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Sample records for cesium strontium actinides

  1. Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents For Cesium, Strontium and Actinides

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    Hobbs, D.; Nyman, M.; Clearfield, A.; Maginn, E.

    2006-06-01

    The basic science goal in this project identifies structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The task will apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of new sorbents that will exhibit increased affinity for cesium, strontium and actinide separations. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to nonradioactive separations.

  2. Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents for Cesium, Strontium and Actinides

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    Edward J. Maginn

    2009-11-09

    The primary objective of the Notre Dame component of the project was computational in nature. The goal was to provide a design tool for the synthesis of optimized sorbents for the removal of cesium, strontium and actinides from nuclear waste solutions. Molecular modeling enables us to observe and better understand the molecular level interactions that govern the selectivity of specific radionuclides in a particular sorbent. The research focused on the development and validation of a suitable and transferable model for all the cations and ion exchangers of interest, nd then subsequent simulations which determined the siting and mobility of water and cations. Speciic accomplishments include: (1) improving existing intermolecular force fields to accurately model the sorbents of interest; (2) utilizing energy-minimizations and molecular dynamics simulations for structural prediction of CST and niobium-substituted CST materials; (3) determining Na+/water positions in polyoxoniobate materials using molecular dynamics simulations; and (4) developing Hybrid Monte Carlo methods for improved structural prediction.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOTYPE TITANATE ION EXCHANGE LOADED MEMBRANES FOR STRONTIUM, CESIUM AND ACTINIDE DECONTAMINATION FROM AQUEOUS MEDIA

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    Oji, L; Keisha Martin, K; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-30

    We have successfully incorporated high surface area particles of titanate ion exchange materials (monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate) with acceptable particle size distribution into porous and inert support membrane fibrils consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon{reg_sign}), polyethylene and cellulose materials. The resulting membrane sheets, under laboratory conditions, were used to evaluate the removal of surrogate radioactive materials for cesium-137 and strontium-90 from high caustic nuclear waste simulants. These membrane supports met the nominal requirement for nonchemical interaction with the embedded ion exchange materials and were porous enough to allow sufficient liquid flow. Some of this 47-mm size stamped out prototype titanium impregnated ion exchange membrane discs was found to remove more than 96% of dissolved cesium-133 and strontium-88 from a caustic nuclear waste salt simulants. Since in traditional ion exchange based column technology monosodium titanate (MST) is known to have great affinity for the sorbing of other actinides like plutonium, neptunium and even uranium, we expect that the MST-based membranes developed here, although not directly evaluated for uptake of these three actinides because of costs associated with working with actinides which do not have 'true' experimental surrogates, would also show significant affinity for these actinides in aqueous media. It was also observed that crystalline silicotitanate impregnated polytetrafluoroethylene or polyethylene membranes became less selective and sorbed both cesium and strontium from the caustic aqueous salt simulants.

  4. FY06 ANNUAL REPORT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT #95061STRATEGIC DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF INORGANIC SORBENTSFOR CESIUM, STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D

    2006-08-10

    The basic science goal in this project identifies structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The task will apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of new sorbents that will exhibit increased affinity for cesium, strontium and actinide separations. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to nonradioactive separations. During the fifth year of the project our studies focused along the following paths: (1) determination of Cs{sup +} ion exchange mechanism in sodium titanium silicates with sitinikite topology and the influence of crystallinity on ion exchange, (2) synthesis and characterization of novel peroxo-titanate materials for strontium and actinide separations, and (3) further refinements in computational models for the CST and polyoxoniobate materials.

  5. Cesium and Strontium Separation Technologies Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Todd; T. A. Todd; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst

    2004-03-01

    Integral to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program’s proposed closed nuclear fuel cycle, the fission products cesium and strontium in the dissolved spent nuclear fuel stream are to be separated and managed separately. A comprehensive literature survey is presented to identify cesium and strontium separation technologies that have the highest potential and to focus research and development efforts on these technologies. Removal of these high-heat-emitting fission products reduces the radiation fields in subsequent fuel cycle reprocessing streams and provides a significant short-term (100 yr) heat source reduction in the repository. This, along with separation of actinides, may provide a substantial future improvement in the amount of fuel that could be stored in a geologic repository. The survey and review of the candidate cesium and strontium separation technologies are presented herein. Because the AFCI program intends to manage cesium and strontium together, technologies that simultaneously separate both elements are of the greatest interest, relative to technologies that separate only one of the two elements.

  6. Cesium and strontium ion specific exchangers

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    Yates, S.

    1996-10-01

    This work is one of two parallel projects that are part of an ESP task to develop high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. In this subtask, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with AlliedSignal, Inc. (Des Plaines, Illinois) to develop inorganic ion exchangers that are selective for strontium and cesium from alkaline high-level waste and groundwater streams.

  7. Crystalline silicotitanates for cesium/strontium removal

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    Brown, N.; Miller, J.; Sherman, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CST) has been developed that exhibits very high selectivity for cesium and strontium in the highly alkaline radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site and other DOE sites. Tests have also shown that CSTs have high selectivity for cesium in acidic and neutral solutions. The ESP is supporting an effort at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A & M University to further develop and characterize the important chemical and physical properties that will determine the applicability of CST to radioactive waste treatment at Hanford and other DOE facilities.

  8. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  9. Seaweed against strontium and preussian blue against cesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Michanek

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available The fact that alginates bind strontium and cyanates bind cesium and are capable of removing these elements from living organisms is scientifically verified. Zeolites offer another possibility for exchange of these ions. Practical research should be initiated to find the right doses and procedure to decrease the body burden of radioactive isotopes in reindeer.Alger mot strontium och berlinerblått mot cesium.Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning: Mitt budskap år kort: Alger binder strontium, Berlinerblått binder cesium, Sätt fart på forskning och forsök!

  10. Membrane-based separation technologies for cesium, strontium, and technetium

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    Kafka, T.

    1996-10-01

    This work is one of two parallel projects that are part of an ESP task to develop high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. In this subtask, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota, working in cooperation with IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah.

  11. Trade study for the disposition of cesium and strontium capsules

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    Claghorn, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    This trade study analyzes alternatives for the eventual disposal of cesium and strontium capsules currently stored at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility as by-product. However, for purposes of this study, it is assumed that at some time in the future, the capsules will be declared high-level waste and therefore will require disposal at an offsite geologic repository. The study considered numerous alternatives and selected three for detailed analysis: (1) overpack and storage at high-level waste canister storage building, (2) overpack at the high-level waste vitrification facility followed by storage at a high-level waste canister storage building, and (3) blend capsule contents with other high-level waste feed streams and vitrify at the high-level waste vitrification facility.

  12. Engineered Materials for Cesium and Strontium Storage Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sean M. McDeavitt

    2010-04-14

    Closing the nuclear fuel cycle requires reprocessing spent fuel to recover the long-lived components that still have useful energy content while immobilizing the remnant waste fission products in stable forms. At the genesis of this project, next generation spent fuel reprocessing methods were being developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. One of these processes was focused on solvent extraction schemes to isolate cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from spent nuclear fuel. Isolating these isotopes for short-term decay storage eases the design requirements for long-term repository disposal; a significant amount of the radiation and decay heat in fission product waste comes from Cs-137 and Sr-90. For the purposes of this project, the Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) process is being considered to be the baseline extraction method. The objective of this project was to evaluate the nature and behavior of candidate materials for cesium and strontium immobilization; this will include assessments with minor additions of yttrium, barium, and rubidium in these materials. More specifically, the proposed research achieved the following objectives (as stated in the original proposal): (1) Synthesize simulated storage ceramics for Cs and Sr using an existing labscale steam reformer at Purdue University. The simulated storage materials will include aluminosilicates, zirconates and other stable ceramics with the potential for high Cs and Sr loading. (2) Characterize the immobilization performance, phase structure, thermal properties and stability of the simulated storage ceramics. The ceramic products will be stable oxide powders and will be characterized to quantify their leach resistance, phase structure, and thermophysical properties. The research progressed in two stages. First, a steam reforming process was used to generate candidate Cs/Sr storage materials for characterization. This portion of the research was carried out at

  13. Comparison of organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removal of cesium and strontium from tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This work is part of an ESP task to develop high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff are investigating novel ion exchangers for use in nuclear waste remediation (groundwater, high-level waste (HLW), and low-level waste (LLW)). Waste components targeted for remediation include cesium, strontium, and technetium.

  14. Cesium and Strontium Specific Exchangers for Nuclear Waste Effluent Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Clearfield; A. I. Bortun; L. A. Bortun; E. A. Bhlume; P. Sylvester; G. M. Graziano

    2000-09-01

    During the past 50 years, nuclear defense activities have produced large quantities of nuclear waste that now require safe and permanent disposal. The general procedure to be implemented involves the removal of cesium and strontium from the waste solutions for disposal in permanently vitrified media. This requires highly selective sorbents or ion exchangers. Further, at the high radiation doses present in the solution, organic exchangers or sequestrants are likely to decompose over time. Inorganic ion exchangers are resistant to radiation damage and can exhibit remarkably high selectivities. We have synthesized three families of tunnel-type ion exchangers. The crystal structures of these compounds as well as their protonated phases, coupled with ion exchange titrations, were determined and this information was used to develop an understanding of their ion exchange behavior. The ion exchange selectivities of these phases could be regulated by isomorphous replacement of the framework metals by larger or smaller radius metals. In the realm of layered compounds, we prepared alumina, silica, and zirconia pillared clays and sodium micas. The pillared clays yielded very high Kd values for Cs+ and were very effective in removing Cs+ from groundwaters. The sodium micas also had a high affinity for Cs+ but an even greater attraction for S42+. They also possess the property of trapping these ions permanently as the layers slowly decrease their interlayer distance as loading occurs. Sodium nonatitanate exhibited extremely high Kd values for Sr2+ in alkaline tank wastes and should be considered for removal of Sr2+ in such cases. For tank wastes containing complexing agents, we have found that adding Ca2+ to the solution releases the complexed Sr2+ which may then be removed with the CST exchanger.

  15. Concentration Ratios for Cesium and Strontium in Produce Near Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Salazar, M.McNaughton, P.R. Fresquez

    2006-03-01

    The ratios of the concentrations of radionuclides in produce (fruits, vegetables, and grains) to the concentrations in the soil have been measured for cesium and strontium at locations near Los Alamos. The Soil, Foodstuffs, and Biota Team of the Meteorology and Air Quality Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) obtained the data at locations within a radius of 50 miles of LANL. The concentration ratios are in good agreement with previous measurements: 0.01 to 0.06 for cesium-137 and 0.1 to 0.5 for strontium-90 (wet-weight basis).

  16. Physical barrier effect of geopolymeric waste form on diffusivity of cesium and strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J G; Park, S M; Lee, H K

    2016-11-15

    The present study investigates the physical barrier effect of geopolymeric waste form on leaching behavior of cesium and strontium. Fly ash-based geopolymers and slag-blended geopolymers were used as solidification agents. The leaching behavior of cesium and strontium from geopolymers was evaluated in accordance with ANSI/ANS-16.1. The diffusivity of cesium and strontium in a fly ash-based geopolymer was lower than that in Portland cement by a factor of 10(3) and 10(4), respectively, showing significantly improved immobilization performance. The leaching resistance of fly ash-based geopolymer was relatively constant regardless of the type of fly ash. The diffusivity of water-soluble cesium and strontium ions were highly correlated with the critical pore diameter of the binder. The critical pore diameter of the fly ash-based geopolymer was remarkably smaller than those of Portland cement and slag-blended geopolymer; consequently, its ability physically to retard the diffusion of nuclides (physical barrier effect) was superior.

  17. Sintered bentonite ceramics for the immobilization of cesium- and strontium-bearing radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Luis Humberto

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) is a Department of Energy (DOE) program, that has been investigating technologies to improve fuel cycle sustainability and proliferation resistance. One of the program's goals is to reduce the amount of radioactive waste requiring repository disposal. Cesium and strontium are two primary heat sources during the first 300 years of spent nuclear fuel's decay, specifically isotopes Cs-137 and Sr-90. Removal of these isotopes from spent nuclear fuel will reduce the activity of the bulk spent fuel, reducing the heat given off by the waste. Once the cesium and strontium are separated from the bulk of the spent nuclear fuel, the isotopes must be immobilized. This study is focused on a method to immobilize a cesium- and strontium-bearing radioactive liquid waste stream. While there are various schemes to remove these isotopes from spent fuel, this study has focused on a nitric acid based liquid waste. The waste liquid was mixed with the bentonite, dried then sintered. To be effective sintering temperatures from 1100 to 1200°C were required, and waste concentrations must be at least 25 wt%. The product is a leach resistant ceramic solid with the waste elements embedded within alumino-silicates and a silicon rich phase. The cesium is primarily incorporated into pollucite and the strontium into a monoclinic feldspar. The simulated waste was prepared from nitrate salts of stable ions. These ions were limited to cesium, strontium, barium and rubidium. Barium and rubidium will be co-extracted during separation due to similar chemical properties to cesium and strontium. The waste liquid was added to the bentonite clay incrementally with drying steps between each addition. The dry powder was pressed and then sintered at various temperatures. The maximum loading tested is 32 wt. percent waste, which refers to 13.9 wt. percent cesium, 12.2 wt. percent barium, 4.1 wt. percent strontium, and 2.0 wt. percent rubidium. Lower loadings of waste

  18. Microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze. 1. Basis of ion exchange selectivity for cesium and strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Christopher S; Luca, Vittorio; Hanna, John V; Pike, Kevin J; Smith, Mark E; Thorogood, Gordon S

    2009-07-06

    The structural basis of selectivity for cesium and strontium of microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) phase Na(x)WO(3+x/2).zH(2)O has been studied using X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques, 1D and 2D (23)Na magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and radiochemical ion exchange investigations. For the HTB system, this study has shown that scattering techniques alone provide an incomplete description of the disorder and rapid exchange of water (with tunnel cations) occurring in this system. However, 1D and 2D (23)Na MAS NMR has identified three sodium species within the HTB tunnels-species A, which is located at the center of the hexagonal window and is devoid of coordinated water, and species B and C, which are the di- and monohydrated variants, respectively, of species A. Although species B accords with the traditional crystallographic model of the HTB phase, this work is the first to propose and identify the anhydrous species A and monohydrate species C. The population (total) of species B and C decreases in comparison to that of species A with increasing exchange of either cesium or strontium; that is, species B and C appear more exchangeable than species A. Moreover, a significant proportion of tunnel water is redistributed by these cations. Multiple ion exchange investigations with radiotracers (137)Cs and (85)Sr have shown that for strontium there is a definite advantage in ensuring that any easily exchanged sodium is removed from the HTB tunnels prior to exchange. The decrease in selectivity (wrt cesium) is most probably due to the slightly smaller effective size of Sr(2+); namely, it is less of a good fit for the hexagonal window, ion exchange site. The selectivity of the HTB framework for cesium has been shown unequivocally to be defined by the structure of the hexagonal window, ion exchange site. Compromising the geometry of this window even in the slightest way by either (1) varying the cell volume through

  19. Uptake and transport of radioactive cesium and strontium into grapevines after leaf contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, H. J.; Kopp, P.; Eikenberg, J.; Feller, U.; Oertli, J. J.

    1995-07-01

    From 1989 to 1993 the foliar uptake of radioactive strontium (Sr-85) and cesium (Cs-134) by selected leaves of grapevine plants and the subsequent redistribution within the plants was examined under controlled conditions in a greenhouse. The radionuclides were applied as chlorides. These plants were grown in large pots containing a mixture of local soil and peat. Plant and soil samples were analyzed throughout the growing season and also during the following vegetation period. Only traces of the applied radiostrontium were taken up by the leaves. This element was essentially not redistributed within the plants. In contrast, radiocesium was easily taken up through the leaf surface, transported to other plant parts and to some extent released from the roots into the soil. Cesium reaching the soil may interact with clay particles causing a very reduced availability for plants. Therefore the soil may act as a long-term sink for radiocesium. On the other hand, grape berries represent transient sinks. The cesium levels in the berries decreased again in a late phase of maturation, but the mechanisms causing this loss are not yet identified. During the second vegetation period, only a very minor proportion of the radiocesium taken up previously by the plants was present in the above ground parts.

  20. Removal efficiency of water purifier and adsorbent for iodine, cesium, strontium, barium and zirconium in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Itaru; Kudo, Hiroaki; Tsuda, Shuji

    2011-01-01

    The severe incident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station has caused radioactive contamination of environment including drinking water. Radioactive iodine, cesium, strontium, barium and zirconium are hazardous fission products because of the high yield and/or relatively long half-life. In the present study, 4 pot-type water purifiers and several adsorbents were examined for the removal effects on these elements from drinking water. Iodide, iodate, cesium and barium were removed by all water purifiers with efficiencies about 85%, 40%, 75-90% and higher than 85%, respectively. These efficiencies lasted for 200 l, which is near the recommended limits for use of filter cartridges, without decay. Strontium was removed with initial efficiencies from 70% to 100%, but the efficiencies were slightly decreased by use. Zirconium was removed by two models, but hardly removed by the other models. Synthetic zeolite A4 efficiently removed cesium, strontium and barium, but had no effect on iodine and zirconium. Natural zeolite, mordenite, removed cesium with an efficiency as high as zeolite A4, but the removal efficiencies for strontium and barium were far less than those of zeolite A4. Activated carbon had little removal effects on these elements. In case of radioactive contamination of tap water, water purifiers may be available for convenient decontamination of drinking water in the home.

  1. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D; Thomas Peters, T; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Major Thompson, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-06-29

    This document provides a final report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger scale by a commercial vendor, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and measurement of filtration characteristics. Key findings and conclusions include the following. Testing evaluated three synthetic methods and eleven process parameters for the optimum synthesis conditions for the preparation on an improved form of MST. We selected the post synthesis method (Method 3) for continued development based on overall sorbate removal performance. We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. The laboratory prepared modified MST exhibited increased sorption kinetics with simulated and actual waste solutions and similar filtration characteristics to the baseline MST. Characterization of the modified MST indicated that the post synthesis treatment did not significantly alter the particle size distribution, but did significantly increase the surface area and porosity compared to the original MST. Testing indicated that the modified MST exhibits reduced affinity for uranium compared to the baseline MST, reducing risk of fissile loading. Shelf-life testing indicated no change in strontium and actinide performance removal after storing the modified MST for 12-months at ambient laboratory temperature. The material releases oxygen during the synthesis and continues to offgas after the synthesis at a rapidly diminishing rate until below a measurable rate after 4 months. Optima Chemical Group LLC prepared a 15-kilogram batch of the modified MST using the post synthesis procedure (Method

  2. Selective removal of cesium and strontium using porous frameworks from high level nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila, Briana; Banerjee, Debasis; Nie, Zimin; Shin, Yongsoon; Ma, Shengqian; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2016-05-01

    Efficient and cost-effective removal of radioactive (137)Cs and (90)Sr found in spent fuel is an important step for safe, long-term storage of nuclear waste. Solid-state materials such as resins and titanosilicate zeolites have been assessed for the removal of Cs and Sr from aqueous solutions, but there is room for improvement in terms of capacity and selectivity. Herein, we report the Cs(+) and Sr(2+) exchange potential of an ultra stable MOF, namely, MIL-101-SO3H, as a function of different contact times, concentrations, pH levels, and in the presence of competing ions. Our preliminary results suggest that MOFs with suitable ion exchange groups can be promising alternate materials for cesium and strontium removal.

  3. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES INVESTIGATING THE RATE OF STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE ADSORPTION BY MONOSODIUM TITANATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-10-01

    A number of laboratory studies have been conducted to determine the influence of mixing and mixing intensity, solution ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature, and monosodium titanate (MST) concentration on the rates of sorbate removal by MST in high-level nuclear waste solutions. Of these parameters, initial sorbate concentrations, ionic strength, and MST concentration have the greater impact on sorbate removal rates. The lack of a significant influence of mixing and mixing intensity on sorbate removal rates indicates that bulk solution transport is not the rate controlling step in the removal of strontium and actinides over the range of conditions and laboratory-scales investigated. However, bulk solution transport may be a significant parameter upon use of MST in a 1.3 million-gallon waste tank such as that planned for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program. Thus, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommends completing the experiments in progress to determine if mixing intensity influences sorption rates under conditions appropriate for this program. Adsorption models have been developed from these experimental studies that allow prediction of strontium (Sr), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np) and uranium (U) concentrations as a function of contact time with MST. Fairly good agreement has been observed between the predicted and measured sorbate concentrations in the laboratory-scale experiments.

  4. Bentonite-Clay Waste Form for the Immobilization of Cesium and Strontium from Fuel Processing Waste Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mertz, Carol J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The physical properties of a surrogate waste form containing cesium, strontium, rubidium, and barium sintered into bentonite clay were evaluated for several simulant feed streams: chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide/polyethylene glycol (CCD-PEG) strip solution, nitrate salt, and chloride salt feeds. We sintered bentonite clay samples with a loading of 30 mass% of cesium, strontium, rubidium, and barium to a density of approximately 3 g/cm3. Sintering temperatures of up to 1000°C did not result in volatility of cesium. Instead, there was an increase in crystallinity of the waste form upon sintering to 1000ºC for chloride- and nitrate-salt loaded clays. The nitrate salt feed produced various cesium pollucite phases, while the chloride salt feed did not produce these familiar phases. In fact, many of the x-ray diffraction peaks could not be matched to known phases. Assemblages of silicates were formed that incorporated the Sr, Rb, and Ba ions. Gas evolution during sintering to 1000°C was significant (35% weight loss for the CCD-PEG waste-loaded clay), with significant water being evolved at approximately 600°C.

  5. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATEPHASE II INTERIM REPORT FOR EXTERNAL RELEASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Mary Thompson, M

    2006-08-31

    This document provides an interim summary report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST materials. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger laboratory scale, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and characterization of the modified MST. Key findings and conclusions include the following: (1) Samples of the modified MST prepared by Method 2 and Method 3 exhibited the best combination of strontium and actinide removal. (2) We selected Method 3 to scale up and test performance with actual waste solution. (3) We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using the Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. (4) Performance tests indicated successful scale-up to the 25-gram scale with excellent performance and reproducibility among each of the three batches. For example, the plutonium decontamination factors (6-hour contact time) for the modified MST samples averaged 13 times higher than that of the baseline MST sample at half the sorbent concentration (0.2 g L{sup -1} for modified MST versus 0.4 g L{sup -1} for baseline MST). (5) Performance tests with actual waste supernate demonstrated that the modified MST exhibited better strontium and plutonium removal performance than that of the baseline MST. For example, the decontamination factors for the modified MST measured 2.6 times higher for strontium and between 5.2 to 11 times higher for plutonium compared to the baseline MST sample. The modified MST did not exhibit improved neptunium removal performance over that of the baseline MST. (6) Two strikes of the modified MST provided increased removal of strontium and actinides from actual waste compared to a single strike. The improved performance

  6. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE III FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2010-09-01

    This document provides a final report of Phase III testing activities for the development of modified monosodium titanate (mMST), which exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included characterization of the crystalline phases present at varying temperatures, solids settling characteristics, quantification of the peroxide content; evaluation of the post-synthesis gas release under different conditions; the extent of desorption of {sup 85}Sr, Np, and Pu under washing conditions; and the effects of age and radiation on the performance of the mMST. Key findings and conclusions include the following. The peroxide content of several mMST samples was determined using iodometric titration. The peroxide content was found to decrease with age or upon extended exposure to elevated temperature. A loss of peroxide was also measured after exposure of the material to an alkaline salt solution similar in composition to the simulated waste solution. To determine if the loss of peroxide with age affects the performance of the material, Sr and actinide removal tests were conducted with samples of varying age. The oldest sample (4 years and 8 months) did show lower Sr and Pu removal performance. When compared to the youngest sample tested (1 month), the oldest sample retained only 15% of the DF for Pu. Previous testing with this sample indicated no decrease in Pu removal performance up to an age of 30 months. No loss in Np removal performance was observed for any of the aged samples, and no uptake of uranium occurred at the typical sorbent loading of 0.2 g/L. Additional testing with a uranium only simulant and higher mMST loading (3.0 g/L) indicated a 10% increase of uranium uptake for a sample aged 3 years and 8 months when compared to the results of the same sample measured at an age of 1 year and 5 months. Performance testing with both baseline-MST and mMST that had been irradiated in a gamma source to

  7. Decontamination of cesium, strontium, and cobalt from aqueous solutions by bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M.A. [Univ. of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, S.A. [Government F.C. College, Lahore (Pakistan)

    1996-12-31

    Sorption studies of cesium, strontium, and cobalt (Cs, Sr, and Co) on bentonite under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, pH, sorbent and sorbate concentration, and temperature, have been performed. The sorption data for all these metals have been interpreted in terms of Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations. Thermodynamics parameters, such as heat of sorption {Delta}H{degrees}, free energy change {Delta}G{degrees}, and entropy change {Delta}S{degrees}, for the sorption of these metals on bentonite have been calculated. The value of {Delta}H{degrees} shows that the sorption of Cs was exothermic, while the sorption of Sr and Co on bentonite were endothermic in nature. The value of {Delta}G{degrees} for their sorption was negative, showing the spontaneity of the process. The maximum loading capacity of Cs, Sr, and Co were 75.5, 22, and 27.5 meq, respectively, for 100 g of bentonite. The mean free energy E of Cs, Sr, and Co sorption on bentonite was 14.5, 9, and 7.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The value of E indicates that ion exchange may be the predominant mode of sorption for these radionuclides. The desorption studies with 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} and groundwater at low-metal loading on bentonite showed that about 95% of Cs, 85-90% of Sr, and 97% of Co were irreversibly sorbed. Bentonite could be effectively used for the decontamination of wastewater effluent containing low concentrations of radioactive nuclides of Cs, Sr, and Co. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Web technology in the separation of strontium and cesium from INEL-ICPP radioactive acid waste (WM-185)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, L.A.; Brown, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    Strontium and cesium were successfully removed from radioactive acidic waste (WM-185) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), with web technology from 3M and IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc. (IBC). A technical team from Pacific Northwest Laboratory, ICPP, 3M and IBC conducted a very successful series of experiments from August 15 through 18, 1994. The ICPP, Remote Analytical Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, provided the hot cell facilities and staff to complete these milestone experiments. The actual waste experiments duplicated the initial `cold` simulated waste results and confirmed the selective removal provided by ligand-particle web technology.

  9. Computational study of organo-cesium complexes and the possibility of lanthanide/actinide ions substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabanal-León, Walter A.; Martinez-Ariza, Guillermo; Roberts, Sue A.; Hulme, Christopher; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2015-11-01

    Relativistic DFT calculations suggest that two organo-cesium complexes studied herein afford large HOMO-LUMO gaps of around 2.4 eV with the PBE xc-functional, which accounts for their stability. Energy decomposition studies suggest these two complexes are largely ionic with about 20% covalency. However, when the Cs+ ions are substituted by the isoelectronic La3+ and Th4+, their predicted ionicity decreases significantly. The significant increase in covalence indicates that employing Ugi reaction cascades that afford tetramic acid-based organo-cesium complexes may be extended to La3+ and Th4+ organometallics.

  10. Comparison of inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium, strontium, and transuranic elements from K-basin water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; DesChane, J.R.

    1997-10-01

    The work presented in this report was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the Efficient Separations and Crosscutting Program (ESP), Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this work was to investigate radionuclide uptake by several newly produced ion exchange materials under actual waste conditions, and to compare the performance of those materials with that of commercially available ion exchangers. The equilibrium uptake data presented in this report are useful for identifying potential materials that are capable of removing cesium and strontium from 105-KE Basin water. The data show the relative selectivities of the ion exchange materials under similar operating conditions. Additional flow studies are needed to predict material capacities and to develop complete ion exchange process flow sheets. The materials investigated in this study include commercially available ion exchangers such as IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 (manufactured by UOP), clinoptilolite (a naturally occurring zeolite), and materials produced on an experimental basis by AlliedSignal (biotites and nonatitanates), 3M (hexacyanoferrates), Selion Technologies, Inc. (hexacyanoferrates and titanates), and Texas A&M University (pharmacosiderites, biotites, and nonatitanates). In all, the performance of 14 ion exchange materials was evaluated at two solution-to-exchanger mass ratios (i.e., 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 5}) using actual 105-KE Basin water. Evaluation consisted of determining cesium and strontium batch distribution coefficients, loading, and decontamination factors. Actual 105-KE Basin water was obtained from a sample collected during the sludge dissolution work conducted by PNNL in FY 1996. This sample was taken from the bottom of the basin and contained significantly higher concentrations of the radioactive constituents than do samples taken from the top of the basin.

  11. [Technical support in the testing of microoganisms for their ability to accumulate strontium and cesium from aqueous solutions]. Final reports, Task order No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-15

    This report describes the binding of cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solution in a variety of microorganisms. Data is provided on the absorption by Ashbya gossyppi, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Candida sp. Ml13, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Scenedesmus obliqus, Streptococcus mutans, Anabaena flosaquae, Escherichia coli, Streptomyces viridochromogenes, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Rhizopus oryzae, Bacillus megaterium, Micrococcus luteus, Zoogloea ramigera, Coelastrum proboscideum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii, Paecilomyces marquandi, and Caulobacter fusiformis.

  12. Performance evaluation of 24 ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated N-Reactor storage basin water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the evaluation of 24 organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated waters from the 100 Area 105 N-Reactor fuel storage basin. The data described in this report can be applied for developing and evaluating ion exchange pre-treatment process flowsheets. Cesium and strontium batch distribution ratios (K{sub d}`s), decontamination factors (DF), and material loadings (mmol g{sup -1}) are compared as a function of ion exchange material and initial cesium concentration. The actual and simulated N-Basin waters contain relatively low levels of aluminum, barium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (ranging from 8.33E-04 to 6.40E-05 M), with slightly higher levels of boron (6.63E-03 M) and sodium (1.62E-03 M). The {sup 137}Cs level is 1.74E-06 Ci L-{sup 1} which corresponds to approximately 4.87E-10 M Cs. The initial Na/Cs ratio was 3.33E+06. The concentration of total strontium is 4.45E-06 M, while the {sup 90}Sr radioactive component was measured to be 6.13E-06 Ci L{sup -1}. Simulant tests were conducted by contacting 0.067 g or each ion exchange material with approximately 100 mL of either the actual or simulated N-Basin water. The simulants contained variable initial cesium concentrations ranging from 1.00E-04 to 2.57E- 10 M Cs while all other components were held constant. For all materials, the average cesium K{sub d} was independent of cesium concentration below approximately 1.0E-06 M. Above this level, the average cesium K{sub d} values decreased significantly. Cesium K{sub d} values exceeding 1.0E+07 mL g{sup -1} were measured in the simulated N-Basin water. However, when measured in the actual N-Basin water the values were several orders of magnitude lower, with a maximum of 1.24E+05 mL g{sup -1} observed.

  13. separation of strontium and cesium from ternary and quaternary lithium chloride-potassium chloride salts via melt crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammon N. Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Separation of cesium chloride (CsCl and strontium chloride (SrCl2 from the lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl salt was studied using a melt crystallization process similar to the reverse vertical Bridgeman growth technique. A ternary SrCl2-LiCl-KCl salt was explored at similar growth rates (1.8–5 mm/h and compared with CsCl ternary results to identify similarities. Quaternary experiments were also conducted and compared with the ternary cases to identify trends and possible limitations to the separations process. In the ternary case, as much as 68% of the total salt could be recycled per batch process. In the quaternary experiments, separation of Cs and Sr was nearly identical at the slower rates; however, as the growth rate increased, SrCl2 separated more easily than CsCl. The quaternary results show less separation and rate dependence than in both ternary cases. As an estimated result, only 51% of the total salt could be recycled per batch. Furthermore, two models have been explored to further understand the growth process and separation. A comparison of the experimental and modeling results reveals that the nonmixed model fits reasonably well with the ternary and quaternary data sets. A dimensional analysis was performed and a correlation was identified to semipredict the segregation coefficient.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE - AN IMPROVED SORBENT FOR STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; Missimer, D.

    2010-12-21

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove {sup 134,137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. An inorganic sorbent, monosodium titanate (MST), is currently used to remove {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides, while a caustic-side solvent extraction process is used for removing {sup 134,137}Cs. A new peroxotitanate material, modified MST, or mMST, has recently been developed and has shown increased removal kinetics and capacity for {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the current baseline material, MST. This paper describes recent results focused on further characterization of this material.

  15. Evaluation of the adsorptive behavior of cesium and strontium on hydroxyapatite and zeolite for decontamination of radioactive substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, K; Aoki, H

    2016-08-12

    Removal of radioactive substances, such as cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr), has become an emerging issue after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster. To assess the possibility that hydroxyapatite (HA) and zeolites can be used for removal of radioactive substances, the adsorption capacities of Cs and Sr on the HA and a zeolite were investigated. The influence of Fe ions on Cs and Sr adsorption on the HA and the zeolite was also evaluated, because Fe ions are the most effective inhibitor of Cs adsorption on the zeolite.In the Cs adsorption process on the HA and the zeolite, the zeolite showed a higher adsorption ratio than the HA, and the maximum sorption capacity of the zeolite was calculated as 196 mg/g, whereas the HA showed a higher Sr adsorption ratio than the zeolite. The maximum sorption capacity of Sr on the HA was 123 mg/g. Under coexistence with Fe, Cs adsorption on the zeolite decreased with increasing Fe concentration, reaching 2.0 ± 0.8% at 0.1 M Fe concentration. In contrast, Cs adsorption on the zeolite was improved by adding the HA. In the case of coexistence of the HA, the Cs adsorption on the mixture of the HA and the zeolite was 52.4% ± 3.6 % at 0.1 M Fe concentration, although Cs adsorption on the HA alone was quite low. In the Fe adsorption processes of the HA and the zeolite, the HA exhibited a maximum sorption capacity of 256 mg/g, which was much higher than that of the zeolite (111 mg/g). The high affinity of Fe on the HA contributes to the improvement of the deteriorated Cs adsorption on the zeolite due to Fe ions.

  16. Comparison or organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removal of cesium and strontium from Hanford waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This work is part of an ESP-CP task to develop and evaluate high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for the uptake of cesium, strontium, and technetium (Cs, Sr, and Tc) from nuclear wastes. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff, in collaboration with researchers from industry, academia, and national laboratories are investigating these and other novel and commercial ion exchangers for use in nuclear waste remediation of groundwater, HLW, and LLW. Since FY 1995, experimental work at PNNL has focused on small-scale batch distribution (K{sub d}) testing of numerous solid sorbents with actual and simulated Hanford wastes, chemical and radiolytic stability of various organic ion exchanger resins, bench-scale column ion exchange testing in actual and simulated Complexant Concentrate (CC) and Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW), and Tc and Sr removal from groundwater and LLW. In addition, PNNL has continued to support various site demonstrations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, West Valley Nuclear Services, Hanford N-Springs, and Hanford N-Basin using technologies developed by their industrial partners. This summary will focus on batch distribution results from the actual waste tests. The data collected in these development and testing tasks provide a rational basis for the selection and direct comparison of various ion exchange materials in simulated and actual HLW, LLW, and groundwater. In addition, prediction of large-scale column loading performance for the materials tested is possible using smaller volumes of actual waste solution. The method maximizes information while minimizing experimental expense, time, and laboratory and process wastes.

  17. STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SORPTION BY MST AND MMST UNDER CONDITIONS REVELANT TO THE SMALL COLUMN ION-EXCHANGE PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.; Poirier, M.

    2011-05-06

    A series of tests were performed to examine the kinetics of Sr and actinide removal by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) under mixing conditions similar to what will be provided in the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Program. Similar removal kinetics were seen for two different mixing energies, indicating that under these conditions bulk solution transport is not the rate limiting step for Sr and actinide removal. Sr removal was found to be rapid for both MST and mMST, reaching steady-state conditions within six hours. In contrast, at least six weeks is necessary to reach steady-state conditions for Pu with MST. For mMST, steady-state conditions for Pu were achieved within two weeks. The actual contact time required for the SCIX process will depend on starting sorbate concentrations as well as the requirements for the decontaminated salt solution. During testing leaks occurred in both the MST and mMST tests and evidence of potential desorption was observed. The desorption likely occurred as a result of the change in solids to liquid phase ratio that occurred due to the loss of solution. Based on these results, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommended additional testing to further study the effect of changing phase ratios on desorption. This testing is currently in progress and results will be documented in a separate report.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED TITANATE-BASED SORBENT FOR STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS UNDER STRONGLY ALKALINE CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Peters, T.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fink, S.

    2010-02-18

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove {sup 134,137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. Separation processes at SRS include the sorption of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides onto monosodium titanate (MST) and caustic side solvent extraction of {sup 137}Cs. The MST and separated {sup 137}Cs is encapsulated along with the sludge fraction of high-level waste (HLW) into a borosilicate glass waste form for eventual entombment at a federal repository. The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 240}Pu; {sup 237}Np; and uranium isotopes, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. This paper describes recent results evaluating the performance of an improved sodium titanate material that exhibits increased removal kinetics and capacity for {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the current baseline material, MST.

  19. Cation exchange applications of synthetic tobermorite for the immobilization and solidification of cesium and strontium in cement matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O P Shrivastava; Rashmi Shrivastava

    2000-12-01

    Immobilization and solidification of hazardous cations like Cs137 and Sr90 are required while handling the radioactive waste of nuclear power plants. Efforts are on to find a fail proof method of safe disposal of nuclear wastes. In this context, various materials like borosilicate glass, zeolites, cements and synthetic rocks have been tried by several workers. This communication deals with the synthesis, characterization, cesium uptake capacity and leaching behaviour of synthetic alumina-substituted calcium silicate hydroxy hydrate, which are close to that obtained for the natural mineral, 11 Å tobermorite. The synthetic mineral show cation selectivity for Cs+ in presence of 500–1000 times concentrated solutions of Na+ , K+ , Mg2+, Ca2+ , Ba2+ and Sr2+. Although the ordinary portland cement (OPC) which is often used in waste management operations alone holds negligible amounts of Cs+ and Sr2+, the addition of alumina-substituted tobermorite to OPC enhances the retention power of cement matrix by drastically lowering the leach rate of cations.

  20. Magnetite effect in radionuclide retention : cesium, strontium, molybdenum and selenium; Efecto de la magnetita en la retencion de los radionucleidos en el campo proximo: cesio, estroncio, molibdeno y selenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, M.; Casas, I.; Gimenez, J.; Clarens, F.; Pablo, J. de

    2004-07-01

    In this work we have investigated the interaction of magnetite with cesium, strontium, molybdenum and selenium, in the frame of radionuclide retention by canister corrosion products. For each radionuclide, the retention on magnetite has been studied as a function of pH and the mass/ volume ratio. The experimental results have been modeled by means of Surface Complexation Models (SCM), that constitute a tool that allows an approach to sorption mechanisms in a wide range of experimental conditions taking into account electrostatic interactions at the mineral-water interface.(Author)

  1. Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Brewer, Ken Neal; Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N.

    1999-09-01

    A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With this testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137 Cs and 90 Sr to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

  2. Investigations into the transfer of cesium 137 and strontium 90 in selected exposure pathways. Final report; Untersuchungen ueber den Transfer von Caesium 137 und Strontium 90 in ausgewaehlten Belastungspfaden. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemmelt, R.; Hiersche, L.; Wirth, E.

    1991-12-01

    This research project investigates the behaviour of radiocesium and strontium 90 in natural conifer forest sites and derives corresponding transfer factors for radioecological calculations. As a point of particular interest the question was investigated in how far the requirements of the different mushroom species and the properties of the forest soil bear on the dynamics and transfer rate of radiocesium and strontium 90. To complement the investigations, autotrophic plants were included. The results of these studies are compared with the behaviour of the same radionuclides on farmland. The differences are discussed. (orig./HP). [Deutsch] Im Forschungsvorhaben wurde das Verhalten von Radiocaesium und Strontium 90 in den natuerlichen Nadelstandorten untersucht und entsprechende Transferfaktoren fuer radiooekologische Berechnungen abgeleitet. Besondere Aufmerksamkeit galt der Frage, inwieweit die Lebensweise der verschiedenen Pilzspezies und die Waldbodeneigenschaften die Dynamik und die Transferrate von Radiocaesium und Strontium 90 beeinflussen. Als Ergaenzung wurden autotrophe Pflanzen in die Untersuchungen einbezogen. Die Ergebnisse dieser Untersuchungen werden mit dem Verhalten dieser Radionuklide auf landwirtschaftlich genutzten Flaechen verglichen und die Unterschiede diskutiert. (orig./HP).

  3. An Ion Exchange Study of Possible Hydridized 5f Bonding in theActinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.M.; Street, Jr., K.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1951-08-28

    A study has been made of the elution behavior of curium(III), americium(III), plutonium(III), actinium(III), plutonium(IV), neptunium(IV), uraniuM(IV), thorium(IV), neptunium(V), plutonium (VI), uranium (VI), lanthanum(III), cerium(III), europium(III), ytterbium(III), ytterium(III), strontium(II), barium(II), radium(II), cesium(I) with 3.2 M, 6.2 M, 9.3 M, and 12.2 M HCl solutions from Dowex-50 cation exchange resin columns. These elutions show that in high concentrations of hydrochloric acid the actinides form complex ions with chloride ion to a much greater extent than the lanthanides. The strengths of the tripositive actinide complex ions apparently go in the order plutonium > americium> curium, although their ionic radii also decrease in this same order. To explain these results, a partial covalent character may be ascribed to the bonding in the transuranium complex ions. It is shown that a reasonable structure for such covalent bonding involves hybridization of the 5f orbitals in the actinide elements.

  4. Demonstration of a crown ether process for partitioning strontium from high level liquid waste (HLLW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianchen; Jing, Shan; Chen, Jing [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET); Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Beijing Key Lab of Radioactive Waste Treatment

    2016-05-01

    Chinese HLLW with a higher-salt liquid that was generated via plutonium uranium recovery by extraction (PUREX) processing was temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks and is waiting for treatment. The volume and heat-loading of the glass block are reduced if the strontium, cesium, actinides and other long-life radioactive elements, such as Tc in the HLLW, are partitioned before the HLLW verification. This process is beneficial to preserve the capacity of the geological disposal repository and to minimize long-term hazards. The process of partitioning strontium from Chinese HLLW using Dicyclohexano-18Crown-6(DCH18C-6) was developed in past decades, including such fundamental studies as the small scale cold and hot test. In this work, new studies are introduced, including the cold and the long time hot cascade tests, using a miniature centrifugal contactor set and the pilot-scale cold test using pulse extraction columns. The results indicate that the crown process is promising for partitioning strontium from Chinese HLLW.

  5. Actinides-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  6. In-vivo determination of strontium 90 and cesium 137 in exposed persons in the Tscheljabinsk region (southern Ural); In-vivo-Bestimmung von Strontium 90 und Caesium 137 an exponierten Personen in der Region Tscheljabinsk (Suedural)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeffmann, E. [Bayerisches Landesamt fuer Umweltschutz, Muenchen (Germany). Referat Betrieb der LfU-Messnetzzentrale; Zeising, H. [Bayerisches Landesamt fuer Umweltschutz, Muenchen (Germany). Referat Radioaktivitaetsmesswesen

    1994-12-31

    While the Russians have been busy for decades determining the doses received by, and resulting health effects to, the concerned population - which falls into three groups: (a) workers at the Majak plutonium factory, (b) the population along the Techa river, and (c) the population from the area contaminated by the Kyschtym accident - it is also true that the integral strontium 90 exposure has been, and is being, determined subsequently via whole-body bremsstrahlung measurement (both on the part of the Russians and as a German scheme in 1993). In accordance with what was indicated by the Russian side, the Majak workers were found to have a distinctly higher risk of cancer. The population along the Techa river, too, with an average dose of 0.4 Gy for the red bone marrow, showed a significant increase in the rate of leukemia. By contrast, the persons affected by the Kyschtym accident, with a distinctly lower mean dose of about 0.02 Gy, so far have not shown any long-term effects.- As yet no exact quantitative statement regarding the cancer risks can be made, for two reasons: the comprehensive data material collected by the Russians has not yet been sufficiently evaluated, and suitable control persons need yet to be found. (orig./HP) [Deutsch] An einer Bestimmung der Dosen und der daraus resultierenden gesundheitlichen Effekte der betroffenen Bevoelkerung - naemlich der drei Gruppen (a) Arbeiter der Plutoniumfabrik Majak, (b) die Bevoelkerung entlang des Flusses Techa und (c) die Bevoelkerung aus dem durch den Kyschtym-Unfall kontaminierten Gebiet, wird zwar von russischer Seite seit Jahrzehnten gearbeitet, aber die integrale Sr 90-Exposition wurde und wird nachtraeglich ueber die Messung von Bremsstrahlung im Ganzkoerper (neben russischer Messung auch die deutsche Messaktion im Jahre 1993) bestimmt. Wie von russischer Seite angegeben, fand sich bei den Majak-Arbeitern eine deutliche Erhoehung des Krebsrisikos, ebenso wurde bei der Bevoelkerungsgruppe entlang des

  7. Study of irradiation effects in perovskite: use of this matrix for actinides conditioning; Effets de l'irradiation dans une perovskite: utilisation de cette matrice pour un conditionnement des actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabathier, C

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study a specific conditioning matrix (ceramics) for actinides: the strontium titanate. At first, the choice of strontium titanate is discussed as well as its structure and its ability to incorporate actinides. The different studies carried out on the irradiation effects on the strontium titanate are reviewed. The main ion-matter interactions considered in the energy range used during our experiments are given. The different devices and techniques used with ion beams to carry out our experiments according to the type of sample: monocrystal or polycrystal are described. The experimental results on the behaviour of strontium titanate in terms of irradiation, temperature and ion flux used to damage the matrix are presented. The experimental results on the different steps of strontium titanate annealing are given as well as the identifying of the defects by different analyses techniques (Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, transmission electron spectroscopy and x-rays spectroscopy). At last, a model of the behaviour of the strontium titanate in the case of an actinide conditioning is proposed and the evolving of the strontium titanate disorder during the storage is discussed. (O.M.)

  8. PREFACE: Actinides 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Linfeng; Tobin, James G.; Shuh, David K.

    2010-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering consists of 98 papers that were presented at Actinides 2009, the 8th International Conference on Actinide Science held on 12-17 July 2009 in San Francisco, California, USA. This conference was jointly organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Actinides conference series started in Baden-Baden, Germany (1975) and this first conference was followed by meetings at Asilomar, CA, USA (1981), Aix-en-Provence, France (1985), Tashkent, USSR (1989), Santa Fe, NM, USA (1993), Baden-Baden, Germany (1997), Hayama, Japan (2001), and Manchester, UK (2005). The Actinides conference series provides a regular venue for the most recent research results on the chemistry, physics, and technology of the actinides and heaviest elements. Actinides 2009 provided a forum spanning a diverse range of scientific topics, including fundamental materials science, chemistry, physics, environmental science, and nuclear fuels. Of particular importance was a focus on the key roles that basic actinide chemistry and physics research play in advancing the worldwide renaissance of nuclear energy. Editors Linfeng Rao Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (lrao@lbl.gov) James G Tobin Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (tobin1@llnl.gov) David K Shuh Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (dkshuh@lbl.gov)

  9. Chemistry of actinides; Chimie des actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitorge, P. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets (DESD), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1999-07-01

    This article gives the basic data of the actinides chemistry, describes then qualitatively the main parts of the fuel cycle and concludes with quantitative data. The theoretical recalls give qualitative notions to explain the chemical reactivity of actinides and to understand thus the values of the thermodynamic data which allow quantitative anticipations at equilibrium. The Thermodynamic Data Base (TDB) of the NEA-OECD and the CEA in France have recently estimated some of them in using and developing methodologies whose some are presented here. Some current problems of actinides chemistry are described: analysis of the possibilities to (1)improve the reprocessing of long-lived actinides (2)anticipate their behaviour in the environment in order to compare the impact of the different options of the wastes management. The Pourbaix diagrams summarize the chemistry in solution; the author has added information on the solubility, the influence of the ionic strength and of the complexes formation in bicarbonate/carbonate (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) media. The discussion on the choice of the equilibrium constants allows to point out the particular points, the dubiousness and the data which have to be proved. (O.M.)

  10. Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Univ. Relations and Science Education; Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.

    2016-06-29

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of plutonium (Pu) have been deposited in the subsurface worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al., 1999; Novikov et al., 2006; Santschi et al., 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program (Figure 1).

  11. Cesium chloride: preventive medicine for radioactive cesium exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, E R; Sohler, A; Pfeiffer, C C

    1988-06-01

    Cesium is produced in high yield fission of uranium and plutonium. Radioactive cesium needles are a radiation hazard for radiotherapists. In this age of nuclear reactors, i.e. Chernobyl, radioactive cesium exposure may be a growing problem. Furthermore, there are numerous therapeutic potentials for cesium therapy, i.e. cancer, depression and schizophrenia. We explored the clearance of cesium in man and found that an oral dose of 50 mg maintains elevated blood cesium levels for 80 days. Cesium is accumulated mainly in the red blood cell fraction. Larger doses (6-9 grams) produce no observed harmful effects and maintain elevated blood levels of cesium for more than a year. Our data suggests there is a threshold of maximum cesium saturation in blood; if maintained, any additional cesium exposure, i.e. radioactive cesium, would be excreted at a more rapid rate. It is probable that large cesium doses can protect against radiation toxicity by blocking sites on red blood cells and thereby result in increased excretion and clearance of the radioactive forms of cesium. This hypothesis should be easily testable in laboratory animals.

  12. Device for Detecting Actinides, Method for Detecting Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Fred J.; Wilkins-Stevens, Priscilla

    1998-10-29

    A heavy metal detector is provided comprising a first molecule and a second molecule, whereby the first and second molecules interact in a predetermined manner; a first region on the first molecule adapted to interact with an actinide; and a second region on the second molecule adapted to interact with the actinide, whereby the interactions of the actinide with the regions effect the predetermined manner of interaction between the molecules.

  13. Clinical effects of cesium intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Petr; Zanoni, Lourdes Zélia

    2010-06-01

    The knowledge about cesium metabolism and toxicity is sparse. Oral intake of cesium chloride has been widely promoted on the basis of the hypothesis referred to as "high pH cancer therapy", a complimentary alternative medicine method for cancer treatment. However, no properly confirmed tumor regression was reported so far in all probability because of neither theoretical nor experimental grounds for this proposal. The aim of the present review was to resume and discuss the material currently available on cesium salts and their applications in medicine. The presence of cesium in the cell does not guarantee high pH of its content, and there is no clinical evidence to support the claims that cancer cells are vulnerable to cesium. Cesium is relatively safe; signs of its mild toxicity are gastrointestinal distress, hypotension, syncope, numbness, or tingling of the lips. Nevertheless, total cesium intakes of 6 g/day have been found to produce severe hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, prolonged QTc interval, episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, with or without torsade de pointes, and even acute heart arrest. However, full information on its acute and chronic toxicity is not sufficiently known. Health care providers should be aware of the cardiac complications, as a result of careless cesium usage as alternative medicine.

  14. Mineral resource of the month: cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    The article offers information on cesium, a golden alkali metal derived from the Latin word caesium which means bluish gray. It mentions that cesium is the first element discovered with the use of spectroscopy. It adds that the leading producer and supplier of cesium is Canada and there are 50,000 kilograms of cesium consumed of the world in a year. Moreover, it states that only 85% of the cesium formate can be retrieved and recycled.

  15. Surveillance of Strontium-90 in Foods after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshi, Hiromi; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Hachisuka, Akiko; Matsuda, Rieko; Teshima, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident, various radionuclides were released into the environment. In this study, we surveyed strontium-90 ((90)Sr) concentrations in several foodstuffs. Strontium-90 is thought to be the third most important residual radionuclide in food collected after the Fukushima Daiichi, NPP accident after following cesium-137 ((137)Cs) and cesium-134 ((134)Cs). Results of (90)Sr analyses indicated that (90)Sr was detect in 25 of the 40 radioactive cesium (r-Cs) positive samples collected in areas around the Fukushima Daiichi NPP, ranging in distance from 50 to 250 km. R-Cs positive samples were defined as containing both (134)Cs and (137)Cs which are considered to be indicators of the after-effects of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. We also detected (90)Sr in 8 of 13 r-Cs negative samples, in which (134)Cs was not detected. Strontium-90 concentrations in the r-Cs positive samples did not significantly exceed the (90)Sr concentrations in r-Cs negative samples or the (90)Sr concentration ranges in comparable food groups found in previous surveys before the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. Thus, (90)Sr concentrations in r-Cs positive samples were indistinguishable from the background (90)Sr concentrations arising from global fallout prior to the Fukushima accident, suggesting that no marked increase of (90)Sr concentrations has occurred in r-Cs positive samples as a result of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident.

  16. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  17. Sorption of strontium on uranyl peroxide: implications for a high-level nuclear waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Rosa; Martínez-Lladó, Xavier; Rovira, Miquel; de Pablo, Joan; Casas, Ignasi; Giménez, Javier

    2010-09-15

    Strontium-90 is considered the most important radioactive isotope in the environment and one of the most frequently occurring radionuclides in groundwaters at nuclear facilities. The uranyl peroxide studtite (UO2O2 . 4H2O) has been observed to be formed in spent nuclear fuel leaching experiments and seems to have a relatively high sorption capacity for some radionuclides. In this work, the sorption of strontium onto studtite is studied as a function of time, strontium concentration in solution and pH. The main results obtained are (a) sorption is relatively fast although slower than for cesium; (b) strontium seems to be sorbed via a monolayer coverage of the studtite surface, (c) sorption has a strong dependence on ionic strength, is negligible at acidic pH, and increases at neutral to alkaline pH (almost 100% of the strontium in solution is sorbed above pH 10). These results point to uranium secondary solid phase formation on the spent nuclear fuel as an important mechanism for strontium retention in a high-level nuclear waste repository (HLNW).

  18. Cesium chloride-induced torsades de pointes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Matthew; Gordon, Wendy; Baulcomb, Daisy; Mattman, Andre; Mock, Tom; Brown, Robert

    2009-09-01

    The chloride salt of cesium, a group 1A element, is gaining popularity as an alternative treatment of advanced cancers. Cesium chloride has primarily been used in cardiovascular research for arrhythmogenesis in animals because of its potassium-blocking effects. The present report describes a 45-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer who experienced repeated episodes of torsades de pointes polymorphic ventricular tachycardia after several months of oral cesium therapy. There was a clear temporal relationship between cesium ingestion and the arrhythmia, which later resolved following discontinuation of cesium therapy. Serial cesium plasma and whole blood levels were measured over the ensuing six months and pharmacokinetic analysis was performed.

  19. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  20. Calculation of cohesive energy of actinide metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱存富; 陈秀芳; 余瑞璜; 耿平; 段占强

    1997-01-01

    According to empirical electron theory of solids and molecules (EET), an equation for calculating the cohesive energy of actinide metals is given, the cohesive energy of 9 actinide metals with known crystal structure is calculated, which is identical with the experimental values on the whole, and the cohesive energy of 6 actinide metals with unknown crystal structure is forecast.

  1. Actinides and Life's Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uraniumand thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3(rd) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  2. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  3. Advanced separations at Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M.; McCabe, D.

    1996-10-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has many waste streams that are contaminated with radionuclides and/or hazardous materials that must be treated to remove the radioactivity (cesium, strontium, tritium, actinides) and hazardous components (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), cyanide, metal ions).

  4. Cesium in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.; Bauer, L.R.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

    1992-03-01

    Cesium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fourth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium, iodine, and uranium. Documents on plutonium, strontium, carbon, and technetium will be published in the future. These are dynamic documents and current plans call for revising and updating each one on a two-year schedule.Radiocesium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Radiocesium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. Several hundred curies of [sup 137]Cs was released into streams in the late 50s and 60s from leaking fuel elements. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 1400 Ci of [sup 137]Cs was released to seepage basins where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A much smaller quantity, about four Ci. was released to the atmosphere. Radiocesium concentration and mechanisms for atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 033 mrem (atmospheric) and 60 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Isotope [sup 137]Cs releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

  5. Cesium in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.; Bauer, L.R.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

    1992-03-01

    Cesium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fourth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium, iodine, and uranium. Documents on plutonium, strontium, carbon, and technetium will be published in the future. These are dynamic documents and current plans call for revising and updating each one on a two-year schedule.Radiocesium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Radiocesium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. Several hundred curies of {sup 137}Cs was released into streams in the late 50s and 60s from leaking fuel elements. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 1400 Ci of {sup 137}Cs was released to seepage basins where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A much smaller quantity, about four Ci. was released to the atmosphere. Radiocesium concentration and mechanisms for atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 033 mrem (atmospheric) and 60 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Isotope {sup 137}Cs releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

  6. Environmental research on actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  7. Evaluation of Alternate Materials and Methods for Strontium and Alpha Removal from Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    2000-11-07

    A literature survey indicated a number of alternate materials and methods for the removal of strontium and alpha-emitting radionuclides (actinides). We evaluated the use of alternate materials versus proposed flowsheets for salt processing at the Savannah River Site (SRS). From this evaluation we recommend the following materials for further testing to determine the rate and extent of removal. We do not recommend testing of liquid/liquid extraction and polymer filtration methods at this time.

  8. Interferometry with Strontium Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jarom; Lambert, Enoch; Otterstrom, Nils; Jones, Tyler; Durfee, Dallin

    2014-05-01

    We describe progress on a cold ion matter-wave interferometer. Cold Strontium atoms are extracted from an LVIS. The atoms will be photo-ionized with a two-photon transition to an auto-ionizing state in the continuum. The ions will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions from a pair of diode lasers injection locked to two beams from a master laser which have been shifted up and down by half the hyperfine splitting. We are developing laser instrumentation for this project including a method to prevent mode-hopping by analyzing laser frequency noise, and an inexpensive, robust wavelength meter. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  9. Decorporation of cesium-137; Decorporation du cesium-137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fleche, Ph.; Destombe, C.; Grasseau, A.; Mathieu, J.; Chancerelle, Y.; Mestries, J.C. [GMR, Direction des Recherches, Etudes et Techniques, 94 - Arcueil (France)

    1997-12-31

    Cesium radio-isotopes, especially cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) are among the radionuclides of main importance produced by a fission reaction in reactor or a nuclear weapon explosion. In the environment, {sup 137}Cs is a major contaminant which can cause severe {beta}, {gamma}irradiations and contaminations. {sup 137}Cs is distributed widely and relatively uniformly throughout the body with the highest concentration in skeletal muscles. A treatment becomes difficult afterwards. The purposes of this report are Firstly to compare the Prussian blue verses cobalt and potassium ferrocyanide (D.I. blue) efficiency for the {sup 137}Cs decorporation and secondly to assess a chronological treatment with D.I. blue. (author)

  10. Rapid determination of strontium-90 by solid phase extraction using DGA Resin® for seawater monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazoe, H.; Obata, H.; Yamagata, T.; Karube, Z.; Yamada, M.

    2015-12-01

    Strontium-90 concentrations in seawater exceeding the background level have been observed at the accidents of nuclear facilities, such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. However, analytical procedure for strontium-90 in seawater is still quite complicated and challenging. Here we show a simple and rapid analytical technique for the determination of strontium-90 in seawater samples without time-consuming separation of strontium from calcium. The separation with DGA Resin® is used to determine the abundance of strontium-90, which selectively collects yttrium-90, progeny of strontium-90. Naturally occurring radioactive nuclides (such as potassium, lead, bismuth, uranium, and thorium) and anthropogenic radionuclides (such as cesium, barium, lanthanum, and cerium) were separated from yttrium. Through a sample separation procedure, a high chemical yield of yttrium-90 was achieved at 93.9 % for seawater. The result of IAEA 443 certified seawater analysis was in good agreement with the certified value. At 20 hrs counting a lower detection limit of 1.5 mBq L-1 was obtained from 3 L of seawater. The proposed method can finish analyzing 8 samples per day, which is a reasonably fast throughput in actual seawater monitoring. Reproducibility was found to be 3.4 % according to 10 separate analyses of natural seawater samples from the vicinity of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in September 2013.

  11. NMR studies of actinide dioxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: tokunaga.yo@jaea.go.jp; Sakai, H.; Fujimoto, T.; Kambe, S.; Walstedt, R.E.; Ikushima, K.; Yasuoka, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Aoki, D.; Homma, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Haga, Y.; Matsuda, T.D.; Ikeda, S.; Yamamoto, E.; Nakamura, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shiokawa, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nakajima, K.; Arai, Y. [Department of Nuclear Energy System, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Onuki, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2007-10-11

    {sup 17}O NMR measurements have been performed on a series of the actinide dioxides, UO{sub 2}, NpO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Although the {sup 17}O NMR spectra in these materials are similar at higher temperatures, the low-temperature spectra present are significantly different. In UO{sub 2} we have observed a wide spectrum, forming a rectangular shape below T{sub N}=30 K. In NpO{sub 2}, on the other hand, the spectra broaden rather gradually and exhibit a two-peak structure below T{sub 0}=26 K. In PuO{sub 2}, neither spectrum broadening nor splitting has been observed. We show that these NMR spectra clearly indicate the different nature of the low-temperature magnetic ground states in these actinide compounds.

  12. Cesium chloride-induced torsades de pointes

    OpenAIRE

    Wiens, Matthew; Gordon, Wendy; Baulcomb, Daisy; Mattman, Andre; Mock, Tom; Brown, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The chloride salt of cesium, a group 1A element, is gaining popularity as an alternative treatment of advanced cancers. Cesium chloride has primarily been used in cardiovascular research for arrhythmogenesis in animals because of its potassium-blocking effects. The present report describes a 45-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer who experienced repeated episodes of torsades de pointes polymorphic ventricular tachycardia after several months of oral cesium therapy. There was a clear ...

  13. Prompt fission neutron spectrum of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capote, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Chen, Y. -J. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Hambsch, F. J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre - IRRM, Geel (Belgium); Jurado, B. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Kornilov, N. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Lestone, J. P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Litaize, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Morillon, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Neudecker, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Oberstedt, S. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre - IRRM, Geel (Belgium); Ohsawa, T. [Kinki Univ., Osaka-fu (Japan); Otuka, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pronyaev, V. G. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Saxena, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Schmidt, K. H. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Serot, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Shcherbakov, O. A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of NRC " Kurchatov Institute" , Gatchina (Russian Federation); Shu, N. -C. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Smith, D. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Talou, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trkov, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Tudora, A. C. [Univ. of Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Vorobyev, A. S. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of NRC " Kurchatov Institute" , Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutron emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  14. Actinide ion sensor for pyroprocess monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Jan-fong; Li, Shelly X.

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus for real-time, in-situ monitoring of actinide ion concentrations which comprises a working electrode, a reference electrode, a container, a working electrolyte, a separator, a reference electrolyte, and a voltmeter. The container holds the working electrolyte. The voltmeter is electrically connected to the working electrode and the reference electrode and measures the voltage between those electrodes. The working electrode contacts the working electrolyte. The working electrolyte comprises an actinide ion of interest. The reference electrode contacts the reference electrolyte. The reference electrolyte is separated from the working electrolyte by the separator. The separator contacts both the working electrolyte and the reference electrolyte. The separator is ionically conductive to the actinide ion of interest. The reference electrolyte comprises a known concentration of the actinide ion of interest. The separator comprises a beta double prime alumina exchanged with the actinide ion of interest.

  15. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  16. Strontium Carbonate Industry Needs Urgent Upgrade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Tianxin

    2007-01-01

    @@ Strontium carbonate is an important inorganic chemical product mainly used in the manufacture of magnetic materials such as glass shell for picture tubes,cathode-ray tubes (CRT) for color TVs,electromagnets and strontium ferrite.

  17. Multiwavelength Strontium Vapor Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Yudin, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    Based on an analysis of experimental and theoretical works, modern notion on conditions of forming of population density inversion on self-terminating IR transitions of alkali-earth metals is given. It is demonstrated that there is a significant difference in the inversion formation in lasers on self-terminating transitions in the visible and near-IR ranges and lasers on self-terminating transitions of alkali-earth metals lasing IR lines in the mid-IR range. It is shown that in the discharge circuit of lasers on self-terminating metal atom transitions (LSMT) there are processes strengthening the influence of the known mechanism limiting the frequency and energy characteristics (FEC) of radiation caused by the presence of prepulse electron concentration. The mechanism of influence of these processes on FEC of the LSMT and technical methods of their neutralization are considered. The possibility of obtaining average lasing power of ~200 W from one liter volume of the active medium of the strontium vapor laser is demonstrated under conditions of neutralization of these processes.

  18. Polymeric strontium ranelate nonahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Stahl

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, poly[[μ-aqua-tetraaqua{μ-5-[bis(carboxylatomethylamino]-3-carboxylatomethyl-4-cyanothiophene-2-carboxylato}distrontium(II] tetrahydrate], [Sr2(C12H6N2O8S(H2O5]·3.79H2O, crystallizes with nine- and eight-coordinated Sr2+ cations. They are bound to seven of the eight ranelate O atoms and five of the water molecules. The SrO8 and SrO9 polyhedra are interconnected by edge-sharing, forming hollow layers parallel to (011. The layers are, in turn, interconnected by ranelate anions, forming a metal–organic framework (MOF structure with channels along the a axis. The four water molecules not coordinated to strontium are located in these channels and hydrogen bonded to each other and to the ranelates. Part of the water H atoms are disordered. The compound dehydrates very easily and 0.210 (4 water molecules out of nine were lost during crystal mounting causing additional disorder in the water structure.

  19. Ionic Interactions in Actinide Tetrahalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Karaman, A.; Tosi, M. P.

    2001-05-01

    We determine a model of the ionic interactions in AX 4 compounds (where A is an atom in the actinide series from Th to Am and X = F, Cl, Br or I) by an analysis of data on the static and dynamic structure of their molecular monomers. The potential energy function that we adopt is taken from earlier work on rare-earth trihalides [Z. Akdeniz, Z. Q q e k and M. P. Tosi, Z. Naturforsch. 55a, 861 (2000)] and in particular allows for the electronic polarizability of the actinide ion. This polarizability quantitatively determines the antisymmetric-bending vibrational mode, but its magnitude remains compatible with a symmetric tetrahedral shape of the molecule at equilibrium. The fluorides have an especially high degree of ionic character, and the interionic-force parameters for each halide of the U, Np, Pu and Am series show regular trends, suggesting that extrapolations to the other transuranic-element halides may usefully be made. The Th compounds show some deviations from these trends, and the interionic-force model that we determine for ThCl4 differs somewhat from that obtained in a previous study. We therefore return on the evaluation of the relative stability of charged oligomers of ThCl4 and ZrCl4 and find confirmation of our earlier results on this problem.

  20. The ALMR actinide burning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, J.E. (General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) actinide burning system is being developed under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to bring its unique capabilities to fruition for deployment in the early 21st century. The system consists of four major parts: the reactor plant, the metal fuel and its recycle, the processing of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel to extract the actinides, and the development of a residual waste package. This paper addresses the status and outlook for each of these four major elements. The ALMR is being developed by an industrial group under the leadership of General Electric (GE) in a cost-sharing arrangement with the US Department of Energy. This effort is nearing completion of the advanced conceptual design phase and will enter the preliminary design phase in 1994. The innovative modular reactor design stresses simplicity, economics, reliability, and availability. The design has evolved from GE's PRISM design initiative and has progressed to the final stages of a prelicensing review by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); a safety evaluation report is expected by the end of 1993. All the major issues identified during this review process have been technically resolved. The next design phases will focus on implementation of the basic safety philosophy of passive shutdown to a safe, stable condition, even without scram, and passive decay heat removal. Economic projections to date show that it will be competitive with non- nuclear and advanced LWR nuclear alternatives.

  1. Ion exchange performance of commercial crystalline silicotitanates for cesium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, R.; Dangieri, T.J.; Fennelly, D.J. [and others

    1996-03-01

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CST), invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University, has been commercialized in a joint Sandia-UOP effort. The original developmental materials exhibited high selectivity for the ion exchange of cesium, strontium, and several other radionuclides from highly alkaline solutions containing molar concentrations of Na{sup +}. The materials also showed excellent chemical and radiation stability. Together, the high selectivity and stability of the CSTs made them excellent candidates for treatment of solutions such as the Hanford tank supernates and other DOE radwastes. Sandia National Laboratories and UOP have teamed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop CSTs in the powdered form and in an engineered form suitable for column ion exchange use. A continuous-flow, column ion exchange process is expected to be used to remove Cs and other radionuclides from the Hanford supernatant. The powder material invented by the Sandia and Texas A&M team consists of submicron-size particles. It is not designed for column ion exchange but may be used in other applications.

  2. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Spin and orbital moments in actinide compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, B.; Wulff, M.; Lander, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    experiments designed to determine the magnetic moments at the actinide and transition-metal sublattice sites in compounds such as UFe2, NpCo2, and PuFe2 and to separate the spin and orbital components at the actinide sites. The results show, indeed, that the ratio of the orbital to spin moment is reduced......The extended spatial distribution of both the transition-metal 3d electrons and the actinide 5f electrons results in a strong interaction between these electron states when the relevant elements are alloyed. A particular interesting feature of this hybridization, which is predicted by single...

  4. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Cassayre, Laurent; Soucek, Pavel; Mendes, Eric; Malmbeck, Rikard; Nourry, Christophe; Eloirdi, Rachel; Glatz, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Pyrochemical processes in molten LiCl–KCl are being developed in ITU for recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is anodically dissolved to the molten salt electrolyte and actinides are electrochemically reduced on solid aluminium cathodes forming solid actinide–aluminium alloys. A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from the alloys. This route consists in three steps: Vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorina...

  5. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  6. Synthesis and investigations of new strontium dicarboxylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzesiak-Nowak, Marta [Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland). Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry; Nitek, Wojciech; Rafalska-Lasocha, Alicja [Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Chemistry; Lasocha, Wieslaw [Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland). Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry; Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Chemistry

    2013-07-01

    Using simple methods of synthesis without template agents, 6 new compounds of strontium and dicarboxylic acids have been obtained. The resulting salts are: {l_brace}1{r_brace} strontium glutarate pentahydrate, {l_brace}2{r_brace} strontium adipate, {l_brace}3{r_brace} strontium pimelate monohydrate, {l_brace}4{r_brace} strontium suberate, {l_brace}5{r_brace} strontium azelate and {l_brace}6{r_brace} strontium dodecanedioate hemihydrate. Similarly to the known barium compounds, starting from the salt of azelaic acid, strontium compounds with longer dicarboxylic acids form acidic salts. Metal centers have the coordination number C.N. = 8, and the coordination polyhedra are dodecahedra. Glutaric acid form layered material, whereas with use of longer acids 3D systems are formed. Acids such as dodecanedioic and azealic form systems in which Sr-O polyhedra do not share edges or vertices. Isolated SrO{sub 8} polyhedra are joined by carboxylic groups of dicarboxylic acids. Strontium salts {l_brace}2, 4, 5{r_brace} are anhydrous, but {l_brace}1{r_brace} is pentahydrate, {l_brace}3{r_brace} is monohydrate, and {l_brace}6{r_brace} is hemihydrate. During thermal decomposition strontium salts of dicarboxylic acids decompose through an unknown intermediate product to strontium carbonate. (orig.)

  7. Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important

  8. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  9. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  10. The Actinide Transition Revisited by Gutzwiller Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhu; Lanata, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the problem of the actinide transition using the Gutzwiller approximation (GA) in combination with the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, we compute the equilibrium volumes of the actinide series and reproduce the abrupt change of density found experimentally near plutonium as a function of the atomic number. We discuss how this behavior relates with the electron correlations in the 5 f states, the lattice structure, and the spin-orbit interaction. Our results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  11. Predictive Modeling in Actinide Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    These are slides from a presentation on predictive modeling in actinide chemistry and catalysis. The following topics are covered in these slides: Structures, bonding, and reactivity (bonding can be quantified by optical probes and theory, and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of actinide complexes); Magnetic resonance properties (transition metal catalysts with multi-nuclear centers, and NMR/EPR parameters); Moving to more complex systems (surface chemistry of nanomaterials, and interactions of ligands with nanoparticles); Path forward and conclusions.

  12. Lattice effects in the light actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, A.C.; Cort, B.; Roberts, J.A.; Bennett, B.I.; Brun, T.O.; Dreele, R.B. von [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Richardson, J.W. Jr. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The light actinides show a variety of lattice effects that do not normally appear in other regions of the periodic table. The article will cover the crystal structures of the light actinides, their atomic volumes, their thermal expansion behavior, and their elastic behavior as reflected in recent thermal vibration measurements made by neutron diffraction. A discussion of the melting points will be given in terms of the thermal vibration measurements. Pressure effects will be only briefly indicated.

  13. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides.

  14. Advances in computational actinide chemistry in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongqi; Wu, Jingyi; Chai, Zhifang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Multidisciplinary Initiative Center; Su, Jing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Div. of Nuclear Materials Science and Engineering; Li, Jun [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemistry and Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering

    2014-04-01

    The advances in computational actinide chemistry made in China are reviewed. Several areas relevant to chemistry of actinides in gas, liquid, and solid phases have been explored. However, we limit the scope to selected contributions in the chemistry of molecular actinide systems in gas and liquid phases. These studies may be classified into two categories: treatment of relativistic effects, which cover the development of two- and four-component Hamiltonians and the optimization of relativistic pseudopotentials, and the applications of theoretical methods in actinide chemistry. The applications include (1) the electronic structures of actinocene, noble gas complexes, An-C multiple bonding compounds, uranyl and its isoelectronic species, fluorides and oxides, molecular systems with metal-metal bonding in their isolated forms (U{sub 2}, Pu{sub 2}) and in fullerene (U{sub 2} rate at C{sub 60}), and the excited states of actinide complexes; (2) chemical reactions, including oxidation, hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}, ligand exchange, reactivities of thorium oxo and sulfido metallocenes, CO{sub 2}/CS{sub 2} functionalization promoted by trivalent uranium complex; and (3) migration of actinides in the environment. A future outlook is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1995-01-17

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP).

  16. PF-4 actinide disposition strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margevicius, Robert W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-05-28

    The dwindling amount of Security Category I processing and storage space across the DOE Complex has driven the need for more effective storage of nuclear materials at LANL's Plutonium Facility's (PF-4's) vault. An effort was begun in 2009 to create a strategy, a roadmap, to identify all accountable nuclear material and determine their disposition paths, the PF-4 Actinide Disposition Strategy (PADS). Approximately seventy bins of nuclear materials with similar characteristics - in terms of isotope, chemical form, impurities, disposition location, etc. - were established in a database. The ultimate disposition paths include the material to remain at LANL, disposition to other DOE sites, and disposition to waste. If all the actions described in the document were taken, over half of the containers currently in the PF-4 vault would been eliminated. The actual amount of projected vault space will depend on budget and competing mission requirements, however, clearly a significant portion of the current LANL inventory can be either dispositioned or consolidated.

  17. Sorption of strontium on clinoptilolite and heulandite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyavskaya, N.B.

    1986-05-01

    The author investigates the sorption of strontium on the isostructural zeolites clinoptilolite and heulandite. In the Sr/Na/zeolite/H/sub 2/O system, clinoptilolite manifests selectivity for strontium, and heulandite for sodium. The role of the nature of the exchange ions is discussed. Modification of the clinoptilolite with acid, subsequently obtaining the Na, NH/sub 4/, or N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ form, increases the capacity for strontium by a factor of 2-4.

  18. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  19. ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

    2014-06-05

    Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  1. Monazite as a suitable actinide waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenz, Hartmut; Heuser, Julia; Schmitz, Stephan; Bosbach, Dirk [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); Neumann, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Crystallography

    2013-03-01

    The conditioning of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and in some countries even of weapons plutonium is an important issue for science and society. Therefore the research on appropriate matrices for the immobilization of fission products and actinides is of great interest. Beyond the widely used borosilicate glasses, ceramics are promising materials for the conditioning of actinides like U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm. Monazite-type ceramics with general composition LnPO{sub 4} (Ln = La to Gd) and solid solutions of monazite with cheralite or huttonite represent important materials in this field. Monazite appears to be a promising candidate material, especially because of its outstanding properties regarding radiation resistance and chemical durability. This article summarizes the most recent results concerning the characterization of monazite and respective solid solutions and the study of their chemical, thermal, physical and structural properties. The aim is to demonstrate the suitability of monazite as a secure and reliable waste form for actinides. (orig.)

  2. Electronic Structure of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental photoelectron spectroscopic results for the actinide metals are reviewed and compared with the theoretical picture of the basic electronic structure that has been developed for the actinides during the last decade. In particular the experimental data confirm the change from...... itinerant to localized 5f electron behaviour calculated to take place between plutonium and americium. From experimental data it is shown that the screening of deep core-holes is due to 5f electrons for the lighter actinide elements and 6d electrons for the heavier elements. A simplified model for the full...... LMTO electronic structure calculations is introduced. In this model the spd and 5f electronic contributions are treated as separable entities. It is shown that the model reproduces quite well the results from the full treatment. The equilibrium volume, cohesive energy and bulk modulus are calculated...

  3. Cesium and strontium loads into a combined sewer system from rainwater runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei-Ishikawa, Nao; Yoshida, Daiki; Ito, Ayumi; Umita, Teruyuki

    2016-12-01

    In this study, combined sewage samples were taken with time in several rain events and sanitary sewage samples were taken with time in dry weather to calculate Cs and Sr loads to sewers from rainwater runoff. Cs and Sr in rainwater were present as particulate forms at first flush and the particulate Cs and Sr were mainly bound with inorganic suspended solids such as clay minerals in combined sewage samples. In addition, multiple linear regression analysis showed Cs and Sr loads from rainwater runoff could be estimated by the total amount of rainfall and antecedent dry weather days. The variation of the Sr load from rainwater to sewers was more sensitive to total amount of rainfall and antecedent dry weather days than that of the Cs load.

  4. Hydrothermal interactions of cesium and strontium phases from spent unreprocessed fuel with basalt phases and basalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komarneni, S.; Scheetz, B.E.; McCarthy, G.J.; Coons, W.E.

    1980-03-01

    This investigation is a segment of an extensive research program aimed at investigating the feasibility of long-term, subsurface storage of commercial nuclear waste. Specifically, it is anticipated that the waste will be housed in a repository mined from the basalt formations which lie beneath the Hanford Site. The elements monitored during the present experiments were Cs and Sr. These two elements represent significant biohazards if released from a repository and are the major heat producing radionuclides present in commercial radioactive waste. Several Cs phases and/or solutions were reacted with either isolated basalt phases or bulk-rock basalt, and the resulting solids and solutions were analyzed. The hydrothermal reactivity of SrZrO/sub 3/, which is believed to be a probable host for Sr in SFE was investigated. While so far no evidence exists which indicates that Sr is present in a water soluble phase in spent fuel elements (SFE), detailed investigation of a potential hazard is warranted. This investigation has determined that some Cs compounds likely to be stable components of spent fuel (i.e., CsOH, Cs/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/, Cs/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/) have significant hydrothermal solubilities. These solubilities are greatly decreased in the presence of basalt and/or basalt minerals. The decrease in the amount of Cs in solution results from reactions which form pollucite and/or CsAlSiO/sub 4/, with the production of pollucite exceeding that of CsAlSiO/sub 4/. Dissolution of ..beta..-Cs/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/ implies solubilizing a uranium species to an undetermined extent. The production of schoepite (UO/sub 3/.3H/sub 2/O) during some experiments containing basalt phases, indicates a tendency to oxidize U/sup 4 +/ to U/sup 6 +/. When diopside (nominally CaMgSi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) and ..beta..-Cs/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/ were hydrothermally reacted, at 300/sup 0/C both UO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 3/.3H/sub 2/O were produced. Results of experiments on SrZrO/sub 3/ show it to be an unreactive phase.

  5. Effects of feed solution chemistry on low pressure reverse osmosis filtration of cesium and strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Shiyuan, E-mail: dingshiyuan@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Yang, Yu, E-mail: yangyu@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Huang, Haiou, E-mail: huanghaiou@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Liu, Hengchen, E-mail: 799599501@qq.com [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Hou, Li-an, E-mail: houlian678@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Xi’an High-Tech Institute, No. 2, Tongxin Street, Baqiao District, Xi’an 710025 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • A low pressure spiral wound RO membrane can reject Cs and Sr efficiently. • The rejection of Cs and Sr is dependent on feed pH and co-existing ions. • Donnan exclusion and electrostatic interaction govern the rejection of Cs and Sr. • The differences of filtration mechanism were influenced by the size of ions. • Sr could strengthen the irreversible membrane fouling resistance with HA. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to identify the removal mechanisms of radionuclides by reverse osmosis (RO) membranes under conditions relevant to full-scale water treatment. For this purpose, the effects of feed solution chemistry on the removal of Cs and Sr by a low pressure RO system was investigated by systematically varying membrane surface charge, ionic composition, and organic matter concentrations. The results showed that the effects of solution chemistry on the filtration of Cs and Sr were related to their hydrated ionic radius, resulting in the predominance of the Donnan’s effect and electrostatic interactions, respectively. Consequently, the rejection of Cs increased more pronouncedly than Sr with the increases of feed concentration. Due to the Donnan’s effect, different anions decreased the rejection of Cs to different extents in accordance to the order of anions’ radii as SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} > Cl{sup −} > NO{sub 3}{sup −} > F{sup −}. The variations in Sr rejection were influenced by the electrostatic interactions between Sr{sup 2+} and the membrane. In addition, humic acid (HA) lowered the rejection of Cs and caused significant membrane flux decline, but did not change the rejection of Sr. Sr also aggravated HA fouling of the membrane.

  6. Evaluation of improved techniques for removing strontium and cesium from process wastewater and groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The goal of this task is to evaluate new sorbent materials, ion-exchange materials, or other processes for groundwater and process wastewater decontamination that will be more selective for the removal of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs than standard treatment methods. Laboratory studies will strive to obtain a quantitative understanding of the behavior of these new materials and to evaluate their sorption efficiency in reference to a standard benchmark treatment technique. Testing of the new materials will begin by conducting scoping tests where new treatment materials are compared with standard, commercially available materials in batch shaker tests. Sorption tests will be performed under various treatment conditions (e.g., pH, temperature, simulant waste composition) for the most promising materials. Additional testing with actual wastewater will be conducted with two or three of the most effective treatment methods. Once batch testing of a treatment method is completed, dynamic column tests will be performed using the most successful sorbents, to obtain the defining column operating parameters.

  7. Strontium and cesium release mechanisms during unsaturated flow through waste-weathered Hanford sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hyun-Shik; Um, Wooyong; Rod, Kenton A.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thompson, Aaron; Perdrial, Nicolas; Steefel, Carl I.; Chorover, Jon

    2011-10-01

    Leaching behavior of Sr and Cs in the vadose zone of Hanford site (WA, USA) was studied with laboratory-weathered sediments mimicking realistic conditions beneath the leaking radioactive waste storage tanks. Unsaturated column leaching experiments were conducted using background Hanford pore water focused on first 200 pore volumes. The weathered sediments were prepared by 6 months reaction with a synthetic Hanford tank waste leachate containing Sr and Cs (10-5 and 10-3 molal representative of LO- and HI-sediment, respectively) as surrogates for 90Sr and 137Cs. The mineral composition of the weathered sediments showed that zeolite (chabazite-type) and feldspathoid (sodalite-type) were the major byproducts but different contents depending on the weathering conditions. Reactive transport modeling indicated that Cs leaching was controlled by ion-exchange, while Sr release was affected primarily by dissolution of the secondary minerals. The later release of K, Al, and Si from the HI-column indicated the additional dissolution of a more crystalline mineral (cancrinite-type). A two-site ion-exchange model successfully simulated the Cs release from the LO-column. However, a three-site ion-exchange model was needed for the HI-column. The study implied that the weathering conditions greatly impact the speciation of the secondary minerals and leaching behavior of sequestrated Sr and Cs.

  8. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)

  9. Spin–orbit coupling in actinide cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The limiting case of Russell–Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin–orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced...... spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell....

  10. Perlite for permanent confinement of cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balencie, J.; Burger, D.; Rehspringer, J.-L.; Estournès, C.; Vilminot, S.; Richard-Plouet, M.; Boos, A.

    2006-06-01

    We present the potential use of expanded perlite, a metastable amorphous hydrated aluminium silicate, as a permanent medium for the long-term confinement of cesium. The method requires simply a loading by mixing an aqueous cesium nitrate solution and expanded perlite at 300 K followed by densification by sintering. The formation of pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, a naturally occurring mineral phase, upon careful heat treatment is demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. Leaching tests on the resulting glass-ceramics reveal a very low Cs departure of 0.5 mg m-2 d-1.

  11. Microbial accumulation of uranium, radium, and cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; North, S.E.

    1981-05-01

    Diverse microbial species varied considerably in their ability to accumulate uranium, cesium, and radium. Mechanistic differences in uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were indicated. S. serevisiae exhibited a slow (hours) surface accumulation of uranium which was subject to environmental factors, while P. aeruginosa accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense intracellular deposits and did not appear to be affected by environmental parameters. Metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by either organism. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several species tested.

  12. Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Cesium Atoms in a Cesium Heat Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardis, Robert G.; Gardner, Bernard W.; Smith, R. Seth

    1997-11-01

    A Cesium Heat Pipe has been constructed to produce a cesium metal vapor for use in laser spectroscopy. The heat pipe consists of a 24 inch stainless steel pipe with 2 inch diameter calcium fluoride windows on each end. Electric heaters are used to control the cesium vapor pressure. An argon buffer gas is used to maintain high transmittance through the end windows. Sensors are used to monitor both temperature and pressure. A Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser system is used to probe the cesium atoms via resonance ionization spectroscopy. Details of the construction of the heat pipe and the experimental setup will be presented. The results of the resonance ionization spectroscopy will be discussed. This experimental setup can be utilized with undergraduates in courses such as Optics, Laser Physics, and Senior Laboratory/Research.

  13. Cesium vapor thermionic converter anomalies arising from negative ion emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasor, Ned S.

    2016-08-01

    Compelling experimental evidence is given that a longstanding limit encountered on cesium vapor thermionic energy converter performance improvement and other anomalies arise from thermionic emission of cesium negative ions. It is shown that the energy that characterizes thermionic emission of cesium negative ions is 1.38 eV and, understandably, is not the electron affinity 0.47 eV determined for the photodetachment threshold of the cesium negative ion. The experimental evidence includes measurements of collector work functions and volt-ampere characteristics in quasi-vacuum cesium vapor thermionic diodes, along with reinterpretation of the classic Taylor-Langmuir S-curve data on electron emission in cesium vapor. The quantitative effects of negative ion emission on performance in the ignited, unignited, and quasi-vacuum modes of cesium vapor thermionic converter operation are estimated.

  14. Scalar Static Polarizabilities of Lanthanides and Actinides

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V

    2014-01-01

    We calculate scalar static polarizabilities for lanthanides and actinides, the atoms with open $4f$ or $5f$ subshell. We show that polarizabilities of the low states are approximately the same for all states of given configuration and present a way of calculating them reducing valence space to just two or three valence electrons occupying $6s$ and $5d$ states for lanthanides or $7s$ and $6d$ states for actinides while $4f$ and $5f$ states are considered to be in the core. Configuration interaction technique is used to calculate polarizabilities of lanthanides and actinides for all states of the $4f^n6s^2$ and $4f^{n-1}6s^25d$ configurations of lanthanides and all states of the $5f^{n}7s^2$ and $5f^{n-1}7s^26d$ configurations of actinides. Polarizability of the electron core (including f-orbitals) has been calculated in the RPA approximation.

  15. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The third international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Cadarache France, on 12-14 December 1994. The proceedings are presented in six sessions : an introduction session, the major programmes and international cooperation, the systems studies, the reactors fuels and targets, the chemistry and a last discussions session. (A.L.B.)

  16. Actinide valences in xenotime and monazite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, E.R. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001 Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Zhang, Y., E-mail: yzx@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001 Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); McLeod, T.; Davis, J. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001 Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2011-02-28

    Tetravalent U, Np and Pu can be substituted by ceramic methods into the rare earth site of xenotime and monazite in air atmospheres using Ca ions as charge compensators, while no evidence of penta- or hexavalent actinide ions was found. Some Pu{sup 3+} and Np{sup 3+} can be incorporated in xenotime samples fired in a reducing atmosphere.

  17. Adventures in Actinide Chemistry: A Year of Exploring Uranium and Thorium in Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagano, Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The first part of this collection of slides is concerned with considerations when working with actinides. The topics discussed in the document as a whole are the following: Actinide chemistry vs. transition metal chemistry--tools we can use; New synthetic methods to obtain actinide hydrides; Actinide metallacycles: synthesis, structure, and properties; and Reactivity of actinide metallacycles.

  18. Solvothermal synthesis of strontium phosphate chloride nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, W. M.; Wong, C. T.; Li, Z. Y.; Luk, K. D. K.; Chan, W. K.; Yang, C.; Chiu, K. Y.; Xu, B.; Lu, W. W.

    2007-08-01

    Strontium phosphate chloride nanowire was synthesized via a solvothermal treatment of strontium tri-polyphosphate and Collin salt in 1,4-dioxane at 150 °C. The effects of 1,4-dioxane concentration on particle morphology, crystallinity and phase purity were investigated in this study. The specimen morphology was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). When the concentration of 1,4-dioxane was below 10%, micron-sized whisker was the dominant form. At 20-25% concentration of 1,4-dioxane, strontium phosphate chloride single-crystalline nanowire was 31±12 nm in diameter and 1.43±0.6 μm in length with an aspect ratio of 52.28±29.41. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of this nanowire matched with that of strontium phosphate chloride (JCPDS #083-0973). When 1,4-dioxane concentration exceeded 25%, nanorod aggregate was the dominant form instead of nanowire. At 20-25% 1,4-dioxane concentration suitable strontium concentration combine with high chemical potential environment favors the formation of nanowires. By adding 1,4-dioxane impure phase such as β-strontium hydrogen phosphate, nanorod formation was suppressed. This method provides an efficient way to synthesize high aspect ratio strontium phosphate chloride nanowire. It has potential bioactive nanocomposite, high mechanical performance bioactive bone cement filler and fluorescent material applications.

  19. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  20. Strontium Ions Substitution in Brushite Crystals: The Role of Strontium Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique López Cabarcos

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of strontium chloride to brushite cement was successful to introduce strontium ions within the lattice of brushite crystals. The effect of strontium ions on brushite cement properties was concentration dependent; such that, the addition of 5% and 10% (w/w SrCl2 significantly increased the cement FST and the addition of 10% SrCl2 decreased the cement tensile strength. Further, cement weight loss was shown to be increased by cement modification with SrCl2. The combination of ionic substitution and the degradability of brushite cements would constitute a system for the local delivery of strontium ions in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  1. Strontium ions substitution in brushite crystals: the role of strontium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad H; Rueda, Carmen; López Cabarcos, Enrique

    2011-05-31

    The incorporation of strontium chloride to brushite cement was successful to introduce strontium ions within the lattice of brushite crystals. The effect of strontium ions on brushite cement properties was concentration dependent; such that, the addition of 5% and 10% (w/w) SrCl2 significantly increased the cement FST and the addition of 10% SrCl2 decreased the cement tensile strength. Further, cement weight loss was shown to be increased by cement modification with SrCl2. The combination of ionic substitution and the degradability of brushite cements would constitute a system for the local delivery of strontium ions in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  2. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  3. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassayre, L.; Souček, P.; Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Nourry, C.; Eloirdi, R.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2011-07-01

    Pyrochemical processes in molten LiCl-KCl are being developed in ITU for recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is anodically dissolved to the molten salt electrolyte and actinides are electrochemically reduced on solid aluminium cathodes forming solid actinide-aluminium alloys. A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from the alloys. This route consists in three steps: Vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorine gas and sublimation of the formed AlCl 3. A thermochemical study showed thermodynamic feasibility of all three steps. On the basis of the conditions identified by the calculations, experiments using pure UAl 3 alloy were carried out to evaluate and optimise the chlorination step. The work was focused on determination of the optimal temperature and Cl 2/UAl 3 molar ratio, providing complete chlorination of the alloy without formation of volatile UCl 5 and UCl 6. The results showed high efficient chlorination at a temperature of 150 °C.

  4. Nano-Cesium for Anti-Cancer Properties: An Investigation into Cesium Induced Metabolic Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Enrique A; Misra, Santosh K; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S; Ohoka, Ayako; Miller, Callie; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-10-03

    The use of cesium chloride (CsCl) for cancer therapy ("high pH therapy") has been theorized to produce anticancer properties by raising intracellular pH to induce apoptosis. Although considered as "alternative medicine", little scientific evidence supports this theory. Alternatively, cells have no cesium ion (Cs(+)) mediated channels for clearance. Thus, such unstable electrochemical distributions have the severe potential to disrupt electrochemical dependent cellular processes, such as glucose cotransporters. Hence, a detailed investigation of pH changing effects and glucose uptake inhibition are warranted as a possible cesium-induced anticancer therapy. We developed and characterized cesium nanoparticles (38 ± 6 nm), termed NanoCs, for nanoparticle-mediated internalization of the ion, and compared its treatment to free CsCl. Our investigations suggest that neither NanoCs nor CsCl drastically changed the intracellular pH, negating the theory. Alternatively, NanoCs lead to a significant decrease in glucose uptake when compared to free CsCl, suggesting cesium inhibited glucose uptake. An apoptosis assay of observed cell death affirms that NanoCs leads tumor cells to initiate apoptosis rather than follow necrotic behavior. Furthermore, NanoCs lead to in vivo tumor regression, where H&E analysis confirmed apoptotic cell populations. Thus, NanoCs performed pH-independent anticancer therapy by inducing metabolic stasis.

  5. Actinide Isotopes for the Synthesis of Superheavy Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, J. B.; Alexander, C. W.; Boll, R. A.; Dean, D. J.; Ezold, J. G.; Felker, L. K.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2014-09-01

    Recent research resulting in the synthesis of isotopes of new elements 113-118 has demonstrated the importance of actinide targets in superheavy element research. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has unique facilities for the production and processing of actinide target materials, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). These facilities have provided actinide target materials that have been used for the synthesis of all superheavy (SHE) elements above Copernicium (element 112). In this paper, the use of actinide targets for SHE research and discovery is described, including recent results for element 117 using 249Bk target material from ORNL. ORNL actinide capabilities are reviewed, including production and separation/purification, availabilities of actinide materials, and future opportunities including novel target materials such as 251Cf.

  6. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-07-01

    The first international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Mito in Japan, on 6-8 November 1990. It starts with a number of general overview papers to give us some broad perspectives. Following that it takes a look at some basic facts about physics and about the quantities of materials it is talking about. Then it proceeds to some specific aspects of partitioning, starting with evolution from today commercially applied processes and going on to other possibilities. At the end of the third session it takes a look at the significance of partitioning and transmutation of actinides before it embarks on two sessions on transmutation, first in reactors and second in accelerators. The last session is designed to throw back into the discussion the main points which need to be looked at when considering future work in this area. (A.L.B.)

  7. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  8. Surface adsorption in strontium chloride ammines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Andreas L.; Lysgaard, Steen; Klukowska, Agata

    2013-01-01

    An adsorbed state and its implications on the ab- and desorption kinetics of ammonia in strontium chloride ammine is identified using a combination of ammonia absorption measurements, thermogravimetric analysis, and density functional theory calculations. During thermogravimetric analysis, ammoni...

  9. Strontium clusters: electronic and geometry shell effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Greiner, Walter

    2008-01-01

    is governed by an interplay of the electronic and geometry shell closures. Influence of the electronic shell effects on structural rearrangements can lead to violation of the icosahedral growth motif of strontium clusters. It is shown that the excessive charge essentially affects the optimized geometry......The optimized structure and electronic properties of neutral, singly and doubly charged strontium clusters have been investigated using it ab initio theoretical methods based on density-functional theory. We have systematically calculated the optimized geometries of neutral, singly and doubly...... charged strontium clusters consisting of up to 14 atoms, average bonding distances, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, and spectra of the density of electronic states (DOS). It is demonstrated that the size-evolution of structural and electronic properties of strontium clusters...

  10. Fixation of Radioactive Strontium in Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregers-Hansen, Birte

    1964-01-01

    The contamination of agricultural areas by fission products from nuclear events is a possibility, and would in turn lead to contamination of plants. Of special importance is the long-lived strontium-90, as it has been shown1 that this isotope is taken up by plants to a much greater extent than an...... been considered6,7. In general, these methods appear to be of little practical value, except for deep ploughing and the liming of acid soils, both of which will reduce the strontium uptake by a factor of 3–4....... of the other long-lived fission products. Much work2–5 has, therefore, been concerned with the possibility of bringing down the strontium-90 uptake by plants through ploughing or through the addition of lime or fertilizer to the soil. Another factor, the effect of ageing on the availability of strontium, has...

  11. Lattice dynamics of strontium tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabhatasree Goel; R Mittal; S L Chaplot; A K Tyagi

    2008-11-01

    We report here measurements of the phonon density of states and the lattice dynamics calculations of strontium tungstate (SrWO4). At ambient conditions this compound crystallizes to a body-centred tetragonal unit cell (space group I41/a) called scheelite structure. We have developed transferable interatomic potentials to study the lattice dynamics of this class of compounds. The model parameters have been fitted with respect to the experimentally available Raman and infra-red frequencies and the equilibrium unit cell parameters. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements have been carried out in the triple-axis spectrometer at Dhruva reactor. The measured phonon density of states is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations, thus validating the inter-atomic potential developed.

  12. Ion exchange removal of strontium from simulated and actual N-Springs well water at the Hanford 100-N Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kafka, T.M.; White, L.R. [Minnesota Mining and Mfg. Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Experimental ion exchange studies are being conducted by the Pacific Northwest national Laboratory (PNNL) under the Efficient Separations and Processing (ESP) Crosscutting Program to evaluate newly emerging materials and technologies for removing cesium, strontium, technetium, and transuranic elements from simulated and actual wastes at Hanford. Previous work focused on applications to treat high-level alkaline tank wastes, but many of the technologies can also be applied in process and ground-water remediation. Ultimately, each process must be evaluated in terms of life-cycle costs, removal efficiency, process chemical consumption and recycle, stability of materials exposed to chemicals and radiation, compatibility with other process streams, secondary waste generation, process and maintenance costs, and final material disposal. This report assesses the performance of the 3M-designed Process Absorber Development Unit (PADU) and the AlliedSignal-produced sodium nonatitanate (NaTi) material in trace quantities of strontium from simulated and actual Hanford N-Springs ground water. The experimental objective was to determine the strontium-loading breakthrough profile of a proprietary 3M-engineered material in either disk or cartridge forms.

  13. SPECIFIC SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR THE ACTINIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Smith, William L.; Weitl, Frederick L.; Durbin, Patricia W.; Jones, E.Sarah; Abu-Dari, Kamal; Sofen, Stephen R.; Cooper, Stephen R.

    1979-09-01

    This paper summarizes the current status of a continuing project directed toward the synthesis and characterization of chelating agents which are specific for actinide ions - especially Pu(IV) - using a biomimetic approach that relies on the observation that Pu(IV) and Fe(III) has marked similarities that include their biological transport and distribution in mammals. Since the naturally-occurring Fe(III) sequestering agents produced by microbes commonly contain hydroxamate and catecholate functional groups, these groups should complex the actinides very strongly and macrocyclic ligands incorporating these moieties are being prepared. We have reported the isolation and structure analysis of an isostructural series of tetrakis(catecholato) complexes with the general stoichiometry Na{sub 4}[M(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}){sub 4}] • 21 H{sub 2}O (M = Th, U, Ce, Hf). These complexes are structural archetypes for the cavity that must be formed if an actinide-specific sequestering agent is to conform ideally to the coordination requirements of the central metal ion. The [M(cat){sub 4}]{sup 4-} complexes have the D{sub 2d} symmetry of the trigonal-faced dodecahedron.. The complexes Th [R'C(0)N(O)R]{sub 4} have been prepared where R = isopropyl and R' = t-butyl or neopentyl. The neopentyl derivative is also relatively close to an idealized D{sub 2d} dodecahedron, while the sterically more hindered t-butyl compound is distorted toward a cubic geometry. The synthesis of a series of 2, 3-dihydroxy-benzoyl amide derivatives of linear and cyclic tetraaza- and diazaalkanes is reported. Sulfonation of these compounds improves the metal complexation and in vivo removal of plutonium from test animals. These results substantially exceed the capabilities of compounds presently used for the therapeutic treatment of actinide contamination.

  14. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The fourth international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Mito City in Japan, on 111-13 September 1996. The proceedings are presented in six sessions: the major programmes and international cooperation, the partitioning and transmutation programs, feasibility studies, particular separation processes, the accelerator driven transmutation, and the chemistry of the fuel cycle. (A.L.B.)

  15. Preparation, properties, and some recent studies of the actinide metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The actinide elements form a unique series of metals. The variation in their physial properties combined with the varying availability of the different elements offers a challenge to the preparative scientist. This article provides a brief review of selected methods used for preparing ..mu..g to kg amounts of the actinide metals and the properties of these metals. In addition, some recent studies on selected actinide metals are discussed. 62 refs.

  16. Vitrification of strontium-90 fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, D.M.; Schulz, W.W.

    1977-04-01

    At Hanford, strontium-90 is removed from high-level nuclear fuel reprocessing waste and converted to strontium-90 fluoride. This /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ is doubly encapsulated in high-integrity containers which are placed under water in monitored storage pools. Conversion of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ to a more immobile compound may be necessary and/or desirable as part of the overall plan for the long-term management of Hanford Defense Wastes. Glasses containing up to 40 mass percent SrF/sub 2/ and having leach rates in the range 1 x 10/sup -8/ to 1 x 10/sup -5/ gram Sr/(m/sup 2/ . s) (1 x 10/sup -7/ to 1 x 10/sup -4/ g Sr/cm/sup 2/ . day)) have now been prepared. From 0.2 to 5 percent of the fluorine is volatilized during the melting of the glass batch at temperatures up to 1500/sup 0/K. At present, the heat generation limit for commercial glasses stored at a nuclear waste repository is 5 kW per canister. All glasses described here would exceed that limit by more than a factor of five. The stored /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ may be treated separately from the bulk of Hanford waste, in which case it would be diluted to an acceptable power level with inert chemicals in the glass batch. Another option is to blend the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ with the bulk of the other Hanford wastes when those wastes are converted to some immobile form.

  17. Preparation of the Superconductor Substrate: Strontium Titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    single crystals of strontium titanate is derived from the original method developed by Verneuil . 16 The general procedure for the growth of single... crystals growth are reported. The growth direction was determined to be 5 degrees away from the [2111 direction. ICP-emission spectroscopy irdicates... Growth of Strontium Titanate Crystals 5 2.4 Preparation of Substrates 8 3. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS 8 REFERENCES 13 Illustrations 1. Schematic Diagram

  18. Cesium Atomic Fountain Clocks at NMIJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    shift in caesium fountain clocks,” Physical Review Letters, 98, 153002. [10] A. Takamizawa, Y. Shirakawa, S. Yanagimachi et al., 2010, “Proposal of a...beam of laser-cooled cesium atoms,” Physical Review, A 60, R4241-R4244. [13] V. Gerginov, N. Nemitz, S. Weyers, et al., 2010, “Uncertainty evaluation of the caesium fountain clock PTB-CSF2,” Metrologia, 47, 65-79.

  19. Actinide and lanthanide separation process (ALSEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelis, Artem V.

    2013-01-15

    The process of the invention is the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in a fluid mixture comprising, fission products, lanthanides, minor actinides, rare earth elements, nitric acid and water by addition of an organic chelating aid to the fluid; extracting the fluid with a solvent comprising a first extractant, a second extractant and an organic diluent to form an organic extractant stream and an aqueous raffinate. Scrubbing the organic stream with a dicarboxylic acid and a chelating agent to form a scrubber discharge. The scrubber discharge is stripped with a simple buffering agent and a second chelating agent in the pH range of 2.5 to 6.1 to produce actinide and lanthanide streams and spent organic diluents. The first extractant is selected from bis(2-ethylhexyl)hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (HEH(EHP)) and the second extractant is selected from N,N,N,N-tetra-2-ethylhexyl diglycol amide (TEHDGA) and N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-3-oxapentanediamide (TODGA).

  20. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souček, P.; Cassayre, L.; Eloirdi, R.; Malmbeck, R.; Meier, R.; Nourry, C.; Claux, B.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2014-04-01

    A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys, which originate from pyrochemical recovery of actinides from spent metallic nuclear fuel by electrochemical methods in molten LiCl-KCl. In the present work, the most important steps of this route were experimentally tested using U-Pu-Al alloy prepared by electrodeposition of U and Pu on solid aluminium plate electrodes. The investigated processes were vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the alloy by chlorine gas and sublimation of the AlCl3 formed. The processes parameters were set on the base of a previous thermochemical study and an experimental work using pure UAl3 alloy. The present experimental results indicated high efficiency of salt distillation and chlorination steps, while the sublimation step should be further optimised.

  1. Hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates: a new aqueous route towards reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates (An= Th, U, Pu at temperatures between 95 and 250 °C is shown to lead to the production of highly crystalline, reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals (NCs. This aqueous process proved to be quantitative, reproducible and fast (depending on temperature. The NCs obtained were characterised by X-ray diffraction and TEM showing their size to be smaller than 15 nm. Attempts to extend this general approach towards transition metal or lanthanide oxalates failed in the 95–250 °C temperature range. The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide oxalates is therefore a clean, flexible and powerful approach towards NCs of AnO2 with possible scale-up potential.

  2. Novel Solvent for the Simultaneous recovery of Radioactive Nuclides from Liquid Radioactive Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanovskiy, Valeriy Nicholiavich; Smirnov, Lgor V.; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.

    1999-10-07

    The present invention relates to solvents, and methods, for selectively extracting and recovering radionuclides, especially cesium and strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive wastes. More specifically, the invention relates to extracting agent solvent compositions comprising complex organoboron compounds, substituted polyethylene glycols, and neutral organophosphorus compounds in a diluent. The preferred solvent comprises a chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, diphenyl-dibutylmethylenecarbamoylphosphine oxide, PEG-400, and a diluent of phenylpolyfluoroalkyl sulfone. The invention also provides a method of using the invention extracting agents to recover cesium, strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive waste.

  3. Determination of the thermal radiation effect on an optical strontium lattice clock; Bestimmung des Einflusses thermischer Strahlung auf eine optische Strontium-Gitteruhr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middelmann, Thomas

    2013-05-31

    Optical clocks have the potential to be 100 times more accurate than current best cesium atomic clocks within a fraction of the averaging time. This corresponds to a fractional uncertainty of the clock frequency on the level of 10{sup -18} and requires highaccuracy knowledge of systematic frequency shifts, such that they can be avoided or corrected for. In strontium optical lattice clocks an ensemble of ultracold strontium atoms is confined in an optical lattice, to allow for spectroscopy of the reference transition 5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}-5s5p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the Lamb-Dicke regime. The by far largest systematic frequency shift of the strontium clock transition is caused by its high sensitivity to blackbody radiation (BBR). The knowledge of the resulting frequency shift limited the achievable clock uncertainty to about 1 x 10{sup -16}. In this thesis for the first time an experimental approach was followed, to determine the sensitivity of the strontium clock transition to blackbody radiation. At an environmental temperature of 300 K the resulting frequency shift corresponds to 2.277 8(23) Hz. The achieved uncertainty contributes with 5 x 10{sup -18} to the fractional systematic uncertainty of the clock frequency. The determination is based on a precision measurement of the difference of static polarizabilities of the two clock states {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} = {alpha}(5s5p {sup 3}P{sub 0})-{alpha}(5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) = 4.078 73(11) x 10{sup -39} Cm{sup 2} /V. For this the de Stark shift of the clock transition has been measured in the accurately known electric field of a precision plate capacitor, which has been developed in this work. The attained static polarizability difference {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} corresponds to the first term of a power series of the sensitivity to BBR. Higher orders are accumulated as dynamic part of the BBR shift. Which has been modelled using {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} and experimental data for other atomic properties. To

  4. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction.

  5. Polarizabilities and Shielding Factors of Ions in Cesium Halide Crystals with the Cesium Chloride Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbubar, Rahman; Michihiro, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Koichi; Kanashiro, Tatsuo

    2001-08-01

    The calculated results of the polarizabilities and the quadrupole shielding factor of the ions in cesium halide crystals with the cesium chloride structure are presented. The calculation is done on the basis of the self-consistent field local density approximation and the modified Sternheimer equation. The crystalline potential is treated by the spherical solid model. The size effect is seen in the values of the polarizabilities and the quadrupole shielding factor. The values of the polarizabilities and the quadrupole shielding factor of cesium ion show only slight change in different crystals. The values of chlorine ion show significant reduction and the amount of the reduction is different in the different crystals. The effect of the crystalline environment on the electron states is discussed.

  6. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Ken [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Martin, Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lumetta, Gregg [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-02

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of used nuclear fuel is the separation of transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanides. This separation is essential if actinide transmutation options are to be pursued in advanced fuel cycles, as lanthanides compete with actinides for neutrons in both thermal and fast reactors, thus limiting efficiency. The separation is difficult because the chemistry of Am3+ and Cm3+ is nearly identical to that of the trivalent lanthanides (Ln3+). The prior literature teaches that two approaches offer the greatest probability of devising a successful group separation process based on aqueous processes: 1) the application of complexing agents containing ligand donor atoms that are softer than oxygen (N, S, Cl-) or 2) changing the oxidation state of Am to the IV, V, or VI state to increase the essential differences between Am and lanthanide chemistry (an approach utilized in the PUREX process to selectively remove Pu4+ and UO22+ from fission products). The latter approach offers the additional benefit of enabling a separation of Am from Cm, as Cm(III) is resistant to oxidation and so can easily be made to follow the lanthanides. The fundamental limitations of these approaches are that 1) the soft(er) donor atoms that interact more strongly with actinide cations than lanthanides form substantially weaker bonds than oxygen atoms, thus necessitating modification of extraction conditions for adequate phase transfer efficiency, 2) soft donor reagents have been seen to suffer slow phase transfer kinetics and hydro-/radiolytic stability limitations and 3) the upper oxidation states of Am are all moderately strong oxidants, hence of only transient stability in media representative of conventional aqueous separations systems. There are examples in the literature of both approaches having been described. However, it is not clear at present that any extant process is sufficiently robust for application at the scale

  7. Development of a CMPO based extraction process for partitioning of minor actinides and demonstration with genuine fast reactor fuel solution (155 GWd/Te)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antony, M.P.; Kumaresan, R.; Suneesh, A.S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (IN). Fuel Chemistry Div.] (and others)

    2011-07-01

    A method has been developed for partitioning of minor actinides from fast reactor (FR) fuel solution by a TRUEX solvent composed of 0.2 M n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (CMPO)-1.2 M tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane (n-DD), and subsequently demonstrated with genuine fast reactor dissolver solution (155 GWd/Te) using a novel 16-stage ejector mixer settler in hot cells. Cesium, plutonium and uranium present in the dissolver solution were removed, prior to minor actinide partitioning, by using ammonium molybdophosphate impregnated XAD-7 (AMP-XAD), methylated poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP-Me), and macroporous bifunctional phosphinic acid (MPBPA) resins respectively. Extraction of europium(III) and cerium(III) from simulated and real dissolver solution, and their stripping behavior from loaded organic phase was studied in batch method using various citric acid-nitric acid formulations. Based on these results, partitioning of minor actinides from fast reactor dissolver solution was demonstrated in hot cells. The extraction and stripping profiles of {sup 154}Eu, {sup 144}Ce, {sup 106}Ru and {sup 137}Cs, and mass balance of {sup 241}Am(III) achieved in the demonstration run have been reported in this paper. (orig.)

  8. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu;

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs(+)) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs(+) uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs(+), chemical library screening was performed using Ara...

  9. Cesium-associated hypokalemia successfully treated with amiloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Sarah; Naidus, Elliot; Alper, Seth L; Danziger, John

    2015-06-01

    Self-treatment of cancer with cesium chloride, despite proven lack of efficacy, continues to produce serious adverse effects. Among these is hypokalemia predisposing to life-threatening arrhythmia. The mechanism of cesium-associated hypokalemia (CAH) has not been described. We report urinary potassium wasting responsive to amiloride therapy in a cancer patient with CAH, and discuss possible mechanisms.

  10. Cesium-associated hypokalemia successfully treated with amiloride

    OpenAIRE

    Horn, Sarah; Naidus, Elliot; Alper, Seth L; Danziger, John

    2015-01-01

    Self-treatment of cancer with cesium chloride, despite proven lack of efficacy, continues to produce serious adverse effects. Among these is hypokalemia predisposing to life-threatening arrhythmia. The mechanism of cesium-associated hypokalemia (CAH) has not been described. We report urinary potassium wasting responsive to amiloride therapy in a cancer patient with CAH, and discuss possible mechanisms.

  11. Distillation device supplies cesium vapor at constant pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiulis, A.; Shefsiek, P. K.

    1968-01-01

    Distillation apparatus in the form of a U tube supplies small amounts of pure cesium vapor at constant pressure to a thermionic converter. The upstream leg of the U tube is connected to a vacuum pump to withdraw noncondensable impurities, the bottom portion serves as a reservoir for the liquid cesium.

  12. Solubility of strontium-substituted apatite by solid titration

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, HB; Darvell, BW; Luk, KDK; Lu, WW; Li, ZY; Lam, WM; Wong, JC

    2009-01-01

    Solid titration was used to explore the solubility isotherms of partially (Srx-HAp, x = 1, 5, 10, 40, 60 mol.%) and fully substituted strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HAp). Solubility increased with increasing strontium content. No phase other than strontium-substituted HAp, corresponding to the original titrant, was detected in the solid present at equilibrium; in particular, dicalcium hydrogen phosphate was not detected at low pH. The increase in solubility with strontium content is interpreted...

  13. Chemistry of lower valent actinide halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, K.H.; Hildenbrand, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This research effort was concerned almost entirely with the first two members of the actinide series, thorium and uranium, although the work was later extended to some aspects of the neptunium-fluorine system in a collaborative program with Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed information about the lighter actinides will be helpful in modeling the properties of the heavier actinide compounds, which will be much more difficult to study experimentally. In this program, thermochemical information was obtained from high temperature equilibrium measurements made by effusion-beam mass spectrometry and by effusion-pressure techniques. Data were derived primarily from second-law analysis so as to avoid potential errors in third-law calculations resulting from uncertainties in spectroscopic and molecular constants. This approach has the additional advantage of yielding reaction entropies that can be checked for consistency with various molecular constant assignments for the species involved. In the U-F, U-Cl, and U-Br systems, all of the gaseous species UX, UX{sub 2}, UX{sub 3}, UX{sub 4}, and UX{sub 5}, where X represents the halogen, were identified and characterized; the corresponding species ThX, ThX{sub 2}, ThX{sub 3}, and ThX{sub 4} were studied in the Th-F, Th-Cl, and Th-Br systems. A number of oxyhalide species in the systems U-0-F, U-0-Cl, Th-0-F, and Th-O-Cl were studied thermochemically. Additionally, the sublimation thermodynamics of NpF{sub 4}(s) and NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}(s) were studied by mass spectrometry.

  14. Specific activity and isotope abundances of strontium in purified strontium-82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, J. M.; Medvedev, D. G.; Mausner, L. F.

    2015-11-12

    A linear accelerator was used to irradiate a rubidium chloride target with protons to produce strontium-82 (Sr-82), and the Sr-82 was purified by ion exchange chromatography. The amount of strontium associated with the purified Sr-82 was determined by either: ICP-OES or method B which consisted of a summation of strontium quantified by gamma spectroscopy and ICP-MS. The summation method agreed within 10% to the ICP-OES for the total mass of strontium and the subsequent specific activities were determined to be 0.25–0.52 TBq mg-1. Method B was used to determine the isotope abundances by weight% of the purified Sr-82, and the abundances were: Sr-82 (10–20.7%), Sr-83 (0–0.05%), Sr-84 (35–48.5%), Sr-85 (16–25%), Sr-86 (12.5–23%), Sr-87 (0%), and Sr-88 (0–10%). The purified strontium contained mass amounts of Sr-82, Sr-84, Sr-85, Sr-86, and Sr-88 in abundances not associated with natural abundance, and 90% of the strontium was produced by the proton irradiation. A comparison of ICP-OES and method B for the analysis of Sr-82 indicated analysis by ICP-OES would be easier to determine total mass of strontium and comply with regulatory requirements. An ICP-OES analytical method for Sr-82 analysis was established and validated according to regulatory guidelines.

  15. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Shigeo

    2015-12-01

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GWey if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  16. Electronic structure and magnetism in actinide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durakiewicz, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: tomasz@lanl.gov; Joyce, J.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lander, G.H. [JRC, Institute of Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Olson, C.G. [Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 5011 (United States); Butterfield, M.T. [Lawrence Livermoore National Laboratory, Livermoore, CA 94550 (United States); Guziewicz, E. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Batista, C.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Arko, A.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Morales, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mattenberger, K. [Laboratorium fur Festkorperphysik, ETH, CH-8093, Zurich (Switzerland); Vogt, O. [Laboratorium fur Festkorperphysik, ETH, CH-8093, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-05-01

    A close relationship between electronic structure and magnetic properties is observed in actinide compounds. The exact nature of this relationship is under investigation. We present examples of a direct link between electronic structure and ordered magnetic moment and/or magnetization. Specifically, results obtained for cubic U, Np and Pu compounds and quasi-2D U compounds are be presented. In the case of cubic compounds, a direct relationship between binding energy of valence band features and magnetic moment will be discussed. A Stoner-like mechanism and simple mean-field explanation is proposed for ferromagnetic UTe.

  17. Status of nuclear data for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzhovskii, B.Y.; Gorelov, V.P.; Grebennikov, A.N. [Russia Federal Nuclear Centre, Arzamas (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear data required for transmutation problem include many actinide nuclei. In present paper the analysis of neutron fission, capture, (n,2n) and (n,3n) reaction cross sections at energy region from thermal point to 14 MeV was carried out for Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotops using modern evaluated nuclear data libraries and handbooks of recommended nuclear data. Comparison of these data indicates on substantial discrepancies in different versions of files, that connect with quality and completeness of original experimental data.

  18. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  19. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohki, Shigeo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GW{sub e}y if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  20. Fission cross section measurements for minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fursov, B. [IPPE, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The main task of this work is the measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section for minor actinides of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243,244,245,246,247,248}Cm. The task of the work is to increase the accuracy of data in MeV energy region. Basic experimental method, fissile samples, fission detectors and electronics, track detectors, alpha counting, neutron generation, fission rate measurement, corrections to the data and error analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  1. Adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchek, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.volchek@ec.gc.ca [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Miah, Muhammed Yusuf [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Noakhali Science and Technology University (Bangladesh); Kuang, Wenxing; DeMaleki, Zack [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Tezel, F. Handan [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar was investigated in a range of temperatures and cesium concentrations. {yields} The pseudo-second order kinetic model produced a good fit with the experimental kinetic data. {yields} Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm adsorption model. {yields} The interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar was dominated by chemical adsorption. - Abstract: The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions was studied in series of bench-scale tests. The effects of cesium concentration, temperature and contact time on process kinetics and equilibrium were evaluated. Experiments were carried out in a range of initial cesium concentrations from 0.0103 to 10.88 mg L{sup -1} and temperatures from 278 to 313 K using coupons of cement mortar immersed in the solutions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive {sup 137}Cs. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Depending on the initial cesium concentration, its equilibrium concentration in solution ranged from 0.0069 to 8.837 mg L{sup -1} while the respective surface concentration on coupons varied from 0.0395 to 22.34 {mu}g cm{sup -2}. Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm model for the entire test duration. Test results revealed that an increase in temperature resulted in an increase in adsorption rate and a decrease in equilibrium cesium surface concentration. Among several kinetic models considered, the pseudo-second order reaction model was found to be the best to describe the kinetic test results in the studied range of concentrations. The adsorption activation energy determined from Arrhenius equation was found to be approximately 55.9 kJ mol{sup -1} suggesting that chemisorption was the prevalent mechanism of interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar.

  2. [Surveillance of radioactive cesium in foods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshi, Hiromi; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Ikarashi, Atsuko; Hachisuka, Akiko; Matsuda, Rieko

    2013-01-01

    We surveyed foods on the market from areas that had been exposed to radioactive materials contamination following the Fukushima accident. We used a NaI (Tl) scintillation spectrometer for the screening tests and a germanium semiconductor detector for the final tests. Test results from 1,427 samples showed that 6 samples (0.4%) exceeded the regulatory limit of 500 Bq/kg. Considering the detection rate of radioactive cesium in each food category, we suggest that it is necessary to continue monitoring fruits such as chestnuts and ginkgo nuts, mushrooms (especially raw wood-shiitake), mountain vegetables, and sea fish.

  3. Strontium Ions Substitution in Brushite Crystals: The Role of Strontium Chloride

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The incorporation of strontium chloride to brushite cement was successful to introduce strontium ions within the lattice of brushite crystals. The effect of strontium ions on brushite cement properties was concentration dependent; such that, the addition of 5% and 10% (w/w) SrCl2 significantly increased the cement FST and the addition of 10% SrCl2 decreased the cement tensile strength. Further, cement weight loss was shown to be increased by cement modification with SrCl2. The combination of ...

  4. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, D S; Pisenti, N C; Campbell, G K

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  5. Enhanced magnetic trap loading for atomic strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, D. S.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Pisenti, N. C.; Campbell, G. K.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a magneto-optical trap. This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the P31→S31 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65% for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30% for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  6. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-11-02

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  7. Printed Barium Strontium Titanate capacitors on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sette, Daniele [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology LIST, Materials Research and Technology Department, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Kovacova, Veronika [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Defay, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.defay@list.lu [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology LIST, Materials Research and Technology Department, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2015-08-31

    In this paper, we show that Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) films can be prepared by inkjet printing of sol–gel precursors on platinized silicon substrate. Moreover, a functional variable capacitor working in the GHz range has been made without any lithography or etching steps. Finally, this technology requires 40 times less precursors than the standard sol–gel spin-coating technique. - Highlights: • Inkjet printing of Barium Strontium Titanate films • Deposition on silicon substrate • Inkjet printed silver top electrode • First ever BST films thinner than 1 μm RF functional variable capacitor that has required no lithography.

  8. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, D.S.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Pisenti, N. C.; Campbell, G. K.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, int...

  9. First principles investigation of substituted strontium hexaferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vivek

    This dissertation investigates how the magnetic properties of strontium hexaferrite change upon the substitution of foreign atoms at the Fe sites. Strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12O19, is a commonly used hard magnetic material and is produced in large quantities (around 500,000 tons per year). For different applications of strontium hexaferrite, its magnetic properties can be tuned by a proper substitution of the foreign atoms. Experimental screening for a proper substitution is a cost-intensive and time-consuming process, whereas computationally it can be done more efficiently. We used the 'density functional theory' a first principles based method to study substituted strontium hexaferrite. The site occupancies of the substituted atoms were estimated by calculating the substitution energies of different configurations. The formation probabilities of configurations were used to calculate the magnetic properties of substituted strontium hexaferrite. In the first study, Al-substituted strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12-x AlxO19 with x=0.5 and x=1.0 were investigated. It was found that at the annealing temperature the non-magnetic Al +3 ions preferentially replace Fe+3 ions from the 12 k and 2a sites. We found that the magnetization decreases and the magnetic anisotropy field increases as the fraction, x of the Al atoms increases. In the second study, SrFe12-xGaxO19 and SrFe12-xInxO19 with x=0.5 and x=1.0 were investigated. In the case of SrFe12-xGaxO19, the sites where Ga+3 ions prefer to enter are: 12 k, 2a, and 4f1. For SrFe12-xInxO19, In+3 ions most likely to occupy the 12k, 4f1 , and 4f2 sites. In both cases the magnetization was found to decrease slightly as the fraction of substituted atom increases. The magnetic anisotropy field increased for SrFe12-xGaxO 19, and decreased for SrFe12-xInxO19 as the concentration of substituted atoms increased. In the third study, 23 elements (M) were screened for their possible substitution in strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12-xMxO 19

  10. Thin extractive membrane for monitoring actinides in aqueous streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Vivek; Paul, Sumana; Pandey, Ashok K; Kalsi, P C; Goswami, A

    2013-09-15

    Alpha spectrometry and solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) are used for monitoring ultra-trace amount of alpha emitting actinides in different aqueous streams. However, these techniques have limitations i.e. alpha spectrometry requires a preconcentration step and SSNTDs are not chemically selective. Therefore, a thin polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) supported on silanized glass was developed for preconcentraion and determination of ultra-trace concentration of actinides by α-spectrometry and SSNTDs. PIMs were formed by spin coating on hydrophobic glass slide or solvent casting to form thin and self-supported membranes, respectively. Sorption experiments indicated that uptakes of actinides in the PIM were highly dependent on acidity of solution i.e. Am(III) sorbed up to 0.1 molL(-1) HNO₃, U(VI) up to 0.5 molL(-1) HNO₃ and Pu(IV) from HNO₃ concentration as high as 4 molL(-1). A scheme was developed for selective sorption of target actinide in the PIM by adjusting acidity and oxidation state of actinide. The actinides sorbed in PIMs were quantified by alpha spectrometry and SSNTDs. For SSNTDs, neutron induced fission-fragment tracks and α-particle tracks were registered in Garware polyester and CR-39 for quantifications of natural uranium and α-emitting actinides ((241)Am/(239)Pu/(233)U), respectively. Finally, the membranes were tested to quantify Pu in 4 molL(-1) HNO3 solutions and synthetic urine samples.

  11. Separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica

    2016-11-15

    This review summarises the methods currently available to extract radioactive actinide elements from solutions of spent nuclear fuel. This separation of actinides reduces the hazards associated with spent nuclear fuel, such as its radiotoxicity, volume and the amount of time required for its' radioactivity to return to naturally occurring levels. Separation of actinides from environmental water systems is also briefly discussed. The actinide elements typically found in spent nuclear fuel include uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides (americium, neptunium and curium). Separation methods for uranium and plutonium are reasonably well established. On the other hand separation of the minor actinides from lanthanide fission products also present in spent nuclear fuel is an ongoing challenge and an area of active research. Several separation methods for selective removal of these actinides from spent nuclear fuel will be described. These separation methods include solvent extraction, which is the most commonly used method for radiochemical separations, as well as the less developed but promising use of adsorption and ion-exchange materials.

  12. End point control of an actinide precipitation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muske, K.R. [Villanova Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Palmer, M.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The actinide precipitation reactors in the nuclear materials processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used to remove actinides and other heavy metals from the effluent streams generated during the purification of plutonium. These effluent streams consist of hydrochloric acid solutions, ranging from one to five molar in concentration, in which actinides and other metals are dissolved. The actinides present are plutonium and americium. Typical actinide loadings range from one to five grams per liter. The most prevalent heavy metals are iron, chromium, and nickel that are due to stainless steel. Removal of these metals from solution is accomplished by hydroxide precipitation during the neutralization of the effluent. An end point control algorithm for the semi-batch actinide precipitation reactors at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. The algorithm is based on an equilibrium solubility model of the chemical species in solution. This model is used to predict the amount of base hydroxide necessary to reach the end point of the actinide precipitation reaction. The model parameters are updated by on-line pH measurements.

  13. Adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchek, Konstantin; Miah, Muhammed Yusuf; Kuang, Wenxing; DeMaleki, Zack; Tezel, F Handan

    2011-10-30

    The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions was studied in series of bench-scale tests. The effects of cesium concentration, temperature and contact time on process kinetics and equilibrium were evaluated. Experiments were carried out in a range of initial cesium concentrations from 0.0103 to 10.88 mg L(-1) and temperatures from 278 to 313 K using coupons of cement mortar immersed in the solutions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive (137)Cs. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Depending on the initial cesium concentration, its equilibrium concentration in solution ranged from 0.0069 to 8.837 mg L(-1) while the respective surface concentration on coupons varied from 0.0395 to 22.34 μg cm(-2). Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm model for the entire test duration. Test results revealed that an increase in temperature resulted in an increase in adsorption rate and a decrease in equilibrium cesium surface concentration. Among several kinetic models considered, the pseudo-second order reaction model was found to be the best to describe the kinetic test results in the studied range of concentrations. The adsorption activation energy determined from Arrhenius equation was found to be approximately 55.9 kJ mol(-1) suggesting that chemisorption was the prevalent mechanism of interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar.

  14. Scenarios for the transmutation of actinides in CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, Bronwyn, E-mail: hylandb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Gihm, Brian, E-mail: gihmb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    With world stockpiles of used nuclear fuel increasing, the need to address the long-term utilization of this resource is being studied. Many of the transuranic (TRU) actinides in nuclear spent fuel produce decay heat for long durations, resulting in significant nuclear waste management challenges. These actinides can be transmuted to shorter-lived isotopes to reduce the decay heat period or consumed as fuel in a CANDU(R) reactor. Many of the design features of the CANDU reactor make it uniquely adaptable to actinide transmutation. The small, simple fuel bundle simplifies the fabrication and handling of active fuels. Online refuelling allows precise management of core reactivity and separate insertion of the actinides and fuel bundles into the core. The high neutron economy of the CANDU reactor results in high TRU destruction to fissile-loading ratio. This paper provides a summary of actinide transmutation schemes that have been studied in CANDU reactors at AECL, including the works performed in the past. The schemes studied include homogeneous scenarios in which actinides are uniformly distributed in all fuel bundles in the reactor, as well as heterogeneous scenarios in which dedicated channels in the reactor are loaded with actinide targets and the rest of the reactor is loaded with fuel. The transmutation schemes that are presented reflect several different partitioning schemes. Separation of americium, often with curium, from the other actinides enables targeted destruction of americium, which is a main contributor to the decay heat 100-1000 years after discharge from the reactor. Another scheme is group-extracted transuranic elements, in which all of the transuranic elements, plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) are extracted together and then transmuted. This paper also addresses ways of utilizing the recycled uranium, another stream from the separation of spent nuclear fuel, in order to drive the transmutation of other actinides.

  15. Separating the Minor Actinides Through Advances in Selective Coordination Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Carter, Jennifer C.

    2012-08-22

    This report describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 under the auspices of the Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. Researchers at PNNL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are investigating a simplified solvent extraction system for providing a single-step process to separate the minor actinide elements from acidic high-level liquid waste (HLW), including separating the minor actinides from the lanthanide fission products.

  16. Distribution of actinides in SFR1; Aktinidfoerdelning i SFR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingemansson, Tor [ALARA Engineering, Skultuna (Sweden)

    2000-02-01

    The amount of actinides in the Swedish repository for intermediate level radioactive wastes has been estimated. The sources for the actinides are mainly the purification filters of the reactors and the used fuel pools. Defect fuel elements are the originating source of the actinides. It is estimated that the 12 Swedish reactors, in total, have had 2.2 kg of fuel dissolved in their systems since start-up. About 880 g of this amount has been brought to the intermediate-level repository.

  17. Self-interaction corrected local spin density calculations of actinides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z

    2010-01-01

    We use the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation in order to describe localization-delocalization phenomena in the strongly correlated actinide materials. Based on total energy considerations, the methodology enables us to predict the ground-state valency configuration...... of the actinide ions in these compounds from first principles. Here we review a number of applications, ranging from electronic structure calculations of actinide metals, nitrides and carbides to the behaviour under pressure of intermetallics, and O vacancies in PuO2....

  18. Calcium and Strontium in Swedish Waters and Fish, and Accumulation of Strontium-90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnedal, P.O.

    1966-04-15

    The purpose of this study has been to investigate the correlation between calcium and strontium in fish in relation to the concentration of these elements in the water. An investigation of the uptake of strontium-90 has also been made and permissible levels of strontium-90 in the water is calculated based upon the uptake in fish muscle tissues. Lakes with calcium concentrations between 2 - 63 mg/l have been studied and samples from the Baltic coastal water are also included. Three fish species are studied, viz. pike (Esox lucius (L.)), perch (Perca fluviatilis (L.)) and roach (Leuciscus rutilus (L.)). Bones, muscle tissues and skin + scales have been analysed. Strontium-90 measurements have been made showing an increase in both water and fish. Calculations show that in water with about 2 mg Ca/l a 10-fold increase of the existing strontium-90 level might give strontium-90 concentrations in fish muscle tissues close to what is permissible. In lakes with calcium concentrations 20 - 40 mg/l the permissible levels for drinking water will be exceeded before the fish consumption would have to be restricted.

  19. Immobilization of cesium in alkaline activated fly ash matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Macphee, D. E.; Lachowski, E. E.; Palomo, A.

    2005-11-01

    The immobilization potential of alkaline activated fly ash (AAFA) matrices for cesium has been investigated. The presence of Cs in the AAFA pastes, prepared using 8M NaOH solution as activator, showed no significant adverse effects on mechanical strength or microstructure, nor were significant quantities of Cs leached following application of the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 leaching protocols. Microstructural analysis shows Cs associated with the main reaction product in the AAFA suggesting that cesium is chemically bound rather than physically encapsulated. It is proposed that cesium is incorporated into the alkaline aluminosilicate gel, a precursor for zeolite formation.

  20. Gamma spectroscopy of neutron rich actinide nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkenbach, Benedikt; Geibel, Kerstin; Vogt, Andreas; Hess, Herbert; Reiter, Peter; Steinbach, Tim; Schneiders, David [Koeln Univ. (Germany). IKP; Collaboration: AGATA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Excited states in neutron-rich actinide Th and U nuclei were investigated after multi nucleon transfer reactions employing the AGATA demonstrator and PRISMA setup at LNL (INFN, Italy). A primary {sup 136}Xe beam of 1 GeV hitting a {sup 238}U target was used to produce the nuclei of interest. Beam-like reaction products of Xe- and Ba isotopes after neutron transfer were selected by the PRISMA spectrometer. The recoil like particles were registered by a MCP detector inside the scattering chamber. Coincident γ-rays from excited states in beam and target like particles were measured with the position sensitive AGATA HPGe detectors. Improved Doppler correction and quality of the γ-spectra is based on the novel γ-ray tracking technique which was successfully exploited. First results on the collective properties of various Th and U isotopes are discussed.

  1. Solidification of simulated actinides by natural zircon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jian-Wen; LUO Shang-Geng

    2004-01-01

    Natural zircon was used as precursor material to produce a zircon waste form bearing 20wt% simulated actinides (Nd2O3 and UO2) through a solid state reaction by a typical synroc fabrication process. The fabricated zircon waste form has relatively good physical properties (density 5.09g/cm3, open porosity 4.0%, Vickers hardness 715kg/mm2). The XRD, SEM/EDS and TEM/EDS analyses indicate that there are zircon phases containing waste elements formed through the reaction. The chemical durability and radiation stability are determined by the MCC-1method and heavy ion irradiation; the results show that the zircon waste form is highly leach resistance and relatively stable under irradiation (amorphous dose 0.7dpa). From this study, the method of using a natural mineral to solidify radioactive waste has proven to be feasible.

  2. Factors affecting the placental transfer of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikov, M.R.; Kelman, B.J. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to consider factors that affect the availability and transport of actinides from maternal blood, through the placenta, to the conceptus. These factors, of particular importance in scaling results from animals to man, include the route and temporal pattern of administration, the mass and physicochemical state of material administered, metabolism of the pregnant animal and fetal organs or tissue, and species-specific changes in placental structure relative to stage of gestation at exposure. Preliminary concepts for descriptive and kinetic models are proposed to integrate these results, to identify additional information required for developing more comprehensive models, and to provide a basis for scaling to human pregnancies for purposes of radiation dosimetry.

  3. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

  4. Studies of actinides in a superanoxic fjord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, P.

    1997-04-01

    Water column and sediment profiles of Pu, Am, Th and U have been obtained in the superanoxic Framvaren fjord, southern Norway. The concentration of bomb test fallout Pu, Am as well as `dissolved` Th in the bottom water are the highest recorded in the marine environment. The behaviour of the actinides in the anoxic water mass is to a large extent governed by the behaviour of the colloidal material. Ultrafiltration reveals that 40-60% of the actinides are associated to the large colloids, surprisingly this is valid also for U. The sediment acts as a source for Pu, Am, and Th to the water column but primarily as a sink for U. The remobilization of Pu, Am and Th is evident from the water column profiles which have similar diffusion shape profiles as other constituents originating from the sediments. The vertical eddy diffusion coefficient calculated from the Pu profile is in the same order of magnitude as reported from the H{sub 2}S profile. Decreased bottom water concentrations (but a constant water column inventory) between 1989 and 1995 as well as pore water Pu concentrations nearly identical to the overlaying bottom water indicates that the present Pu flux from the sediments are low. Contrary to Pu and Am, the water column Th inventory ({sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th) continues to increase. The flux of {sup 232}Th from the sediments was determined from changes in water column inventory between 1989 and 1995 and from a pore water profile to be in the order of 2-8 Bq/m{sup 2}/y. 208 refs.

  5. Radiochemical studies of neutron deficient actinide isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, K.E.

    1978-04-01

    The production of neutron deficient actinide isotopes in heavy ion reactions was studied using alpha, gamma, x-ray, and spontaneous fission detection systems. A new isotope of berkelium, /sup 242/Bk, was produced with a cross-section of approximately 10 ..mu..b in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7.0 +- 1.3 minutes. The alpha-branching ratio for this isotope is less than 1% and the spontaneous fission ratio is less than 0.03%. Studies of (Heavy Ion, pxn) and (Heavy Ion, ..cap alpha..xn) transfer reactions in comparison with (Heavy ion, xn) compound nucleus reactions revealed transfer reaction cross-sections equal to or greater than the compound nucleus yields. The data show that in some cases the yield of an isotope produced via a (H.I.,pxn) or (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) reaction may be higher than its production via an xn compound nucleus reaction. These results have dire consequences for proponents of the ''Z/sub 1/ + Z/sub 2/ = Z/sub 1+2/'' philosophy. It is no longer acceptable to assume that (H.I.,pxn) and (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) product yields are of no consequence when studying compound nucleus reactions. No evidence for spontaneous fission decay of /sup 228/Pu, /sup 230/Pu, /sup 232/Cm, or /sup 238/Cf was observed indicating that strictly empirical extrapolations of spontaneous fission half-life data is inadequate for predictions of half-lives for unknown neutron deficient actinide isotopes.

  6. Atmospheric transmission for cesium DPAL using TDLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Christopher A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2012-03-01

    The cesium (Cs) Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) operates near 894 nm, in the vicinity of atmospheric water vapor absorption lines. An open-path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption (TDLAS) system composed of narrow band (~300 kHz) diode laser fiber coupled to a 12" Ritchey-Chrétien transmit telescope has been used to study the atmospheric transmission characteristics of Cs DPALs over extended paths. The ruggedized system has been field deployed and tested for propagation distances of greater than 1 km. By scanning the diode laser across many free spectral ranges, many rotational absorption features are observed. Absolute laser frequency is monitored with a High Finesse wavemeter to an accuracy of less than 10 MHz. Phase sensitive detection is employed with an absorbance of less than 1% observable under field conditions.

  7. Element Partitioning in Glass-Ceramic Designed for Actinides Immobilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Glass-ceramics were designed for immobilization of actinides. In order to immobilizing more wastes in the matrix and to develop the optimum formulation for the glass-ceramic, it is necessary to study the

  8. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  9. Low-work-function surfaces produced by cesium carbonate decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, T. R.; Sommer, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    Cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) was heated to the decomposition temperature of approximately 600 C. The nonvolatile decomposition products were condensed on a nickel substrate while the carbon dioxide was removed by pumping. The deposited material is characterized by an effective work function of between 1.05 and 1.15 eV at 450 K and by photoemission in the visible and near-infrared region of the spectrum. It is suggested that the deposited material consists of Cs2O, possibly Cs2O2, and adsorbed cesium. Silver, evaporated from a heated silver bead, produced the typical photoemissive and thermionic properties of a silver-oxygen-cesium (S-1) photocathode. The material may be of interest for thermionic energy converters and for the formation of silver-oxygen-cesium photocathodes.

  10. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks; Horloge a reseau optique au strontium: une 2. generation d'horloges a atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Targat, R

    2007-07-15

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10{sup -16}. It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 {yields} J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S{sub 0} {yields} 3P{sub 0} transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 {mu}K. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope {sup 87}Sr, at a level of a few 10{sup -15}. (author)

  11. Mechanisms of strontium and uranium removal from high-level radioactive waste simulant solutions by the sorbent monosodium titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, M C; Hunter, D B; Hobbs, D T; Fink, S D; Dai, Z; Bradley, J P

    2004-10-01

    High-level waste (HLW) is a waste associated with the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel for the recovery of weapons-grade material. It is the priority problem for the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management Program. Current HLW treatment processes at the Savannah River Site (Aiken, SC) include the use of monosodium titanate (MST, with a similar stoichiometry to NaTi2O5 x xH2O) to concentrate strontium (Sr) and actinides. The high affinity of MST for Sr and actinides in HLW solutions rich in Na+ is poorly understood. Mechanistic information about the nature of radionuclide uptake will provide insight about MST treatment reliability. Our study characterized the morphology of MST and the chemistry of sorbed Sr2+ and uranium [U(VI)] as uranyl ion, UO2(2+), on MST, which were added (individually) from stock solutions of Sr and 238U(VI) with spectroscopic and transmission electron microscopic techniques. The local structure of sorbed U varied with loading, but the local structure of Sr did not vary with loading. Sorbed Sr exhibited specific adsorption as partially hydrated species whereas sorbed U exhibited specific adsorption as monomeric and dimeric U(VI)-carbonate complexes. Sorption proved site specific. These differences in site specificity and sorption mechanism may account forthe difficulties associated with predicting Sr and U loading and removal kinetics using MST.

  12. Analysis of the Gas Core Actinide Transmutation Reactor (GCATR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Design power plant studies were carried out for two applications of the plasma core reactor: (1) As a breeder reactor, (2) As a reactor able to transmute actinides effectively. In addition to the above applications the reactor produced electrical power with a high efficiency. A reactor subsystem was designed for each of the two applications. For the breeder reactor, neutronics calculations were carried out for a U-233 plasma core with a molten salt breeding blanket. A reactor was designed with a low critical mass (less than a few hundred kilograms U-233) and a breeding ratio of 1.01. The plasma core actinide transmutation reactor was designed to transmute the nuclear waste from conventional LWR's. The spent fuel is reprocessed during which 100% of Np, Am, Cm, and higher actinides are separated from the other components. These actinides are then manufactured as oxides into zirconium clad fuel rods and charged as fuel assemblies in the reflector region of the plasma core actinide transmutation reactor. In the equilibrium cycle, about 7% of the actinides are directly fissioned away, while about 31% are removed by reprocessing.

  13. Strontium isotope stratigraphy of the Pelotas Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerfass, Geise de Santana dos Anjos, E-mail: geise.zerfass@petrobras.com.br [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS/CENPES/PDGEO/BPA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento Leopoldo Americo Miguez de Mello; Chemale Junior, Farid, E-mail: fchemale@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias; Moura, Candido Augusto Veloso, E-mail: candido@ufpa.br [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Centro de Geociencias. Dept. de Geoquimica e Petrologia; Costa, Karen Badaraco, E-mail: karen.costa@usp.br [Instituto Oceanografico, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kawashita, Koji, E-mail: koji@usp.br [Unversidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas Geocronologicas

    2014-07-01

    Strontium isotope data were obtained from foraminifera shells of the Pelotas Basin Tertiary deposits to facilitate the refinement of the chronostratigraphic framework of this section. This represents the first approach to the acquisition of numerical ages for these strata. Strontium isotope stratigraphy allowed the identification of eight depositional hiatuses in the Eocene-Pliocene section, here classified as disconformities and a condensed section. The reconnaissance of depositional gaps based on confident age assignments represents an important advance considering the remarkably low chronostratigraphic resolution in the Cenozoic section of the Pelotas Basin. The recognition of hiatuses that match hiatuses is based on biostratigraphic data, as well as on global events. Furthermore, a substantial increase in the sedimentation rate of the upper Miocene section was identified. Paleotemperature and productivity trends were identified based on oxygen and carbon isotope data from the Oligocene-Miocene section, which are coherent with worldwide events, indicating the environmental conditions during sedimentation. (author)

  14. Phase Stability of the Lanthanum Strontium Manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feng; Pederson, Larry

    1996-03-01

    Phase diagram and thermodynamic data of the La-Sr-Mn-O system has been studied. The ABO3 -type perovskite of this system is presently the preferred cathode material for application in solid oxide fuel cells. And the phase stability of the lanthanum strontium manganites at elevated temperature is vital to fuel cell operation. Measuring the electromotive force through solid galvanic cell (-) Air,Pt|SrF_2,SrO||CaF_2||La_1-xSr_xMnO_3,SrF_2|Pt,Air (+) and the like enable us to derive the strontium oxide activity and other thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy of reaction, etc, which help us to understand the materials in using.

  15. Growth and characterization of strontium tartrate pentahydrate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firdous, A.; Ahmad, M.M. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Kashmir (India); Quasim, I.; Kotru, P.N. [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu (India)

    2008-10-15

    Silica gel impregnated with L-tartaric acid and using strontium nitrate as the second reactant leads to the growth of well faceted strontium tartrate pentahydrate single crystals.The morphological developmen and internal cell dimensions are observed to be different from the ones reported in the literature for strontium tartrate trihydrate crystals. The crystals are characterized using XRD, CH analysis, SEM, FTIR spectroscopy and thermoanalytical techniques. The crystals are observed to be thermally stable upto about 105 C but thereafter start decomposing and ejecting water of hydration at various stages, finally reducing to strontium oxide. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Strontium ranelate in postmenopausal osteoporosis treatment: a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Cesareo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Cesareo1, Clemente Napolitano1, Mario Iozzino21Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, S.M. Goretti Hospital, Latina, ItalyAbstract: Osteoporosis is a progressive and debilitating disease characterized by a massive bone loss with a deterioration of bone tissues, and a propensity for a fragility fracture. Strontium ranelate is the first antiosteoporotic treatment that has dual mode of action and simultaneously increases bone formation, while decreasing bone resorption, thus rebalancing bone turnover formation. Strontium ranelate rebalances bone turnover in favor of improved bone geometry, cortical thickness, trabecular bone morphology and intrinsic bone tissue quality, which translates into enhanced bone strength. This review describes the mechanism of the strontium ranelate action and its effects on bone mineral density, bone turnover, and osteoporotic fractures. The efficacy of strontium ranelate in postmenopausal osteoporosis treatment to reduce the risk of vertebral and hip fractures has been highlighted in several randomized, controlled trials. Treatment efficacy with strontium ranelate has been documented across a wide range of patient profiles: age, number of prevalent vertebral fractures, body mass index, and a family history of osteoporosis. Because strontium ranelate has a large spectrum of efficacy, it can be used to treat different subgroups of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Strontium ranelate was shown to be relatively well tolerated and the safety aspects were good. Strontium ranelate should be considered as a first-line treatment for postmenopausal osteoporotic patients.Keywords: osteoporosis, strontium ranelate, therapy

  17. Synthesis of Strontium Carbonate by the Induction of Microbiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Ji-Chuan; LIU Shu-Xin; WANG Li-Na; LEI Hong

    2012-01-01

    Spherical strontium carbonate was synthesized by the induction of microbial bacillus pasteurii at ambient temperature with strontium chloride and urea as the raw materials. The phase composition, particle size and morphology of the product were studied by XRD and SEM. The results indicated that the strontium carbonate synthesized by the induction of microbial bacillus pasteurii was of good dispersion and uniform particle size. The spherical strontium carbonate particles obtained by adding different control agents were constructed by numerous flakes or olive-shaped nano-particles. The products were orthorhombic according to their XRD patterns.

  18. Ceria and strontium titanate based electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A ceramic anode structure obtainable by a process comprising the steps of: (a) providing a slurry by dispersing a powder of an electronically conductive phase and by adding a binder to the dispersion, in which said powder is selected from the group consisting of niobium-doped strontium titanate, ......) with the precursor solution of step (c),(e) subjecting the resulting structure of step (d) to calcination, and (f) conducting steps (d)-(e) at least once....

  19. Eu2+ luminescence in strontium aluminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutczak, D.; Juestel, T.; Ronda, C.; Meijerink, A.

    2015-01-01

    The luminescence properties of Eu2+ doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice, relat

  20. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plukienė, R., E-mail: rita@ar.fi.lt; Plukis, A.; Barkauskas, V.; Gudelis, A.; Gvozdaitė, R.; Duškesas, G.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  1. Cesium-induced QT-interval prolongation in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Catherine E; Harik, Nada; James, Laura P; Seib, Paul M; Stowe, Cindy D

    2008-08-01

    Alternative medicine is becoming increasingly popular, especially with terminally ill patients. Most alternative remedies have not been adequately studied or proven effective for the diseases for which they are promoted. In the worst cases, these therapies are harmful. We describe a 16-year-old girl with metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma who experienced cesium-induced QT-interval prolongation after the start of a cesium chloride-based alternative treatment regimen. She had received seven courses of chemotherapy, with a cumulative doxorubicin dose of 500 mg/m(2) over 5 months, resulting in minimal tumor regression. Against the advice of her oncologist, she abandoned traditional therapy and started an alternative regimen that included cesium chloride supplements. Two weeks later, the patient went to a local emergency department after experiencing two brief syncopal episodes. An electrocardiogram revealed occasional premature ventricular contractions, a QTc interval of 683 msec (normal range for females 450-460 msec), and R on T phenomenon. She was admitted to the hospital and later experienced monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, which resolved spontaneously. Lidocaine therapy was started, and the patient was transferred to a cardiac intensive care unit at our hospital. Her plasma cesium level was 2400 microg/dl (normal cesium level was 1800 microg/dl, and her QTc interval was 494 msec. According to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, cesium was the probable cause of the patient's arrhythmia. In animal models, cesium chloride has induced cardiac arrhythmias, including torsade de pointes. It inhibits delayed rectifier potassium channels in the myocardium, causing delayed repolarization and QT-interval prolongation. Patients with cancer should be aware that alternative remedies may be harmful and ineffective. Because patients may be unlikely to self-report alternative remedies, health care providers should specifically ask their patients about any

  2. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL`s Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused.

  3. Cesium toxicity: a case of self-treatment by alternate therapy gone awry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Andrew W; Mayhew, William J

    2003-02-01

    Cesium salts have been used in animal models to induce cardiac arrhythmias for several decades, but the sequelae of human cesium toxicity have seldom been described. The authors describe a case of cesium toxicity manifested by syncope, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, hypokalemia, and a QT interval prolonged to 650 milliseconds that resolved over 4 days following withdrawal of cesium. The patient had a 2-year history of colon cancer and had self-treated with cesium chloride, 3 g/d, for several weeks, using cesium as a form of alternate therapy for cancer. The authors describe the pathophysiologic correlates and risks of cesium consumption and conclude that cesium toxicity should be considered among the differential diagnoses of prolonged QT interval.

  4. A novel role for methyl cysteinate, a cysteine derivative, in cesium accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Eri; Miyazaki, Takae; Hayaishi-Satoh, Aya; Han, Minwoo; Kusano, Miyako; Khandelia, Himanshu; Saito, Kazuki; Shin, Ryoung

    2017-01-01

    Phytoaccumulation is a technique to extract metals from soil utilising ability of plants. Cesium is a valuable metal while radioactive isotopes of cesium can be hazardous. In order to establish a more efficient phytoaccumulation system, small molecules which promote plants to accumulate cesium were investigated. Through chemical library screening, 14 chemicals were isolated as ‘cesium accumulators’ in Arabidopsis thaliana. Of those, methyl cysteinate, a derivative of cysteine, was found to function within the plant to accumulate externally supplemented cesium. Moreover, metabolite profiling demonstrated that cesium treatment increased cysteine levels in Arabidopsis. The cesium accumulation effect was not observed for other cysteine derivatives or amino acids on the cysteine metabolic pathway tested. Our results suggest that methyl cysteinate, potentially metabolised from cysteine, binds with cesium on the surface of the roots or inside plant cells and improve phytoaccumulation. PMID:28230101

  5. Photofission of actinide and pre-actinide nuclei in the quasideuteron and delta energy regions

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, B L; Cole, P L; Dodge, W R; Feldman, G; Sanabria, J C; Kolb, N; Pywell, R E; Vogt, J; Nedorezov, V; Sudov, A; Kezerashvili, G Ya

    1999-01-01

    The photofission cross sections for the actinide nuclei sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th, sup 2 sup 3 sup 3 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, and sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np have been measured from 68 to 264 MeV and those for the pre-actinide nuclei sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au and sup N sup A sup T Pb from 122 to 222 MeV at the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory, using monoenergetic tagged photons and novel parallel-plate avalanche detectors for the fission fragments. The aim of the experiment was to obtain a comprehensive and self-consistent data set and to investigate previous anomalous results in this energy region. The fission probability for transuranic nuclei is expected to be close to unity here. However, important discrepancies have been confirmed for sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th, compared with sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, which have serious implications for the inferred total photoabsorption strengths, and hence call into question the 'Universal Curve' for photon absorption at these energies. High-s...

  6. Studies on Neutron, Photon (Bremsstrahlung and Proton Induced Fission of Actinides and Pre-Actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Naik

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the yields of various fission products determined in the reactor neutron, 3.7-18.1 MeV quasi-mono energetic neutron, 8-80 MeV bremsstrahlung and 20-45 MeV proton induced fission of 232Th and 238U using radiochemical and off-line beta or gamma ray counting. The yields of the fission products in the bremsstrahlung induced fission natPb and 209Bi with 50- 70 MeV and 2.5 GeV based on off-line gamma ray spectrometric technique were also presented. From the yields of fission products, the mass chains yields were obtained using charge distribution correction. From the mass yield distribution, the peak-to-valley (P/V ratio was obtained. The role of excitation energy on the peak-to-valley ratio and fine structure such as effect of shell closure proximity and even-odd effect of mass yield distribution were examined. The higher yields of the fission products around A=133-134, 138-140 and 143-144 and their complementary products explained from the nuclear structure effect and role of standard I and II mode of asymmetric fission. In the neutron, photon (bremsstrahlung and proton induced fission, the asymmetric mass distribution for actinides (Th, U and symmetric distribution for pre-actinides (Pb, Bi were explained from different type of potential fission barrier

  7. Recovery and chemical purification of actinides at JRC, Karlsruhe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelund, H.; Apostolidis, C.; Glatz, J.-P.

    1989-07-01

    The application of actinide elements in research and in technology is many times subject to rather stringent purity requirements; often a nuclear grade quality is specified. The additional possible demand for a high isotopic purity is a special feature in the handling of these elements. The amount of actinide elements contained in or adhering to materials declared as waste should be low for safety reasons and out of economic considerations. The release of transuranium elements to the environment must be kept negligible. For these and for other reasons a keen interest in the separation of actinides from various materials exists, either for a re-use through recycling, or for their safe confinement in waste packages. This paper gives a short review of the separation methods used for recovery and purification of actinide elements over the past years in the European Institute for Transuranium Elements. The methods described here involve procedures based on precipitation, ion exchange or solvent extraction; often used in a combination. The extraction methods were preferably applied in a Chromatographie column mode. The actinide elements purified and/or separated from each other by the above methods include uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, and californium. For the various elements the work was undertaken with different aims, ranging from reprocessing and fabrication of nuclear fuels on a kilogramme scale, over the procurement of alpha-free waste, to the preparation of neutron sources of milligramme size.

  8. Development of the Chalmers Grouped Actinide Extraction Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halleröd Jenny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Several solvents for Grouped ActiNide EXtraction (GANEX processes have been investigated at Chalmers University of Technology in recent years. Four different GANEX solvents; cyclo-GANEX (CyMe4- -BTBP, 30 vol.% tri-butyl phosphate (TBP and cyclohexanone, DEHBA-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 20 vol.% N,N-di-2(ethylhexyl butyramide (DEHBA and cyclohexanone, hexanol-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 30 vol.% TBP and hexanol and FS-13-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 30 vol.% TBP and phenyl trifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13 have been studied and the results are discussed and compared in this work. The cyclohexanone based solvents show fast and high extraction of the actinides but a somewhat poor diluent stability in contact with the acidic aqueous phase. FS-13-GANEX display high separation factors between the actinides and lanthanides and a good radiolytic and hydrolytic stability. However, the distribution ratios of the actinides are lower, compared to the cyclohexanone based solvents. The hexanol-GANEX is a cheap solvent system using a rather stable diluent but the actinide extraction is, however, comparatively low.

  9. The actinides-a beautiful ending of the Periodic Table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Boerje [Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics, Uppsala University, Box 530, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Applied Materials Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvaegen 23, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: borje.johansson@fysik.uu.se; Li, Sa [Applied Materials Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvaegen 23, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States)

    2007-10-11

    The 5f elements, actinides, show many properties which have direct correspondence to the 4f transition metals, the lanthanides. The remarkable similarity between the solid state properties of compressed Ce and the actinide metals is pointed out in the present paper. The {alpha}-{gamma} transition in Ce is considered as a Mott transition, namely, from delocalized to localized 4f states. An analogous behavior is also found for the actinide series, where the sudden volume increase from Pu to Am can be viewed upon as a Mott transition within the 5f shell as a function of the atomic number Z. On the itinerant side of the Mott transition, the earlier actinides (Pa-Pu) show low symmetry structures at ambient conditions; while across the border, the heavier elements (Am-Cf) present the dhcp structure, an atomic arrangement typical for the trivalent lanthanide elements with localized 4f magnetic moments. The reason for an isostructural Mott transition of the f electron in Ce, as opposed to the much more complicated cases in the actinides, is identified. The strange appearance of the {delta}-phase (fcc) in the phase diagram of Pu is another consequence of the border line behavior of the 5f electrons. The path leading from {delta}-Pu to {alpha}-Pu is identified.

  10. A Summary of Actinide Enrichment Technologies and Capability Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, Bradley D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robinson, Sharon M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation performed in this study indicates that a new program is needed to efficiently provide a national actinide radioisotope enrichment capability to produce milligram-to-gram quantities of unique materials for user communities as summarized in Table 1. This program xiv should leverage past actinide enrichment, the recent advances in stable isotope enrichment, and assessments of the future requirements to cost effectively develop this capability while establishing an experience base for a new generation of researchers in this vital area. Preliminary evaluations indicate that an EMIS device would have the capability to meet the future needs of the user community for enriched actinides. The EMIS technology could be potentially coupled with other enrichment technologies, such as irradiation, as pre-enrichment and/or post-enrichment systems to increase the throughput, reduce losses of material, and/or reduce operational costs of the base EMIS system. Past actinide enrichment experience and advances in the EMIS technology applied in stable isotope separations should be leveraged with this new evaluation information to assist in the establishment of a domestic actinide radioisotope enrichment capability.

  11. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-Pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of /sup 238/U, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239,240/Pu and /sup 241/Am that are approximately three orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated by assuming that actinide behavior in their bodies was similar to that defined for Standard Man by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (approx.1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 years. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Hydrophilic actinide complexation studied by solvent extraction radiotracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydberg, J. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry Consultant Group, Vaestra Froelunda (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Actinide migration in the ground water is enhanced by the formation of water soluble complexes. It is essential to the risk analysis of a wet repository to know the concentration of central atoms and the ligands in the ground water, and the stability of complexes formed between them. Because the chemical behavior at trace concentrations often differ from that at macro concentrations, it is important to know the chemical behavior of actinides at trace concentrations in ground water. One method used for such investigations is the solvent extraction radiotracer (SXRT) technique. This report describes the SXRT technique in some detail. A particular reason for this analysis is the claim that complex formation constants obtained by SXRT are less reliable than results obtained by other techniques. It is true that several difficulties are encountered in the application of SXRT technique to actinide solution, such as redox instability, hydrophilic complexation by side reactions and sorption, but it is also shown that a careful application of the SXRT technique yields results as reliable as by any other technique. The report contains a literature survey on solvent extraction studies of actinide complexes formed in aqueous solutions, particularly by using the organic reagent thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) dissolved in benzene or chloroform. Hydrolysis constants obtained by solvent extraction are listed as well as all actinide complexes studied by SX with inorganic and organic ligands. 116 refs, 11 tabs.

  13. Ion microscopy based on laser-cooled cesium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viteau, M.; Reveillard, M.; Kime, L.; Rasser, B.; Sudraud, P. [Orsay Physics, TESCAN Orsay, 95 Avenue des Monts Auréliens – ZA Saint-Charles – 13710 Fuveau (France); Bruneau, Y.; Khalili, G.; Pillet, P.; Comparat, D. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, ENS Cachan, Bât. 505, 91405 Orsay (France); Guerri, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fioretti, A., E-mail: andrea.fioretti@ino.it [Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO-CNR, U.O.S. ”Adriano Gozzini”, via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia, CNISM, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Ciampini, D.; Allegrini, M.; Fuso, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO-CNR, U.O.S. ”Adriano Gozzini”, via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia, CNISM, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate a prototype of a Focused Ion Beam machine based on the ionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam and adapted for imaging and modifying different surfaces in the few-tens nanometer range. Efficient atomic ionization is obtained by laser promoting ground-state atoms into a target excited Rydberg state, then field-ionizing them in an electric field gradient. The method allows obtaining ion currents up to 130 pA. Comparison with the standard direct photo-ionization of the atomic beam shows, in our conditions, a 40-times larger ion yield. Preliminary imaging results at ion energies in the 1–5 keV range are obtained with a resolution around 40 nm, in the present version of the prototype. Our ion beam is expected to be extremely monochromatic, with an energy spread of the order of the eV, offering great prospects for lithography, imaging and surface analysis. - Highlights: • We realize a Focused Ion Beam with an ionic source based on laser cooled cesium atoms. • Ionization involves excitation of the laser cooled atoms to Rydberg states. • We use the cesium FIB system to image different materials. • We use the cesium FIB to produce permanent modifications on surfaces. • In the present configuration, the focused probe size of the cesium FIB prototype is about 300 nm for beam energies in the 2–5 keV range.

  14. Ventilation system of actinides handling facility in Oarai-branch of Tohoku University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshimitsu; Watanabe, Makoto; Hara, Mituo; Shikama, Tatsuo; Kayano, Hideo; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki [Oarai Branch, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku Univ., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    We have reported the development of the facility for handling actinides in Tohoku University at the second KAERI-JAERI joint seminar on PIE technology. Actinide isotopes have most hazurdous {alpha}-radioactivity. Therefore, a specially designed facility is necessary to carry out experimental study for actinide physics and chemistry. In this paper, we will describe the ventilation system and monitoring system for actinide handling facility. (author)

  15. Mechanisms of Strontium and Uranium Removal From Radioactive Waste Simulant Solutions by the Sorbent Monosodium Titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUFF, MARTINE

    2004-12-03

    High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) is the priority problem for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Environmental Management Program. Current HLW treatment processes at the Savannah River Site (Aiken, SC) include the use of monosodium titanate (MST, similar to NaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}xH{sub 2}O) to concentrate radioactive strontium (Sr) and actinides. Mechanistic information about radionuclide uptake will provide us with insight about the reliability of MST treatments. We characterized the morphology of MST and the chemistry of sorbed Sr{sup 2+} and uranium [U(VI)] on MST with x-ray based spectroscopic and electron microscopic techniques. Sorbed Sr{sup 2+} exhibited specific adsorption as partially-hydrated species, whereas sorbed U exhibited site-specific adsorption as monomeric and dimeric U(VI)-carbonate complexes. These differences in site specificity and mechanism may account for the difficulties associated with predicting MST loading and removal kinetics.

  16. The contents and forms of solid-phase species of radioactive strontium and cesium in Taiwan soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S W Chang; Wang, M C; Chiu, C L; Lin, Yu-Ming; Lai, Shu-Ying

    2007-02-01

    This study was to investigate the activities and contents of (137)Cs in the profiles of selected arable and forest soils in Taiwan and various solid-phase species of (85)Sr and (137)Cs in selected arable soils in Taiwan. The gamma (gamma) ray spectra of the collected soil samples and some of the soils amended with (85)Sr and (137)Cs were measured. The data indicate that the arable soils from Sanhsing series, Sanhsing Township and Chuangwei series, Chuangwei Township, Ilan County, and from Tunglochuan series, Pinglin Township, Taipei County shows significantly higher radioactivity of (137)Cs (ND - 11.0 +/- 0.2 Bq kg(-1)). Furthermore, the radioactivity of (137)Cs in the mountain soils (1.24 +/- 0.07 - 42 +/- 1 Bq kg(-1)) from Yuanyang Lake Nature Preserve among Ilan, Taoyuan, and Hsinchu Counties is the highest among the investigated mountain forest soils. This may be mainly attributed to the fact that Ilan County is located in the northeastern part of Taiwan and faces the northeastern and northern seasonal winds with lots of precipitation annually from mid-autumn through mid-spring next year and is receiving greater amount of fallouts yearly. Due to longer reaction period (>or=3 y) of (137)Cs with soil components, (137)Cs was mainly in the forms bound to oxides and to organic matter in the soil amended with (137)Cs and in the soil contaminated with (137)Cs. On the contrary, due to shorter reaction period (<60 d) of (85)Sr with soil components, (85)Sr was mainly in exchangeable form and partially in the forms bound to carbonates and oxides in the soils amended with (85)Sr.

  17. Cancrinite and sodalite formation in the presence of cesium, potassium, magnesium, calcium and strontium in Hanford tank waste simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Youjun [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Center for Multiphase Environmental Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6420 (United States); Flury, Markus [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Center for Multiphase Environmental Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6420 (United States); Harsh, James B. [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Center for Multiphase Environmental Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6420 (United States)]. E-mail: harsh@wsu.edu; Felmy, Andrew R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Environmental Molecular Science laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Qafoku, Odeta [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Environmental Molecular Science laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    High-level radioactive tank waste solutions that have leaked into the subsurface at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site, Washington, are chemically complex. Here, the effect of five cations, Cs{sup +}, K{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, on mineral formation and transformation pathways under conditions mimicking Hanford tank leaks is investigated. Sodium silicate was used to represent the dissolved silicate from sediments. The silicate was added into a series of simulants that contained 0.5M aluminate, 1M or 16M NaOH, and the NO{sub 3}{sup -} salts of the cations. The precipitates were monitored by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. In the 1M NaOH simulants, low concentration of Cs{sup +} (<100mM) did not affect the formation of lepispheric cancrinite and sodalite, whereas only highly crystalline cancrinite formed when Cs{sup +} concentration was >=250mM. An unidentified feldspathoid or zeolite intermediate phase was observed in the presence of high concentrations of Cs{sup +} (500mM). The presence of K{sup +} did not alter, but slowed, the formation of cancrinite and sodalite. The presence of divalent cations led to the formation of metastable or stable silicates, aluminates, hydroxides, or aluminosilicates. The formation of these intermediate phases slowed the formation of cancrinite and sodalite by consuming OH{sup -}, silicate, or aluminate. Compared with the concentrations used in this study, the concentrations of radioactive Cs{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+} in the tank solutions are much lower and divalent cations (Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}) released from sediments likely precipitate out as hydroxides, silicates or aluminates; therefore, the authors do not expect that the presence of these monovalent and divalent cations significantly affect the formation of cancrinite and sodalite in the sediments underneath the leaking waste tanks.

  18. Cancrinite and Sodalite Formation in the Presence of Cesium, Potassium, Magnesium, Calcium and Strontium in Hanford Tank Waste Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Youjun; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta

    2006-12-01

    High-level radioactive tank waste solutions that have leaked into the subsurface at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site, Washington, are chemically complex. Here, the effect of five cations, Cs⁺, K⁺, Sr²⁺, Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺, on mineral formation and transformation pathways under conditions mimicking Hanford tank leaks is investigated. Sodium silicate was used to represent the dissolved silicate from sediments. The silicate was added into a series of simulants that contained 0.5 M aluminate, 1M or 16 M NaOH, and the NO⁻₃ salts of the cations. The precipitates were monitored by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. In the 1M NaOH simulants, low concentration of Cs⁺ (<100 mM) did not affect the formation of lepispheric cancrinite and sodalite, whereas only highly crystalline cancrinite formed when Cs⁺ concentration was ≥250 mM. An unidentified feldspathoid or zeolite intermediate phase was observed in the presence of high concentrations of Cs⁺ (500 mM). The presence of K⁺ did not alter, but slowed, the formation of cancrinite and sodalite. The presence of divalent cations led to the formation of metastable or stable silicates, aluminates, hydroxides, or aluminosilicates. The formation of these intermediate phases slowed the formation of cancrinite and sodalite by consuming OH⁻, silicate, or aluminate. Compared with the concentrations used in this study, the concentrations of radioactive Cs+ and Sr²⁺ in the tank solutions are much lower and divalent cations (Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺) released from sediments likely precipitate out as hydroxides, silicates or aluminates; therefore, the authors do not expect that the presence of these monovalent and divalent cations significantly affect the formation of cancrinite and sodalite in the sediments underneath the leaking waste tanks.

  19. γ-H2AX Kinetic Profile in Mouse Lymphocytes Exposed to the Internal Emitters Cesium-137 and Strontium-90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C Turner

    Full Text Available In the event of a dirty bomb scenario or an industrial nuclear accident, a significant dose of volatile radionuclides such as 137Cs and 90Sr may be dispersed into the atmosphere as a component of fallout and inhaled or ingested by hundreds and thousands of people. To study the effects of prolonged exposure to ingested radionuclides, we have performed long-term (30 day internal-emitter mouse irradiations using soluble-injected 137CsCl and 90SrCl2 radioisotopes. The effect of ionizing radiation on the induction and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in peripheral mouse lymphocytes in vivo was determined using the γ-H2AX biodosimetry marker. Using a serial sacrifice experimental design, whole-body radiation absorbed doses for 137Cs (0 to 10 Gy and 90Sr (0 to 49 Gy were delivered over 30 days following exposure to each radionuclide. The committed absorbed doses of the two internal emitters as a function of time post exposure were calculated based on their retention parameters and their derived dose coefficients for each specific sacrifice time. In order to measure the kinetic profile for γ-H2AX, peripheral blood samples were drawn at 5 specific timed dose points over the 30-day study period and the total γ-H2AX nuclear fluorescence per lymphocyte was determined using image analysis software. A key finding was that a significant γ-H2AX signal was observed in vivo several weeks after a single radionuclide exposure. A mechanistically-motivated model was used to analyze the temporal kinetics of γ-H2AX fluorescence. Exposure to either radionuclide showed two peaks of γ-H2AX: one within the first week, which may represent the death of mature, differentiated lymphocytes, and the second at approximately three weeks, which may represent the production of new lymphocytes from damaged progenitor cells. The complexity of the observed responses to internal irradiation is likely caused by the interplay between continual production and repair of DNA damage, cell cycle effects and apoptosis.

  20. Phytoremediation of 137cesium and 90strontium from solutions and low-level nuclear waste by Vetiveria zizanoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shraddha; Eapen, Susan; Thorat, Vidya; Kaushik, C P; Raj, Kanwar; D'Souza, S F

    2008-02-01

    Vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanoides) L. Nash plantlets when tested for their potential to remove (90)Sr and (137)Cs (5 x 10(3) k Bq l(-1)) from solutions spiked with individual radionuclide showed that 94% of (90)Sr and 61% of (137)Cs could be removed from solutions after 168 h. When both (90)Sr and (137)Cs were supplemented together to the solution, 91% of (90)Sr and 59% of (137)Cs were removed at the end of 168 h. In case of (137)Cs, accumulation occurred more in roots than shoots, while (90)Sr accumulated more in shoots than roots. When experiments were performed to study the effect of analogous elements, K(+) ions reduced the uptake of (137)Cs, while (90)Sr accumulation was found to decrease in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. Plants of V. zizanoides could also effectively remove radioactive elements from low-level nuclear waste and the level of radioactivity was reduced below detection limit at the end of 15 days of exposure. The results of the present study indicate that V. zizanoides may be a potential candidate plant for phytoremediation of (90)Sr and (137)Cs.

  1. STRONTIUM AS AN EFFICIENT PROMOTER FOR SUPPORTED PALLADIUM HYDROGENATION CATALYSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of strontium promotion is studied for a series of supported palladium catalysts such as Pd/zeolite-β, Pd/Al2O3, Pd/SiO2, Pd/hydrotalcite and Pd/MgO. Strontium is found to be an effective promoter for enhancing the metal area, perce...

  2. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2015-03-01

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitation for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on 90Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr-AGe model). The Sr-AGe model has similar structure as the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly reevaluated: gastro-intestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr-AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (0–80 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr-AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general population exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes.

  3. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  4. Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capote, R; Chen, Y J; Hambsch, F J; Kornilov, N V; Lestone, J P; Litaize, O; Morillon, B; Neudecker, D; Oberstedt, S; Ohsawa, T; Smith, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides”was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei. The following technical areas were addressed: (i) experiments and uncertainty quantification (UQ): New data for neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U, 238U, and 239Pu have been measured, and older data have been compiled and reassessed. There is evidence from the experimental work of this CRP that a very small percentage of neutrons emitted in fission are actually scission neutrons; (ii) modeling: The Los Alamos model (LAM) continues to be the workhorse for PFNS evaluations. Monte Carlo models have been developed that describe the fission phenomena microscopically, but further development is needed to produce PFNS evaluations meeting the uncertainty targets; (iii) evaluation methodologies: PFNS evaluations rely on the use of the least-squares techniques for merging experimental and model data. Considerable insight was achieved on how to deal with the problem of too small uncertainties in PFNS evaluations. The importance of considering that all experimental PFNS data are “shape” data was stressed; (iv) PFNS evaluations: New evaluations, including covariance data, were generated for major actinides including 1) non-model GMA evaluations of the 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f), and 233U(nth,f) PFNS based exclusively on experimental data (0.02 ≤ E ≤ 10 MeV), which resulted in PFNS average energies E of 2.00±0.01, 2.073±0.010, and 2.030±0.013 MeV, respectively; 2) LAM evaluations of neutron-induced fission spectra on uranium and plutonium targets with improved UQ for incident energies from thermal up to 30 MeV; and 3) Point-by-Point calculations for 232Th, 234U and 237Np targets; and (v) data

  5. Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

  6. Fluoride-conversion synthesis of homogeneous actinide oxide solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, G W Chinthaka M [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Yeamans, Charles B. [University of California, Berkeley; Cerefice, Gary S. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2011-01-01

    Here, a novel route to synthesize (U, Th)O2 solid solutions at a relatively low temperature of 1100 C is demonstrated. First, the separate actinide oxides reacted with ammonium bifluoride to form ammonium actinide fluorides at room temperature. Subsequently, this mixture was converted to the actinide oxide solid solution using a two-phased heat treatment, first at 610 C in static air, then at 1100 C in flowing argon. Solid solutions obeying Vegard s Law were synthesized for ThO2 content from 10 to 90 wt%. Microscopy showed that the (U, Th)O2 solid solutions synthesized with this method to have considerably high crystallinity and homogeneity, suggesting the suitability of material thus synthesized for sintering into nuclear fuel pellets at low temperatures.

  7. Actinide consumption: Nuclear resource conservation without breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannum, W.H.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to the nuclear power issue based on a metallic fast reactor fuel and pyrometallurgical processing of spent fuel is showing great potential and is approaching a critical demonstration phase. If successful, this approach will complement and validate the LWR reactor systems and the attendant infrastructure (including repository development) and will alleviate the dominant concerns over the acceptability of nuclear power. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is a metal-fueled, sodium-cooled pool-type fast reactor supported by a pyrometallurgical reprocessing system. The concept of a sodium cooled fast reactor is broadly demonstrated by the EBR-II and FFTF in the US; DFR and PFR in the UK; Phenix and SuperPhenix in France; BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600 in the USSR; and JOYO in Japan. The metallic fuel is an evolution from early EBR-II fuels. This fuel, a ternary U-Pu-Zr alloy, has been demonstrated to be highly reliable and fault tolerant even at very high burnup (160-180,000 MWd/MT). The fuel, coupled with the pool type reactor configuration, has been shown to have outstanding safety characteristics: even with all active safety systems disabled, such a reactor can survive a loss of coolant flow, a loss of heat sink, or other major accidents. Design studies based on a small modular approach show not only its impressive safety characteristics, but are projected to be economically competitive. The program to explore the feasibility of actinide recovery from spent LWR fuel is in its initial phase, but it is expected that technical feasibility could be demonstrated by about 1995; DOE has not yet committed funds to achieve this objective. 27 refs.

  8. Applications of cesium in the perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fengjun; Yang, Wenqiang; Luo, Deying; Zhu, Rui; Gong, Qihuang

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells have experienced an unprecedented rapid development in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) during the past 7 years, and the record PCE has been already comparable to the traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Presently, it is more urgent to address the challenge on device stability for the future commercial application. Recently, the inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite has been intensively studied as one of the alternative candidates to improve device stability through controlling the phase transition. The cesium (Cs)-doped perovskites show more superior stability comparing with organic methylammonium (MA) lead halide perovskite or formamidinium (FA) lead halide perovskite. Here, recent progress of the inorganic cesium application in organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells (PSCs) is highlighted from the viewpoints of the device efficiency and the device stability. Project supported by the 973 Program of China (No. 2015CB932203), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61377025, 91433203), and the Young 1000 Talents Global Recruitment Program of China.

  9. Controllable evaporation of cesium from a dispenser oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, U.; Friedl, R.; Fröschle, M.

    2012-12-01

    This instrument allows controlled evaporation of the alkali metal cesium over a wide range of evaporation rates. The oven has three unique features. The first is an alkali metal reservoir that uses a dispenser as a cesium source. The heating current of the dispenser controls the evaporation rate allowing generation of an adjustable and stable flow of pure cesium. The second is a blocking valve, which is fully metallic as is the body of the oven. This construction both reduces contamination of the dispenser and enables the oven to be operated up to 300 °C, with only small temperature variations (metal at a cold spot is significantly hindered. The last feature is an integral surface ionization detector for measuring and controlling the evaporation rate. The dispenser oven can be easily transferred to the other alkali-metals.

  10. Dating of mine waste in lacustrine sediments using cesium-137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rember, W. C.; Erdman, T. W.; Hoffmann, M. L.; Chamberlain, V. E.; Sprenke, K. F.

    1993-11-01

    For over a century Medicine Lake in northern Idaho has received heavy-metal-laden tailings from the Coeur d'Alene mining district. Establishing the depositional chronology of the lake bottom sediments provides information on the source and rate of deposition of the tailings. Cesium-137, an isotope produced in the atmosphere by nuclear bomb tests, was virtually absent in the environment prior to 1951, but reached its apex in 1964. Our analysis of cesium-137 in the sediments of Medicine Lake revealed that 14 cm of fine-grained tailings were deposited in the lake from 1951 to 1964 and tailing deposition downstream was greatly reduced by the installation of tailings dams in the district in 1968. Cesium-137 analysis is accomplished by a fairly simple gamma-ray counting technique and should be a valuable tool for analyzing sedimentation in any lacustrine environment that was active during the 1950s and 1960s.

  11. Strontium Promotes Cementoblasts Differentiation through Inhibiting Sclerostin Expression In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingfu Bao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cementogenesis, performed by cementoblasts, is important for the repair of root resorption caused by orthodontic treatment. Based on recent studies, strontium has been applied for osteoporosis treatment due to its positive effect on osteoblasts. Although promising, the effect of strontium on cementoblasts is still unclear. So the aim of this research was to clarify and investigate the effect of strontium on cementogenesis via employing cementoblasts as model. A series of experiments including MTT, alkaline phosphatase activity, gene analysis, alizarin red staining, and western blot were carried out to evaluate the proliferation and differentiation of cementoblasts. In addition, expression of sclerostin was checked to analyze the possible mechanism. Our results show that strontium inhibits the proliferation of cementoblasts with a dose dependent manner; however, it can promote the differentiation of cementoblasts via downregulating sclerostin expression. Taking together, strontium may facilitate cementogenesis and benefit the treatment of root resorption at a low dose.

  12. Measurement of Actinides in Molybdenum-99 Solution Analytical Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weaver, Jamie L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This document is a companion report to a previous report, PNNL 24519, Measurement of Actinides in Molybdenum-99 Solution, A Brief Review of the Literature, August 2015. In this companion report, we report a fast, accurate, newly developed analytical method for measurement of trace alpha-emitting actinide elements in commercial high-activity molybdenum-99 solution. Molybdenum-99 is widely used to produce 99mTc for medical imaging. Because it is used as a radiopharmaceutical, its purity must be proven to be extremely high, particularly for the alpha emitting actinides. The sample of 99Mo solution is measured into a vessel (such as a polyethylene centrifuge tube) and acidified with dilute nitric acid. A gadolinium carrier is added (50 µg). Tracers and spikes are added as necessary. Then the solution is made strongly basic with ammonium hydroxide, which causes the gadolinium carrier to precipitate as hydrous Gd(OH)3. The precipitate of Gd(OH)3 carries all of the actinide elements. The suspension of gadolinium hydroxide is then passed through a membrane filter to make a counting mount suitable for direct alpha spectrometry. The high-activity 99Mo and 99mTc pass through the membrane filter and are separated from the alpha emitters. The gadolinium hydroxide, carrying any trace actinide elements that might be present in the sample, forms a thin, uniform cake on the surface of the membrane filter. The filter cake is first washed with dilute ammonium hydroxide to push the last traces of molybdate through, then with water. The filter is then mounted on a stainless steel counting disk. Finally, the alpha emitting actinide elements are measured by alpha spectrometry.

  13. Electronic structure and ionicity of actinide oxides from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The ground-state electronic structures of the actinide oxides AO, A2O3, and AO2 (A=U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf) are determined from first-principles calculations, using the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation. Emphasis is put on the degree of f-electron localization, whi...... lanthanide oxides. The ionic nature of the actinide oxides emerges from the fact that only those compounds will form where the calculated ground-state valency agrees with the nominal valency expected from a simple charge counting....

  14. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE METAL VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, R.A.; Hyman, H.H.; Vogler, S.

    1962-08-14

    A process of countercurrently extracting an aqueous mineral acid feed solution for the separation of actinides from lanthanides dissolved therern is described. The feed solution is made acid-defrcient with alkali metal hydroxide prior to.contact with acid extractant; during extraction, however, acid is transferred from organic to aqueous solution and the aqueous solution gradually becomes acid. The acid-deficient phase ' of the process promotes the extraction of the actinides, while the latter acid phase'' of the process improves retention of the lanthanides in the aqueous solution. This provides for an improved separation. (AEC)

  15. Physics studies of higher actinide consumption in an LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.; Khalil, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    The core physics aspects of the transuranic burning potential of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) are assessed. The actinide behavior in fissile self-sufficient IFR closed cycles of 1200 MWt size is characterized, and the transuranic isotopics and risk potential of the working inventory are compared to those from a once-through LWR. The core neutronic performance effects of rare-earth impurities present in the recycled fuel are addressed. Fuel cycle strategies for burning transuranics from an external source are discussed, and specialized actinide burner designs are described. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. New cubic structure compounds as actinide host phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovsky, S V [SIA Radon, 7th Rostovskii lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation); Yudintsev, S V; Livshits, T S, E-mail: profstef@mtu-net.ru [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry RAS, Staromonetny lane 35, Moscow 119017 (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-15

    Various compounds with fluorite (cubic zirconia) and fluorite-derived (pyrochlore, zirconolite) structures are considered as promising actinide host phases at immobilization of actinide-bearing nuclear wastes. Recently some new cubic compounds - stannate and stannate-zirconate pyrochlores, murataite and related phases, and actinide-bearing garnet structure compounds were proposed as perspective matrices for complex actinide wastes. Zirconate pyrochlore (ideally Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) has excellent radiation resistance and high chemical durability but requires high temperatures (at least 1500 deg. C) to be produced by hot-pressing from sol-gel derived precursor. Partial Sn{sup 4+} substitution for Zr{sup 4+} reduces production temperature and the compounds REE{sub 2}ZrSnO{sub 7} may be hot-pressed or cold pressed and sintered at {approx}1400 deg. C. Pyrochlore, A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7-x} (two-fold elementary fluorite unit cell), and murataite, A{sub 3}B{sub 6}C{sub 2}O{sub 20-y} (three-fold fluorite unit cell), are end-members of the polysomatic series consisting of the phases whose structures are built from alternating pyrochlore and murataite blocks (nano-sized modules) with seven- (2C/3C/2C), five- (2C/3C), eight- (3C/2C/3C) and three-fold (3C - murataite) fluorite unit cells. Actinide content in this series reduces in the row: 2C (pyrochlore) > 7C > 5C > 8C > 3C (murataite). Due to congruent melting murataite-based ceramics may be produced by melting and the firstly segregated phase at melt crystallization is that with the highest fraction of the pyrochlore modules in its structure. The melts containing up to 10 wt. % AnO{sub 2} (An = Th, U, Np, Pu) or REE/An fraction of HLW form at crystallization zoned grains composed sequentially of the 5C {yields} 8C {yields} 3C phases with the highest actinide concentration in the core and the lowest - in the rim of the grains. Radiation resistance of the 'murataite' is comparable to titanate pyrochlores. One

  17. Thermally unstable complexants/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In situ immobilization is an approach to isolation of radionuclides from the hydrosphere that is receiving increasing attention. Rather than removing the actinides from contaminated soils, this approach transforms the actinides into intrinsically insoluble mineral phases resistant to leaching by groundwater. The principal advangates of this concept are the low cost and low risk of operator exposure and/or dispersion of the radionuclides to the wider environment. The challenge of this approach is toe accomplish the immobilization without causing collateral damage to the environment (the cure shouldn`t be worse than the disease) and verification of system performance.

  18. New molecules for the separation of actinides (III): the picolinamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, P.Y.; Condamines, N.; Berthon, L.; Madic, C.

    1994-12-31

    Minor actinide partitioning from high level liquid wastes produced during the reprocessing of nuclear fuels by the Purex process, requires the design of new extracting molecules. These new extractants must be able to separate, for example, actinides from lanthanides. This separation is very difficult, due to the similar chemical properties of these metallic species, but it can possibly be reached by using extractants with soft donor atoms (N or S). Some new molecules : the picolinamides are investigated in this way. The general chemical formula and the behaviour of these compounds in acidic media are given. (O.L.). 3 refs.

  19. Production of heavy actinides in incomplete fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, N. V.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Iljinov, A. S.; Mebel, M. V.

    1994-10-01

    We present preliminary results of calculations by the phenomenological model of the estimated yield of some heavy actinide isotopes. It is assumed that these isotopes are produced as a result of multinucleon transfers followed by neutrons and charged particle emission A.S. Iljinov and E.A. Cherepanov (1980). The yield P(sub Z, N)(E*) of primary excited actinides is found using the model of N.V. Antonenko and R.V. Jolos (1991). Absolute cross-sections for different binary reaction channels are obtained by summing the cross-sections for all subchannels with an appreciable yield according to J. Wilczynski et al. (1980).

  20. CAFS: A Cesium Atomic Frequency Standard for GPS block IIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnia, Jeffry A.

    1993-01-01

    Kernco, Inc. was selected to design the Cesium Atomic Frequency Standards (CAFS) for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These spacecraft are scheduled to be launched in the mid-1990's to replenish and upgrade the existing constellation of Global Positioning System satellites. The Block IIR CAFS output frequency is 13.4003378 MHz, the 686th submultiple of the cesium atomic resonance frequency. Using an integer submultiple simplifies the design of the atomic frequency standard's rf multiplier circuits, eliminating the secondary frequency synthesizer needed in previous designs. The GPS Block IIR CAFS design, particularly the improvements made on our earlier Block II design is described. Test results are included.

  1. Efficient cooling and trapping of strontium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtillot, I; Quessada, A; Kovacich, R P; Zondy, J J; Landragin, A; Clairon, A; Lemonde, P

    2003-03-15

    We report the capture of cold strontium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) at a rate of 4 x 10(10) atoms/s. The MOT is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower operating with a focused laser beam. The 461-nm laser, used for both cooling and trapping, was generated by sum-frequency mixing in a KTP crystal with diode lasers at 813 nm and a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. As much as 115 mW of blue light was obtained.

  2. Nondestructive measurement of environmental radioactive strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiba, Shuntaro; Okamiya, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Saki; Tanuma, Ryosuke; Totsuka, Yumi; Murata, Jiro

    2014-03-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The main radioactivity concerns after the accident are I-131 (half-life: 8.0 days), Cs-134 (2.1 years), Cs-137 (30 years), Sr-89 (51 days), and Sr-90 (29 years). We are aiming to establish a new nondestructive measurement and detection technique that will enable us to realize a quantitative evaluation of strontium radioactivity without chemical separation processing. This technique is needed to detect radiation contained in foods, environmental water, and soil, to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to radiation.

  3. Nondestructive measurement of environmental radioactive strontium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiba Shuntaro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The main radioactivity concerns after the accident are I-131 (half-life: 8.0 days, Cs-134 (2.1 years, Cs-137 (30 years, Sr-89 (51 days, and Sr-90 (29 years. We are aiming to establish a new nondestructive measurement and detection technique that will enable us to realize a quantitative evaluation of strontium radioactivity without chemical separation processing. This technique is needed to detect radiation contained in foods, environmental water, and soil, to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to radiation.

  4. Dielectric behaviour of strontium tartrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Arora; Vipul Patel; Brijesh Amin; Anjana Kothari

    2004-04-01

    Strontium tartrate trihydrate (STT) crystals have been grown in silica hydrogel. Various polarization mechanisms such as atomic polarization of lattice, orientational polarization of dipoles and space charge polarization in the grown crystals have been understood using results of the measurements of dielectric constant (') and dielectric loss (tan ) as functions of frequency and temperature. Ion core type polarization is seen in the temperature range 75–180°C, and above 180°C, there is interfacial polarization for relatively lower frequency range. One observes dielectric dispersion at lower frequency presumably due to domain wall relaxation.

  5. Non-compound nucleus fission in actinide and pre-actinide regions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Tripathi; S Sodaye; K Sudarshan

    2015-08-01

    In this article, some of our recent results on fission fragment/product angular distributions are discussed in the context of non-compound nucleus fission. Measurement of fission fragment angular distribution in 28Si+176Yb reaction did not show a large contribution from the non-compound nucleus fission. Data on the evaporation residue cross-sections, in addition to those on mass and angular distributions, are necessary for better understanding of the contribution from non-compound nucleus fission in the pre-actinide region. Measurement of mass-resolved angular distribution of fission products in 20Ne+232Th reaction showed an increase in angular anisotropy with decreasing asymmetry of mass division. This observation can be explained based on the contribution from pre-equilibrium fission. Results of these studies showed that the mass dependence of anisotropy may possibly be used to distinguish pre-equilibrium fission and quasifission.

  6. Increased strontium uptake in trabecular bone of ovariectomized calcium-deficient rats treated with strontium ranelate or strontium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmer, Bernhard; Hofstaetter, Jochen G; Meirer, Florian; Smolek, Stephan; Wobrauschek, Peter; Simon, Rolf; Fuchs, Robyn K; Allen, Matthew R; Condon, Keith W; Reinwald, Susan; Phipps, Roger J; Burr, David B; Paschalis, Eleftherios P; Klaushofer, Klaus; Streli, Christina; Roschger, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Based on clinical trials showing the efficacy to reduce vertebral and non-vertebral fractures, strontium ranelate (SrR) has been approved in several countries for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Hence, it is of special clinical interest to elucidate how the Sr uptake is influenced by dietary Ca deficiency as well as by the formula of Sr administration, SrR versus strontium chloride (SrCl(2)). Three-month-old ovariectomized rats were treated for 90 days with doses of 25 mg kg(-1) d(-1) and 150 mg kg(-1) d(-1) of SrR or SrCl(2) at low (0.1% Ca) or normal (1.19% Ca) Ca diet. Vertebral bone tissue was analysed by confocal synchrotron-radiation-induced micro X-ray fluorescence and by backscattered electron imaging. Principal component analysis and k-means clustering of the acquired elemental maps of Ca and Sr revealed that the newly formed bone exhibited the highest Sr fractions and that low Ca diet increased the Sr uptake by a factor of three to four. Furthermore, Sr uptake in bone of the SrCl(2)-treated animals was generally lower compared with SrR. The study clearly shows that inadequate nutritional calcium intake significantly increases uptake of Sr in serum as well as in trabecular bone matrix. This indicates that nutritional calcium intake as well as serum Ca levels are important regulators of any Sr treatment.

  7. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu; Shin, Ryoung

    2015-03-01

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs+) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs+ uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs+, chemical library screening was performed using Arabidopsis. Of 10,000 chemicals tested, five compounds were confirmed as Cs+ tolerance enhancers. Further investigation and quantum mechanical modelling revealed that one of these compounds reduced Cs+ concentrations in plants and that the imidazole moiety of this compound bound specifically to Cs+. Analysis of the analogous compounds indicated that the structure of the identified compound is important for the effect to be conferred. Taken together, Cs+ tolerance enhancer isolated here renders plants tolerant to Cs+ by inhibiting Cs+ entry into roots via specific binding to the ion thus, for instance, providing a basis for phytostabilisation of radiocesium-contaminated farmland.

  8. Investigation of strontium accumulation on ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rat tibia by micro-PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Li, Y.; Jin, W.; Zheng, Y.; Rong, C.; Lyu, H.; Shen, H.

    2014-08-01

    Strontium ranelate is a newly developed drug effective in osteoporosis treatment by depressing bone resorption and maintaining bone formation. Strontium accumulation and distribution are determined in bones of rat after strontium ranelate administration by using micro-PIXE. The investigated rats are divided into four groups: (A) control, (B) ovariectomized, (C) ovariectomized followed with strontium chloride, (D) ovariectomized followed with strontium ranelate. It was found that strontium ranelate would result in increasing trabecular volume and decreasing bone resorption to treat osteoporosis. There are similar contours of calcium and strontium in two-dimensional images, while the strontium is not evenly distributed in the bone. It supports the conclusion that strontium has an affinity for bone and it is capable of replacing calcium atoms as a part of the strontium mechanism in the osteoporosis treatment. The results related to biochemistry are also discussed.

  9. Investigation of strontium accumulation on ovariectomized Sprague–Dawley rat tibia by micro-PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Li, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Jin, W. [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zheng, Y.; Rong, C.; Lyu, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shen, H., E-mail: haoshen@fudan.edu.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Strontium ranelate is a newly developed drug effective in osteoporosis treatment by depressing bone resorption and maintaining bone formation. Strontium accumulation and distribution are determined in bones of rat after strontium ranelate administration by using micro-PIXE. The investigated rats are divided into four groups: (A) control, (B) ovariectomized, (C) ovariectomized followed with strontium chloride, (D) ovariectomized followed with strontium ranelate. It was found that strontium ranelate would result in increasing trabecular volume and decreasing bone resorption to treat osteoporosis. There are similar contours of calcium and strontium in two-dimensional images, while the strontium is not evenly distributed in the bone. It supports the conclusion that strontium has an affinity for bone and it is capable of replacing calcium atoms as a part of the strontium mechanism in the osteoporosis treatment. The results related to biochemistry are also discussed.

  10. Molecular and electronic structure of actinide hexa-cyanoferrates; Structure moleculaire et electronique des hexacyanoferrates d'actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonhoure, I

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this work is to improve our knowledge on the actinide-ligand bond properties. To this end, the hexacyanoferrate entities have been used as pre-organized ligand. We have synthesized, using mild chemistry, the following series of complexes: An{sup IV}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Th, U, Np, Pu); Am{sup III}[Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O; Pu {sup III}[Co{sup III}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O and K(H?)An{sup III}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Pu, Am). The metal oxidation states have been obtained thanks to the {nu}{sub CN}, stretching vibration and to the actinide L{sub III} absorption edge studies. As Prussian Blue, the An{sup IV}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Np, Pu) are class II of Robin and Day compounds. X-ray Diffraction has shown besides that these complexes crystallize in the P6{sub 3}/m space group, as the isomorphic LaKFe(CN){sub 6}.4H{sub 2}O complex used as structural model. The EXAFS oscillations at the iron K edge and at the An L{sub III} edge allowed to determine the An-N, An-O, Fe-C and Fe-N distances. The display of the multiple scattering paths for both edges explains the actinide contribution absence at the iron edge, whereas the iron signature is present at the actinide edge. We have shown that the actinide coordination sphere in actinides hexa-cyanoferrates is comparable to the one of lanthanides. However, the actinides typical behavior towards the lanthanides is brought to the fore by the An{sup IV} versus Ln{sup III} ions presence in this family of complexes. Contrarily to the 4f electrons, the 5f electrons influence the electronic properties of the compounds of this family. However, the gap between the An-N and Ln-N distances towards the corresponding metals ionic radii do not show any covalence bond evolution between the actinide and lanthanide series. (author)

  11. Laser Stabilization with Laser Cooled Strontium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjarke Takashi Røjle

    The frequency stability of current state-of-the-art stabilized clock lasers are limited by thermal fluctuations of the ultra-stable optical reference cavities used for their frequency stabilization. In this work, we study the possibilities for surpassing this thermal limit by exploiting the nonli......The frequency stability of current state-of-the-art stabilized clock lasers are limited by thermal fluctuations of the ultra-stable optical reference cavities used for their frequency stabilization. In this work, we study the possibilities for surpassing this thermal limit by exploiting...... the nonlinear effects from coupling of an optical cavity to laser cooled atoms having a narrow transition linewidth. Here, we have realized such a system where a thermal sample of laser cooled strontium-88 atoms are coupled to an optical cavity. The strontium-88 atoms were probed on the narrow 1S0-3P1 inter......-combination line at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. The dynamics of the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the probe light were experimentally studied in details with the purpose of applications to laser stabilization. The atomic sample temperature was in the mK range which brought this system out...

  12. Elastic Scattering Properties of Ultracold Strontium Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张计才; 朱遵略; 刘玉芳; 孙金锋

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the elastic scattering properties of strontium atoms at ultracold temperatures.The scattering parameters,such as s-wave scattering lengths,effective ranges and p-wave scattering lengths,are calculated for all stable isotope combinations of Sr atoms by the quantal method and semiclassical method,respectively.Good agreements are obtained.The scattering parameters are very sensitive to small changes of the reduced mass.Due to the repulsive interisotope and intraisotope s-wave scattering length and large elastic cross sections,84Sr-86Srmixture is a good candidate to realize Bose-Bose quantum degenerate atomic gases.%We investigate the elastic scattering properties of strontium atoms at ultracold temperatures. The scattering parameters, such as s-wave scattering lengths, effective ranges and p-wave scattering lengths, are calculated for all stable isotope combinations of Sr atoms by the quantal method and semiclassical method, respectively. Good agreements are obtained. The scattering parameters are very sensitive to small changes of the reduced mass. Due to the repulsive interisotope and intraisotope s-wave scattering length and large elastic cross sections, MSr-s(iSr mixture is a good candidate to realize Bose-Bose quantum degenerate atomic gases.

  13. Sorption of cesium in young till soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusa, Merja; Lempinen, Janne; Ahola, Hanna; Soederlund, Mervi; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Laboratory of Radiochemistry; Lahdenperae, Anne-Maj [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland); Ikonen, Ari T.K. [Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland)

    2014-10-01

    Soil samples from three forest soil pits were examined down to a depth of approximately three metres using 1 M ammonium acetate extraction and microwave-assisted extraction with concentrated nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), to study the binding of cesium (Cs) at Olkiluoto Island, southern Finland. Ammonium acetate was used to extract the readily exchangeable Cs fractions roughly representing the Cs fraction in soil which is available for plants. Microwave-assisted HNO{sub 3} extraction dissolves various minerals, e.g. carbonates, most sulphides, arsenides, selenides, phosphates, molybdates, sulphates, iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) oxides and some silicates (olivine, biotite, zeolite), and reflects the total Cs concentrations. Cs was mostly found in the strongly bound fraction obtained through HNO{sub 3} extraction. The average Cs concentrations found in this fraction were 3.53 ± 0.30 mg/kg (d.w.), 3.06 ± 1.86 mg/kg (d.w.) and 1.83 ± 0.42 mg/kg (d.w.) in the three soil pits, respectively. The average exchangeable Cs found in the ammonium acetate extraction in all three sampling pits was 0.015 ± 0.008 mg/kg (d.w.). In addition, Cs concentrations in the soil solution were determined and in situ distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Cs were calculated. Furthermore, the in situ K{sub d} data was compared with the Cs K{sub d} data obtained using the model batch experiments. The in situ K{sub d} values were observed to fairly well follow the trend of batch sorption data with respect to soil depth, but on average the batch distribution coefficients were almost an order of magnitude higher than the in situ K{sub d} data. In situ Cs sorption data could be satisfactory fitted with the Langmuir sorption isotherm, but the Freundlich isotherm failed to fit the data. Finally, distribution coefficients were calculated by an ion exchange approach using soil solution data, the cation exchange capacity (CEC) as well as Cs to sodium (Na) and Cs to potassium (K) ion exchange selectivity

  14. Preparation of actinide targets and sources using nonaqueous electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, M.M.; Gursky, J.C.; Wilhelmy, J.B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1991-05-15

    Application of the method of 'molecular plating' to prepare actinide targets suitable for accelerator bombardment is presented. Two example applications involving {sup 229}Th and {sup 254}Es are discussed along with the merits and liabilities of the method. (orig.).

  15. Actinides How well do we know their stellar production?

    CERN Document Server

    Goriely, S

    2001-01-01

    The reliable evaluation of the r-process production of the actinides and careful estimates of the uncertainties affecting these predictions are key ingredients especially in nucleo-cosmochronology studies based on the analysis of very metal-poor stars or on the composition of meteorites. This type of information is also required in order to make the best possible use of future high precision data on the actinide composition of galactic cosmic rays, of the local interstellar medium, or of meteoritic grains of presumed circumstellar origin. This paper provides the practitioners in these various fields with the most detailed and careful analysis of the r-process actinide production available to-date. In total, thirty-two different multi-event canonical calculations using different nuclear ingredients or astrophysics conditions are presented, and are considered to give a fair picture of the level of reliability of the predictions of the actinide production, at least in the framework of a simple r-process model. T...

  16. Nuclear fuel cycle-oriented actinides separation in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing; He, Xihong; Wang, Jianchen [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology

    2014-04-01

    In the last decades, the separation of actinides was widely and continuously studied in China. A few kinds of salt-free reductants to adjust Pu and Np valences have been investigated. N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine is a good reductant with high reduction rate constants for the co-reduction of Pu(IV) and Np(VI), and monomethylhydrazine is a simple compound for the individual reduction of Np(VI). Advanced PUREX based on Organic Reductants (APOR) was proposed. Trialkylphosphine oxide (TRPO) with a single functional group was found to possess strong affinity to tri-, tetra- and hexa-valent actinides. TRPO process has been first explored in China for actinides partitioning from high level waste and the good partitioning performance was demonstrated by the hot test. High extraction selectivity for trivalent actinides over lanthanides by dialkyldithiophosphinic acids was originally found in China. A separation process based on purified Cyanex 301 for the separation of Am from lanthanides was presented and successfully tested in a battery of miniature centrifugal contactors. (orig.)

  17. RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-06-01

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

  18. Functionalized pyrazines as ligands for minor actinide extraction and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikishkin, N.

    2013-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis concerns the design of ligands for a wide range of applications, from nuclear waste treatment to catalysis. The strategies employed to design actinide-selective extractants, for instance, comprise the fine tuning of the ligand electronic properties as well as us

  19. Actinide biocolloid formation in brine by halophilic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J. [Univ. of Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  20. ACTINIDE BIOCOLLOID FORMATION IN BRINE BY HALOPHILIC BACTERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GILLOW,J.B.; FRANCIS,A.J.; DODGE,C.J.; HARRIS,R.; BEVERIDGE,T.J.; BRADY,P.B.; PAPENGUTH,H.W.

    1998-11-09

    The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  1. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-28

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  2. Experimental Evaluation of Actinide Transport in a Fractured Granodiorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-03-16

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate and evaluate new experimental methods for quantifying the potential for actinide transport in deep fractured crystalline rock formations. We selected a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland as a model system because field experiments have already been conducted with uranium and additional field experiments using other actinides are planned at the site. Thus, working on this system provides a unique opportunity to compare lab experiment results with fieldscale observations. Rock cores drilled from the GTS were shipped to Los Alamos National Laboratory, characterized by x-ray diffraction and microscopy, and used in batch sorption and column breakthrough experiments. Solutions with pH 6.8 and 8.8 were tested. Solutions were switched to radionuclide-free synthetic Grimsel groundwater after near-steady actinide/colloid breakthrough occurred in column experiments. We are currently evaluating actinide adsorption/desorption rates as a function of water chemistry (initial focus on pH), with future testing planned to evaluate the influence of carbonate concentrations, flow rates, and mineralogy in solutions and suspensions with bentonite colloids. (auth)

  3. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (USA))

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of /sup 238/U, /sup 238/Pu, sup(239,240)Pu and /sup 241/Am that are approx. 3 orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-Pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (of the order of 1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 yr. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources.

  4. Surface Electrical Conductivity of Single Crystal Spinel in Cesium Vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    magnesium aluminate spinel at temperatures ranging from 573K to 923K, in the presence of cesium vapour at pressures up to 1Torr. The interest in spinel has...in the core of a nuclear reactor. In contrast to magnesium oxide and alumina, electron irradiation of spinel produces no dislocation structures

  5. Detection of quadrupole relaxation in an optically pumped cesium vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabeu, E.; Tornos, J.

    1985-10-01

    The relaxation of quadrupole orientation induced by means of optical pumping in a cesium vapour is experimentally studied, and the results are compared to the theoretical predictions. The optical detection process of this type of orientation is also discussed as a function of the polarization and spectral profile of the detection light.

  6. Fundamental study of cesium decontamination from soil by superconducting magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Susumu, E-mail: igarashi@qb.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko, E-mail: yoko-ak@see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The method for the soil decontamination by the superconducting magnet is proposed. •Cesium ion can be absorbed by Prussian blue in potassium iodide wash fluid. •It is possible to recover Cs{sup +} ion-adsorbing Prussian blue with a high rate by HGMS. •It is expected that HGMS can be applied to the actual soil decontamination. -- Abstract: The radioactive substances have been spread out all over the surrounding area of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused by the accident in March 2011. Decontamination and volume reduction of radioactive substances, especially cesium ion, are desired issue. This study proposed a decontamination method of the soil by the magnetic separation using superconducting magnet. Cesium ion was adsorbed by Prussian blue in the potassium iodide solution. We succeeded in separating selectively the cesium ion-adsorbed Prussian blue out of the liquid phase by high gradient magnetic separation. High recovery ratio of the Prussian blue was achieved by this method.

  7. Suspension of superfluid helium using cesium-coated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.C.; Giese, C.F.; Halley, J.W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    We report results of an experiment which demonstrates that a layer of superfluid helium can be suspended over a cesium-coated orifice. By measuring the layer thickness with a capacitance bridge, we have shown in two runs that fluid layers up to 2 mm thick were suspended over a 70-{mu}m-diam cesium-coated orifice in a platinum foil for over 2 h in a cryostat held at 1.2 K. The effect depends on the recently established fact that superfluid helium does not wet cesium-coated surfaces. As a consequence, superfluid helium is expected to form a stable meniscus across such a cesium-coated hole. The observed depths of suspended helium are consistent with a simple theoretical model based on this picture. We briefly discuss the possible application of this method to the performance of a proposed experiment to study quantum coherence in superfluid helium by directing pulsed beams of helium atoms at such a suspended layer of fluid. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Preparation of cesium targets for gamma-spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Basu, S. K.; Chanda, S.; Deb, P.; Eqbal, Md; Kundu, S.; Joseph, D.

    2000-11-01

    A procedure to prepare monoisotopic cesium compound targets for gamma-spectroscopic experiments is described. Using this procedure, uniform targets up to thicknesses of 0.6-1.2 mg/cm 2 were prepared and used for in-beam spectroscopic studies. The purity of the target was tested by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) measurements.

  9. Cesium-137 Levels Detected in Otters from Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutleb A.C.

    1991-02-01

    Full Text Available Pollution seems to be one of the most important causes for the decline of the European otter (Lutra lutra. The accident in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant added another aspect to environmental pollution. Few data on cesium-137 contents in otters are available, so levels were measured in 3 otters from Austria. All levels found were very low.

  10. Innovative SANEX process for trivalent actinides separation from PUREX raffinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sypula, Michal

    2013-07-01

    Recycling of nuclear spent fuel and reduction of its radiotoxicity by separation of long-lived radionuclides would definitely help to close the nuclear fuel cycle ensuring sustainability of the nuclear energy. Partitioning of the main radiotoxicity contributors followed by their conversion into short-lived radioisotopes is known as partitioning and transmutation strategy. To ensure efficient transmutation of the separated elements (minor actinides) the content of lanthanides in the irradiation targets has to be minimised. This objective can be attained by solvent extraction using highly selective ligands that are able to separate these two groups of elements from each other. The objective of this study was to develop a novel process allowing co-separation of minor actinides and lanthanides from a high active acidic feed solution with subsequent actinide recovery using just one cycle, so-called innovative SANEX process. The conditions of each step of the process were optimised to ensure high actinide separation efficiency. Additionally, screening tests of several novel lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands provided by University of Twente were performed. These tests were aiming in better understanding the influence of the extractant structural modifications onto An(III)/Ln(III) selectivity and complexation properties. Optimal conditions for minor actinides separation were found and a flow-sheet of a new innovative SANEX process was proposed. Tests using a single centrifugal contactor confirmed high Eu(III)/Am(III) separation factor of 15 while the lowest SF{sub Ln/Am} obtained was 6,5 (for neodymium). In addition, a new masking agent for zirconium was found as a substitution for oxalic acid. This new masking agent (CDTA) was also able to mask palladium without any negative influence on An(III)/Ln(III). Additional tests showed no influence of CDTA on plutonium present in the feed solution unlike oxalic acid which causes Pu precipitation. Therefore, CDTA was proposed as

  11. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Strontium(II) Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day; Newville; Neuhoff; Sahai; Carroll

    2000-02-15

    Detailed analyses of crystalline, hydrated, and precipitated strontium compounds and an aqueous strontium solution by synchrotron extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to quantify local thermal and static disorder and to characterize strontium coordination in a variety of oxygen-ligated bonding environments. Analysis of anharmonic vibrational disorder (i.e., significant contribution from a third cumulant term (C(3)) in the EXAFS phase-shift function) in compounds with low and high static disorder around strontium showed that first-shell anharmonic contributions were generally not significant above experimental error in the EXAFS fits (R+/-0.02 Å with and without C(3)). The only case in which a significant apparent decrease in Sr-O distance was observed with increasing temperature, and for which a third cumulant term was significant, was for dilute strontium in aqueous solution. Empirical parameterization of Debye-Waller factor (sigma(2)) for strontium compounds as a function of backscatterer atomic number (Z), interatomic Sr-Z distance, and temperature of spectral data collection showed systematic increases in sigma(2) as a function of increasing temperature and Sr-Z bond length. At values of sigma(2) greater than approximately 0.025 Å(2) (for N3 Å), backscattering was generally not significant above noise levels in spectra of compounds of known crystal structure. Comparison of the EXAFS spectra of freshly precipitated SrCO(3) (spectra collected wet) to that of dry, powdered strontianite (SrCO(3)(s)) indicated no significant differences in the local atomic structure around strontium. Analysis of partially hydrated strontium in natural Ca-zeolite (heulandite) showed that strontium is substituted only in the calcium (Ca2) site. Backscattering from aluminum and silicon atoms in the zeolite framework were apparent in the EXAFS spectra at low and room temperature at distances from central strontium of strontium structural coordination determined

  12. TEM observation of sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hongya; LIU Zhengyi; ZENG Dechang

    2006-01-01

    Sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrites were studied using transmission electron microscopy to investigate the microstructure morphology and its correlation with the magnetic properties. The present study shows that the microstructure of sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrites is an important parameter in determining their magnetic properties. The microstructure morphology in low-performance ferrite magnet is obviously different from high-performance one. Themagnetic properties of sintered permanent strontium ferrite depend strongly on the orientation degree of strong magnetic crystals. The presence of ferric oxidephase in ferrite magnet can deteriorate the magnetic properties. Moreover, proper quantities of crystal defects are beneficial to high coercive force due to the fixing of magnetic domain.

  13. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. I. Overall assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Blomeke, J.O.; Finney, B.C.

    1980-06-01

    This report is concerned with an overall assessment of the feasibility of and incentives for partitioning (recovering) long-lived nuclides from fuel reprocessing and fuel refabrication plant radioactive wastes and transmuting them to shorter-lived or stable nuclides by neutron irradiation. The principal class of nuclides considered is the actinides, although a brief analysis is given of the partitioning and transmutation (P-T) of /sup 99/Tc and /sup 129/I. The results obtained in this program permit us to make a comparison of the impacts of waste management with and without actinide recovery and transmutation. Three major conclusions concerning technical feasibility can be drawn from the assessment: (1) actinide P-T is feasible, subject to the acceptability of fuels containing recycle actinides; (2) technetium P-T is feasible if satisfactory partitioning processes can be developed and satisfactory fuels identified (no studies have been made in this area); and (3) iodine P-T is marginally feasible at best because of the low transmutation rates, the high volatility, and the corrosiveness of iodine and iodine compounds. It was concluded on the basis of a very conservative repository risk analysis that there are no safety or cost incentives for actinide P-T. In fact, if nonradiological risks are included, the short-term risks of P-T exceed the long-term benefits integrated over a period of 1 million years. Incentives for technetium and iodine P-T exist only if extremely conservative long-term risk analyses are used. Further RD and D in support of P-T is not warranted.

  14. Sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, K.N.; White, D.J.; Xu, Jide; Mohs, T.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The goal of this project is to take a biomimetic approach toward developing new separation technologies for the removal of radioactive elements from contaminated DOE sites. To achieve this objective, the authors are investigating the fundamental chemistry of naturally occurring, highly specific metal ion sequestering agents and developing them into liquid/liquid and solid supported actinide extraction agents. Nature produces sideophores (e.g., Enterobactin and Desferrioxamine B) to selectivity sequester Lewis acidic metal ions, in particular Fe(III), from its surroundings. These chelating agents typically use multiple catechols or hydroxamic acids to form polydentate ligands that chelate the metal ion forming very stable complexes. The authors are investigating and developing analogous molecules into selective chelators targeting actinide(IV) ions, which display similar properties to Fe(III). By taking advantage of differences in charge, preferred coordination number, and pH stability range, the transition from nature to actinide sequestering agents has been applied to the development of new and highly selective actinide extraction technologies. Additionally, the authors have shown that these chelating ligands are versatile ligands for chelating U(VI). In particular, they have been studying their coordination chemistry and fundamental interactions with the uranyl ion [UO{sub 2}]{sup 2+}, the dominant form of uranium found in aqueous media. With an understanding of this chemistry, and results obtained from in vivo uranium sequestration studies, it should be possible to apply these actinide(IV) extraction technologies to the development of new extraction agents for the removal of uranium from waste streams.

  15. Effect of long-term treatment with strontium ranelate on bone strontium content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bärenholdt, Olaf; Kolthoff, Niels; Nielsen, Stig Pors

    2009-01-01

    in a 3 years open study of the effect on bone Sr. The group was treated with 2 g SrR/day, 17 of the group had received active treatment for 4-5 years before the study. DXA BMD measurements and DPA measurements of the relative bone strontium hydroxy apatite termed %Sr (SrHA/(CaHA+SrHA)) were done...... at the end of treatment. No effect was demonstrated on distal radius relative bone Ca hydroxy apatite. Bone strontium uptake and retention data were compatible with a power function model. Withdrawal of SrR resulted in a decline in bone Sr, but 73 %Sr and 67 %Sr, respectively remained in UD-radius three...

  16. Selective extraction of cesium: from compound to process; Extraction selective du cesium: de la molecule au procede

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, N.; Eymard, S.; Tournois, B.; Dozol, J.F. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets (DCC/DESD/SEP), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2000-07-01

    Under the French law of 30 December 1991 on nuclear waste management, research is conducted to recover long-lived fission products from high-level radioactive effluents generated by spent fuel reprocessing, in order to destroy them by transmutation or encapsulate them in specific matrices. Cesium extraction with mono and bis-crown calix(4)arenes (Frame 1) is a candidate for process development. These extractants remove cesium from highly acidic or basic pH media even with high salinity. A real raffinate was treated in 1994 in a hot cell to extract cesium with a calix-crown extractant. The success of this one batch experiment confirmed the feasibility of cesium decontamination from high-level liquid waste. It was then decided to develop a process flowchart to extract cesium selectively from high-level raffinate, to be included in the general scheme of long-lived radionuclide partitioning. It was accordingly decided to develop a process based on liquid-liquid extraction and hence optimize a calixarene/diluent solvent according to: - hydraulic properties: density, viscosity, interfacial tension, - chemical criteria: sufficient cesium extraction (depending on the diluent), kinetics, third phase elimination... New mono-crown-calixarenes branched with long aliphatic groups (Frame 2) were designed to be soluble in aliphatic diluents. To prevent third phase formation associated with nitric acid extraction, the addition of modifiers (alcohol, phosphate and amide) in the organic phase was tested (Frame 3). Table 1 shows examples of calixarene/diluent systems suitable for a process flowchart, and Figure 2 provides data on cesium extraction with these new systems. Alongside these improvements, a system based on a modified 1,3-di(n-octyl-oxy)2,4-calix[4]arene crown and a modified diluent was also developed, considering a mixed TPH/NPHE system as the diluent, where TPH (hydrogenated tetra propylene) is a common aliphatic industrial solvent and NPHE is nitrophenyl

  17. Internal contamination by actinides after wounding: a robust rodent model for assessment of local and distant actinide retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, N M; Wilk, J C; Abram, M C; Renault, D; Chau, Q; Helfer, N; Guichet, C; Van der Meeren, A

    2012-08-01

    Internal contamination by actinides following wounding may occur in nuclear fuel industry workers or subsequent to terrorist activities, causing dissemination of radioactive elements. Contamination by alpha particle emitting actinides can result in pathological effects, either local or distant from the site of entry. The objective of the present study was to develop a robust experimental approach in the rat for short- and long- term actinide contamination following wounding by incision of the skin and muscles of the hind limb. Anesthetized rats were contaminated with Mixed OXide (MOX, uranium, plutonium oxides containing 7.1% plutonium) or plutonium nitrate (Pu nitrate) following wounding by deep incision of the hind leg. Actinide excretion and tissue levels were measured as well as histological changes from 2 h to 3 mo. Humid swabs were used for rapid evaluation of contamination levels and proved to be an initial guide for contamination levels. Although the activity transferred from wound to blood is higher after contamination with a moderately soluble form of plutonium (nitrate), at 7 d most of the MOX (98%) or Pu nitrate (87%) was retained at the wound site. Rapid actinide retention in liver and bone was observed within 24 h, which increased up to 3 mo. After MOX contamination, a more rapid initial urinary excretion of americium was observed compared with plutonium. At 3 mo, around 95% of activity remained at the wound site, and excretion of Pu and Am was extremely low. This experimental approach could be applied to other situations involving contamination following wounding including rupture of the dermal, vascular, and muscle barriers.

  18. Actinides: How well do we know their stellar production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2001-12-01

    The reliable evaluation of the r-process production of the actinides and careful estimates of the uncertainties affecting these predictions are key ingredients especially in nucleo-cosmochronology studies based on the analysis of very metal-poor stars or on the composition of meteorites. This type of information is also required in order to make the best possible use of future high precision data on the actinide composition of galactic cosmic rays, of the local interstellar medium, or of meteoritic grains of presumed circumstellar origin. This paper provides the practitioners in these various fields with the most detailed and careful analysis of the r-process actinide production available to-date. This study is based on a version of the multi-event canonical model of the r-process which discards the largely used waiting point approximation. It considers also different combinations of models for the calculation of nuclear masses, beta -decay and fission rates. Two variants of the model used to predict nuclear reaction rates are adopted. In addition, the influence of the level of Pb and Bi production by the r-process on the estimated actinide production is evaluated by relying on the solar abundances of these two elements. In total, thirty-two different cases are presented, and are considered to give a fair picture of the level of reliability of the predictions of the actinide production, at least in the framework of a simple r-process model. This simplicity is imposed by our inability to identify the proper astrophysical sites for the r-process. As a guide to the practitioners, constraints on the actinide yield predictions and associated uncertainties are suggested on grounds of the measured abundances of r-nuclides, including Th and U, in the star CS 31082-001, and under the critical and questionable assumption of the ``universality'' of the r-process. We also define alternative constraints based on the nucleo-cosmochronological results derived from the present

  19. Production of high-n strontium Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S.; Zhang, X.; Killian, T. C.; Dunning, F. B.; Hiller, M.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    The photoexcitation of strontium Rydberg atoms with n ~ 300 is being examined using a crossed laser-atom beam approach to enable study of quasi-stable two-electron excited states and of strongly-coupled Rydberg systems.

  20. Progress Toward Intercombination Line Cooling in Strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Sarah B.; Simien, Clayton; Vudayagiri, Ashok; Killian, Thomas C.

    2002-05-01

    An external-cavity, grating-tuned diode laser system is being developed for laser cooling on the 689 nm intercombination line of Strontium (^1S0 arrow ^2P_1, Γ= (2π)*7.5 kHz), using commercially availably laser diodes. We are making progress toward locking the external-cavity diode laser to a heat pipe to produce a few mW of tunable, stabilized, single-mode power at 689 nm. The output from this laser can be injected into a slave laser to produce up to 35 mW of stabilized polarized single-mode power. The completed laser system will be used for both high-resolution spectroscopy and laser cooling. The design of this laser system as well as preliminary results will be presented.

  1. Solubility of actinides and surrogates in nuclear glasses; Solubilite des actinides et de leurs simulants dans les verres nucleaires. Limites d'incorporation et comprehension des mecanismes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Ch

    2003-07-01

    The nuclear wastes are currently incorporated in borosilicate glass matrices. The resulting glass must be perfectly homogeneous. The work discussed here is a study of actinide (thorium and plutonium) solubility in borosilicate glass, undertaken to assess the extent of actinide solubility in the glass and to understand the mechanisms controlling actinide solubilization. Glass specimens containing; actinide surrogates were used to prepare and optimize the fabrication of radioactive glass samples. These preliminary studies revealed that actinide Surrogates solubility in the glass was enhanced by controlling the processing temperature, the dissolution kinetic of the surrogate precursors, the glass composition and the oxidizing versus reducing conditions. The actinide solubility was investigated in the borosilicate glass. The evolution of thorium solubility in borosilicate glass was determined for temperatures ranging from 1200 deg C to 1400 deg C.Borosilicate glass specimens containing plutonium were fabricated. The experimental result showed that the plutonium solubility limit ranged from 1 to 2.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} at 1200 deg C. A structural approach based on the determination of the local structure around actinides and their surrogates by EXAFS spectroscopy was used to determine their structural role in the glass and the nature of their bonding with the vitreous network. This approach revealed a correlation between the length of these bonds and the solubility of the actinides and their surrogates. (author)

  2. Porous allograft bone scaffolds: doping with strontium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yantao Zhao

    Full Text Available Strontium (Sr can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28 ± 0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60 ± 0.20 µm/day; p<0.05. Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes.

  3. Theory of the crystal structures of the actinide metals; Theorie des structures cristallines des metaux actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penicaud, M. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2005-07-01

    We describe, by bands calculation methods, the delocalized-localized transition of 5f electrons in the series of actinide metals, at ambient conditions, which happens between {alpha}-Pu and Am, and which is characterized by the change from the open and complex monoclinic crystal structure to the double hexagonal close-packed structure, and by the density collapse from 19.86 g.cm{sup -3} to 13.67 g.cm{sup -3}. The case of the alloy stabilized Pu in the high temperature {delta} phase (face centered cubic) is treated. Its ambient experimental density (15.92 g.cm{sup -3}) is obtained with a localization of the only 5f5/2 electrons. We find a 5f5/2 density of states peak pinned at the Fermi level, in agreement with photoelectron spectroscopy, and the high value of the electronic specific heat coefficient. The crystalline stability under pressure of U, Np, Pu and Am is examined. We find theoretically, at high pressure in Am, the stability of the recently discovered experimentally Am IV structure which is primitive-orthorhombic with four atoms in the unit cell. We calculate this structure also stable for Pu, for which it is proposed that the sequence is: {alpha}-Pu {yields} Am IV {yields} body-centered cubic. (author)

  4. Improved Actinide Neutron Capture Cross Sections Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, W.; Pardo, R. C.; Kondev, F. G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Nusair, O.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R.; Collon, P.; Paul, M.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; Berg, J.; Maddock, T.; Imel, G.

    2014-09-01

    The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are developing a technique to inject solid material into the ECR with laser ablation. With laser ablation, we can better control material injection and potentially increase efficiency in the ECR, thus creating less contamination in the source and reducing cross talk. I will present work on the laser ablation system and preliminary results from our AMS measurements. The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are

  5. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odutemowo, O. S.; Malherbe, J. B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D. F.; Wendler, E.

    2016-03-01

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  6. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odutemowo, O.S., E-mail: u12052613@tuks.co.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Malherbe, J.B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D.F. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Wendler, E. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  7. Superabsorbing gel for actinide, lanthanide, and fission product decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michael D.; Mertz, Carol J.

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides an aqueous gel composition for removing actinide ions, lanthanide ions, fission product ions, or a combination thereof from a porous surface contaminated therewith. The composition comprises a polymer mixture comprising a gel forming cross-linked polymer and a linear polymer. The linear polymer is present at a concentration that is less than the concentration of the cross-linked polymer. The polymer mixture is at least about 95% hydrated with an aqueous solution comprising about 0.1 to about 3 percent by weight (wt %) of a multi-dentate organic acid chelating agent, and about 0.02 to about 0.6 molar (M) carbonate salt, to form a gel. When applied to a porous surface contaminated with actinide ions, lanthanide ions, and/or other fission product ions, the aqueous gel absorbs contaminating ions from the surface.

  8. Recovery of minor actinides from irradiated superfact fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apoltolidis, C.; Glatz, J.P.; Molinet, R.; Nicholl, A.; Pagliosa, G.; Romer, K.; Bokelund, H.; Koch, L. [European Commission, JRC, Institute fuer Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    It could be demonstrated that the reprocessing of fast reactor oxide fuels containing up to 45 % MA (Np and Am), irradiated in the PHENIX reactor in the frame of a transmutation study, is possible. The fuels were dissolved under PUREX type conditions in order to determine their behaviour in the head-end step of the reprocessing process. For one of the fuels containing 20 % Am and 20 % Np before irradiation, an almost complete partitioning of actinides from the dissolver solution could be achieved. Chromatographic extraction was used for the separation of the main bulk elements U, Pu and Np, whereas centrifugal extractors were used to separate the minor actinides from the remaining high level liquid wastes (HLLW). For the relevant radio-toxic isotopes a high recovery rate from the irradiation targets was reached. Those elements are thus available for new fuel fabrication. (authors) 12 refs.

  9. Radioanalytical determination of actinides and fission products in Belarus soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, H; Gasparro, J; Barci-Funel, G; Dalmasso, J; Ardisson, G; Sharovarov, G

    1999-04-01

    Alpha emitting actinides such as plutonium, americium or curium were measured by alpha-spectrometry after radiochemical separation. The short range of alpha-particles within matter requires, after a pre-concentration process, a succession of isolation and purification steps based on the valence states modification of the researched elements. For counting, actinides were electrodeposited in view to obtain the mass-less source necessary to avoid self-absorption of the emitted radiations. Activity concentrations of gamma-emitting fission products were calculated after measurement with high purity germanium detectors (HPGe). These different methods were used to analyse soils sampled in the Republic of Belarus, not far from the Chernobyl nuclear plant.

  10. Accuracy Improvement of Neutron Nuclear Data on Minor Actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of accuracy of neutron nuclear data for minor actinides (MAs and long-lived fission products (LLFPs is required for developing innovative nuclear system transmuting these nuclei. In order to meet the requirement, the project entitled as “Research and development for Accuracy Improvement of neutron nuclear data on Minor ACtinides (AIMAC” has been started as one of the “Innovative Nuclear Research and Development Program” in Japan at October 2013. The AIMAC project team is composed of researchers in four different fields: differential nuclear data measurement, integral nuclear data measurement, nuclear chemistry, and nuclear data evaluation. By integrating all of the forefront knowledge and techniques in these fields, the team aims at improving the accuracy of the data. The background and research plan of the AIMAC project are presented.

  11. Development of a remote bushing for actinide vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F.; Ramsey, W.G.; Johnson, F.M. [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are combining their existing experience in handling highly radioactive, special nuclear materials with commercial glass fiberization technology in order to assemble a small vitrification system for radioactive actinide solutions. The vitrification system or {open_quotes}brushing{close_quotes}, is fabricated from platinum-rhodium alloy and is based on early marble remelt fiberization technology. Advantages of this unique system include its relatively small size, reliable operation, geometrical safety (nuclear criticality), and high temperature capability. The bushing design should be capable of vitrifying a number of the actinide nuclear materials, including solutions of americium/curium, neptunium, and possibly plutonium. State of the art, mathematical and oil model studies are being combined with basic engineering evaluations to verify and improve the thermal and mechanical design concepts.

  12. Actinide-specific sequestering agents and decontamination applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, William L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials and Molecular Research Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Raymond, Kenneth N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials and Molecular Research Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1981-04-07

    With the commercial development of nuclear reactors, the actinides have become very important industrial elements. A major concern of the nuclear industry is the biological hazard associated with nuclear fuels and their wastes. The acute chemical toxicity of tetravalent actinides, as exemplified by Th(IV), is similar to Cr(III) or Al(III). However, the acute toxicity of 239Pu(IV) is similar to strychnine, which is much more toxic than any of the non-radioactive metals such as mercury. Although the more radioactive isotopes of the transuranium elements are more acutely toxic by weight than plutonium, the acute toxicities of 239Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm are nearly identical in radiation dose, ~100 μCi/kg in rodents. Finally and thus, the extreme acute toxicity of 239Pu is attributed to its high specific activity of alpha emission.

  13. Status of measurements of fission neutron spectra of Minor Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drapchinsky, L.; Shiryaev, B. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The report considers experimental and theoretical works on studying the energy spectra of prompt neutrons emitted in spontaneous fission and neutron induced fission of Minor Actinides. It is noted that neutron spectra investigations were done for only a small number of such nuclei, most measurements, except those of Cf-252, having been carried out long ago by obsolete methods and imperfectapparatus. The works have no detailed description of experiments, analysis of errors, detailed numerical information about results of experiments. A conclusion is made that the available data do not come up to modern requirements. It is necessary to make new measurements of fission prompt neutron spectra of transuranium nuclides important for the objectives of working out a conception of minor actinides transmutation by means of special reactors. (author)

  14. Kelvin Probe Studies of Cesium Telluride Photocathode for AWA Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, Eric; Yusof, Zikri; Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff; Harkay, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (~50 nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin Probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating.

  15. Nutrients and cancer: an introduction to cesium therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, H E

    1984-01-01

    A brief overview on the relevance in dietary factors in both development and prevention of cancer is presented. The pharmacologic properties of various food ingredients are discussed. Establishing of a special diet for the cancer patient is suggested. In addition, avoidance of certain foods is recommended to counteract mucus production of cancer cells. Evaluation of the nutrient content of certain diets in regions with low incidence of cancer has advanced the use of certain alkali metals, i.e., rubidium and cesium, as chemotherapeutic agents. The rationale for this approach termed the "high pH" therapy resides in changing the acidic pH range of the cancer cell by cesium towards weak alkalinity in which the survival of the cancer cell is endangered, and the formation of acidic and toxic materials, normally formed in cancer cells, is neutralized and eliminated.

  16. Cesium-137, a drama recounted; Cesio-137, um drama recontado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Suzane de Alencar

    2013-01-15

    The radiological accident with Cesium-137, which started on Goiania in 1987, did not stop with the end of radiological contamination and continues in a judicial, scientific and narrative process of identification and recognition of new victims. The drama occupies a central place on the dynamics of radiological event, as it extends its limits, inflects its intensity and updates the event. As a narrative of the event, the ethnography incorporates and brings up to date the drama as an analysis landmark and the description of the theme as it is absorbed by a dramatic process. Cesium-137, a drama recounted is a textual experimentation based on real events and characters picked out from statements reported in various narratives about the radiological accident. (author)

  17. Fiber laser system for cesium and rubidium atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Diboune, Clément; Bidel, Yannick; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative fiber laser system for both cesium and rubidium manipulation. The architecture is based on frequency conversion of two lasers at 1560 nm and 1878 nm. By taking advantage of existing fiber components at these wavelengths, we demonstrate an all fiber laser system delivering 350 mW at 780 nm for rubidium and 210 mW at 852 nm for cesium. This result highlights the promising nature of such laser system especially for Cs manipulation for which no fiber laser system has been reported. It offers new perspectives for the development of atomic instruments dedicated to onboard applications and opens the way to a new generation of atom interferometers involving three atomic species $^{85}$Rb, $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs for which we propose an original laser architecture.

  18. New thermodynamic regularity for cesium over the whole liquid range

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatee, M H

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we derive an equation of state for liquid cesium based on a suggested potential function in accord to the characteristics large attraction and soft repulsion at the asymptotes of interaction potentials. By considering the interaction of nearest adjacent atoms in dense fluid, the equation of state predicts that the isotherm is linear function of, where is the compression factor, is the molar volume, and is the molar density. The linear parameters are identified as interaction coefficients related to attraction and repulsion, and are used to evaluate the molecular parameters with interesting implications. The isotherm is intended to resolve the particular thermodynamic properties of alkali metals, which have been known for their unusual change of the nature of intermolecular force as the characteristic metal-nonmetal transition range is approached. When applied to liquid cesium, the isotherms persist linear over the whole liquid range including the metal non-metals transition range and at the crit...

  19. Spectrally selective optical pumping in Doppler-broadened cesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Hai; Zeng, Xian-Jin; Li, Qing-Meng; Huang, Qiang; Sun, Wei-Min

    2013-05-01

    The D1 line spectrally selective pumping process in Doppler-broadened cesium is analyzed by solving the optical Bloch equations. The process, described by a three-level model with the Λ scheme, shows that the saturation intensity of broadened atoms is three orders of magnitude larger than that of resting atoms. The |Fg = 3> → |Fe = 4> resonance pumping can result in the ground state |Fg = 4, mF = 4> sublevel having a maximum population of 0.157 and the population difference would be about 0.01 in two adjacent magnetic sublevels of the hyperfine (HF) state Fg = 4. To enhance the anisotropy in the ground state, we suggest employing dichromatic optical HF pumping by adding a laser to excite D1 line |Fg = 4> → |Fe = 3> transition, in which the cesium magnetometer sensitivity increases by half a magnitude and is unaffected by the nonlinear Zeeman effect even in Earth's average magnetic field.

  20. Test procedures and instructions for Hanford tank waste supernatant cesium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, D.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-31

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test using Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed supernatant liquor from tank 251-AW-101 in a bench-scale column.Cesium sorbents to be tested include resorcinol-formaldehyde resin and crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-022, Hanford Tank Waste Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  1. Test procedures and instructions for Hanford complexant concentrate supernatant cesium removal using CST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1997-01-08

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test, using Hanford Complexant Concentrate supernatant liquor from tank 241-AN-107, in a bench-scale column. The cesium sorbent to be tested is crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-023, Hanford Complexant Concentrate Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  2. Study About Origin of Radioactive Cesium in Wild Mushroom in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    鎌田, 素之; 角田, 光淳

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive cesium, released from the Fukushima I nuclear power plant that destroyed by Great East Japan Earthquake, has been detected from various agricultural products. Especially, wild mushrooms are known to assimilate radioactive cesium and other heavy metals. In this study, we focused on the concentration of radioactive cesium in wild mushrooms in Japan, calculated the ratio of 134Cs/137Cs and discussed on their origin whether they were released from the Fukushima I nuclear power plant o...

  3. Comparative Study of f-Element Electronic Structure across a Series of Multimetallic Actinide, Lanthanide-Actinide and Lanthanum-Actinide Complexes Possessing Redox-Active Bridging Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelter, Eric J.; Wu, Ruilian; Veauthier, Jacqueline M.; Bauer, Eric D.; Booth, Corwin H.; Thomson, Robert K.; Graves, Christopher R.; John, Kevin D.; Scott, Brian L.; Thompson, Joe D.; Morris, David E.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

    2010-02-24

    A comparative examination of the electronic interactions across a series of trimetallic actinide and mixed lanthanide-actinide and lanthanum-actinide complexes is presented. Using reduced, radical terpyridyl ligands as conduits in a bridging framework to promote intramolecular metal-metal communication, studies containing structural, electrochemical, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are presented for (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}An[-N=C(Bn)(tpy-M{l_brace}C{sub 5}Me4R{r_brace}{sub 2})]{sub 2} (where An = Th{sup IV}, U{sup IV}; Bn = CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; M = La{sup III}, Sm{sup III}, Yb{sup III}, U{sup III}; R = H, Me, Et) to reveal effects dependent on the identities of the metal ions and R-groups. The electrochemical results show differences in redox energetics at the peripheral 'M' site between complexes and significant wave splitting of the metal- and ligand-based processes indicating substantial electronic interactions between multiple redox sites across the actinide-containing bridge. Most striking is the appearance of strong electronic coupling for the trimetallic Yb{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Yb{sup III}, Sm{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Sm{sup III}, and La{sup III}-U{sup IV}-La{sup III} complexes, [8]{sup -}, [9b]{sup -} and [10b]{sup -}, respectively, whose calculated comproportionation constant K{sub c} is slightly larger than that reported for the benchmark Creutz-Taube ion. X-ray absorption studies for monometallic metallocene complexes of U{sup III}, U{sup IV}, and U{sup V} reveal small but detectable energy differences in the 'white-line' feature of the uranium L{sub III}-edges consistent with these variations in nominal oxidation state. The sum of this data provides evidence of 5f/6d-orbital participation in bonding and electronic delocalization in these multimetallic f-element complexes. An improved, high-yielding synthesis of 4{prime}-cyano-2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine is also reported.

  4. EXAFS studies of actinide ions in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, D P; Georgopoulos, P; Knapp, G S

    1979-01-01

    The applicability of the EXAFS technique in the study of actinide systems is discussed. Uranium L/sub III/-edge spectra obtained on an in-lab rotating anode EXAFS facility are presented and analyzed for crystalline UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ and aqueous solutions containing hexavalent uranium ions. Methods for the extension of the technique to more dilute systems are discussed.

  5. Future nuclear fuel cycles: Prospect and challenges for actinide recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warin, Dominique

    2010-03-01

    The global energy context pleads in favour of a sustainable development of nuclear energy since the demand for energy will likely increase, whereas resources will tend to get scarcer and the prospect of global warming will drive down the consumption of fossil fuel. In this context, nuclear power has the worldwide potential to curtail the dependence on fossil fuels and thereby to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions while promoting energy independence. How we deal with nuclear radioactive waste is crucial in this context. In France, the public's concern regarding the long-term waste management made the French Governments to prepare and pass the 1991 and 2006 Acts, requesting in particular the study of applicable solutions for still minimizing the quantity and the hazardousness of final waste. This necessitates High Active Long Life element (such as the Minor Actinides MA) recycling, since the results of fuel cycle R&D could significantly change the challenges for the storage of nuclear waste. HALL recycling can reduce the heat load and the half-life of most of the waste to be buried to a couple of hundred years, overcoming the concerns of the public related to the long-life of the waste and thus aiding the "burying approach" in securing a "broadly agreed political consensus" of waste disposal in a geological repository. This paper presents an overview of the recent R and D results obtained at the CEA Atalante facility on innovative actinide partitioning hydrometallurgical processes. For americium and curium partitioning, these results concern improvements and possible simplifications of the Diamex-Sanex process, whose technical feasibility was already demonstrated in 2005. Results on the first tests of the Ganex process (grouped actinide separation for homogeneous recycling) are also discussed. In the coming years, next steps will involve both better in-depth understanding of the basis of these actinide partitioning processes and, for the new promising

  6. Validation of minor actinides fission neutron cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Verification of neutron fission cross-sections of minor actinides from some recently available evaluated nuclear data libraries was carried out by comparison of the reaction rates calculated by the MCNP6.1 computer code to the experimental values. The experimental samples, containing thin layers of 235U, 237Np, 238,239,240,241Pu, 242mAm, 243Cm, 245Cm, and 247Cm, deposited on metal support and foils of 235U (pseudo-alloy 27Al + 235U, 238U, natIn, 64Zn, 27Al, and multi-component sample alloy 27Al + 55Mn + natCu + natLu + 197Au, were irradiated in the channels of the tank containing fluorine salts 0.52NaF + 0.48ZrF4, labelled as the Micromodel Salt Blanket, inserted in the lattice centre of the MAKET heavy water critical assembly at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow. This paper is a continuation of earlier initiated scientific-research activities carried out for validation of the evaluated fission cross-sections of actinides that were supposed to be used for the quality examination of the fuel design of the accelerator driven systems or fast reactors, and consequently, determination of transmutation rates of actinides, and therefore, determination of operation parameters of these reactor facilities. These scientific-research activities were carried out within a frame of scientific projects supported by the International Science and Technology Center and the International Atomic Energy Agency co-ordinated research activities, from 1999 to 2010. Obtained results confirm that further research is needed in evaluations in order to establish better neutron cross-section data for the minor actinides and selected nuclides which could be used in the accelerator driven systems or fast reactors.

  7. Chemical and Ceramic Methods Toward Safe Storage of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.E.D. Morgan; R.M. Housley; J.B. Davis; M.L. DeHaan

    2005-08-19

    A very import, extremely-long-term, use for monazite as a radwaste encapsulant has been proposed. THe use of ceramic La-monazite for sequestering actinides (isolating them from the environment), especially plutonium and some other radioactive elements )e.g., fission-product rare earths), had been especially championed by Lynn Boatner of ORNL. Monazite may be used alone or, copying its compatibility with many other minerals in nature, may be used in diverse composite combinations.

  8. Chemical properties of the heavier actinides and transactinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulet, E.K.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical properties of each of the elements 99 (Es) through 105 are reviewed and their properties correlated with the electronic structure expected for 5f and 6d elements. A major feature of the heavier actinides, which differentiates them from the comparable lanthanides, is the increasing stability of the divalent oxidation state with increasing atomic number. The divalent oxidation state first becomes observable in the anhydrous halides of californium and increases in stability through the series to nobelium, where this valency becomes predominant in aqueous solution. In comparison with the analogous 4f electrons, the 5f electrons in the latter part of the series are more tightly bound. Thus, there is a lowering of the 5f energy levels with respect to the Fermi level as the atomic number increases. The metallic state of the heavier actinides has not been investigated except from the viewpoint of the relative volatility among members of the series. In aqueous solutions, ions of these elements behave as a normal trivalent actinides and lanthanides (except for nobelium). Their ionic radii decrease with increasing nuclear charge which is moderated because of increased screening of the outer 6p electrons by the 5f electrons. The actinide series of elements is completed with the element lawrencium (Lr) in which the electronic configuration is 5f/sup 14/7s/sup 2/7p. From Mendeleev's periodicity and Dirac-Fock calculations, the next group of elements is expected to be a d-transition series corresponding to the elements Hf through Hg. The chemical properties of elements 104 and 105 only have been studied and they indeed appear to show the properties expected of eka-Hf and eka-Ta. However, their nuclear lifetimes are so short and so few atoms can be produced that a rich variety of chemical information is probably unobtainable.

  9. Design of unique pins for irradiation of higher actinides in a fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Birney, K.R.; Weber, E.T.; Adair, H.L.; Quinby, T.C.; Raman, S.; Butler, J.K.; Bateman, B.C.; Swanson, K.M.

    1982-03-01

    The actinides produced by transmutation reactions in nuclear reactor fuels are a significant factor in nuclear fuel burnup, transportation and reprocessing. Irradiation testing is a primary source of data of this type. A segmented pin design was developed which provides for incorporation of multiple specimens of actinide oxides for irradiation in the UK's Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay Scotland. Results from irradiation of these pins will extend the basic neutronic and material irradiation behavior data for key actinide isotopes.

  10. Strontium-90 at the Hanford Site and its ecological implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RE Peterson; TM Poston

    2000-05-22

    Strontium-90, a radioactive contaminant from historical operations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, enters the Columbia River at several locations associated with former plutonium production reactors at the Site. Strontium-90 is of concern to humans and the environment because of its moderately long half-life (29.1 years), its potential for concentrating in bone tissue, and its relatively high energy of beta decay. Although strontium-90 in the environment is not a new issue for the Hanford Site, recent studies of near-river vegetation along the shoreline near the 100 Areas raised public concern about the possibility of strontium-90-contaminated groundwater reaching the riverbed and fall chinook salmon redds. To address these concerns, DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to prepare this report on strontium-90, its distribution in groundwater, how and where it enters the river, and its potential ecological impacts, particularly with respect to fall chinook salmon. The purpose of the report is to characterize groundwater contaminants in the near-shore environment and to assess the potential for ecological impact using salmon embryos, one of the most sensitive ecological indicators for aquatic organisms. Section 2.0 of the report provides background information on strontium-90 at the Hanford Site related to historical operations. Public access to information on strontium-90 also is described. Section 3.0 focuses on key issues associated with strontium-90 contamination in groundwater that discharges in the Hanford Reach. The occurrence and distribution of fall chinook salmon redds in the Hanford Reach and characteristics of salmon spawning are described in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 describes the regulatory standards and criteria used to set action levels for strontium-90. Recommendations for initiating additional monitoring and remedial action associated with strontium-90 contamination at the Hanford Site are presented in Section 6

  11. Fatal Cesium Chloride Toxicity After Alternative Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sessions, Daniel; Heard, Kennon; Kosnett, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cesium chloride (CsCl) is sold as a treatment for several types of cancers. The purported mechanism of action is alkalinization of relatively acidic neoplastic cells. The efficacy of CsCl has not been demonstrated in controlled experiments. Oral and intravenous CsCl use has been associated with seizures, cardiotoxicity, syncope, and death. Although intratumoral treatment with various antineoplastic agents is described, no cases of intratumoral cancer treatment with CsCl have been ...

  12. Cesium pentazolate: A new nitrogen-rich energetic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Brad A.; Stavrous, Elissaios; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Radousky, Harry; Zaug, Joseph; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Oleynik, Ivan I.

    2017-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental evidence for a new class of high-nitrogen content energetic material compounds consisting of molecular pentazoles, which are stabilized in the crystal phase upon introduction of elemental cesium. First-principles structural predictions show that the material with composition CsN5 is thermodynamically stable above 15 GPa. Indexing of the measured X-ray diffraction spectra indicate the synthesis of this material at 60 GPa as well its stability upon decompression down to 24 GPa.

  13. MECHANISM OF CESIUM EXCHANGE WITH POTASSIUM TITANIUM HEXACYANOFERRATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuShiping; SunYongxia; 等

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of cesium exchange on potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate (KTiFC) is described in this paper.The dependence of the exchange rate on temperature,particle granule size,and shaking frequency is studied.The results show that ion exchange process is controlled by liquid film diffusion in granule particle.An exchange reaction occurs mainly between K+ in the exchanger and Cs+ in the solution.

  14. Studies on the Separation of Cesium From Fission Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANLi-juan; ZHANGSheng-dong; GUOJing-ru; CUIAn-zhi; YANGLei; WUWang-suo

    2003-01-01

    135Cs is a long-life fission product. When measuring its thermal cross section, we must separate radiochemical purity cesium from fission products. Except for decontaminating radio- nuclides, others which can be activated must be avoided to come into solution. So ion exchanger is used. Inorganic ion exchangers have received increased attention because of their high resistance to radiation and their very efficient separation of alkali metal ions.

  15. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1994-06-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

  16. A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, D.L. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Carroll, S.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage.

  17. Crystalline matrices for the immobilization of plutonium and actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, E.B.; Burakov, E.E.; Galkin, Ya.B.; Starchenko, V.A.; Vasiliev, V.G. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-05-01

    The management of weapon plutonium, disengaged as a result of conversion, is considered together with the problem of the actinide fraction of long-lived high level radioactive wastes. It is proposed to use polymineral ceramics based on crystalline host-phases: zircon ZrSiO{sub 4} and zirconium dioxide ZrO{sub 2}, for various variants of the management of plutonium and actinides (including the purposes of long-term safe storage or final disposal from the human activity sphere). It is shown that plutonium and actinides are able to form with these phases on ZrSiO{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} was done on laboratory level by the hot pressing method, using the plasmochemical calcination technology. To incorporate simulators of plutonium into the structure of ZrSiO{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} in the course of synthesis, an original method developed by the authors as a result of studying the high-uranium zircon (Zr,U) SiO{sub 4} form Chernobyl {open_quotes}lavas{close_quotes} was used.

  18. A FAMILY OF PEROXO-TITANATE MATERIALS TAILORED FOR OPTIMAL STRONTIUM ANDACTINIDE SORPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D

    2006-08-07

    Achieving global optimization of inorganic sorbent efficacy, as well as tailoring sorbent specificity for target sorbates would facilitate increased wide-spread use of these materials in applications such as producing potable water or nuclear waste treatment. Sodium titanates have long been known as sorbents for radionuclides; {sup 90}Sr and transuranic elements in particular. We have developed a related class of materials, which we refer to as peroxo-titanates: these are sodium titanates or hydrous titanates synthesized in the presence of or treated post-synthesis with hydrogen peroxide. Peroxo-titanates show remarkable and universal improved sorption behavior with respect to separation of actinides and strontium from Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear waste simulants. Enhancement in sorption kinetics can potentially result in as much as an order of magnitude increase in batch processing throughput. Peroxo-titanates have been produced by three different synthetic routes: post-synthesis peroxide-treatment of a commercially produced monosodium titanate, an aqueous-peroxide synthetic route, and an isopropanol-peroxide synthetic route. The peroxo-titanate materials are characteristically yellow to orange, indicating the presence of protonated or hydrated Ti-peroxo species; and the chemical formula can be generally written as H{sub v}Na{sub w}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}-(xH{sub 2}O)[yH{sub z}O{sub 2}] where (v+w) = 2, z = 0-2, and total volatile species accounts for 25-50 wt % of the solid. Further enhancement of sorption performance is achieved by processing, storing and utilizing the peroxo-titanate as an aqueous slurry rather than a dry powder, and post-synthesis acidification. All three synthesis modifications; addition of hydrogen peroxide, use of a slurry form and acidification can be applied more broadly to the optimization of other metal oxide sorbents and other ion separations processes.

  19. Cesium chloride protects cerebellar granule neurons from apoptosis induced by low potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jin; Yao, Weiguo; Lee, Weihua

    2007-10-01

    Neuronal apoptosis plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, and neuroprotective agents targeting apoptotic signaling could have therapeutic use. Here we report that cesium chloride, an alternative medicine in treating radiological poison and cancer, has neuroprotective actions. Serum and potassium deprivation induced cerebellar granule neurons to undergo apoptosis, which correlated with the activation of caspase-3. Cesium prevented both the activation of caspase-3 and neuronal apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Cesium at 8 mM increased the survival of neurons from 45 +/- 3% to 91 +/- 5% of control. Cesium's neuroprotection was not mediated by PI3/Akt or MAPK signaling pathways, since it was unable to activate either Akt or MAPK by phosphorylation. In addition, specific inhibitors of PI3 kinase and MAP kinase did not block cesium's neuroprotective effects. On the other hand, cesium inactivated GSK3beta by phosphorylation of serine-9 and GSK3beta-specific inhibitor SB415286 prevented neuronal apoptosis. These data indicate that cesium's neuroprotection is likely via inactivating GSK3beta. Furthermore, cesium also prevented H(2)O(2)-induced neuronal death (increased the survival of neurons from 72 +/- 4% to 89 +/- 3% of control). Given its relative safety and good penetration of the brain blood barrier, our findings support the potential therapeutic use of cesium in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Radioactive cesium dynamics derived from hydrographic observations in the Abukuma River Estuary, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehi, Shigeho; Kaeriyama, Hideki; Ambe, Daisuke; Ono, Tsuneo; Ito, Shin-ichi; Shimizu, Yugo; Watanabe, Tomowo

    2016-03-01

    Large quantities of radioactive materials were released into the air and the ocean as a result of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, caused by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and the subsequent major tsunami off the Pacific coast. There is much concern about radioactive contamination in both the watershed of the Abukuma River, which flows through Fukushima Prefecture, and its estuary, where it discharges into the sea in Miyagi Prefecture. We investigated radioactive cesium dynamics using mixing diagrams obtained from hydrographic observations of the Abukuma River Estuary. Particulate radioactive cesium dominates the cesium load in the river, whereas the dissolved form dominates in the sea. As the salinity increased from <0.1 to 0.1-2.3, the mixing diagram showed that dissolved radioactive cesium concentrations increased, because of desorption. Desorption from suspended particles explained 36% of dissolved radioactive cesium in estuarine water. However, the dissolved and particulate radioactive cesium concentrations in the sea decreased sharply because of dilution. It is thought that more than 80% of the discharged particulate radioactive cesium was deposited off the river mouth, where the radioactive cesium concentrations in sediment were relatively high (217-2440 Bq kg(-1)). Radioactive cesium that was discharged to the sea was transported southward by currents driven by the density distribution.

  1. Cesium Toxicity Alters MicroRNA Processing and AGO1 Expressions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il Lae Jung

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short RNA fragments that play important roles in controlled gene silencing, thus regulating many biological processes in plants. Recent studies have indicated that plants modulate miRNAs to sustain their survival in response to a variety of environmental stimuli, such as biotic stresses, cold, drought, nutritional starvation, and toxic heavy metals. Cesium and radio-cesium contaminations have arisen as serious problems that both impede plant growth and enter the food chain through contaminated plants. Many studies have been performed to define plant responses against cesium intoxication. However, the complete profile of miRNAs in plants during cesium intoxication has not been established. Here we show the differential expression of the miRNAs that are mostly down-regulated during cesium intoxication. Furthermore, we found that cesium toxicity disrupts both the processing of pri-miRNAs and AGONOUTE 1 (AGO1-mediated gene silencing. AGO 1 seems to be especially destabilized by cesium toxicity, possibly through a proteolytic regulatory pathway. Our study presents a comprehensive profile of cesium-responsive miRNAs, which is distinct from that of potassium, and suggests two possible mechanisms underlying the cesium toxicity on miRNA metabolism.

  2. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  3. Actinides and lanthanides under pressure: the pseudopotential approach; Actinides et terres rares sous pression: approche pseudopotentiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, N

    2002-07-01

    In the Density Functional Theory Framework, the pseudopotential formalism offers a broader scope of study than other theoretical methods such as global relaxation of the parameters of the cell or ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. This method has been widely used to study light elements or transition metals but never to study f elements. We have generated two non local norm conserving Trouillier-Martins pseudopotentials (one in LDA and one in GGA) for the cerium. To check the validity of the pseudopotentials, we have calculated the equilibrium volume and the incompressibility modulus and compared our results to previous all-electron calculations. If the GGA and non linear core corrections are used, the equation of state is in a good agreement with the experimental equation of state. A static study of the previously proposed high pressure phases give a transitions fcc-a''(I)-bct. Using the pseudopotentials we have generated, an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation at constant pressure, in the region between 5 and 12 GPa where the stable phase of cerium is not well defined, lead us to predict that a centred monoclinic structure, as the a''(I) phase previously observed in some experiments, is the most stable phase. We have also generated pseudopotentials for the light actinides (Th, Pa, U and Np). We have study their phase transitions under pressure at zero temperature. We compared our results with all electron results. The structure parameters have always been relaxed in this study. And for the first time in pseudopotential calculation, the spin-orbit coupling has been taken into account. The curves describing the variation of the volume or the incompressibility modulus depending on the elements and the phase transitions are always in agreement with the one found in the all electron calculations. (author)

  4. Utilization of Minor Actinides (Np, Am, Cm) in Nuclear Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, A.; Bergelson, B.; Tikhomirov, G.

    2014-06-01

    Calculation research of the utilization process of minor actinides (transmutation with use of power released) is performed for specialized power reactor of the VVER type operating on the level of electric power of 1000 MW. Five subsequent cycles are considered for the reactor with fuel elements containing minor actinides along with enriched uranium. It was shown that one specialized reactor for the one cycle (900 days) can utilize minor actinides from several VVER-1000 reactors without any technological and structural modifications. Power released because of minor actinide fission is about 4% with respect to the total power

  5. Studies of Bone Metabolism with the Aid of Radioactive Strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.C.; Copp, D.H., M.D.

    1948-04-01

    The kinetics of skeletal uptake and urinary excretion of radiostrontium were studied during the critieal first hour following intraperitoneal injection of a carrier-free dose. These experiments not only provided valuable data con.cerning the metabolism and fixation of this important fission product, but, because of the close similarity of strontium and calcium, also gave basic information on the process of calcification. Three groups of rats were compared: normal mature adults, young growing normal animals, and young rachitic rats. In all groups, the blood radioactive strontium rose to a maximum in 10-15 minutes, and then declined as the strontium continued to deposit in the skeleton or to be excreted in the urine. Muscle and skin strontium curves followed those of blood quite closely, suggesting a rapid equilibrium between their extracellular fluid and blood plasma. In all groups there was a continous uptake of strontium by the skeleton. In the adults, this was almost constant, suggesting uptek e by absorption and exchange with the calcium of the bone mineral. In the young rats, both normal and rachitic, the very rapid initial rate of uptake of radio-strontium tapered off sharply with time, indicating that some of this radio-element was coming back from the bone into the blood stream. This suggested a rapid labile combination of strontiunl in these animals, which, since it also occured in the rachitic group in which normal calcification is inhibited, probably associated with the protein osteoid matrix present in both. A hypothetical calcification mechanism was suggested by these findings. Urinary excretion and renal clearance of strontium was constant in all three groups, but the clearance was almost ten times as great in the rachitic as in the normal young and adult rats. This would seem to indicate a direct effect of rickets on the renal mechanism of radiostrontium (and calcium) excretion.

  6. Eu(2+) luminescence in strontium aluminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutczak, D; Jüstel, T; Ronda, C; Meijerink, A

    2015-06-21

    The luminescence properties of Eu(2+) doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice, related to the Sr/Al ratio, on the optical properties of the Eu(2+) ion. The UV and VUV excited luminescence spectra as well as luminescence decay curves were recorded to characterize the luminescence properties of the investigated aluminates. The emission of Eu(2+) ions varies over a wide spectral range, from ultraviolet (UV) to red, for the series of aluminates. The variation in emission color can be related to the crystal-field splitting of the 5d levels and the covalent interaction with the surrounding oxygen anions. In the least covalent material, viz. SrAl12O19:Eu(2+), narrow line emission due to the (6)P7/2-(8)S7/2 transition occurs at 4 K, indicating that the 4f(6)5d excited state is situated above the (6)P7/2(4f(7)) excited state around 360 nm. The most alkaline material, viz. Sr3Al2O6:Eu(2+) is the most covalent host and exhibits several d-f emission bands in the yellow to red spectral range due to the Eu(2+) ions located on different crystallographic Sr(2+) sites. The Eu(2+) emission spectra in the other aluminates confirm the trend that with increasing Sr/Al ratio the Eu(2+) emission shifts to longer wavelengths. Interesting differences are observed for the Eu(2+) from different crystallographic sites which cannot always be related with apparent differences in the first oxygen coordination sphere. The discussion gives insight into how in a similar class of materials, strontium aluminates, the emission color of Eu(2+) can be tuned over a wide spectral region.

  7. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  8. Fission fragment angular distributions in pre-actinide nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Jhingan, A.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Dubey, R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Laveen, P. V.; Shamlath, A.; Shareef, M.; Gehlot, J.; Saneesh, N.; Prasad, E.; Sugathan, P.; Pal, Santanu

    2016-10-01

    Background: Complete fusion of two nuclei leading to formation of a heavy compound nucleus (CN) is known to be hindered by various fission-like processes, in which the composite system reseparates after capture of the target and the projectile inside the potential barrier. As a consequence of these non-CN fission (NCNF) processes, fusion probability (PCN) starts deviating from unity. Despite substantial progress in understanding, the onset and the experimental signatures of NCNF and the degree of its influence on fusion have not yet been unambiguously identified. Purpose: This work aims to investigate the presence of NCNF, if any, in pre-actinide nuclei by systematic study of fission angular anisotropies and fission cross sections (σfis) in a number of nuclear reactions carried out at and above the Coulomb barrier (VB) . Method: Fission fragment angular distributions were measured for six 28Si-induced reactions involving isotopically enriched targets of 169Tm,176Yb,175Lu,180Hf,181Ta, and 182W leading to probable formation of CN in the pre-actinide region, at a laboratory energy (Elab) range of 129-146 MeV. Measurements were performed with large angular coverage (θlab=41∘ -170∘) in which fission fragments (FFs) were detected by nine hybrid telescope (E -Δ E ) detectors. Extracted fission angular anisotropies and σfis were compared with statistical model (SM) predictions. Results: Barring two reactions involving targets with large non-zero ground state spin (J ) , viz., 175Lu(7/2+) and 181Ta(7/2+) , experimental fission angular anisotropies were found to be higher in comparison with predictions of the statistical saddle point model (SSPM), at Ec .m . near VB. Comparison of present results with those from neighboring systems revealed that experimental anisotropies increasingly deviated from SSPM predictions as one moved from pre-actinide to actinide nuclei. For reactions involving targets with large nonzero J , this deviation was subdued. Comparison between

  9. Radioactive cesium. Dynamics and transport in forestal food-webs; Radioaktivt cesium. Dynamik och transport i skogliga naeringsvaevar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palo, T.; Nelin, P. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Animal Ecology; Bergman, R.; Nylen, T. [FOA NBC Defence, Umeaa (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    This report summarises results from a radioecological study during 1994-1995 concerning turnover, redistribution and loss of radioactive Cesium (134 and 137) in boreal forest ecosystems, as well as uptake and transfer in important food-chains over moose, vole and vegetation. The basis for this report are 9 publications published 1994-95. These reports are presented in summary form. 9 refs, 17 figs.

  10. Stable strontium isotopic ratios from archaeological organic remains from the Thorsberg peat bog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech; von Carnap-Bornheim, Claus; Grupe, Gisela;

    2007-01-01

    Pilot study analysing stable strontium isotopic ratios from Iron Age textile and leather finds from the Thorsberg peat bog.......Pilot study analysing stable strontium isotopic ratios from Iron Age textile and leather finds from the Thorsberg peat bog....

  11. Effects of strontium and boron interactions in Al-7Si alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Effects of boron and strontium combined treatment on the microstructure of hypoeutectic Al-7Si alloy have been studied. Experimental results show that strontium has no significant effect on the grain refinement efficiency of boron and the eutectic silicon modification efficiency is not only related to the strontium content but also related to the boron content in the Al-7Si alloy melt. There is a negative interaction between boron and strontium that results in the formation of a strontium-boron-aluminum containing compound, which reduces the effective strontium level and decreases the eutectic silicon modification efficiency substantially. The refinement and modification mechanisms remain unchanged after the combined addition of strontium and boron. Based on the experimental results, a model for assessing the modification level in the Al-Si alloy melts after combined addition of boron and strontium was presented.

  12. [Cytotoxicity of the strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite evaluated by MTT colorimetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y; Chen, D; Zhang, J

    2001-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the cytotoxicity of strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) colorimetry. We used the MTT method to assay the cytotoxicity of the strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite containing different strontium concentrations (1%, 5%, 10%, 100% Sr2+) and the pure hydroxyapatite. The results showed that the cytotoxicity scores of the different materials were grade 0 or grade 1. These led us to the conclusion that strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite has good biocompatibility.

  13. Surface functionalization with strontium-containing nanocomposite coatings via EPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kena; Huang, Dan; Cai, Jing; Cai, Xinjie; Gong, Lingling; Huang, Pin; Wang, Yining; Jiang, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Metal orthopedic implants still face challenges in some compromised conditions, partly due to bio-inertness. The present study aimed to functionalize metallic implants with organic-inorganic nanocomposite (strontium-containing chitosan/gelatin) coatings through a simple single-step electrophoretic deposition under mild conditions. The surface characterization and in vitro cellular response were studied and compared with chitosan/gelatin (CS/G) coatings. SEM images suggested the inorganic nanoparticles may be encapsulated within or mixed with organic polymers. The XRD patterns showed that strontium carbonate was generated in the coatings. The TEM images revealed strontium-containing nanoparticles were released from the coatings in PBS. The continuous release after the initial burst release ensured the enduring effects of the functionalized surface. The tensile bond strength of the coatings to the substrates increased after the addition of strontium. In vitro cellular study confirmed that strontium-containing coatings supported the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells and exhibited excellent ability to enhance the differentiation of such pre-osteoblasts. Therefore, such organic-inorganic nanocomposite coatings are a promising candidate to functionalize orthopedic implant surfaces.

  14. [Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation in strontium solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamed'iarov, M A; Kochunova, Iu O; Telina, E N; Zefirov, A L

    2008-02-01

    Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation were studied using electrophysiological recording of end-plate currents (EPC) and nerve ending (NE) responses after substitution of extracellular Ca ions with Sr ions at the frog neuromuscular junction. The solutions with 0.5 mM concentration of Ca ions (calcium solution) or 1 mM concentration of Sr ions (strontium solution) were used where baseline neurotransmitter release (at low-frequency stimulation) is equal. Decay of paired-pulse facilitation of EPC at calcium solutions with increase of interpulse interval from 5 to 500 ms was well described by three-exponential function consisting of early, first and second components. Facilitation at strontium solutions was significantly diminished due mainly to decrease of early and first components. At the same time, EPC facilitation with rhythmic stimulation (10 or 50 imp/s) at strontium solutions was significantly increased. Also more pronounced decrease of NE response 3rd phase, reflecting potassium currents was detected under rhythmic stimulation of 50 imp/s at strontium solutions comparing to calcium solutions. It was concluded that facilitation sites underlying first and early components had lower affinity to Sr ions than to Ca ions. The enhancement of frequency facilitation at strontium solutions is mediated by two mechanisms: more pronounced broadening of NE action potential and increase of bivalent cation influx due to feebly marked activation of Ca(2+)-dependent potassium current by Sr ions, and slower dynamics of Sr(2+) removal from NE axoplasm comparing to Ca(2+).

  15. Strontium-Containing Apatite/Poly Lactide Composites Favoring Osteogenic Differentiation and in Vivo Bone Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Xiaoman; Barbieri, D.; Zhang, Yunfei; Yan, Yonggang; Bruijn, de Joost D.; Yuan, Huipin

    2015-01-01

    Strontium was shown to enhance bone growth; however, its oral administration may lead to severe side effects. The application of strontium in orthopedic biomaterials may therefore be an alternative to achieve targeted and sustained strontium treatment to the surgery site in aid of bone growth locall

  16. Energy dependence of radioluminescence spectra from strontium titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y., E-mail: wyfemail@gmail.com [School of Science, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Wu, X. [School of Science, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Finch, A.A. [Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9AL (United Kingdom); Townsend, P.D. [Physics Building, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    X-ray excited luminescence spectra of strontium titanate are reported over the temperature range from 20 to 300 K. The range includes several crystalline phases, each with different emission spectra. The signals are thermally quenched above ~220 K. There are spectral shifts and intensity changes around the temperatures associated with phase changes and overall there are nominally three spectral emission bands. A remarkable observation is that at fixed lower temperatures the spectra undergo major changes with the energy of the X-rays. A possible cause of the effect is discussed in terms of inner shell excitation from the K shell of the strontium. Comparisons with thermoluminescence spectra from the strontium titanate are reported. - Highlights: • Radioluminescence spectra of SrTiO{sub 3} are reported from 20 to 300 K. • X-ray luminescence spectra depend on crystal phase. • Direct evidence for inner shell excitation of Sr controlling emission spectra.

  17. Studies of Ultracold Strontium Atoms in an Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, A. J.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We survey recent experiments with ultracold strontium performed in our group. Trapping and cooling occurs in three stages: successive magneto-optical traps (MOTs) operating on 461 nm and 689 nm transitions of strontium, respectively, are loaded to cool atoms to a temperature of 1 μK. Finally, atoms are loaded into a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (ODT). We examine the loading characteristics, thermalization, and lifetime of atoms held within the ODT. We also perform spectroscopy of atoms held within the ODT. During laser cooling, we are able to manipulate the energy levels of the atoms and shelve them into metastable states using 707 nm and 3 μm lasers. These experiments reveal interesting physics of ultracold strontium.

  18. Microstructure of pre-sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrite powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hongya; LIU Zhengyi; ZENG Dechang

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and characteristics of pre-sintered strontium ferrite powderwere investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The present study shows that the pre-sintered strontium ferrite powder is provided with a certain particle size distribution, which results in high-density magnets. The strontium ferrite particle has a laminar hexagonal structure with a size similar to ferrite single domain. Ferric oxidephase due to an incomplete solid phase reaction in the first sintering is discovered, which will deteriorate the magnetic properties of ferrite magnet. In addition, the waste ferrite magnets with needle shape arranging along C axis in good order into the powders are found, which have no negative effects on finished product quality.

  19. Helium and fission gas behaviour in magnesium aluminate spinel and zirconia for actinide transmutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, P.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    In order to reduce the long-term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel, many studies are performed on partitioning and transmutation of actinides. In such a scenario, the long-lived radio-isotopes (mostly actinides) are partitioned from the nuclear waste, and subsequently transmuted or fissioned in a

  20. Invisible structures in the X-ray absorption spectra of actinides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; De Groot, Frank M F

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of actinides are discussed with an emphasis on the fundamental effects that influence their spectral shape, including atomic multiplet theory, charge transfer theory and crystal field theory. Many actinide spectra consist of a single peak and it is shown that the use of

  1. Actinide Partitioning and Transmutation Program. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedder, D. W.; Blomeke, J. O. [comps.

    1977-10-01

    Experimental work on the 16 tasks comprising the Actinide Partitioning and Transmutation Program was continued. Summaries of work are given on Purex Process modifications, actinide recovery, Am-Cm recovery, radiation effects on ion exchangers, LMFBR transmutation studies, thermal reactor transmutation studies, fuel cycle studies, and partitioning-transmutation evaluation. (JRD)

  2. Systematic Characteristics of Fast Neutron Fission Cross Sections for Actinide Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The neutron fission cross sections of actinide nuclei are important data for the design of nuclear reactor and nuclear engineering, and so on. So far, there has been a certain amount of experimental data for the fission cross sections of actinide nuclei. However,

  3. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a

  4. Impurities that cause difficulty in stripping actinides from commercial tetraalkylcarbamoylmethylphosphonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahner, C. T.; Shoun, R. R.; McDowell, W. J.

    1977-09-01

    Dihexyl((diethylcarbamoyl)methyl)phosphonate (DHDECMP) in diethylbenzene extracts actinides well from 6 M nitric acid solution, but commercially available DHDECMP contains impurities which interfere with stripping the actinides from the organic extract. DHDECMP purified by molecular distillation does not contain these impurities, but the pot residue contains increased concentrations of them. Heating the purified DHDECMP causes the formation of products which interfere with stripping in the same way, suggesting that high temperatures employed in the manufacture of DHDECMP may produce the offending impurities. These impurities can be separated from the heat-decomposed material or the pot residues by dilution with a large volume of hexanes (causing part of the impurities to separate as a second liquid phase) followed by equilibration of the hexane solution with dilute alkali. After the treatment with hexane and dilute alkali, the DHDECMP is readily recovered and functions well in the actinide extraction process. Dibutyl((dibutylcarbamoyl)methyl)-phosphonate (DBDBCMP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)((diethylcarbamoyl)-methyl)phosphonate (DEHDECMP) are purified less effectively by these methods. Similar separation methods using diethylbenzene or CCl/sub 4/ as solvent do not remove impurities as completely as the hexane process. Impurities can also be removed from a benzene solution of the DHDECMP pot residue by passing it through a column packed with silica gel or diethylaminoethyl cellulose. These impurities have been separated into fractions for analytical examination by use of various solvents and by column chromatography. Hexyl hydrogen ((diethylcarbamoyl)methyl)-phosphonate has been identified tentatively as a principal objectionable impurity. Dihexyl phosphoric acid and possibly dihexylphosphonate have been identified in other fractions.

  5. MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-09-20

    This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

  6. Rational Design of Cesium-Selective Ionophores and Chemosensors: Dihydrocalix[4]arene Crown-6 Ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Engle, Nancy L.; Haverlock, Tamara J.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Urvoas, Agathe; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2003-12-15

    Molecular mechanics calculations performed on calix[4]arene crown-6 ethers predict that the 1,3-dihydro derivatives will exhibit greater complementarity for potassium and cesium ions than the parent 1,3-dialkoxy calix crowns. The X-ray crystal structures of 1,3-alt bis-octyloxycalix[4]arene benzocrown-6 ether, dihydrocalix[4]arene benzocrown-6 ether, and the cesium nitrate complex of dihydrocalix[4]arene benzocrown-6 ether were determined. The cesium complex structure corresponds closely to the structure predicted by molecular mechanics. The dihydrocalix[4]arene crown-6 ethers exhibit enhanced cesium selectivity in the extraction of alkali metal salts and provide a platform for a highly sensitive and selective cesium chemosensor.

  7. [Variation in amount of radioactive cesium before and after cooking dry shiitake and beef].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshi, Hiromi; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Hachisuka, Akiko; Matsuda, Rieko

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the change of radioactive cesium content in food due to cooking in order to estimate the internal radiation exposure due to from radioactive materials in food. Our results revealed that soaking dry shiitake in water decreased the radioactive cesium content by about 50%, compared with that present in uncooked shiitake. Radioactive cesium in beef was decreased by about 10%, 12%, 60-65% and 80% by grilling, frying, boiling and stewing, respectively, compared to uncooked beef. For cooked beef, the decrease in the ratio of radioactive cesium was significantly different among the types of cooking. The decrease ratio of radioactive cesium in boiled and stewed beef was 8 times higher than that in grilled and fried beef.

  8. Selective extraction of trivalent actinides from lanthanides with dithiophosphinic acids and tributylphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvinen, G.; Barrans, R.; Schroeder, N.; Wade, K.; Jones, M.; Smith, B.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Mills, J.; Howard, G. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Freiser, H.; Muralidharan, S. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A variety of chemical systems have been developed to separate trivalent actinides from lanthanides based on the slightly stronger complexation of the trivalent actinides with ligands that contain soft donor atoms. The greater stability of the actinide complexes in these systems has often been attributed to a slightly greater covalent bonding component for the actinide ions relative to the lanthanide ions. The authors have investigated several synergistic extraction systems that use ligands with a combination of oxygen and sulfur donor atoms that achieve a good group separation of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides. For example, the combination of dicyclohexyldithiophosphinic acid and tributylphosphate has shown separation factors of up to 800 for americium over europium in a single extraction stage. Such systems could find application in advanced partitioning schemes for nuclear waste.

  9. Studies on the properties of hard-spectrum, actinide fissioning reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, J.B.; Prichard, A.W.; Schofield, P.E.; Robinson, A.H.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1980-01-01

    It is technically feasible to construct an operable (e.g., safe and stable) reactor to burn waste actinides rapidly. The heart of the concept is a driver core of EBR-II type, with a central radial target zone in which fuel elements, made entirely of waste actinides are exposed. This target fuel undergoes fission, as a result of which actinides are rapidly destroyed. Although the same result could be achieved in more conventionally designed LWR or LMFBR systems, the fast spectrum reactor does a much more efficient job, by virtue of the fact that in both LWR and LMFBR reactors, actinide fission is preceded by several captures before a fissile nuclide is formed. In the fast spectrum reactor that is called ABR (actinide burning reactor), these neutron captures are short-circuited.

  10. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2–Al2O3–Y2O3–SrO–Na2O–K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O–P2O5–F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F – pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  11. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2-Al2O3-Y2O3-SrO-Na2O-K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O-P2O5-F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F - pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F - Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite - pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). These

  12. ADSORPTION OF STRONTIUM IONS FROM WATER ON MODIFIED ACTIVATED CARBONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Ciobanu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of strontium ions from aqueous solutions on active carbons CAN-7 and oxidized CAN-8 has been studied. It has been found that allure of the adsorption isotherms for both studied active carbons are practically identical. Studies have shown that the adsorption isotherms for strontium ions from aqueous solutions are well described by the Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations, respectively. The surface heterogeneity of activated carbons CAN-7 and oxidized CAN-8 has been assessed by using Freundlich equation.

  13. Strontium cobaltite oxygen sponge catalyst and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Choi, Woo Seok; Biegalski, Michael; Folkman, Chad M.; Tung, I-Cheng; Fong, Dillon D.; Freeland, John W.; Shin, Dongwon; Ohta, Hiromichi; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2017-01-24

    Rapid, reversible redox activity may be accomplished at significantly reduced temperatures, as low as about 200.degree. C., from epitaxially stabilized, oxygen vacancy ordered SrCoO.sub.2.5 and thermodynamically unfavorable perovskite SrCoO.sub.3-.delta.. The fast, low temperature redox activity in SrCoO.sub.3-.delta. may be attributed to a small Gibbs free energy difference between the two topotactic phases. Epitaxially stabilized thin films of strontium cobaltite provide a catalyst adapted to rapidly transition between oxidation states at substantially low temperatures. Methods of transitioning a strontium cobaltite catalyst from a first oxidation state to a second oxidation state are described.

  14. Modified strontium titanates: From defect chemistry to SOFC anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbraeken, M.C.; Ramos, Tania; Agersted, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    and amount of substituent, but also perovskite defect chemistry, distinguishing between A-site deficiency (A1-xBO3) and cation-stoichiometry (ABO3+δ). Literature suggests distinct differences in the materials properties between the latter two compositional approaches. After discussing the defect chemistry...... of modified strontium titanates, this paper reviews three different A-site deficient donor (La, Y, Nb) substituted strontium titanates for their electrical behaviour and fuel cell performance. Promising performances in both electrolyte as well as anode supported cell designs have been obtained, when using...

  15. Crystal structure of strontium dinickel iron orthophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Ouaatta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, SrNi2Fe(PO43, synthesized by solid-state reaction, crystallizes in an ordered variant of the α-CrPO4 structure. In the asymmetric unit, two O atoms are in general positions, whereas all others atoms are in special positions of the space group Imma: the Sr cation and one P atom occupy the Wyckoff position 4e (mm2, Fe is on 4b (2/m, Ni and the other P atom are on 8g (2, one O atom is on 8h (m and the other on 8i (m. The three-dimensional framework of the crystal structure is built up by [PO4] tetrahedra, [FeO6] octahedra and [Ni2O10] dimers of edge-sharing octahedra, linked through common corners or edges. This structure comprises two types of layers stacked alternately along the [100] direction. The first layer is formed by edge-sharing octahedra ([Ni2O10] dimer linked to [PO4] tetrahedra via common edges while the second layer is built up from a strontium row followed by infinite chains of alternating [PO4] tetrahedra and FeO6 octahedra sharing apices. The layers are held together through vertices of [PO4] tetrahedra and [FeO6] octahedra, leading to the appearance of two types of tunnels parallel to the a- and b-axis directions in which the Sr cations are located. Each Sr cation is surrounded by eight O atoms.

  16. Surface energy and work function of the light actinides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollár, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated the surface energy and work function of the light actinides Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu by means of a Green's-function technique based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding representation. In these calculations we apply an energy functional which...... combines the kinetic energy calculated within the atomic-sphere approximation with Coulomb- and exchange-correlation-energy terms calculated by means of the complete nonspherically symmetric charge density derived from the atomic-sphere potential within nonoverlapping and space-filling cells....... The calculated surface energies and work functions are in good agreement with the limited experimental data....

  17. Fission of actinides using a table-top laser

    CERN Document Server

    Schwoerer, H; Sauerbrey, R; Galy, J; Magill, J; Rondinella, V; Schenkel, R; Butz, T

    2003-01-01

    Powerful table-top lasers are now available in the laboratory and can be used to induce nuclear reactions. We report the first demonstration of nuclear fission using a high repetition rate table-top laser with intensities of 10 sup 2 sup 0 W/cm sup 2. Actinide photo-fission has been achieved in both sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th from the high-energy Bremsstrahlung radiation produced by laser acceleration of electrons. The fission products were identified by time-resolved gamma-spectroscopy. (authors)

  18. Detection of Actinides via Nuclear Isomer De-Excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francy, Christopher J. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This dissertation discusses a data collection experiment within the Actinide Isomer Identification project (AID). The AID project is the investigation of an active interrogation technique that utilizes nuclear isomer production, with the goal of assisting in the interdiction of illicit nuclear materials. In an attempt to find and characterize isomers belonging to 235U and its fission fragments, a 232Th target was bombarded with a monoenergetic 6Li ion beam, operating at 45 MeV.

  19. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; GENG Tao; YAN Shubin; LI Gang; ZHANG Jing; WANG Junmin; PENG Kunchi; ZHANG Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  20. The effects of strontium ranelate treatment on ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rat tibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Jin, W. [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wang, C.; Yang, M. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shen, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)], E-mail: haoshen@fudan.edu.cn; Eisa, M.H. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sudan University of Science and Technology, Box 407, Khartoum 111113 (Sudan); Mi, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2009-06-15

    Micro Proton Induced X-ray Emission (micro-PIXE) technique was used to study the effect of strontium ranelate on osteoporosis resulted from estrogen deficiency. The contents of calcium and strontium in tibia, as well as calcium distribution for structural determination were investigated. Three groups of tibia samples were respectively taken from three groups of female Sprague-Dawley (S.D.) rats, i.e. control, ovariectomized and ovariectomized followed strontium ranelate treatment. It was found that the strontium content was decreasing in the bone from ovariectomized rat compared with that in control, but significantly increasing in the bone from strontium ranelate treated ovariectomized rat. Our study showed that strontium content is a feasible parameter for the diagnosis of osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency. Strontium ranelate is an effective antiosteoporosis chemical to rebuild the bone structure and prevent deterioration of bone strength as well.

  1. Variation in strontium isotope ratios of archaeological fauna in the Midwestern United States: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Kristin M.; Curry, B. Brandon; Johnson, Thomas M.; Fullagar, Paul D.; Emerson, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Strontium isotope values (87Sr/86Sr) in bone and tooth enamel have been used increasingly to identify non-local individuals within prehistoric human populations worldwide. Archaeological research in the Midwestern United States has increasingly highlighted the role of population movement in affecting interregional cultural change. However, the comparatively low level of geologic variation in the Midwestern United States might suggest a corresponding low level of strontium variation, and calls into question the sensitivity of strontium isotopes to identify non-local individuals in this region. Using strontium isotopes of archaeological fauna, we explore the degree of variability in strontium ratios across this region. Our results demonstrate measurable variation in strontium ratios and indicate the potential of strontium analysis for addressing questions of origin and population movement in the Midwestern United States.

  2. The effects of strontium ranelate treatment on ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rat tibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Jin, W.; Wang, C.; Yang, M.; Shen, H.; Eisa, M. H.; Mi, Y.

    2009-06-01

    Micro Proton Induced X-ray Emission (micro-PIXE) technique was used to study the effect of strontium ranelate on osteoporosis resulted from estrogen deficiency. The contents of calcium and strontium in tibia, as well as calcium distribution for structural determination were investigated. Three groups of tibia samples were respectively taken from three groups of female Sprague-Dawley (S.D.) rats, i.e. control, ovariectomized and ovariectomized followed strontium ranelate treatment. It was found that the strontium content was decreasing in the bone from ovariectomized rat compared with that in control, but significantly increasing in the bone from strontium ranelate treated ovariectomized rat. Our study showed that strontium content is a feasible parameter for the diagnosis of osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency. Strontium ranelate is an effective antiosteoporosis chemical to rebuild the bone structure and prevent deterioration of bone strength as well.

  3. Octupole correlations in excited 0{sup +} states of the actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spieker, Mark; Endres, Janis; Zilges, Andreas [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Bucurescu, Dorel; Pascu, Sorin; Zamfir, Nicolae-Victor [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Faestermann, Thomas [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Hertenberger, Ralf; Wirth, Hans-Friedrich [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    New experimental data has once again shown the importance of the octupole degree of freedom in the actinides. To further study possible admixtures of double-octupole structures to the wave function of positive-parity states, a high-resolution (p,t) experiment on {sup 242}Pu has been recently performed at the Q3D magnetic spectrograph in Munich. Excited 0{sup +} states were populated in {sup 240}Pu up to an excitation energy of 3 MeV. The new data allowed for a stringent test of the predictions of the spdf interacting boson model. In order to find possible double-octupole 0{sup +} candidates in the actinides, the signature of close-lying first and second excited 0{sup +} states has been proposed. It is found that the observation of this signature coincides with an E1 γ-decay of the first excited 0{sup +} state, while this state is strongly populated in the (p,t) reaction.

  4. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  5. Actinide production from xenon bombardments of curium-248

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    Production cross sections for many actinide nuclides formed in the reaction of /sup 129/Xe and /sup 132/Xe with /sup 248/Cm at bombarding energies slightly above the coulomb barrier were determined using radiochemical techniques to isolate these products. These results are compared with cross sections from a /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction at a similar energy. When compared to the reaction with /sup 136/Xe, the maxima in the production cross section distributions from the more neutron deficient projectiles are shifted to smaller mass numbers, and the total cross section increases for the production of elements with atomic numbers greater than that of the target, and decreases for lighter elements. These results can be explained by use of a potential energy surface (PES) which illustrates the effect of the available energy on the transfer of nucleons and describes the evolution of the di-nuclear complex, an essential feature of deep-inelastic reactions (DIR), during the interaction. The other principal reaction mechanism is the quasi-elastic transfer (QE). Analysis of data from a similar set of reactions, /sup 129/Xe, /sup 132/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe with /sup 197/Au, aids in explaining the features of the Xe + Cm product distributions, which are additionally affected by the depletion of actinide product yields due to deexcitation by fission. The PES is shown to be a useful tool to predict the general features of product distributions from heavy ion reactions.

  6. Heat capacities of lanthanide and actinide monazite-type ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Piotr M.; Beridze, George; Vinograd, Victor L.; Bosbach, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    (Ln, An)xPO4 monazite-type ceramics are considered as potential matrices for the disposal of nuclear waste. In this study we computed the heat capacities and the standard entropies of these compounds using density functional perturbation theory. The calculations of lanthanide monazites agree well with the existing experimental data and provide information on the variation of the standard heat capacities and entropies along the lanthanide series. The results for AnPO4 monazites are similar to those obtained for the isoelectronic lanthanide compounds. This suggests that the missing thermodynamic data on actinide monazites could be similarly computed or assessed based on the properties of their lanthanide analogs. However, the computed heat capacity of PuPO4 appear to be significantly lower than the measured data. We argue that this discrepancy might indicate potential problems with the existing experimental data or with their interpretation. This shows a need for further experimental studies of the heat capacities of actinide-bearing, monazite-type ceramics.

  7. Actinides transmutation - a comparison of results for PWR benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claro, Luiz H. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: luizhenu@ieav.cta.br

    2009-07-01

    The physical aspects involved in the Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) of minor actinides (MA) and fission products (FP) generated by reactors PWR are of great interest in the nuclear industry. Besides these the reduction in the storage of radioactive wastes are related with the acceptability of the nuclear electric power. From the several concepts for partitioning and transmutation suggested in literature, one of them involves PWR reactors to burn the fuel containing plutonium and minor actinides reprocessed of UO{sub 2} used in previous stages. In this work are presented the results of the calculations of a benchmark in P and T carried with WIMSD5B program using its new cross sections library generated from the ENDF-B-VII and the comparison with the results published in literature by other calculations. For comparison, was used the benchmark transmutation concept based in a typical PWR cell and the analyzed results were the k{infinity} and the atomic density of the isotopes Np-239, Pu-241, Pu-242 and Am-242m, as function of burnup considering discharge of 50 GWd/tHM. (author)

  8. The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. J. Carmack; M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; H. Tsai

    2008-01-01

    The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR II as part of the Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few MA bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide, and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MAs. Of primary interest are the effect of the MAs on fuel cladding chemical interaction and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995–1996 and, currently, represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This report provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

  9. Stabilization of actinides and lanthanides in unusually high oxidation states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eller, P.G.; Penneman, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical environments can be chosen which stabilize actinides and lanthanides in unusually high or low oxidation states and in unusual coordination. In many cases, one can rationalize the observed species as resulting from strong charge/size influences provided by specific sites in host lattices (e.g., Tb(IV) in BaTbO/sub 3/ or Am(IV) in polytungstate anions). In other cases, the unusual species can be considered from an acid-base viewpoint (e.g., U(III) in AsF/sub 5//HF solution or Pu(VII) in Li/sub 5/PuO/sub 6/). In still other cases, an interplay of steric and redox effects can lead to interesting comparisons (e.g., instability of double fluoride salts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) relative to U, Np, and Am analogues). Generalized ways to rationalize compounds containing actinides and lanthanides in unusual valences (particularly high valences), including the above and numerous other examples, will form the focus of this paper. Recently developed methods for synthesizing high valent f-element fluorides using superoxidizers and superacids at low temperatures will also be described. 65 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. APPLICATION OF ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY TO ACTINIDE PROCESS ANALYSIS AND MONITORING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascola, R.; Sharma, V.

    2010-06-03

    The characteristic strong colors of aqueous actinide solutions form the basis of analytical techniques for actinides based on absorption spectroscopy. Colorimetric measurements of samples from processing activities have been used for at least half a century. This seemingly mature technology has been recently revitalized by developments in chemometric data analysis. Where reliable measurements could formerly only be obtained under well-defined conditions, modern methods are robust with respect to variations in acidity, concentration of complexants and spectral interferents, and temperature. This paper describes two examples of the use of process absorption spectroscopy for Pu analysis at the Savannah River Site, in Aiken, SC. In one example, custom optical filters allow accurate colorimetric measurements of Pu in a stream with rapid nitric acid variation. The second example demonstrates simultaneous measurement of Pu and U by chemometric treatment of absorption spectra. The paper concludes with a description of the use of these analyzers to supplement existing technologies in nuclear materials monitoring in processing, reprocessing, and storage facilities.

  11. Energy-Dependent Fission Q Values Generalized for All Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R

    2008-09-25

    We generalize Madland's parameterization of the energy release in fission to obtain the dependence of the fission Q values on incident neutron energy, E{sub n}, for all major and minor actinides. These Q(E{sub n}) parameterizations are included in the ENDL2008 release. This paper describes calculations of energy-dependent fission Q values based on parameterizations of the prompt energy release in fission [1], developed by Madland [1] to describe the prompt energy release in neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu. The energy release is then related to the energy deposited during fission so that experimentally measurable quantities can be used to obtain the Q values. A discussion of these specific parameterizations and their implementation in the processing code for Monte Carlo neutron transport, MCFGEN, [2] is described in Ref. [3]. We extend this model to describe Q(E) for all actinides, major and minor, in the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) 2008 release, ENDL2008.

  12. Multi-nucleon transfer experiments in the actinide region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geibel, Kerstin; Reiter, Peter; Birkenbach, Benedikt [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Valiente-Dobon, Jose Javier; Recchia, Francesco [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy); Gadea, Andres [IFIC, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Lenzi, Silvia [Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Padova (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Two experiments at the PRISMA-CLARA-Setup at the LNL in Legnaro were analysed focussing on the target-like reaction products in the actinide region after multi-nucleon transfer reactions. Both experiments use {sup 238}U as target; a {sup 70}Zn-beam with 460 MeV and a {sup 136}Xe-beam with 926 MeV were employed. Kinematic correlations between the reaction partners are used to obtain information about the unobserved target-like reaction products by the analysis of the beam-like particles identified with the PRISMA-spectrometer. Clean {gamma}-spectra from neutron-rich actinide nuclei are obtained with the CLARA-array. An extension of the ground state rotational band in {sup 240}U and insights in neutron-rich Th-isotopes were achieved. Based on relative cross section distributions for various reaction channels the perspectives and limitations for in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy with this experimental method in this mass region are discussed.

  13. Adsorption of sodium and cesium on aggregates of C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnisch, Martina; Daxner, Matthias; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2016-09-01

    We explore the formation of C60 sodium and C60 cesium complexes in superfluid helium nanodroplets. Anomalies in mass spectra of these doped droplets reveal anomalies in the stability of ions. (C60) m Cs+ n ions ( m ≤ 6) are particularly abundant if they contain n = 6 m + 1 cesium atoms; (C60) m Cs2+ n dications ( m ≤ 3 or 5) are abundant if n = 6 m + 2. These findings are consistent with the notion that alkali metal atoms (A) transfer their valence electrons into the three-fold degenerate lowest unoccupied orbital of C60, resulting in particularly stable C60A6 building blocks. However, (C60) 4CsCs2+ n dications display an entirely different pattern; instead of an expected anomaly at n = 6 × 4 + 2 = 26 we observe a strong odd-even alternation starting at n = 6. Also surprising is the effect of adding one H2O or CO2 molecule to (C60) m Cs n mono- or dications; anomalies shift by two units as if the impurity were acting as an acceptor for two valence electrons from the alkali metal atoms.

  14. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Eric E., E-mail: ewisniew@anl.gov [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Velazquez, Daniel [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Yusof, Zikri, E-mail: zyusof@hawk.iit.edu [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Sarkar, Tapash J. [Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Harkay, Katherine [Accelerator Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-05-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (≈50nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating. -- Highlights: ► The correlation between Quantum Efficiency (QE) and work function. ► How QE and work function evolve together. ► Rejuvenation of the photocathode via heating and the effect on work function. ► The effects on the work function due to exposure to UV light.

  15. Morphological and electrical properties of zirconium vanadate doped with cesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa F. Elkady

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cesium doped zirconium vanadate ZrV2O7 with different Cs dopant content (Cs/Zr varied from 0 to 0.5 in weight ratio were fabricated by hydrothermal technique at 120 °C for 60 min. The synthesized materials are thermally treated using microwave technique. The structural and morphological properties of the synthesized materials and thermally treated samples were investigated using XRD and SEM respectively. It was evident that all synthesized specimens have cubic phase structural without any extra phase but after heat treatment Orthorhombic phase appear with doped samples. However, the morphological structure of the doped synthesized materials has transferred from nanoparticles into rods aspect with heat treatment for the different dopant ratio. Moreover, the electrical properties of both the synthesized and thermally treated materials are studied by AC impedance measurements. The results indicated that the ionic conductivity of Cs-doped ZrV2O7 materials decreased by increasing the dopant ratio while that thermally treated samples the ionic conductivity increase by increasing the dopant ratio. Finally, the concentration of cesium dopants is found to play crucial role in tuning the morphology and electrical properties of nanostructures.

  16. Structure and bonding in crystalline cesium uranyl tetrachloride under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Hussien H; Pertierra, Pilar; Salvadó, Miguel A; Izquierdo-Ruiz, F; Recio, J M

    2016-07-21

    A thorough investigation of pressure effects on the structural properties of crystalline cesium uranyl chloride was performed by means of first-principles calculations within the density functional theory framework. Total energies, equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies were computed at selected pressures up to 50 GPa. Zero pressure results present good agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. Our calculated equation of state parameters reveal that Cs2UO2Cl4 is a high compressible material, similar to other ionic compounds with cesium cations, and displays a structural anisotropic behavior guided by the uranyl moiety. An unexpected variation of the U-O bond length, dUO, is detected as pressure is applied. It leads to a dUO-stretching frequency relationship that cannot be described by the traditional Badger's rule. Interestingly enough, it can be explained in terms of a change in the main factor controlling dUO. At low pressure, the charge transferred to the uranyl cation induces an increase of the bond length and a red shift of the stretching frequencies, whereas it is the mechanical effect of the applied pressure above 10 GPa that is the dominant factor that leads to a shortening of dUO and a blue shift of the stretching frequencies.

  17. Spectrally selective optical pumping in Doppler-broadened cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jun-Hai; Zeng Xian-Jin; Li Qing-Meng; Huang Qiang; Sun Wei-Min

    2013-01-01

    The D1 line spectrally selective pumping process in Doppler-broadened cesium is analyzed by solving the optical Bloch equations.The process,described by a three-level model with the A scheme,shows that the saturation intensity of broadened atoms is three orders of magnitude larger than that of resting atoms.The |Fg =3> → |Fe-4> resonance pumping can result in the ground state |Fg =4,mF =4> sublevel having a maximum population of 0.157 and the population difference would be about 0.01 in two adjacent magnetic sublevels of the hyperfine (HF) state Fg =4.To enhance the anisotropy in the ground state,we suggest employing dichromatic optical HF pumping by adding a laser to excite D1 line |Fg =4> → |Fe =3>transition,in which the cesium magnetometer sensitivity increases by half a magnitude and is unaffected by the nonlinear Zeeman effect even in Earth's average magnetic field.

  18. Advanced techniques in actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2014). Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin (eds.)

    2014-07-01

    In 2012, The Institute of Resource Ecology at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf organized the first international workshop of Advanced Techniques in Actinide Spectroscopy (ATAS). A very positive feedback and the wish for a continuation of the workshop were communicated from several participants to the scientific committee during the workshop and beyond. Today, the ATAS workshop has been obviously established as an international forum for the exchange of progress and new experiences on advanced spectroscopic techniques for international actinide and lanthanide research. In comparison to already established workshops and conferences on the field of radioecology, one main focus of ATAS is to generate synergistic effects and to improve the scientific discussion between spectroscopic experimentalists and theoreticians. The exchange of ideas in particular between experimental and theoretical applications in spectroscopy and the presentation of new analytical techniques are of special interest for many research institutions working on the improvement of transport models of toxic elements in the environment and the food chain as well as on reprocessing technologies of nuclear and non-nuclear waste. Spectroscopic studies in combination with theoretical modelling comprise the exploration of molecular mechanisms of complexation processes in aqueous or organic phases and of sorption reactions of the contaminants on mineral surfaces to obtain better process understanding on a molecular level. As a consequence, predictions of contaminant's migration behaviour will become more reliable and precise. This can improve the monitoring and removal of hazardous elements from the environment and hence, will assist strategies for remediation technologies and risk assessment. Particular emphasis is placed on the results of the first inter-laboratory Round-Robin test on actinide spectroscopy (RRT). The main goal of RRT is the comprehensive molecular analysis of the actinide

  19. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium.

  20. Laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, R

    1995-01-15

    An experiment that involves laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms is proposed and the spectral line shape of the cross section is calculated on the basis of data available in the literature. The feasibility of the experiment both in oven cells and in a crossed-atomic-beam geometry is discussed.

  1. Effects of strontium ranelate on spinal osteoarthritis progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyere, O; Delferriere, D; Roux, C

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether a 3-year treatment with strontium ranelate could delay the progression of spinal osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: This study was a post-hoc analysis of pooled data from the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention (SOTI) and TReatment...

  2. Vibrational spectra of the two hydrates of strontium oxalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Maria C; Torres, María M; Palacios, Daniel; González-Baró, Ana C; Baran, Enrique J

    2015-02-25

    The infrared and Raman spectra of the two hydrates of strontium oxalate, SrC2O4⋅H2O and SrC2O4⋅2H2O, were recorded and discussed on the basis of their structural peculiarities and in comparison with the spectra of the related calcium oxalates and other previously investigated metallic oxalates.

  3. Strontium hydrogeochemistry of thermal groundwaters from Baikal and Xinzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王焰新; 沈照理

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports our work on the strontium hydrogeochemistry of thermal groundwa-ters in the Baikal Rift System (BRS) in Russia and Mongolia and the Xinzhou basin of the Shanxi Rift System (SRS) in northern China. Though similar in geological background, groundwaters from the BRS and the Xinzhou basin have different strontium isotope compositions. Both the strontium contents and the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of thermal water samples from Xinzhou are higher than those of most samples from Baikal. The major reason is the difference in hostrock geochemistry. The hos-trocks of the Xinzhou waters are Archaean metamorphic rocks, while those of the Baikal waters except the Kejielikov spring are Proterozoic or younger rocks. In the study areas, cold groundwaters usually show lower 87Sr/86Sr ratio due to shorter water-rock interaction history and lower equilibration degree. Strontium hydrogeochemistry often provides important information about mixing processes. Ca/Sr ratio can be used as an important hydrogeochemical pa

  4. Heavy ion recoil spectrometry of barium strontium titanate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannard, W. B.; Johnston, P. N.; Walker, S. R.; Bubb, I. F.; Scott, J. F.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Martin, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    Thin films of barium strontium titanate have been analysed using heavy ion recoil spectrometry with 77 and 98 MeV 127I ions at the new heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. New calibration procedures have been developed for quantitative analysis. Energy spectra for each of the elements present reveal interdiffusion that was not previously known.

  5. Thermal behaviour of strontium tartrate single crystals grown in gel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M H Rahimkutty; K Rajendra Babu; K Sreedharan Pillai; M R Sudarsana Kumar; C M K Nair

    2001-04-01

    Thermal behaviour of strontium tartrate crystals grown with the aid of sodium metasilicate gel is investigated using thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Effect of magnetic field and dopant (Pb)2+ on the crystal stability is also studied using thermal analysis. This study reveals that water molecules are locked up in the lattice with different strengths in the grown crystals.

  6. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation.

  7. Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, Christy

    2005-06-01

    This project seeks to understand the influence of phytosiderophore-producing plants (grasses, including crops such as wheat and barley) on the biogeochemistry of actinide and other metal contaminants in the subsurface environment, and to determine the potential of phytosiderophore-producing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system as for Fe is being investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes. We may also show possible harm caused by these plants through increased chelation of actinides that increase in actinide mobilization & migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or can be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies. Such technologies could be the low-cost, low risk solution to many DOE actinide contamination problems.

  8. Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D. [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan); Sawada, K. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

  9. Interaction of actinides with amino acids: from peptides to proteins; Interaction des actinides avec les acides amines: du peptide a la proteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanson, A

    2008-09-15

    Structural information on complexes of actinides with molecules of biological interest is required to better understand the mechanisms of actinides transport in living organisms, and can contribute to develop new decorporation treatments. Our study is about Th(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV) and uranyl(VI) cations, which have a high affinity for some protein domains, and Fe(III), which is the natural cation of these biological systems. In this work, chelation of actinides has been brought to light with UV-visible-Near Infra Red spectroscopy, NMR, EPR, and ultrafiltration. Determination of the structure of the complexation site has been undertaken with Exafs measurements, and of the tertiary structure of the protein with SANS measurements. The first approach was to describe the interaction modes between actinides and essential chemical functions of proteins. Thus, the Ac-AspAspProAspAsp-NH{sub 2} peptide was studied as a possible chelate of actinides. Polynuclear species with {mu}-oxo or {mu}-hydroxo bridges were identified. The iron complex is binuclear, and the actinide ones have a higher nuclearity. The second approach was to study a real case of complexation of actinide with a protein: transferrin. Results show that around physiological ph a mononuclear complex is formed with Np(IV) and Pu(IV), while transferrin does not complex Th(IV) in the same conditions. Characteristic distances of M-transferrin complexes (M = Fe, Np, Pu) were determined. Moreover, the protein seems to be in its close conformation with Pu(IV), and in its open form with Np(IV) and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. (author)

  10. Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, M.J.

    2005-12-01

    The separation of An(III) ions from chemically similar Ln(III) ions is perhaps one of the most difficult problems encountered during the processing of nuclear waste. In the 3+ oxidation states, the metal ions have an identical charge and roughly the same ionic radius. They differ strictly in the relative energies of their f- and d-orbitals, and to separate these metal ions, ligands will need to be developed that take advantage of this small but important distinction. The extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution can be performed quantitatively by the extraction with the TBP (tributyl phosphate). Commercially, this process has found wide use in the PUREX (plutonium uranium extraction) reprocessing method. The TRUEX (transuranium extraction) process is further used to coextract the trivalent lanthanides and actinides ions from HLLW generated during PUREX extraction. This method uses CMPO [(N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide] intermixed with TBP as a synergistic agent. However, the final separation of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides still remains a challenging task. In TRUEX nitric acid solution, the Am(III) ion is coordinated by three CMPO molecules and three nitrate anions. Taking inspiration from this data and previous work with calix[4]arene systems, researchers on this project have developed a C3-symmetric tris-CMPO ligand system using a triphenoxymethane platform as a base. The triphenoxymethane ligand systems have many advantages for the preparation of complex ligand systems. The compounds are very easy to prepare. The steric and solubility properties can be tuned through an extreme range by the inclusion of different alkoxy and alkyl groups such as methyoxy, ethoxy, t-butoxy, methyl, octyl, t-pentyl, or even t-pentyl at the ortho- and para-positions of the aryl rings. The triphenoxymethane ligand system shows promise as an improved extractant for both tetravalent and trivalent actinide recoveries form

  11. Microwave-assisted fabrication of strontium doped apatite coating on Ti6Al4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Kong, Shiqin [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Pan, Yan; Zhang, Zhiguo [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Deng, Linhong, E-mail: dlh@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China)

    2015-11-01

    Strontium has been shown to be a beneficial dopant to calcium phosphates when incorporated at nontoxic level. In the present work we studied the possibility of solution derived doping strontium into calcium phosphate coatings on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V based implants by a recently reported microwave-assisted method. By using this method strontium doped calcium phosphate nuclei were deposited to pretreated titanium alloy surface dot by dot to compose a crack-free coating layer. The presence of strontium in solution led to reduced roughness of the coating and finer nucleus size formed. In vitro study found that proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast cells seeded on the coating were influenced by strontium content in coatings, showing an increasing followed by a decreasing behavior with increasing substitution of calcium by strontium. It is suggested that this new microwave-assisted strontium doped calcium phosphate coatings may have great potential in implant modification. - Highlights: • Strontium doped calcium phosphate coating is deposited with microwave irradiation. • Increase of strontium reduces coating roughness and results in finer nucleus size. • Proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts depend on doped strontium content.

  12. Physico-chemical and in vitro biological evaluation of strontium/calcium silicophosphate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, Saeed; Alizadeh, Masoud; Nazarian, Hamid; Sharifi, Davood

    2010-02-01

    Strontium is known to reduce bone resorption and stimulate bone formation. Incorporation of strontium into calcium phosphate bioceramics has been widely reported. In this work, calcium and calcium/strontium silicophosphate glasses were synthesized from the sol-gel process and their rheological, thermal, and in vitro biological properties were studied and compared to each other. The results showed that the gel viscosity and thus the rate of gel formation increased by using strontium in glass composition and by increasing aging temperature. In strontium-containing glass, the crystallization temperature increased and the type of the crystallized phase was different to that of strontium-free glass. Both glasses favored precipitation of calcium phosphate layer when they were soaked in simulated body fluid; however strontium seemed to retard the rate of precipitation slightly. The in vitro biodegradation rate of the strontium/calcium silicophosphate glass was higher than that of strontium-free one. The cell culture experiments carried out using rat calvaria osteoblasts showed that the incorporation of strontium into the glass composition stimulated proliferation of the cells and enhanced their alkaline phosphatase activity, depending on cell culture period.

  13. High voltage holding in the negative ion sources with cesium deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belchenko, Yu.; Abdrashitov, G.; Ivanov, A.; Sanin, A.; Sotnikov, O., E-mail: O.Z.Sotnikov@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    High voltage holding of the large surface-plasma negative ion source with cesium deposition was studied. It was found that heating of ion-optical system electrodes to temperature >100 °C facilitates the source conditioning by high voltage pulses in vacuum and by beam shots. The procedure of electrode conditioning and the data on high-voltage holding in the negative ion source with small cesium seed are described. The mechanism of high voltage holding improvement by depletion of cesium coverage is discussed.

  14. Historical Cost Curves for Hydrogen Masers and Cesium Beam Frequency and Timing Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, D. S.; Moore, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Historical cost curves were developed for hydrogen masers and cesium beam standards used for frequency and timing calibration in the Deep Space Network. These curves may be used to calculate the cost of future hydrogen masers or cesium beam standards in either future or current dollars. The cesium beam standards are decreasing in cost by about 2.3% per year since 1966, and hydrogen masers are decreasing by about 0.8% per year since 1978 relative to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration inflation index.

  15. The Diagnostics Of Hydrogen-Cesium Plasma Using Fully Relativistic Electron Impact Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti, Priti; Dipti, Dipti; Gangwar, Reetesh; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    Electron excitation cross-sections and rate coefficients have been calculated using fully relativistic distorted wave theory for several fine-structure transitions from the ground as well as excited states of cesium atom in the wide range of incident electron energy. These processes play dominant role in low pressure hydrogen-cesium plasma relevant to the negative ion based neutral beam injectors for the ITER project. The calculated cross-sections are used to construct a reliable collisional radiative (CR) model to characterize the hydrogen-cesium plasma. The calculated plasma parameters are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  16. Comparative analysis of cesium and potassium uptake in onion Allium cepa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, P. Ł.; Bystrzejewska-Piotrowska, G.

    2003-01-01

    Cesium uptake in onion (from 0.3 mM CsCl solution traced with 137CsCl) has been examined. The highest uptake occurred at pH 4-5 and it decreased with increasing pH. The intensity of Cs translocation depended on acidity of the solution. For acidic solutions, translocation of cesium into bulbs and leaves was greater than in case of alkaline solutions, where most of the cesium remained in the roots. Addition of potassium into the solutions (millimolar K concentrations) inhibits Cs uptake. The potassium pH-influx/efflux characteristic does not coincide with the Cs uptake.

  17. Fission of Multiply Charged Cesium and Potassium Clusters in Helium Droplets - Approaching the Rayleigh Limit

    OpenAIRE

    Renzler, Michael; Harnisch, Martina; Daxner, Matthias; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Kuhn, Martin; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Electron ionization of helium droplets doped with cesium or potassium results in doubly and, for cesium, triply charged cluster ions. The smallest observable doubly charged clusters are $Cs_{9}^{2+}$ and $K_{11}^{2+}$; they are a factor two smaller than reported previously. The size of potassium dications approaches the Rayleigh limit nRay for which the fission barrier is calculated to vanish, i.e. their fissilities are close to 1. Cesium dications are even smaller than nRay, implying that th...

  18. Test procedures and instructions for single shell tank saltcake cesium removal with crystalline silicotitanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1997-01-07

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test, using Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake from tanks 24 t -BY- I 10, 24 1 -U- 108, 24 1 -U- 109, 24 1 -A- I 0 1, and 24 t - S-102, in a bench-scale column. The cesium sorbent to be tested is crystalline siticotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-024, Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  19. Effect of Rare Earth Elements on Exchange Performances of Cesium Ion-Sieve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张惠源; 王榕树; 林灿生; 张先业

    2003-01-01

    The exchange performances and the distribution coefficient of Cesium Ion-Sieve (Cs-IS) for cesium and for some rare earth elements were compared. In particular, the effects of neodymium on the cesium ion exchange and the Cs+ selectivity variation on Cs-IS owing to introduction of rare earth elements into HLLW were studied. Though rare earth elements exhibit a small influence on the distribution coefficient for Cs+, they impair Cs-exchange capacity of Cs-IS to some extent. This interruption on the selectivity to Cs+ can be significantly eliminated provided an appropriate ratio of liquid to solid V:m is used.

  20. Cesium leaching from {gamma}-irradiated CsA and CsX zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Enrique [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, A. P. 55-532, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186 Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: lima@xanum.uam.mx; Ibarra, Ilich A.; Lara, Victor [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, A. P. 55-532, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186 Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bosch, Pedro [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, A. P. 70-360, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bulbulian, Silvia [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, Col. Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    The present study discusses the effect of {gamma}-irradiation on Cs{sup +}-exchanged X and A zeolites. The incorporation of Cs{sup +} ions into A and X zeolites was performed using three different cesium salts (chloride, nitrate or acetate). Cs{sup +} ions immobilized into the vitrified zeolites by thermal treatment are located in different sites of the zeolite networks. It is found that {gamma}-irradiation favors cesium retention depending on the cesium precursor salt used in the cationic exchange step.

  1. Application of Cesium isotopes in daily life; Aplicacoes dos isotopos do Cesio no cotidiano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordao, B.O.; Quaresma, D.S.; Carvalho, R.J., E-mail: bjordan@on.br, E-mail: dansq@on.br, E-mail: carvalho@on.br [Observatorio Nacional (ON/LPTF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Tempo e Frequencia; Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: guilherm@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes

    2014-07-01

    In the world of science, the desire of the scientific community to discover new chemical elements is crucial for the development of new technologies in various fields of knowledge. And the main chemical element addressed by this article is Cesium, but specifically {sup 133}Cesium isotope and radioisotope {sup 137}Cesium, exemplifying their physical and chemical characteristics, and their applications. This article will also show how these isotopes have provided researchers a breakthrough in the field of radiological medicine and in time and frequency metrology. (author)

  2. First-principles study of cesium adsorption to weathered micaceous clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroki; Machida, Masahiko

    2014-05-01

    A large amount of radioactive nuclides was produced into environment due to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Residents near FDNPP were suffering from radioactive cesium and then evacuated, because which has long half-life and is retained by surface soil for long time. The Japanese government has been decontaminating the cesium by removing the surface soil in order to return them to their home. This decontamination method is very effective, but which produces huge amount of waste soil. This becomes another big problem in Fukushima, because it is not easy to find large storage sites. Then effective and economical methods to reduce the volume of the waste soil are needed. However, it has not been invented yet. One of the reasons is lack of knowledge about microscopic process of adsorption/desorption of cesium to/from soil. It is known that weathered micaceous clay minerals play crucial role on adsorption and retention of cesium. They are expected to have special sorption sites, called frayed edge sites (FESs), which adsorb cesium selectively and irreversibly. Properties of FES have been intensely investigated by experiments. But microscopic details of the adsorption process on FES are still unclear. Because direct observation of the process with current experimental techniques is quite difficult. We investigated the adsorption of cesium to FES in muscovite, which is a typical micaceous clay mineral, via first-principles calculations (density functional theory). We made a minimal model of FES and evaluate the energy difference before and after cesium adsorption to FES. This is the first numerical modeling of FES. It was shown that FES does adsorb cesium if the weathering of muscovite has been weathered. In addition, we revealed the mechanism of cesium adsorption to FES, which is competition between ion radius of cesium and the degree of weathering. I plan to discuss volume reduction of the waste soil based on our result. Reference M. Okumura

  3. A New Pumping-Probing Scheme for the Optically Pumped Cesium Beam Frequency Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈景标; 朱程锦; 王凤芝; 杨东海

    2001-01-01

    A new pumping-probing scheme for the optically pumped cesium beam frequency standard has been experimentally tested in our laboratory. The stability of the optically pumped cesium beam frequency standard was measured by comparing its 10 MHz output with an HP5071A commercial cesium atomic clock. The result shows that the frequency stability for the 1 s and 30000s sample times are 1.2 × 10-11 and 3.7 × 10-13, respectively. It was proved that the new pumping scheme works well.

  4. Thermodynamics of actinide complexation in solution at elevated temperatures: application of variable-temperature titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Linfeng

    2007-06-01

    Studies of actinide complexation in solution at elevated temperatures provide insight into the effect of solvation and the energetics of complexation, and help to predict the chemical behavior of actinides in nuclear waste processing and disposal where temperatures are high. This tutorial review summarizes the data on the complexation of actinides at elevated temperatures and describes the methodology for thermodynamic measurements, with the emphasis on variable-temperature titration calorimetry, a highly valuable technique to determine the enthalpy and, under appropriate conditions, the equilibrium constants of complexation as well.

  5. Removal of cesium from nuclear liquid waste using hybrid organic-inorganic membranes grafted by immobilized calixarenes; Synthese et caracterisation de membranes hybrides organo-minerales contenant des calixarenes. Application au traitement des effluents radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhart, A

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the Actinex program is to reduce massively the noxiousness of the vitrified wastes mainly due to actinides and other long-lived fission products such as {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc or {sup 135}Cs. Specific treatment means applicable to the industrial processes of spent fuel reprocessing have to be defined. The selective extraction of these radioelements for their transmutation or packaging in specific matrices is one of the research theme of this program. Different studies allowing the extraction of radioelements such as cesium, americium and plutonium by preferential diffusional transport through a supported liquid membrane of complexes (formed between a selective transport compound and the radioelements) are at the present time carried out in the ETPL (Effluents Treatment Processes Laboratory). Calix-4-arenes mono/bis-crown-6 are used as selective transport compounds. Meanwhile the possible losses of the selective transport compound by dissolution in the aqueous phases have oriented our researches towards a solid material in which the selective transport compound is chemically bound or trapped in the matrix. The transport compound is a calixarene, dissymmetrical and double grafted. It has been specifically synthesized for this study. It allows both to complex the cesium and to chemically bind a hetero-poly-siloxane. These monomers have poly-condensable groups which lead by sol-gel process to the formation of a three-dimensional bonds lattice. The matrix, thus obtained, can be supported either on a mineral material or on a porous organic material. Pre-polymers and the deposited layers have been characterized and correlations between the materials preparation and their properties, applied to cesium extraction, have been established. Experiments of cesium transfer through the solid membrane containing between 2 to 40% of selective transport compound, located between 2 compartments containing upstream, an acidic solution with strong salinity doped with Cs 137

  6. FY2011 Annual Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Francy, Christopher J.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Hatarik, R.

    2011-10-01

    This project seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the isomeric state is unique to a particular isotope, providing an unambiguous signature for SNM. This project entails isomer identification and characterization and neutron population studies. This document summarizes activities from its third year - completion of the isomer identification characterization experiments and initialization of the neutron population experiments. The population and decay of the isomeric state in 235U remain elusive, although a number of candidate gamma rays have been identified. In the course of the experiments, a number of fission fragment isomers were populated and measured [Ressler 2010]. The decays from these isomers may also provide a suitable signature for the presence of fissile material. Several measurements were conducted throughout this project. This report focuses on the results of an experiment conducted collaboratively by PNNL, LLNL and LBNL in December 2010 at LBNL. The measurement involved measuring the gamma-rays emitted from an HEU target when bombarded with 11 MeV neutrons. This report discussed the analysis and resulting conclusions from those measurements. There was one strong candidate, at 1204 keV, of an isomeric signature of 235U. The half-life of the state is estimated to be 9.3 {mu}s. The measured time dependence fits the decay time structure very well. Other possible explanations for the 1204-keV state were investigated, but they could not explain the gamma ray. Unfortunately, the relatively limited statistics of the measurement limit, and the lack of understanding of some of the systematic of the experiment, limit

  7. Novel Pharmaceutical Strontium Malonate Influence on Calcium and Strontium Adsorption by Dog Femur and by Dog Teeth in a Four-Week Toxicity Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Anders Christer; Christgau, Stephan; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    Strontium is known to have a positive effect on bone by concomitantly increasing bone formation while decreasing bone resorption thereby providing a sustained skeletal benefit. Strontium malonate is being developed as a novel orally available pharmaceutical for the treatment and prevention...

  8. a Biokinetic Model for CESIUM-137 in the Fetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Karen Lynn

    1995-01-01

    Previously, there was no method to determine the dose to the embryo, fetus, fetal organs or placenta from radionuclides within the embryo, fetus, or placenta. In the past, the dose to the fetus was assumed to be equivalent to the dose to the uterus. Watson estimated specific absorbed fractions from various maternal organs to the uterine contents which included the fetus, placenta, and amniotic fluid and Sikov estimated the absorbed dose to the embryo/fetus after assuming 1 uCi of radioactivity was made available to the maternal blood.^{1,2} However, this method did not allow for the calculation of a dose to individual fetal organs or the placenta. The radiation dose to the embryo or fetus from Cs-137 in the fetus and placenta due to a chronic ingestion by the mother was determined. The fraction of Cs-137 in the maternal plasma crossing the placenta to the fetal plasma was estimated. The absorbed dose from Cs-137 in each modelled fetal organ was estimated. Since there has been more research regarding potassium in the human body, and particularly in the pregnant woman, a biokinetic model for potassium was developed first and used as a basis and confirmation of the cesium model. Available pertinent information in physiology, embryology, biokinetics, and radiation dosimetry was utilized. Due to the rapid growth of the fetus and placenta, the pregnancy was divided into four gestational periods. The numerous physiological changes that occurred during pregnancy were considered and an appropriate biokinetic model was developed for each of the gestational periods. The amount of cesium in the placenta, embryo, and fetus was estimated for each period. The dose to the fetus from cesium deposited in the embryo or fetus and in the placenta was determined for each period using Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) methodology. An uncertainty analysis was also performed to account for the variability of the parameters in the biokinetic model based on the experimental data

  9. Safe management of actinides in the nuclear fuel cycle: Role of mineralogy; La gestion des actinides dans le cycle du combustible nucleaire: le role de la mineralogie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Department of Geological Sciences, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1005 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    During the past 60 years, more than 1800 metric tonnes of Pu, and substantial quantities of the 'minor' actinides, such as Np, Am and Cm, have been generated in nuclear reactors. Some of these transuranium elements can be a source of energy in fission reactions (e.g., {sup 239}Pu), a source of fissile material for nuclear weapons (e.g., {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np), and of environmental concern because of their long-half lives and radiotoxicity (e.g., {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np). There are two basic strategies for the disposition of these heavy elements: (1) to 'burn' or transmute the actinides using nuclear reactors or accelerators; (2) to 'sequester' the actinides in chemically durable, radiation-resistant materials that are suitable for geologic disposal. There has been substantial interest in the use of actinide-bearing minerals, especially isometric pyrochlore, A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A rare earths; B = Ti, Zr, Sn, Hf), for the immobilization of actinides, particularly plutonium, both as inert matrix fuels and nuclear waste forms. Systematic studies of rare-earth pyrochlores have led to the discovery that certain compositions (B = Zr, Hf) are stable to very high doses of alpha-decay event damage. Recent developments in our understanding of the properties of heavy element solids have opened up new possibilities for the design of advanced nuclear fuels and waste forms. (author)

  10. Determination of strontium and simultaneous determination of strontium oxide, magnesium oxide and calcium oxide content of Portland cement by derivative ratio spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idriss, K A; Sedaira, H; Ahmed, S S

    2009-04-15

    A derivative spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of strontium in Portland cement. The method is applied successfully for the simultaneous determination of SrO, MgO and CaO. It is based on the use of Alizarin Complexone (AC) as a complexing agent and measurement of the derivative ratio spectra of the analytes. Interferences of manganese(II) and zinc(II) were eliminated by precipitation. The validity of the method was examined by analyzing several Standard Reference Material (SRM) Portland cement samples. The strontium complex formed at pH 9.5 allows precise and accurate determination of strontium over the concentration range of 1.5-18 mg L(-1) of strontium. The MDL (at 95% confidence level) was found to be 25 ng mL(-1) for strontium in National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cement samples using the proposed method.

  11. First ionization potential of the heaviest actinide lawrencium, element 103

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tetsuya K.; Asai, Masato; Borschevsky, Anastasia; Stora, Thierry; Sato, Nozomi; Kaneya, Yusuke; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Düllmann, Christoph E.; Eberhardt, Klaus; Eliav, Ephraim; Ichikawa, Shinichi; Kaldor, Uzi; Kratz, Jens V.; Miyashita, Sunao; Nagame, Yuichiro; Ooe, Kazuhiro; Osa, Akihiko; Renisch, Dennis; Runke, Jörg; Schädel, Matthias; Thörle-Pospiech, Petra; Toyoshima, Atsushi; Trautmann, Norbert

    2016-12-01

    The first ionization potential (IP1) of element 103, lawrencium (Lr), has been successfully determined for the first time by using a newly developed method based on a surface ionization process. The measured IP1 value is 4.963 eV. This value is the smallest among those of actinide elements and is in excellent agreement with the value of 4.963(15) eV predicted by state-of-the-art relativistic calculations also performed in this work. Our results strongly support that the Lr atom has an electronic configuration of [Rn]7s25f147p, which is influenced by strong relativistic effects. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations and also opens the way for studies on atomic properties of heavy elements with atomic number Z > 100. Moreover, the present achievement has triggered a controversy on the position of lutetium (Lu) and Lr in the Periodic Table of Elements.

  12. Chemistry of tetravalent actinides phosphates. The thorium phosphate-diphosphate as immobilisation matrix of actinides; Chimie des phosphates d'actinides tetravalents. Le phosphate-diphosphate de thorium en tant que matrice d'imobilisation des actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacheux, N

    2002-07-01

    The author presents in this document its scientific works from 1992 to 2001, in order to obtain the enabling to manage scientific and chemical researches at the university Paris Sud Orsay. The first part gives an abstract of the thesis on the characterizations, lixiviation and synthesis of uranium and thorium based phosphate matrix in the framework of the search for a ceramic material usable in the radioactive waste storage. The second part presents briefly the researches realized at the CEA, devoted to a reliable, independent and accurate measure of some isotopes activity. The last part presents the abstracts of researches activities from 1996 to 2001 on the tetravalent actinides phosphates chemistry, the sintering of PDT and solid solutions of PDTU and the kinetic and thermodynamical studies of the PDT dissolution. Many references and some publication in full text are provided. (A.L.B.)

  13. Facilities for preparing actinide or fission product-based targets

    CERN Document Server

    Sors, M

    1999-01-01

    Research and development work is currently in progress in France on the feasibility of transmutation of very long-lived radionuclides such as americium, blended with an inert medium such as magnesium oxide and pelletized for irradiation in a fast neutron reactor. The process is primarily designed to produce ceramics for nuclear reactors, but could also be used to produce targets for accelerators. The Actinide Development Laboratory is part of the ATALANTE complex at Marcoule, where the CEA investigates reprocessing, liquid and solid waste treatment and vitrification processes. The laboratory produces radioactive sources; after use, their constituents are recycled, notably through R and D programs requiring such materials. Recovered americium is purified, characterized and transformed for an experiment known as ECRIX, designed to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating americium-based ceramics and to determine the reactor transmutation coefficients.

  14. Pillared metal(IV) phosphate-phosphonate extraction of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, J.D.; Clearfield, A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Borkowski, M.; Reed, D.T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.

    2012-07-01

    Four pillared metal(IV) phosphate-phosphonate ion exchange materials were synthesized and characterized. Studies were conducted to determine their affinity for the lanthanides (Ln's) and actinides (An's). It was determined that by simply manipulating the metal source (Zr or Sn) and the phosphate source (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} or Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) large differences were seen in the extraction of the Ln and An species. K{sub d} values higher than 4 x 10{sup 5} were observed for the AnO{sub 2}{sup 2+} species in nitric acid at pH 2. These basic uptake experiments are important, as the data they provide may indicate the possibility of a separation of Ln's from An's or even more notably americium from curium and Ln's. (orig.)

  15. Angular distributions in the neutron-induced fission of actinides

    CERN Multimedia

    In 2003 the n_TOF Collaboration performed the fission cross section measurement of several actinides ($^{232}$Th, $^{233}$U, $^{234}$U, $^{237}$Np) at the n_TOF facility using an experImental setup made of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC). The method based on the detection of the 2 fragments in coincidence allowed to clearly disentangle the fission reactions among other types of reactions occurring in the spallation domain. We have been therefore able to cover the very broad neutron energy range 1eV-1GeV, taking full benefit of the unique characteristics of the n_TOF facility. Figure 1 shows an example obtained in the case of $^{237}$Np where the n_ TOF measurement showed that the cross section was underestimated by a large factor in the resonance region.

  16. Flammability Analysis For Actinide Oxides Packaged In 9975 Shipping Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, James E.; Askew, Neal M.; Hensel, Steve J.

    2013-03-21

    Packaging options are evaluated for compliance with safety requirements for shipment of mixed actinide oxides packaged in a 9975 Primary Containment Vessel (PCV). Radiolytic gas generation rates, PCV internal gas pressures, and shipping windows (times to reach unacceptable gas compositions or pressures after closure of the PCV) are calculated for shipment of a 9975 PCV containing a plastic bottle filled with plutonium and uranium oxides with a selected isotopic composition. G-values for radiolytic hydrogen generation from adsorbed moisture are estimated from the results of gas generation tests for plutonium oxide and uranium oxide doped with curium-244. The radiolytic generation of hydrogen from the plastic bottle is calculated using a geometric model for alpha particle deposition in the bottle wall. The temperature of the PCV during shipment is estimated from the results of finite element heat transfer analyses.

  17. ENHANCING ADVANCED CANDU PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE FUEL WITH MINOR ACTINIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray S. Chang

    2010-05-01

    The advanced nuclear system will significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and to enhance the spent fuel proliferation resistance. Minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. MAs can play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In this work, an Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) fuel unit lattice cell model with 43 UO2 fuel rods will be used to investigate the effectiveness of a Minor Actinide Reduction Approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance. The main MARA objective is to increase the 238Pu / Pu isotope ratio by using the transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel and thereby increase the proliferation resistance even for a very low fuel burnup. As a result, MARA is a very effective approach to enhance the proliferation resistance for the on power refueling ACR system nuclear fuel. The MA transmutation characteristics at different MA loadings were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality assessed. The concept of MARA, significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in atoms for peace and the intermediate term of nuclear energy reconnaissance.

  18. Ion microscopy based on laser-cooled cesium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteau, M; Reveillard, M; Kime, L; Rasser, B; Sudraud, P; Bruneau, Y; Khalili, G; Pillet, P; Comparat, D; Guerri, I; Fioretti, A; Ciampini, D; Allegrini, M; Fuso, F

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a prototype of a Focused Ion Beam machine based on the ionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam and adapted for imaging and modifying different surfaces in the few-tens nanometer range. Efficient atomic ionization is obtained by laser promoting ground-state atoms into a target excited Rydberg state, then field-ionizing them in an electric field gradient. The method allows obtaining ion currents up to 130pA. Comparison with the standard direct photo-ionization of the atomic beam shows, in our conditions, a 40-times larger ion yield. Preliminary imaging results at ion energies in the 1-5keV range are obtained with a resolution around 40nm, in the present version of the prototype. Our ion beam is expected to be extremely monochromatic, with an energy spread of the order of the eV, offering great prospects for lithography, imaging and surface analysis.

  19. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, D; Sayrin, C; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-06-14

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized ∼ 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time of T(2)(*) = 0.6 ms and an irreversible dephasing time of T(2)(') = 3.7 ms. By modeling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, T(2)(*) and T(2)(') are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  20. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Reitz, D; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time $T_2^\\ast=0.6$ ms and an irreversible dephasing time $T_2^\\prime=3.7$ ms. By theoretically modelling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, $T_2^\\ast$ and $T_2^\\prime$ are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  1. Morphological effects in the quantum yield of cesium iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, J. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Barbo, F. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Bertolo, M. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Bianco, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Braem, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Cerasari, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Coluzza, C. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Dell`Orto, T. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Fontana, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Nappi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy); Paic, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Piuz, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Sanjines, R. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Scognetti, T. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy); Sgobba, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments

    1995-07-15

    We demonstrated that polycrystalline cesium iodide (CsI) on large area Ni/Au coated printed board provides a quantum efficiency (QE) higher by a factor of 2 than the films deposited on the standard Cu/Au printed circuits. This is the most important result of the present systematic study of the QE lateral inhomogeneity for CsI on different substrates. We found a strong correlation between the QE lateral variation and the morphological homogeneity of the films. The QE was measured by UV photoelectron emission microscopy and spatially resolved X-ray photoemission, and the morphology studies were performed by secondary electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. (orig.).

  2. Hyperfine relaxation of an optically pumped cesium vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornos, J.; Amare, J.C.

    1986-07-01

    The relaxation of hyperfine orientation indirectly induced by optical pumping with a sigma-polarized D/sub 1/-light in a cesium vapor in the presence of Ar is experimentally studied. The detection technique ensures the absence of quadrupole relaxation contributions in the relaxation signals. The results from the dependences of the hyperfine relaxation rate on the temperature and argon pressure are: diffusion coefficient of Cs in Ar, D/sub 0/ = 0.101 +- 0.010 cm/sup 2/s/sup -1/ at 0/sup 0/C and 760 Torr; relaxation cross section by Cs-Ar collisions, sigma/sub c/ = (104 +- 5) x 10/sup -23/ cm/sup 2/; relaxation cross section by Cs-Cs (spin exchange) collisions, sigma/sub e//sub x/ = (1.63 +- 0.13) x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 2/.

  3. New Efimov resonances in an ultracold cesium gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenesini, Alessandro; Berninger, Martin; Besler, Stefan; Naegerl, Hanns-Christoph; Ferlaino, Francesca [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huang, Bo; Grimm, Rudolf [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2011-07-01

    Efimov trimer states represent the paradigm of universality in few-body physics. Although these exotic three-body weakly-bound states have been experimentally investigated in an increasing number of ultracold atomic systems, many fundamental aspects remain unclear. An intriguing open question is related to how short-range physics influences the Efimov effect in real systems. Short range contributions are commonly included in universal theory via a single parameter, known as ''three-body parameter''. An open question is whether this parameter is constant or whether it can vary significantly when Feshbach resonances are employed for interaction tuning. Cesium is a very promising candidate to address this issue because of the many broad and narrow Feshbach resonances with different partial-wave character. Our experimental results reveal new Efimov features close to different Feshbach resonances and shed new light on the three-body parameter.

  4. Mercury and cesium-137 in urban gray squirrels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, J.H. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens); Davis, A.H.; Bigler, W.J.; Hoff, G.L.

    1980-08-01

    Recent emphasis upon the revitalization of major cities has underscored a need for urban wildlife management. Intensive management of the wildlife populations indigenous to metropolitan areas will enhance our quality of life in many ways. One important benefit is that certain species can serve as sensitive indicators of environmental change. The gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is usually abundant in cities and they are often subject to a variety of destructive environmental factors. In an attempt to evaluate the gray squirrel as an indicator of zoonoses and pollutants, the Health Program Office of the Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services conducted a multifaceted study in Jacksonvlle, Florida during 1974. This report presents baseline measurements of body burdens of mercury and cesium-137.

  5. Fission of Multiply Charged Cesium and Potassium Clusters in Helium Droplets - Approaching the Rayleigh Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Renzler, Michael; Daxner, Matthias; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Kuhn, Martin; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Electron ionization of helium droplets doped with cesium or potassium results in doubly and, for cesium, triply charged cluster ions. The smallest observable doubly charged clusters are $Cs_{9}^{2+}$ and $K_{11}^{2+}$; they are a factor two smaller than reported previously. The size of potassium dications approaches the Rayleigh limit nRay for which the fission barrier is calculated to vanish, i.e. their fissilities are close to 1. Cesium dications are even smaller than nRay, implying that their fissilities have been significantly overestimated. Triply charged cesium clusters as small as $Cs_{19}^{3+}$ are observed; they are a factor 2.6 smaller than previously reported. Mechanisms that may be responsible for enhanced formation of clusters with high fissilities are discussed.

  6. Biological effects of cesium-137 injected in beagle dogs of different ages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikula, K.J.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Griffith, W.C. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The toxicity of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) in the Beagle dog was investigated at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as part of a program to evaluate the biological effects of internally deposited radionuclides. The toxicity and health effects of {sup 137}Cs are important to understand because {sup 137}Cs is produced in large amounts in light-water nuclear reactors. Large quantities of cesium radioisotopes have entered the human food chain as a result of atmospheric nuclear weapons test, and additional cesium radioisotopes were released during the Chernobyl accident. Although the final analyses are not complete, three findings are significant: older dogs dies significantly earlier than juvenile and young adult dogs; greater occurrence of sarcomas in the cesium-137 injected dogs; the major nonneoplastic effect in dogs surviving beyond 52 d appears to be testicular atrophy.

  7. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

    2008-08-26

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

  8. Preparation, structure and application of a new ecomaterials cesium ion-sieve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new ecomaterials cesium ion-sieve (Cs-IS), which has high selectivity to cesium and excellent acid resistance, is prepared with zirconyl molybdopyrophosphate as its matrix by specific chemical sieve-making means. Cs-IS has large exchange capacity ( 1.83mmol@g-1) and high distribution coefficient (4.09 x 104 mL@ L-1) in the medium of 3 mol@ L- 1 HNO3. In the static exchange with strongly acidic high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW) (3 mol@ L-1 HNO3), Cs-IS exhibits high exchange rate for cesium (above 96.53 % ) and large separation factor (greater than 958.41). These indicate the possible use of Cs-IS in cesium-137 selective removal and recovery from highly saline acidic HLLW system.

  9. Cold cesium molecules produced directly in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hong-Shan; Ji Zhong-Hua; Yuan Jin-Peng; Zhao Yan-Ting; Ma Jie; Wang Li-Rong; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2011-01-01

    We report on the observation of ultracold ground electric-state cesium molecules produced directly in a magnetooptical trap with a good signal-to-noise ratio.These molecules arise from the photoassociation of magneto-optical trap lasers and they are detected by resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization technology.The production rate of ultracold cesium molecules is up to 4× 104 s-1.We measure the characteristic time of the ground electric-state cesium molecules generated in the experiment and investigate the Cs2+ molecular ion intensity as a function of the trapping laser intensity and the ionization pulse laser energy.We conclude that the production of cold cesium molecules may be enhanced by using appropriate experimental parameters,which is useful for future experiments involving the production and trapping of ultracold ground electric-state molecules.

  10. Synthesis of novel calix[4]crown telomers and selective extraction of cesium ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Bing Li; Yuan Yin Chen; De Jun Xiong; Jun Yan Zhan; Cui Ping Han

    2007-01-01

    p-tert-Butylcalix[4]diazacrown-4 telomer, which contains hard and soft ion binding sites, was synthesized. It exhibited high selectivity toward cesium ions. The binding sites may complex alkali metal ions selectively.

  11. Prussian blue caged in spongiform adsorbents using diatomite and carbon nanotubes for elimination of cesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Baiyang; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Yu, Hongwen; Abe, Yoshiteru

    2012-05-30

    We developed a spongiform adsorbent that contains Prussian blue, which showed a high capacity for eliminating cesium. An in situ synthesizing approach was used to synthesize Prussian blue inside diatomite cavities. Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used to form CNT networks that coated the diatomite to seal in the Prussian blue particles. These ternary (CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue) composites were mixed with polyurethane (PU) prepolymers to produce a quaternary (PU/CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue), spongiform adsorbent with an in situ foaming procedure. Prussian blue was permanently immobilized in the cell walls of the spongiform matrix and preferentially adsorbed cesium with a theoretical capacity of 167 mg/g cesium. Cesium was absorbed primarily by an ion-exchange mechanism, and the absorption was accomplished by self-uptake of radioactive water by the quaternary spongiform adsorbent.

  12. Total deposition of cesium-137 measured in Finland during the exercise `RESUME 95` in August 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, L.E. De; Vintersved, I.; Arntsing, R. [National Defence Research Establisment, Nuclear Detection Group, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    In the exercise called `RESUME 95` the Nuclear Detection Group from the National Defence Research Establishment in Stockholm participated with field gamma ray measurements combined with soil sampling and profile measurements. The results are presented in this report for the measurements of cesium-137. We considered the measurements of cesium-137 at the airfield the most important part of the in-situ exercise. Data was of course collected also for cesium-134 and natural radionuclides but time has not permitted a full analysis of these radionuclides. The methodology would, however, be the same as applied for cesium-137. Less attention was paid for area II and due to limited personnel resources the search exercise was not fully carried out. (au).

  13. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X

    2008-01-15

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr{sup 87} using the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr{sup 87} atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10{sup -15} and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10{sup -15} level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr{sup 88} by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10{sup -14}. (author)

  14. Nuclear data uncertainty analysis on a minor actinide burner for transmuting spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hangbok

    1998-08-01

    A comprehensive sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was performed on a 1200 MWt minor actinides burner designed for a low burnup reactivity swing, negative doppler coefficient, and low sodium void worth. Sensitivities of the performance parameters were generated using depletion perturbation methods for the constrained close fuel cycle of the reactor. The uncertainty analysis was performed using the sensitivity and covariance data taken from ENDF-B/V and other published sources. The uncertainty analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinide has shown that uncertainties in the nuclear data of several key minor actinide isotopes can introduce large uncertainties in the predicted performance of the core. The relative uncertainties in the burnup swing, doppler coefficient, and void worth were conservatively estimated to be 180 %, 97 %, and 46 %, respectively. An analysis was performed to prioritize the minor actinide reactions for reducing the uncertainties. (author). 41 refs., 17 tabs., 1 fig.

  15. Review and needs in actinide chemistry in relation with biological purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Moulin, V.; Bion, L.; Doizi, D.; Moulin, C.; Cote, G.; Madic, C.; Van der Lee, J

    2004-07-01

    In case of accidental release of radionuclides in the environment, actinides could occur and may present an healthy risk for human beings. In order to study their behavior in human organism (metabolism, retention, excretion), it is of prime importance to know solution actinide chemistry, and more particularly thermodynamic constants, which will allow to determine their speciation: speciation governs biological availability and toxicity of elements and is also of great interest for decorporation purposes. In this framework, a CEA working group on speciation has been created in order to share data both on thermodynamic constants and on speciation analytical methods, interesting chemists, environmentalists and biologists. It has been focused, in a first time, on actinides. The purpose of this paper is to present the state of the art on actinide speciation within biological media and to focus on the lack of information in order to orientate future research. (authors)

  16. Organophosphorus reagents in actinide separations: Unique tools for production, cleanup and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K. L.

    2000-01-12

    Interactions of actinide ions with phosphate and organophosphorus reagents have figured prominently in nuclear science and technology, particularly in the hydrometallurgical processing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Actinide interactions with phosphorus-containing species impact all aspects from the stability of naturally occurring actinides in phosphate mineral phases through the application of the bismuth phosphate and PUREX processes for large-scale production of transuranic elements to the development of analytical separation and environment restoration processes based on new organophosphorus reagents. In this report, an overview of the unique role of organophosphorus compounds in actinide production, disposal, and environment restoration is presented. The broad utility of these reagents and their unique chemical properties is emphasized.

  17. SACSESS – the EURATOM FP7 project on actinide separation from spent nuclear fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourg Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of actinides by their separation from spent nuclear fuel, followed by transmutation in fast neutron reactors of Generation IV, is considered the most promising strategy for nuclear waste management. Closing the fuel cycle and burning long-lived actinides allows optimizing the use of natural resources and minimizing the long-term hazard of high-level nuclear waste. Moreover, improving the safety and sustainability of nuclear power worldwide. This paper presents the activities striving to meet these challenges, carried out under the Euratom FP7 collaborative project SACSESS (Safety of Actinide Separation Processes. Emphasis is put on the safety issues of fuel reprocessing and waste storage. Two types of actinide separation processes, hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical, are considered, as well as related aspects of material studies, process modeling and the radiolytic stability of solvent extraction systems. Education and training of young researchers in nuclear chemistry is of particular importance for further development of this field.

  18. Strontium Adsorption and Desorption Reactions in Model Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-04

    Strontium K-edge spectra for bulk XANES sr’+ standards and for the iron corrosion product samples representing (a) chlorine and chloramine simulated...RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 11-04-2014 Journal Article Strontium adsorption and desorption reactions in model... strontium (Sr2+) adsorption to and desorption from iron corrosion products were examined in two model drinking water distribution systems (DWDS

  19. Radiochemical separation of actinides for their determination in environmental samples and waste products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleisberg, B. [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    The determination of low level activities of actinides in environmental samples and waste products makes high demands on radiochemical separation methods. Artificial and natural actinides were analyzed in samples form the surrounding areas of NPP and of uranium mines, incorporation samples, solutions containing radioactive fuel, solutions and solids resutling from the process, and in wastes. The activities are measured by {alpha}-spectrometry and {gamma}-spectrometry. (DG)

  20. Actinides in molecules: exotic properties probed by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Auwer, C.; Moisy, P.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaumont, D.; Simoni, E.; Conradson, S.D

    2004-07-01

    Dealing with actinide elements in molecular chemistry may result in particularly attractive and exotic physico-chemical properties. In solution, one of the spectroscopic tools able to selectively probe the structural or electronic properties of these molecules is the X-ray absorption process. Different aspects of absorption edge or EXAFS analysis related to actinide studies are presented, including phenomenological and semi-quantitative approaches. (authors)

  1. From carbon to actinides: A new universal 1MV accelerator mass spectrometer at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Hotchkis, M.; Levchenko, V.; Fink, D.; Hauser, T.; Kitchen, R.

    2015-10-01

    A new 1 MV NEC pelletron AMS system at ANSTO is presented. The spectrometer comprises large radius magnets for actinide measurements. A novel feature of the system is fast switching between isotopes both at low and high energy sections allowing measurements of up to 8 isotopes within a single sequence. Technical details and layout of the spectrometer is presented. Performance data for 14C, 10Be, 26Al and actinides demonstrate the system is ready for routine AMS measurements.

  2. From carbon to actinides: A new universal 1MV accelerator mass spectrometer at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcken, K.M., E-mail: klaus.wilcken@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Hotchkis, M.; Levchenko, V.; Fink, D. [Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Hauser, T.; Kitchen, R. [National Electrostatics Corporation, 7540 Graber Road, Middleton, WI 53562-0310 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    A new 1 MV NEC pelletron AMS system at ANSTO is presented. The spectrometer comprises large radius magnets for actinide measurements. A novel feature of the system is fast switching between isotopes both at low and high energy sections allowing measurements of up to 8 isotopes within a single sequence. Technical details and layout of the spectrometer is presented. Performance data for {sup 14}C, {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and actinides demonstrate the system is ready for routine AMS measurements.

  3. Calculation of fully relativistic cross sections for electron excitation of cesium atom and its application to the diagnostics of hydrogen-cesium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti; Dipti; Gangwar, R. K.; Srivastava, R.

    2017-01-01

    Electron impact excitation cross-sections and rate coefficients have been calculated using fully relativistic distorted wave theory for several fine-structure transitions from the ground as well as excited states of cesium atom in the wide range of incident electron energy. These processes play dominant role in low pressure hydrogen-cesium plasma, which is relevant to the negative ion based neutral beam injectors for the ITER project. As an application, the calculated detailed cross-sections are used to construct a reliable collisional radiative (CR) model to characterize the hydrogen-cesium plasma. Other processes such as radiative population transfer, electron impact ionization and mutual neutralization of Cs+ ion with negative hydrogen ion along with their reverse processes are also taken into account. The calculated cross-sections and the extracted plasma parameters from the present model are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  4. Applicability of sodium alginate in decorporation therapy of strontium radioisotopes in human being; Aplicabilidade do alginato de sodio na terapia de decorporacao de radioisotopos de estroncio em seres humanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Aloisio Cordilha

    1999-10-01

    The increasing release of fission products from nuclear weapon tests in the environment has been rising the levels of radioactive contamination of food chains caused by the fall-out of these elements. In cases of accidental exposure, human subjects could be submitted to an internal contamination, which is likely to include several radionuclides. Special concern must be given, however, to the radioactive isotopes of strontium, cesium and iodine, along with the highly radio toxic transuranium elements like cerium. It was found that sodium alginate, a polyelectrolyte commonly used in food industry and obtained from brown algae (Phaeophyceae), provides the selective suppression of absorption of radioactive strontium presented in the ingested food material with no disturbance of the electrolyte balance nor undesirable side effects, even for a long term treatment. Moreover, these patterns were maintained when alginate was associated to other decontamination additives, specially those related to the other radioisotopes mentioned above, as, in this case, losses in the effectiveness, mutual interference or adverse health effects were not detected. These conclusions ground the discussion about the present trend in the usual choice of EDTA/DTPA complex therapy rather than of alginate therapy for medical assistance of radiocontaminated patients, although they corroborate the efficiency and usefulness of alginate salts in situations related to extensive intakes of strontium radioisotopes alone or associated to other fission products. The purpose of the present work is to make a general review of the alginate therapy as well as to discuss its present and future therapeutic importance from the scientific and institutional points of view. (author)

  5. Migration Behaviour of Strontium in Czech Bentonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Baborova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with sorption and diffusion behaviour of strontium in Czech bentonite B75. The study is a part of a research on reactive transport of radioactive contaminants in barrier materials of a deep geological repository of radioactive waste in the Czech Republic. Series of sorption and diffusion experiments with Sr and non-activated Ca bentonite B75 produced in the Czech Republic were performed in two background solutions (CaCl2 and NaCl. On the basis of sorption batch experiments the kinetics of strontium sorption on bentonite was assessed and the sorption isotherms for various experimental conditions were obtained. As a result of performed diffusion experiments the parameters of diffusion (i.e. effective diffusion coefficient De and apparent diffusion coefficient Da were determined. The observed discrepancies between sorption characteristics obtained from the sorption and diffusion experiments are discussed.

  6. Growth of strontium oxalate crystals in agar–agar gel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P V Dalal; K B Saraf

    2011-04-01

    Single crystals of strontium oxalate have been grown by using strontium chloride and oxalic acid in agar–agar gel media at ambient temperature. Different methods for growing crystals were adopted. The optimum conditions were employed in each method by varying concentration of gel and reactants, and gel setting time etc. Transparent prismatic bi-pyramidal platy-shaped and spherulite crystals were obtained in various methods. The grown crystals were characterized with the help of FT–IR studies and monoclinic system of crystals were supported with lattice parameters = 9.67628 Å, = 6.7175 Å, = 8.6812 Å, = 113.566°, and = 521.84 Å3 calculated from X-ray diffractogram.

  7. Biomimetic synthesis of calcium-strontium apatite hollow nanospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this work,calcium-strontium apatite (Sr-HA) hollow nanospheres were synthesized by a facile biomimetic method.The structure and property of Sr-HA were characterized by FESEM,TEM,HRTEM,XRD and FT-IR spectroscopy.The influences of different ratios of calcium and strontium on the morphologies of the Sr-HA products were investigated.The experimental results revealed that the hollow spherical Sr-HA,with a size of 30-120 nm in diameter,could be synthesized when the molar ratio of Ca/Sr was 1:1.The possible formation mechanism of the hollow Sr-HA was proposed.The drug release experiments indicated that the hollow spherical Sr-HA had the property of sustained release.

  8. Synergistically strengthened 3D micro-scavenger cage adsorbent for selective removal of radioactive cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung-Chan; Kang, Sung-Min; Haldorai, Yuvaraj; Giribabu, Krishnan; Lee, Go-Woon; Lee, Young-Chul; Hyun, Moon Seop; Han, Young-Kyu; Roh, Changhyun; Huh, Yun Suk

    2016-12-01

    A novel microporous three-dimensional pomegranate-like micro-scavenger cage (P-MSC) composite has been synthesized by immobilization of iron phyllosilicates clay onto a Prussian blue (PB)/alginate matrix and tested for the removal of radioactive cesium from aqueous solution. Experimental results show that the adsorption capacity increases with increasing the inactive cesium concentration from 1 ppm to 30 ppm, which may be attributed to greater number of adsorption sites and further increase in the inactive cesium concentration has no effect. The P-MSC composite exhibit maximum adsorption capacity of 108.06 mg of inactive cesium per gram of adsorbent. The adsorption isotherm is better fitted to the Freundlich model than the Langmuir model. In addition, kinetics studies show that the adsorption process is consistent with a pseudo second-order model. Furthermore, at equilibrium, the composite has an outstanding adsorption capacity of 99.24% for the radioactive cesium from aqueous solution. This may be ascribed to the fact that the AIP clay played a substantial role in protecting PB release from the P-MSC composite by cross-linking with alginate to improve the mechanical stability. Excellent adsorption capacity, easy separation, and good selectivity make the adsorbent suitable for the removal of radioactive cesium from seawater around nuclear plants and/or after nuclear accidents.

  9. Export of radioactive cesium from agricultural fields under simulated rainfall in Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Phong K; Suka, Yuma; Sakai, Masaru; Nanko, Kazuki; Yen, Jui-Hung; Watanabe, Hirozumi

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of rainfall on runoff, soil erosion and consequently on the discharge of radioactive cesium in agricultural fields in Fukushima prefecture using a rainfall simulator. Simulated heavy rainfalls (50 mm h(-1)) generated significant runoff and soil erosion. The average concentration of radioactive cesium (the sum of (134)Cs and (137)Cs) in the runoff sediments was ∼3500 Bq kg(-1) dry soil, more than double the concentrations measured in the field soils which should be considered in studies using the (137)Cs loss to estimate long-term soil erosion. However, the estimated mass of cesium discharged through one runoff event was less than 2% of the cesium inventory in the field. This suggested that cesium discharge via soil erosion is not a significant factor in reducing the radioactivity of contaminated soils in Fukushima prefecture. However, the eroded sediment carrying radioactive cesium will deposit into the river systems and potentially pose a radioactivity risk for aquatic living organisms.

  10. Prussian blue caged in spongiform adsorbents using diatomite and carbon nanotubes for elimination of cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Baiyang [Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Fugetsu, Bunshi, E-mail: hu@ees.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Yu, Hongwen [Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Abe, Yoshiteru [Kyoei Engineering Corporation, Niigata 959-1961 (Japan)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prussian blue was sealed in cavities of diatomite using carbon nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The caged Prussian blue after being permanently immobilized in polyurethane spongy showed a 167 mg/g capability for absorbing cesium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cesium elimination was accomplished by simply adding the Prussian-blue based spongiform adsorbent to radioactive water. - Abstract: We developed a spongiform adsorbent that contains Prussian blue, which showed a high capacity for eliminating cesium. An in situ synthesizing approach was used to synthesize Prussian blue inside diatomite cavities. Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used to form CNT networks that coated the diatomite to seal in the Prussian blue particles. These ternary (CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue) composites were mixed with polyurethane (PU) prepolymers to produce a quaternary (PU/CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue), spongiform adsorbent with an in situ foaming procedure. Prussian blue was permanently immobilized in the cell walls of the spongiform matrix and preferentially adsorbed cesium with a theoretical capacity of 167 mg/g cesium. Cesium was absorbed primarily by an ion-exchange mechanism, and the absorption was accomplished by self-uptake of radioactive water by the quaternary spongiform adsorbent.

  11. Review and assessment of technologies for the separation of cesium from acidic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, R.J.; Brooks, K.P.; Kurath, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    A preliminary literature survey has been conducted to identify and evaluate methods for the separation of cesium from acidic waste. The most promising solvent extraction, precipitation, and ion exchange methods, along with some of the attributes for each method, are listed. The main criteria used in evaluating the separation methods were as follows: (1) good potential for cesium separation must be demonstrated (i.e., cesium decontamination factors on the order of 50 to 100). (2) Good selectivity for cesium over bulk components must be demonstrated. (3) The method must show promise for evolving into a practical and fairly simple process. (4) The process should be safe to operate. (5) The method must be robust (i.e., capable of separating cesium from various acidic waste types). (6) Secondary waste generation must be minimized. (7) The method must show resistance to radiation damage. The most promising separation methods did not necessarily satisfy all of the above criteria, thus key areas requiring further development are suggested for each method. The report discusses in detail these and other areas requiring further development, as well as alternative solvent extraction, precipitation, ion exchange, and {open_quote}other{close_quote} technologies that, based on current information, show less promise for the separation of cesium from acidic wastes because of significant process limitations. When appropriate, the report recommends areas of future development.

  12. Enhanced electronic injection in organic light-emitting diodes by incorporating silver nanoclusters and cesium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying-Chung; Gao, Chia-Yuan [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kan-Lin [Department of Electronic Engineering, Fortune Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Sze, Po-Wen [Department of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering, Kao Yuan University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chien-Jung, E-mail: chien@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • The localized electric field around SNCs is enhanced. • When the cesium carbonate/silver nanoclusters/cesium carbonate electron-injection structure replaces the cesium carbonate electron-injection structure, higher electron-injection ability is obtained. • The structure for efficient electron injection is critical to characteristics of the device. - Abstract: The influence of the cesium carbonate/silver nanoclusters/cesium carbonate electron-injection structure (CSC-EIS) on the performance of organic light-emitting diodes is investigated in this study. The silver nanoclusters (SNCs) are introduced between the electron-injection layers by means of thermal evaporation. When the CSC-EIS replaces the cesium carbonate electron-injection structure, higher electron-injection ability is obtained because the electron-injection barrier between the cathode and the electron-transport layer is remarkably reduced from 1.2 to 0 eV. In addition, surface plasmon resonance effect will cause the enhanced localized electric field around the SNCs, resulting that electron-injection ability is further enhanced from the cathode to the emitting layer.

  13. Modeling Ion-Exchange Processing With Spherical Resins For Cesium Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, T.; Nash, C. A.; Aleman, S. E.

    2012-09-19

    The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig(r) 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig(r) 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for high-potassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowest-potassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ''cesium bleed'' is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual post-elution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2008-11-20

    In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

  15. Strontium isotopic identification of water-rock interaction and ground water mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Carol D; Toner, Rachel N

    2004-01-01

    87Sr/86Sr ratios of ground waters in the Bighorn and Laramie basins' carbonate and carbonate-cemented aquifer systems, Wyoming, United States, reflect the distinctive strontium isotope signatures of the minerals in their respective aquifers. Well water samples from the Madison Aquifer (Bighorn Basin) have strontium isotopic ratios that match their carbonate host rocks. Casper Aquifer ground waters (Laramie Basin) have strontium isotopic ratios that differ from the bulk host rock; however, stepwise leaching of Casper Sandstone indicates that most of the strontium in Casper Aquifer ground waters is acquired from preferential dissolution of carbonate cement. Strontium isotope data from both Bighorn and Laramie basins, along with dye tracing experiments in the Bighorn Basin and tritium data from the Laramie Basin, suggest that waters in carbonate or carbonate-cemented aquifers acquire their strontium isotope composition very quickly--on the order of decades. Strontium isotopes were also used successfully to verify previously identified mixed Redbeds-Casper ground waters in the Laramie Basin. The strontium isotopic compositions of ground waters near Precambrian outcrops also suggest previously unrecognized mixing between Casper and Precambrian aquifers. These results demonstrate the utility of strontium isotopic ratio data in identifying ground water sources and aquifer interactions.

  16. Collision-induced shifts of Rydberg levels of strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafi, M; Bhatia, K S; Makdisi, Y Y; Philips, G [Department of Physics, Kuwait University, PO Box 5969, Safat, 13060 (Kuwait)

    2003-05-14

    Measurements of spectral line shifts induced by collisions with rare gas perturbers are reported. High Rydberg states were prepared by multiphoton excitation using an excimer pumped tunable dye laser. A thermionic detector inside a heat pipe was used to collect the ionization products resulting from excited states. Analysis of the data for the shifts of the absorption transition to 5snd {sup 1}D{sub 2} states in strontium is presented.

  17. Collision-induced shifts of Rydberg levels of strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafi, M.; Bhatia, K. S.; Makdisi, Y. Y.; Philips, G.

    2003-05-01

    Measurements of spectral line shifts induced by collisions with rare gas perturbers are reported. High Rydberg states were prepared by multiphoton excitation using an excimer pumped tunable dye laser. A thermionic detector inside a heat pipe was used to collect the ionization products resulting from excited states. Analysis of the data for the shifts of the absorption transition to 5snd 1D 2 states in strontium is presented.

  18. Treatment of metastatic bone pain with strontium-89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R G; Spicer, J A; Preston, D F; Wegst, A V; Martin, N L

    1987-01-01

    We have utilized 89Sr as palliative treatment for bone pain secondary to metastatic cancer in the skeleton of over 200 patients. The best results have been in patients with carcinoma of the prostate (80% response rate) and breast (89%). Results in a small number of patients with a variety of other cell types were not nearly as encouraging. Strontium-89 provides excellent palliation in the management of bone pain secondary to prostate and breast carcinoma.

  19. Complex Impedance Studies of Optically Excited Strontium Barium Niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    has a tetragonal tungsten - bronze structure. The unit cell for this structure, illustrated below in Fig. 2.1, consists of ten oxygen octahedra joined...4 Kittel, pp. 373-374. 5 P. B. Jamieson, et al, “Ferroelectric Tungsten Bronze -Type Crystal Structures. I. Barium Strontium Niobate...Oxford, 1987). 2. C. Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics, (Wiley, New York, 1986). 3. P. B. Jamieson, et al, “Ferroelectric Tungsten

  20. The effects of K+ growth conditions on the accumulation of cesium by the bacterium Thermus sp. TibetanG6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hailei; KONG; Fanjing; ZHENG; Mianping

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation of cesium by the bacterium Thermus sp. TibetanG6 was examined under different K+ growth conditions. The effects of external pH and Na+ on the accumulation of cesium were also studied, and the mechanism involved was discussed. K+ regimes played an important role in the accumulation of cesium by the strain TibetanG6. The quantity of cesium accumulated (24 h) was much higher in K+-deficient regime than that in K+-sufficient regime. The pH and Na+ had different effects on the accumulation of cesium in the two K+ regimes. IR spectra analyses indicated that the biosorption is a process of homeostasis with cesium initially accumulated on the cell wall.

  1. Lifetimes of ultra-long-range strontium Rydberg molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Camargo, F; Ding, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Yoshida, S; Burgdörfer, J; Dunning, F B; Killian, T C

    2015-01-01

    The lifetimes of the lower-lying vibrational states of ultralong-range strontium Rydberg molecules comprising one ground-state 5s2 1S0 atom and one Rydberg atom in the 5s38s 3S1 state are reported. The molecules are created in an ultracold gas held in an optical dipole trap and their numbers determined using ?eld ionization, the product electrons being detected by a microchannel plate. The measurements show that, in marked contrast to earlier measurements involving rubidium Rydberg molecules, the lifetimes of the low-lying molecular vibrational states are very similar to those of the parent Rydberg atoms. This results because the strong p-wave resonance in low-energy electronrubidium scattering, which plays an important role in determining the molecular lifetimes, is not present for strontium. The absence of this resonance o?ers advantages for experiments involving strontium Rydberg atoms as impurities in quantum gases and for testing theories of molecular formation and decay.

  2. Production of very-high-n strontium Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S.; Zhang, X.; Killian, T. C.; Dunning, F. B.; Hiller, M.; Yoshida, S.; Nagele, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2013-10-01

    The production of very-high-n (n˜300-500) strontium Rydberg atoms is explored using a crossed-laser-atom-beam geometry. n1S0 and n1D2 states are created by two-photon excitation via the 5s5p 1P1 intermediate state using radiation with wavelengths of ˜461 and ˜413 nm. Rydberg atom densities as high as ˜3×105 cm-3 have been achieved, sufficient that Rydberg-Rydberg interactions can become important. The isotope shifts in the Rydberg series limits are determined by tuning the 461-nm light to preferentially excite the different strontium isotopes. Photoexcitation in the presence of an applied electric field is examined. The initially quadratic Stark shift of the n1P1 and n1D2 states becomes near-linear at higher fields and the possible use of n1D2 states to create strongly polarized, quasi-one-dimensional electronic states in strontium is discussed. The data are analyzed with the aid of a two-active-electron (TAE) approximation. The two-electron Hamiltonian, within which the Sr2+ core is represented by a semi-empirical potential, is numerically diagonalized allowing the calculation of the energies of high-n Rydberg states and their photoexcitation probabilities.

  3. Production of very-high-$n$ strontium Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Shuzhen; Killian, Thomas C; Dunning, F Barry; Hiller, Moritz; Yoshida, Shuhei; Nagele, Stefan; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The production of very-high-$n$, $n\\sim300$-500, strontium Rydberg atoms is explored using a crossed laser-atom beam geometry. $n$$^{1}$S$_{0}$ and $n$$^{1}$D$_{2}$ states are created by two-photon excitation via the 5s5p $^{1}$P$_{1}$ intermediate state using radiation with wavelengths of $\\sim$~461 and $\\sim$ 413 nm. Rydberg atom densities as high as $\\sim 3 \\times 10^{5}$ cm$^{-3}$ have been achieved, sufficient that Rydberg-Rydberg interactions can become important. The isotope shifts in the Rydberg series limits are determined by tuning the 461 nm light to preferentially excite the different strontium isotopes. Photoexcitation in the presence of an applied electric field is examined. The initially quadratic Stark shift of the $n$$^{1}$P$_{1}$ and $n$$^{1}$D$_{2}$ states becomes near-linear at higher fields and the possible use of $n{}^{1}$D$_{2}$ states to create strongly-polarized, quasi-one-dimensional electronic states in strontium is discussed. The data are analyzed with the aid of a two-active-elect...

  4. Allyl strontium compounds: synthesis, molecular structure and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, Phillip; Davin, Julien P; Maslek, Stefanie; Spaniol, Thomas P; Sarazin, Yann; Carpentier, Jean-Francois; Okuda, Jun

    2012-08-14

    The synthesis and attempted isolation of neutral bis(allyl)strontium [Sr(C(3)H(5))(2)] (1) resulted in the isolation of potassium tris(allyl)strontiate K[Sr(C(3)H(5))(3)] (2). In situ generated 1 shows a pronounced Brønsted basicity, inducing polymerisation of THF. Ate complex 2 crystallises as [K(THF)(2){Sr(C(3)H(5))(3)}(THF)](∞) (2·(THF)(3)). The salt-like solid state structure of 2·(THF)(3) comprises a two-dimensional network of (μ(2)-η(3):η(3)-C(3)H(5))(-) bridged potassium and strontium centres. Synthesis of allyl complexes 1 and 2 utilised SrI(2), [Sr(TMDS)(2)] (3) (TMDS = tetramethyldisilazanide), and [Sr(HMDS)(2)] (HMDS = hexamethyldisilazanide) as strontium precursors. The solid state structure of previously reported [Sr(TMDS)(2)] (3) was established by X-ray single crystal analysis as a dissymmetric dimer of [Sr(2)(TMDS)(4)(THF)(3)] (3·(THF)(3)) with multiple Si-HSr agostic interactions. The presence of ether ligands (THF, 18-crown-6) influenced the Si-HSr resonances in the NMR spectra of the amido complex 3.

  5. Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis of barium strontium titanate nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes, A.Z., E-mail: alezipo@yahoo.co [Universidade Federal de Itajuba- Unifei - Campus Itabira, Rua Sao Paulo, 377, Bairro, Amazonas, CEP 35900-37, Itabira, MG (Brazil); Universidade Estadual Paulista- Unesp - Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratingueta, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, Bairro Pedregulho, CEP 12516-410 Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Moura, F.; Onofre, T.B. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba- Unifei - Campus Itabira, Rua Sao Paulo, 377, Bairro, Amazonas, CEP 35900-37, Itabira, MG (Brazil); Ramirez, M.A.; Varela, J.A.; Longo, E. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica (LIEC), Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP, CEP 14800-900, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Barium strontium titanate nanoparticles were obtained by the Hydrothemal microwave technique (HTMW) {yields} This is a genuine technique to obtain nanoparticles at low temperature and short times {yields} Barium strontium titanate free of carbonates with tetragonal structure was grown at 130 {sup o}C. - Abstract: Hydrothermal-microwave method (HTMW) was used to synthesize crystalline barium strontium titanate (Ba{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3}) nanoparticles (BST) in the temperature range of 100-130 {sup o}C. The crystallization of BST with tetragonal structure was reached at all the synthesis temperatures along with the formation of BaCO{sub 3} as a minor impurity at lower syntheses temperatures. Typical FT-IR spectra for tetragonal (BST) nanoparticles presented well defined bands, indicating a substantial short-range order in the system. TG-DTA analyses confirmed the presence of lattice OH- groups, commonly found in materials obtained by HTMW process. FE/SEM revealed that lower syntheses temperatures led to a morphology that consisted of uniform grains while higher syntheses temperature consisted of big grains isolated and embedded in a matrix of small grains. TEM has shown BST nanoparticles with diameters between 40 and 80 nm. These results show that the HTMW synthesis route is rapid, cost effective, and could serve as an alternative to obtain BST nanoparticles.

  6. Strontium isotope analysis of archaeological fauna at the Erlitou site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO ChunYan; YANG Jie; YUAN Jing; LI ZhiPeng; XU Hong; ZHAO HaiTao; CHEN GuoLiang

    2012-01-01

    The Erlitou site is located at Yanshi City,Henan Province.This site is a large settlement site of Erlitou culture,and it is dated to 3800-3500 a BP.Five kinds of domestic animals,i.e.,dogs,pigs,sheep,goats,and cattle were found from the site.In this paper,two problems have emerged in studies involving the estimation of local isotope levels and the distinction of migrants from locals.Tooth enamel samples fron 17 domestic animals individuals were analyzed for strontium isotope ratio (87Sr/86Sr),by the thermal ionization mass spectrometry,including 10 pigs,5 sheep and 2 cattle.The results show that the mean 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 10 pigs enamel samples were 0.712078,Based on the local strontium isotopes ratio range determined by the mean 87Sr/86Sr ratios ±2σrof 10 pig enamel samples (0.712256-.711900),we found that five sheep and one cattle from the Erlitou site fell well outside the local strontium isotopes ratio range and were considered to be non-local.

  7. Actinides reduction by recycling in a thermal reactor; Reduccion de actinidos por reciclado en un reactor termico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Martinez C, E.; Balboa L, H., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    This work is directed towards the evaluation of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material; firstly a production reference of actinides in standard nuclear fuel of uranium at the end of its burning in a BWR reactor is established, after a fuel containing plutonium is modeled to also calculate the actinides production in MOX fuel type. Also it proposes a design of fuel rod containing 6% of actinides in a matrix of uranium from the tails of enrichment, then four standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by actinides rods to evaluate the production and transmutation thereof, the same procedure was performed in the fuel type MOX and the end actinide reduction in the fuel was evaluated. (Author)

  8. Sensitivity analysis of minor actinides transmutation to physical and technological parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooyman Timothée

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Minor actinides transmutation is one of the three main axis defined by the 2006 French law for management of nuclear waste, along with long-term storage and use of a deep geological repository. Transmutation options for critical systems can be divided in two different approaches: (a homogeneous transmutation, in which minor actinides are mixed with the fuel. This exhibits the drawback of “polluting” the entire fuel cycle with minor actinides and also has an important impact on core reactivity coefficients such as Doppler Effect or sodium void worth for fast reactors when the minor actinides fraction increases above 3 to 5% depending on the core; (b heterogeneous transmutation, in which minor actinides are inserted into transmutation targets which can be located in the center or in the periphery of the core. This presents the advantage of decoupling the management of the minor actinides from the conventional fuel and not impacting the core reactivity coefficients. In both cases, the design and analyses of potential transmutation systems have been carried out in the frame of Gen IV fast reactor using a “perturbation” approach in which nominal power reactor parameters are modified to accommodate the loading of minor actinides. However, when designing such a transmutation strategy, parameters from all steps of the fuel cycle must be taken into account, such as spent fuel heat load, gamma or neutron sources or fabrication feasibility. Considering a multi-recycling strategy of minor actinides, an analysis of relevant estimators necessary to fully analyze a transmutation strategy has been performed in this work and a sensitivity analysis of these estimators to a broad choice of reactors and fuel cycle parameters has been carried out. No threshold or percolation effects were observed. Saturation of transmutation rate with regards to several parameters has been observed, namely the minor actinides volume fraction and the irradiation time

  9. Strontium isoscapes in The Netherlands. Spatial variations in 87Sr/86Sr as a proxy for palaeomobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, Lisette M.; van Lanen, Rowin J.; Kars, Henk; Davies, Gareth R.

    2016-01-01

    Strontium isotope analysis has been successfully applied to archaeological questions of residential mobility and animal husbandry for over three decades. To obtain a full understanding of variations in archaeological samples, spatial variations in bioavailable strontium should be accurately mapped o

  10. Strontium incorporates at sites critical for bone mineralization in rats with renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oste, Line; Verberckmoes, Steven C.; Behets, Geert J.; Dams, Geert; Bervoets, An R.; De Broe, Marc E.; D' Haese, Patrick C. [Faculty of Medicine, Antwerp University (Belgium); Van Hoof, Viviane O. [Department of Biochemistry, Antwerp University Hospital (Belgium); Bohic, Sylvain [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15

    We previously demonstrated the development of a mineralization defect during strontium administration and its reversibility after withdrawal in rats with chronic renal failure. Recently, strontium ranelate has been introduced as a therapeutic agent for osteoporosis. However, caution has to be taken, as this bone disorder mainly develops in elderly people who may present a moderately decreased renal function. In order to assess the ultra-structural localization of strontium in bone and thereby to get a better insight into the element's systemic effects on bone, synchrotron-based x-ray micro-fluorescence was applied, which showed that after 2 weeks of strontium loading (2 g l{sup -1} in drinking water) in rats with renal failure, concomitant with the development of impaired mineralization, the element was localized mainly at the outer edge of the mineralized bone, while after longer loading periods, a more homogeneous distribution was found. After washout, strontium was found at sites deeper within the trabeculae, while newly deposited low-strontium-containing mineral was found at the outer edges. Synchrotron x-ray micro-diffraction analysis showed that strontium is incorporated in the apatite crystal lattice through exchange with calcium. The results show that strontium is initially incorporated in bone at sites of active bone mineralization, close to the osteoid/mineralization front.Most likely, strontium binds to matrix proteins serving as crystal nucleation points and by hetero-ionic substitution with calcium within the hydroxyapatite crystals, thereby impairing further hydroxyapatite formation. After withdrawal, strontium is released from these sites, by which mineralization is restored and the previously formed strontium-containing hydroxyapatite is buried under a new layer of mineralized bone. (authors)

  11. Quantum Mechanical Studies of the Early Actinide Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obodo, Kingsley Onyebuchi

    This study involves the investigation of the early actinide systems using ab initio techniques based on density functional theory (DFT). It was motivated by: (i) the incomplete description of these systems using conventional DFT because they are strongly correlated, (ii) the usefulness of these systems in nuclear energy generation, (iii) the complexity that arises in experimentally studying these systems due to their inherent radioactive nature and (iv) their limited availability. The results obtained from this study are divided into two broad sections. The first comprises chapters 3 and 4 while the second comprises chapters 5 and 6. Thorium based compounds are studied in chapters 3 and 4. In the first section, the Hubbard U parameter is not necessary to accurately describe the electronic, elastic and mechanical properties of these systems. In the second, the inclusion of the Hubbard U parameter is shown to be paramount for the accurate description of most compounds considered. Chapter 3 presents the electronic, structural and bonding character of thorium based nitrides. We obtained the result that Th2N2 NH, which is crystallographically equivalent to metallic Th2N 3, is insulating. Chapter 4 demonstrates that the formation of a meta-stable thorium-titanium based alloy is plausible and also further information on bonding, electronic and elastic properties of the determined meta-stable alloy is provided. This has provided important new knowledge about these bulk systems. In Chapter 5 the DFT + U based study on Pa and its oxides is presented. The electronic, structural and bonding character of these systems was studied. We found that PaO2 is a Mott-Hubbard insulator with an indirect band gap of 3.48 eV within the generalized gradient approximation GGA + U. Chapter 6 discusses various actinide nitrides. We explored the electronic properties, elastic properties, lattice dynamics and the energetics of the various compounds using GGA + U. Also, we investigated the effect

  12. Paving the way for the synthesis of a series of divalent actinide complexes: a theoretical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q-Y; Lan, J-H; Wang, C-Z; Cheng, Z-P; Chai, Z-F; Gibson, J K; Shi, W-Q

    2016-02-21

    Recently, the +2 formal oxidation state in soluble molecular complexes for lanthanides (La-Nd, Sm-Lu) and actinides (Th and U) has been discovered [W. J. Evans, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 15914; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 8420; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 13310; Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 517]. To explore the nature of the bonding and stabilities of the low-valent actinide complexes, a series of divalent actinide species, [AnCp'3](-) (An[double bond, length as m-dash]Th-Am, Cp' = [η(5)-C5H4(SiMe3)](-)) have been investigated in THF solution using scalar relativistic density functional theory. The electronic structures and electron affinity properties were systematically studied to identify the interactions between the +2 actinide ions and Cp' ligands. The ground state electron configurations for the [AnCp'3](-) species are [ThCp'3](-) 6d(2), [PaCp'3](-) 5f(2)6d(1), [UCp'3](-) 5f(3)6d(1), [NpCp'3](-) 5f(5), [PuCp'3](-) 5f(6), and [AmCp'3](-) 5f(7), respectively, according to the MO analysis. The total bonding energy decreases from the Th- to the Am-complex and the electrostatic interactions mainly dominate the bonding between the actinide atom and ligands. The electron affinity analysis suggests that the reduction reaction of AnCp'3→ [AnCp'3](-) should become increasingly facile across the actinide series from Th to Am, in accord with the known An(iii/ii) reduction potentials. This work expands the knowledge on the low oxidation state chemistry of actinides, and further motivates and guides the synthesis of related low oxidation state compounds of 5f elements.

  13. Efficiency of aluminum-pillared montmorillonite on the removal of cesium and copper from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanis, D; Assimakopoulos, P A

    2007-05-01

    Aluminum-pillared-layered montmorillonites (PILMs) were tested for their potential application in the removal of copper or cesium from aqueous solutions. By varying the initial conditions, several PILMs were prepared and characterized by means of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and sorption isotherms. Uptake of metals was studied by means of XRF spectrometry for copper sorption or gamma-ray spectrometry for cesium, using 137Cs as radiotracer. The sorption kinetics and capacity of PILMs were determined in relation to the effects of factors such as the initial metal concentration, initial pH of the solution and the presence of competitive cations. Kinetic studies showed that an equilibrium time of few minutes was needed for the adsorption of metal ions on PILMs. A pseudo-first-order equation was used to describe the sorption process for either copper or cesium. The most effective pH range for the removal of copper and cesium was found to be 4.0-6.0 and 3.0-8.0, respectively. Cesium sorption isotherms were best represented by a two-site Langmuir model while copper isotherms followed the Freundlich or the two-site Langmuir model. Cesium sorption experiments with inorganic or organic competitive cations as blocking agents revealed that the high selective sites of PILMs for cesium sorption (1-2% of total) are surface and edge sites in addition to interlayer exchange sites. In copper sorption, the two sites were determined as interlayer sites of PILMs after restoring their cation exchange capacity and sites associated with the pillar oxides.

  14. Reversible optical sensor for the analysis of actinides in solution; Capteur optique reversible pour l'analyse des actinides en solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesage, B.; Picard, S. [CEA Marcoule, Dept. de Radiochimie et Procedes, Service de Chimie des Procedes de Separation, Lab. de Chimie des Actinides, 30 (France); Serein-Spirau, F.; Lereporte, J.P. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Montpellier (ENSCM), CNRS UMR 5076, Lab. Heterochimie Moleculaire et Macromoleculaire, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2007-07-01

    In this work is presented a concept of reversible optical sensor for actinides. It is composed of a p doped conducing polymer support and of an anion complexing the actinides. The chosen conducing polymer is the thiophene-2,5-di-alkoxy-benzene whose solubility and conductivity are perfectly known. The actinides selective ligand is a lacunar poly-oxo-metallate such as P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}{sup 10-} or SiW{sub 11}O{sub 39}{sup 8-} which are strong anionic complexing agents of actinides at the oxidation state (IV) even in a very acid medium. The sensor is prepared by spin coating of the composite mixture 'polymer + ligand' on a conducing glass electrode and then tested towards its optical and electrochemical answer in presence of uranium (IV). The absorption change due to the formation of cations complexes by poly-oxo-metallate reveals the presence of uranium (IV). After the measurement, the sensor is regenerated by anodic polarization of the support and oxidation of the uranium (IV) into uranium (VI) which weakly interacts with the poly-oxo-metallate and is then released in solution. (O.M.)

  15. Obtaining of Nanostructured Powders of Barium and Strontium Hexaferrite by the Polymer Precursor Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Kostishyn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Studied the possibility of obtaining by precursors in the polymer nanostructured powders of barium hexaferrite BaFe12O19 and strontium hexaferrite SrFe12O19. The reagents were used as starting barium nitrate, strontium nitrate and ferric nitrate nonahydrate (III, and polyethylene glycol-400 used this technology as a polymer.

  16. On the similarity between the energy characteristics of strontium and europium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, V. N.

    2016-11-01

    The spectra of Eu, Sr, Eu+, and Sr+ are used as examples to demonstrate the similarity between the energy characteristics of these elements. It is shown that europium is identical to strontium in the strong and inhomogeneous magnetic field whose source in lanthanides is their empty and compact 4 f n strontium with no magnetic fields.

  17. Strontium localization in bone tissue studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Raffalt, Anders Christer; Stahl, Kenny

    2014-02-01

    Strontium has recently been introduced as a pharmacological agent for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. We determined the localization of strontium incorporated into bone matrix from dogs treated with Sr malonate by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A new approach for analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model and allowed the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone components to be estimated. Approximately 35-45% of the strontium present is incorporated into calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA) by substitution of some of the calcium ions occupying highly ordered sites, and at least 30% is located at less ordered sites where only the first solvation shell is resolved, suggesting that strontium is surrounded by only oxygen atoms similar to Sr(2+) in solution. Strontium was furthermore shown to be absorbed in collagen in which it obtains a higher structural order than when present in serum but less order than when it is incorporated into CaHA. The total amount of strontium in the samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the amount of Sr was found to increase with increasing dose levels and treatment periods, whereas the relative distribution of strontium among the different components appears to be independent of treatment period and dose level.

  18. Full-Scale and Bench-Scale Studies on the Removal of Strontium from Water (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strontium (Sr) is a natural and commonly occurring alkaline earth metal which has an oxidation state of +2 under normal environmental conditions. Stable strontium is suspended in water and is dissolved after water runs through rocks and soil. It behaves very similar to calcium. G...

  19. Synthesis and characterization of strontium carboxylates at room temperature and at high temperature in autoclave vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, Stephan; Ståhl, Kenny; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2006-01-01

    -ray crystallography. Optimum conditions were found at T = 120-1400C, a base-to-acid ratio of 1.2 and 15 min. of reaction-time in an autoclave vessel. Large crystals were readily obtained within a time period of hours. The crystal structures of strontium D-glutamate hexahydrate (I) and strontium di-(hydrogen L...

  20. Marking pike fry otoliths with alizarin complexone and strontium : an evaluation of methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Christian; Grønkjær, P.; Nielsen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experiments demonstrated that both alizarin complexone and strontium are useful in mass marking of pike Esox lucius fry otoliths. Visual detection of alizarin complexone marks was considered more reliable than the quantitative analysis of strontium for differentiating marked and unmarked...

  1. Repumping of ultracold strontium atoms using the ^3P2 - ^3D2 transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, P. G.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Traverso, A. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We discuss recent experiments involving ultracold strontium. Using a commercially-available 3 micron laser, we repump atoms out of the ^3P2 level via the ^3D2 state and gain almost a factor of 10 in the number of atoms in our system. This increase in the signal-to-noise ratio enables improved spectroscopy of strontium in our optical trap.

  2. Study on Performance of Empore~(TM) Strontium Rad Disks-Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    EmporeTM Strontium Rad disks produced by 3M Company contain a strontium-selective crown ether extractant loaded on silica particles that are embedded in an inert PTFE matrix. The disks allow aqueous solutions to pass through in high flow rate. It makes

  3. On the valence fluctuation in the early actinide metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Söderlind, P., E-mail: soderlind@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Landa, A.; Tobin, J.G.; Allen, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Medling, S.; Booth, C.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bauer, E.D.; Cooley, J.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Sokaras, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Nordlund, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We make a connection between experimentally observed valence fluctuations and density functional theory. • We present a new model for valence fluctuations. • We present new experimental data for uranium and valence fluctuations. - Abstract: Recent X-ray measurements suggest a degree of valence fluctuation in plutonium and uranium intermetallics. We are applying a novel scheme, in conjunction with density functional theory, to predict 5f configuration fractions of states with valence fluctuations for the early actinide metals. For this purpose we perform constrained integer f-occupation calculations for the α phases of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium metals. For plutonium we also investigate the δ phase. The model predicts uranium and neptunium to be dominated by the f{sup 3} and f{sup 4} configurations, respectively, with only minor contributions from other configurations. For plutonium (both α and δ phase) the scenario is dramatically different. Here, the calculations predict a relatively even distribution between three valence configurations. The δ phase has a greater configuration fraction of f{sup 6} compared to that of the α phase. The theory is consistent with the interpretations of modern X-ray experiments and we present resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy results for α-uranium.

  4. First ionization potential of the heaviest actinide lawrencium, element 103

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Tetsuya K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first ionization potential (IP1 of element 103, lawrencium (Lr, has been successfully determined for the first time by using a newly developed method based on a surface ionization process. The measured IP1 value is 4.9630.080.07 eV. This value is the smallest among those of actinide elements and is in excellent agreement with the value of 4.963(15 eV predicted by state-of-the-art relativistic calculations also performed in this work. Our results strongly support that the Lr atom has an electronic configuration of [Rn]7s25f147p11/2, which is influenced by strong relativistic effects. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations and also opens the way for studies on atomic properties of heavy elements with atomic number Z > 100. Moreover, the present achievement has triggered a controversy on the position of lutetium (Lu and Lr in the Periodic Table of Elements.

  5. Functionalization of mesoporous materials for lanthanide and actinide extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek, Justyna; Giret, Simon; Juère, Estelle; Larivière, Dominic; Kleitz, Freddy

    2016-10-14

    Among the energy sources currently available that could address our insatiable appetite for energy and minimize our CO2 emission, solar, wind, and nuclear energy currently occupy an increasing portion of our energy portfolio. The energy associated with these sources can however only be harnessed after mineral resources containing valuable constituents such as actinides (Ac) and rare earth elements (REEs) are extracted, purified and transformed into components necessary for the conversion of energy into electricity. Unfortunately, the environmental impacts resulting from their manufacture including the generation of undesirable and, sometimes, radioactive wastes and the non-renewable nature of the mineral resources, to name a few, have emerged as challenges that should be addressed by the scientific community. In this perspective, the recent development of functionalized solid materials dedicated to selective elemental separation/pre-concentration could provide answers to several of the above-mentioned challenges. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of mesoporous solid-phase (SP) sorbents designed for REEs and Ac liquid-solid extraction. Particular attention will be devoted to silica and carbon sorbents functionalized with commonly known ligands, such as phosphorus or amide-containing functionalities. The extraction performances of these new systems are discussed in terms of sorption capacity and selectivity. In order to support potential industrial applications of the silica and carbon-based sorbents, their main drawbacks and advantages are highlighted and discussed.

  6. Iron (III) Matrix Effects on Mineralization and Immobilization of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cynthia-May S. Gong; Tyler A. Sullens; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

    2006-01-01

    Abstract - A number of models for the Yucca Mountain Project nuclear waste repository use studies of actinide sorption onto well-defined iron hydroxide materials. In the case of a waste containment leak, however, a complex interaction between dissolved waste forms and failed containment vessel components can lead to immediate precipitation of migratory iron and uranyl in the silicate rich near-field environment. Use of the Fe(III) and UO22+ complexing agent acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) as a colorimetric agent for visible spectrophotometry is well-known. Using the second derivative of these spectra a distinct shift in iron complexation in the presence of silicate is seen that is not seen with uranyl or alone. Silica also decreases the ability of uranyl and ferric solutions to absorb hydroxide, hastening precipitation. These ferric silicate precipitates are highly amorphous and soluble. Precipitates formed in the presence of uranyl below ~1 mol% exhibit lower solubility than precipitates from up to 50 mol % and of uranyl silicates alone.

  7. Actinide-specific complexing agents: their structural and solution chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, K.N.; Freeman, G.E.; Kappel, M.J.

    1983-07-01

    The synthesis of a series of tetracatecholate ligands designed to be specific for Pu(IV) and other actinide(IV) ions has been achieved. Although these compounds are very effective as in vivo plutonium removal agents, potentiometric and voltammetric data indicate that at neutral pH full complexation of the Pu(IV) ion by all four catecholate groups does not occur. Spectroscopic results indicate that the tetracatecholates, 3,4,3-LICAMS and 3,4,3-LICAMC, complex Am(III). The Am(IV)/(III)-catecholate couple (where catecholate = 3,4,3-LICAMS or 3,4,3-LICAMC) is not observed, but may not be observable due to the large currents associated with ligand oxidation. However, within the potential range where ligand oxidation does not occur, these experiments indicate that the reduction potential of free Am(IV)/(III) is probably greater than or equal to + 2.6 V vs NHE or higher. Proof of the complexation of americium in the trivalent oxidation state by 3,4,3-LICAMS and 3,4,3-LICAMC elimates the possibility of tetracatholates stabilizing Am(IV) in vivo.

  8. Structural organization and spectroscopy of peptide-actinide(IV) complexes; Organisation structurale et spectroscopie de peptides susceptibles de complexer les actinides(IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahou, S.

    2010-11-05

    The contamination of living organisms by actinide elements is at the origin of both radiological and chemical toxicity that may lead to severe dysfunction. Most of the data available on the actinide interaction with biological systems are macroscopic physiological measurements and are lacking a molecular description of the systems. Because of the intricacy of these systems, classical biochemical methods are difficult to implement. Our strategy consisted in designing simplified biomimetic peptides, and describing the corresponding intramolecular interactions with actinides. A carboxylic pentapeptide of the form DDPDD has been at the starting point of this work in order to further assess the influence of the peptide sequence on the topology of the complexes.To do so, various linear (Asp/Ala permutations, peptoids) and cyclic analogues have been synthesized. Furthermore, in order to include the hydroxamic function (with a high affinity for Fe(III)) in the peptide, both desferrioxamine and acetohydroxamic acid have been investigated. However because of difficulties in synthesis, we have not been able to test these peptides. Three actinide cations have been considered at oxidation state +IV (Th, Np, Pu) and compared to Fe(III), often considered as a biological surrogate of Pu(IV). The spatial arrangement of the peptide around the cation has been probed by spectrophotometry and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. The spectroscopic data and EXAFS data adjustment lead us to rationalize the topology of the complexes as a function of the peptide sequence: mix hydroxy polynuclear species for linear and cyclic peptides, mononuclear for the desferrioxamine complexes. Furthermore, significant differences have appeared between Fe(III) and actinide(IV), related to differences of reactivity in aqueous medium. (author)

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of new Polyfunctional Molecules for Group Actinide Extraction; Synthese et evaluation de Nouvelles Molecules Polyfonctionnelles pour la Separation Groupee des Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, C.

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this project is to design new extracting molecules for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In order to minimize the long-term residual radiotoxicity of the waste, the GANEX process is an option based on homogeneous recycling of actinides. All actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm), present in a highly acidic aqueous solution, would be extracted together and separated from fission products (especially from lanthanides) using liquid-liquid extraction. In this context, twenty new bi-topic ligands constituted of a nitrogen poly-aromatic unit functionalized by amide groups were synthesized. Liquid-liquid extraction tests with these ligands dissolved alone in the organic phase show that N, N, N', N'-tetra-alkyl-6, 6''(2, 2':6', 2''-terpyridine)-diamides are able to selectively extract actinides at different oxidation states (Np(V et VI), U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), Cm(III)) from an aqueous solution 3M HNO{sub 3}. Nevertheless, actinides(III) are poorly extracted. According to crystallographic structures of complexes with Nd(III) and U(VI) determined by X-rays diffraction, these ligands are penta-dentate. In solution (methanol), complexes stoichiometries (1:1) of Nd(III), U(VI) and Pu(IV) were determined by electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Stability constants, evaluated by UV-visible spectrophotometry in MeOH/H{sub 2}O solutions, confirm the selectivity of ligands toward actinides(III) with respect to lanthanides(III). Associate to nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and DFT calculations (Density Functional Theory), a better knowledge of their coordination mode was achieved. (author)

  10. Chromatic instabilities in cesium-doped tungsten bronze nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Kenji, E-mail: kenji-adachi@ni.smm.co.jp; Ota, Yosuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Okada, Mika; Oshimura, Nobumitsu; Tofuku, Atsushi [Ichikawa Research Laboratories, Sumitomo Metal Mining Co., Ltd., Ichikawa 272-8588 (Japan)

    2013-11-21

    Nanoparticles of alkali-doped tungsten bronzes are an excellent near-infrared shielding material, but exhibit slight chromatic instabilities typically upon applications of strong ultra-violet light or heating in humid environment, which acts detrimentally to long-life commercial applications. Origin of the chromatic instabilities in cesium-doped tungsten bronze has been investigated, and it has been found that the coloration and bleaching processes comprised electronic exchanges which accelerate or depress the polaron excitation and the localized surface plasmon resonance. Coloration on UV illumination is evidenced by electron diffraction as due to the formation of H{sub x}WO{sub 3}, which is considered to take place in the surface Cs-deficient WO{sub 3} region via the double charge injection mechanism. On the other hand, bleaching on heating in air and in humid environment is shown to accompany the extraction of Cs and electrons from Cs{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis and is concluded to be an oxidation of Cs{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} on the particle surface.

  11. The crystal structures of potassium and cesium trivanadates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, H.T.; Block, S.

    1966-01-01

    Potassium and cesium trivanadates are monoclinic and isomorphous, space group P21/m, with the following dimensions (Z = 2): KV3O8, a = 7.640 A, b = 8.380 A, c = 4.979 A, ??= 96?? 57???; CsV3O8, a = 8.176 A, b = 8.519 A, c = 4.988 A, ?? = 95?? 32???. The crystal structure of KV3O8 has been determined from hk0, 0kl, and h0l Weissenberg data with an R factor of 0.15. The structure of CsV3O8 has been refined with 1273 hkl Weissenberg data to an R factor of 0.089. The structures consist of corrugated sheets based on a linkage of distorted VO6, octahedra. Two of the vanadium atoms lie in double, square-pyramid groups V2O8, which are linked through opposite basal corners into chains along the b axis. The chains are joined laterally along the c axis into sheets by the third vanadium atom in VO groups, also forming part of a square-pyramid coordination. Various aspects of these structures are compared with other known oxovanadate structures.

  12. Photoionization spectroscopy of excited states of cold cesium dimers

    CERN Document Server

    Bouloufa, Nadia; Viteau, Matthieu; Chotia, Amodsen; Fioretti, Andrea; Gabbanini, Carlo; Allegrini, Maria; Aymar, Mireille; Comparat, Daniel; Dulieu, Olivier; Pillet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Photoionization spectroscopy of cold cesium dimers obtained by photoassociation of cold atoms in a magneto-optical trap is reported here. In particular, we report on the observation and on the spectroscopic analysis of all the excited states that have actually been used for efficient detection of cold molecules stabilized in the triplet a^3Sigma_u^+ ground state. They are: the (1)^3Sigma_g^+ state connected to the 6s+6p asymptote, the (2)^3Sigma_g^+ and (2)^3Pi_g states connected to the 6s+5d asymptote and finally the (3)^3Sigma_g^+ state connected to the 6s + 7s asymptote. The detection through these states spans a wide range of laser energies, from 8000 to 16500 cm-1, obtained with different laser dyes and techniques. Information on the initial distribution of cold molecules among the different vibrational levels of the a^3Sigma_u^+ ground state is also provided. This spectroscopic knowledge is important when conceiving schemes for quantum manipulation, population transfer and optical detection of cold cesi...

  13. Chromatic instabilities in cesium-doped tungsten bronze nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kenji; Ota, Yosuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Okada, Mika; Oshimura, Nobumitsu; Tofuku, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticles of alkali-doped tungsten bronzes are an excellent near-infrared shielding material, but exhibit slight chromatic instabilities typically upon applications of strong ultra-violet light or heating in humid environment, which acts detrimentally to long-life commercial applications. Origin of the chromatic instabilities in cesium-doped tungsten bronze has been investigated, and it has been found that the coloration and bleaching processes comprised electronic exchanges which accelerate or depress the polaron excitation and the localized surface plasmon resonance. Coloration on UV illumination is evidenced by electron diffraction as due to the formation of HxWO3, which is considered to take place in the surface Cs-deficient WO3 region via the double charge injection mechanism. On the other hand, bleaching on heating in air and in humid environment is shown to accompany the extraction of Cs and electrons from Cs0.33WO3 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis and is concluded to be an oxidation of Cs0.33WO3 on the particle surface.

  14. Hanford Isotope Project strategic business analysis Cesium-137 (Cs-137)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this business analysis is to address the beneficial reuse of Cesium 137 (Cs-137) in order to utilize a valuable national asset and possibly save millions of tax dollars. Food irradiation is the front runner application along with other uses. This business analysis supports the objectives of the Department of Energy National Isotope Strategy distributed in August 1994 which describes the DOE plans for the production and distribution of isotope products and services. As part of the Department`s mission as stated in that document. ``The Department of Energy will also continue to produce and distribute other radioisotopes and enriched stable isotopes for medical diagnostics and therapeutics, industrial, agricultural, and other useful applications on a businesslike basis. This is consistent with the goals and objectives of the National Performance Review. The Department will endeavor to look at opportunities for private sector to co-fund or invest in new ventures. Also, the Department will seek to divest from ventures that can more profitably or reliably be operated by the private sector.``

  15. Synthesis and characterization of strontium and barium guanidinate; Synthese und Charakterisierung von Strontium- und Bariumguanidinat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missong, Ronja

    2016-07-01

    After investigation of the mono-alkali-metal guanidinates in recent years and the structural properties of the various compounds by means of X-ray and neutron diffraction, the guanidinates of the alkaline earth metals seemed to be well investigated. The synthesis of the mono-alkali-metal guanidinates in liquid ammonia has been further developed for the alkaline earth metal guanidinates. Strontium guanidinate was used for the first time to synthesize a compound with a twofold deprotonated guanidinate anion and to study the structure of this compound by means of spectroscopic analysis and different diffraction methods. The structure model was generated from X-ray powder diffraction data, supplemented by density function theory with the help of hydrogen position and subsequently refined and validated with highly resolved neutron diffraction data. The anion has the predicted C3h symmetry and thus resembles the appearance of a Trinacria. The compound of the barium guanidinate with the desired composition Ba (CN3H4) 2 was also investigated by means of IR spectroscopy and different diffraction methods. Structural proposals were developed from X-ray and flight time neutron diffraction data. However, the results of the refinements of these proposals were not satisfactory. In some structure-chemical aspects, however, the individual structural proposals nevertheless produced a uniform picture. The close relationship between the various structural proposals suggests that a final structure could be in many respects consistent with the various structural proposals. [German] Nachdem die Monoalkaliguanidinate in den letzten Jahren untersucht wurden und die strukturellen Eigenschaften der verschiedenen Verbindungen mittels Roentgen- und Neutronenbeugung aufgeklaert werden konnten, schien es aussichtsreich auch die Guanidinate der Erdalkalimetalle zu untersuchen. Die Synthese der Monoalkaliguanidinate in fluessigem Ammoniak wurde fuer die Erdalkalimetallguanidinate weiter entwickelt

  16. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room

  17. Effects of strontium-induced stress on marine microalgae Platymonas subcordiformis (Chlorophyta: Volvocales)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Strontium-induced stress in growth and chlorophyll contents ofPlatymonas subcordiformis was investigated under laboratory condition. The results showed that strontium exposure had little influences in general on growth and chlorophyll contents of the algae except for very high Sr concentrations.The maximum biosorption capacity of strontium ranged from 69.62 to 269.18 mg Sr2+/gdry weight. The algal biomass exhibited high uptake capacity of strontium. Total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and the content of lipid peroxidation products malondialdehyde (MDA) were significantly different in different treatments. SOD activity reached the highest level at 0.09 mmol/L that was about 55.8 % higher than that in the control. The MDA content increased significantly at 0.36 mmol/L, which was 2.15 times higher than that in the control, indicating a state of oxidative stress. With the increase of strontium concentration,the amount of fatty acids decreased.

  18. Removal of cesium from simulated liquid waste with countercurrent two-stage adsorption followed by microfiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Guang-Hui [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Gu, Ping, E-mail: guping@tju.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorption isotherm of cesium by copper ferrocyanide followed a Freundlich model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decontamination factor of cesium was higher in lab-scale test than that in jar test. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A countercurrent two-stage adsorption-microfiltration process was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cesium concentration in the effluent could be calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a new cesium removal process with a higher decontamination factor. - Abstract: Copper ferrocyanide (CuFC) was used as an adsorbent to remove cesium. Jar test results showed that the adsorption capacity of CuFC was better than that of potassium zinc hexacyanoferrate. Lab-scale tests were performed by an adsorption-microfiltration process, and the mean decontamination factor (DF) was 463 when the initial cesium concentration was 101.3 {mu}g/L, the dosage of CuFC was 40 mg/L and the adsorption time was 20 min. The cesium concentration in the effluent continuously decreased with the operation time, which indicated that the used adsorbent retained its adsorption capacity. To use this capacity, experiments on a countercurrent two-stage adsorption (CTA)-microfiltration (MF) process were carried out with CuFC adsorption combined with membrane separation. A calculation method for determining the cesium concentration in the effluent was given, and batch tests in a pressure cup were performed to verify the calculated method. The results showed that the experimental values fitted well with the calculated values in the CTA-MF process. The mean DF was 1123 when the dilution factor was 0.4, the initial cesium concentration was 98.75 {mu}g/L and the dosage of CuFC and adsorption time were the same as those used in the lab-scale test. The DF obtained by CTA-MF process was more than three times higher than the single-stage adsorption in the jar test.

  19. Global searches for microalgae and aquatic plants that can eliminate radioactive cesium, iodine and strontium from the radio-polluted aquatic environment: a bioremediation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shin-Ya; Iwamoto, Koji; Atsumi, Mika; Yokoyama, Akiko; Nakayama, Takeshi; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Inouye, Isao; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011 released an enormously high level of radionuclides into the environment, a total estimation of 6.3 × 10¹⁷ Bq represented by mainly radioactive Cs, Sr, and I. Because these radionuclides are biophilic, an urgent risk has arisen due to biological intake and subsequent food web contamination in the ecosystem. Thus, urgent elimination of radionuclides from the environment is necessary to prevent substantial radiopollution of organisms. In this study, we selected microalgae and aquatic plants that can efficiently eliminate these radionuclides from the environment. The ability of aquatic plants and algae was assessed by determining the elimination rate of radioactive Cs, Sr and I from culture medium and the accumulation capacity of radionuclides into single cells or whole bodies. Among 188 strains examined from microalgae, aquatic plants and unidentified algal species, we identified six, three and eight strains that can accumulate high levels of radioactive Cs, Sr and I from the medium, respectively. Notably, a novel eustigmatophycean unicellular algal strain, nak 9, showed the highest ability to eliminate radioactive Cs from the medium by cellular accumulation. Our results provide an important strategy for decreasing radiopollution in Fukushima area.

  20. Evaluation of Cesium, Strontium, and Lead Sorption, Desorption, and Diffusion in Volcanic Tuffs from Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site: Macroscopic and Spectroscopic Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charalambos Papelis; Wooyong Um

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of radionuclides and other contaminants with minerals and other aquifer materials controls the rate of migration of these contaminants in groundwater. The stronger these interactions, the more a radionuclide will be retarded. Processes such as sorption and diffusion often control the migration of inorganic compounds in aquifers. In addition, these processes are often controlled by the nature of ions of interest, the nature of the aquifer materials, and the specific geochemical conditions. Parameters describing sorption and diffusion of radionuclides and other inorganic ions on aquifer materials are used in transport codes to predict the potential for migration of these contaminants into the accessible environment. Sorption and diffusion studies can help reduce the uncertainty of radionuclide transport modeling on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other nuclear testing areas. For example, reliable sorption equilibrium constants, obtained under a variety of conditions, can be used to suggest a plausible sorption mechanism and to provide retardation parameters that can be used in transport models. In addition, these experiments, performed under a variety of conditions, can lead to models that can accommodate changing geochemical conditions. Desorption studies can probe the reversibility of reactions and test whether the reversibility assumed by equilibrium models is justified. Kinetic studies can be used to probe the time-dependent limitations of reactions and suggest whether an equilibrium or kinetic model may be more appropriate. Finally, spectroscopic studies can be used to distinguish between different sorption mechanisms, and provide further guidance with respect to model selection.