the organisms potentially affected by the seismic survey. The monitoring of the seismic survey activity realized in blocks BM-C-26 e BM-C-27 lasted six months embracing 200 km of beaches, from Rio de Janeiro North up to the Espirito Santo South coasts. It was realized by thirty four monitors, who covered a beach section daily registering the founded animal. 159 chelonians occurrence registers were realized and fifteen registers of cetaceans. The results gotten in PMVE give additional information for the evaluation of possible impacts of seismic survey's activities in registered species. Besides, these information contribute to increase technical scientific knowledge related to effect of seismic survey activity in marine biot at Campos Basin. (author)

  5. Develop a General Framework for Estimating Cetacean Density from Data Collected by Slow-Moving Autonomous Ocean Vehicles, Investigating Key Aspects of Survey Design, Data Collection, and Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Density from Data Collected by Slow-Moving Autonomous Ocean Vehicles , Investigating Key Aspects of Survey Design, Data Collection, and Data Analysis...TERM GOALS In this project, which started in April 2015, we focus on cetacean density estimation using autonomous underwater vehicles such as ocean...efforts. The major advantage of gliders and other autonomous vehicles over prior methods is their ability to provide both spatial and temporal coverage of

  6. Posible impacto en la salud pública del encallamiento de cetáceos en Costa Rica Potential public health impact of the stranding of cetaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Rivas-Solano

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El encallamiento de cetáceos se presenta cuando estos mamíferos llegan a la playa sin poder regresar al mar por sus propios medios. En Costa Rica, la mayoría de los casos se han registrado en las costas del Pacífico. Entre las posibles causas de este fenómeno, están las enfermedades infecciosas como la brucelosis marina. Dicha enfermedad es provocada por bacterias del género Brucella, y se puede transmitir a los humanos. El contacto entre humanos y cetáceos ha venido en aumento debido a actividades recreativas y ocupacionales. Además, el varamiento usualmente llama la atención de turistas y locales, quienes tienden mantener un acercamiento estrecho con el animal encallado para tratar de regresarlo al mar. Lo anterior potencia el riesgo de transmisión de cepas patogénicas desde los mamíferos marinos hacia los humanos y otros animales. En Costa Rica se desarrolló, durante los años 2009 y 2011, un proyecto de investigación en cual participaron expertos de universidades estatales, de instituciones gubernamentales y de la Fundación Keto. Como parte del mismo, se organizaron talleres de capacitación a profesionales en salud, líderes comunales y autoridades locales de la costa pacífica, con el fin de concientizarlos sobre los protocolos a seguir para la atención integral de la problemática de los encallamientos de cetáceos, con miras a prevenir posibles situaciones de riesgo a la salud pública.Cetacean stranding occurs when those animals arrive to the beach without having the possibility to come back to the sea. In Costa Rica, most of the cases have been registered along the pacific coast.  Between the possible causes of the stranding, there are infectious diseases like marine brucellosis. This disease is caused by bacteria from the genus Brucella and it can be transmitted to humans. Contact between humans and cetaceans, has been increased because of touristic and working activities. Besides, stranding phenomenon usually calls

  7. An Evaluation of Ad Hoc Presence-Only Data in Explaining Patterns of Distribution: Cetacean Sightings from Whale-Watching Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa K. Higby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of presence-only data is a problem in determining species distributions and accurately determining population sizes. The collection of such data is common from unequal or nonrandomised effort surveys, such as those surveys conducted by citizen scientists. However, causative regression-based methods have been less well examined using presence-only data. In this study, we examine a range of predictive factors which might influence Cetacean sightings (specifically minke whale sightings from whale-watching vessels in Faxaflói Bay in Iceland. In this case, environmental variables were collected regularly regardless of whether sightings were recorded. Including absences as well as presence in the analysis resulted in a multiple-generalised linear regression model with significantly more explanatory power than when data were presence only. However, by including extra information on the sightings of the whales, in this case, their observed behaviour when the sighting occurred resulted in a significantly improved model over the presence-only data model. While there are limitations of conducting nonrandomised surveys for the use of predictive models such as regression, presence-only data should not be considered as worthless, and the scope of collection of these data by citizen scientists using modern technology should not be underestimated.

  8. A Literature Review on the Molecular Mechanism Underlying Secondary Aquatic Adaptation of Cetaceans%鲸类次生性水生适应的分子机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪正飞; 杨光

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on the secondary aquatic adaptations of cetaceans in the past decades, with various evidences mainly from fossils,morphology,physiology,biochemistry,and molecular biology.Here, we presented a review of the recent research progresses on the evolutionary history of cetaceans and the genetic mechanism underlying their aquatic life style.Some problems in the present studies and perspectives for the future research areas were also preliminarily discussed.%关于鲸类次生性水生适应机制已经开展了大量研究,涉及化石、形态、生理、生化及分子水平等诸多领域。分别从鲸类的进化与水生生活的形成历史和鲸类水生适应的遗传机制两个方面,对最新的研究进展进行了简要综述。同时,根据国内外的研究进展,对未来鲸类次生性水生适应的研究方向提出了一些建议。

  9. Cetacean distribution and abundance in relation to oceanographic domains on the eastern Bering Sea shelf, June and July of 2002, 2008, and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friday, Nancy A.; Zerbini, Alexandre N.; Waite, Janice M.; Moore, Sue E.; Clapham, Phillip J.

    2013-10-01

    As part of the Bering Sea Project, cetacean surveys were conducted to describe distribution and estimate abundance on the eastern Bering Sea shelf. Three marine mammal observers conducted visual surveys along transect lines sampled during the Alaska Fisheries Science Center walleye pollock assessment survey in June and July of 2008 and 2010. Distribution and abundance in 2008 and 2010 (cold years) are compared with results from a similar survey conducted in 2002 (a warm year), as the only three years that the entire survey area was sampled; patterns largely match those previously observed. Abundance estimates for comparable areas in 2002, 2008 and 2010 were as follows: humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae): 231 (CV=0.63), 436 (CV=0.45), and 675 (CV=0.80); fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus): 419 (CV=0.33), 1368 (CV=0.34), and 1061 (CV=0.38); minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata): 389 (CV=0.52), 517 (CV=0.69), and 2020 (CV=0.73); Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli): 35,303 (CV=0.53), 14,543 (CV=0.32), and 11,143 (CV=0.32); and harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena): 1971 (CV=0.46), 4056 (CV=0.40), and 833 (CV=0.66). It should be noted that these abundance estimates are not corrected for biases due to perception, availability, or responsive movement. Estimates for humpback, fin and minke whales increased from 2002 to 2010, while those for harbor and Dall's porpoise decreased; trends were significant for fin whales. It is likely that changes in estimated abundance are due at least in part to shifts in distribution and not just changes in overall population size. Annual abundance estimates were examined by oceanographic domain. Humpback whales were consistently concentrated in coastal waters north of Unimak Pass. Fin whales were broadly distributed in the outer domain and slope in 2008 and 2010, but sightings were sparse in 2002. Minke whales were distributed throughout the study area in 2002 and 2008, but in 2010 they were concentrated in the outer domain and

  10. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  11. Cetaceans and pinnipeds, Alaskan waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A tentative checklist of those species known or likely to occur in the inside waters of Southeastern Alaska or Prince William Sound and adjacent Gulf of Alaska.

  12. Potential geographical distribution of seven species of marine cetaceans reported in Venezuela, Southeast Caribbean%委内瑞拉东南加勒比海岸七种海洋鲸类的潜在地理分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romina ACEVEDO GALINDO

    2007-01-01

    本研究阐述了委内瑞拉沿海最常见的海洋鲸类的潜在地理分布情况.通过GIS分析,鲸类分布与地形和深度是相反的,以此可以获得鲸类潜在的分布图.已报告确认了16个物种(有402个目击报告),其中小布氏鲸(Balaenoptera edeni)、座头鲸(Megaptera novaeangliae)、海豚(Delphinus spp.)、圭亚那侏型豚(Sotalia guianensis)、花斑原海豚(Stenella frontalis)、长吻原海豚(Stenella longirostris)和宽吻海海豚(Tursiops truncatus) 是最常见的.小布氏鲸和宽吻海海豚有可能分布于整个海岸,包括江河区域.座头鲸则可能季节性地集中分布在大陆架上的海岛沿岸和浅水区域.海豚(Delphinus spp.)有可能分布于高边坡区或沿海上升流区.花斑原海豚可能分布在东北区的西部,中部沿海以及与委内瑞拉海岸平行的岛屿周围.长吻原海豚则分布于浅海和远海区域.在一些高产的生态系统内新的物种可能正在形成,而这些潜在可能的分布图可以作为在高产生态系统内确立关键栖息地的标准,由此我们可以在委内瑞拉水域为鲸类建立新的保护区.%This study describes the potential geographical distribution of the most frequently sighted marine cetaceans in Venezuelan waters. Through GIS analysis, cetacean sightings were contrasted to topography and depth in order to generate distribution maps. Sixteen species (402 sighting records) were reported. Out of these, Balaenoptera edeni, Megaptera novaeangliae, Delphinus spp., Sotalia guianensis, Stenella frontalis, Stenella longirostris and Tursiops truncatus were the most frequently sighted. Balaenoptera edeni and Tursiops truncatus might occupy the whole coast, including estuarine areas. The seasonal distribution of humpback whales is probably concentrated on insular coasts and shallow waters of the continental shelf. Delphinus spp. Could be associated to high slope areas or coastal upwelling zones. Stenella frontalis is probably

  13. 基于13个内含子的序列探讨鲸目的系统发育关系%Molecular phylogenetics of cetaceans: an insight from 13 nuclear intron sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊晔; 周旭明; 杨梅; 张盼; 杨云霞; 杨光

    2011-01-01

    本文基于实验室筛选得到的13对内含子标记,在鲸偶蹄目的15个物种中进行有效扩增,并重建了这15个物种的系统发育关系.结果表明,抹香鲸总科(Physeteroidea)位于齿鲸亚目(Odontoceti)的基部,从而支持了传统的齿鲸亚目的单系性.在海豚总科(Delphinoidea)内部,贝斯分析结果支持了鼠海豚科(Phocoenidae)和一角鲸科(Monodontidae)的姐妹群关系,而后再与海豚科(Delphinidae)相聚.系统发育分析同时还强烈支持了海豚科的四个属(Sousa,Tursiops,Stenella,Delphinus)组成一个单系的"复合体".另外,我们的分析结果并不支持瓶鼻海豚属(Tursiops)和原海豚属(Stenella)的单系性.基于松散分子钟的分歧时间估算与以往文献中的结果没有明显差异.这些研究结果提示,核基因内含子序列有希望解决一些长期存在的鲸类系统发育问题.%Sequences of 13 introns from 15 Cetartiodactyla species were determined to reveal the phylogeny of cetaceans.Our results support the monophyly of the traditionally accepted suborder Odontoceti ( toothed whales ), placing the dwarf sperm whale ( Kogia sima), a representative species of superfamily Physeteroidea, as sister to other toothed whales. Within the superfamily Delphinoidea, phylogenetic analyses identified a sister relationship between Delphinidae and Monodontidae + Phocoenidae. A close relationship among four genera ( Sousa, Tursiops, Stenella, and Delphinus) is strongly supported,which suggested the monophyly of the Sousa-Stenella-Tursiops-Delphinus complex. Neither the two Tursiops species ( T.truncates and T. aduncus ) nor the two Stenella species (S. coeruleoalba and S. attenuata ) examined in present study clustered together, which strongly supported the paraphyly of these two genera as suggested in previous studies. Furthermore,the present Bayesian inference with a lognormal relaxed molecular clock provided divergence time for each clade, which is consistent with

  14. Strandings of cetaceans and sea turtles in the Alboran Sea and Strait of Gibraltar: a long–time glimpse of the north coast (Spain and the south coast (Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojo–Nieto, E.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of 13 species of cetaceans and three species of marine turtles were found in this study. Data were collected by eight independent and self-regulated stranding networks, providing information about 1,198 marine mammal (10 odontocetii, three mysticetii and one phocidae and 574 sea turtle stranding events between 1991 and 2008. Trends in the strandings were analysed in relation to species composition and abundance, and their geographic and seasonal distribution. The most abundant species recorded were the striped dolphin and the loggerhead turtle. Some of the strandings, such as the humpback whale, harbour porpoise, hooded seal and olive ridley turtle, were considered ‘rare’ because their distribution did not match the pattern of the study. When the north and south coasts in the study area were compared, pilot whales stranded more frequently in the north, while delphinid species stranded more in the south coast, and loggerhead turtles stranded more frequently in the north while leatherback turtles stranded more in south coast.

  15. Determination of Trace Elements in Marine Cetaceans by ICP-MS and Health Risk Assessment%ICP-MS 法测定海洋鲸豚的微量元素及其健康风险评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁玉龙; 宁曦; 桂端; 莫辉; 李育森; 吴玉萍

    2015-01-01

    The liver,kidney and muscle samples from seven cetaceans were digested by microwave digestion,and trace elements amounts of V,Cd,Cu,Zn,As,Cr,Ni,Mn,Se,Hg and Pb were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS),and the health risk assessment for Zn,Cu,Cd,Hg,Se in the liver was conducted.The results of international lob-ster hepatopancreas standard (TORT-2)showed acceptable agreement with the certified values,and the relative standard devia-tion (RSD)of eleven kinds of trace elements were less than 3.54%,showing that the method is suitable for the determination of trace elements in cetaceans.The experimental results indicated that different tissues and organs of the dolphins had different trace elements,presenting the tissue specificity.There is a certain inter-species difference among different dolphins about the bioaccumulation ability of the trace elements.The distribution of trace elements in whales presented a certain regularity:the con-tents of most elements in liver,kidney were much higher than the contents of muscle tissues,Cu,Mn,Hg,Se,and Zn exhibit the higher concentrations in liver,while Cd was mainly accumulated in kidney.And according to the health risk assessment in liver,the exceeding standardrate of selenium and copper in seven kinds of whales was 100%,suggesting that these whales were suffering the contamination of trace elements.The experimental results is instructive to the study of trace elements in cetaceans, while this is the first report for the concentrations in organs of Striped dolphin,Bottlenose dolphin,Fraser’s Dolphin and Risso’ s dolphin in China,it may provide us valuable data for the conservation of cetaceans.%建立了微波消解电感耦合等离子质谱(ICP-MS)法测定珠江口水域搁浅的七种不同鲸豚肌肉,肝脏和肾脏中的 V,Cr,Cu,Zn,As,Cd,Ni,Mn,Se,Hg,Pb 等11种微量元素的分析方法,并对七种鲸豚肝脏中的 Zn,Cu,Cd,Hg,Se 五种元素进

  16. Small-boat Cetacean Surveys Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The database contains multiple spreadsheets that hold data collected during each small-boat survey project conducted by the PIFSC CRP. This includes a summary of the...

  17. Limitations to the application of line transect surveying on cetaceans in Chinese waters and recommendations%截线抽样法在中国水域鲸豚考察中的应用及其局限性与改进建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵修江; 王丁

    2011-01-01

    截线抽样法广泛应用于鲸豚类动物的考察.通过文献调查并结合我们自己的研究工作,本文从考察设计、野外考察和数据分析三个方面分析了截线抽样法在我国水域应用时可能出现的问题.针对考察设计,提出了截线设计的建议.针对野外考察,主要从观察平台、人员配置、观察方法和记录方法几个方面提,建议.针对分析过程,介绍了使用R编程平台和Distance软件进行数据预处理和数据分析的简要过程.笔者期望本文的相关建议有助于促进我国鲸豚类考察方法的规范化.%Line transect methods are widely used in the surveys of cetaceans worldwide. Based on a literature survey and on our own experiences, we reviewed possible application problems in survey design, field survey, and data analysis stages of such kinds of surveys in Chinese waters. Thus, for survey design, relevant recommendations on transect design were proposed. For field surveys, suggestions were made on observation platforms, observer configurations, observation methods, and recording methods. For data analysis, we proposed processing procedures on preliminary treatment of data and line transect analysis based on R programming platform and Distance program. We hope this paper would facilitate the normalization of line transect surveys in China.

  18. Minke whale genome and aquatic adaptation in cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Hyung-Soon; Cho, Yun Sung; Guang, Xuanmin; Kang, Sung Gyun; Jeong, Jae-Yeon; Cha, Sun-Shin; Oh, Hyun-Myung; Lee, Jae-Hak; Yang, Eun Chan; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Kim, Yun Jae; Kim, Tae Wan; Kim, Wonduck; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Kim, Sang-Jin; Choi, Dong Han; Jho, Sungwoong; Kim, Hak-Min; Ko, Junsu; Kim, Hyunmin; Shin, Young-Ah; Jung, Hyun-Ju; Zheng, Yuan; Wang, Zhuo; Chen, Yan; Chen, Ming; Jiang, Awei; Li, Erli; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Haolong; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yu, Lili; Liu, Sha; Ahn, Kung; Cooper, Jesse; Park, Sin-Gi; Hong, Chang Pyo; Jin, Wook; Kim, Heui-Soo; Park, Chankyu; Lee, Kyooyeol; Chun, Sung; Morin, Phillip A; O'Brien, Stephen J; Lee, Hang; Kimura, Jumpei; Moon, Dae Yeon; Manica, Andrea; Edwards, Jeremy; Kim, Byung Chul; Kim, Sangsoo; Wang, Jun; Bhak, Jong; Lee, Hyun Sook; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The shift from terrestrial to aquatic life by whales was a substantial evolutionary event. Here we report the whole-genome sequencing and de novo assembly of the minke whale genome, as well as the whole-genome sequences of three minke whales, a fin whale, a bottlenose dolphin and a finless porpoise. Our comparative genomic analysis identified an expansion in the whale lineage of gene families associated with stress-responsive proteins and anaerobic metabolism, whereas gene families related to body hair and sensory receptors were contracted. Our analysis also identified whale-specific mutations in genes encoding antioxidants and enzymes controlling blood pressure and salt concentration. Overall the whale-genome sequences exhibited distinct features that are associated with the physiological and morphological changes needed for life in an aquatic environment, marked by resistance to physiological stresses caused by a lack of oxygen, increased amounts of reactive oxygen species and high salt levels.

  19. Deep-ocean predation by a high Arctic cetacean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laidre, K.L.; Heide-Jørgensen, M.P.; Jørgensen, Ole A

    2004-01-01

    A bioenergetic model for two narwhal (Monodon monoceros) sub-populations was developed to quantify daily gross energy requirements and estimate the biomass of Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) needed to sustain the sub-populations for their 5-month stay on wintering grounds in Baff...

  20. Automatic Classification of Cetacean Vocalizations Using an Aural Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    were inspired by research directed at discriminating the timbre of different musical instruments – a passive classification problem – which suggests...the method should be able to classify marine mammal vocalizations since these calls possess many of the acoustic attributes of music . APPROACH

  1. Determination of gender in cetaceans by the polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palsboll, PJ; Vader, A; Bakke, P; El-Gewely, MR

    1992-01-01

    We determined the gender of a variety of cet can species, including both ondotocetes and mysticetes, using the polymerase chain reaction for amplification of the sex chromosome specific regions ZFY/ZFX and SRY. This quick and simple method requires extremely small amounts of tissue, and therefore al

  2. Lift and Drag Performance of Odontocete Cetacean Flippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Cooper et al., 2008). The cross-section of a typical flipper is similar to that of a modern engineered air/ hydrofoil (Fish, 2004; Miklosovic et al., 2004...to modern engineered hydrofoils , which have hydrodynamic properties such as lift coefficient, drag coefficient and associated efficiency. Field...study are differentiated by whether or not their lift curves are linear. An engineered hydrofoil with linear behavior in the non-stall region was also

  3. The Metabolic Costs of Sound Production in Odontocete Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Veirs, V., Emmons, C., Veirs, S. 2009. Speaking up: Killer whales (Orcinus orca) increase their call amplitude in response to vessel noise. Journal...Acoustical Society of America 129: 2397. Parks, S.E, Johnson, M., Nowacek, D., Tyack P.L. 2010. Individual right whales call louder in increased...Musiek, F.E., Max, L. 2005. Indication of a Lombard vocal response in the St. Lawrence River beluga. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 117

  4. PNW cetacean muscle biochemistry - Muscle Myoglobin Content and Acid Buffering Capacity of Cetaceans from the Pacific Northwest to Assess Dive Capacity and the Development of Diving Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project assesses the development of two important skeletal muscle adaptations for diving (enhanced myoglobin content and acid buffering capacities) in a range...

  5. Sensory perception in cetaceans: Part I – Current knowledge about dolphin senses as a representative species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee eKremers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A large part of the literature on sensory perception and behavior in dolphins is devoted to its well-developed vocal and echolocation abilities. In this review, we aim to augment current knowledge by examining the literature on dolphins’ entire Merkwelt (which refers to everything a subject perceives, creating a crucial part of the subject’s Umwelt. We will show that despite extensive knowledge on audition, aspects such as context relatedness, the social function of vocalizations or socio-sexual recognition, remain poorly understood. Therefore, we propose areas for further lines of investigation. Recent studies have shown that the sensory world of dolphins might well be much more diverse than initially thought. Indeed, although underwater and aerial visual systems differ in dolphins, they have both been shown to be important. Much debated electro- and magnetoreception appear to be functional senses according to recent studies. Finally, another neglected area is chemoreception. We will summarize neuroanatomical and physiological data on olfaction and taste, as well as corresponding behavioral evidence. Taken together, we will identify a number of technical and conceptual reasons for why chemosensory data appear contradictory, which is much debated in the literature. In summary, this article aims to provide both an overview of the current knowledge on dolphin perception, but also offer a basis for further discussion and potential new lines of research.

  6. AMAPPS-Cetacean and Turtle Abundance Summer Survey (HB1403, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AMAPPS survey will primarily focus on beaked whale species, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better understanding of beaked whale habitat use and site...

  7. Distribution and migrations of cetaceans in the Russian Arctic according to observations from aerial ice reconnaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav E Belikov

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on 748 observations of belugas (Delphinapterus leucas and 382 observations of baleen whales in the Russian Arctic, the majority of the data provided by aerial reconnaissance of sea ice (ARSI. Although the data are not suitable for the estimation of the number and density of the animals, they represent a multi-year (1958-1995 range of observations to update our knowledge on the seasonal distribution and migrations of the species. Belugas inhabit not only shelf waters but also the zone of the shelf slope and the abyssal zone of the Arctic Ocean, where the animals appear mostly in summer. In winter belugas were observed only in the Barents Sea. In June-August, the frequency of beluga observations was highest in the Laptev Sea, which has previously been believed to have considerably lower numbers of beluga than the Kara and Barents seas. Patterns of seasonal distribution and ice cover suggest the existence of a natural border preventing or reducing population exchange between belugas inhabiting the western and eastern parts of the Russian Arctic. A brief review of available data on distribution of the narwhal (Monodon monoceros in the Russian Arctic is also given. Two species of baleen whales were frequently seen in the Russian Arctic: the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus, and the grey whale (Eschrichtius robustus. The majority of such observations were made in the southeastern part of the East-Siberian Sea and the southern part of the Chukchi Sea. In the Bering Sea baleen whales were usually seen near the Chukotka Peninsula, in Anadyr Bay and southeast of it. Whales were usually seen in ice-free water: observations of whales among rarefied ice and near the ice edge were rare. There were considerable annual and seasonal variations in distribution and migrations of baleen whales in the region, probably caused mainly by the dynamics of ice conditions.

  8. Novel gastric helicobacters and oral campylobacters are present in captive and wild cetaceans

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Cinthia G.; Matteo, Mario J.; Loureiro, Julio D.; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Catalano, Mariana; Heredia, Sergio Rodríguez; Mantero, Paula; Boccio, Jose R.; Zubillaga, Marcela B.; Cremaschi, Graciela A.; Solnick, Jay V.; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I; Blaser, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian gastric and oral mucosa may be colonized by mixed Helicobacter and Campylobacter species, respectively, in individual animals. To better characterize the presence and distribution of Helicobacter and Campylobacter among marine mammals, we used PCR and 16S rDNA sequence analysis to examine gastric and oral samples from ten dolphins (Tursiops gephyreus), one killer whale (Orcinus orca), one false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens), and three wild La Plata river dolphins (Pontopor...

  9. Comparing Manned Aerial Surveys to Unmanned Aerial Surveys for Cetacean Monitoring in the Arctic: Field Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    periods, and areas, thereby minimizing risks to human life, reducing disturbance to wildlife, and possibly decreasing the logistical complexity...camera payload, were responsible for most logistics for the field project, and conducted UAS flights to collect imagery between August 26 and September...offshore and entered the transit corridor inbound for recovery at NARL. The ASAMM field team provided the manned aircraft support for the project

  10. Cetacean Density Estimation from Novel Acoustic Datasets by Acoustic Propagation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    by Acoustic Propagation Modeling Martin Siderius and Elizabeth Thorp Küsel Portland State University Electrical and Computer Engineering...example with Blainville’s beaked whales,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 1982-1994. McMurtry G. M., Herrero-Bervera, E., Cremer , M. D., Smith, J. R., Resig, J

  11. Defining management units for cetaceans by combining genetics, morphlogy, acoustics and satellite tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveegaard, Signe; Galatius, Anders; Dietz, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Managing animal units is essential in biological conservation and requires spatial and temporal identification of such units. Since even neighbouring populations often have different conservation status and face different levels of anthropogenic pressure, detailed knowledge of population structur...

  12. The occurrence of mtDNA heteroplasmy in multiple cetacean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Nicole L; Viricel, Amélia; Wilcox, Lynsey; Katherine Moore, M; Rosel, Patricia E

    2011-04-01

    In population genetics and phylogenetic studies, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is commonly used for examining differences both between and within groups of individuals. For these studies, correct interpretation of every nucleotide position is crucial but can be complicated by the presence of ambiguous bases resulting from heteroplasmy. Particularly for non-model taxa, the presence of heteroplasmy in mtDNA is rarely reported, therefore, it is unclear how commonly it occurs and how it can affect phylogenetic relationships among taxa and the overall understanding of evolutionary processes. We examined the occurrence of both site and length heteroplasmy within the mtDNA of ten marine mammal species, for most of which mtDNA heteroplasmy has never been reported. After sequencing a portion of the mtDNA control region for 5,062 individuals, we found heteroplasmy in at least 2% of individuals from seven species, including Stenella frontalis where 58.9% were heteroplasmic. We verified the presence of true heteroplasmy, ruling out artifacts from amplification and sequencing methods and the presence of nuclear copies of mitochondrial genes. We found no evidence that mtDNA heteroplasmy influenced phylogenetic relationships, however, its occurrence does have the potential to increase the genetic diversity for all species in which it is found. This study stresses the importance of both detecting and reporting the occurrence of heteroplasmy in wild populations in order to enhance the knowledge of both the introduction and the persistence of mutant mitochondrial haplotypes in the evolutionary process.

  13. Bee Dances, Bird Songs, Monkey Calls, and Cetacean Sonar: Is Speech Unique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liska, Jo

    1993-01-01

    Examines to what extent, and in what ways, speech is unusual and how it compares to other semiotic systems. Discusses language and speech, neurolinguistic processing, comparative vocal/auditory abilities, primate evolution, and semiogenesis. (SR)

  14. ON DEALING WITH THE CETACEAN STRANDINGS%鲸类搁浅的处理对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖鹏翔; 祝茜; 姜波; 汤庭耀

    2001-01-01

    @@ 早在2000多年前亚里斯多德就曾记载过鲸类的搁浅,但时至今日,这一神秘的自然现象一直难以揭开.一些搁浅事例比较容易解释:鲸类是在海中死后被海流和潮水冲到了岸边.但对于活体或集体搁浅就无法作出准确的回答,对此,大家各抒己见,产生了多种理论或假说,如Geraci 1978年、Geraci和Lounsbury1993年、祝茜等2000年的报道[8].

  15. The acoustic bubble: Ocean, cetacean and extraterrestrial acoustics, and cold water cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, T. G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the content of a plenary lecture on the author’s personal research into the interactions between bubbles and sound fields, covering particular topics involving the climatically important gas exchange between atmosphere and ocean, the implications of bubbly ocean water to marine mammals that use sound, and the opportunities afforded by incorporating acoustical sensors onto probes launched to investigate other worlds in our solar system. It closes with recent data on the opportunities of bubble acoustics to investigate methods of cold water cleaning.

  16. Cetacean diversity and distribution in the coast of Gipuzkoa and adjacent waters, southeastern Bay of Biscay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCOS, E., SALAZAR, J.M., STHEPANIS, R. de

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde el año 2003, se ha realizado un seguimiento continuo a las poblaciones de cetáceos de la costa guipuzcoana, siguiendo los protocolos de muestreo de cetáceos en mar de la Sociedad Española de Cetáceos. Se ha estudiado la diversidad, la densidad, la distribución espacial y temporal de estas especies. Los resultados indican la presencia de 12 especies de cetáceos en el área, y la importancia de la misma para cinco de ellas, especialmente para el delfín mular (Tursiops truncatus. El delfín común (Delphinus delphis, el calderon de aleta larga (Globicephala melas, el delfín listado (Stenella coeruleoalba y el cifio de cuvier (Ziphius cavirostris son especies altamente representadas en el área. Se han definido las principales áreas de distribución de estas especies con el fin de dar los primeros pasos para la creación de un Área Marina Protegida en el área.

  17. Near-real-time acoustic monitoring of beaked whales and other cetaceans using a Seaglider™.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Klinck

    Full Text Available In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle--a glider--equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many endangered marine mammal species.

  18. Near-real-time acoustic monitoring of beaked whales and other cetaceans using a Seaglider™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M; Luby, James C; Jump, William A; Shilling, Geoffrey B; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S; Schorr, Gregory S; Baird, Robin W

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle--a glider--equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many endangered marine mammal species.

  19. Improving Attachments of Non-Invasive (Type III) Electronic Data Loggers to Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Simulations were run at multiple speeds (1 to 7 m/s) in steady inline flow. These simulations were used to examine the relative difference in force...28, 227-335, 2002 2. Tonge T, et al. Acta Biomaterialia 9, 5913-5925, 2013 3. Viidik A, Journal of Biomechanics , 1, 3-11, 1968 PUBLICATIONS...Improved, physically based, estimates of work would provide a more complete picture of swimming biomechanics and offer improved insight into energy

  20. Cetacean Community Ecology in the Waters of Sri Lanka and the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    water (e.g., Bay of Bengal), by evaporation and low river runoff (e.g., Arabian Sea), as well as coastal currents, eddy activity, and large-scale...Bay of Bengal. What little research has been done in the region has focused on the river dolphins and near- shore porpoises (e.g., Smith et al. 2008...area in the central Bay of Bengal and the waters of Sri Lanka, including ASIRI cruise transects and mooring lines. Light yellow lines indicate national EEZs. 5

  1. SWFSC/MMTD/ETP: Cetacean Acoustic Detection and Dive Interval Studies (CADDIS) 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study was conducted in Mexico aboard the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research ship McArthur during two months in summer/fall...

  2. Potential Synergism between Stress and Contaminants in Free-ranging Cetaceans

    OpenAIRE

    Martineau, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Noise has increased significantly over the last decades in oceans, and this trend is accelerating in large part because of oil exploration and exploitation, both of which are expanding worldwide. Considered together with recent evidence that noise disturbs the behavior, echolocation, navigation and communication of marine mammals, it is likely that noise, increasingly encountered by marine mammals, will add to their allostatic load. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the major hormones that mediate th...

  3. Behavioral Ecology of Cetaceans: The Relationship of Body Condition with Behavior and Reproductive Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Webster, T., Dawson, S.M. & Slooten, E. 2010. A simple laser photogrammetry technique for measuring Hector’s dolphins (Cephalorhynchus hectori) in the...of Lipid Content 23 2.1 Laser Photogrammetry 23 2.2 Blubber Lipid Quantification 34 3) Foraging Effort...whale 25 10 Showing the two dots from the laser photogrammetry device 25 11 Laser dots before and after digital enhancement 26 12 Measurement taken

  4. Cheap DECAF: Density Estimation for Cetaceans from Acoustic Fixed Sensors Using Separate, Non-Linked Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-29

    Centra de Geofisica Universidade de Lisboa Lisbon, Portugal. Award Number: N00014-11 -1 -0615 This project was a collaborative project between...submitted or in prep) from the University of St Andrews (UStA) and Universidade de Lisboa (UL) research effort. The work has also generated multiple...routines. Task 1.4. Use distance sampling software , Distance (Thomas et al. 2010), to estimate seasonal density, incorporating covariates affecting

  5. AMAPPS-Cetacean and Turtle Abundance Spring Survey (GU1402, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AMAPPS survey primarily focuses on beaked whale species, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better understanding of beaked whale habitat use and site...

  6. Quantifying Stress in Marine Mammals: Measuring Biologically Active Cortisol in Cetaceans and Pinnipeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Quantifying Stress in Marine Mammals: Measuring...boonstra/ LONG-TERM GOALS This research will improve our ability to measure stress in marine mammals. Stress hormones (glucocorticoids...are best estimated by measuring “free glucocorticoid” levels (i.e. that hormone not bound by CBG). This project will improve the capacity of marine

  7. Improving Attachments of Non-Invasive (Type III) Electronic Data Loggers to Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    from teleoperated surgical systems to the design of lower - limb prosthetic socket interfaces. The work presented here was further motivated by the need...in sliding on the animal is much lower than the force that results in a detached cup. Impact/Applications: The lift and drag forces generated by...forces are lower than the glue failure force. Impact/Applications:These preliminary results indicate the important role surface treatment and

  8. AFSC/RACE/MACE: Association between large cetaceans and their prey: East Kodiak

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Analysis of two different surveys of acoustic and biological data from the Albatross Bank region of the Gulf of Alaska off eastern Kodiak Island indicates that...

  9. AMAPPS-Cetacean and Turtle Abundance Summer Survey (HB1503, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AMAPPS survey primarily focuses on beaked whale species, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better understanding of beaked whale habitat use and site...

  10. AMAPPS-Cetacean and Turtle Abundance Summer Survey (HB1103, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AMAPPS survey will primarily focus on beaked whale species, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better understanding of beaked whale habitat use and site...

  11. AMAPPS-Cetacean and Turtle Abundance Summer Survey (HB1303, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AMAPPS survey will primarily focus on beaked whale species, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better understanding of beaked whale habitat use and site...

  12. AMAPPS-Cetacean and Turtle Abundance Survey (HB0903, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AMAPPS survey will primarily focus on beaked whale species, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better understanding of beaked whale habitat use and site...

  13. Contamination level of mercury in red meat products from cetaceans available from South Korea markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Tetsuya [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757 Ishikari-Tobetsu, Hokkaido 061-0293 (Japan)]. E-mail: endotty@hoku-iryo-u.ac.jp; Yong-Un, Ma [Korean Federation for Environmental Movement, 251 Nuha-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-806, Republic of Korea (Korea); Baker, C. Scott [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Marine Mammal Program and Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University, Newport, OR 97365 (United States); Funahashi, Naoko [International Fund for Animal Welfare, 1-6-10-203, Saiwaicho, Higashikurume, Tokyo 203-0052 (Japan); Lavery, Shane [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dalebout, Merel L. [School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Lukoschek, Vimoksalehi [School of Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811 (Australia); Haraguchi, Koichi [Daiichi College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 22-1 Tamagawa-Cho, Minami-Ku, Fukuoka 815-8511 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Levels of total mercury (T-Hg) were surveyed in red meat (n = 73) and liver (n = 3) from toothed whales, dolphins and porpoises (odontocetes) sold for human consumption in the coastal cities of South Korea. High concentrations of T-Hg were found in the liver products of finless porpoises (18.7 and 156 {mu}g/wet g) and common dolphins (13.2 {mu}g/wet g). The T-Hg concentrations in red meat products were highest in the false killer whale (9.66 {+-} 12.3 {mu}g/wet g, n = 9), bottlenose dolphin (10.6 {+-} 12.6 {mu}g/wet g, n = 3) and killer whale (13.3 {mu}g/wet g, n = 1), and lowest in Cuvier's beaked whale and the harbour porpoise (0.4-0.5 {mu}g/wet g). Thus, most of the products that originated from odontocetes exceeded the safety limit of 0.5 {mu}g/wet g for T-Hg set by the South Korean health authorities for the fishery industry. Pregnant women and other vulnerable sectors of the population living in South Korea should therefore limit their consumption of odontocete products.

  14. Approaches for Assessing the Presence and Impact of Thyroid Hormone Disrupting Chemicals in Delphinid Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    a fetal common dolphin, Delphinus delphis. Anatomy and Embryology 203:393-402. Marino L, Rilling JK, Lin SK, Ridgway SH. 2000. Relative volume of the...marine mammals is a daunting task because of ethical , logistical, and legal concerns. Researchers have focused primarily on epidemiological studies of...reconstructions of the brain of a fetal common dolphin, Delphinus delphis. Anatomy and Embryology 203:393-402. Marino L, Rilling JK, Lin SK, Ridgway SH

  15. Cetacean Density Estimation from Novel Acoustic Datasets by Acoustic Propagation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    whales off Kona, Hawai’i, is based on the works of Zimmer et al. (2008), Marques et al. (2009), and Küsel et al. (2011). The density estimator formula...given by Marques et al. (2009) is applied here for the case of one (k=1) sensor, yielding the following formulation: � = (−�) ...2124 manually labeled false killer whale clicks, calculated in 1 kHz band intervals from 0 to 90 kHz. From the above image it can be observed the

  16. Mobile computation offloading architecture for mobile augmented reality, case study: Visualization of cetacean skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Augmented Reality applications can serve as teach-ing tools in different contexts of use. Augmented reality appli-cation on mobile devices can help to provide tourist information on cities or to give information on visits to museums. For example, during visits to museums of natural history, applications of augmented reality on mobile devices can be used by some visitors to interact with the skeleton of a whale. However, making rendering heavy models can be computationally infeasible on device...

  17. Defining management units for cetaceans by combining genetics, morphology, acoustics and satellite tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Sveegaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing animal units is essential in biological conservation and requires spatial and temporal identification of such units. Since even neighbouring populations often have different conservation status and face different levels of anthropogenic pressure, detailed knowledge of population structure, seasonal range and overlap with animals from neighbouring populations is required to manage each unit separately. Previous studies on genetic structure and morphologic separation suggests three distinct populations of harbour porpoises with limited geographic overlap in the North Sea (NS, the Belt Sea (BS and the Baltic Proper (BP region. In this study, we aim to identify a management unit for the BS population of harbour porpoises. We use Argos satellite data and genetics from biopsies of tagged harbour porpoises as well as acoustic data from 40 passive acoustic data loggers to determine management areas with the least overlap between populations and thus the least error when abundance and population status is estimated. Discriminant analysis of the satellite tracking data from the BS and NS populations showed that the best fit of the management unit border during the summer months was an east–west line from Denmark to Sweden at latitude 56.95°N. For the border between BS and BP, satellite tracking data indicate a sharp decline in population density at 13.5°E, with 90% of the locations being west of this line. This was supported by the acoustic data with the average daily detection rate being 27.5 times higher west of 13.5°E as compared to east of 13.5°E. By using this novel multidisciplinary approach, we defined a management unit for the BS harbour porpoise population. We recommend that these boundaries are used for future monitoring efforts of this population under the EU directives. The boundaries may also be used for conservation efforts during the summer months, while seasonal movements of harbour porpoises should be considered during winter.

  18. 3S2: Behavioral Response Studies of Cetaceans to Navy Sonar Signals in Norwegian Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Simpson R, von Benda- Beckmann A, Tyack P, Samarra F, Miller P, Wallin J (2014) Classification of large acoustic datasets using machine learning and...10.1163/1568539X-00003195). von Benda- Beckmann , A.M., P.J. Wensveen, P.H. Kvadsheim, F.P.A. Lam, P.J.O. Miller, P.L. Tyack, M.A. Ainslie (2013

  19. Hydrodynamic Performance of the Flippers of Large-bodied Cetaceans in Relation to Locomotor Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    freedom (i.e., flexion -extension, abduction-adduction, rota- tion) (Felts 1966, Berta et al. 2006). The mobility of the flippers makes these appendages...ankylosed cervical vertebrae would limit maneuverability for active pursuit of prey (Norris and Møhl 1983, Rice 1989). The flipper shape of the killer

  20. 3S2 - Behavioral Response Studies of Cetaceans to Naval Sonar Signals in Norwegian Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    playbacks of mammal- feeding killer whale sounds to humpback whales , and early indications are that they respond more strongly and more consistently to...behavioral reactions and the sound exposures required to elicit them of three species of whales : bottlenose whales , minke whales , and humpback whales to Low...sounds; 2.) Conduct a directed study of the effectiveness of ramp-up as a mitigation method with abundant and relatively easy-to-study humpback whales

  1. 3S2 - Behavioral Response Studies of Cetaceans to Navy Sonar Signals in Norwegian Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    whale sounds to pilot whales , sperm whales , and humpback whales . We have now conducted 8 playbacks of mammal- feeding ...reactions and the sound exposures required to elicit them of three species of whales : bottlenose whales , minke whales , and humpback whales to Naval...sounds; 2.) Conduct a directed study of the effectiveness of ramp-up as a mitigation method with abundant and relatively easy-to-study humpback whales

  2. Acoustic and Visual Monitoring for Cetaceans Along the Outer Washington Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Clark, C.W. and P.J. Clapham. 2004. Acoustic monitoring on a humpback whale ( Megaptera novaeangliae ) feeding ground shows continual singing into late...Anne Douglas Cascadia Research Collective Olympia, WA Julie Rivers Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Pacific Pearl Harbor, HI

  3. AFSC/NMML: Small cetacean aerial survey in Alaskan waters, 1997-1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys were conducted to produce abundance estimates for the three Alaska stocks of harbor porpoise. Surveys occurred from May to July 1997 for the Southeast...

  4. Mobile computation offloading architecture for mobile augmented reality, case study: Visualization of cetacean skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belen G. Rodriguez-Santana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality applications can serve as teach-ing tools in different contexts of use. Augmented reality appli-cation on mobile devices can help to provide tourist information on cities or to give information on visits to museums. For example, during visits to museums of natural history, applications of augmented reality on mobile devices can be used by some visitors to interact with the skeleton of a whale. However, making rendering heavy models can be computationally infeasible on devices with limited resources such as smart phones or tablets. One solution to this problem is to use techniques to Mobile Computation Offloading. This work proposes a mobile computation offloading architecture for mobile augmented reality. This solution would allow users to interact with a whale skeleton through an augmented reality application on mobile devices. Finally testing to assess the optimization of the resources of the mobile device when performing heavy render tests were made.

  5. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlke, Julia M; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  6. 75 FR 22119 - Marine Mammals; File No. 14245

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... cetacean species, including endangered blue (Balaenoptera musculus), sei (B. borealis), fin (B. physalus... mammals in the Pacific, Southern, Atlantic, and Arctic Oceans to monitor cetaceans for scientific and... various methods to investigate cetacean movements and habitat use. Beluga whales, Dall's...

  7. Provide a Vessel to Conduct Observations and Deploy Sound Source for a Behavioral Response Study of Cetaceans off Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    offshore to include waters west of San Clemente and around San Nicolas and Catalina Islands • Cruising speed of at least 10 knots and range of 400 nmi of...place both regionally and from other BRS • Conduct semi-flexible field operations where RHIBs may base on ship, island , or coast in response to...just north of Santa Cruz Island RESULTS This was the first year of an anticipated 5-year study with this grant representing just one component

  8. Social and Behavioural Factors in Cetacean Responses to Overexploitation: Are Odontocetes Less “Resilient” Than Mysticetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Wade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many severely depleted populations of baleen whales (Mysticeti have exhibited clear signs of recovery whereas there are few examples in toothed whales (Odontoceti. We hypothesize that this difference is due, at least in part, to social and behavioural factors. Clearly, a part of the lack of resilience to exploitation is explained by odontocete life history. However, an additional factor may be the highly social nature of many odontocetes in which survival and reproductive success may depend on: (a social cohesion and organization, (b mutual defence against predators and possible alloparental care, (c inter-generational transfer of “knowledge”, and (d leadership by older individuals. We found little evidence of strong recovery in any of the depleted populations examined. Their relatively low potential rates of increase mean that odontocete populations can be over-exploited with take rates of only a few percent per year. Exploitation can have effects beyond the dynamics of individual removals. Four species showed evidence of a decrease in birth rates following exploitation; potential mechanisms include a deficit of adult females, a deficit of adult males, and disruption of mating systems. The evidence for a lack of strong recovery in heavily exploited odontocete populations indicates that management should be more precautionary.

  9. 人工饲养鲸类动物的繁殖%The Reproduction of Cetaceans in Artificial Feeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘仁俊; 杨健; 陈德勤

    2003-01-01

    介绍多年来对鲸类动物在人工饲养条件下繁殖问题的研究成果,包括:雌雄性生殖器官的组织解剖,饲养和采精训练,人工饲养条件下的繁殖,孕豚护理,分娩和幼豚饲养.为推动我国鲸类动物的人工繁殖提供科学资料.

  10. 鲸类分子系统学研究进展%A REVIEW ON THE MOLECULAR SYSTEMATICS OF CETACEANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光; 季国庆; 魏辅文

    2003-01-01

    综述了近年来分子生物学标记技术在鲸类系统学研究中的进展.分子生物学证据支持鲸目与有蹄类之间有较近的亲缘关系,并支持鲸类的单系起源,但鲸类不同类群(须鲸类、抹香鲸类及不包括抹香鲸类的齿鲸类)之间的系统发生关系仍存在争议.抹香鲸类到底与须鲸类还是与其它齿鲸类有更近的亲缘关系,不同的分子生物学家所得到的结果并不一致.此外,分子生物学技术还被用于解决须鲸亚目和齿鲸亚目内科间以及科内种间的系统发生关系,特别是齿鲸亚目的海豚科、鼠豚科和淡水豚类.通过分子标记技术来研究鲸类种下的遗传结构是鲸类分子系统学研究中的一个新热点,使用的标记主要是mtDNA控制区、核DNA微卫星和主要组织相容性复合体(major histocompatibility complex,MHC)等.

  11. New cetacean ΔR values for Arctic North America and their implications for marine-mammal-based palaeoenvironmental reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furze, Mark F. A.; Pieńkowski, Anna J.; Coulthard, Roy D.

    2014-05-01

    Radiocarbon-dated marine mammal remains from emergent Arctic coastlines have frequently been used to reconstruct Holocene sea-ice histories. The use of such reconstructions has hitherto been complicated by uncertain marine reservoir corrections precluding meaningful intercomparisons with data reported in calibrated or sidereal years. Based on an exhaustive compilation of previously published marine mammal radiocarbon dates (both live-harvested materials and subfossils) from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), new, statistically-derived δ13C and ΔR values are provided. Average δ13C values are: -16.1 ± 1.1‰ (bone collagen; n = 193) for bowhead (Balaena mysticetus); -14.4 ± 0.5‰ (n = 44; dentine) for beluga (Delphinapterus leucas); -14.8 ± 1.9‰ (teeth and tusks; n = 18) and -18.0 ± 4.7‰ (n = 9; bone collagen) for walrus (Odobenus rosmarus). ΔR values are 170 ± 95 14C years for bowhead (n = 23) and 240 ± 60 14C years for beluga (n = 12). Scarce data preclude calculation of meaningful, statistically robust walrus ΔR. Using the new ΔR values, an expanded and revised database of calibrated bowhead dates (651 dates; many used in previous CAA sea-ice reconstructions) shows pronounced late Quaternary spatio-temporal fluctuations in bone abundance. Though broadly resembling earlier bowhead subfossil frequency data, analysis of the new expanded database suggests early- and mid-Holocene increases in whale abundance to be of longer duration and lower amplitude than previously considered. A more even and persistent spread of infrequent low-abundance remains during “whale free” intervals is also seen. The dominance of three eastern regions (Prince Regent Inlet & Gulf of Boothia; Admiralty Inlet; Berlinguet Inlet/Bernier Bay) in the CAA data, collectively contributing up to 88% of all subfossil remains in the mid-Holocene, is notable. An analysis of calibrated regional sea-level index points suggests that severance of the Admiralty Inlet-Gulf of Boothia marine channel due to isostatically-driven regression may have played a significant role in enhanced whale mortality during this interval. Comparisons between the newly calibrated bowhead data and other regional sea-ice proxy data further highlight spatial and temporal discrepancies, potentially due to regional asynchronicities and variable sensitivities in proxy response to climate and oceanographic forcing. However, the limited number of deglacial-postglacial marine records continues to hamper extensive intercomparisons between marine mammal and other proxy datasets. Nevertheless, an examination of assumptions inherent in linking bowhead subfossil frequencies, population densities, and sea-ice thickness and distribution, shows that such relationships are highly complex. Factors such as broad sea-ice preferences, variable mortality rates and causes, long distance carcass transport, variable coastline and basin/channel geometries, and changing emergence rates all complicate the correlation of whale bone abundance to sea-ice histories.

  12. Seafloor seismicity, Antarctic ice-sounds, cetacean vocalizations and long-term ambient sound in the Indian Ocean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, J.-Y.; Chateau, R.; Dziak, R. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results from the Deflo-hydroacoustic experiment in the Southern Indian Ocean using three autonomous underwater hydrophones, complemented by two permanent hydroacoustic stations. The array monitored for 14 months, from November 2006 to December 2007, a 3000 × 3000 km wide area, encompassing large segments of the three Indian spreading ridges that meet at the Indian Triple Junction. A catalogue of 11 105 acoustic events is derived from the recorded data, of which 55 per cent are located from three hydrophones, 38 per cent from 4, 6 per cent from five and less than 1 per cent by six hydrophones. From a comparison with land-based seismic catalogues, the smallest detected earthquakes are mb 2.6 in size, the range of recorded magnitudes is about twice that of land-based networks and the number of detected events is 5-16 times larger. Seismicity patterns vary between the three spreading ridges, with activity mainly focused on transform faults along the fast spreading Southeast Indian Ridge and more evenly distributed along spreading segments and transforms on the slow spreading Central and ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian ridges; the Central Indian Ridge is the most active of the three with an average of 1.9 events/100 km/month. Along the Sunda Trench, acoustic events mostly radiate from the inner wall of the trench and show a 200-km-long seismic gap between 2 °S and the Equator. The array also detected more than 3600 cryogenic events, with different seasonal trends observed for events from the Antarctic margin, compared to those from drifting icebergs at lower (up to 50°S) latitudes. Vocalizations of five species and subspecies of large baleen whales were also observed and exhibit clear seasonal variability. On the three autonomous hydrophones, whale vocalizations dominate sound levels in the 20-30 and 100 Hz frequency bands, whereas earthquakes and ice tremor are a dominant source of ambient sound at frequencies <20 Hz.

  13. REARING OF CETACEANS IN CAPTIVITY IN CHINA%中国鲸类动物的人工饲养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘仁俊; 王克雄; 赵庆中

    2002-01-01

    我国从1965年由青岛海产博物馆首次开始饲养江豚和宽吻海豚.以后中国科学院水生生物研究所等单位先后饲养白(既)/(鱼)豚和长江江豚成功,1995年以后,由于外国资本和技术的介入,使我国鲸类动物的人工饲养水平很快赶上世界先进水平,但由于发展速度太快,布局也不尽合理,因此,必须认真研究和探讨,使我国鲸类动物的人工饲养得到健康有序的发展.

  14. A Review of the Conservation Genetics of Cetaceans%鲸类保护遗传学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘珊; 杨光

    2002-01-01

    简要介绍了mtDNA的PCR直接测序、微卫星microsatellite DNA分型、组织相容性复合体(major histocompatibility complex, MHC)分析等DNA分子标记技术在鲸类遗传变异、种群结构、进化历史、个体识别、亲缘鉴定及系统分类等保护遗传学领域的应用.

  15. Improving Large Cetacean Implantable Satellite Tag Designs to Maximize Tag Robustness and Minimize Health Effects to Individual Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Ave W Olympia, WA, 98501 & National Marine Mammal Laboratory Alaska Fisheries Science Center NOAA Fisheries 7600 Sand Point Way NE Seattle, WA...tag duration. OBJECTIVES The specific objectives of this project are as follows: 1) Design, build, and test robust blubber and/or muscle...vulnerability, inform the development of new tag designs. Impact tests on new designs will be performed in the laboratory as well as in fresh

  16. Validating the Novel Method of Measuring Cortisol Levels in Cetacean Skin by use of an ACTH Challenge in Bottlenose Dolphins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    National Marine Mammal Foundation, USA), Dr. Bjarne Styrishave (Copenhagen University, Denmark), and Dr. Andrew J. Wright (George Mason University, USA...using skin samples collected from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). The dolphins will be sampled as part of an ongoing out-of water stress test ...and stress hormones study conducted by Dr. Dorian Houser in collaboration with the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program (MMP) under ONR project

  17. The Auditory System of the Minke Whale (Balaenoptera Acutorostrata): A Potential Fatty Sound Reception Pathway in a Mysticete Cetacean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Research Marine Mammal Program and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Academic Programs Office. Reproduction in whole or in part is permitted for...conducted under NMFS Permit number 493-1848-00. 35 2.6. References Beauregard H. 1882. L’articulation temporomaxillaire chez les...given for the tympanic and periotic bones. d – Within the range of human, bovine , and canine teeth, which are the densest of bones listed in Duck

  18. A high resolution stratigraphic framework for the remarkable fossil cetacean assemblage of the Miocene/Pliocene Pisco Formation, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Leonard; Urbina, Mario; Chadwick, Arthur; DeVries, Thomas J.; Esperante, Raul

    2011-04-01

    The Miocene/Pliocene Pisco Formation of Peru contains a rich marine vertebrate fossil record, providing a unique opportunity for the study of paleoecology and evolution, along with the sedimentological context of the fossils. The lack of a high-resolution stratigraphic framework has hampered such study. In this paper we develop the needed stratigraphy for the areas in the Pisco Formation where most of the vertebrate paleontological research is occurring. In the Ica Valley and in the vicinity of Lomas, series of lithologically or paleontologically unique marker beds were identified. These were walked out and documented with GPS technology. Measured sections connecting these marker beds provide a stratigraphic framework for the areas studied. GPS locations, maps of the marker beds on aerial photographs, and outcrop photographs allow field determination of the stratigraphic positions of study areas.

  19. Fossil dolphin Otekaikea marplesi (latest Oligocene, New Zealand) expands the morphological and taxonomic diversity of Oligocene cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2014-01-01

    The Oligocene Epoch was a time of major radiation of the Odontoceti (echolocating toothed whales, dolphins). Fossils reveal many odontocete lineages and considerable structural diversity, but whether the clades include some crown taxa or only archaic groups is contentious. The New Zealand fossil dolphin "Prosqualodon" marplesi (latest Oligocene, ≥23.9 Ma) is here identified as a crown odontocete that represents a new genus, Otekaikea, and adds to the generic diversity of Oligocene odontocetes. Otekaikea marplesi is known only from the holotype, which comprises a partial skeleton from the marine Otekaike Limestone of the Waitaki Valley. Otekaikea marplesi was about 2.5 m long; it had procumbent anterior teeth, and a broad dished face for the nasofacial muscles implicated in production of echolocation sounds. The prominent condyles and unfused cervical vertebrae suggest a flexible neck. A phylogenetic analysis based on morphological features places Otekaikea marplesi in the extinct group Waipatiidae, within the clade Platanistoidea. The phylogeny implies an Oligocene origin for the lineage now represented by the endangered Ganges River dolphin (Platanista gangetica), supporting an Oligocene history for the crown Odontoceti.

  20. 3S(expn 2): Behavioral Response Studies of Cetaceans to Navy Sonar Signals in Norwegian Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    behavioral reactions and the sound exposures required to elicit them of three species of whales : bottlenose whales , minke whales , and humpback whales to... humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae, family Balaenopteridae); 3.) Record sufficient no-sonar baseline data of all target species to statistically...the outcomes of the experiments indicate that long-finned pilot whale approached the playback speaker consistently when mammal- feeding killer whale

  1. Validating the Novel Method of Measuring Cortisol Levels in Cetacean Skin by use of an ACTH Challenge in Bottlenose Dolphins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Validating the Novel Method of Measuring Cortisol...hours, in addition to other manipulations (e.g. blubber biopsies ). This process has shown to significantly raise both cortisol and aldosterone above

  2. Monitoring Cetaceans in the North Pacific: Analysis of Retrospective SOSUS Data and Acoustic Detection on the Northern Edge Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    C-POD software is based on the time and frequency characteristics of known species, such as harbor porpoise and beluga whales, and is constantly...Dalebout University of New South Wales Sydney, Australia Robin W. Baird Cascadia Research Collective Olympia, WA Brenda K. Rone National

  3. 76 FR 65697 - Marine Mammals; File No. 16685

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... to conduct research on nine cetacean species off the California coast. DATES: Written, telefaxed, or... operations on California stocks of nine cetacean species including bottlenose (Tursiops truncatus),...

  4. Provide a Vessel to Conduct Observations and Deploy Sound Source for a Behavioral Response Study of Cetaceans off Southern California in 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Catalina Islands • Cruising speed of at least 10 knots and range of 400 nmi of more. 3 • Operations generally involve daylight ops (12 hours) but...requirements: • Area of operations to extend from Moro Bay to San Diego and offshore to include waters west of San Clemente and around San Nicolas and

  5. Clonally related methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus), human volunteers, and a bayfront cetacean rehabilitation facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hower, Suzanne; Phillips, Matthew C; Brodsky, Micah; Dameron, Adrienne; Tamargo, Manuel A; Salazar, Norma C; Jackson, Charlene R; Barrett, John B; Davidson, Maureen; Davis, Johnnie; Mukherjee, Sampa; Ewing, Ruth Y; Gidley, Maribeth L; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Johns, Lisa; Johnson, Frank E; Adebanjo, Olufunmilola; Plano, Lisa R W

    2013-05-01

    In May of 2011, a live mass stranding of 26 short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) occurred in the lower Florida Keys. Five surviving whales were transferred from the original stranding site to a nearby marine mammal rehabilitation facility where they were constantly attended to by a team of volunteers. Bacteria cultured during the routine clinical care of the whales and necropsy of a deceased whale included methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA). In order to investigate potential sources or reservoirs of MSSA and MRSA, samples were obtained from human volunteers, whales, seawater, and sand from multiple sites at the facility, nearby recreational beaches, and a canal. Samples were collected on 3 days. The second collection day was 2 weeks after the first, and the third collection day was 2 months after the last animal was removed from the facility. MRSA and MSSA were isolated on each day from the facility when animals and volunteers were present. MSSA was found at an adjacent beach on all three collection days. Isolates were characterized by utilizing a combination of quantitative real-time PCR to determine the presence of mecA and genes associated with virulence, staphylococcal protein A typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing, multilocus sequence typing, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Using these methods, clonally related MRSA were isolated from multiple environmental locations as well as from humans and animals. Non-identical but genetically similar MSSA and MRSA were also identified from distinct sources within this sample pool. PFGE indicated that the majority of MRSA isolates were clonally related to the prototype human strain USA300. These studies support the notion that S. aureus may be shed into an environment by humans or pilot whales and subsequently colonize or infect exposed new hosts.

  6. Modeled prevalance of seabirds and relative abundance of cetaceans in NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from 1980-04-01 to 1988-10-01 (NCEI Accession 0130025)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is a compilation of modeled seabird prevalence predictions for a selection of species including Razorbill (Alca torda), Greater Shearwater (Puffinus...

  7. 鲸类繁殖生物学的研究概况%REVIEW OF THE RESEARCH ON REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF CETACEANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝茜; 王丁; 王克雄; 姜波; 汤庭耀

    2003-01-01

    @@ 生殖是生物繁殖自身的能力,生殖过程包括生殖细胞(精子与卵子)的生成与成熟、受精过程、妊娠、胎儿的发育、分娩等环节。任何生物须经各种方式产生与自己相似的个体,繁殖是物种得以延续的最基本前提。因此,开展繁殖生物学的研究不仅在理论和学术上有重大的意义,而且奠定了人工育苗和增养殖的基础,同时,可为资源保护和利用提供可靠的科学依据。

  8. 鲸的食性、摄食方式及其与渔业的关系%Cetacean diet, feeding method and the relationship with fishery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝茜; 姜波; 汤庭耀

    2004-01-01

    鲸具胎生、哺乳、用肺呼吸、体温恒定等典型哺乳动物的特征,由于终生生活在水中,体型庞大,要保持正常的体温和代谢活动,必须消耗大量食物来补充能量.因此,了解鲸的食性、摄食方式及其与渔业的关系就显得十分重要.按摄食方式的不同将须鲸划为过滤型,齿鲸为捕食型;按食物组成和摄食方法的不同,将齿鲸又分成三大类型:食乌贼型、食肉型和食鱼型;须鲸则为食浮游生物型.同时探讨了鲸类造成渔业的损失:直接摄食、毁坏渔具、妨碍作业、争食渔网内的渔获物、驱散鱼群造成鱼捕捞量降低等.渔业对鲸类的主要影响表现为:误捕、食物短缺和噪音等.

  9. The importance of post-mortem examinations in cetacean biology: A report of a necropsy on Stenella coeruleoalba (Meyen, 1833 (Cetacea: Delphinidae, from the Azores, Northeastern Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário César Sedrez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the necropsy of a specimen of striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba found stranded in the north coast of Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal. Here, the importance of standard protocols in post-mortem examinations and the need to adequately proceed were discussed. Stranded marine mammals are valuable specimens for several studies of pathology and other veterinary medical aspects. Although the causa mortis was not determined, the full access to stranded specimens was crucial, not only for pathology studies but also for a proper training to veterinary medicine students whenever possible.

  10. Sex Identification of Cetaceans by PCR with Sry-Specific Primers%PCR扩增Sry基因进行鲸类动物性别的鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王加连; 杨光; 周开亚; 魏辅文; 严洁

    2005-01-01

    哺乳动物Y染色体短臂上的Sry基因决定雄性发育方向.本研究参照哺乳动物Sry基因保守区序列设计引物,以非性别特异性的线粒体DNA细胞色素b基因作为阳性对照,用PCR扩增江豚、长喙真海豚等鲸类动物的Sry基因片断并对其进行凝胶电泳分析来鉴定鲸类动物的性别.通过此方法对87个已知性别鲸类动物标本的检验,结果完全正确,并进一步应用此方法成功地完成了另外33个未知性别鲸类标本的性别鉴定.由此建立了一套简单、快速、可靠的鲸类动物的性别鉴定方法.

  11. Understanding the Patterns and Causes of Variability in Distribution, Habitat use, Abundance, Survival and Reproductive Rates of Three Species of Cetacean in the Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    the summer months, an increase of proportion of groups with calves was observed coinciding with the first inmigration event between 1997 and 2001...There is also an increase in 2005- 2006 coinciding with the second inmigration event (according to field observations, this second event started in

  12. Clonally related methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus), human volunteers, and a bayfront cetacean rehabilitation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    In May of 2011 a live mass stranding of 26 short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) occurred in the lower Florida Keys. Five surviving whales were transferred from the original stranding site to a nearby marine mammal rehabilitation facility where they were constantly attended to by a ...

  13. Understanding the Patterns and Causes of Variability in Distribution, Habitat Use, Abundance, Survival and Reproductive Rates of Three Species of Cetacean in the Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Kilograms for each of the 11 main fishing ports of Andalucía including more than 150 fish, shellfish and cephalopods commercial species. The monthly...generate graphics on the fish catches evolution for each prey species. 0.00 100000.00 200000.00 300000.00 400000.00 500000.00 600000.00 e n e -0 0 a b r... Evolution 23 (4): 202-210. Navarro, A., Vázquez, A.. Macías, D. Bruno, M. and Ruiz, J. 2011. Understanding the patterns of biological response to

  14. Identification and characterization of a tandem repeat in exon III of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene in cetaceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Line; Kinze, Carl Christian; Werge, Thomas;

    2006-01-01

    A large number of mammalian species harbor a tandem repeat in exon III of the gene encoding dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4), a receptor associated with cognitive functions. In this study, a DRD4 gene exon III tandem repeat from the order Cetacea was identified and characterized. Included in our study...... were samples from 10 white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris), 10 harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), eight sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus), and five minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata). Using enzymatic amplification followed by sequencing of amplified fragments, a tandem repeat...... composed of 18-bp basic units was detected in all of these species. The tandem repeats in white-beaked dolphin and harbor porpoise were both monomorphic and consisted of 11 and 12 basic units, respectively. In contrast, the sperm whale harbored a polymorphic tandem repeat with size variants composed...

  15. Cetáceos del Pacífico de Guatemala: Cincuenta años de historia Guatemala's Pacific Cetaceans: Fifty Years of History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A. Cabrera Arreola

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available En Guatemala el estudio de los cetáceos inició en la década de los sesenta con los primeros registros de varamiento y captura incidental. Sin embargo, pocos trabajos científicos con datos de cetáceos han sido publicados. Con el objetivo de centralizar la información de cetáceos y obtener conocimiento biológico para el desarrollo de planes de manejo y conservación, se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de cetáceos en Guatemala que recaba información de los últimos 50 años. Se obtuvo un total de 1,014 registros de avistamiento (1979-2011, 62 registros de captura incidental (1961/85 y 16 registros de varamientos (1975, 2007-2012, los cuales se analizaron en mapas batimétricos y en mapas de presiones antropogénicas. Se identificaron diecinueve especies pertenecientes a cinco familias de cetáceos, incluyendo Balaenopteridae, Delphinidae, Ziphiidae, Kogiidae y Physeteridae. El esfuerzo y área de muestreo varió durante 1961-2012. Se identificaron diferentes patrones de distribución especie-específicos. La mayoría de avistamientos se registraron cerca de zonas con topografía compleja. Aunque los eventos de captura incidental se registraron únicamente en alta mar, los resultados sugieren que especies de distribución costera se encuentran en zonas con mayor riesgo antropogénico. Se reportaron ocho especies de cetáceos varados, eventos ocurridos principalmente en el departamento de Escuintla desde el año 2007. Debido a la gran diversidad en los patrones de distribución, comportamiento y uso de hábitat de los cetáceos, combinado con los riesgos antropogénicos de la zona, es necesario que se considere un enfoque integral cuando se implementen planes de manejo y conservación marina en Guatemala.

  16. WATER TEMPERATURE, DISSOLVED OXYGEN, and others collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in Central Pacific Ocean, American Samoa EEZ, and others from 2006-03-06 to 2006-03-26 (NCEI Accession 0156427)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD data were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID OES 06-03). CTD casts...

  17. 76 FR 81916 - Marine Mammals; File No. 16685

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... research on nine cetacean species off the California coast. ADDRESSES: The permit and related documents are... research on nine cetacean species off of the California coast had been submitted by the...

  18. 76 FR 67151 - Marine Mammals; File No. 13927

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... a request for a permit to conduct research on 23 cetacean species had been submitted by the above... northeast United States; (2) takes of pinnipeds, sea turtles, and cetacean species other than those...

  19. 77 FR 58358 - Marine Mammals; File No. 14097

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... an amendment to Permit No. 14097-01 to conduct research on 5 pinniped species, 57 cetacean species... Scientific Research Permit for Pinniped, Cetacean, and Sea Turtle Studies (NMFS 2010) and the...

  20. WATER TEMPERATURE and DEPTH - SENSOR collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in main Hawaiian Islands and Hawaii EEZ from 2009-02-06 to 2009-02-25 (NCEI Accession 0155922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID SE 09-01). XBT casts...

  1. WATER TEMPERATURE and DEPTH - SENSOR collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in Hawaii EEZ, central North Pacific Ocean, and others from 2010-01-22 to 2010-02-06 (NCEI Accession 0155913)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID SE 10-01). XBT casts...

  2. CHLOROPHYLL A CONCENTRATION collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in Hawaii EEZ, Palmyra EEZ, and American Samoa EEZ from 2012-04-23 to 2012-05-15 (NCEI Accession 0155998)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface water samples were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID SE 12-03)....

  3. WATER TEMPERATURE and DEPTH - SENSOR collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in Hawaii EEZ, main Hawaiian Islands, and Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument from 2010-09-02 to 2010-10-26 (NCEI Accession 0155914)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID: SE 10-08). XBT casts...

  4. WATER TEMPERATURE and DEPTH - SENSOR collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in Hawaii EEZ and Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument from 2013-05-08 to 2013-06-03 (NCEI Accession 0156421)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID SE 13-03). XBT casts...

  5. WATER TEMPERATURE and DEPTH - SENSOR collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in main Hawaiian Islands from 2008-07-11 to 2008-07-29 (NCEI Accession 0155892)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID SE 08-06). XBT casts...

  6. WATER TEMPERATURE and DEPTH - SENSOR collected from NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in Hawaii EEZ, central North Pacific Ocean, and others from 2010-04-20 to 2010-04-30 (NCEI Accession 0155915)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected during a Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center's Cetacean Research Program's shipboard cetacean survey (Cruise ID: SE 10-04). XBT casts...

  7. Responses of male sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) to killer whale sounds: Implications for anti-predator strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curé, C.; Antunes, R.; Alves, A.C.; Visser, F.; Kvadsheim, P.H.; Miller, P.J.O.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between individuals of different cetacean species are often observed in the wild. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) can be potential predators of many other cetaceans, and the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may trigger anti-predator behavior that could m

  8. 77 FR 5775 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Territory MUS E. Discussion on Hawaii Cetacean Genetics F. Public Comment G. SSC Discussion and... Mammal Assessments 1. Hawaiian Islands Cetacean and Ecosystem Assessment Survey (HICEAS) II Analyses 2... for Shallow-Set Longline Fishery B. Update on ESA and MMPA actions C. Hawaiian Islands Cetacean...

  9. 78 FR 29117 - Marine Mammals; File No. 17005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ..., GA 30332 to conduct research on cetacean species not listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA... cetacean species had been submitted by the above-named applicant. The requested permit has been issued... research on non-listed cetacean species in Atlantic and Pacific coastal areas of the contiguous...

  10. 77 FR 31836 - Marine Mammals; File No. 15240

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... Party: Frank A. Parrish, Ph.D.) to conduct research on cetaceans. ADDRESSES: The permit and related... cetacean research had been submitted by the above-named applicant. The requested permit has been issued... authorizes the PIFSC to take 20 cetacean species, including six species listed as endangered...

  11. Concentration-Dependant Changes of PCB Patterns in Fish-Eating Mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boon, J.P.; van der Meer, J.; Allchin, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    - and meta-positions and with one ortho-chlorine substituent generally increased in the order otter cetaceans (harbor porpoise, common dolphin) ... in the order cetaceans cetaceans, the pinnipeds, and the otter. Within-species CB patterns differed in a concentration-dependent manner...

  12. 78 FR 2956 - Marine Mammals; File No. 17005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... form for a permit to conduct research on cetacean species not listed under the Endangered Species Act... part 216). Dr. Rogers proposes to conduct scientific research on cetacean species in Atlantic and... elastic properties of cetacean head tissues. The ultrasound system is intended to provide...

  13. Cetáceos del Pacífico de Guatemala: Cincuenta años de historia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrera Arreola, Andrea; Ortíz Wolford, Jenniffer S.; Corona Figueroa, Mildred Fabiola; Gudiel Corona, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    Cetaceans have been studied in Guatemala since 1960s, but only a few scientific works based on the collected cetacean data were published. We reviewed literatures about cetaceans in Guatemala for the past fifty years to gain the biological knowledge for conservation and management plans. A total of

  14. Helicobacter cetorum infection in striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus), and short-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus delphus) from the southwest coast of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Nicholas J; Barnett, James E F; Koylass, Mark; Whatmore, Adrian M; Perkins, Matthew W; Deaville, Robert C; Jepson, Paul D

    2014-07-01

    Helicobacter infection in cetaceans was first reported from the US in 2000 when the isolation of a novel Helicobacter species was described from two Atlantic white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus acutus). Since then, Helicobacter species have been demonstrated in cetaceans and pinnipeds from around the world. Since 1990, the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency Polwhele, Truro, has been involved in the UK Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme to establish the cause of death of cetacean species stranded along the coast of Cornwall, England. We describe the isolation of Helicobacter cetorum in a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) and evidence of H. cetorum infection in cetaceans from European waters.

  15. Provide a Vessel to Conduct Observations and Deploy Sound Source and a Vessel for Passive Acoustic Monitoring for a Behavioral Response Study of Cetaceans off Southern California in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Clemente and around San Nicolas and Catalina Islands • Cruising speed of at least 10 knots and range of 400 nmi of more. • Operations generally involve...including meeting the following requirements: • Area of operations to extend from Moro Bay to San Diego and offshore to include waters west of San...vessels to begin the search for beaked whales. During operations in the Catalina Basin, this platform was able to repeatedly locate areas of beaked whale

  16. Provide a Vessel to Conduct Observations and Deploy Sound Source and a Vessel for Passive Acoustic Monitoring for a Behavioral Response Study of Cetaceans off Southern California in 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    to extend from Moro Bay to San Diego and offshore to include waters west of San Clemente and around San Nicolas and Catalina Islands  Cruising...hours typically heading out to the study area ahead of the other vessels to begin the search for beaked whales. During operations in the Catalina Basin

  17. Application of Routine Cytological Examination on Disease Diagnosis of Captive Cetaceans%常规细胞学检查在人工饲养鲸类动物疾病诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗清

    2008-01-01

    为了更好地维护人工饲养鲸类动物的健康,利用普通光学显微镜,对30头人工饲养鲸类动物的近4 000份粪便、胃液、呼吸道分泌物样本进行了常规细胞学检查,结果表明:其中200余份病理样本具有重要的临床意义,能及时为疾病诊断和疗效评价提供可靠依据,因此,常规细胞学检查方法非常有必要在饲养鲸类动物的水族馆和动物园中加以推广和深入研究.

  18. 木孜塔格-鲸鱼湖断裂带特征、演化及其意义%MEANING AND EVOLUTION & CHARACTERISTIC OF MUZTAG- CETACEAN LAKE FRACTURE ZONE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    弓小平; 马华东; 杨兴科; 李国填; 王庆明

    2004-01-01

    通过对东昆仑山木孜塔格-鲸鱼湖断裂在青藏高原北部陆内变形过程中形成的构造形迹、沉积建造、新生代火山活动、地球物理场变化综合研究,以野外第一手资料重建该过程的演化历史,认为木孜塔格-鲸鱼湖断裂是青藏高原北部陆内变形过程遗留的重要地质证据,卫星遥感图像上显示极为明显,它具有重要的区域构造意义.首先,发育大规模由北向南的叠瓦式逆冲推覆构造,新近纪由南向北沿构造带分布着东西向平行排列的"堑垒"相间式断陷盆地;其次还见有大量中性火山岩浆沿该断裂及其次级断裂溢出分布,成因分析表明其来源于陆内俯冲作用;第三,该断裂的走向延伸线上现今还发生较大规模的地震活动.综合分析表明,该断裂作为与柴达木地块南部构造边界断裂彼此平行的南东东向大型走滑断裂带,具有左行走滑构造分量,应是青藏高原北缘亚洲大陆向北东逃逸的主要断裂系统.

  19. Progress and status of research on persistent organochlorine compounds in cetaceans%鲸类体内持久性有机氯残留研究的进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘会; 甘居利; 贾晓平

    2008-01-01

    文章综述了20世纪70年代以来有关鲸类体内持久性有机氯(persistent organochlorines,Pos)的研究进展和概况,包括鲸类体内Pos残留水平的分析方法;Pos进入鲸体内的方式及消除途径;鲸类体内Pos的残留水平;Pos对鲸的有害影响;鲸类体内Pos污染的毒性评价.通过分析表明,Pos对海洋生态系统的影响还将持续很长时间,中国应进一步研究近岸海域哺乳动物Pos的长期污染效应,进"面更深入地研究其环境行为、归宿和影响效应.

  20. 台湾海峡南部及闽南沿岸的鲸豚记录%Records of Cetaceans in the Southern Taiwan Straits and along the Coast of Southern Fujian Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宗国; 刘文华

    2000-01-01

    1991~1999年,在台湾海峡南部和闽南沿海获52只鲸豚标本,1种须鲸、5种齿鲸.已对其中3种海豚进行过专题报道.本文对另3种,即花斑原海豚、伪虎鲸和鲲鲸进行研究.给出了这3种的体表颜色、大小、性别、齿式,各部位测量记录;以及心、肺等内脏的重量.

  1. Diverse stem cetaceans and their phylogenetic relationships with mesonychids and artiodactyls%基干鲸类的多样性及其与中兽和偶蹄类的系统关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高红艳; 倪喜军

    2015-01-01

    在鲸类的演化历史中,由陆生动物转化成完全的水生动物的过程足一个由来已久的演化谜题.基干鲸类的多样性很高,化石记录也很完整.5个科一级的基干鲸类演化支系组成一个并系类群,包括:巴基鲸科(Pakicetidae)、游走鲸科(Ambulocetidae)、雷明顿鲸科(Remingtonocetidae)、原鲸科(Protocetidae)和龙王鲸科(Basilosauridae).最基干的鲸类巴基鲸科动物可能是一种半水生动物,生活在接近淡水的环境中,代表了陆生偶蹄类向水生鲸类演化的初始一步.更为进步的游走鲸类具有更多适应于水生生活的特征,而且可能更加适应于海水环境.雷明顿鲸类的平衡觉器官和声音传导机制已经表现出向现代鲸类方向演化的趋势.基于稳定氧同位素分析的研究表明,雷明顿鲸类可能完全是海生的.原鲸类的多样性非常高,是鲸类中最先实现全球分布的类群.原鲸保留有发育良好的后肢,但是它们的髂骶关节很松甚至消失.龙王鲸类是鲸类冠类群的绝灭姊妹群.鲸类与其他哺乳动物的系统关系一直存在争议,分子生物学、古生物学和形态学证据都支持鲸类与偶蹄类的亲缘关系较近,但是流行的河马-鲸类亲缘假说尚缺乏坚实的古生物学和形态学数据支持.对石炭兽类和(稀)类开展详细的系统分析和研究,将有助于厘清河马-鲸类亲缘假说中的不确定关系.如果不使用分子数据来限定现代鲸类和偶蹄类的系统位置,仅使用古生物学和形态学数据的分析仍然支持传统的中兽-鲸类亲缘假说.

  2. APPLICABILITY OF CETACEAN MICROSATELLITE PRIMERS IN THE YANGTZE FINLESS PORPOISE%鲸类微卫星引物对长江江豚的适用性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏军红; 郑劲松; 王丁

    2004-01-01

    微卫星在长江江豚(Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis)中的应用研究还未见报道.本研究采用已发表的来自6个鲸种的23对微卫星引物对一个长江江豚群体DNA样本进行了微卫星扩增.结果表明其中有7对引物在此群体中的扩增产物是稳定且多态的,序列分析结果表明这7对引物的扩增产物都具有AC或GT两碱基重复单元,从而证明了扩增的有效性.研究结果表明用从其他鲸类分离出的微卫星引物可以快速筛选到适用于长江江豚指纹分析的引物.

  3. Small cetacean aerial survey conducted in Alaskan waters by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 1997-05-08 to 1999-07-04 (NCEI Accession 0131991)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys were conducted to produce abundance estimates for the three Alaska stocks of harbor porpoise. Surveys occurred from May to July 1997 for the Southeast...

  4. Visual surveys of cetaceans conducted in the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 2010-08-25 to 2015-09-28 (NCEI Accession 0137906)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of several inter-agency agreements between the National Marine Mammal Laboratory (NMML) and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), visual surveys of...

  5. The importance of post-mortem examinations in cetacean biology:A report of a necropsy onStenella coeruleoalba(Meyen, 1833) (Cetacea:Delphinidae), from the Azores, Northeastern Atlantic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mrio Csar Sedrez; Joo de vila Barcelos; Joo Pedro Barreiros

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the necropsy of a specimen of striped dolphinStenella coeruleoalba found stranded in the north coast of Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal. Here, the importance of standard protocols in post-mortem examinations and the need to adequately proceed were discussed. Stranded marine mammals are valuable specimens for several studies of pathology and other veterinary medical aspects. Although the causa mortis was not determined, the full access to stranded specimens was crucial, not only for pathology studies but also for a proper training to veterinary medicine students whenever possible.

  6. Beaked Whales Respond to Simulated and Actual Navy Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    in cetaceans [6,24]. For example, the risk function used to assess probability of behavioral harassment of cetaceans from sonar assumes a very low...US, regulators have a separate exposure criterion for harbor porpoise than other cetaceans . Regulators predict that any exposure above 120 dB SPL will...out in strict accordance with the US Animal Welfare Act following the relevant recommendations of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals

  7. Acoustical dead zones and the spatial aggregation of whale strandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Bala; Poje, Andrew C; Veit, Richard R; Nganguia, Herve

    2006-02-21

    Cetacean strandings display a marked geographical clustering. We propose a simple, two-dimensional ray-dynamics model of cetacean echolocation to examine the role played by coastline topography in influencing the location and clustering of stranding sites. We find that a number of coastlines known to attract cetacean strandings produce acoustical "Dead Zones" where echolocation signals are severely distorted by purely geometric effects. Using available cetacean stranding data bases from four disparate areas, we show that the geographical clusters in the observations correlate strongly with the regions of distorted echolocation signals as predicted by the model.

  8. 76 FR 40338 - Marine Mammals; Photography Permit No. 16360

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Mammals; Photography Permit No. 16360 AGENCY..., Auckland, New Zealand to conduct commercial/educational photography of cetaceans off Hawaii. ADDRESSES: The... request for a permit to conduct commercial/educational photography on 12 cetacean species had...

  9. 鯨類の生態学及び集団遺伝学に関する研究に用いられるゲノムDNAの解析手法

    OpenAIRE

    景, 崇洋; 中山, 一郎; 河村, 章人; Kage, Takahiro; Nakayama, Ichiro; Kawamura, Akito

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews analyses of cetacean DNA, including polymorphisms of mitochondrial DNA, conventional multi‐locus DNA fingerprinting techniques, and SSLP (Simple Sequence Length Polymorphisms) DNA fingerprinting. It also describes the possible application of other techniques, e.g., RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA), CAP‐PCR (CA‐repeat Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction) and SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphisms) to cetaceans.

  10. Bilateral directional asymmetry of the appendicular skeleton of the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galatius, Anders; Jespersen, Åse

    2005-01-01

    robust right humerii and ulnae may be designed for higher levels of mechanical stress. These DAs and the examples of lateralized behavior recorded in cetaceans, point to the existence of lateralized use of the flippers at the population level in harbor porpoises and possibly other cetacean species....

  11. Under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de Marijke N.; Saulino, James T.; Waerebeek, van Koen; Aarts, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Within the Gulf of Guinea high levels of fisheries-related cetacean mortality (bycatch and direct-capture) has been documented. For locally rare species such removals could potentially lead to significant population level effects. However, information on the cetacean abundance and distribution is

  12. Acoustic tags on wild harbour porpoises reveal context-specific reactions to ship noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, Jonas; Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Johnson, Mark

    While cetacean auditory systems have evolved to cope with underwater noise from natural sources, there is a growing concern that anthropogenic noise may disrupt the behavior, impair the hearing or compromise the general health of cetaceans. Evaluation of the effect of anthropogenic sounds...

  13. 9 CFR 3.111 - Swim-with-the-dolphin programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and.... The primary enclosure for SWTD cetaceans shall contain an interactive area, a buffer area, and a sanctuary area. None of these areas shall be made uninviting to the animals. Movement of cetaceans into...

  14. Nuclear and Mitochondrial Patterns of Population Structure in North Pacific False Killer Whales (Pseudorca crassidens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-14

    areas: Population structure and phylogeography Key words: cetacean , island-associated, male-mediated gene flow, population structure, social structure...efficiently exploit such different habitats have been proposed as important mecha- nisms driving population differentiation in other cetaceans ...689424, 774–1714, and 14097. Procedures for ensuring animal welfare during biopsy sampling were approved as part of the Scientific Research permits

  15. 9 CFR 3.113 - Primary enclosures used to transport marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care... mammals other than cetaceans and sirenians must: (1) Be constructed from materials of sufficient... mammals such as cetaceans and sirenians must: (1) Be designed so as not to prevent access to the...

  16. 78 FR 23538 - Marine Mammals; File No. 17312

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... Features box on the Applications and Permits for Protected Species (APPS) home page, https://apps.nmfs.noaa... cetaceans; and (3) suction-cup tag, track, and collect passive acoustic recordings to study cetacean diving...; phone (206)526-6150; fax (206)526-6426; Alaska Region, NMFS, P.O. Box 21668, Juneau, AK...

  17. Dolphins and Children: A Blueprint for Marine Environmental Education in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bressem, Marie-Francoise; Alfaro-Shigueto, Joanna; Geysen, Karen; Onton, Karina; Vega, Diana; Chavez-Lisambart, Laura; Van Waerebeek, Koen

    2006-01-01

    To complement legislative measures protecting cetaceans and other marine animals, the Peruvian Centre for Cetacean Research in the period 1993-2000 implemented an environmental education program at the kindergartens, primary and high schools of several fishing towns and in Lima, Peru. This program included environmental classes based on selected…

  18. Ceteacean Social Behavioral Response to Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ceteacean Social Behavioral Response to Sonar Dr...effort is to investigate cetacean social behavioral response to sonar signals. OBJECTIVES The scientific objectives of this effort are 1) to study...social, group-level behavioral responses of cetaceans to sonar signals and other stimuli, including tagging; 2) to study natural, baseline social

  19. The Stranding Anomaly as Population Indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltier, Helene; Baagøe, Hans J.; Camphuysen, Kees C.J.;

    2013-01-01

    in space and constant in time. We used a drift model to map stranding probabilities and predict stranding patterns of cetacean carcasses under H0 across the North Sea, the Channel and the Bay of Biscay, for the period 1990–2009. As the most common cetacean occurring in this area, we chose the harbour...

  20. Building Capacity and International Partnerships to Address Anthropogenic Impacts on Aquatic Animal Health: 44th Annual Conference of the International Association of Aquatic Animal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Brucellosis , and the interpretation of gas bubbles in stranded cetaceans. Workshops provided training in oil spill preparedness, necropsy techniques to...ship strike diagnosis (M. Moore), oil spill preparedness (M. Ziccardi), pinniped sampling and handling (Gulland). IMPACT/APPLICATIONS The focus...and established collaborations for future research on this topic. Productive discussions on future directions in tag design for cetaceans, diagnosis

  1. Development and Field testing of the DTAG for Deep-Diving Odontocetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-12

    34Resident and reproductive populations of beaked whales in El Hierro , Canary Islands", European Research on Cetaceans 19th, France, April 2005. Aguilar... Hierro (Canary Islands)", European Research on Cetaceans 18th, Sweden, 2004. Tregenza N.J.C., Johnson M., Aguilar de Soto N., "Automated detection of

  2. Unique biochemical and mineral composition of whale ear bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sora L; Thewissen, J G M; Churchill, Morgan M; Suydam, Robert S; Ketten, Darlene R; Clementz, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cetaceans are obligate aquatic mammals derived from terrestrial artiodactyls. The defining characteristic of cetaceans is a thick and dense lip (pachyosteosclerotic involucrum) of an ear bone (the tympanic). This unique feature is absent in modern terrestrial artiodactyls and is suggested to be important in underwater hearing. Here, we investigate the mineralogical and biochemical properties of the involucrum, as these may hold clues to the aquatic adaptations of cetaceans. We compared bioapatites (enamel, dentine, cementum, and skeletal bone) of cetaceans with those of terrestrial artiodactyls and pachyosteosclerotic ribs of manatees (Sirenia). We investigated organic, carbonate, and mineral composition as well as crystal size and crystallinity index. In all studied variables, bioapatites of the cetacean involucrum were intermediate in composition and structure between those of tooth enamel on the one hand and those of dentine, cementum, and skeletal bone on the other. We also studied the amino acid composition of the cetacean involucrum relative to that of other skeletal bone. The central involucrum had low glycine and hydroxyproline concentrations but high concentrations of nonessential amino acids, unlike most bone samples but similar to the tympanic of hippos and the (pachyosteosclerotic) ribs of manatees. These amino acid results are evidence of rapid bone development. We hypothesize that the mineralogical and amino acid composition of cetacean bullae differs from that of other bone because of (1) functional modifications for underwater sound reception and (2) structural adaptations related to rapid ossification.

  3. Isolation of Brucella ceti from a Long-finned Pilot Whale (Globicephala melas) and a Sowerby's Beaked Whale (Mesoploden bidens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Geoffrey; Whatmore, Adrian M; Dagleish, Mark P; Baily, Johanna L; Deaville, Rob; Davison, Nicholas J; Koylass, Mark S; Perrett, Lorraine L; Stubberfield, Emma J; Reid, Robert J; Brownlow, Andrew C

    2015-10-01

    Brucella ceti is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has been recovered from several species of cetaceans in the world's oceans over the past 20 yr. We report the recovery of B. ceti from a Sowerby's beaked whale (Mesoploden bidens) and a long-finned pilot whale (Globicehala melas). Recovery from the testis of a long-finned pilot whale provides further evidence of potential for B. ceti infection to impact the reproductive success of cetaceans, many of which are threatened species. The addition of another two cetacean species to the growing number from which B. ceti has been recovered also further emphasizes the concern for human infections with this organism.

  4. Stranded Specimen Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Mammal and Turtle Division collects data about individual cetaceans and sea turtles that come ashore, or strand on the beach. The date and location of...

  5. Anisakis spp. induced granulomatous dermatitis in a harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena and a bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beurden, Steven J; IJsseldijk, Lonneke L; Cremers, Herman J W M; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, M Hélène; Begeman, Lineke

    2015-01-01

    Cetaceans are well known definitive hosts of parasitic nematodes of the genus Anisakis (Nematoda: Anisakidae). Anisakid nematodes are also a health hazard for humans, potentially causing gastrointestinal infections or allergic reactions following the consumption of infected fish. In marine mammals,

  6. SWFSC/MMTD/ETP: Stenella Abundance Research (STAR) 1998-2000, 2003, and 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Stenella Abundance Research Project (STAR) is a multi-year cetacean and ecosystem assessment study designed to assess the status of dolphin stocks which have...

  7. 75 FR 69295 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Navy Training Activities Conducted Within the Northwest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... Council (on behalf of the International Fund for Animal Welfare, the Center for Biological Diversity, Cetacean Society International, Friends of the San Juans, the Humane Society of the United States,...

  8. 78 FR 60852 - Marine Mammals; File Nos. 16239 and 17312

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ..., relatedness and stock structure of cetaceans; and (3) suction-cup tag, track, and collect passive acoustic...; phone (206)526-6150; fax (206)526-6426; Alaska Region, NMFS, P.O. Box 21668, Juneau, AK...

  9. 75 FR 53271 - Marine Mammals; File No. 15271

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... are available for review by selecting ``Records Open for Public Comment'' from the Features box on the...) determine types of acoustic behavior of marine mammals (primarily cetaceans) and how acoustic signals...

  10. Marine mammals line-transect survey conducted in the Gulf of Alaska from 2003-06-27 to 2003-07-15 (NCEI Accession 0130075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Three marine mammal observers participated on a cetacean survey from 26 June to 15 July 2003, aboard NOAA Ship Miller Freeman as a piggyback project during a RACE...

  11. HARP MHI- Cross Seamount

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PIFSC and Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) conducted passive acoustic monitoring for cetaceans at Cross Seamount in 2005 and 2006 using a High-Frequency...

  12. Mammals of the Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information on sea mammals, including definitions and characteristics of cetaceans, pinnipeds, and sirenians. Contains descriptions of the teaching activities "Whale Music,""Draw A Whale to Scale,""Adopt a Sea Mammal," and "Sea Mammal Sleuths." (TW)

  13. Northern Right Whale Survey (DE0107, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The right whale and cetacean survey primarily focuses on right whales in the coastal and continental shelf areas, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better...

  14. 1- HARPs of the Pacific Islands Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains information on acoustic recordings of cetaceans collected from areas within the Pacific Islands Region since 2006. In collaboration with...

  15. 78 FR 28411 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... occur in the seismic survey area include nine cetacean species, beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas... exposed to seismic survey noise in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Di Iorio and Clark 2009). The North...

  16. Northern Right Whale Survey (DE0306, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The right whale and cetacean survey primarily focuses on right whales in the coastal and continental shelf areas, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better...

  17. POPs, Fatty acids, lipid and Stable Isotopes data - The behavioral ecology of deep-diving odontocetes in the Bahamas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project will use a unique set of individual-based data to quantify and model the behavioral ecology of six Department of Defense priority cetacean species in...

  18. AFSC/NMML: Killer Whale encounter data in the Aleutian Islands, Bering Sea, and the western and central Gulf of Alaska from 2000 - 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Comprises data from surveys focused on killer whales with opportunistic data from other cetacean species; includes data describing encounters for...

  19. The Emergency Alternative Arrangement Exception to the National Environmental Policy Act: What Constitutes an Emergency? Should the Navy Pin Its Hopes on Noah Webster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-31

    environmental groups, the International Fund for Animal Welfare , the Cetacean Society International, the League for Coastal Protection, and Ocean Futures...health and welfare of man; [and] to enrich the understanding of the ecological systems and natural resources important to the Nation .... ,,2 NEPA is...species, such as the blue and humpback whales, harbor seals, and common dolphins are either stable or improving?21 Strandings of small cetaceans and

  20. International Workshop on Detection, Classification and Localization of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics (4th). International Workshop on Density Estimation of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics (1st)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-13

    PRESENTATION 11 WORKSHOPS PROGRAM 13 ORAL COMMUNICATIONS DCL WORKSHOP 19 Lazzaro Spallanzani: a hero of pre-animal welfare experimental biology...Filho 62 Using Passive Acoustic Monitoring to Evaluate the Impact of Anthropogenic Noise on Cetacean Vocal Activity Cholewiak Danielle, Vu Elizabeth...La Manna 69 ORAL COMMUNICATIONS DE WORKSHOP 71 Review of methods for estimating cetacean density from passive acoustics Len Thomas and Tiago A.Marques

  1. Assessing the Potential for Nitrogen Bubble Formation in Diving Odontocetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    first compartment within which exchange occurs is the blood pool, and assuming that cetacean hematological factors do not inhibit bubble formation...relationship between “bubble-like” cavitary lesions reported in the portal system of some stranding cetaceans , and the accessibility of these vessels...Dorian Houser served as the PI on project and was responsible for facilities coordination, animal welfare issues, ultrasound inspections and blood

  2. Theater Missile Defense Extended Test Range Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement - Eglin Gulf Test Range. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Gulf of Mexico .............................3-297 3.2.3-3 Locations of Cetaceans (Whales and Dolphins) .....................................3-299... Cetaceans on the Upper Continental Slope in the North-Central Gulf of Mexico,” Fishery Bulletin, No. 92: 773-786. Myers, R. and J. Ewel, 1992. Ecosystems...on Levels of Environmental Noise Requisite to Protect Public Health and Welfare with an Adequate Margin of Safety, March. U.S. Environmental

  3. NRL Review, 1994. (Naval Research Lab)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    significantly ed-ancos human knowledge and welfare The Franklin Institute ’ovas organized in Phldelphia in 1824 as a momorial to Sc ijamin Franklin...and the Naval Ocean They hypothesized these signals to be originat- Processing Facility (NOPF) at Dam Neck, ing from cetaceans (e.g., whales) or...Because IUSS is an operational compon- "* catalog the acoustic signals from large ent of the U.S. Navy, security restrictions are marine cetaceans to

  4. The modelling and assessment of whale-watching impacts

    OpenAIRE

    New, Leslie Frances; Hall, Ailsa Jane; Harcourt, R.; Kaufman, G.; E. C. M. Parsons; Pearson, H.C.; Cosentino, A.M.; Schick, Robert Schilling

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been significant interest in modelling cumulative effects and the population consequences of individual changes in cetacean behaviour and physiology due to disturbance. One potential source of disturbance that has garnered particular interest is whale-watching. Though perceived as 'green' or eco-friendly tourism, there is evidence that whale-watching can result in statistically significant and biologically meaningful changes in cetacean behaviour, raising the questio...

  5. Measuring and Validating Levels of Steroid Hormones in the Skin of Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Björklund E & Styrishave B. Developing a new research tool for use in free-ranging cetaceans: recovering cortisol from harbor porpoise skin. Conservation Physiology, 3: doi:10.1093/conphys/cov016 ...relationship between serum and skin concentrations of aldosterone, c) how long it takes for aldosterone , corticosterone, and cortisol to be measurable in...project described here is complementary to another currently ongoing project: “Validating the novel method of measuring cortisol levels in cetacean

  6. Culture in whales and dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendell, L; Whitehead, H

    2001-04-01

    Studies of animal culture have not normally included a consideration of cetaceans. However, with several long-term field studies now maturing, this situation should change. Animal culture is generally studied by either investigating transmission mechanisms experimentally, or observing patterns of behavioural variation in wild populations that cannot be explained by either genetic or environmental factors. Taking this second, ethnographic, approach, there is good evidence for cultural transmission in several cetacean species. However, only the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops) has been shown experimentally to possess sophisticated social learning abilities, including vocal and motor imitation; other species have not been studied. There is observational evidence for imitation and teaching in killer whales. For cetaceans and other large, wide-ranging animals, excessive reliance on experimental data for evidence of culture is not productive; we favour the ethnographic approach. The complex and stable vocal and behavioural cultures of sympatric groups of killer whales (Orcinus orca) appear to have no parallel outside humans, and represent an independent evolution of cultural faculties. The wide movements of cetaceans, the greater variability of the marine environment over large temporal scales relative to that on land, and the stable matrilineal social groups of some species are potentially important factors in the evolution of cetacean culture. There have been suggestions of gene-culture coevolution in cetaceans, and culture may be implicated in some unusual behavioural and life-history traits of whales and dolphins. We hope to stimulate discussion and research on culture in these animals.

  7. ANIMALS - INDIVIDUAL - COUNTS, cetacean and SPECIES IDENTIFICATION marine mammal observation and visual observation data collected in the North Pacific Ocean on the NEW HORIZON cruises NH0005 and NH0007 as part of the NEP project from 2000-05-31 to 2000-08-12 (NODC Accession 0113948)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113948 includes marine mammal observation, visual observation and biological data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruises NH0005 and NH0007...

  8. 鲸类c-mos基因的序列变异性及在系统发生分析中应用的初步研究%A Preliminary Study on the Sequence Variability of Cetacean c-mos Genes and its Application in Phylogenetic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光; 季国庆; 周开亚; 魏辅文

    2003-01-01

    通过猪等的c-mos基因保守区序列设计了用于扩增鲸类c-mos基因的引物.应用此引物扩增并测定了齿鲸类5个科12个种546 bp的c-mos基因编码区序列.结果表明鲸类的c-mos基因遗传变异水平较低.在系统发生重建中,同科的物种聚为单系,但不能很好地解决科下亚科间的关系,提示c-mos基因仅适于鲸类科级以上阶元的系统发生研究.

  9. 木孜塔格-鲸鱼湖地区新生代火山岩地球化学特征及其构造意义%GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND TECTONIC SIGNIFICANCE OF CENOZOIC VOLCANIC ROCKS IN MUZTAG-CETACEAN LAKE AREA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂其军; 王新昆; 杨子江; 王小虎

    2007-01-01

    木孜塔格-鲸鱼湖地区分布的新生代火山岩,主要由玄武安山岩、安山岩、安山玄武岩、白榴碱玄岩等组成.中性火山岩约占99.1%,具钙碱性/钾质中性火山岩特征.富集Ba、Rb、K、Sr等大离子亲石元素,亏损Zr、Hf、Nb等高场强元素,并呈现相似的轻稀土元素富集的分布模式.火山岩沿区域深大断裂分布,深大断裂起到岩浆通道的作用.岩石地球化学环境判别表明它们都源自EMⅡ型地幔,属于轻稀土元素富集的一种壳-幔物质的混合地幔,形成于板内拉张构造环境.

  10. Adaptive evolution of the Hox gene family for development in bats and dolphins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liang

    Full Text Available Bats and cetaceans (i.e., whales, dolphins, porpoises are two kinds of mammals with unique locomotive styles and occupy novel niches. Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight in the sky, while cetaceans have returned to the aquatic environment and are specialized for swimming. Associated with these novel adaptations to their environment, various development changes have occurred to their body plans and associated structures. Given the importance of Hox genes in many aspects of embryonic development, we conducted an analysis of the coding regions of all Hox gene family members from bats (represented by Pteropus vampyrus, Pteropus alecto, Myotis lucifugus and Myotis davidii and cetaceans (represented by Tursiops truncatus for adaptive evolution using the available draft genome sequences. Differences in the selective pressures acting on many Hox genes in bats and cetaceans were found compared to other mammals. Positive selection, however, was not found to act on any of the Hox genes in the common ancestor of bats and only upon Hoxb9 in cetaceans. PCR amplification data from additional bat and cetacean species, and application of the branch-site test 2, showed that the Hoxb2 gene within bats had significant evidence of positive selection. Thus, our study, with genomic and newly sequenced Hox genes, identifies two candidate Hox genes that may be closely linked with developmental changes in bats and cetaceans, such as those associated with the pancreatic, neuronal, thymus shape and forelimb. In addition, the difference in our results from the genome-wide scan and newly sequenced data reveals that great care must be taken in interpreting results from draft genome data from a limited number of species, and deep genetic sampling of a particular clade is a powerful tool for generating complementary data to address this limitation.

  11. Repellence Effect of the New Sound for Underwater Speaker of Hydrofoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsunori Nakashima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent hydrofoil colliding with cetaceans, the underwater speaker (UWS has been installed to repel cetaceans. Yamada et al. (2012 analyzed and devised the UWS sound as it fits the cetaceans' acoustic properties to prevent the collision furthermore. The new UWS sound was devised and synthesized by Yamada et al. (2015 with expectation of avoiding collision with large cetaceans (Patent applied for, JP2014-171411. In this research project, the new UWS sound was investigated by the playback experiment on humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae and by sighting survey in the actual hydrofoil shipping service route. As a result, a physiological and behavioral change of the humpback whale was observed in the playback experiment of the new UWS sound, and the chance of hydrofoil encountering cetaceans of the new UWS sound was smaller than that of the previous UWS sound. Therefore, the improvement of the new UWS sound was confirmed. Lastly, we wish this research project would contribute toward the safer cruise of hydrofoil in the future.

  12. Unsupervised Threshold for Automatic Extraction of Dolphin Dorsal Fin Outlines from Digital Photographs in DARWIN (Digital Analysis and Recognition of Whale Images on a Network)

    CERN Document Server

    Hale, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    At least two software packages---DARWIN, Eckerd College, and FinScan, Texas A&M---exist to facilitate the identification of cetaceans---whales, dolphins, porpoises---based upon the naturally occurring features along the edges of their dorsal fins. Such identification is useful for biological studies of population, social interaction, migration, etc. The process whereby fin outlines are extracted in current fin-recognition software packages is manually intensive and represents a major user input bottleneck: it is both time consuming and visually fatiguing. This research aims to develop automated methods (employing unsupervised thresholding and morphological processing techniques) to extract cetacean dorsal fin outlines from digital photographs thereby reducing manual user input. Ideally, automatic outline generation will improve the overall user experience and improve the ability of the software to correctly identify cetaceans. Various transformations from color to gray space were examined to determine whi...

  13. Propulsive efficiency of the underwater dolphin kick in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Loebbecke, Alfred; Mittal, Rajat; Fish, Frank; Mark, Russell

    2009-05-01

    Three-dimensional fully unsteady computational fluid dynamic simulations of five Olympic-level swimmers performing the underwater dolphin kick are used to estimate the swimmer's propulsive efficiencies. These estimates are compared with those of a cetacean performing the dolphin kick. The geometries of the swimmers and the cetacean are based on laser and CT scans, respectively, and the stroke kinematics is based on underwater video footage. The simulations indicate that the propulsive efficiency for human swimmers varies over a relatively wide range from about 11% to 29%. The efficiency of the cetacean is found to be about 56%, which is significantly higher than the human swimmers. The computed efficiency is found not to correlate with either the slender body theory or with the Strouhal number.

  14. Integrating chemistry, biophysics and physiology in the evolution of mammalian Myoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria

    of mutations in Mb on the aerobic dive limits (ADL) of Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii). We show that wild-type Mb traits are only superior under specific physiological conditions that critically prolong the ADL, action radius, and fitness of the seals. Third, we deal with the observation of higher...... folding stabilities (i.e., ΔGfolding) of cetacean Mbs compared to their terrestrial counterparts. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and Bayesian tests to describe the evolution of cetacean Mbs, and experimentally calibrated computation of stability effects of mutations (i...... a general protein phenotype such as folding stability, that was shown as an example to be positively selected in cetacean Mbs in the iv third part of this thesis, affects the rate of protein evolution. Using a model that combines explicit evolution of Mb sequences, folding stability, and application...

  15. Molecular evolution tracks macroevolutionary transitions in Cetacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowen, Michael R; Gatesy, John; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-06-01

    Cetacea (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) is a model group for investigating the molecular signature of macroevolutionary transitions. Recent research has begun to reveal the molecular underpinnings of the remarkable anatomical and behavioral transformation in this clade. This shift from terrestrial to aquatic environments is arguably the best-understood major morphological transition in vertebrate evolution. The ancestral body plan and physiology were extensively modified and, in many cases, these crucial changes are recorded in cetacean genomes. Recent studies have highlighted cetaceans as central to understanding adaptive molecular convergence and pseudogene formation. Here, we review current research in cetacean molecular evolution and the potential of Cetacea as a model for the study of other macroevolutionary transitions from a genomic perspective.

  16. Encountering whales: How encounter rates became the basis for managing whaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim D Smith

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Declining rates of encountering whales, including both sighting and catching, were noted by whalers throughout the 19th century, and these declines became the first indication that whaling was adversely affecting whale abundance. The interpretation of declines in both sighting and catch rates proved to be a difficult scientific task. Satisfactory quantitative methods of interpreting changes in whale encounter rates were not developed until the second half of the 20th century. Rates of encountering whales played a key role in the International Whaling Commission (IWC Scientific Committee from its beginning in the early 1950s, as well as in the US in implementing its Marine Mammal Protection Act beginning in the early 1970s. The development of methods of collecting and interpreting sighting and catch data was intimately interwoven with the development of themanagement of whaling and cetacean by-catches in fisheries throughout the world, but especially within the context of the Scientific Committees of the IWC and the North Atlantic Marine Mammal Commission (NAMMCO. Although overfishing of whales was initially identified through the use of sighting rate data, catch rate data provided the IWC’s Committee its first firm footing for management advice. However, it was sighting rate data that ultimately became the basis for the scientific advice on whaling and for management advice in other settings. This led to the development of large scale cetacean sighting programmes, such as the IWC’s International Decade of Cetacean Researchsurveys in Antarctic aboard Japanese ships, the North Atlantic Sighting Surveys (NASS aboard Norwegian, Icelandic, Spanish, Greenlandic and Faroese vessels and aircraft (coordinated by NAMMCO through its Scientific Committee from 1995, and surveys under the US’s Marine Mammal Protection Act and the European Union’s Small Cetacean Abundance in the North Sea (SCANS programme. Fishery independent cetacean sighting surveys

  17. Bilateral Directional Asymmetry of the Appendicular Skeleton of the White-Beaked Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus albirostris)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galatius, Anders

    2006-01-01

    (Phocoena phocoena) that show asymmetry favouring the right side in all of the dimensions investigated here. This may indicate a different pattern of employment of the flippers. The detected asymmetries, along with the many examples of lateralized behaviour recorded in cetaceans, point to the existence...... of lateralized use of the flippers in the white-beaked dolphin and possibly other delphinid and cetacean species. Although some evidence exists for flipper preference in the baleen humpback whale (Megaptera novaengliae) and turning preferences in other species, this needs to be confirmed through further...

  18. Timing of epiphyseal development in the flipper skeleton of the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) as an indicator of paedomorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galatius, Anders; Andersen, Mai-Britt Elin Rindom; Haugan, Birgitte Margrethe

    2006-01-01

    Epiphyseal development was investigated on X-rays of flippers from 158 harbour porpoises from Danish waters. Development followed a proximodistal pattern similar to what is known in other cetacean species. Ossification of epiphyses was rare in the phalanges of the first and fifth digits and in th......Epiphyseal development was investigated on X-rays of flippers from 158 harbour porpoises from Danish waters. Development followed a proximodistal pattern similar to what is known in other cetacean species. Ossification of epiphyses was rare in the phalanges of the first and fifth digits...

  19. Quantitative Measures of Anthropogenic Noise on Harbor Porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Teilmann, Jonas; Hermannsen, Line

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several sound and movement recording tags have been developed to sample the acoustic fi eld experienced by cetaceans and their reactions to it. However, little is known about how tag placement and an animal’s orientation in the sound fi eld affect the reliability of on-animal rec......In recent years, several sound and movement recording tags have been developed to sample the acoustic fi eld experienced by cetaceans and their reactions to it. However, little is known about how tag placement and an animal’s orientation in the sound fi eld affect the reliability of on...

  20. Dolphin Watching in the Southern Tañon Strait Protected Seascape, Philippines: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemnuel V. Aragones

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dolphin watching is a growing economic activity in the southern Tañon Strait Protected Seascape (TSPS, the Philippines, an area that is also heavily exploited by fisheries. In order to examine the issues and challenges in this growing industry, we monitored relevant information regarding cetacean watching, conducted focus group discussions (FGDs and educational seminar-workshops for various local stakeholders from 2004 to 2006, and followed these up from 2008-2012. From 9 May to 16 August 2004, we conducted structured interviews to determine the perceptions of cetacean-watching tourists (CWTs and assess the level of local knowledge of f ishers and non-fishers (NFs regarding marine mammals and environmental management in this area. Ninety f ive (95 CWTs, 100 local fishers, and 64 NFs were interviewed. Sixty seven percent (n=64 of the CWTs believed that the overall quality of tours was impressive primarily because they were able to watch, at reasonable costs, large groups of dolphins in close proximity and in an almost pristine environment. The majority of CWTs (~91% felt that there is a need to develop a ‘Special Management Plan’ (SMP for the southern TSPS focusing on cetaceans and their habitats. The increasing number of dolphin watching boats, heavy exploitation of f ishing ground, misperception of local f ishers that cetaceans are competitors with f isheries, and lack of a SMP or a Management Plan per se for TSPS warranted the facilitation of a participatory management process to protect the cetaceans and their habitats.This study has shown that even with only preliminary results, survey interviews of key stakeholders in combination with FGDs and seminar-workshop could be critical in facilitating a participatory management process. In the case of the TSPS, this par ticipatory approach led to the formation of the Tañon Strait Association of Dolphin and Whale Watching Operators, Inc. (TaSADoWWI, and eventual development of cetacean

  1. A wideband connection to sperm whales: A fiber-optic, deep-sea hydrophone array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerfordt, Anders; Møhl, Bertel; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    A 10-element, 950 m long, vertical hydrophone array based on fiber-optic data transmission has been developed primarily for studying the beam pattern from deep diving cetaceans emitting sonar pulses. The array elements have a configurable sampling rate and resolution with a maximum signal bandwidth...

  2. The Whale That Walked

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Until about 55 million years ago,ancestors of whales and their kind, the cetaceans,were four-legged landlubbers. Gradually they evolved to take advantage of ocean resources and became the sea-dwelling mammals we know today. Now with the discovery of a skeleton in Pakistan,scientists are begin-

  3. Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises of the Eastern North Pacific and Adjacent Arctic Waters: A Guide to Their Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherwood, Stephen; And Others

    This field guide is designed to permit observers to identify the cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) they see in the waters of the eastern North Pacific, including the Gulf of California, Hawaii, and the western Arctic of North America. The animals described are grouped not by scientific relationships but by similarities in appearance in…

  4. Ecological characteristics contribute to sponge distribution and tool use in bottlenose dolphins Tursiops sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyne, Julian A.; Loneragan, Neil R.; Kopps, Anna M.; Allen, Simon J.; Kruetzen, Michael; Bejder, Lars

    2012-01-01

    In Shark Bay, Western Australia, bottlenose dolphins Tursiops sp. carry conical sponges Echinodictyum mesenterinum on their rostra in the only documented cetacean foraging behaviour using a tool ('sponging'). In this study, we examined the influence of various ecological factors on live sponge distr

  5. To see or not to see: investigating detectability of Ganges River dolphins using a combined visual-acoustic survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia I Richman

    Full Text Available Detection of animals during visual surveys is rarely perfect or constant, and failure to account for imperfect detectability affects the accuracy of abundance estimates. Freshwater cetaceans are among the most threatened group of mammals, and visual surveys are a commonly employed method for estimating population size despite concerns over imperfect and unquantified detectability. We used a combined visual-acoustic survey to estimate detectability of Ganges River dolphins (Platanista gangetica gangetica in four waterways of southern Bangladesh. The combined visual-acoustic survey resulted in consistently higher detectability than a single observer-team visual survey, thereby improving power to detect trends. Visual detectability was particularly low for dolphins close to meanders where these habitat features temporarily block the view of the preceding river surface. This systematic bias in detectability during visual-only surveys may lead researchers to underestimate the importance of heavily meandering river reaches. Although the benefits of acoustic surveys are increasingly recognised for marine cetaceans, they have not been widely used for monitoring abundance of freshwater cetaceans due to perceived costs and technical skill requirements. We show that acoustic surveys are in fact a relatively cost-effective approach for surveying freshwater cetaceans, once it is acknowledged that methods that do not account for imperfect detectability are of limited value for monitoring.

  6. To see or not to see: investigating detectability of Ganges River dolphins using a combined visual-acoustic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Nadia I; Gibbons, James M; Turvey, Samuel T; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Ahmed, Benazir; Mahabub, Emile; Smith, Brian D; Jones, Julia P G

    2014-01-01

    Detection of animals during visual surveys is rarely perfect or constant, and failure to account for imperfect detectability affects the accuracy of abundance estimates. Freshwater cetaceans are among the most threatened group of mammals, and visual surveys are a commonly employed method for estimating population size despite concerns over imperfect and unquantified detectability. We used a combined visual-acoustic survey to estimate detectability of Ganges River dolphins (Platanista gangetica gangetica) in four waterways of southern Bangladesh. The combined visual-acoustic survey resulted in consistently higher detectability than a single observer-team visual survey, thereby improving power to detect trends. Visual detectability was particularly low for dolphins close to meanders where these habitat features temporarily block the view of the preceding river surface. This systematic bias in detectability during visual-only surveys may lead researchers to underestimate the importance of heavily meandering river reaches. Although the benefits of acoustic surveys are increasingly recognised for marine cetaceans, they have not been widely used for monitoring abundance of freshwater cetaceans due to perceived costs and technical skill requirements. We show that acoustic surveys are in fact a relatively cost-effective approach for surveying freshwater cetaceans, once it is acknowledged that methods that do not account for imperfect detectability are of limited value for monitoring.

  7. On the comparative anatomy and function of the nasal tract in odontocetes (Mammalia, Cetacea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenkkan, E.J.

    1973-01-01

    In the study of phonation in odontocete cetaceans and particularly that of echolocation by means of sonar, a great number of conflicting hypotheses have been advanced regarding the correlation of sound production with the many anatomical features that are to be found in the upper respiratory tract.

  8. 76 FR 78242 - Marine Mammals; File No. 14241

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... conduct research on cetacean behavior, sound production, and responses to sound. The research methods... No. 14241-02 to conduct research on marine mammals. DATES: Written, telefaxed, or email comments must... request or by appointment in the following office(s): Permits, Conservation and Education Division,...

  9. Dolphins and African apes: comparisons of sympatric socio-ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bearzi, M.; Stanford, C.B.

    2007-01-01

    Dolphins and African apes are distantly related mammalian taxa that exhibit striking convergences in their socioecology. In both cetaceans and African apes, two or more closely related species sometimes occur in sympatry. However, detailed reviews of the ways in which sympatric associations of dolph

  10. Common dolphin ( Delphinus delphis) habitat preferences using data from two platforms of opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, André E.; Sillero, Neftalí; Rodrigues, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Cetaceans are difficult to observe in the wild, and demand complex logistics for dedicated collection of biological data. As such, the distribution of most cetacean species is still poorly understood. Ecological niche models are useful in studying species distributions and their ecological determinants, and platforms of opportunity (e.g. commercial nautical operators) can provide an alternative source for that data in cetaceans. In this study, we modelled common dolphin ( Delphinus delphis) habitat preferences using ecological niche modelling and presence data obtained from distinct platforms of opportunity in two different areas in the Portuguese coast (west and south mainland Portugal) for the period 2005-2007. Models from southern Portugal were projected to western Portugal and vice-versa, to check for robustness in predicting the species ecological niche. Our results show that data from platforms of opportunity can result in robust ecological models and provide extremely useful information on cetacean ecology. We found that common dolphins exhibit a patchy distribution pattern over the Portuguese coastline, and identified key habitats for their occurrence. The most important variable associated with this species' distribution was chlorophyll concentration which, given the results from previous research, we hypothesise reflects an ecological specialisation on pelagic schooling fish. Given that the most abundant schooling fish species in Portugal is increasingly overexploited and in constant decline, more attention should be given to the conservation of common dolphin in Portuguese waters.

  11. Quantitative relationships in delphinid neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Heidi S.; Pakkenberg, Bente; Dam, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Possessing large brains and complex behavioral patterns, cetaceans are believed to be highly intelligent. Their brains, which are the largest in the Animal Kingdom and have enormous gyrification compared with terrestrial mammals, have long been of scientific interest. Few studies, however, report...

  12. Placentation in dolphins from the Amazon River Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva, Vera M F; Carter, Anthony M; Ambrosio, Carlos E

    2007-01-01

    A recent reassessment of the phylogenetic affinities of cetaceans makes it timely to compare their placentation with that of the artiodactyls. We studied the placentae of two sympatric species of dolphin from the Amazon River Basin, representing two distinct families. The umbilical cord branched...

  13. The stranding anomaly as population indicator: the case of harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena in North-Western Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Peltier

    Full Text Available Ecological indicators for monitoring strategies are expected to combine three major characteristics: ecological significance, statistical credibility, and cost-effectiveness. Strategies based on stranding networks rank highly in cost-effectiveness, but their ecological significance and statistical credibility are disputed. Our present goal is to improve the value of stranding data as population indicator as part of monitoring strategies by constructing the spatial and temporal null hypothesis for strandings. The null hypothesis is defined as: small cetacean distribution and mortality are uniform in space and constant in time. We used a drift model to map stranding probabilities and predict stranding patterns of cetacean carcasses under H0 across the North Sea, the Channel and the Bay of Biscay, for the period 1990-2009. As the most common cetacean occurring in this area, we chose the harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena for our modelling. The difference between these strandings expected under H0 and observed strandings is defined as the stranding anomaly. It constituted the stranding data series corrected for drift conditions. Seasonal decomposition of stranding anomaly suggested that drift conditions did not explain observed seasonal variations of porpoise strandings. Long-term stranding anomalies increased first in the southern North Sea, the Channel and Bay of Biscay coasts, and finally the eastern North Sea. The hypothesis of changes in porpoise distribution was consistent with local visual surveys, mostly SCANS surveys (1994 and 2005. This new indicator could be applied to cetacean populations across the world and more widely to marine megafauna.

  14. Monitoring the marine environment using marine mammal tissue samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, P.D.; Hannah, D.J.; Day, P.J. [ESR:Environmental, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Marine environments, both inshore and open ocean, receive numerous inputs of anthropogenic chemicals. Cetaceans provide a valuable resource for monitoring the low level contamination of marine environments with persistent organic contaminants. Comparative studies using inshore and offshore southern ocean cetaceans have revealed significant differences in the types of contamination in these two environments. The polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) deposited in the southern oceans are characterized by an abundance of lower chlorinated congeners. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) are not present at significant concentrations in cetaceans from the open southern ocean. In contrast significant concentrations of PCDD/F congeners are detected in the blubber of the inshore living Hector`s dolphin. This species lives close to the shore and has a very small home range (approximately 30 km) for a cetacean. Analysis of tissue PCDD/F and PCB profiles from different populations and their food sources will be presented. The data are being used to determine if there are local variations in the contamination of the New Zealand inshore marine environment.

  15. Passive acoustic methods for fine-scale tracking of harbour porpoises in tidal rapids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macaulay, Jamie; Gordon, Jonathan; Gillespie, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    on how marine mammals use tidal rapid habitats and in particular, their underwater movements and dive behaviour is required. Porpoises, which are the most abundant small cetacean at most European tidal sites, are difficult animals to tag, and the limited size of tidal habitats means that any telemetered...

  16. Ultra-High Foraging Rates of Harbor Porpoises Make Them Vulnerable to Anthropogenic Disturbance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Johnson, Mark; Teilmann, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    recording tags on five wild harbour porpoises to examine foraging interactions in one of the most metabolically challenged cetacean species. We report that porpoises forage nearly continuously day and night, attempting to capture up to 550 small (3-10 cm) fish prey per hour with a remarkable prey capture...

  17. Prey consumed by Guiana dolphin Sotalia guianensis (Cetacea, Delphinidae and franciscana dolphin Pontoporia blainvillei (Cetacea, Pontoporiidae in an estuarine environment in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta J. Cremer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study provides information about the diet of sympatric populations of small cetaceans in the Babitonga Bay estuary. This is the first study on the diet of these species in direct sympatry. The stomach contents of seven Guiana dolphins Sotalia guianensis and eight franciscanas Pontoporia blainvillei were analyzed. The prey of both cetaceans was mostly teleost fishes, followed by cephalopods. We identified 13 teleost fishes as part of the diet of the franciscanas, and 20 as part of the diet of Guiana dolphins. Lolliguncula brevis was the only cephalopod recorded, and was the most important prey for both cetaceans. Stellifer rastrifer and Gobionellus oceanicus were also important for franciscana, so as Mugil curema and Micropogonias furnieri were important for Guiana dolphins. Stellifer rastrifer and Cetengraulis edentulus were the fishes with the highest frequency of occurrence for franciscana (50%, while Achirus lineatus, C. edentulus, S. brasiliensis, Cynoscion leiarchus, M. furnieri, M. curema, Diapterus rhombeus, Eugerres brasilianus and G. oceanicus showed 28.6% of frequency of occurrence for Guiana dolphins. Franciscanas captured greater cephalopods than the Guiana dolphins in both total length (z= -3.38; n= 40; p< 0.05 and biomass (z = -2.46; n = 40; p<0.05. All of the prey species identified occur inside the estuary, which represents a safe habitat against predators and food availability, reinforcing the importance of the Babitonga Bay for these cetacean populations.

  18. Mammal Reproductive Strategies Driven by Offspring Mortality-Size Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibly, Richard M.; Brown, James H.

    2009-01-01

    . Artiodactyls, perissodactyls, cetaceans, and pinnipeds, which give birth in the open on land or in the sea, produce a few large offspring, at infrequent intervals, because this increases their chances of escaping predation. Insectivores, fissiped carnivores, lagomorphs, and rodents, whose offspring...

  19. 45 CFR 670.19 - Designation of native mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of native mammals. 670.19 Section 670.19 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION.... Large Cetaceans (Whales): Blue whale—Balaenoptera musculus. Fin whale—Balaenoptera physalus....

  20. USSR Report, Life Sciences Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    the way of the sonic wave is an acoustical lens, a very special part of the body, which exists only in cetaceans , the so-called melon (Figure 8...specialized children’s homes until they are 4 years old, and then are transferred to the home-boarding school system of social welfare . Thus, according

  1. Worldwide Emerging Environmental Issues Affecting the U.S. Military. July 2006 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    around the world. The conservation groups that filed the lawsuit were: Natural Resources Defense Council, the International Fund for Animal Welfare , the... Cetacean Society International, the Ocean Futures Society (OFS), and (OFS) founder and director Jean-Michel Cousteau. [See also Underwater Sounds

  2. Plastics Pollution Control Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    recycling program has generated $1 million as well as avoided significant landfill costs. The money collected is going to the base welfare and...Barbara Britten American Cetacean Society 1300 South Arlington Ridge Road #614 Arlington, Virginia 22202 703-920-0076 Fax: 703-271-8204 Madelyn

  3. 75 FR 38457 - Marine Mammals; File No. 15511

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... California for the purpose of public display. This animal was rescued by the Southern Caribbean Cetacean... 93-C- 0069, issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture under the Animal Welfare Act (7 U.S.C. Sec... and does not represent any unnecessary risks to the health and welfare of marine mammals; that...

  4. Augmentation of the In Vivo Elastic Properties Measurement System to Include Bulk Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    estimates based on measured displacement magnitudes. APPROACH The bulk properties measurement methods are intended to run concurrently with the...to better understand biomechanics of sound reception and production in cetaceans, and 2) to understand and hopefully mitigate any harmful effects of

  5. The modelling and assessment of whale-watching impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Leslie; Hall, Ailsa J.; Harcourt, Robert; Kaufman, Greg; Parsons, E.C.M.; Pearson, Heidi C.; Cosentino, A. Mel; Schick, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been significant interest in modelling cumulative effects and the population consequences of individual changes in cetacean behaviour and physiology due to disturbance. One potential source of disturbance that has garnered particular interest is whale-watching. Though perceived as ‘green’ or eco-friendly tourism, there is evidence that whale-watching can result in statistically significant and biologically meaningful changes in cetacean behaviour, raising the question whether whale-watching is in fact a long term sustainable activity. However, an assessment of the impacts of whale-watching on cetaceans requires an understanding of the potential behavioural and physiological effects, data to effectively address the question and suitable modelling techniques. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on the viability of long-term whale-watching, as well as logistical limitations and potential opportunities. We conclude that an integrated, coordinated approach will be needed to further understanding of the possible effects of whale-watching on cetaceans.

  6. Report on ONR Conference on ’Dolphin Behavior and Cognition: Comparative and Ecological Aspects’, Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute, San Diego, California, 92109, July 6-9, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Brookfield Zoo Brookfield, IL 60513 Robert Buhr Animal communication and cognition; Department of Linguistics neurolinguistics and neuropsychology Brown...Rockefeller University 1230 York Avenue New York, NY 10021 Henry Halff (observer) Personnel and Training Research Program .,,; Code 442 PT Arlington, VA 22212...observer) Physiology and Neurobiology Research Program Code 441 NP e., Office of Naval Research Arlington, VA 22217 Bernd Wursig Cetacean behavior

  7. 75 FR 32372 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Longline Limited Entry Program Modifications (Action) D. Territory Fisheries Development (Action) E.... Protected Species A. False Killer Whale Take Reduction Team Meeting Report B. Cetacean Survey Methodology C... Killer Whale) D. American Samoa Longline Amendment Consultation E. Public Comment F. SSC Discussion...

  8. Fitting Models of the Population Consequences of Acoustic Disturbance to Data from Marine Mammal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    including humans . By using sporadic observations together with an underlying process model, we can infer how individuals are interacting with their... cetaceans (e.g. gray whales – (Bradford et al. 2012)), the right whale analysis provides a framework for analyzing many different mammalian species

  9. DCL System Using Deep Learning Approaches for Land-based or Ship-based Real-Time Recognition and Localization of Marine Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    human operator to interact with the data. (a) Feature distribution plot. (b) Feature scatter plot. (c) Scatter plots having interoperability with...Ward Human auditory perception for identifying cetaceans , specifically those located in the Mass. Bay area. Senior Research Analyst, Cornell...long-term, continuous datasets to provide automatic recognition, minimizing human time to annotate the signals. Effort will begin by focusing on

  10. Assessing the Operational Effectiveness of a Small Surface Combat Ship in an Anti-Surface Warfare Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Marine Protected Areas for CETACEANS , 93. Bonabeau, E. (2002). Agent-based modeling: Methods and techniques for simulating human systems...61 5. Interaction of the Factors ...................................................... 63 6...stepwise regression model to include the main effects, two-way interactions , and polynomials. ....... 48 Figure 23. Sorted parameter estimates of

  11. Population Parameters of Beaked Whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    of deep diving cetaceans , their use of the habitat, and their sensitivity to human interactions . The results will facilitate improved regional...augment the sparse knowledge of beaked whale population biology, facilitating the assessment of possible population effects of human impacts...potential population effects of human impacts. Economic development Economic development is often related to increasing noise levels in the ocean

  12. Pinniped Hearing in Complex Acoustic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    channels to aid in detection in noisy environments, consistent with similar findings in human and cetacean subjects (e.g. Hall et al. 1984...how signal structure and noise environments interact to constrain auditory performance, and develop weighting functions that can be used for species

  13. Comparative genomics reveals conservation of filaggrin and loss of caspase-14 in dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Bettina; Mlitz, Veronika; Fischer, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2015-05-01

    The expression of filaggrin and its stepwise proteolytic degradation are critical events in the terminal differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes and in the formation of the skin barrier to the environment. Here, we investigated whether the evolutionary transition from a terrestrial to a fully aquatic lifestyle of cetaceans, that is dolphins and whales, has been associated with changes in genes encoding filaggrin and proteins involved in the processing of filaggrin. We used comparative genomics, PCRs and re-sequencing of gene segments to screen for the presence and integrity of genes coding for filaggrin and proteases implicated in the maturation of (pro)filaggrin. Filaggrin has been conserved in dolphins (bottlenose dolphin, orca and baiji) but has been lost in whales (sperm whale and minke whale). All other S100 fused-type genes have been lost in cetaceans. Among filaggrin-processing proteases, aspartic peptidase retroviral-like 1 (ASPRV1), also known as saspase, has been conserved, whereas caspase-14 has been lost in all cetaceans investigated. In conclusion, our results suggest that filaggrin is dispensable for the acquisition of fully aquatic lifestyles of whales, whereas it appears to confer an evolutionary advantage to dolphins. The discordant evolution of filaggrin, saspase and caspase-14 in cetaceans indicates that the biological roles of these proteins are not strictly interdependent.

  14. Whale-Watching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lande, Rivian

    1973-01-01

    Describes a program initiated by the Cabrillo Beach Museum (San Pedro, California) and the American Cetacean Society to take students of the fourth grade through high school on half-day cruises to observe gray whales. College students assist in the program with related field projects and presentations in the schools. (JR)

  15. Citrobacter freundii septicemia in a stranded newborn Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Antonio; Vela, Ana Isabel; Andrada, Marisa; Herraez, Pedro; Díaz-Delgado, Josue; Domínguez, Lucas; Arbelo, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Citrobacter freundii, a gram-negative enterobacterium, may cause fatal septicemia in humans and animals. Its potential pathogenic role in cetaceans (bottlenose dolphins and beluga whales) has been hypothesized. Here we describe fatal C. freundii septicemia in a stranded newborn Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris).

  16. 78 FR 32624 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... Limits (ACLs) 2. Modified Catch-Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) Approach to Specify ABCs 3. Options for... A. Age-Structured Model of False Killer Whales B. Papahanaumokuakea Associated Cetacean Ecology... Western Pacific D. Community Projects, Activities and Issues 1. Community Development Project (CDP)...

  17. Correlates of Cytochrome P450 1A1 Expression in Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) Integument Biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, J.Y.; Wells, R.; Anguilar, A.; Borrell, A.; Tornero, V.; Reijnders, P.J.H.; Moore, M.

    2007-01-01

    Integument biopsy is a nondestructive method for sampling free-ranging cetaceans, which allows for the determination of both contaminant concentrations and biomarker responses. Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression is induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and planar halogenated aromatic hydr

  18. The mitochondrial genome and ribosomal operon of Brachycladium goliath (Digenea: Brachycladiidae) recovered from a stranded minke whale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Andrew G; Bray, Rodney A; Brabec, Jan; Littlewood, D T J

    2016-06-01

    Members of the Brachycladiidae are known to cause pathologies implicated in cetacean strandings and it is important to develop accurate diagnostic markers to differentiate these and other helminths found in cetaceans. Brachycladium goliath (van Beneden, 1858) is a large trematode found, as adults, usually in the hepatic (bile) and pancreatic ducts of various cetaceans. Complete sequences were determined for the entire mitochondrial genome, and phylogenetically informative nuclear genes contained within the ribosomal operon, from a small piece of an individual worm taken from a common minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata Lacépède, 1804. Genomic DNA was sequenced using an Illumina MiSeq platform. The mtDNA is 15,229 bp in length consisting of 12 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 2 non-coding regions of which the larger is comprised of 4 tandemly repeated units (260 bp each). The ribosomal RNA operon is 9297 bp long. These data provide a rich resource of molecular markers for diagnostics, phylogenetics and population genetics in order to better understand the role, and associated pathology of helminth infections in cetaceans.

  19. The stranding anomaly as population indicator: the case of harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena in North-Western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Helene; Baagøe, Hans J; Camphuysen, Kees C J; Czeck, Richard; Dabin, Willy; Daniel, Pierre; Deaville, Rob; Haelters, Jan; Jauniaux, Thierry; Jensen, Lasse F; Jepson, Paul D; Keijl, Guido O; Siebert, Ursula; Van Canneyt, Olivier; Ridoux, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Ecological indicators for monitoring strategies are expected to combine three major characteristics: ecological significance, statistical credibility, and cost-effectiveness. Strategies based on stranding networks rank highly in cost-effectiveness, but their ecological significance and statistical credibility are disputed. Our present goal is to improve the value of stranding data as population indicator as part of monitoring strategies by constructing the spatial and temporal null hypothesis for strandings. The null hypothesis is defined as: small cetacean distribution and mortality are uniform in space and constant in time. We used a drift model to map stranding probabilities and predict stranding patterns of cetacean carcasses under H0 across the North Sea, the Channel and the Bay of Biscay, for the period 1990-2009. As the most common cetacean occurring in this area, we chose the harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena for our modelling. The difference between these strandings expected under H0 and observed strandings is defined as the stranding anomaly. It constituted the stranding data series corrected for drift conditions. Seasonal decomposition of stranding anomaly suggested that drift conditions did not explain observed seasonal variations of porpoise strandings. Long-term stranding anomalies increased first in the southern North Sea, the Channel and Bay of Biscay coasts, and finally the eastern North Sea. The hypothesis of changes in porpoise distribution was consistent with local visual surveys, mostly SCANS surveys (1994 and 2005). This new indicator could be applied to cetacean populations across the world and more widely to marine megafauna.

  20. 78 FR 19652 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Office of Naval Research Acoustic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    .... Stranding and Mortality Specific sound-related processes that lead to strandings and mortality are not well... exposure, could be a pathologic mechanism for the strandings and mortality of some deep- diving cetaceans exposed to sonar. The cause or causes of most strandings are unknown (Geraci et al., 1976; Eaton,...