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Sample records for cesium space experiment

  1. Experiments and simulations for the dynamics of cesium in negative hydrogen ion sources for ITER N-NBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutser, Raphael

    2010-07-21

    The injection of fast neutral particles (NBI) into a fusion plasma is an important method for plasma heating and current drive. A source for negative deuterium ions delivering an 1 MeV beam that is accelerated to a specific energy and neutralized by a gas target is required for the ITER-NBI. Cesium seeding is required to extract high negative ion current densities from these sources. The optimization of the cesium homogeneity and control are major objectives to achieve the source requirements imposed by ITER. Within the scope of this thesis, the Monte Carlo based numerical transport simulation CsFlow3D was developed, which is the first computer model that is capable of simulating the flux and the accumulation of cesium on the surfaces of negative-ion sources. Basic studies that support the code development were performed at a dedicated experiment at the University of Augsburg. Input parameters of the ad- and desorption of cesium at ion source relevant conditions were taken from systematic measurements with a quartz micro balance, while the injection rate of the cesium oven at the ion source was determined by surface ionization detection. This experimental setup was used for further investigations of the work function of cesium-coated samples during plasma exposure. (orig.)

  2. Space Experiment Module (SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodell, Charles L.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Experiment Module (SEM) Program is an education initiative sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle Small Payloads Project. The program provides nationwide educational access to space for Kindergarten through University level students. The SEM program focuses on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Within the program, NASA provides small containers or "modules" for students to fly experiments on the Space Shuttle. The experiments are created, designed, built, and implemented by students with teacher and/or mentor guidance. Student experiment modules are flown in a "carrier" which resides in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The carrier supplies power to, and the means to control and collect data from each experiment.

  3. Beyond optical molasses: 3D raman sideband cooling of atomic cesium to high phase-space density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman; Vuletic; Chin; Chu

    2000-01-17

    We demonstrate a simple, general purpose method to cool neutral atoms. A sample containing 3x10(8) cesium atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap is cooled and simultaneously spin polarized in 10 ms at a density of 1.1x10(11) cm (-3) to a phase space density nlambda(3)(dB) = 1/500, which is almost 3 orders of magnitude higher than attainable in free space with optical molasses. The technique is based on 3D degenerate Raman sideband cooling in optical lattices and remains efficient even at densities where the mean lattice site occupation is close to unity.

  4. Experimental and analytical study on cesium iodide behavior in piping in wave experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, A.; Igarashi, M.; Hashimoto, K.; Sugimoto, J. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Dep. of Reactor Safety Research, Tokai-mura (Japan); Yoshino, T. [Toshiba Advanced System Corp., Isago Kawasaki-ku (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    The WAVE (Wide range Aerosol model VErification) experiments have been performed at JAERI to investigate cesium iodide (CsI) deposition onto an inner surface of piping wall under typical severe accident conditions. The test facility consists of a dish containing CsI powder, electrical heaters and a straight pipe of 1.5 m in length with diameter of 0.042m. Nitrogen gas and superheated steam were injected into the pipe to carry the vaporized CsI and to simulate the thermohydraulic condition for the PWR hot-leg inlet. Analyses of the experiments have been conducted with a three-dimensional thermohydraulic code, SPRAC and the radionuclide behavior analysis codes, ART and VICTORIA. A clear difference was found in the deposition behavior between nitrogen and steam conditions as carrier gases. For nitrogen gas, the analyses well reproduced the experimental results by closely coupling the CsI behavior and the detailed thermohydraulic analyses. For steam carrier gas, on the contrary, the experimental results could not be well reproduced without the use of larger aerosol size. Since the observed enhancement of aerosol size in superheated steam cannot be explained by existing models, it is necessary to further investigate this mechanisms by experiment and analysis. (author) 34 figs., 23 refs.

  5. Materials science experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, S. H.; Giessen, B. C.; Glicksman, M. E.; Margrave, J. L.; Markovitz, H.; Nowick, A. S.; Verhoeven, J. D.; Witt, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    The criteria for the selection of the experimental areas and individual experiments were that the experiment or area must make a meaningful contribution to the field of material science and that the space environment was either an absolute requirement for the successful execution of the experiment or that the experiment can be more economically or more conveniently performed in space. A number of experimental areas and individual experiments were recommended for further consideration as space experiments. Areas not considered to be fruitful and others needing additional analysis in order to determine their suitability for conduct in space are also listed. Recommendations were made concerning the manner in which these materials science experiments are carried out and the related studies that should be pursued.

  6. The GAMMA-400 Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongi, M.

    2014-06-01

    GAMMA-400 is a new space experiment which will study gamma rays and cosmic rays from about 100 MeV up to some TeVs. The proposed instrument has an angular resolution ˜ 0.1 degrees at 10 GeV and better than ˜ 0.02 degrees above 100 GeV, and an energy resolution ˜ 1% at E > 100 GeV for gamma rays. With these characteristics the experiment will be able to contribute to the search for signatures of Dark Matter, and to the study of Galactic and ex-tragalactic gamma sources and diffuse emission. A large segmented calorimeter more than 25 X0 deep will allow the study of high-energy electrons, and the measurement of the flux of protons and nuclei up to the "knee" region.

  7. Performance experiments with a shock-tunnel-driven argon-cesium MHD disk generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veefkind, A.; Karavasilev, P.; Wang, D.

    1988-08-01

    An extensive amount of data has been collected concerning MHD disk generator performance under different operation conditions. The results are obtained from a large number of runs with the Eindhoven shock tunnel facility. The runs are carried out at different stagnation temperatures, stagnation pressures, external loads, and seed fractions. Two channels have been used, one with and one without inlet swirl. Voltage, pressure, and radiation measurements have been employed. Current to voltage characteristics have been measured for different seed ratios. The enthalpy extractions of the disk with inlet swirl are found to be comparable with similar experiments with linear channels. The enthalpy extractions of the radial disk are found to be lower. A high enthalpy extraction (18 percent at a stagnation temperature of 2100 K) is reported at a comparatively low stagnation pressure (4.2 bar). A one-dimensional-gasdynamical analysis using measured voltages as an input is discussed. The measured fluctuations of electron temperature and density indicate that the results are obtained in a nonuniform plasma. 10 references.

  8. The PAMELA experiment in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonvicini, V. E-mail: bonvicini@trieste.infn.it; Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M.; Mocchiutti, E.; Schiavon, P.; Scian, G.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Bergstroem, D.; Carlson, P.; Francke, T.; Lund, J.; Pearce, M.; Hof, M.; Menn, W.; Simon, M.; Stephens, S.A.; Ambriola, M.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Ciacio, F.; Circella, M.; De Marzo, C.; Giglietto, N.; Marangelli, B.; Mirizzi, N.; Spinelli, P.; Adriani, O.; Boscherini, M.; D' Alessandro, R.; Finetti, N.; Grandi, M.; Papini, P.; Perego, A.; Piccardi, S.; Spillantini, P.; Vannuccini, E.; Bartalucci, S.; Marino, L.; Ricci, M.; Spataro, B.; Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; De Pascale, M.P.; Furano, G.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Sparvoli, R.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.; Krizmanic, J.F.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ormes, J.F.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Bravar, U.; Stochaj, S.J.; Bertazzoni, S.; Salsano, A.; Bazilevskaja, G.; Grigorjeva, A.; Mukhametshin, R.; Stozhokov, Y.; Bogomolv, E.; Krutkov, S.; Vasiljev, G.; Galper, A.M.; Koldashov, S.V.; Korotkov, M.G.; Mikhailov, V.V.; Moissev, A.A.; Ozerov, J.V.; Voronov, S.A.; Yurkin, Y.; Castellini, G.; Gabbanini, A.; Taccetti, F.; Tesi, M.; Vignoli, V

    2001-04-01

    We provide in this paper a status report of the space experiment PAMELA. PAMELA aims primarily to measure the flux of antiparticles, namely antiprotons and positrons, in cosmic rays with unprecedented statistics over a large energy range. In addition, it will measure the light nuclear components of cosmic rays, investigate phenomena connected to Solar and Earth physics and it will search for cosmic ray antinuclei with sensitivity better than 10{sup -7} in the He-bar/He ratio. PAMELA consists of a magnet spectrometer, a transition radiation detector, an imaging calorimeter, a time of flight system and an anticoincidence detector. The apparatus will be installed on board of the Russian satellite of the Resurs type in a polar orbit at about 680 km of altitude. The launch is foreseen for late 2002/early 2003.

  9. Towards precision measurements of parity violation in cesium: construction of a new experiment using an active detection method by induced emission; Vers des mesures precises de violation de la parite dans le cesium: construction d'une experience nouvelle utilisant une detection active par emission induite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquier, Ph

    1991-04-15

    Experiments that show the breaking of parity invariance in atoms can be considered as valid tests of the electroweak theory complementary to those made at high energies. The accurate measurement of the weak charge of a cesium nucleus would bring useful information on radiative corrections. The experiment, that is proposed in this work concerns the strongly forbidden 6S-7S transition of cesium at 540 nm, aims at reaching an accuracy of 1% for this measurement. Cesium atoms are first excited from 6S level to 7S level by a pulsed laser (10 ns) in the presence of a longitudinal electrical field. Then they are detected through induced emission by a probe laser set on 7S-6P(3/2) transition at 1.470 {mu}m. The transitory amplification of the probe beam can be over 100%.The vapour presents a strong plane dichroism due to the alignment of 7S level through the linear polarization of the pumping beam. The weak interaction in the atom makes this alignment tilt by a small angle (1 to 10 micro-radians) that the measurement of the polarization of the amplified probe enables us to determine. In this work we have described the 3 steps we have passed through: the test with a transverse field and a continuous laser beam, the use of a pulsed laser, and the setting of a longitudinal configuration. Preliminary results show that the experiment will be useful and feasible.

  10. MISSE 5 Thin Films Space Exposure Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Gale A.; Kinard, William H.; Jones, James L.

    2007-01-01

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) is a set of space exposure experiments using the International Space Station (ISS) as the flight platform. MISSE 5 is a co-operative endeavor by NASA-LaRC, United Stated Naval Academy, Naval Center for Space Technology (NCST), NASA-GRC, NASA-MSFC, Boeing, AZ Technology, MURE, and Team Cooperative. The primary experiment is performance measurement and monitoring of high performance solar cells for U.S. Navy research and development. A secondary experiment is the telemetry of this data to ground stations. A third experiment is the measurement of low-Earth-orbit (LEO) low-Sun-exposure space effects on thin film materials. Thin films can provide extremely efficacious thermal control, designation, and propulsion functions in space to name a few applications. Solar ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen are major degradation mechanisms in LEO. This paper is an engineering report of the MISSE 5 thm films 13 months space exposure experiment.

  11. Children's Experience of Public Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsley, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Children and young people regard the external physical environment as important for their needs. Their use of space varies according to age and circumstance and includes designated play and leisure facilities as well as other informal areas within their neighbourhoods. However, children have little influence over the development of public space as…

  12. The Creation of Experience Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Thyrrestrup

    2013-01-01

    for the theoretical discussions, mainly inspired by Harvey (2009), Brenner (2004) and Mackinnon (2010), to put in to context the relations between national – regional – municipal, in the light of relational space (Massey, 2005) and the quality of place (Healey, 2010). The third space of Soja (1996) will be addressed...

  13. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  14. Biotechnological experiments in space flights on board of space stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.

    2012-07-01

    Space flight conditions are stressful for any plant and cause structural-functional transition due to mobiliation of adaptivity. In space flight experiments with pea tissue, wheat and arabidopsis we found anatomical-morphological transformations and biochemistry of plants. In following experiments, tissue of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana), potato (Solanum tuberosum), callus culture and culture and bulbs of suffron (Crocus sativus), callus culture of ginseng (Panax ginseng) were investigated. Experiments with stevia carried out in special chambers. The duration of experiment was 8-14 days. Board lamp was used for illumination of the plants. After experiment the plants grew in the same chamber and after 50 days the plants were moved into artificial ionexchange soil. The biochemical analysis of plants was done. The total concentration of glycozides and ratio of stevioside and rebauside were found different in space and ground plants. In following generations of stevia after flight the total concentration of stevioside and rebauside remains higher than in ground plants. Experiments with callus culture of suffron carried out in tubes. Duration of space flight experiment was 8-167 days. Board lamp was used for illumination of the plants. We found picrocitina pigment in the space plants but not in ground plants. Tissue culture of ginseng was grown in special container in thermostate under stable temperature of 22 ± 0,5 C. Duration of space experiment was from 8 to 167 days. Biological activity of space flight culutre was in 5 times higher than the ground culture. This difference was observed after recultivation of space flight samples on Earth during year after flight. Callus tissue of potato was grown in tubes in thermostate under stable temperature of 22 ± 0,5 C. Duration of space experiment was from 8 to 14 days. Concentration of regenerates in flight samples was in 5 times higher than in ground samples. The space flight experiments show, that microgravity and other

  15. High temperature superconductivity space experiment (HTSSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, J. C.; Nisenoff, M.; Price, G.; Wolf, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment dealing with high-temperature superconducting devices and components in space is discussed. A variety of devices (primarily passive microwave and millimeter-wave components) has been procured and will be integrated with a cryogenic refrigerating and data acquisition system to form the space package, which will be launched in late 1992. This space experiment is expected to demonstrate that this technology is sufficiently robust to survive the space environment and that the technology has the potential to improve the operation of space systems significantly. The devices for the initial launch have been evaluated electrically, thermally, and mechanically, and will be integrated into the final space package early in 1991. The performance of the devices is summarized, and some potential applications of this technology in space systems are outlined.

  16. Spaces of interaction, places for experience

    CERN Document Server

    Benyon, David

    2014-01-01

    Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience is a book about Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), interaction design (ID) and user experience (UX) in the age of ubiquitous computing. The book explores interaction and experience through the different spaces that contribute to interaction until it arrives at an understanding of the rich and complex places for experience that will be the focus of the next period for interaction design. The book begins by looking at the multilayered nature of interaction and UX-not just with new technologies, but with technologies that are embedded in the world. Peop

  17. The City's new hybrid experience spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Lasse; Kiib, Hans

    2007-01-01

    from an industrial mindset towards a new pragmatic philosophy in the development of our cities, cities based on knowledge and culture. The term "hybrid urban spaces" breaks down the traditional division between public and private and seeks to choreograph the city as the space of experience which both...

  18. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction.

  19. Preliminary safe-handling experiments on a mixture of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate/nitrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, R.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Cady, H.H. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Site's evaluation of the potential hazards associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes generated when ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from waste supernates in the 1950s, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) subcontracted with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform a series of sensitivity tests. These test supplement PNL's thermal sensitivity testing results on the reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide (Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}) and nitrates and nitrites (Burger and Schelle 1991). LANL used a selected set of their standard tests to determine the sensitivity of a mixture of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} (FECN-1) and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite oxidant to nonthermal and thermal stimuli. The stoichiometric ratio of oxidant to Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in the tested mixture FECN-1 was 1.1:1. The appendix presents the results of the LANL testing of the sensitivity of FECN-1 to initiation by mechanical impact, spark, friction, and various thermal conditions. In addition to the sensitivity testing, LANL used an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) to estimate the behavior of large batches of the mixture.

  20. Preliminary safe-handling experiments on a mixture of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate/nitrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Cady, H.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Site`s evaluation of the potential hazards associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes generated when ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from waste supernates in the 1950s, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) subcontracted with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform a series of sensitivity tests. These test supplement PNL`s thermal sensitivity testing results on the reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide (Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}) and nitrates and nitrites (Burger and Schelle 1991). LANL used a selected set of their standard tests to determine the sensitivity of a mixture of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} (FECN-1) and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite oxidant to nonthermal and thermal stimuli. The stoichiometric ratio of oxidant to Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in the tested mixture FECN-1 was 1.1:1. The appendix presents the results of the LANL testing of the sensitivity of FECN-1 to initiation by mechanical impact, spark, friction, and various thermal conditions. In addition to the sensitivity testing, LANL used an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) to estimate the behavior of large batches of the mixture.

  1. Cell biology experiments conducted in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    A review of cell biology experiments conducted during the first two decades of space flight is provided. References are tabulated for work done with six types of living test system: isolated viruses, bacteriophage-host, bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, protozoans, and small groups of cells (such as hamster cell tissue and fertilized frog eggs). The general results of studies involving the survival of cells in space, the effect of space flight on growing cultures, the biological effects of multicharged high-energy particles, and the effects of space flight on the genetic apparatus of microorganisms are summarized. It is concluded that cell systems remain sufficiently stable during space flight to permit experimentation with models requiring a fixed cell line during the space shuttle era.

  2. Double-slit experiment in momentum space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I. P.; Seipt, D.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-08-01

    Young's classic double-slit experiment demonstrates the reality of interference when waves and particles travel simultaneously along two different spatial paths. Here, we propose a double-slit experiment in momentum space, realized in the free-space elastic scattering of vortex electrons. We show that this process proceeds along two paths in momentum space, which are well localized and well separated from each other. For such vortex beams, the (plane-wave) amplitudes along the two paths acquire adjustable phase shifts and produce interference fringes in the final angular distribution. We argue that this experiment can be realized with the present-day technology. We show that it gives experimental access to the Coulomb phase, a quantity which plays an important role in all charged particle scattering but which usual scattering experiments are insensitive to.

  3. Space science experiments aboard ATS-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, R.; King, W.

    1972-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Experiment (EME) package is mounted on the ATS-F spacecraft to a structure that is located on top of the 30-foot parabolic reflector hub. The eight experiments of the EME package are designed to study the environment in space at synchronous altitude and to obtain information on electromagnetic-ionospheric interactions. Six of these experiments will obtain data on charged particles of several different types. A seventh experiment is to provide magnetic field data. The eighth experiment is concerned with solar cell degradation studies.

  4. Cesium chloride: preventive medicine for radioactive cesium exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, E R; Sohler, A; Pfeiffer, C C

    1988-06-01

    Cesium is produced in high yield fission of uranium and plutonium. Radioactive cesium needles are a radiation hazard for radiotherapists. In this age of nuclear reactors, i.e. Chernobyl, radioactive cesium exposure may be a growing problem. Furthermore, there are numerous therapeutic potentials for cesium therapy, i.e. cancer, depression and schizophrenia. We explored the clearance of cesium in man and found that an oral dose of 50 mg maintains elevated blood cesium levels for 80 days. Cesium is accumulated mainly in the red blood cell fraction. Larger doses (6-9 grams) produce no observed harmful effects and maintain elevated blood levels of cesium for more than a year. Our data suggests there is a threshold of maximum cesium saturation in blood; if maintained, any additional cesium exposure, i.e. radioactive cesium, would be excreted at a more rapid rate. It is probable that large cesium doses can protect against radiation toxicity by blocking sites on red blood cells and thereby result in increased excretion and clearance of the radioactive forms of cesium. This hypothesis should be easily testable in laboratory animals.

  5. Festival Spaces and the Visitor Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A festival implies a special use of space for both the organiser and the visitor.\\ud On the practical level of events management, it is a series of temporary per -\\ud formance venues presenting special organisational problems. For the festivalgoers,\\ud it is a space set apart to which they come seeking an extraordinary\\ud experience. This experience can have an emotional and symbolic significance,\\ud which they then come to associate with the place itself.\\ud For this reason, festivals and sp...

  6. Double-slit experiment in momentum space

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, I P; Surzhykov, A; Fritzsche, S

    2016-01-01

    Young's classic double-slit experiment demonstrates the reality of interference when waves and particles travel simultaneously along two different spatial paths. Here, we propose a double-slit experiment in momentum space. We show that elastic scattering of vortex electrons proceeds via two paths in momentum space, which are well localized and well separated from each other. For such vortex beams, the (plane-wave) amplitudes along the two paths acquire adjustable phase shifts and produce interference fringes in the final angular distribution. We argue that this experiment can be realized with the present day technology. We show that it gives experimental access to the Coulomb phase, a quantity which plays an important role in all charged particle scattering but which usual scattering experiments are insensitive to.

  7. Evaporative cooling of cesium atoms in the gravito-optical surface trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hammes, M; Grimm, R

    2000-01-01

    We report on cooling of an atomic cesium gas closely above an evanescent-wave. Our first evaporation experiments show a temperature reduction from 10muK down to 300nK along with a gain in phase-space density of almost two orders of magnitude. In a series of measurements of heating and spin depolarization an incoherent background of resonant photons in the evanescent-wave diode laser light was found to be the limiting factor at this stage.

  8. Results of space experiment program "interferon"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tálas, Margarita; Bátkai, László; Stöger, Ivana; Nagy, Károly; Hiros, László; Konstantinova, Irina; Rykova, Marina; Mozgovaya, Irina; Guseva, Olga; Kozharinov, Valerii

    The results of the biological space experiment "Interferon" performed by two international cosmonaut teams (26 May 1980, and 16 May 1981) aboard space laboratory Solyut-6 are reported: (1) Human lymphocytes separated from blood of healthy donors and placed into "Interferon I" equipment could be kept for 7 days in suspension culture under spaceflight conditons. Interferon production could be induced in human lymphocytes by preparations of different origin: virus, synthetic polyribonucleotides, bacterial protein and plant pigment. An increased lymphocyte interferon production in space laboratory compared to ground control was observed. (2) Human interferon preparations and interferon inducers placed in space laboratory at room temperature for 7 days maintained their biological activity. (3) A decrease of induced interferon production and natural killer activity of lymphocytes isolated from peripheral blood of cosmonauts was observed on the 1st day on Earth after 7-days spaceflight.

  9. On minimalism in architecture - space as experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilski Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Architecture has to be experienced to be understood. The complexity of the experience is seen through a better understanding of the relationship between objectivity (architecture and subjectivity (our life. Being physically, emotionally and psychologically aware of the space we occupy is an experience that could be described as being present, which is a sensation that is personal and difficult to explicitly describe. Research into experience through perception and emotion positions architecture within scientific fields, in particular psychological disciplines. Relying on the standpoints of Immanuel Kant, the paper considers the juxtaposition between (minimalism in architecture and philosophy on the topic of experience. Starting from the basic aspects of perception and representation of the world around us, a thesis is presented in which the notions of silence and light as experienced in minimalism (in architecture are considered as adequate counterparts to Kant’s factors of experience - the awareness of the objective order of events and the impossibility to perceive time itself. Through a case study we verify the starting hypothesis on minimalism (in architecture whereby space becomes an experience of how the world touches us.

  10. U.S. biological experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.

    1981-01-01

    The history of biologic experimentation in space is traced. Early balloon and rocket borne animals showed no abnormalities on the macroscale, and biosatellite launches with bacteria and amoebae revealed no microscopic dysfunctions. Adult Drosophila flies on board Cosmos spacecraft died with a shortened lifespan, while their offspring lived full lifespans. Green pepper plants grown in weightlessness showed a different orientation, but no physiological disturbances. Normal bone growth in rats has been found to almost cease after 11 days in space, and the mean life span of red blood cells decreases by four days. A series of experiments designed by U.S. scientists will be performed on primates provided and flown by the U.S.S.R. Finally, experiments on board Spacelab will involve determination of the persistence of circadian rhythms in bacteria and humans.

  11. Exobiology experiment concepts for Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Lynn D.; Devincenzi, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    The exobiology discipline uses ground based and space flight resources to conduct a multidiscipline research effort dedicated to understanding fundamental questions about the origin, evolution, and distribution of life and life related molecules throughout the universe. Achievement of this understanding requires a methodical research strategy which traces the history of the biogenic elements from their origins in stellar formation processes through the chemical evolution of molecules essential for life to the origin and evolution of primitive and, ultimately, complex living species. Implementation of this strategy requires the collection and integration of data from solar system exploration spacecraft and ground based and orbiting observatories and laboratories. The Science Lab Module (SLM) of the Space Station orbiting complex may provide an ideal setting in which to perform certain classes of experiments which form the cornerstone of exobiology research. These experiments could demonstrate the pathways and processes by which biomolecules are synthesized under conditions that stimulate the primitive earth, planetary atmospheres, cometary ices, and interstellar dust grains. Exobiology experiments proposed for the Space Station generally fall into four classes: interactions among gases and grains (nucleation, accretion, gas-grain reactions), high energy chemistry for the production of biomolecules, physical and chemical processes occurring on an artificial comet, and tests of the theory of panspermia.

  12. Adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchek, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.volchek@ec.gc.ca [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Miah, Muhammed Yusuf [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Noakhali Science and Technology University (Bangladesh); Kuang, Wenxing; DeMaleki, Zack [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Tezel, F. Handan [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar was investigated in a range of temperatures and cesium concentrations. {yields} The pseudo-second order kinetic model produced a good fit with the experimental kinetic data. {yields} Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm adsorption model. {yields} The interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar was dominated by chemical adsorption. - Abstract: The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions was studied in series of bench-scale tests. The effects of cesium concentration, temperature and contact time on process kinetics and equilibrium were evaluated. Experiments were carried out in a range of initial cesium concentrations from 0.0103 to 10.88 mg L{sup -1} and temperatures from 278 to 313 K using coupons of cement mortar immersed in the solutions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive {sup 137}Cs. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Depending on the initial cesium concentration, its equilibrium concentration in solution ranged from 0.0069 to 8.837 mg L{sup -1} while the respective surface concentration on coupons varied from 0.0395 to 22.34 {mu}g cm{sup -2}. Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm model for the entire test duration. Test results revealed that an increase in temperature resulted in an increase in adsorption rate and a decrease in equilibrium cesium surface concentration. Among several kinetic models considered, the pseudo-second order reaction model was found to be the best to describe the kinetic test results in the studied range of concentrations. The adsorption activation energy determined from Arrhenius equation was found to be approximately 55.9 kJ mol{sup -1} suggesting that chemisorption was the prevalent mechanism of interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar.

  13. Adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchek, Konstantin; Miah, Muhammed Yusuf; Kuang, Wenxing; DeMaleki, Zack; Tezel, F Handan

    2011-10-30

    The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions was studied in series of bench-scale tests. The effects of cesium concentration, temperature and contact time on process kinetics and equilibrium were evaluated. Experiments were carried out in a range of initial cesium concentrations from 0.0103 to 10.88 mg L(-1) and temperatures from 278 to 313 K using coupons of cement mortar immersed in the solutions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive (137)Cs. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Depending on the initial cesium concentration, its equilibrium concentration in solution ranged from 0.0069 to 8.837 mg L(-1) while the respective surface concentration on coupons varied from 0.0395 to 22.34 μg cm(-2). Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm model for the entire test duration. Test results revealed that an increase in temperature resulted in an increase in adsorption rate and a decrease in equilibrium cesium surface concentration. Among several kinetic models considered, the pseudo-second order reaction model was found to be the best to describe the kinetic test results in the studied range of concentrations. The adsorption activation energy determined from Arrhenius equation was found to be approximately 55.9 kJ mol(-1) suggesting that chemisorption was the prevalent mechanism of interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar.

  14. Deep space experiment to measure $G$

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, Michael R; Schubert, Gerald; Trimble, Virginia; Kopeikin, Sergei; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Responding to calls from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for new proposals to measure the gravitational constant $G$, we offer an interesting experiment in deep space employing the classic gravity train mechanism. Our setup requires three bodies: a larger layered solid sphere with a cylindrical hole through its center, a much smaller retroreflector which will undergo harmonic motion within the hole and a host spacecraft with laser ranging capabilities to measure round trip light-times to the retroreflector but ultimately separated a significant distance away from the sphere-retroreflector apparatus. Measurements of the period of oscillation of the retroreflector in terms of host spacecraft clock time using existing technology could give determinations of $G$ nearly three orders of magnitude more accurate than current measurements here on Earth. However, significant engineering advances in the release mechanism of the apparatus from the host spacecraft will likely be necessary. Issues with regard to the ...

  15. An overview of Korean astronaut’s space experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Yi, S. Y.; Kim, K. S.; Kang, S. W.; Choi, G. H.; Sim, E. S.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the scientific space experiments in the Korean Astronaut Program (KAP) that were conducted on the International Space Station (ISS), beginning with launch of the Soyuz TMA-12 spacecraft with the first Korean astronaut and two Russian astronauts on April 8, 2008 and returning to Earth on April 19, 2008. During the 10 days aboard the ISS, the Korean astronaut successfully completed thirteen scientific experiments in biology, life science, material science, earth science, and system engineering, five educational space experiments, and three kinds of international collaboration experiments. These experiments were the first Korean manned space experiments and these missions were the first steps toward the manned space exploration by Korea. In this paper, we briefly discuss the descriptions, conduct, and results of the space experiments and discuss future plans. In addition, the lessons learned with respect to the performing of these manned space experiments on the ISS are presented.

  16. Clinical effects of cesium intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Petr; Zanoni, Lourdes Zélia

    2010-06-01

    The knowledge about cesium metabolism and toxicity is sparse. Oral intake of cesium chloride has been widely promoted on the basis of the hypothesis referred to as "high pH cancer therapy", a complimentary alternative medicine method for cancer treatment. However, no properly confirmed tumor regression was reported so far in all probability because of neither theoretical nor experimental grounds for this proposal. The aim of the present review was to resume and discuss the material currently available on cesium salts and their applications in medicine. The presence of cesium in the cell does not guarantee high pH of its content, and there is no clinical evidence to support the claims that cancer cells are vulnerable to cesium. Cesium is relatively safe; signs of its mild toxicity are gastrointestinal distress, hypotension, syncope, numbness, or tingling of the lips. Nevertheless, total cesium intakes of 6 g/day have been found to produce severe hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, prolonged QTc interval, episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, with or without torsade de pointes, and even acute heart arrest. However, full information on its acute and chronic toxicity is not sufficiently known. Health care providers should be aware of the cardiac complications, as a result of careless cesium usage as alternative medicine.

  17. Mineral resource of the month: cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    The article offers information on cesium, a golden alkali metal derived from the Latin word caesium which means bluish gray. It mentions that cesium is the first element discovered with the use of spectroscopy. It adds that the leading producer and supplier of cesium is Canada and there are 50,000 kilograms of cesium consumed of the world in a year. Moreover, it states that only 85% of the cesium formate can be retrieved and recycled.

  18. DFB-ridge laser diodes at 894 nm for Cesium atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bandel, N.; Garcia, M.; Lecomte, M.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Driss, O.; Parrilaud, O.; Krakowski, M.; Gruet, F.; Matthey, R.; Mileti, G.

    2016-02-01

    Time and frequency applications are in need of high accuracy and high stability clocks. Optically pumped compact industrial Cesium atomic clocks are a promising approach that could satisfy these demands. However, the stability of these clocks relies, among others, on the performances of the laser diodes that are used. This issue has led the III-V Lab to commit to the European Euripides-LAMA project that aims to provide competitive compact optical Cesium clocks for ground applications. This work will provide key experience for further space technology qualification. III-V Lab is in charge of the design, fabrication and reliability of Distributed-Feedback diodes (DFB) at 894 nm (D1 line of Cesium) and 852 nm (D2 line). LTF-Unine is in charge of their spectral characterisation. The use of D1 line for pumping will provide simplified clock architecture compared to the D2 line pumping thanks to simpler atomic transitions and a larger spectral separation between lines in the 894 nm case. Also, D1 line pumping overcomes the issue of unpumped "idle states" that occur with D2 line. The modules should provide narrow linewidth (= 10 Hz and 109 Hz2/Hz @ f >= 10 Hz.

  19. Optical and evaporative cooling of cesium atoms in the gravito-optical surface trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hammes, M; Druzhinina, V; Moslener, U; Manek-Hönninger, I; Grimm, R

    2000-01-01

    We report on cooling of an atomic cesium gas closely above an evanescent-wave atom mirror. At high densitities, optical cooling based on inelastic reflections is found to be limited by a density-dependent excess temperature and trap loss due to ultracold collisions involving repulsive molecular states. Nevertheless, very good starting conditions for subsequent evaporative cooling are obtained. Our first evaporation experiments show a temperature reduction from 10muK down to 300nK along with a gain in phase-space density of almost two orders of magnitude.

  20. Relaxation mechanisms affecting magneto-optical resonances in an extremely thin cell: experiment and theory for the cesium D$_1$ line

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, M; Ferber, R; Gahbauer, F; Kalnins, U; Kalvans, L; Rundans, R; Sarkisyan, D

    2014-01-01

    We have measured magneto-optical signals obtained by exciting the $D_1$ line of cesium atoms confined to an extremely thin cell (ETC), whose walls are separated by less than one micrometer, and developed an improved theoretical model to describe these signals with experimental precision. The theoretical model was based on the optical Bloch equations and included all neighboring hyperfine transitions, the mixing of the magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, and the Doppler effect, as in previous studies. However, in order to model the extreme conditions in the ETC more realistically, the model was extended to include a unified treatment of transit relaxation and wall collisions with relaxation rates that were obtained directly from the thermal velocities of the atoms and the length scales involved. Furthermore, the interaction of the atoms with different regions of the laser beam were modeled separately to account for the varying laser beam intensity over the beam profile as well as saturation effec...

  1. Physics of Colloids in Space: Microgravity Experiment Launched, Installed, and Activated on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment is a Microgravity Fluids Physics investigation that is presently located in an Expedite the Process of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack on the International Space Station. PCS was launched to the International Space Station on April 19, 2001, activated on May 31, 2001, and will continue to operate about 90 hr per week through May 2002.

  2. Overview of International Space Station orbital environments exposure flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Schmidl, Danny; Finckenor, Miria; Neish, Michael; Imagawa, Kichiro; Dinguirard, Magdeleine; van Eesbeek, Marc; Naumov, S. F.; Krylov, A. N.; Mishina, L. V.; Gerasimov, Y. I.; Sokolova, S. P.; Kurilyonok, A. O.; Alexandrov, N. G.; Smirnova, T. N.

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of International Space Station (ISS) on-orbit environments exposure flight experiments. International teams are flying, or preparing to fly, externally mounted materials exposure trays and sensor packages. The samples in these trays are exposed to a combination of induced molecular contamination, ultraviolet radiation, atomic oxygen, ionizing radiation, micrometeoroids and orbital debris. Exposed materials samples are analyzed upon return. Typical analyses performed on these samples include optical property measurements, X-ray photo spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles, scanning electron microscope (SEM) surface morphology and materials properties measurements. The objective of these studies is to characterize the long-term effects of the natural and induced environments on spacecraft materials. Ongoing flight experiments include the U.S. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) program, the Japanese Micro-Particles Capturer and Space Environment Exposure Device (SM/MPAC&SEED) experiment, the Russian SKK and Kromka experiments from RSC-Energia, and the Komplast flight experiment. Flight experiments being prepared for flight, or in development stage, include the Japanese Space Environment Data Acquisition Attached Payload (SEDA-AP), the Russian BKDO monitoring package from RSC-Energia, and the European Materials Exposure and Degradation Experiment (MEDET). Results from these ISS flight experiments will be crucial to extending the performance and life of long-duration space systems such as Space Station, Space Transportation System, and other missions for Moon and Mars exploration.

  3. Historical Cost Curves for Hydrogen Masers and Cesium Beam Frequency and Timing Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, D. S.; Moore, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Historical cost curves were developed for hydrogen masers and cesium beam standards used for frequency and timing calibration in the Deep Space Network. These curves may be used to calculate the cost of future hydrogen masers or cesium beam standards in either future or current dollars. The cesium beam standards are decreasing in cost by about 2.3% per year since 1966, and hydrogen masers are decreasing by about 0.8% per year since 1978 relative to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration inflation index.

  4. Cesium chloride-induced torsades de pointes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Matthew; Gordon, Wendy; Baulcomb, Daisy; Mattman, Andre; Mock, Tom; Brown, Robert

    2009-09-01

    The chloride salt of cesium, a group 1A element, is gaining popularity as an alternative treatment of advanced cancers. Cesium chloride has primarily been used in cardiovascular research for arrhythmogenesis in animals because of its potassium-blocking effects. The present report describes a 45-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer who experienced repeated episodes of torsades de pointes polymorphic ventricular tachycardia after several months of oral cesium therapy. There was a clear temporal relationship between cesium ingestion and the arrhythmia, which later resolved following discontinuation of cesium therapy. Serial cesium plasma and whole blood levels were measured over the ensuing six months and pharmacokinetic analysis was performed.

  5. The Information Science Experiment System - The computer for science experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foudriat, Edwin C.; Husson, Charles

    1989-01-01

    The concept of the Information Science Experiment System (ISES), potential experiments, and system requirements are reviewed. The ISES is conceived as a computer resource in space whose aim is to assist computer, earth, and space science experiments, to develop and demonstrate new information processing concepts, and to provide an experiment base for developing new information technology for use in space systems. The discussion covers system hardware and architecture, operating system software, the user interface, and the ground communication link.

  6. INSPIRE - Premission. [Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  7. Presence Experiences - the eventalisation of urban space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pløger, John

    2010-01-01

    Cultural events are, as part of an urban development strategy, about (symbolic) representations, but for the human beings participating in the event it may include acts of in/visibility (anonymity versus expressivity) and different articulations of meaning or subjectivity in space. A particular...... and presence qualities should be experienced as emotional, sensate, and cognitively important, the how of the eventalisation is important. Different aspects of the eventalisation of spaces—such as the subject qualities, or singular multiplicity, of circumstances—are discussed here that point to the vital...

  8. Hybrid Experience Space for Cultural Heritage Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Niels Einar; Christensen, Mogens Fiil; Mayerhofer, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    by daily use of experience products like computer-games, IMAX cinemas and theme parks featuring virtual reality installations. “It’s a question of stone-axe displays versus Disney-power installations” as one of the involved museum professionals point it, “but we don’t want any of these possibilities...

  9. The theory and application of space microbiology: China's experiences in space experiments and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changting

    2017-02-01

    Microorganisms exhibit high adaptability to extreme environments of outer space via phenotypic and genetic changes. These changes may affect astronauts in the space environment as well as on Earth because mutant microbes will inevitably return with the spacecraft. However, the role and significance of these phenotypic changes and the underlying mechanisms are important unresolved questions in the field of space biology. By reviewing, especially the Chinese studies, we propose a space microbial molecular effect theory, that is, the space environment affects the nature of genes and the molecular structure of microorganisms to produce phenotypic changes. In this review, we discussed three basic theories for the research of space microbiology, including (1) space microbial pathogenicity and virulence mutations and the human mutualism theory; (2) space microbial drug-resistance mutations and metabolism associated with space pharmaceuticals theory; (3) space corrosion, microbial decontamination, and new materials technology theory.

  10. Giving Children Space: A Phenomenological Exploration of Student Experiences in Space Science Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of 4th grade students in an inquiry-based space science classroom. At the heart of the study lies the essential question: What is the lived experience of children engaged in the process of space science inquiry? Through the methodology of phenomenological inquiry, the author investigates the essence of the lived…

  11. AMS experiment takes off for Kennedy Space Center August 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2010-01-01

    Geneva, 18 August 2010. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), an experiment that will search for antimatter and dark matter in space, leaves CERN next Tuesday on the next leg of its journey to the International Space Station. The AMS detector is being transported from CERN to Geneva International Airport in preparation for its planned departure from Switzerland on 26 August, when it will be flown to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on board a US Air Force Galaxy transport aircraft.

  12. Precision Cosmic Ray physics with space-born experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incagli, Marco

    2016-07-01

    More than 100 years after their discoveries, cosmic rays have been extensively studied, both with balloon experiments and with ground observatories. More recently, the possibility of mounting detectors on satellites or on the International Space Station has allowed for a long duration (several years) continuous observation of primary cosmic rays, i.e. before their interaction with the earth atmosphere, thus opening a new regime of precision measurements. In this review, recent results from major space experiments, as Pamela, AMS02 and Fermi, as well as next generation experiments proposed for the International Space Station, for standalone satellites or for the yet to come Chinese Space Station, will be presented. The impact of these experiment on the knowledge of Cosmic Ray propagation will also be discussed.

  13. Modal identification experiment design for large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung M.; Doiron, Harold H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an on-orbit modal identification experiment design for large space structures. Space Station Freedom (SSF) systems design definition and structural dynamic models were used as representative large space structures for optimizing experiment design. Important structural modes of study models were selected to provide a guide for experiment design and used to assess the design performance. A pulsed random excitation technique using propulsion jets was developed to identify closely-spaced modes. A measuremenat location selection approach was developed to estimate accurate mode shapes as well as frequencies and damping factors. The data acquisition system and operational scenarios were designed to have minimal impacts on the SSF. A comprehensive simulation was conducted to assess the overall performance of the experiment design.

  14. First among equals: The selection of NASA space science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugle, John E.

    1990-01-01

    The process is recounted by which NASA and the scientific community have, since 1958, selected individual experiments for NASA space missions. It explores the scientific and organizational issues involved in the selection process and discusses the significance of the process in the character and accomplishments of U.S. space activities.

  15. Bubble Behavior in Nucleate Boiling Experiment Aboard the Space Shuttle

    OpenAIRE

    Koeln, Justin P.; Boulware, Jeffrey C.; Ban, Heng

    2009-01-01

    Boiling dynamics in microgravity need to be better understood before heat transfer systems based on boiling mechanism can be developed for space applications. This paper presents the results of a nucleate boiling experiment aboard Space Shuttle Endeavor (STS- 108). The experiment utilized nickel-chromium resistance wire to boil water in microgravity, and the data was recorded with a CCD camera and six thermistors. This data was analyzed to determine the behavior of bubble formation, detachmen...

  16. Multinational Experiment 7. Space: Dependencies, Vulnerabilities and Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Identification System (AIS) data and specialised intelligence Multinational Experiment 7 2-9 Space Fundamentals 2-10 Multinational Experiment 7...Distress and Safety Service GPS Global Positioning System GSM Global System for Mobile Communications HEO Highly-elliptical Orbit HF High...enables users to develop a basic, but sufficient, understanding of the key capabilities that space systems can provide, while also describing mitigation

  17. Preparation of cesium targets for gamma-spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Basu, S. K.; Chanda, S.; Deb, P.; Eqbal, Md; Kundu, S.; Joseph, D.

    2000-11-01

    A procedure to prepare monoisotopic cesium compound targets for gamma-spectroscopic experiments is described. Using this procedure, uniform targets up to thicknesses of 0.6-1.2 mg/cm 2 were prepared and used for in-beam spectroscopic studies. The purity of the target was tested by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) measurements.

  18. Fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, F. T.; Abramson, H. N.; Angrist, S. W.; Catton, I.; Churchill, S. W.; Mannheimer, R. J.; Otrach, S.; Schwartz, S. H.; Sengers, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    An overstudy committee was formed to study and recommend fundamental experiments in fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer for experimentation in orbit, using the space shuttle system and a space laboratory. The space environment, particularly the low-gravity condition, is an indispensable requirement for all the recommended experiments. The experiments fell broadly into five groups: critical-point thermophysical phenomena, fluid surface dynamics and capillarity, convection at reduced gravity, non-heated multiphase mixtures, and multiphase heat transfer. The Committee attempted to assess the effects of g-jitter and other perturbations of the gravitational field on the conduct of the experiments. A series of ground-based experiments are recommended to define some of the phenomena and to develop reliable instrumentation.

  19. ULISSE -a new approach of archiving space experiment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckmann, Enno; Hauan, Tore Martin; Karoliussen, Irene; Fossum, Knut R.

    The evaluation of Space experiments is usually completed by a scientific publication. The re-maining sample material might be re-assessed by new techniques or with reference to other experiments, which might be difficult due to lacking of a common flight data archive. A new way of archiving Space experiment data has been initiated by the European Commission in the ULISSE Project ("USOCs KnowLedge Integration and dissemination for Space Science Experimentation") which is built around the User Support Operation Centers (USOCs) and their industrial partners. ULISSE will be a collaborative open network able to allow informa-tion and knowledge exchange. Due to the vast amount of data in this network, Web based interfaces need to be implemented. Therefore, each experiment will be described in a topic map containing experimental methods, the experiment environment, hardware and software methods and products, biological processes, and the experimental results. Each topic needs to have an identifier, i.e. a link to a Web based thesaurus where the definition of this topic is described. Existing databases (e.g. ontologies for genetic information) have been used to define recent Space experiments, but the range of topics needs to be extended in ULISSE to cover the specific features of Space experiments. Credits: European Commission (FP7/2007-2013, grant agreement n218815).

  20. Experiments in Planetary and Related Sciences and the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald (Editor); Williams, Richard J. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Numerous workshops were held to provide a forum for discussing the full range of possible experiments, their science rationale, and the requirements on the Space Station, should such experiments eventually be flown. During the workshops, subgroups met to discuss areas of common interest. Summaries of each group and abstracts of contributed papers as they developed from a workshop on September 15 to 16, 1986, are included. Topics addressed include: planetary impact experimentation; physics of windblown particles; particle formation and interaction; experimental cosmochemistry in the space station; and an overview of the program to place advanced automation and robotics on the space station.

  1. Engineering the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Richard H.; Moore, Chris L.

    1992-01-01

    The Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) is being developed by NASA for flight on the Space Shuttle in early 1994. A discussion of the NASA four-phase design process is followed by a short history of the experiment heritage. The instrument is then described at the subsystem level from an engineering point of view, with special emphasis on the laser and the receiver. Some aspects of designing for the space environment are discussed, as well as the importance of contamination control, and product assurance. Finally, the instrument integration and test process is described and the current status of the instrument development is given.

  2. Model Experiments for the Determination of Airflow in Large Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    Model experiments are one of the methods used for the determination of airflow in large spaces. This paper will discuss the formation of the governing dimensionless numbers. It is shown that experiments with a reduced scale often will necessitate a fully developed turbulence level of the flow....... Details of the flow from supply openings are very important for the determination of room air distribution. It is in some cases possible to make a simplified supply opening for the model experiment....

  3. Achievements of Space Scientific Experiments Aboard SJ-8 Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jingchang; WAN Shixin; ZHANG Pu; LIN Hai; LIU Fang; HU Wenrui

    2008-01-01

    As scientific experiment payloads, microgravity experiments of fluid physics, life science,combustion science, physics and accelerator measurement were conducted on board the Chinese recoverable satellite SJ-8 during 18-day orbital flight. The experimental payloads and an experiment support system constituted the microgravity experiment system of the flight mission. This article has presented the briefs of the scientific achievements of these space experiments, the composition and performance of the Microgravity Experimental System (MES) and the general picture of the overall flight mission, respectively.

  4. Laboratory science with space data accessing and using space-experiment data

    CERN Document Server

    van Loon, Jack J W A; Zell, Martin; Beysens, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    For decades experiments conducted on space stations like MIR and the ISS have been gathering data in many fields of research in the natural sciences, medicine and engineering. The European Union-sponsored ULISSE project focused on exploring the wealth of unique experimental data provided by revealing raw and metadata from these studies via an Internet Portal. This book complements the portal. It serves as a handbook of space experiments and describes the various types of experimental infrastructure areas of research in the life and physical sciences and technology space missions that hosted scientific experiments the types and structures of the data produced and how one can access the data through ULISSE for further research. The book provides an overview of the wealth of space experiment data that can be used for additional research and will inspire academics (e.g. those looking for topics for their PhD thesis) and research departments in companies for their continued development.

  5. Suspension of superfluid helium using cesium-coated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.C.; Giese, C.F.; Halley, J.W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    We report results of an experiment which demonstrates that a layer of superfluid helium can be suspended over a cesium-coated orifice. By measuring the layer thickness with a capacitance bridge, we have shown in two runs that fluid layers up to 2 mm thick were suspended over a 70-{mu}m-diam cesium-coated orifice in a platinum foil for over 2 h in a cryostat held at 1.2 K. The effect depends on the recently established fact that superfluid helium does not wet cesium-coated surfaces. As a consequence, superfluid helium is expected to form a stable meniscus across such a cesium-coated hole. The observed depths of suspended helium are consistent with a simple theoretical model based on this picture. We briefly discuss the possible application of this method to the performance of a proposed experiment to study quantum coherence in superfluid helium by directing pulsed beams of helium atoms at such a suspended layer of fluid. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Lead-Free Experiment in a Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, J. F.; Strickland, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum addresses the Lead-Free Technology Experiment in Space Environment that flew as part of the seventh Materials International Space Station Experiment outside the International Space Station for approximately 18 months. Its intent was to provide data on the performance of lead-free electronics in an actual space environment. Its postflight condition is compared to the preflight condition as well as to the condition of an identical package operating in parallel in the laboratory. Some tin whisker growth was seen on a flight board but the whiskers were few and short. There were no solder joint failures, no tin pest formation, and no significant intermetallic compound formation or growth on either the flight or ground units.

  7. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the Living With a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbed (SET) program is to improve the performance of hardware in the space radiation environment. The program has developed a payload for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) spacecraft that is scheduled for launch in August 2015 on the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The primary structure of DSX is an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) ring. DSX will be in a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). This oral presentation will describe the SET payload.

  8. Decorporation of cesium-137; Decorporation du cesium-137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fleche, Ph.; Destombe, C.; Grasseau, A.; Mathieu, J.; Chancerelle, Y.; Mestries, J.C. [GMR, Direction des Recherches, Etudes et Techniques, 94 - Arcueil (France)

    1997-12-31

    Cesium radio-isotopes, especially cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) are among the radionuclides of main importance produced by a fission reaction in reactor or a nuclear weapon explosion. In the environment, {sup 137}Cs is a major contaminant which can cause severe {beta}, {gamma}irradiations and contaminations. {sup 137}Cs is distributed widely and relatively uniformly throughout the body with the highest concentration in skeletal muscles. A treatment becomes difficult afterwards. The purposes of this report are Firstly to compare the Prussian blue verses cobalt and potassium ferrocyanide (D.I. blue) efficiency for the {sup 137}Cs decorporation and secondly to assess a chronological treatment with D.I. blue. (author)

  9. Al-free active region laser diodes at 894 nm for compact Cesium atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Bandel, N.; Bébé Manga Lobé, J.; Garcia, M.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Lecomte, M.; Drisse, O.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.

    2015-03-01

    Time-frequency applications are in need of high accuracy and high stability clocks. Compact industrial Cesium atomic clocks optically pumped is a promising area that could satisfy these demands. However, the stability of these clocks relies, among others, on the performances of laser diodes that are used for atomic pumping. This issue has led the III-V Lab to commit to the European Euripides-LAMA project that aims to provide competitive compact optical Cesium clocks for earth applications. This work will provide key experience for further space technology qualification. We are in charge of the design, fabrication and reliability of Distributed-Feedback diodes (DFB) at 894nm (D1 line of Cesium) and 852nm (D2 line). The use of D1 line for pumping will provide simplified clock architecture compared to D2 line pumping thanks to simpler atomic transitions and larger spectral separation between lines in the 894nm case. Also, D1 line pumping overcomes the issue of unpumped "dark states" that occur with D2 line. The modules should provide narrow linewidth (<1MHz), very good reliability in time and, crucially, be insensitive to optical feedback. The development of the 894nm wavelength is grounded on our previous results for 852nm DFB. Thus, we show our first results from Al-free active region with InGaAsP quantum well broad-area lasers (100μm width, with lengths ranging from 2mm to 4mm), for further DFB operation at 894nm. We obtained low internal losses below 2cm-1, the external differential efficiency is 0.49W/A with uncoated facets and a low threshold current density of 190A/cm², for 2mm lasers at 20°C.

  10. Cold cesium molecules produced directly in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hong-Shan; Ji Zhong-Hua; Yuan Jin-Peng; Zhao Yan-Ting; Ma Jie; Wang Li-Rong; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2011-01-01

    We report on the observation of ultracold ground electric-state cesium molecules produced directly in a magnetooptical trap with a good signal-to-noise ratio.These molecules arise from the photoassociation of magneto-optical trap lasers and they are detected by resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization technology.The production rate of ultracold cesium molecules is up to 4× 104 s-1.We measure the characteristic time of the ground electric-state cesium molecules generated in the experiment and investigate the Cs2+ molecular ion intensity as a function of the trapping laser intensity and the ionization pulse laser energy.We conclude that the production of cold cesium molecules may be enhanced by using appropriate experimental parameters,which is useful for future experiments involving the production and trapping of ultracold ground electric-state molecules.

  11. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  12. Electric power management for the International Space Station experiment racks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burcham, M. [Boeing Missile and Space, Huntsville, AL (United States); Darty, M.A.; Thibodeau, P.E. [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, Huntsville, AL (United States); Coe, R. [SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Dunn, M. [Europa Ltd., Glenrothes (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    An intelligent, all solid state, electric power management system for International Space Station experiment racks is described. This power system is implemented via redundant internal microcomputers, controlling hybridized solid state power controllers in response to 1553B data bus commands. The solid state power controllers are programmable for current trip level and for normally-open or normally-closed operation.

  13. Cesium chloride-induced torsades de pointes

    OpenAIRE

    Wiens, Matthew; Gordon, Wendy; Baulcomb, Daisy; Mattman, Andre; Mock, Tom; Brown, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The chloride salt of cesium, a group 1A element, is gaining popularity as an alternative treatment of advanced cancers. Cesium chloride has primarily been used in cardiovascular research for arrhythmogenesis in animals because of its potassium-blocking effects. The present report describes a 45-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer who experienced repeated episodes of torsades de pointes polymorphic ventricular tachycardia after several months of oral cesium therapy. There was a clear ...

  14. Mission Possible: BioMedical Experiments on the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, E.; Kreutzberg, K.

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical research, both applied and basic, was conducted on every Shuttle mission from 1981 to 2011. The Space Shuttle Program enabled NASA investigators and researchers from around the world to address fundamental issues concerning living and working effectively in space. Operationally focused occupational health investigations and tests were given priority by the Shuttle crew and Shuttle Program management for the resolution of acute health issues caused by the rigors of spaceflight. The challenges of research on the Shuttle included: limited up and return mass, limited power, limited crew time, and requirements for containment of hazards. The sheer capacity of the Shuttle for crew and equipment was unsurpassed by any other launch and entry vehicle and the Shuttle Program provided more opportunity for human research than any program before or since. To take advantage of this opportunity, life sciences research programs learned how to: streamline the complicated process of integrating experiments aboard the Shuttle, design experiments and hardware within operational constraints, and integrate requirements between different experiments and with operational countermeasures. We learned how to take advantage of commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and developed a hardware certification process with the flexibility to allow for design changes between flights. We learned the importance of end-to-end testing for experiment hardware with humans-in-the-loop. Most importantly, we learned that the Shuttle Program provided an excellent platform for conducting human research and for developing the systems that are now used to optimize research on the International Space Station. This presentation will include a review of the types of experiments and medical tests flown on the Shuttle and the processes that were used to manifest and conduct the experiments. Learning Objective: This paper provides a description of the challenges related to launching and implementing biomedical

  15. Space Debris Radar Experiments at the Medicina VLBI Dish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupillo, G.; Montebugnoli, S.; Di Martino, M.; Salerno, E.; Bartolini, M.; Pluchino, S.; Schilliro, F.; Anselmo, L.; Portelli, C.; Konovalenko, A.; Nabatov, A.

    2009-03-01

    In 2007 three space debris detection tests were performed in the framework of a monitoring program carried out by the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica - INAF - in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency - ASI. The observations were made by using the bistatic radar technique. The INAF 32 m radiotelescope located at Medicina (Bologna, Italy) was used as receiver whereas the Ukrainian 70 m parabolic antenna located at Evpatoria was utilized as transmitter. The aim of the experiment was to test the sensitivity of the Medicina-Evpatoria radar system in space debris detection, and to validate and optimize the hardware setup. Measurements were mainly carried out on inactive satellites and catalogued space debris. However the search for new fragments in LEO was also performed during the campaign. This paper reports on results of these observations.

  16. BIOSPEX: Biological space experiments, a compendium of life sciences experiments carried on US spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M.; Rummel, J. A. (Editor); Deutsch, S. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    United States space life science experiments, encompassing 27 years of experience beginning with sounding rocket flights carrying primates (1948) to the last U.S. spaceflight, the joint US/USSR Apollo Test Project (1975), are presented. The information for each experiment includes Principal Investigators, the program and mission on which it was flown, the specimens used, the objectives, protocol, equipment, results, conclusions, and bibliographic reference citations for publications derived from each experiment.

  17. The Role of Space Experiments in the Radiation Qualification of Electronic and Photonic Devices and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, S.; LaBel, K.; Barth, J.; Campbell, A.

    2005-01-01

    Space experiments are occasionally launched to study the effects of radiation on electronic and photonic devices. This begs the following questions: Are space experiments necessary? Do the costs justify the benefits? How does one judge success of space experiment? What have we learned from past space experiments? How does one design a space experiment? This viewgraph presentation provides information on the usefulness of space and ground tests for simulating radiation damage to spacecraft components.

  18. Responses of Bacillus subtilis spores to space environment: results from experiments in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G

    1993-02-01

    Onboard of several spacecrafts (Apollo 16, Spacelab 1, LDEF), spores of Bacillus subtilis were exposed to selected parameters of space, such as space vacuum, different spectral ranges of solar UV-radiation and cosmic rays, applied separately or in combination, and we have studied their survival and genetic changes after retrieval. The spores survive extended periods of time in space--up to several years--, if protected against the high influx of solar UV-radiation. Water desorption caused by the space vacuum leads to structural changes of the DNA; the consequences are an increased mutation frequency and altered photobiological properties of the spores. UV-effects, such as killing and mutagenesis, are augmented, if the spores are in space vacuum during irradiation. Vacuum-specific photoproducts which are different from the 'spore photoproduct' may cause the synergistic response of spores to the simultaneous action of UV and vacuum. The experiments provide an experimental test of certain steps of the panspermia hypothesis.

  19. Space Life Sciences Research: The Importance of Long-Term Space Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This report focuses on the scientific importance of long-term space experiments for the advancement of biological science and the benefit of humankind. It includes a collection of papers that explore the scientific potential provided by the capability to manipulate organisms by removing a force that has been instrumental in the evolution and development of all organisms. Further, it provides the scientific justification for why the long-term space exposure that can be provided by a space station is essential to conduct significant research.

  20. Permafrost in Space: first results of experiment "EXOBIOFROST"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirina, Elena; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Shmakova, Lubov; Mironov, Vasiliy; Shatilovich, Anastasiya

    Experiment "EXOBIOFROST" was conducted as part of BION-M project of Russian Space Agency. We investigated a response of microbial complexes, including the pure cultures of microorganisms isolated from permafrost and the initial permafrost samples of different origin and age on space conditions. Duration of experiment was 1 month, from April, 19 to May, 19, 2013. All samples were investigated before and after the space flight. For the experiment we selected five samples of permafrost soil from Kolyma-Indigirka Lowland and Antarctica, and also the cultures of microorganisms: Exiguobacterium sibiricum - gram negative bacteria; Colpoda Steinii and Exocolpoda augustini — ciliates, and two strains of Acanthamoeba castelliane. Studies have revealed differences in structure and composition of microbial communities in control and in post-flight samples. All Arctic samples were characterized by a significant, 3-5 orders of magnitude, increase in the number of microorganisms compared to the control samples. However, there is a marked reduction in the amount of extracted DNA in post-flight permafrost samples. Post-flight analysis of ciliates, Colpoda Steinii and Exocolpoda augustini, revealed that 70-97% of cysts are damaged. In general, the primary post-flight analysis and a comparison with the control samples showed that the modern tundra colpoda more resistant to space conditions than they from the ancient permafrost sediments and strain of Colpoda steinii more resistant than the strain Exocolpoda augustini. Post-flight analysis of Acanthamoeba castelliane showed presence of viable cysts capable of excystation. Thus, we can conclude that the experiment "EXOBIOFROST" conducted in open space on the apparatus BION-M №1 does not prove fatal to permafrost microorganisms.

  1. First-principles study of cesium adsorption to weathered micaceous clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroki; Machida, Masahiko

    2014-05-01

    A large amount of radioactive nuclides was produced into environment due to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Residents near FDNPP were suffering from radioactive cesium and then evacuated, because which has long half-life and is retained by surface soil for long time. The Japanese government has been decontaminating the cesium by removing the surface soil in order to return them to their home. This decontamination method is very effective, but which produces huge amount of waste soil. This becomes another big problem in Fukushima, because it is not easy to find large storage sites. Then effective and economical methods to reduce the volume of the waste soil are needed. However, it has not been invented yet. One of the reasons is lack of knowledge about microscopic process of adsorption/desorption of cesium to/from soil. It is known that weathered micaceous clay minerals play crucial role on adsorption and retention of cesium. They are expected to have special sorption sites, called frayed edge sites (FESs), which adsorb cesium selectively and irreversibly. Properties of FES have been intensely investigated by experiments. But microscopic details of the adsorption process on FES are still unclear. Because direct observation of the process with current experimental techniques is quite difficult. We investigated the adsorption of cesium to FES in muscovite, which is a typical micaceous clay mineral, via first-principles calculations (density functional theory). We made a minimal model of FES and evaluate the energy difference before and after cesium adsorption to FES. This is the first numerical modeling of FES. It was shown that FES does adsorb cesium if the weathering of muscovite has been weathered. In addition, we revealed the mechanism of cesium adsorption to FES, which is competition between ion radius of cesium and the degree of weathering. I plan to discuss volume reduction of the waste soil based on our result. Reference M. Okumura

  2. Selective extraction of cesium: from compound to process; Extraction selective du cesium: de la molecule au procede

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, N.; Eymard, S.; Tournois, B.; Dozol, J.F. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets (DCC/DESD/SEP), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2000-07-01

    Under the French law of 30 December 1991 on nuclear waste management, research is conducted to recover long-lived fission products from high-level radioactive effluents generated by spent fuel reprocessing, in order to destroy them by transmutation or encapsulate them in specific matrices. Cesium extraction with mono and bis-crown calix(4)arenes (Frame 1) is a candidate for process development. These extractants remove cesium from highly acidic or basic pH media even with high salinity. A real raffinate was treated in 1994 in a hot cell to extract cesium with a calix-crown extractant. The success of this one batch experiment confirmed the feasibility of cesium decontamination from high-level liquid waste. It was then decided to develop a process flowchart to extract cesium selectively from high-level raffinate, to be included in the general scheme of long-lived radionuclide partitioning. It was accordingly decided to develop a process based on liquid-liquid extraction and hence optimize a calixarene/diluent solvent according to: - hydraulic properties: density, viscosity, interfacial tension, - chemical criteria: sufficient cesium extraction (depending on the diluent), kinetics, third phase elimination... New mono-crown-calixarenes branched with long aliphatic groups (Frame 2) were designed to be soluble in aliphatic diluents. To prevent third phase formation associated with nitric acid extraction, the addition of modifiers (alcohol, phosphate and amide) in the organic phase was tested (Frame 3). Table 1 shows examples of calixarene/diluent systems suitable for a process flowchart, and Figure 2 provides data on cesium extraction with these new systems. Alongside these improvements, a system based on a modified 1,3-di(n-octyl-oxy)2,4-calix[4]arene crown and a modified diluent was also developed, considering a mixed TPH/NPHE system as the diluent, where TPH (hydrogenated tetra propylene) is a common aliphatic industrial solvent and NPHE is nitrophenyl

  3. Giving children space: A phenomenological exploration of student experiences in space science inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Christopher R.

    This study explores the experiences of 4th grade students in an inquiry-based space science classroom. At the heart of the study lies the essential question: What is the lived experience of children engaged in the process of space science inquiry? Through the methodology of phenomenological inquiry, the author investigates the essence of the lived experience of twenty 4th grade students as well as the reflections of two high school students looking back on their 4th grade space science experience. To open the phenomenon more deeply, the concept of space is explored as an overarching theme throughout the text. The writings of several philosophers including Martin Heidegger and Hans-Georg Gadamer are opened up to understand the existential aspects of phenomenology and the act of experiencing the classroom as a lived human experience. The methodological structure for the study is based largely on the work of Max van Manen (2003) in his seminal work, Researching Lived Experience, which describes a structure of human science research. A narrative based on classroom experiences, individual conversations, written reflections, and group discussion provides insight into the students' experiences. Their stories and thoughts reveal the themes of activity , interactivity, and "inquiractivity," each emerging as an essential element of the lived experience in the inquiry-based space science classroom. The metaphor of light brings illumination to the themes. Activity in the classroom is associated with light's constant and rapid motion throughout the Milky Way and beyond. Interactivity is seen through students' interactions just as light's reflective nature is seen through the illumination of the planets. Finally, inquiractivity is connected to questioning, the principal aspect of the inquiry-based classroom just as the sun is the essential source of light in our solar system. As the era of No Child Left Behind fades, and the next generation of science standards emerge, the

  4. Review of Nuclear Physics Experiments for Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Miller, Jack; Adamczyk, Anne M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2011-01-01

    Human space flight requires protecting astronauts from the harmful effects of space radiation. The availability of measured nuclear cross section data needed for these studies is reviewed in the present paper. The energy range of interest for radiation protection is approximately 100 MeV/n to 10 GeV/n. The majority of data are for projectile fragmentation partial and total cross sections, including both charge changing and isotopic cross sections. The cross section data are organized into categories which include charge changing, elemental, isotopic for total, single and double differential with respect to momentum, energy and angle. Gaps in the data relevant to space radiation protection are discussed and recommendations for future experiments are made.

  5. CCSDS telemetry systems experience at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carper, Richard D.; Stallings, William H., III

    1990-09-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) designs, builds, manages, and operates science and applications spacecraft in near-earth orbit, and provides data capture, data processing, and flight control services for these spacecraft. In addition, GSFC has the responsibility of providing space-ground and ground-ground communications for near-earth orbiting spacecraft, including those of the manned spaceflight programs. The goal of reducing both the developmental and operating costs of the end-to-end information system has led the GSFC to support and participate in the standardization activities of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), including those for packet telemetry. The environment in which such systems function is described, and the GSFC experience with CCSDS packet telemetry in the context of the Gamma-Ray Observatory project is discussed.

  6. Photobiology in Space - an Experiment on Spacelab-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.; Bücker, H.; Dose, K.; Martens, K. D.; Mennigmann, H. D.; Reitz, G.; Requardt, H.; Weber, P.

    1984-12-01

    The joint European/US Spacelab Mission I, scheduled for October 1983 for a 9 day lasting Earth-orbiting flight, provides a laboratory system for various disciplines of science, including exobiology. On the pallet, in the experiment ES 029 “Microorganisms and Biomolecules in Space Hard Environment” 316 dry samples of Bacillus subtilis spores will be exposed to space vacuum and/or selected wavelengths of solar UV radiation. After recovery action spectra of inactivation, mutation induction, reparability and photochemical damage in DNA and protein will be determined. The results will contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of the increased UV sensitivity of bacterial spores in vacuo and to a better assessment of the chance of survival of resistant life forms in space and of interplanetary transfer of life.

  7. Measurement of Critical Contact Angle in a Microgravity Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the USMT,2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's "double proboscis" containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  8. Fatal Cesium Chloride Toxicity After Alternative Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sessions, Daniel; Heard, Kennon; Kosnett, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cesium chloride (CsCl) is sold as a treatment for several types of cancers. The purported mechanism of action is alkalinization of relatively acidic neoplastic cells. The efficacy of CsCl has not been demonstrated in controlled experiments. Oral and intravenous CsCl use has been associated with seizures, cardiotoxicity, syncope, and death. Although intratumoral treatment with various antineoplastic agents is described, no cases of intratumoral cancer treatment with CsCl have been ...

  9. The "SCORPION" experiment onboard the International Space Station. Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, V; Deshevaya, E; Grachov, E; Grigoryan, O; Tchurilo, I; Tsetlin, V

    2003-01-01

    The "SCORPION" program onboard the Russian Segment (RS) of the International Space Station (ISS) is designed to carry out complex research of the effects of the nar-Earth space parameters on the conditions under which various experiments and operations are being conducted. Special attention in this program was paid to the biological objects onboard the orbital station, e.g. it was found that variation in the number of colony forming units (micromicets and bacteria) correlates with the solar activity and the absorbed dose. The "SCORPION" experiment onboard the RS ISS started in January 2002. It was designed to measure the following parameters inside the space absorbed doses in different places inside the RS ISS, the fluxes of energetic charged particles, neutrons and gamma-quanta; the vectors of the magnetic field and low-frequency electromagnetic waves. At the same time the growth of micromicets on the samples of various materials was studied. The description of the "SCORPION" experiment and the preliminary results obtained onboard the RS ISS in 2002 are presented.

  10. "Smart" Magnetic Fluids Experiment Operated on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Lekan, Jack F.

    2004-01-01

    InSPACE is a microgravity fluid physics experiment that was operated on the International Space Station (ISS) in the Microgravity Science Glovebox from late March 2003 through early July 2003. (InSPACE is an acronym for Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates From Colloidal Emulsions.) The purpose of the experiment is to obtain fundamental data of the complex properties of an exciting class of smart materials termed magnetorheological (MR) fluids. MR fluids are suspensions, or colloids, comprised of small (micrometer-sized) superparamagnetic particles in a nonmagnetic medium. Colloids are suspensions of very small particles suspended in a liquid. (Examples of other colloids are blood, milk, and paint.) These controllable fluids can quickly transition into a nearly solid state when exposed to a magnetic field and return to their original liquid state when the magnetic field is removed. Controlling the strength of the magnetic field can control the relative stiffness of these fluids. MR fluids can be used to improve or develop new seat suspensions, robotics, clutches, airplane landing gear, and vibration damping systems. The principal investigator for InSPACE is Professor Alice P. Gast of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The InSPACE hardware was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The InSPACE samples were delivered to the ISS in November 2002, on the Space Shuttle Endeavour, on Space Station Utilization Flight UF-2/STS113. Operations began on March 31, 2003, with the processing of three different particle size samples at multiple test parameters. This investigation focused on determining the structural organization of MR colloidal aggregates when exposed to a pulsing magnetic field. On Earth, the aggregates take the shape of footballs with spiky tips. This characteristic shape may be influenced by the pull of gravity, which causes most particles initially suspended in the fluid to sediment, (i.e., settle and collect at the

  11. Atmospheric science experiments applicable to Space Shuttle Spacelab missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. S.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Fichtl, G. H.; Vaughan, W. W.; Goodman, S. J.; Robertson, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The present lack of a lower atmosphere research satellite program for the 1980s has prompted consideration of the Space Shuttle/Spacelab system as a means of flying sensor complements geared toward specific research problems, as well as continued instrument development. Three specific examples of possible science questions related to precipitation are discussed: (1) spatial structure of mesoscale cloud and precipitation systems, (2) lightning and storm development, and (3) cyclone intensification over oceanic regions. Examples of space sensors availab le to provide measurements needed in addressing these questions are also presented. Distinctive aspects of low-earth orbit experiments would be high resolution, multispectral sensing of atmospheric phenomena by complements of instruments, and more efficient sensor development through reflights of specific hardware packages.

  12. SADE: A space experiment to demonstrate structural assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J. K.; Cramblit, D. C.

    1983-05-01

    The Structural Assembly and Demonstration Experiment (SADE) demonstrates that the Shuttle is a suitable base for space construction; this includes a test of the Shuttle's control system to determine its performance when a long attached truss or beam is extended from the bay. Examples of Shuttle-related systems that will receive special attention are the RMS, the lighting system, and the crew assembly capabilities. A second purpose is to determine the extent to which the assembly results from the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator can be used to forecast the results of space assembly is determined. Finally, the SADE truss design will be validated by measuring the performance of the deployment, the special connectors, and the assembly methods.

  13. Space Experiment on Tuber Development and Starch Accumulation for CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbitts,Theodore W.; Croxdale, Judith C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1997-01-01

    Potato explants (leaf, small stem section, and axillary bud), flown on STS-73, developed tubers of 1.5 cm diameter and 1.7 g mass during the 16 day period of spaceflight. The experiment was undertaken in the ASTROCULTURE(Trademark) experiment package under controlled temperature, humidity, lighting, and carbon dioxide concentrations. The tubers formed in the explant system under microgravity had the same gross morphology, the same anatomical configuration of cells and tissues, and the same sizes, shapes, and surface character of starch granules as tubers formed in a 1 g environment. The total accumulation of starch and other energy containing compounds was singular in space flight and ground control tubers. Enzyme activity of starch synthase, starch phosphorylase, and total hydrolase was similar in spaceflight and ground controls but activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was reduced in the spaceflight tuber tissue. This experiment documented that potatoes will metabolize and accumulate starch as effectively in spaceflight as on the ground and thus this data provides the potential for effective utilization of potatoes in life support systems of space bases.

  14. FIRST experiment: Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, C.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Balestra, F.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Bohlen, T. T.; Bondì, M.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Carbone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Finck, C.; Foti, A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Lavagno, A.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in different fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, has been designed for the measurement of different ions fragmentation cross sections at different energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The experiment is performed by an international collaboration made of institutions from Germany, France, Italy and Spain. The experimental apparatus is partly based on an already existing setup made of the ALADIN magnet, the MUSIC IV TPC, the LAND2 neutron detector and the TOFWALL scintillator TOF system, integrated with newly designed detectors in the interaction Region (IR) around the carbon removable target: a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger for detection of light fragments emitted at large angles (KENTROS). The scientific program of the FIRST experiment started on summer 2011 with the study of the 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8mm) carbon target.

  15. Space Weathering of Olivine: Samples, Experiments and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Christoffersen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Olivine is a major constituent of chondritic bodies and its response to space weathering processes likely dominates the optical properties of asteroid regoliths (e.g. S- and many C-type asteroids). Analyses of olivine in returned samples and laboratory experiments provide details and insights regarding the mechanisms and rates of space weathering. Analyses of olivine grains from lunar soils and asteroid Itokawa reveal that they display solar wind damaged rims that are typically not amorphized despite long surface exposure ages, which are inferred from solar flare track densities (up to 10 (sup 7 y)). The olivine damaged rim width rapidly approaches approximately 120 nm in approximately 10 (sup 6 y) and then reaches steady-state with longer exposure times. The damaged rims are nanocrystalline with high dislocation densities, but crystalline order exists up to the outermost exposed surface. Sparse nanophase Fe metal inclusions occur in the damaged rims and are believed to be produced during irradiation through preferential sputtering of oxygen from the rims. The observed space weathering effects in lunar and Itokawa olivine grains are difficult to reconcile with laboratory irradiation studies and our numerical models that indicate that olivine surfaces should readily blister and amorphize on relatively short time scales (less than 10 (sup 3 y)). These results suggest that it is not just the ion fluence alone, but other variable, the ion flux that controls the type and extent of irradiation damage that develops in olivine. This flux dependence argues for caution in extrapolating between high flux laboratory experiments and the natural case. Additional measurements, experiments, and modeling are required to resolve the discrepancies among the observations and calculations involving solar wind processing of olivine.

  16. Gravitropic mechanisms derived from space experiments and magnetic gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.; Park, Myoung Ryoul

    2016-07-01

    Gravitropism is the result of a complex sequence of events that begins with the movement of dense particles, typically starch-filled amyloplasts in response to reorientation. Although these organelles change positions, it is not clear whether the critical signal is derived from sedimentation or dynamic interactions of amyloplasts with relevant membranes. Substituting gravity by high-gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) provides a localized stimulus for diamagnetic starch that is specific for amyloplasts and comparable to gravity without affecting other organelles. Experiments with Brassica rapa showed induction of root curvature by HGMF when roots moved sufficiently close to the magnetic gradient-inducing foci. The focused and short-range effectiveness of HGMFs provided a gravity-like stimulus and affected related gene expression. Root curvature was sensitive to the mutual alignment between roots and HGMF direction. Unrelated to any HGMF effects, the size of amyloplasts in space-grown roots increased by 30% compared to ground controls and suggests enhanced sensitivity in a gravity-reduced environment. Accompanying gene transcription studies showed greater differences between HGMF-exposed and space controls than between space and ground controls. This observation may lead to the identification of gravitropism-relevant genes. However, space grown roots showed stronger transcription of common reference genes such as actin and ubiquitin in magnetic fields than in non-magnetic conditions. In contrast, α-amylase, glucokinase and PIN encoding genes were transcribed stronger under non-magnetic conditions than under HGMF. The large number of comparisons between space, ground, and HGMF prompted the assessment of transcription differences between root segments, root-shoot junction, and seeds. Because presumed transcription of reference genes varied more than genes of interest, changes in gene expression cannot be based on reference genes. The data provide an example of complex

  17. Capacity building in emerging space nations: Experiences, challenges and benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Susan; da Silva Curiel, Alex; Liddle, Doug; Chizea, Francis; Leloglu, Ugur Murat; Helvaci, Mustafa; Bekhti, Mohammed; Benachir, Djouad; Boland, Lee; Gomes, Luis; Sweeting, Martin

    2010-09-01

    This paper focuses on ways in which space is being used to build capacity in science and technology in order to: Offer increasing support for national and global solutions to current and emerging problems including: how to improve food security; resource management; understanding the impacts of climate change and how to deal with them; improving disaster mitigation, management and response. Support sustainable economic development. We present some of the experiences, lessons learned and benefits gained in capacity building projects undertaken by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. and our partners from developing and mature space nations. We focus on the Turkish, Algerian and Nigerian know-how and technology transfer programmes which form part of the first Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC) in orbit. From the lessons learned on Surrey's know-how and technology transfer partnership programmes, it is clear that space technology needs to be implemented responsibly as part of a long-term capacity building plan to be a sustainable one. It needs to be supported with appropriate policy and legal frameworks, institutional development, including community participation, human resources development and strengthening of managerial systems. In taking this on board, DMC has resulted in a strong international partnership combining national objectives, humanitarian aid and commerce. The benefits include: Ownership of space-based and supporting ground assets with low capital expenditure that is in line with national budgets of developing nations. Ownership of data and control over data acquisition. More for the money via collaborative consortium. Space related capacity building in organisations and nations with the goal of sustainable development. Opportunities for international collaboration, including disaster management and relief.

  18. The second space experiment of protein crystallization with domestic facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王耀萍; 潘冀燊; 牛秀田; 周元聪; 华子千; 徐谦; 吴伸; 韩青; 李宏民; 刘延顺; 滕脉坤; 何海辉; 林胜祥; 毕汝昌

    1996-01-01

    The second experiment of protein crystallization was performed on domestic re-entry satelliteFSW-2 in 1994-07. The results are superior to the ones of the first mission in 1992: 9 of 10 different proteins were crystallized in space, and 70% of the total 48 samples yielded single crystals. Besides hen egg-white lysozyme which grew high-quality crystals on the first mission, an acidic phospholipase A2(aPLA2) from snake venom and hemoglobin from Anser Indicus produced good-quality crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analyses. The positive effect of microgravity on protein crystal growth is verified again at this time.

  19. The international space station human life sciences experiment implementation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, LadonnaJ.; Haven, CynthiaP.; McCollum, SuzanneG.; Lee, AngeleneM.; Kamman, MichelleR.; Baumann, DavidK.; Anderson, MarkE.; Buderer, MelvinC.

    2001-08-01

    The selection, definition, and development phases of a Life Sciences flight research experiment has been consistent throughout the past decade. The implementation process, however, has changed significantly within the past two years. This change is driven primarily by the shift from highly integrated, dedicated research missions on platforms with well defined processes to self contained experiments with stand alone operations on platforms which are being concurrently designed. For experiments manifested on the International Space Station (ISS) and / or on short duration missions, the more modular, streamlined, and independent the individual experiment is, the more likely it is to be successfully implemented before the ISS assembly is completed. During the assembly phase of the ISS, science operations are lower in priority than the construction of the station. After the station has been completed, it is expected that more resources will be available to perform research. The complexity of implementing investigations increases with the logistics needed to perform the experiment. Examples of logistics issues include: hardware unique to the experiment; large up and down mass and volume needs; access to crew and hardware during the ascent or descent phases; maintenance of hardware and supplies with a limited shelf life; baseline data collection schedules with lengthy sessions or sessions close to the launch or landing; onboard stowage availability, particularly cold stowage; and extensive training where highly proficient skills must be maintained. As the ISS processes become better defined, experiment implementation will meet new challenges due to distributed management, on-orbit resource sharing, and adjustments to crew availability pre- and post-increment.

  20. The International Space Station human life sciences experiment implementation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. J.; Haven, C. P.; McCollum, S. G.; Lee, A. M.; Kamman, M. R.; Baumann, D. K.; Anderson, M. E.; Buderer, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    The selection, definition, and development phases of a Life Sciences flight research experiment has been consistent throughout the past decade. The implementation process, however, has changed significantly within the past two years. This change is driven primarily by the shift from highly integrated, dedicated research missions on platforms with well defined processes to self contained experiments with stand alone operations on platforms which are being concurrently designed. For experiments manifested on the International Space Station (ISS) and/or on short duration missions, the more modular, streamlined, and independent the individual experiment is, the more likely it is to be successfully implemented before the ISS assembly is completed. During the assembly phase of the ISS, science operations are lower in priority than the construction of the station. After the station has been completed, it is expected that more resources will be available to perform research. The complexity of implementing investigations increases with the logistics needed to perform the experiment. Examples of logistics issues include- hardware unique to the experiment; large up and down mass and volume needs; access to crew and hardware during the ascent or descent phases; maintenance of hardware and supplies with a limited shelf life,- baseline data collection schedules with lengthy sessions or sessions close to the launch or landing; onboard stowage availability, particularly cold stowage; and extensive training where highly proficient skills must be maintained. As the ISS processes become better defined, experiment implementation will meet new challenges due to distributed management, on-orbit resource sharing, and adjustments to crew availability pre- and post-increment. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The International Space Station human life sciences experiment implementation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L J; Haven, C P; McCollum, S G; Lee, A M; Kamman, M R; Baumann, D K; Anderson, M E; Buderer, M C

    2001-01-01

    The selection, definition, and development phases of a Life Sciences flight research experiment has been consistent throughout the past decade. The implementation process, however, has changed significantly within the past two years. This change is driven primarily by the shift from highly integrated, dedicated research missions on platforms with well defined processes to self contained experiments with stand alone operations on platforms which are being concurrently designed. For experiments manifested on the International Space Station (ISS) and/or on short duration missions, the more modular, streamlined, and independent the individual experiment is, the more likely it is to be successfully implemented before the ISS assembly is completed. During the assembly phase of the ISS, science operations are lower in priority than the construction of the station. After the station has been completed, it is expected that more resources will be available to perform research. The complexity of implementing investigations increases with the logistics needed to perform the experiment. Examples of logistics issues include- hardware unique to the experiment; large up and down mass and volume needs; access to crew and hardware during the ascent or descent phases; maintenance of hardware and supplies with a limited shelf life,- baseline data collection schedules with lengthy sessions or sessions close to the launch or landing; onboard stowage availability, particularly cold stowage; and extensive training where highly proficient skills must be maintained. As the ISS processes become better defined, experiment implementation will meet new challenges due to distributed management, on-orbit resource sharing, and adjustments to crew availability pre- and post-increment.

  2. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  3. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrath, M.; Canfield, P. J.; Bronowicki, P. M.; Dreyer, M. E.; Weislogel, M. M.; Grah, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  4. Deep Space Networking Experiments on the EPOXI Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Space Communications & Navigation Program within the Space Operations Directorate is operating a program to develop and deploy Disruption Tolerant Networking [DTN] technology for a wide variety of mission types by the end of 2011. DTN is an enabling element of the Interplanetary Internet where terrestrial networking protocols are generally unsuitable because they rely on timely and continuous end-to-end delivery of data and acknowledgments. In fall of 2008 and 2009 and 2011 the Jet Propulsion Laboratory installed and tested essential elements of DTN technology on the Deep Impact spacecraft. These experiments, called Deep Impact Network Experiment (DINET 1) were performed in close cooperation with the EPOXI project which has responsibility for the spacecraft. The DINET 1 software was installed on the backup software partition on the backup flight computer for DINET 1. For DINET 1, the spacecraft was at a distance of about 15 million miles (24 million kilometers) from Earth. During DINET 1 300 images were transmitted from the JPL nodes to the spacecraft. Then, they were automatically forwarded from the spacecraft back to the JPL nodes, exercising DTN's bundle origination, transmission, acquisition, dynamic route computation, congestion control, prioritization, custody transfer, and automatic retransmission procedures, both on the spacecraft and on the ground, over a period of 27 days. The first DINET 1 experiment successfully validated many of the essential elements of the DTN protocols. DINET 2 demonstrated: 1) additional DTN functionality, 2) automated certain tasks which were manually implemented in DINET 1 and 3) installed the ION SW on nodes outside of JPL. DINET 3 plans to: 1) upgrade the LTP convergence-layer adapter to conform to the international LTP CL specification, 2) add convergence-layer "stewardship" procedures and 3) add the BSP security elements [PIB & PCB]. This paper describes the planning and execution of the flight experiment and the

  5. Nucleate Pool Boiling Experiments (NPBX) on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Vijay Kumar; Warrier, Gopinath R.; Aktinol, Eduardo; Chao, David; Eggers, Jeffery; Sheredy, William; Booth, Wendell

    2012-11-01

    During the period of March-May 2011, a series of boiling experiments was carried out in the Boiling Experimental Facility (BXF) located in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) of the International Space Station (ISS). The BXF Facility was carried to ISS on Space Shuttle Mission STS-133 on February 24, 2011. Nucleate Pool Boiling Experiment (NPBX) was one of the two experiments housed in the BXF. Results of experiments on single bubble dynamics (e.g., inception and growth), multiple bubble dynamics (lateral merger and departure, if any), nucleate pool boiling heat transfer, and critical heat flux are described. In the experiments Perfluoro-n-hexane was used as the test liquid. The system pressure was varied from 51 to 243 kPa, pool temperature was varied from 30° to 59°C, and test surface temperature was varied from 40° to 80°C. The test surface was a polished aluminum disc (1 mm thick, 89.5 mm in diameter) heated from below with strain gage heaters. Five cylindrical cavities were formed on the surface with four cavities located at the corners of a square and one in the middle. During experiments the magnitude of mean gravity level normal to the heater surface varied from 1.2 × 10 - 7g e to 6 × 10 - 7g e . The results of the experiments show that a single bubble continues to grow to occupy the size of the chamber without departing from the heater surface. During lateral merger of bubbles, at high superheats a large bubble may lift off from the surface but continues to hover near the surface. Neighboring bubbles are continuously pulled into the large bubble. At low superheats bubbles at neighboring sites simply merge to yield a larger bubble. The larger bubble mostly locates in the middle of the heated surface and serves as a vapor sink. The latter mode continues to persist when boiling is occurring all over the heater surface. Heat fluxes for steady state nucleate boiling and critical heat fluxes are found to be much lower than those obtained under earth

  6. Preparing normal tissue cells for space flight experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Claudia; Kohn, Florian P M; Bauer, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Deterioration of health is a problem in modern space flight business. In order to develop countermeasures, research has been done on human bodies and also on single cells. Relevant experiments on human cells in vitro are feasible when microgravity is simulated by devices such as the Random Positioning Machine or generated for a short time during parabolic flights. However, they become difficult in regard to performance and interpretation when long-term experiments are designed that need a prolonged stay on the International Space Station (ISS). One huge problem is the transport of living cells from a laboratory on Earth to the ISS. For this reason, mainly rapidly growing, rather robust human cells such as cancer cells, embryonic cells, or progenitor cells have been investigated on the ISS up to now. Moreover, better knowledge on the behavior of normal mature cells, which mimic the in vivo situation, is strongly desirable. One solution to the problem could be the use of redifferentiable cells, which grow rapidly and behave like cancer cells in plain medium, but are reprogrammed to normal cells when substances like retinoic acid are added. A list of cells capable of redifferentiation is provided, together with names of suitable drugs, in this review.

  7. Space experiment BTN-NEUTRON on INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION - CURRENT STATUS and future stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, V. I.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Laygushin, V. I.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Pronin, M. A.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Sanin, A. B.

    2009-04-01

    Space experiment BTN (Board Telescope of Neutrons) was suggested in 1997 for the Russian segment of International Space Station. The first stage of this experiment was started in February 2007 with instrumentation BTN-M1, which contain two separate units: 1) the electronics unit for commanding and data handling, which is installed inside the Station; 2) the detector unit, which is installed at the outer surface of Russian Service Module "Zvezda". The total mass of this instrument without cables is about 15 kg and total power consumption is about 18 Watts. Detector unit of BTN-M1 has the set of four neutron detectors: three proportional counters of epithermal neutrons with 3He covered by cadmium shields and polyethylene moderators with different thickness and stylbene scintillator for fast neutrons at the energy range 0.4 Mev - 10 Mev. There are three sources of neutrons in the near-Earth space. Permanent flux of neutrons is produced due to interaction of energetic particles of galactic and solar cosmic rays with the upper atmosphere of the Earth ("natural neutrons") and with the body of the spacecraft ("technogenic neutrons"). The third transient sources of neutrons are active regions of the Sun, which may sporadically emit energetic neutrons during strong flares. Some of these particles have sufficiently high energy to neutrons cover the distance to the Earth before decay Data from BTN-M1 after 2 years of space operations is sufficient for preliminary estimation of neutron component of radiation environment in the near-Earth space. BTN-M1 detector unit is equal to the Russian instrument HEND, which also operates now onboard NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter since May 2001. Simultaneous measurements of neutron radiation on orbits around Mars and Earth give the unique opportunity to compare neutron radiation environment around two planets. The technogenic component of neutron background may be estimated by analysis of data for different stages of flight. After evaluation

  8. Experiments of the Space Weather Network Using JGN2

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) operates a Japanese space forecast center for the International Space Environment Service (ISES). Information on space weather is exchanged daily among the space weather forecast centers all over the world. Researches of space weather need data on large areas of space from the Sun to the Earth's upper atmosphere. It is necessary for researchers of space weather to access various data and to communicate among various ot...

  9. Cesium and strontium ion specific exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, S.

    1996-10-01

    This work is one of two parallel projects that are part of an ESP task to develop high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. In this subtask, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with AlliedSignal, Inc. (Des Plaines, Illinois) to develop inorganic ion exchangers that are selective for strontium and cesium from alkaline high-level waste and groundwater streams.

  10. Removal of cesium using coconut fiber in raw and modified forms for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Nella N.M. de; Nobre, Vanessa B.; Potiens Junior, Ademar J.; Sakata, Solange K., E-mail: sksakata@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Di Vitta, Patricia B. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2013-07-01

    Sorption is one of the most studied methods to reduce the volume of radioactive waste streams. Cesium-137 is a radioisotope formed by the fission of uranium and it can cause health problems due to its easy assimilation by cells. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of coconut fiber in removing cesium from radioactive liquid wastes; this process can help in disposing radioactive waste. The experiments were performed in batch and the particle size of the fiber ranged between 0.30 mm and 0.50 mm. The fiber was treated with hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium. The following parameters were analyzed: contact time, pH and concentration of cesium ions in aqueous solution. After the experiments the samples were filtered and cesium remaining in solution was quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. (author)

  11. A New Paradigm in Space Based Experiments Using Rubber Balloons

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Palit, Sourav; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Mondal, Sushanta; Bhattacharyya, Arnab; Middya, Susanta; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-01-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics is engaged in long duration balloon borne experiments with typical payloads less than ~ 3kg. Low cost rubber balloons are used. In a double balloon system, the booster balloon lifts the orbiter balloon to its cruising altitude where data is taken for a long time. Here we present results of muon detections and recent solar activities, including the light curves and flare spectra in the 20-100keV range. We not only show that we have successfully obtained several flares and there spectra at different altitudes, we also found that the high energy X-ray flux of strong flares at altitudes of 10-13 km (the flight altitude of commercial planes) could be more than the contribution due to cosmic rays.

  12. The Midcourse Space Experiment Infrared-Dark Cloud Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S. J.; Egan, M. P.; Kuchar, T. A.; Mizuno, D.; Feldman, P. A.; Redman, R. O.; Price, S. D.

    2000-12-01

    We present a preliminary catalog of infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) that were identified in the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Galactic Plane Survey images. These objects are clearly visible as absorption features against the diffuse Galactic emission in the 8.3 micron MSX images. IRDCs are cold (T CS, C18O and HCO+. IRDC have a wide variety of shapes from globule-like to filamentary. We will present the filling factors, fractal dimension and other morphological identifiers for the IRDCs. In particular, the fractal dimension will be compared to the dimensions of other components of the ISM including GMCs and infrared cirrus. Few IRDCs are associated with previously observed star formation tracers such as far-infrared point sources and maser emission. The catalog will be cross-referenced with published observations of star formation tracers and the properties of previously identified star forming regions will be contrasted with the new objects detected by MSX.

  13. The GAMMA-400 Space Experiment: Gammas, Electrons and Nuclei Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocchiutti, E.; Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Carbone, R.; Cumani, P.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Picozza, P.; Rodin, V. G.; Runtso, M. F.; Sarkar, R.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Yurkin, Yu. T.; Zampa, N.; Zverev, V. G.; Zirakashvili, V. N.

    2013-06-01

    The present design of the new space gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-400 for the energy range 50 MeV-3 TeV is presented. The proposed instrument has an angular resolution of 1-2 degrees at E(γ)˜100 MeV and ˜0.01 degrees at E(γ)>100 GeV and an energy resolution ˜1% at E(γ)>100 GeV. By means of a deep segmented calorimeter high energy electron flux can be studied, with a proton rejection factor of about 106. The GAMMA-400 experiment is optimized to address a broad range of science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, studies of galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, gamma-ray bursts, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high energy electrons, protons and nuclei up to the knee.

  14. New calorimeters for space experiments: physics requirements and technological challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocchesi, Pier Simone

    2015-07-01

    Direct measurements of charged cosmic radiation with instruments in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), or flying on balloons above the atmosphere, require the identification of the incident particle, the measurement of its energy and possibly the determination of its sign-of-charge. The latter information can be provided by a magnetic spectrometer together with a measurement of momentum. However, magnetic deflection in space experiments is at present limited to values of the Maximum Detectable Rigidity (MDR) hardly exceeding a few TV. Advanced calorimetric techniques are, at present, the only way to measure charged and neutral radiation at higher energies in the multi-TeV range. Despite their mass limitation, calorimeters may achieve a large geometric factor and provide an adequate proton background rejection factor, taking advantage of a fine granularity and imaging capabilities. In this lecture, after a brief introduction on electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry, an innovative approach to the design of a space-borne, large acceptance, homogeneous calorimeter for the detection of high energy cosmic rays will be described.

  15. Recovery of In-Space Cubesat Experiments (RICE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ELORET Corporation, in collaboration with the Space Systems Design Laboratory of Georgia Institute of Technology, proposes developing and demonstrating a...

  16. Historical parallels of biological space experiments from Soyuz, Salyut and Mir to Shenzhou flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.; Kondyurin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Human exploitation of space is a great achievement of our civilization. After the first space flights a development of artificial biological environment in space systems is a second big step. First successful biological experiments on a board of space station were performed on Salyut and Mir stations in 70-90th of last century such as - first long time cultivation of plants in space (wheat, linen, lettuce, crepis); - first flowers in space (Arabidopsis); - first harvesting of seeds in space (Arabidopsis); - first harvesting of roots (radish); - first full life cycle from seeds to seeds in space (wheat), Guinness recorded; - first tissue culture experiments (Panax ginseng L, Crocus sativus L, Stevia rebaundiana B; - first tree growing in space for 2 years (Limonia acidissima), Guinness recorded. As a new wave, the modern experiments on a board of Shenzhou Chinese space ships are performed with plants and tissue culture. The space flight experiments are now focused on applications of the space biology results to Earth technologies. In particular, the tomato seeds exposed 6 years in space are used in pharmacy industry in more then 10 pharmaceutical products. Tissue culture experiments are performed on the board of Shenzhou spaceship for creation of new bioproducts including Space Panax ginseng, Space Spirulina, Space Stetatin, Space Tomato and others products with unique properties. Space investments come back.

  17. From laboratory plasma experiments to space plasma experiments with `CubeSat' nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christine

    2016-09-01

    `CubeSat' nano-satellites provide low-cost access to space. SP3 laboratory's involvement in the European Union `QB50' `CubeSat' project [www.qb50.eu] which will launch into space 50 `CubeSats' from 27 Countries to study the ionosphere and the lower thermosphere will be presented. The Chi Kung laboratory plasma experiment and the Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype can be tailored to investigate expanding magnetized plasma physics relevant to space physics (solar corona, Earth's aurora, adiabatic expansion and polytropic studies). Chi Kung is also used as a plasma wind tunnel for ground-based calibration of the University College London QB50 Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer. Space qualification of the three Australian QB50 `CubeSats' (June 2016) is carried out in the WOMBAT XL space simulation chamber. The QB50 satellites have attitude control but altitude control is not a requirement. SP3 is developing end-to-end miniaturised radiofrequency plasma propulsion systems (such as the Pocket Rocket and the MiniHel thrusters with power and propellant sub-systems) for future `CubeSat' missions.

  18. Efficiency of aluminum-pillared montmorillonite on the removal of cesium and copper from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanis, D; Assimakopoulos, P A

    2007-05-01

    Aluminum-pillared-layered montmorillonites (PILMs) were tested for their potential application in the removal of copper or cesium from aqueous solutions. By varying the initial conditions, several PILMs were prepared and characterized by means of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and sorption isotherms. Uptake of metals was studied by means of XRF spectrometry for copper sorption or gamma-ray spectrometry for cesium, using 137Cs as radiotracer. The sorption kinetics and capacity of PILMs were determined in relation to the effects of factors such as the initial metal concentration, initial pH of the solution and the presence of competitive cations. Kinetic studies showed that an equilibrium time of few minutes was needed for the adsorption of metal ions on PILMs. A pseudo-first-order equation was used to describe the sorption process for either copper or cesium. The most effective pH range for the removal of copper and cesium was found to be 4.0-6.0 and 3.0-8.0, respectively. Cesium sorption isotherms were best represented by a two-site Langmuir model while copper isotherms followed the Freundlich or the two-site Langmuir model. Cesium sorption experiments with inorganic or organic competitive cations as blocking agents revealed that the high selective sites of PILMs for cesium sorption (1-2% of total) are surface and edge sites in addition to interlayer exchange sites. In copper sorption, the two sites were determined as interlayer sites of PILMs after restoring their cation exchange capacity and sites associated with the pillar oxides.

  19. FCJ-133 The Scripted Spaces of Urban Ubiquitous Computing: The experience, poetics, and politics of public scripted space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ulrik Andersen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes and introduces the concept of ‘scripted space’ as a new perspective on ubiquitous computing in urban environments. Drawing on urban history, computer games, and a workshop study of the city of Lund the article discusses the experience of digitally scripted spaces, and their relation to the history of public spaces. In conclusion, the article discusses the potential for employing scripted spaces as a reinvigoration of urban public space.

  20. Understanding cosmic rays with Balloon and Space Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picozza, P., E-mail: piergiorgio.picozza@roma2.infn.it [University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Physics, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Di Felice, V. [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Measurements of cosmic rays provide important information on their sources and on the mechanisms of acceleration and propagation of cosmic particles through the Galaxy. Positrons and antiprotons in cosmic rays are also the major candidates for searching signals from annihilation of dark matter and contributions from other exotic sources as nearby pulsars. Many balloon-borne experiments have been performed since the sixties, obtaining important results that strongly suggested the realization of the PAMELA and Fermi satellite missions, the latter mainly for gamma rays, and AMS-02 on the ISS. The precision of the measurements and the high statistics highlighted unexpected features in the cosmic particle energy spectra that are setting strong constraints to the nature of Dark Matter and are contributing to change our basic vision of their origin and propagation. The continuous particle detection in space experiments is allowing a constant monitoring of the solar activity and detailed study of the solar modulation for a long period, giving important improvements to the comprehension of the heliosphere mechanisms.

  1. Materials Science Experiments on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    The Performance Goal for NASA's Microgravity Materials Science Program reads "Use microgravity to establish and improve quantitative and predictive relationships between the structure, processing and properties of materials." The advent of the International Space Station will open up a new era in Materials Science Research including the ability to perform long term and frequent experiments in microgravity. As indicated the objective is to gain a greater understanding of issues of materials science in an environment in which the force of gravity can be effectively switched off. Thus gravity related issues of convection, buoyancy and hydrostatic forces can be reduced and the science behind the structure/processing/properties relationship can more easily be understood. The specific areas of research covered within the program are (1) the study of Nucleation and Metastable States, (2) Prediction and Control of Microstructure (including pattern formation and morphological stability), (3) Phase Separation and Interfacial Stability, (4) Transport Phenomena (including process modeling and thermophysical properties measurement), and (5) Crystal Growth, and Defect Generation and Control. All classes of materials, including metals and alloys, glasses and ceramics, polymers, electronic materials (including organic and inorganic single crystals), aerogels and nanostructures, are included in these areas. The principal experimental equipment available to the materials scientist on the International Space Station (ISS) will be the Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF). Each of these systems will be accommodated in a single ISS rack, which can operate autonomously, will accommodate telescience operations, and will provide real time data to the ground. Eventual plans call for three MSRF racks, the first of which will be shared with the European Space Agency (ESA). Under international agreements, ESA and other partners will provide some of the equipment, while NASA covers launch

  2. Removal of cesium from simulated liquid waste with countercurrent two-stage adsorption followed by microfiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Guang-Hui [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Gu, Ping, E-mail: guping@tju.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorption isotherm of cesium by copper ferrocyanide followed a Freundlich model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decontamination factor of cesium was higher in lab-scale test than that in jar test. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A countercurrent two-stage adsorption-microfiltration process was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cesium concentration in the effluent could be calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a new cesium removal process with a higher decontamination factor. - Abstract: Copper ferrocyanide (CuFC) was used as an adsorbent to remove cesium. Jar test results showed that the adsorption capacity of CuFC was better than that of potassium zinc hexacyanoferrate. Lab-scale tests were performed by an adsorption-microfiltration process, and the mean decontamination factor (DF) was 463 when the initial cesium concentration was 101.3 {mu}g/L, the dosage of CuFC was 40 mg/L and the adsorption time was 20 min. The cesium concentration in the effluent continuously decreased with the operation time, which indicated that the used adsorbent retained its adsorption capacity. To use this capacity, experiments on a countercurrent two-stage adsorption (CTA)-microfiltration (MF) process were carried out with CuFC adsorption combined with membrane separation. A calculation method for determining the cesium concentration in the effluent was given, and batch tests in a pressure cup were performed to verify the calculated method. The results showed that the experimental values fitted well with the calculated values in the CTA-MF process. The mean DF was 1123 when the dilution factor was 0.4, the initial cesium concentration was 98.75 {mu}g/L and the dosage of CuFC and adsorption time were the same as those used in the lab-scale test. The DF obtained by CTA-MF process was more than three times higher than the single-stage adsorption in the jar test.

  3. Cesium accumulation by bacterium Thermus sp.TibetanG7: hints for biomineralization of cesiumbearing geyserite in hot springs in Tibet, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The bacterium Thermus sp. TibetanG7, isolated from hot springs in Tibet, China, was examined for the ability to accumulate cesium from solutions. Environmental conditions were simulated and the effects of pH, K+, Na+ and K+-regimes were then studied to determine the possible role of the bacterium in the formation of cesium-bearing geyserite around these hot springs. In despite of the inhibition of K+ and Na+, the bacterium Thermus sp. TibetanG7 revealed noticeable accumulation of cesium from solutions, with maximum accumulations of 53.49 and 40.41 μmol Cesium/g cell dry weight in Na+ and K+ inhibition experiments, respectively. The accumulation of cesium by this microorganism is rapid, with 40%―50% accumulated within the first 5 min. K+-deficient cells showed a much higher capacity of cesium accumulation compared with K+-sufficient cells. It is evident that the bacteria within the genus thermus play a significant role in the cesium assembly. The formation of cesium-bearing geyserite is also considered.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  5. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  6. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CELLRAD)": Hardware and biological system tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CELLRAD, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CELLRAD in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  7. ESA takes part in Earth observation and space science experiments on board the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The ATLAS-2 mission is focusing on Earth observation and space science; three out of the seven instruments have been developed by scientific institutes in Belgium, France and Germany, with support from ESA. Four experiments have been provided by NASA and US scientists. The three European instruments have already shown an excellent performance during the first Atlas mission in March 1992, when they were tended by payload specialist Dirk Frimout, a Belgian astronaut and ESA staff member. Although the main scientific objective of the series of Atlas missions is to achieve continuity of annual measurements over a period as long as a decade, the first scientific results from Atlas can already be considered as a contribution to critical research topics, in particular the environment. The data from ATLAS-2 will add to this achievement. Two European instruments, Solcon and Solspec, are measuring to a very high degree of precision the total irradiation the Earth receives from the Sun - the "solar constant" -and the spectral distribution of this radiation over a wide range of wavelengths. Knowledge of the solar constant and the solar radiation spectrum matters not only for a better understanding of the Sun, but also for improving numerical models of climate and climate change. SOLCON was developed under the responsibility of Dr. Dominique Crommelynck of the Royal Meteorological Institute of Brussels, Belgium. SOLSPEC was instead developed under the responsibility of Dr. Gerard Thuillier of the CNRS, Verrieres le Buisson, France. One of these instruments will be fully remote-controlled by scientists from a laboratory in Belgium, via telecommunications links to the Shuttle, and the data of another will be transmitted to Belgium in real time to follow the results obtained. This approach is known as telescience: using telescience, a scientist can monitor his experiment in real-time, repeat it with different settings, consult his team, process data and adapt his measurements when

  8. Electromagnetically-induced transparency in a multi-V-type system in cesium atomic vapour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建明; 尹王保; 汪丽蓉; 肖连团; 贾锁堂

    2002-01-01

    Electromagnetically-induced transparency is observed in a three-level multi-V-type system in cesium vapour atroom temperature. The absorption property is measured and the hyperfine structures of atomic states can be determined.The results of the experiment agree with the theoretical analysis.

  9. Evaluation of a method for removing cesium and reducing the volume of leaf litter from broad-leaved trees contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident during the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Shigeki; Yanagisawa, Mitsunori

    2017-04-01

    The town of Marumori in southern Miyagi Prefecture borders on Fukushima Prefecture, and following the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, there were concerns about cesium deposition in forested areas. One of the authors of this paper has continually surveyed leaf litter from the forested areas. As leaf litter may be a source of cesium contamination from the forest to downstream areas, we considered a simplified version of wet oxidation, a method previously presented by one of the authors of this study, as a technology to reduce leaf litter weight and cesium concentration, separating radioactive nuclides from non-radioactive ones, in leaf litter. We tested our method in three experiments. Experiment 1 used new leaf litter (232 Bq/kg) from the surface of a small stream at the forest edge nearby an area with air dose level higher than the national standard threshold of 0.23 μSv/h for the implementation of governmental decontamination works. Experiment 2 applied wet oxidation to older leaf litter (705 Bq/kg) harvested from a pasture nearby the stream mentioned above. We also used the same leaf litter in experiment 3 for a cesium release tests using pure water. In experiment 1 and 2 we treated leaf litter with a sodium hypochlorite solution, optimizing sodium hypochlorite concentration and reaction temperature. We measured a 50-60% decrease in the leaf litter weight and a 60% decrease in the cesium concentration. Moreover, we also measured the amount of cesium washout. The cesium budget of experiment 1 showed no cesium gasification (wet oxidation avoids airborne cesium as this element is prone to be volatile at 600 °C), and that high sodium hypochlorite concentration and high temperature had a strong positive effect on leaf litter volume reduction and cesium decontamination. Experiment 2 confirmed the reproducibility of these results in leaves with different cesium concentration and harvested in different conditions. We could also explain the

  10. Perlite for permanent confinement of cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balencie, J.; Burger, D.; Rehspringer, J.-L.; Estournès, C.; Vilminot, S.; Richard-Plouet, M.; Boos, A.

    2006-06-01

    We present the potential use of expanded perlite, a metastable amorphous hydrated aluminium silicate, as a permanent medium for the long-term confinement of cesium. The method requires simply a loading by mixing an aqueous cesium nitrate solution and expanded perlite at 300 K followed by densification by sintering. The formation of pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, a naturally occurring mineral phase, upon careful heat treatment is demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. Leaching tests on the resulting glass-ceramics reveal a very low Cs departure of 0.5 mg m-2 d-1.

  11. Crystalline silicotitanates for cesium/strontium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.; Miller, J.; Sherman, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CST) has been developed that exhibits very high selectivity for cesium and strontium in the highly alkaline radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site and other DOE sites. Tests have also shown that CSTs have high selectivity for cesium in acidic and neutral solutions. The ESP is supporting an effort at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A & M University to further develop and characterize the important chemical and physical properties that will determine the applicability of CST to radioactive waste treatment at Hanford and other DOE facilities.

  12. Microbial accumulation of uranium, radium, and cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; North, S.E.

    1981-05-01

    Diverse microbial species varied considerably in their ability to accumulate uranium, cesium, and radium. Mechanistic differences in uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were indicated. S. serevisiae exhibited a slow (hours) surface accumulation of uranium which was subject to environmental factors, while P. aeruginosa accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense intracellular deposits and did not appear to be affected by environmental parameters. Metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by either organism. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several species tested.

  13. Arts in space: French experiences and elements of prospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Jacques

    2009-04-01

    The French space adventure started more than 40 years ago. Its rich and long scientific and technical tradition made France able to occupy the place which is hers today. But what does happen to the world of arts, to which the French culture brought so much? Beyond some French artists belonging to the community of the space artists, do arts constitute a true dimension of the French space activity? Conversely, did space influence the national artistic culture? This paper proposes to tackle these questions according to a retrospective historical glance and to offer some prospective reflexions.

  14. Real-time collision avoidance in space: the GETEX experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Juergen; Schluse, Michael

    2000-10-01

    Intelligent autonomous robotic systems require efficient safety components to assure system reliability during the entire operation. Especially if commanded over long distances, the robotic system must be able to guarantee the planning of safe and collision free movements independently. Therefore the IRF developed a new collision avoidance methodology satisfying the needs of autonomous safety systems considering the dynamics of the robots to protect. To do this, the collision avoidance system cyclically calculates the actual collision danger of the robots with respect to all static and dynamic obstacles in the environment. If a robot gets in collision danger the methodology immediately starts an evasive action to avoid the collision and guides the robot around the obstacle to its target position. This evasive action is calculated in real-time in a mathematically exact way by solving a quadratic convex optimization problem. The secondary conditions of this optimization problem include the potential collision danger of the robots kinematic chain including all temporarily attached grippers and objects and the dynamic constraints of the robots. The result of the optimization procedure are joint accelerations to apply to prevent the robot from colliding and to guide it to its target position. This methodology has been tested very successfully during the Japanese/German space robot project GETEX in April 1999. During the mission, the collision avoidance system successfully protected the free flying Japanese robot ERA on board the satellite ETS-VII at all times. The experiments showed, that the developed system is fully capable of ensuring the safety of such autonomous robotic systems by actively preventing collisions and generating evasive actions in cases of collision danger.

  15. Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6) Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    An atomic oxygen fluence monitor was flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6). The monitor was designed to measure the accumulation of atomic oxygen fluence with time as it impinged upon the ram surface of the MISSE 6B Passive Experiment Container (PEC). This was an active experiment for which data was to be stored on a battery-powered data logger for post-flight retrieval and analysis. The atomic oxygen fluence measurement was accomplished by allowing atomic oxygen to erode two opposing wedges of pyrolytic graphite that partially covered a photodiode. As the wedges of pyrolytic graphite erode, the area of the photodiode that is illuminated by the Sun increases. The short circuit current, which is proportional to the area of illumination, was to be measured and recorded as a function of time. The short circuit current from a different photodiode, which was oriented in the same direction and had an unobstructed view of the Sun, was also to be recorded as a reference current. The ratio of the two separate recorded currents should bear a linear relationship with the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence and be independent of the intensity of solar illumination. Ground hyperthermal atomic oxygen exposure facilities were used to evaluate the linearity of the ratio of short circuit current to the atomic oxygen fluence. In flight, the current measurement circuitry failed to operate properly, thus the overall atomic oxygen mission fluence could only be estimated based on the physical erosion of the pyrolytic graphite wedges. The atomic oxygen fluence was calculated based on the knowledge of the space atomic oxygen erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite measured from samples on the MISSE 2. The atomic oxygen fluence monitor, the expected result and comparison of mission atomic oxygen fluence based on the erosion of the pyrolytic graphite and Kapton H atomic oxygen fluence witness samples are presented in this paper.

  16. Experiences in riding a technology roller coaster to deep space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, P.; Lehman, D.; Livesay, L.; Rayman, M.

    2001-01-01

    Deep Space 1(DS1) was the first mission of NASA's New Millennium program and was chartered to flight test twelve high-risk, enabling technologies important for future space and Earth science programs on both a fast schedule and a low budget.

  17. Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Cesium Atoms in a Cesium Heat Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardis, Robert G.; Gardner, Bernard W.; Smith, R. Seth

    1997-11-01

    A Cesium Heat Pipe has been constructed to produce a cesium metal vapor for use in laser spectroscopy. The heat pipe consists of a 24 inch stainless steel pipe with 2 inch diameter calcium fluoride windows on each end. Electric heaters are used to control the cesium vapor pressure. An argon buffer gas is used to maintain high transmittance through the end windows. Sensors are used to monitor both temperature and pressure. A Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser system is used to probe the cesium atoms via resonance ionization spectroscopy. Details of the construction of the heat pipe and the experimental setup will be presented. The results of the resonance ionization spectroscopy will be discussed. This experimental setup can be utilized with undergraduates in courses such as Optics, Laser Physics, and Senior Laboratory/Research.

  18. Cesium vapor thermionic converter anomalies arising from negative ion emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasor, Ned S.

    2016-08-01

    Compelling experimental evidence is given that a longstanding limit encountered on cesium vapor thermionic energy converter performance improvement and other anomalies arise from thermionic emission of cesium negative ions. It is shown that the energy that characterizes thermionic emission of cesium negative ions is 1.38 eV and, understandably, is not the electron affinity 0.47 eV determined for the photodetachment threshold of the cesium negative ion. The experimental evidence includes measurements of collector work functions and volt-ampere characteristics in quasi-vacuum cesium vapor thermionic diodes, along with reinterpretation of the classic Taylor-Langmuir S-curve data on electron emission in cesium vapor. The quantitative effects of negative ion emission on performance in the ignited, unignited, and quasi-vacuum modes of cesium vapor thermionic converter operation are estimated.

  19. Particle detection technology for space-borne astroparticle experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    I review the transfer of technology from accelerator-based equipment to space-borne astroparticle detectors. Requirements for detection, identification and measurement of ions, electrons and photons in space are recalled. The additional requirements and restrictions imposed by the launch process in manned and unmanned space flight, as well as by the hostile environment in orbit, are analyzed. Technology readiness criteria and risk mitigation strategies are reviewed. Recent examples are given of missions and instruments in orbit, under construction or in the planning phase.

  20. The large silicon tracker for the AMS experiment on the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauluzzi, M.

    1996-02-01

    The design of the high precision microstrip silicon tracker for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment (AMS) is presented. We emphasize features of the silicon tracker which make it suitable for a space born experiment and for equipping large active areas.

  1. Space Weathering Effects on Sulfates and Carbonates: Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, Catherine; Bu, Caixia; Rodriguez lopez, Gerard; McFadden, Lucy Ann; Li, Jian-Yang; Ruesch, Ottaviano

    2016-10-01

    Introduction: The solar wind plasma continuously streams from the Sun, interacting with the surfaces of airless bodies throughout the solar system. Sulfates and carbonates, identified by the UV-Vis spectral slope [1] and 3.4 / 4.0 μm absorption features [2] on the surface of Ceres, will be exposed to solar H, He at ~1keV/amu. We investigate the stability of anhydrous salts under 4 keV He+ irradiation as proxy for the solar wind.Experiment: Anhydrous MgSO4, Na2SO4, and Na2CO3 powders are pressed into pellets, with compositions confirmed by XRD. Pellet samples are placed in ultra-high vacuum (10-9 Torr) and the effects of 4keV He+ irradiation on surface composition and chemistry are monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy, as a function of ion fluence. We measure ex situ diffuse optical reflectance prior and subsequent to irradiation through ranges 0.2-2.5µm (Lambda 1050) and 0.6-10µm (Thermo Nicolet 670).Results: Ion irradiation of MgSO4 damages the crystal structure, preferentially removing oxygen along with sulfur. XPS measurements imply the formation of MgO after 5x1017 He+cm-2 (~15,000 years at 2.7AU). During irradiation, we observe secondary ion ejection (Mg, MgO, O, OH, H, S, and SO) and neutral SO2. In addition, XPS sulfur spectra suggest the presence of a small amount of trapped SO2, confirming this decomposition product observed in the optical UV spectra at ~240 and 280nm [3,4] with dehydration, as well as in the IR at ~7.8μm [5] with irradiation. Our observations are consistent with the potential decomposition pathway for MgSO4 to SO2 provided by McCord et al. (2001) [6]. Spectral darkening and reddening in the UV-Vis region after irradiation are observed by ex situ optical spectroscopy. We suggest that space weathering by solar ions limits the stability of salts on Ceres and other airless bodies, which influences the optical reflectance.Acknowledgements: We thank the NASA SSW program for support

  2. Sympathetic cooling in a rubidium cesium mixture: Production of ultracold cesium atoms; Sympathetisches Kuehlen in einer Rubidium-Caesium-Mischung: Erzeugung ultrakalter Caesiumatome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, M.

    2007-07-01

    This thesis presents experiments for the production of ultracold rubidium cesium mixture in a magnetic trap. The long-termed aim of the experiment is the study of the interaction of few cesium atoms with a Bose-Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms. Especially by controlled variation of the cesium atom number the transition in the description of the interaction by concepts of the one-particle physics to the description by concepts of the many-particle physics shall be studied. The rubidium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) and from there reloaded into a magnetic trap. In this the rubidium atoms are stored in the state vertical stroke f=2,m{sub f}=2 right angle of the electronic ground state and evaporatively cooled by means of microwave-induced transitions into the state vertical stroke f=1,m{sub f}=1] (microwave cooling). The cesium atoms are also trppaed in a MOT and into the same magnetic trap reloaded, in which they are stored in the state vertical stroke f=4,m{sub f}=4 right angle of the electronic ground state together with rubidium. Because of the different hyperfine splitting only rubidium is evaporatively cooled, while cesium is cooled jointly sympathetically - i.e. by theramal contact via elastic collisions with rubidium atoms. The first two chapters contain a description of interatomic interactions in ultracold gases as well as a short summary of theoretical concepts in the description of Bose-Einstein condensates. The chapters 3 and 4 contain a short presentation of the methods applied in the experiment for the production of ultracold gases as well as the experimental arrangement; especially in the framework of this thesis a new coil system has been designed, which offers in view of future experiments additionally optical access for an optical trap. Additionally the fourth chapter contains an extensive description of the experimental cycle, which is applied in order to store rubidium and cesium atoms together into the magnetic trap. The

  3. Life science experiments performed in space in the ISS/Kibo facility and future research plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    Over the past several years, current techniques in molecular biology have been used to perform experiments in space, focusing on the nature and effects of space radiation. In the Japanese 'Kibo' facility in the International Space Station (ISS), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has performed five life science experiments since 2009, and two additional experiments are currently in progress. The first life science experiment in space was the 'Rad Gene' project, which utilized two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines containing a mutated P53 : gene (m P53 : ) and a parental wild-type P53 : gene (wt P53 : ) respectively. Four parameters were examined: (i) detecting space radiation-induced DSBs by observing γH2AX foci; (ii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression during space flight; (iii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression after space flight; and (iv) observing the adaptive response in the two cell lines containing the mutated and wild type P53 : genes after exposure to space radiation. These observations were completed and have been reported, and this paper is a review of these experiments. In addition, recent new information from space-based experiments involving radiation biology is presented here. These experiments involve human cultured cells, silkworm eggs, mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse eggs in various experiments designed by other principal investigators in the ISS/Kibo. The progress of Japanese science groups involved in these space experiments together with JAXA are also discussed here. The Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space (JSBSS), the Utilization Committee of Space Environment Science (UCSES) and the Science Council of Japan (ACJ) have supported these new projects and new experimental facilities in ISS/Kibo. Currently, these organizations are proposing new experiments for the ISS through 2024.

  4. Cesium and Strontium Separation Technologies Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Todd; T. A. Todd; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst

    2004-03-01

    Integral to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program’s proposed closed nuclear fuel cycle, the fission products cesium and strontium in the dissolved spent nuclear fuel stream are to be separated and managed separately. A comprehensive literature survey is presented to identify cesium and strontium separation technologies that have the highest potential and to focus research and development efforts on these technologies. Removal of these high-heat-emitting fission products reduces the radiation fields in subsequent fuel cycle reprocessing streams and provides a significant short-term (100 yr) heat source reduction in the repository. This, along with separation of actinides, may provide a substantial future improvement in the amount of fuel that could be stored in a geologic repository. The survey and review of the candidate cesium and strontium separation technologies are presented herein. Because the AFCI program intends to manage cesium and strontium together, technologies that simultaneously separate both elements are of the greatest interest, relative to technologies that separate only one of the two elements.

  5. Space, body, time and relationship experiences of recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Andersen, Henriette Bondo; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing recess physical activity has been the aim of several interventions, as this setting can provide numerous physical activity opportunities. However, it is unclear if these interventions are equally effective for all children, or if they only appeal to children who are already...... the classroom as a space for physical activity, designing schoolyards with smaller secluded spaces and varied facilities, improving children's self-esteem and body image, e.g., during physical education, and creating teacher organised play activities during recess....

  6. Relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudimetla, V. S. Rao

    1996-01-01

    An effort was initiated last year in the Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center to examine and incorporate, if necessary, the effects of relativity in the design of space-based lidar systems. A space-based lidar system, named AEOLUS, is under development at Marshall Space Flight Center and it will be used to accurately measure atmospheric wind profiles. Effects of relativity were also observed in the performance of space-based systems, for example in case of global positioning systems, and corrections were incorporated into the design of instruments. During the last summer, the effects of special relativity on the design of space-based lidar systems were studied in detail, by analyzing the problem of laser scattering off a fixed target when the source and a co-located receiver are moving on a spacecraft. Since the proposed lidar system uses a coherent detection system, errors even in the order of a few microradians must be corrected to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio. Previous analysis assumed that the ground is flat and the spacecraft is moving parallel to the ground, and developed analytical expressions for the location, direction and Doppler shift of the returning radiation. Because of the assumptions used in that analysis, only special relativity effects were involved. In this report, that analysis is extended to include general relativity and calculate its effects on the design.

  7. The “PHOENIX” Space Experiment: Study of Space Radiation Impact on Cells Genetic Apparatus on Board the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karganov, M. Yu; Alchinova, I. B.; Yakovenko, E. N.; Kushin, V. V.; Inozemtsev, K. O.; Strádi, A.; Szabó, J.; Shurshakov, V. A.; Tolochek, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    The preliminary results of the 1st session of Russian “PHOENIX” long-term space experiment are presented. The survival of dried human lymphocytes and mouse bone marrow cells in 199 days space flight is studied. The degree of DNA fragmentation is analysed for samples flown in different ISS compartments. It is shown that biological data correlates with the results of space radiation dose measurements.

  8. Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

  9. Life science research objectives and representative experiments for the space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine C. (Editor); Arno, Roger D. (Editor); Mains, Richard (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A workshop was convened to develop hypothetical experiments to be used as a baseline for space station designer and equipment specifiers to ensure responsiveness to the users, the life science community. Sixty-five intra- and extramural scientists were asked to describe scientific rationales, science objectives, and give brief representative experiment descriptions compatible with expected space station accommodations, capabilities, and performance envelopes. Experiment descriptions include hypothesis, subject types, approach, equipment requirements, and space station support requirements. The 171 experiments are divided into 14 disciplines.

  10. Setting priorities for space research: An experiment in methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    In 1989, the Space Studies Board created the Task Group on Priorities in Space Research to determine whether scientists should take a role in recommending priorities for long-term space research initiatives and, if so, to analyze the priority-setting problem in this context and develop a method by which such priorities could be established. After answering the first question in the affirmative in a previous report, the task group set out to accomplish the second task. The basic assumption in developing a priority-setting process is that a reasoned and structured approach for ordering competing initiatives will yield better results than other ways of proceeding. The task group proceeded from the principle that the central criterion for evaluating a research initiative must be its scientific merit -- the value of the initiative to the proposing discipline and to science generally. The group developed a two-stage methodology for priority setting and constructed a procedure and format to support the methodology. The first of two instruments developed was a standard format for structuring proposals for space research initiatives. The second instrument was a formal, semiquantitative appraisal procedure for evaluating competing proposals. This report makes available complete templates for the methodology, including the advocacy statement and evaluation forms, as well as an 11-step schema for a priority-setting process. From the beginning of its work, the task group was mindful that the issue of priority setting increasingly pervades all of federally supported science and that its work would have implications extending beyond space research. Thus, although the present report makes no recommendations for action by NASA or other government agencies, it provides the results of the task group's work for the use of others who may study priority-setting procedures or take up the challenge of implementing them in the future.

  11. Survival of Spores of Trichoderma longibrachiatum in Space: data from the Space Experiment SPORES on EXPOSE-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Katja; Lux-Endrich, Astrid; Panitz, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    In the space experiment `Spores in artificial meteorites' (SPORES), spores of the fungus Trichoderma longibrachiatum were exposed to low-Earth orbit for nearly 2 years on board the EXPOSE-R facility outside of the International Space Station. The environmental conditions tested in space were: space vacuum at 10-7-10-4 Pa or argon atmosphere at 105 Pa as inert gas atmosphere, solar extraterrestrial ultraviolet (UV) radiation at λ > 110 nm or λ > 200 nm with fluences up to 5.8 × 108 J m-2, cosmic radiation of a total dose range from 225 to 320 mGy, and temperature fluctuations from -25 to +50°C, applied isolated or in combination. Comparable control experiments were performed on ground. After retrieval, viability of spores was analysed by two methods: (i) ethidium bromide staining and (ii) test of germination capability. About 30% of the spores in vacuum survived the space travel, if shielded against insolation. However, in most cases no significant decrease was observed for spores exposed in addition to the full spectrum of solar UV irradiation. As the spores were exposed in clusters, the outer layers of spores may have shielded the inner part. The results give some information about the likelihood of lithopanspermia, the natural transfer of micro-organisms between planets. In addition to the parameters of outer space, sojourn time in space seems to be one of the limiting parameters.

  12. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Cesium Extraction Performance by Calix[4]Arene Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumppe, J.L.; Delmau, L.

    2004-01-01

    Novel aza-crown derivatives of dioctyloxy-calix[4]arene crown-6 were examined for their cesium extraction performance at different pH levels. These studies are of interest in addressing high-level waste tank remediation and the removal of 137Cs, a major contributor to heat and radiation generation. Preliminary studies were done to assess the performance of these calixarene compounds under varying conditions. Results showed an increase of cesium extraction with pH as well as expected trends in diluent effects and anion selectivity. Poor extraction performance of some aza-crown derivatives raised questions regarding the possibility of intramolecular hydrogen-bonding. A novel methylated derivative was used to address these questions. Additional experiments were conducted to determine the extraction effect on pH. Results indicate an increase in cesium extraction with pH, as shown in preliminary studies. Mono-aza derivatives were shown to exhibit better cesium extraction performance than their di-aza counterparts. The methylated derivative showed poorer extraction performance than the non-methylated derivative, indicating that completely removing the possibility of intramolecular hydrogen-bonding has negative effects on extraction performance. This suggests that the hydrogen-bonding facilitates anion co-extraction, which would lead to better overall extraction. Mono-aza derivatives were shown to cause unexpected changes in pH. This could possibly be attributed to protonation of the calix crown.

  13. Sorption and desorption of cesium on rapakivi granite and its minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huitti, T.; Hakanen, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Lindberg, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2000-04-01

    Batch sorption experiments of cesium were performed for rapakivi granite and its main minerals, and also for some fracture minerals. The main minerals quartz, potassium feldspar, plagioclase, biotite and hornblende were magnetically separated from crushed rapakivi granite. The fracture minerals were chlorite, dolomite and kaolinite. Sorption was studied in fresh and saline reference waters containing cesium in the range of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -3} mol/l. The distribution ratios for rapakivi granite generally decreased with an increasing Cs concentration and an increasing ionic strength. For fresh rapakivi granite, the sorption behaviour was rather complex in both fresh and saline reference waters, being complex for the other alteration stages only in saline water. Sorption increased unexpectedly when the initial cesium concentration was raised to 10{sup -5} - 10{sup -4} mol/l. The sorption on rapakivi granite was non-linear, especially in saline water. Sorption was reversible for rapakivi granite. The sorption on the minerals proved to be very non-linear, especially on biotite. Sorption was also reversible for biotite and kaolinite. For the other minerals, sorption was irreversible to some degree. As to the sorption of cesium investigated by studying thin sections of rapakivi granite and their autoradiograms, the most dominating mineral was biotite. The water analyses made during the sorption experiment revealed the exchange of potassium and cesium. The corresponding changes were difficult to detect in saline water. Calculation of the R{sub d} values for the rock, based on the R{sub d} values of minerals and the portions of minerals in the rock, yielded smaller distribution ratios than the values determined for the rock. (orig.)

  14. Nano-Cesium for Anti-Cancer Properties: An Investigation into Cesium Induced Metabolic Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Enrique A; Misra, Santosh K; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S; Ohoka, Ayako; Miller, Callie; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-10-03

    The use of cesium chloride (CsCl) for cancer therapy ("high pH therapy") has been theorized to produce anticancer properties by raising intracellular pH to induce apoptosis. Although considered as "alternative medicine", little scientific evidence supports this theory. Alternatively, cells have no cesium ion (Cs(+)) mediated channels for clearance. Thus, such unstable electrochemical distributions have the severe potential to disrupt electrochemical dependent cellular processes, such as glucose cotransporters. Hence, a detailed investigation of pH changing effects and glucose uptake inhibition are warranted as a possible cesium-induced anticancer therapy. We developed and characterized cesium nanoparticles (38 ± 6 nm), termed NanoCs, for nanoparticle-mediated internalization of the ion, and compared its treatment to free CsCl. Our investigations suggest that neither NanoCs nor CsCl drastically changed the intracellular pH, negating the theory. Alternatively, NanoCs lead to a significant decrease in glucose uptake when compared to free CsCl, suggesting cesium inhibited glucose uptake. An apoptosis assay of observed cell death affirms that NanoCs leads tumor cells to initiate apoptosis rather than follow necrotic behavior. Furthermore, NanoCs lead to in vivo tumor regression, where H&E analysis confirmed apoptotic cell populations. Thus, NanoCs performed pH-independent anticancer therapy by inducing metabolic stasis.

  15. MIT-NASA/KSC space life science experiments - A telescience testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Charles M.; Lichtenberg, Byron K.; Fiser, Richard L.; Vordermark, Deborah S.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments performed at MIT to better define Space Station information system telescience requirements for effective remote coaching of astronauts by principal investigators (PI) on the ground are described. The experiments were conducted via satellite video, data, and voice links to surrogate crewmembers working in a laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Teams of two PIs and two crewmembers performed two different space life sciences experiments. During 19 three-hour interactive sessions, a variety of test conditions were explored. Since bit rate limits are necessarily imposed on Space Station video experiments surveillance video was varied down to 50 Kb/s and the effectiveness of PI controlled frame rate, resolution, grey scale, and color decimation was investigated. It is concluded that remote coaching by voice works and that dedicated crew-PI voice loops would be of great value on the Space Station.

  16. Development and verification of hardware for life science experiments in the Japanese Experiment Module "Kibo" on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishioka, Noriaki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Asashima, Makoto; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Mogami, Yoshihiro; Ochiai, Toshimasa; Aizawa-Yano, Sachiko; Higashibata, Akira; Ando, Noboru; Nagase, Mutsumu; Ogawa, Shigeyuki; Shimazu, Toru; Fukui, Keiji; Fujimoto, Nobuyoshi

    2004-03-01

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has developed a cell biology experiment facility (CBEF) and a clean bench (CB) as a common hardware in which life science experiments in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM known as "Kibo") of the International Space Station (ISS) can be performed. The CBEF, a CO2 incubator with a turntable that provides variable gravity levels, is the basic hardware required to carry out the biological experiments using microorganisms, cells, tissues, small animals, plants, etc. The CB provides a closed aseptic operation area for life science and biotechnology experiments in Kibo. A phase contrast and fluorescence microscope is installed inside CB. The biological experiment units (BEU) are designed to run individual experiments using the CBEF and the CB. A plant experiment unit (PEU) and two cell experiment units (CEU type1 and type2) for the BEU have been developed.

  17. Big Science, Small-Budget Space Experiment Package Aka MISSE-5: A Hardware And Software Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowski, Michael; Greer, Lawrence; Flatico, Joseph; Jenkins, Phillip; Spina, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Conducting space experiments with small budgets is a fact of life for many design groups with low-visibility science programs. One major consequence is that specialized space grade electronic components are often too costly to incorporate into the design. Radiation mitigation now becomes more complex as a result of being restricted to the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts. Unique hardware and software design techniques are required to succeed in producing a viable instrument suited for use in space. This paper highlights some of the design challenges and associated solutions encountered in the production of a highly capable, low cost space experiment package.

  18. Atomic frequency standard relativistic Doppler shift experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, H. E.; Reinhardt, V. S.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment has been performed to measure possible space anisotropy as it would effect the frequency of a cesium atomic beam standard clock in a laboratory on earth due to motion relative to external coordinate frames. The cesium frequency was measured as a function of orientation with respect to an atomic hydrogen maser standard. Over a period of 34 days 101 measurements were made. The results are consistent with a conclusion that no general orientation dependance attributable to spacial anisotropy was observed. It is shown that both the airplane clock results, and the null results for the atomic beam clock, are consistent with Einstein general or special relativity, or with the Lorentz transformations alone.

  19. NASA uses Eclipse RCP Applications for Experiments on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    Eclipse is going to space for the first time in 2013! The International Space Station (ISS) is used as a site for experiments any software developed as part of these experiments has to comply with extensive and strict user interface guidelines. NASA Ames Research Center's Intelligent Robotics Group is doing 2 sets of experiments, both with astronauts using Eclipse RCP applications to remotely control robots. One experiment will control SPHERES with an Android Smartphone on the ISS the other experiment will control a K10 rover on Earth.

  20. Sorption of cesium in young till soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusa, Merja; Lempinen, Janne; Ahola, Hanna; Soederlund, Mervi; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Laboratory of Radiochemistry; Lahdenperae, Anne-Maj [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland); Ikonen, Ari T.K. [Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland)

    2014-10-01

    Soil samples from three forest soil pits were examined down to a depth of approximately three metres using 1 M ammonium acetate extraction and microwave-assisted extraction with concentrated nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), to study the binding of cesium (Cs) at Olkiluoto Island, southern Finland. Ammonium acetate was used to extract the readily exchangeable Cs fractions roughly representing the Cs fraction in soil which is available for plants. Microwave-assisted HNO{sub 3} extraction dissolves various minerals, e.g. carbonates, most sulphides, arsenides, selenides, phosphates, molybdates, sulphates, iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) oxides and some silicates (olivine, biotite, zeolite), and reflects the total Cs concentrations. Cs was mostly found in the strongly bound fraction obtained through HNO{sub 3} extraction. The average Cs concentrations found in this fraction were 3.53 ± 0.30 mg/kg (d.w.), 3.06 ± 1.86 mg/kg (d.w.) and 1.83 ± 0.42 mg/kg (d.w.) in the three soil pits, respectively. The average exchangeable Cs found in the ammonium acetate extraction in all three sampling pits was 0.015 ± 0.008 mg/kg (d.w.). In addition, Cs concentrations in the soil solution were determined and in situ distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Cs were calculated. Furthermore, the in situ K{sub d} data was compared with the Cs K{sub d} data obtained using the model batch experiments. The in situ K{sub d} values were observed to fairly well follow the trend of batch sorption data with respect to soil depth, but on average the batch distribution coefficients were almost an order of magnitude higher than the in situ K{sub d} data. In situ Cs sorption data could be satisfactory fitted with the Langmuir sorption isotherm, but the Freundlich isotherm failed to fit the data. Finally, distribution coefficients were calculated by an ion exchange approach using soil solution data, the cation exchange capacity (CEC) as well as Cs to sodium (Na) and Cs to potassium (K) ion exchange selectivity

  1. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) Spacecraft Silicone Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; de Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Under a microscope, atomic oxygen (AO) exposed silicone surfaces are crazed and seen as "islands" separated by numerous crack lines, much analogous to mud-tile cracks. This research characterized and compared the degree of AO degradation of silicones by analyzing optical microscope images of samples exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) AO as part of the Spacecraft Silicone Experiment. The Spacecraft Silicone Experiment consisted of eight DC 93-500 silicone samples exposed to eight different AO fluence levels (ranged from 1.46 to 8.43 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm) during two different Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) missions. Image analysis software was used to analyze images taken using a digital camera. To describe the morphological degradation of each AO exposed flight sample, three different parameters were selected and estimated: (1) average area of islands was determined and found to be in the 1000 to 3100 sq mm range; (2) total length of crack lines per unit area of the sample surface were determined and found to be in the range of 27 to 59 mm of crack length per sq mm of sample surface; and (3) the fraction of sample surface area that is occupied by crack lines was determined and found to be in the 25 to 56 percent range. In addition, average crack width can be estimated from crack length and crack area measurements and was calculated to be about 10 mm. Among the parameters studied, the fraction of sample surface area that is occupied by crack lines is believed to be most useful in characterizing the degree of silicone conversion to silicates by AO because its value steadily increases with increasing fluence over the entire fluence range. A series of SEM images from the eight samples exposed to different AO fluences suggest a complex sequence of surface stress due to surface shrinkage and crack formation, followed by re-distribution of stress and shrinking rate on the sample surface. Energy dispersive spectra (EDS) indicated that upon AO

  2. Small craters on the meteoroid and space debris impact experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Donald H.

    1995-01-01

    Examination of 9.34 m(exp 2) of thick aluminum plates from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) using a 25X microscope revealed 4341 craters that were 0.1 mm in diameter or larger. The largest was 3 mm in diameter. Most were roughly hemispherical with lips that were raised above the original plate surface. The crater diameter measured was the diameter at the top of the raised lips. There was a large variation in the number density of craters around the three-axis gravity-gradient stabilized spacecraft. A model of the near-Earth meteoroid environment is presented which uses a meteoroid size distribution based on the crater size distribution on the space end of the LDEF. An argument is made that nearly all the craters on the space end must have been caused by meteoroids and that very few could have been caused by man-made orbital debris. However, no chemical analysis of impactor residue that will distinguish between meteoroids and man-made debris is yet available. A small area (0.0447 m(exp 2)) of one of the plates on the space end was scanned with a 200X microscope revealing 155 craters between 10 micron and 100 micron in diameter and 3 craters smaller than 10 micron. This data was used to extend the size distribution of meteoroids down to approximately 1 micron. New penetration equations developed by Alan Watts were used to relate crater dimensions to meteoroid size. The equations suggest that meteoroids must have a density near 2.5 g/cm(exp 3) to produce craters of the shape found on the LDEF. The near-Earth meteoroid model suggests that about 80 to 85 percent of the 100 micron to 1 mm diameter craters on the twelve peripheral rows of the LDEF were caused by meteoroids, leaving 15 to 20 percent to be caused by man-made orbital debris.

  3. Cesium Atomic Fountain Clocks at NMIJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    shift in caesium fountain clocks,” Physical Review Letters, 98, 153002. [10] A. Takamizawa, Y. Shirakawa, S. Yanagimachi et al., 2010, “Proposal of a...beam of laser-cooled cesium atoms,” Physical Review, A 60, R4241-R4244. [13] V. Gerginov, N. Nemitz, S. Weyers, et al., 2010, “Uncertainty evaluation of the caesium fountain clock PTB-CSF2,” Metrologia, 47, 65-79.

  4. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  5. Polarizabilities and Shielding Factors of Ions in Cesium Halide Crystals with the Cesium Chloride Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbubar, Rahman; Michihiro, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Koichi; Kanashiro, Tatsuo

    2001-08-01

    The calculated results of the polarizabilities and the quadrupole shielding factor of the ions in cesium halide crystals with the cesium chloride structure are presented. The calculation is done on the basis of the self-consistent field local density approximation and the modified Sternheimer equation. The crystalline potential is treated by the spherical solid model. The size effect is seen in the values of the polarizabilities and the quadrupole shielding factor. The values of the polarizabilities and the quadrupole shielding factor of cesium ion show only slight change in different crystals. The values of chlorine ion show significant reduction and the amount of the reduction is different in the different crystals. The effect of the crystalline environment on the electron states is discussed.

  6. NAVEX - A Space Shuttle Experiment with Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    for synchronization will be clock transportations. In cooperation with our national time institute ’ Physikalisch -Technische Bundesanstalt’ (FTB...Einwegentfernungsrnessung" Nachrichtentechniskh Zeitschrift 29 (1976) H. 9, S. 673-677. [41 Tschiesche, H, : Experiment zur "Syllchronisation und Ein

  7. Space flight effects on antioxidant molecules in dry tardigrades: the TARDIKISS experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Altiero, Tiziana; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Montorfano, Gigliola; Guidetti, Roberto; Rebecchi, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    The TARDIKISS (Tardigrades in Space) experiment was part of the Biokon in Space (BIOKIS) payload, a set of multidisciplinary experiments performed during the DAMA (Dark Matter) mission organized by Italian Space Agency and Italian Air Force in 2011. This mission supported the execution of experiments in short duration (16 days) taking the advantage of the microgravity environment on board of the Space Shuttle Endeavour (its last mission STS-134) docked to the International Space Station. TARDIKISS was composed of three sample sets: one flight sample and two ground control samples. These samples provided the biological material used to test as space stressors, including microgravity, affected animal survivability, life cycle, DNA integrity, and pathways of molecules working as antioxidants. In this paper we compared the molecular pathways of some antioxidant molecules, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and fatty acid composition between flight and control samples in two tardigrade species, namely, Paramacrobiotus richtersi and Ramazzottius oberhaeuseri. In both species, the activities of ROS scavenging enzymes, the total content of glutathione, and the fatty acids composition between flight and control samples showed few significant differences. TARDIKISS experiment, together with a previous space experiment (TARSE), further confirms that both desiccated and hydrated tardigrades represent useful animal tool for space research.

  8. Space Flight Effects on Antioxidant Molecules in Dry Tardigrades: The TARDIKISS Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Rizzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The TARDIKISS (Tardigrades in Space experiment was part of the Biokon in Space (BIOKIS payload, a set of multidisciplinary experiments performed during the DAMA (Dark Matter mission organized by Italian Space Agency and Italian Air Force in 2011. This mission supported the execution of experiments in short duration (16 days taking the advantage of the microgravity environment on board of the Space Shuttle Endeavour (its last mission STS-134 docked to the International Space Station. TARDIKISS was composed of three sample sets: one flight sample and two ground control samples. These samples provided the biological material used to test as space stressors, including microgravity, affected animal survivability, life cycle, DNA integrity, and pathways of molecules working as antioxidants. In this paper we compared the molecular pathways of some antioxidant molecules, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and fatty acid composition between flight and control samples in two tardigrade species, namely, Paramacrobiotus richtersi and Ramazzottius oberhaeuseri. In both species, the activities of ROS scavenging enzymes, the total content of glutathione, and the fatty acids composition between flight and control samples showed few significant differences. TARDIKISS experiment, together with a previous space experiment (TARSE, further confirms that both desiccated and hydrated tardigrades represent useful animal tool for space research.

  9. Interspecies Feshbach resonances in an ultracold, optically trapped Bose-Fermi mixture of cesium and lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repp, Marc

    2013-05-08

    This thesis reports on the tunability of interactions in ultracold Bose-Fermi mixtures of Cesium and Lithium. The first realization of an optically trapped {sup 6}Li - {sup 133}Cs mixture enabled to perform trap loss spectroscopy measurements to identify magnetic Feshbach resonances. A total of 19 interspecies Feshbach resonances, all in the magnetic field range between 650 G and 950 G, were observed for the two energetically lowest spin states of each species. Two 5 G broad and especially two 60 G broad s-wave resonances give perspectives to produce a dipolar quantum gas of LiCs ground state molecules as well as to study the Efimov effect in highly mass imbalanced systems. In addition, a unique relative tunability of intra- and interspecies scattering lengths was found which makes the {sup 6}Li - {sup 133}Cs system also well suited for the investigation of polarons. Evaporative cooling was performed on optically trapped samples which contained only one of the species. In this way, Bose-Einstein condensates of {sup 6}Li molecules as well as {sup 133}Cs samples at a phase-space density of ρ = 4 . 10{sup -2} were prepared. All experiments were performed in a new apparatus, which has been designed and set up during this thesis.

  10. Structural, thermal behaviour and vibrational study of a new mixed cesium-ammonium tellurate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wafa Ben Aribia; Makki Abdelmouleh; Van Der Lee; Ahlem Kabadou

    2012-03-01

    Synthesis, crystal structure, thermal characterization, FTIR and Raman measurements are given for a new mixed compound cesium-ammonium tellurate. X-ray study showed that the [Cs0.92(NH4)0.08]2TeCl4Br2 compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4/mnc, with a = 7.452 (1) Å, c = 10.544 (3) Å and Z = 2. The refinement converged at room temperature to = 0.093 and = 0.076. The structure is considered as isolated octahedral TeCl4Br$^{2−}_{2}$. These anions show a 4° rotation around the fourfold axis against the cubic arrangement of the K2PtCI6 type structure. The monovalent cations (Cs+/NH$^{+}_{4}$) are located between the octahedra ensuring the stability of the structure by ionic and hydrogen bonding contacts: Cs…Cl/Br and N-H$\\ldots\\ldots$Cl/Br. A DTA/TGA experiment at high temperature reveals one endothermic peak at 780K for this compound. At low temperature a transition from phase I to phase II was detected at 213K by DSC. This transition, confirmed by Raman analysis, can be attributed to an order-disorder phase transition.

  11. Ion exchange kinetics of cesium for various reaction designs using crystalline silicotitanate, UOP IONSIV IE-911

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hyun

    Through collaborative efforts at Texas A&M University and Sandia National Laboratories, a crystalline silicotitanate (CST), which shows extremely high selectivity for radioactive cesium removal in highly concentrated sodium solutions, was synthesized. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on a CST under cesium ion exchange conditions has been investigated. The experimental results with hydrogen peroxide showed that the distribution coefficient of cesium decreased and the tetragonal phase, the major component of CST, slowly dissolved at hydrogen peroxide concentrations greater than 1 M. A simple and novel experimental apparatus for a single-layer ion exchange column was developed to generate experimental data for estimation of the intraparticle effective diffusivity. A mathematical model is presented for estimation of effective diffusivities for a single-layer column of CST granules. The intraparticle effective diffusivity for Cs was estimated as a parameter in the analytical solution. By using the least square method, the effective diffusivities of 1.56 +/- 0.14 x 10-11 m2/s and 0.68 +/- 0.09 x 10-11 m2/s, respectively, were obtained. The difference in the two values was due to the different viscosities of the solutions. A good fit of the experimental data was obtained which supports the use of the homogeneous model for this system. A counter-current ion exchange (CCIX) process was designed to treat nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site. A numerical method based on the orthogonal collocation method was used to simulate the concentration profile of cesium in the CCIX loaded with CST granules. To maximize cesium loading onto the CST and minimize the volume of CST, two design cases of a moving bed, where the fresh CST is pulsed into the column at certain periods or at certain concentration of cesium, were investigated. Simulation results showed that cesium removal behavior in the pilot-scale test of CCIX experiment, where the column length is 22 ft and the CST is pulsed

  12. An experiment to evaluate liquid hydrogen storage in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Fester, D. A.; Johns, W. A.; Marino, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The design and verification of a Cryogenic Fluid Management Experiment for orbital operation on the Shuttle is described. The experiment will furnish engineering data to establish design criteria for storage and supply of cryogenic fluids, mainly hydrogen, for use in low gravity environments. The apparatus comprises an LAD (liquid acquisition device) and a TVS (thermodynamic vent system). The hydrogen will be either vented or forced out by injected helium and the flow rates will be monitored. The data will be compared with ground-based simulations to determine optimal flow rates for the pressurizing gas and the release of the cryogenic fluid. It is noted that tests on a one-g, one-third size LAD system are under way.

  13. Revisiting the first fluid interface experiment in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongkang; Weislogel, Mark; Masica, William; Kohl, Fred; Green, Robert

    2016-11-01

    This year marks the 54th anniversary of the first fluid physics experiment performed aboard a spacecraft during the Mercury-Atlas 7 mission (MA7). The MA7 experiment test cell served as an early model for a spacecraft liquid fuel tank consisting of a circular standpipe mounted within a spherical container. The low-g free surface configuration was dependent on contact angle, fluid fill fraction, standpipe dimensions, and initial conditions. Well-behaved symmetric equilibrium interfaces in the symmetric tank were expected and observed during the historic flight. We revisit the problem here employing a modern numerical tool and discover a rich variety of asymmetric fluid interface configurations that were not observed during the experiment. Interestingly, experimental support for these newly-computed outcomes may be found in 54 year old drop tower data collected by the original NASA investigator team. In short, rotationally symmetric nodoidal surfaces are unstable in a certain domain giving rise to highly asymmetric surfaces with significant shifts in the mass center of the liquid. The NASA team selected a fluid fill level for MA7 that 'fortunately' fell outside this domain. NASA NNX12A047A.

  14. Microgravity research results and experiences from the NASA/MIR space station program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, R A; Trach, B L

    2003-12-01

    The Microgravity Research Program (MRP) participated aggressively in Phase 1 of the International Space Station Program using the Russian Mir Space Station. The Mir Station offered an otherwise unavailable opportunity to explore the advantages and challenges of long duration microgravity space research. Payloads with both National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) and commercial backing were included as well as cooperative research with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). From this experience, much was learned about long-duration on-orbit science utilization and developing new working relationships with our Russian partner to promote efficient planning, operations, and integration to solve complexities associated with a multiple partner program. This paper focuses on the microgravity research conducted onboard the Mir space station. It includes the Program preparation and planning necessary to support this type of cross increment research experience; the payloads which were flown; and summaries of significant microgravity science findings.

  15. Shared Space, Liminal Space: Five Years into a Community-University Place-Based Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas, Heidi Lasley; Martin, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    This article explores shared space at the University of Minnesota's Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach Engagement Center (UROC), located four miles off campus in a community strong in assets, but facing inequality, disinvestment and racism. UROC's mission promotes university-community collaboration to solve critical urban challenges. We…

  16. SM/SEED space exposure experiment of ball bearing lubricated by trobo-coating

    OpenAIRE

    足立, 幸志; Adachi, Koshi; 加藤, 康司; Kato, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of friction properties of three types of ball bearings (conventional vacuum ball bearing and two types of ball bearings lubricated by tribo-coating of indium) exposed to real space environment was investigated on SM/SEED experiment. Well-friction properties of ball bearings lubricated by tribo-coating of indium were maintained for one year exposure to real space field. Even after degradation of ball bearing due to exposure to the real space environment, friction properties could b...

  17. Design and Development of the Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nancy Rabel; Tin, Padetha; Sheehan, C. C.; Stannarius, R.; Trittel, T.; Clark, N.; Maclennan, J.; Glaser, M.; Park, C.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) experiment is to exploit the unique characteristics of freely suspended liquid crystals in a microgravity environment to advance the understanding of fluid state physics

  18. T-Rex: A Japanese Space Tether Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Electrodynamic tether (EDT) thrusters work by virtue of the force a magnetic field exerts on a wire carrying an electrical current. The force, which acts on any charged particle moving through a magnetic field (including the electrons moving in a current-carrying wire), were concisely expressed by Lorentz in 1895 in an equation that now bears his name. The force acts in a direction perpendicular to both the direction of current flow and the magnetic field vector. Electric motors make use of this force: a wire loop in a magnetic field is made to rotate by the torque the Lorentz Force exerts on it due to an alternating current in the loop times so as to keep the torque acting in the same sense. The motion of the loop is transmitted to a shaft, thus providing work. Although the working principle of EDT thrusters is not new, its application to space transportation may be significant. In essence, an EDT thruster is just a clever way of getting an electrical current to flow in a long orbiting wire (the tether) so that the Earth s magnetic field will accelerate the wire and, consequently the payload attached to the wire. The direction of current flow in the tether, either toward or away from the Earth along the local vertical, determines whether the magnetic force will raise or lower the orbit. The bias voltage of a vertically deployed metal tether, which results just from its orbital motion (assumed eastward) through Earth s magnetic field, is positive with respect to the ambient plasma at the top and negative at the bottom. This polarization is due to the action of the Lorentz force on the electrons in the tether. Thus, the natural current flow is the result of negative electrons being attracted to the upper end and then returned to the plasma at the lower end. The magnetic force in this case has a component opposite to the direction of motion, and thus leads to a lowering of the orbit and eventually to re-entry. In this generator mode of operation the Lorentz Force

  19. Autonomous GPS/INS navigation experiment for Space Transfer Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Triveni N.; Cotterill, Stephen; Deaton, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    An experiment to validate the concept of developing an autonomous integrated spacecraft navigation system using on board Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Navigation System (INS) measurements is described. The feasibility of integrating GPS measurements with INS measurements to provide a total improvement in spacecraft navigation performance, i.e. improvement in position, velocity and attitude information, was previously demonstrated. An important aspect of this research is the automatic real time reconfiguration capability of the system designed to respond to changes in a spacecraft mission under the control of an expert system.

  20. Special relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raogudimetla, V. S.

    1994-01-01

    There is a great need to develop a system that can measure accurately atmospheric wind profiles because an accurate data of wind profiles in the atmosphere constitutes single most input for reliable simulations of global climate numerical methods. Also such data helps us understand atmospheric circulation and climate dynamics better. Because of this need for accurate wind measurements, a space-based Laser Atmospheric Winds Sounder (LAWS) is being designed at MSFC to measure wind profiles in the lower atmosphere of the earth with an accuracy of 1 m/s at lower altitudes to 5m/s at higher altitudes. This system uses an orbiting spacecraft with a pulsed laser source and measures the Doppler shift between the transmitted and received frequencies to estimate the atmospheric wind velocities. If a significant return from the ground (sea) is possible, the spacecraft speed and height are estimated from it and these results and the Doppler shift are then used to estimate the wind velocities in the atmosphere. It is expected that at the proposed wavelengths, there will be enough backscatter from the aerosols but there may no be significant return from the ground. So a coherent (heterodyne) detection system is being proposed for signal processing because it can provide high signal to noise ratio and sensitivity and thus make the best use of low ground return. However, for a heterodyne detection scheme to provide the best results, it is important that the receiving aperture be aligned properly for the proposed wind sounder, this amounts to only a few microradians tolerance in alignment. It is suspected that the satellite motion relative to the ground may introduce errors in the order of a few microradians because of special relativity. Hence, the problem of laser scattering off a moving fixed target when the source and receiver are moving, which was not treated in the past in the literature, was analyzed in the following, using relativistic electrodynamics and applied to the

  1. Summary of Data Analysis of the YES2 Tethered SpaceMail Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, M.; Van der Heide, E.J.; Ockels, W.J.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2008-01-01

    The 2nd Young Engineers' Satellite (YES2) is a 36 kg student-built experiment that piggybacked on the Foton-M3 microgravity platform in September 2007. YES2 intended to demonstrate tethered SpaceMail, a concept for frequent sample return originally proposed for the International Space Station (ISS).

  2. Preliminary studies for the ORganics Exposure in Orbit (OREOcube) Experiment on the International Space Station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonzo, Jason; Fresneau, A.; Elsaesser, A.; Chan, J.; Breitenbach, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Ricco, A.; Salama, F.; Mattioda, A.; Santos, O.; Cottin, H.; Dartois, E.; d'Hendecourt, L.; Demets, R.; Foing, B.; Martins, Z.; Sephton, M.; Spaans, M.; Quinn, R.

    2013-01-01

    Organic compounds that survive in uncommon space environments are animportant astrobiology focus. The ORganics Exposure in Orbit (OREOcube)experiment will investigate, in real time, chemical changes in organiccompounds exposed to low Earth orbit radiation conditions on anInternational Space Station

  3. Preliminary studies for the ORganics Exposure in Orbit (OREOcube) Experiment on the International Space Station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonzo, Jason; Fresneau, A.; Elsaesser, A.; Chan, J.; Breitenbach, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Ricco, A.; Salama, F.; Mattioda, A.; Santos, O.; Cottin, H.; Dartois, E.; d'Hendecourt, L.; Demets, R.; Foing, B.; Martins, Z.; Sephton, M.; Spaans, M.; Quinn, R.

    2013-01-01

    Organic compounds that survive in uncommon space environments are an important astrobiology focus. The ORganics Exposure in Orbit (OREOcube) experiment will investigate, in real time, chemical changes in organic compounds exposed to low Earth orbit radiation conditions on an International Space Stat

  4. NASA Glenn Research Center's Materials International Space Station Experiments (MISSE 1-7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce a.; Dever, Joyce A.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Panko, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (Glenn) has 39 individual materials flight experiments (>540 samples) flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) to address long duration environmental durability of spacecraft materials in low Earth orbit (LEO). MISSE is a series of materials flight experiments consisting of trays, called Passive Experiment Carriers (PECs) that are exposed to the space environment on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). MISSE 1-5 have been successfully flown and retrieved and were exposed to the space environment from one to four years. MISSE 6A & 6B were deployed during the STS-123 shuttle mission in March 2008, and MISSE 7A & 7B are being prepared for launch in 2009. The Glenn MISSE experiments address atomic oxygen (AO) effects such as erosion and undercutting of polymers, AO scattering, stress effects on AO erosion, and in-situ AO fluence monitoring. Experiments also address solar radiation effects such as radiation induced polymer shrinkage, stress effects on radiation degradation of polymers, and radiation degradation of indium tin oxide (ITO) coatings and spacesuit fabrics. Additional experiments address combined AO and solar radiation effects on thermal control films, paints and cermet coatings. Experiments with Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) seals and UltraFlex solar array materials are also being flown. Several experiments were designed to provide ground-facility to in-space calibration data thus enabling more accurate in-space performance predictions based on ground-laboratory testing. This paper provides an overview of Glenn s MISSE 1-7 flight experiments along with a summary of results from Glenn s MISSE 1 & 2 experiments.

  5. Light storage via coherent population oscillation in a thermal cesium vapor

    CERN Document Server

    de Almeida, A J F; Maynard, M -A; Laupretre, T; Bretenaker, F; Felinto, D; Goldfarb, F; Tabosa, J W R

    2014-01-01

    We report on the storage of light via the phenomenon of Coherent Population Oscillation (CPO) in an atomic cesium vapor at room temperature. In the experiment the optical information of a probe field is stored in the CPO of two ground states of a Lambda three-level system formed by the Zeeman sublevels of the hyperfine transition F = 3 - F' = 2 of cesium D2 line. We show directly that this CPO based memory is very insensitive to stray magnetic field inhomogeneities and presents a lifetime which is mainly limited only by atomic motion. A theoretical simulation of the measured spectra was also developed and is in very good agreement with the experiment.

  6. Experiments as Liminal Learning Spaces in Leadership Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette; Meier, Frank; Tangkjær, Christian

    In this paper we address the question of what professional practitioner students learn from experiments in leadership development programs. Drawing from our own design and teaching in a leadership programme, we explore how certain models and frameworks become threshold concepts for students...... practicebased knowledge have a much stronger influence on students’ learning than those, which invoke theoretically based knowledge, have. We discuss the power of threshold concepts in education of professional practitioner students and how they influence student learning. Finally, we conclude by suggesting......’ learning while others leave only minor traces. By relating the concept of threshold concepts to different notions of knowledge, we explore what concepts are of particular relevance to exec students and how they influence their learning. Conclusions from our study show that threshold concepts that invoke...

  7. Adaptive Approach for Situational Analysis of Space Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Atanassov, Atanas Marinov

    2010-01-01

    The solving of scientific and practical application connected with conducting of satellite experiments and measurement demand analysis of geometric and physic conditions according to different kind of models. This is forced in connect of optimization of complex and expensive scientific projects. This article treat complex situation conditions described as conjunction of elementary mutually independent are discussed. Two formal algorithms based on alternative strategy for verification of multitude of the checked conditions which increase effectiveness of model calculation are present in this article. Every algorithm is connected with an approach for rearranging of the multitude of conditions. The inverse problem is presented as disjunction of all inverse constrains. The possibilities for applying of these algorithms are analyzed and behavior and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms are discussed.

  8. Experiments Advance Gardening at Home and in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Aeroponics, the process of growing plants suspended in air without soil or media, provides clean, efficient, and rapid food production. Crops can be planted and harvested year-round without interruption, and without contamination from soil, pesticides, and residue. Aeroponic systems also reduce water usage by 98 percent, fertilizer usage by 60 percent, and eliminate pesticide usage altogether. Plants grown in aeroponic systems have been shown to absorb more minerals and vitamins, making the plants healthier and potentially more nutritious. The suspended system also has other advantages. Since the growing environment can be kept clean and sterile, the chances of spreading plant diseases and infections commonly found in soil and other growing media are greatly reduced. Also, seedlings do not stretch or wilt while their roots are forming, and once the roots are developed, the plants can be easily moved into any type of growing media without the risk of transplant shock. Lastly, plants tend to grow faster in a regulated aeroponic environment, and the subsequent ease of transplant to a natural medium means a higher annual crop yield. For example, tomatoes are traditionally started in pots and transplanted to the ground at least 28 days later; growers using an aeroponic system can transplant them just 10 days after starting the plants in the growing chamber. This accelerated cycle produces six tomato crops per year, rather than the traditional one to two crop cycles. These benefits, along with the great reduction in weight by eliminating soil and much of the water required for plant growth, illustrate why this technique has found such enthusiastic support from NASA. Successful long-term missions into deep space will require crews to grow some of their own food during flight. Aeroponic crops are also a potential source of fresh oxygen and clean drinking water, and every ounce of food produced and water conserved aboard a spacecraft reduces payload weight, decreasing

  9. Lost in space: design of experiments and scientific exploration in a Hogarth Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendrem, Dennis W; Lendrem, B Clare; Woods, David; Rowland-Jones, Ruth; Burke, Matthew; Chatfield, Marion; Isaacs, John D; Owen, Martin R

    2015-11-01

    A Hogarth, or 'wicked', universe is an irregular environment generating data to support erroneous beliefs. Here, we argue that development scientists often work in such a universe. We demonstrate that exploring these multidimensional spaces using small experiments guided by scientific intuition alone, gives rise to an illusion of validity and a misplaced confidence in that scientific intuition. By contrast, design of experiments (DOE) permits the efficient mapping of such complex, multidimensional spaces. We describe simulation tools that enable research scientists to explore these spaces in relative safety.

  10. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu;

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs(+)) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs(+) uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs(+), chemical library screening was performed using Ara...

  11. Cesium-associated hypokalemia successfully treated with amiloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Sarah; Naidus, Elliot; Alper, Seth L; Danziger, John

    2015-06-01

    Self-treatment of cancer with cesium chloride, despite proven lack of efficacy, continues to produce serious adverse effects. Among these is hypokalemia predisposing to life-threatening arrhythmia. The mechanism of cesium-associated hypokalemia (CAH) has not been described. We report urinary potassium wasting responsive to amiloride therapy in a cancer patient with CAH, and discuss possible mechanisms.

  12. Cesium-associated hypokalemia successfully treated with amiloride

    OpenAIRE

    Horn, Sarah; Naidus, Elliot; Alper, Seth L; Danziger, John

    2015-01-01

    Self-treatment of cancer with cesium chloride, despite proven lack of efficacy, continues to produce serious adverse effects. Among these is hypokalemia predisposing to life-threatening arrhythmia. The mechanism of cesium-associated hypokalemia (CAH) has not been described. We report urinary potassium wasting responsive to amiloride therapy in a cancer patient with CAH, and discuss possible mechanisms.

  13. Distillation device supplies cesium vapor at constant pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiulis, A.; Shefsiek, P. K.

    1968-01-01

    Distillation apparatus in the form of a U tube supplies small amounts of pure cesium vapor at constant pressure to a thermionic converter. The upstream leg of the U tube is connected to a vacuum pump to withdraw noncondensable impurities, the bottom portion serves as a reservoir for the liquid cesium.

  14. The space experiment CERASP: Definition of a space-suited radiation source and growth conditions for human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Spitta, Luis; Thelen, Melanie; Arenz, Andrea; Franz, Markus; Schulze-Varnholt, Dirk; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther

    The combined action of ionizing radiation and microgravity will continue to influence future space missions, with special risks for astronauts on the Moon surface or for long duration missions to Mars. It has been estimated that on a 3-year mission to Mars about 3% of the bodies' cell nuclei would have been hit by one iron ion with the consequence that nuclear DNA will be heavily damaged. There is increasing evidence that basic cellular functions are sensitive not only to radiation but also to microgravity. DNA repair studies in space on bacteria, yeast cells and human fibroblasts, which were irradiated before, flight, gave contradictory results: from inhibition of repair by microgravity to enhancement, whereas others did not detect any influence of microgravity on repair. The space experiment CERASP (CEllular Responses to RAdiation in SPace) to be performed at the International Space Station (ISS) is aimed to supply basic information on the cellular response in microgravity to radiation applied during flight. It makes use of a recombinant human cell line as reporter for cellular signal transduction modulation by genotoxic environmental conditions. The main biological endpoints under investigation will be gene activation based on enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP, originally isolated from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria) expression controlled by a DNA damage-dependent promoter element which reflects the activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF- κB) pathway. The NF- κB family of proteins plays a major role in the inflammatory and immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation, anti-apoptosis and tumorgenesis. For radiation exposure during space flight a radiation source has been constructed as damage accumulation by cosmic radiation will certainly be insufficient for analysis. The space experiment specific hardware consists of a specially designed radiation source made up of the β-emitter promethium-147, combined with a

  15. Toward space solar power: Wireless energy transmission experiments past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Frank E.; McSpadden, James O.; Chang, Kai; Kaya, Nobuyuki

    1998-01-01

    Solar power is a reality. Today, increasing numbers of photovoltaic and other solar-powered installations are in service around the world and in space. These uses range from the primary electric power source for satellites, remote site scientific experiments and villages in developing countries to augmenting the commercial electric grid and providing partial power for individual businesses and homeowners in developed countries. In space, electricity generated by photovoltaic conversion of solar energy is the mainstay of power for low Earth and geostationary satellite constellations. Still, for all its acceptance as a benign and environmentally friendly energy source, terrestrial solar power has yet to be seriously considered a viable technology for providing base electrical generating capacity. The obvious reason is sunshine on Earth is too unreliable. In addition to the diurnal and seasonal cycles, inclement weather reduces the average daily period and intensity of insolation. However, the Sun shines constantly in space. The challenge is to harvest and transmit the energy from space to Earth. The concept of space solar power based on microwave wireless energy transmission was first put forth more than 25 years ago by Dr. Peter Glaser. We review historical experiments in wireless energy transmission which have brought the technology from a laboratory curiosity to its present status. Results from recent experiments and their implications for wireless energy transmission as an enabling technology for space solar power are reviewed. Current developments are discussed along with proposed terrestrial and space experiments.

  16. Experience with Space Forums and Engineering Courses Organized for the Broad Dissemination of Space-related Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessimoz, J.-D.; D'Aquino, U.; Gander, J.-G.; Sekler, J.

    2002-01-01

    , the basics of propulsion techniques, and selected chapters in specific fields, such as communication, microgravity issues, space journeys, telerobotics, space instrumentation or bio-medical experiments, to mention just a few topics. Both types of actions are complementary and have each so far involved more than thousand participants, notably with very little overlap between both groups of attendees. Those numbers are particularly significant in view of the small country size and the low urban concentration of Switzerland. For the successful organisation of such actions, the co-ordinated effort of several institutions is mandatory. Among other main contributors, the SRV could gratefully count on the support and help from the European Space Agency (ESA), the Swiss Space Office (SSO), the Swiss Academy for Technical Sciences (SATW), as well as on numerous universities, schools, space industries and dedicated individuals. The communication mainly reports here on two types of actions: the Space technology courses for engineering students and professionals and our Space Forums for the interested public. In addition, the SRV association is also active in the realisation of yet other kinds of events: Space days, initiatives at the Swiss Transportation Museum, encouragement of applied R&D studies sponsored by the Swiss government (i.e. the CTI - Swiss Commission for Technology and Innovation), website offering and maintenance, newsletters, etc.

  17. Preliminary studies for the ORganics Exposure in Orbit (OREOcube) Experiment on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Jason; Fresneau, A.; Elsaesser, A.; Chan, J.; Breitenbach, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Ricco, A.; Salama, F.; Mattioda, A.; Santos, O.; Cottin, H.; Dartois, E.; d'Hendecourt, L.; Demets, R.; Foing, B.; Martins, Z.; Sephton, M.; Spaans, M.; Quinn, R.

    2013-01-01

    Organic compounds that survive in uncommon space environments are an important astrobiology focus. The ORganics Exposure in Orbit (OREOcube) experiment will investigate, in real time, chemical changes in organic compounds exposed to low Earth orbit radiation conditions on an International Space Station (ISS) external platform. OREOcube is packaged as an identical pair of 10-cm cube instruments, each weighing electronics, microcontroller, and data storage to make each cube an autonomous stand-alone instrument package requiring only a standard power and data interface. We have characterized the influence of mineralogically relevant inorganic materials on the stability, modification, and degradation of the organic molecules under ground laboratory experimental conditions. The results of our laboratory experiments will be used as the basis for the selection of samples for further investigations on the OREOcube ISS experiment. OREOcube is an international collaboration between the European Space Agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and University partners.

  18. Space, the final frontier: A critical review of recent experiments performed in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbrink, Joshua P; Kiss, John Z

    2016-02-01

    Space biology provides an opportunity to study plant physiology and development in a unique microgravity environment. Recent space studies with plants have provided interesting insights into plant biology, including discovering that plants can grow seed-to-seed in microgravity, as well as identifying novel responses to light. However, spaceflight experiments are not without their challenges, including limited space, limited access, and stressors such as lack of convection and cosmic radiation. Therefore, it is important to design experiments in a way to maximize the scientific return from research conducted on orbiting platforms such as the International Space Station. Here, we provide a critical review of recent spaceflight experiments and suggest ways in which future experiments can be designed to improve the value and applicability of the results generated. These potential improvements include: utilizing in-flight controls to delineate microgravity versus other spaceflight effects, increasing scientific return via next-generation sequencing technologies, and utilizing multiple genotypes to ensure results are not unique to one genetic background. Space experiments have given us new insights into plant biology. However, to move forward, special care should be given to maximize science return in understanding both microgravity itself as well as the combinatorial effects of living in space.

  19. Design and Development of a CPCI-Based Electronics Package for Space Station Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacz, John S.; Clapper, Randy S.; Wade, Raymond P.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center is developing a Compact-PCI (CPCI) based electronics package for controlling space experiment hardware on the International Space Station. Goals of this effort include an easily modified, modular design that allows for changes in experiment requirements. Unique aspects of the experiment package include a flexible circuit used for internal interconnections and a separate enclosure (box in a box) for controlling 1 kW of power for experiment fuel heating requirements. This electronics package was developed as part of the FEANICS (Flow Enclosure Accommodating Novel Investigations in Combustion of Solids) mini-facility which is part of the Fluids and Combustion Facility s Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR). The CIR will be the platform for future microgravity combustion experiments and will reside on the Destiny Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The FEANICS mini-facility will be the primary means for conducting solid fuel combustion experiments in the CIR on ISS. The main focus of many of these solid combustion experiments will be to conduct applied scientific investigations in fire-safety to support NASA s future space missions. A description of the electronics package and the results of functional testing are the subjects of this report. The report concludes that the use of innovative packaging methods combined with readily available COTS hardware can provide a modular electronics package which is easily modified for changing experiment requirements.

  20. Community-Based Field Experiences in Teacher Education: Possibilities for a Pedagogical Third Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Heidi L.

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses the importance of community-based field experiences as a feature of teacher education programs. Through a qualitative case study, prospective teachers' work with homeless youth in an after-school initiative is presented. Framing community-based field experiences in teacher education through "third space" theory, the…

  1. [Surveillance of radioactive cesium in foods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshi, Hiromi; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Ikarashi, Atsuko; Hachisuka, Akiko; Matsuda, Rieko

    2013-01-01

    We surveyed foods on the market from areas that had been exposed to radioactive materials contamination following the Fukushima accident. We used a NaI (Tl) scintillation spectrometer for the screening tests and a germanium semiconductor detector for the final tests. Test results from 1,427 samples showed that 6 samples (0.4%) exceeded the regulatory limit of 500 Bq/kg. Considering the detection rate of radioactive cesium in each food category, we suggest that it is necessary to continue monitoring fruits such as chestnuts and ginkgo nuts, mushrooms (especially raw wood-shiitake), mountain vegetables, and sea fish.

  2. Experiment of Diffuse Reflection Laser Ranging to Space Debris and Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Hao; Zhang, ZhongPing; Wu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Space debris has been posing a serious threat to human space activities and is needed to be measured and cataloged. As a new technology of space target surveillance, the measurement accuracy of DRLR (Diffuse Reflection Laser Ranging) is much higher than that of microwave radar and electro-optical measurement. Based on laser ranging data of space debris from DRLR system collected at SHAO (Shanghai Astronomical Observatory) in March-April 2013, the characteristics and precision of the laser ranging data are analyzed and its applications in OD (Orbit Determination) of space debris are discussed in this paper, which is implemented for the first time in China. The experiment indicates that the precision of laser ranging data can reach 39cm-228cm. When the data is sufficient enough (4 arcs of 3 days), the orbit accuracy of space debris can be up to 50m.

  3. Space Experiment Module: A new low-cost capability for education payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Theodore C.; Lewis, Ruthan

    1995-01-01

    The Space Experiment Module (SEM) concept is one of a number of education initiatives being pursued by the NASA Shuttle Small Payloads Project (SSPP) in an effort to increase educational access to space by means of Space Shuttle Small Payloads and associated activities. In the SEM concept, NASA will provide small containers ('modules') which can accommodate small zero-gravity experiments designed and constructed by students. A number, (nominally ten), of the modules will then be flown in an existing Get Away Special (GAS) carrier on the Shuttle for a flight of 5 to 10 days. In addition to the module container, the NASA carrier system will provide small amounts of electrical power and a computer system for controlling the operation of the experiments and recording experiment data. This paper describes the proposed SEM carrier system and program approach.

  4. Understanding macrophage differentiation during space flight: The importance of ground-based experiments before space flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapes, Stephen K; Ortega, M Teresa

    2013-06-01

    In preparation for a space flight on STS-126, two in vitro culture systems were used to investigate macrophage colony stimulating factor-dependent macrophage differentiation from mouse primary bone marrow cells. The patented Techshot Cell Cult Bioreactor and the BioServe Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA) were operated in different orientations to determine their impact on macrophage growth and differentiation. Bone marrow cell parameters were determined after cells were grown in FPAs incubated at 37°C in vertical or horizontal orientations, and macrophage cell recovery was significantly higher from FPAs that were incubated in the horizontal orientation compared to "vertical" FPAs. Similarly, when bone marrow cells were grown in the Techshot bioreactor, there were significant differences in the numbers of macrophages recovered after 7 days, depending on movement and orientation of the bioreactor. Macrophage recovery was highest when the patented bioreactor was rotated in the horizontal, x-axis plane (merry-go-round fashion) compared to static and vertically, y-axis plane rotated (Ferris wheel fashion) bioreactors. In addition, the expression of F4/80 and other differentiation markers varied depending on whether macrophages differentiated in FPAs or in bioreactors. After 7 days, significant differences in size, granularity and molecule expression were seen even when the same primary bone marrow cells were used to seed the cultures. These data show that culture outcomes are highly dependent on the culture device and device orientation. Moreover, the impact of the culture system needs to be understood in order to interpret space flight data.

  5. Accumulation of radioactive cesium released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in terrestrial cyanobacteria Nostoc commune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hideaki; Shirato, Susumu; Tahara, Tomoya; Sato, Kenji; Takenaka, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident released large amounts of radioactive substances into the environment and contaminated the soil of Tohoku and Kanto districts in Japan. Removal of radioactive material from the environment is an urgent problem, and soil purification using plants is being considered. In this study, we investigated the ability of 12 seed plant species and a cyanobacterium to accumulate radioactive material. The plants did not accumulate radioactive material at high levels, but high accumulation was observed in the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune. In Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Prefecture, N. commune accumulated 415,000 Bq/kg dry weight (134)Cs and 607,000 Bq kg(-1) dry weight (137)Cs. The concentration of cesium in N. commune tended to be high in areas where soil radioactivity was high. A cultivation experiment confirmed that N. commune absorbed radioactive cesium from polluted soil. These data demonstrated that radiological absorption using N. commune might be suitable for decontaminating polluted soil.

  6. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of cesium adsorption on ceiling tiles from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, Muhammed Yusuf [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0H3 (Canada); Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Noakhali Science and Technology University (Bangladesh); Volchek, Konstantin, E-mail: Konstantin.Volchek@ec.gc.ca [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0H3 (Canada); Kuang, Wenxing [SAIC Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0H3 (Canada); Tezel, F. Handan [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    A series of experiments were performed to quantify the adsorption of cesium on ceiling tiles as a representative of urban construction materials. Adsorption was carried out from solutions to mimic wet environmental conditions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive {sup 137}Cs. The experiments were performed in the range of initial cesium concentrations of 0.114-23.9 mg L{sup -1} at room temperature (21 deg. C) around three weeks. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The quantity of adsorbed Cs was calculated by mass balance as a function of time. Two kinetic and three equilibrium models were employed to interpret the test results. Determination of kinetic parameters for adsorption was carried out using the first-order reaction model and the intra-particle diffusion model. Adsorption equilibrium was studied using Langmuir, Freundlich and three-parameter Langmuir-Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. A satisfactory correlation between the experimental and the predicted values was observed.

  7. Ion Irradiation Experiments on the Murchison CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrite: Simulating Space Weathering of Primitive Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C. A.; Baragiola, R. A.; Rahman, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Remote sensing observations show that space weathering processes affect all airless bodies in the Solar System to some degree. Sample analyses and lab experiments provide insights into the chemical, spectroscopic and mineralogic effects of space weathering and aid in the interpretation of remote- sensing data. For example, analyses of particles returned from the S-type asteroid Itokawa by the Hayabusa mission revealed that space-weathering on that body was dominated by interactions with the solar wind acting on LL ordinary chondrite-like materials [1, 2]. Understanding and predicting how the surface regoliths of primitive carbonaceous asteroids respond to space weathering processes is important for future sample return missions (Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS-REx) that are targeting objects of this type. Here, we report the results of our preliminary ion irradiation experiments on a hydrated carbonaceous chondrite with emphasis on microstructural and infrared spectral changes.

  8. Experimenting Maintenance of Flight Software in an Integrated Modular Avionics for Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Johan; Laroche, Thomas; Creten, Philippe; Parisis, Paul; Hiller, Martin

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents an experiment of Flight Software partitioning in an Integrated Modular Avionics for Space (IMA-SP) system. This experiment also tackles the maintenance aspects of IMA-SP systems. The presented case study is PROBA-2 Flight Software. The paper addresses and discusses the following subjects: On-Board Software Maintenance in IMA- SP, boot strategy for Time and Space Partitioning, considerations about the ground segment related to On-Board Software Maintenance in IMA-SP, and architectural impacts of Time and Space Partitioning for PROBA software's. Finally, this paper presents the results and the achievements of the study and it appeals at further perspectives for IMA-SP and Time and Space Partitioning.

  9. The Franco-American macaque experiment. [bone demineralization of monkeys on Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Leonard F.; Ballard, Rodney W.

    1988-01-01

    The details of studies to be carried out jointly by French and American teams on two rhesus monkeys prepared for future experiments aboard the Space Shuttle are discussed together with the equipment involved. Seven science discipline teams were formed, which will study the effects of flight and/or weightlessness on the bone and calcium metabolism, the behavior, the cardiovascular system, the fluid balance and electrolytes, the muscle system, the neurovestibular interactions, and the sleep/biorhythm cycles. New behavioral training techniques were developed, in which the animals were trained to respond to behavioral tasks in order to measure the parameters involving eye/hand coordination, the response time to target tracking, visual discrimination, and muscle forces used by the animals. A large data set will be obtained from different animals on the two to three Space Shuttle flights; the hardware technologies developed for these experiments will be applied for primate experiments on the Space Station.

  10. Development of a Plastic Melt Waste Compactor for Space Missions Experiments and Prototype Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Gregory; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Pisharody, Suresh; Fisher, John

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes development at NASA Ames Research Center of a heat melt compactor that can be used on both near term and far term missions. Experiments have been performed to characterize the behavior of composite wastes that are representative of the types of wastes produced on current and previous space missions such as International Space Station, Space Shuttle, MIR and Skylab. Experiments were conducted to characterize the volume reduction, bonding, encapsulation and biological stability of the waste composite and also to investigate other key design issues such as plastic extrusion, noxious off-gassing and removal of the of the plastic waste product from the processor. The experiments provided the data needed to design a prototype plastic melt waste processor, a description of which is included in the paper.

  11. Standardization of XML Database Exchanges and the James Webb Space Telescope Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Edd, Jonathan; Detter, Ryan; Jones, Ron; Fatig, Curtis C.

    2007-01-01

    Personnel from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project have been working with various standard communities such the Object Management Group (OMG) and the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) to assist in the definition of a common extensible Markup Language (XML) for database exchange format. The CCSDS and OMG standards are intended for the exchange of core command and telemetry information, not for all database information needed to exercise a NASA space mission. The mission-specific database, containing all the information needed for a space mission, is translated from/to the standard using a translator. The standard is meant to provide a system that encompasses 90% of the information needed for command and telemetry processing. This paper will discuss standardization of the XML database exchange format, tools used, and the JWST experience, as well as future work with XML standard groups both commercial and government.

  12. Telescience testbed for biomedical experiments in space morphological and physiological experiments of rat musculoskeletal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoru; Tanaka, Masafumi; Wada, Yoshiro; Yanagihara, Dai; Tsujimoto, Naoya; Suzuki, Hideki; Kawai, Noriyo; Yamashita, Masamichi; Nagaoka, Shunji; Shoji, Takatoshi; Higashino, Shinichiro; Sudoh, Hideo

    As the second telescience testbed experiment we were examined sophisticated processes of biomedical experiment, such as an implantation of a transmitter into the hmster's abdominal cavity, non-stressful blood sampling, large amountof blood collection, muscle extirpation and biopsy from the hamsters on Feburay 6-8, 1990. To make clear the differences between successful results obtained by an experienced hand and by a non-experienced one, three operators wereselected for three successive experimental days; an engineer who had never experienced any biological experiment, a non-biology student, who experienced on biological experiments, and a veterinary surgeon. Surgical procedures need much experiences on maneuvering and understanding of theory to shorten the elapse time. Especially for a non-experienced hand, graphic instructions were much helpful to understand and to maneuver the procedures. Continuous recordings of ECG from a operator and PIs were of an advantage to grasp an extent of the mental strain, which was compared with their reports requested after end of each experimental day. The mental strain was not related to degrees of scientific achievement, but showed faithfully difficulty of each experimental procedure. Training effects on PIs in successive experimental days were found in their instructions for the operator to let understand the procedures.

  13. Aesthetic experience and institutional daily life: new maps for subjectively dealing with spaces for mental healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Caruso Mecca

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of artistic activities as agents for mental healthcare practices is discussed in relation to the organization of daily life and institutional spaces, in substitutive services, such as at psychosocial care centers. The importance of the porosity of this daily routine to embrace the users' creations and articulate these with the other activities that structure daily life and occupy institutional spaces is discussed. It is advocated that institutional spaces need to reflect the intrinsic characteristics and needs of people who are treated there and for the institution to function as a backdrop for semantic linkage of the subjects' experiences and their possible dialogue with culture.

  14. Traveling-wave tube reliability estimates, life tests, and space flight experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalli, V. R.; Speck, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Infant mortality, useful life, and wearout phase of twt life are considered. The performance of existing developmental tubes, flight experience, and sequential hardware testing are evaluated. The reliability history of twt's in space applications is documented by considering: (1) the generic parts of the tube in light of the manner in which their design and operation affect the ultimate reliability of the device, (2) the flight experience of medium power tubes, and (3) the available life test data for existing space-qualified twt's in addition to those of high power devices.

  15. Robotic experiment with a force reflecting handcontroller onboard MIR space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, M.; Matzakis, Y.

    1994-01-01

    During the French CASSIOPEE mission that will fly onboard MIR space station in 1996, ergonomic evaluations of a force reflecting handcontroller will be performed on a simulated robotic task. This handcontroller is a part of the COGNILAB payload that will be used also for experiments in neurophysiology. The purpose of the robotic experiment is the validation of a new control and design concept that would enhance the task performances for telemanipulating space robots. Besides the handcontroller and its control unit, the experimental system includes a simulator of the slave robot dynamics for both free and constrained motions, a flat display screen and a seat with special fixtures for holding the astronaut.

  16. Tethered elevator and platforms as space station facilities: Systems studies and demonstrative experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Several key concepts of the science and applications tethered platforms were studied. Some conclusions reached are herein listed. Tether elevator and platform could improve the space station scientific and applicative capabilities. The space elevator presents unique characteristics as microgravity facility and as a tethered platform servicing vehicle. Pointing platforms could represent a new kind of observation facility for large class of payloads. The dynamical, control and technological complexity of these concepts advised demonstrative experiments. The on-going tethered satellite system offers the opportunity to perform such experiments. And feasibility studies are in progress.

  17. Seaweed against strontium and preussian blue against cesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Michanek

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available The fact that alginates bind strontium and cyanates bind cesium and are capable of removing these elements from living organisms is scientifically verified. Zeolites offer another possibility for exchange of these ions. Practical research should be initiated to find the right doses and procedure to decrease the body burden of radioactive isotopes in reindeer.Alger mot strontium och berlinerblått mot cesium.Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning: Mitt budskap år kort: Alger binder strontium, Berlinerblått binder cesium, Sätt fart på forskning och forsök!

  18. Immobilization of cesium in alkaline activated fly ash matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Macphee, D. E.; Lachowski, E. E.; Palomo, A.

    2005-11-01

    The immobilization potential of alkaline activated fly ash (AAFA) matrices for cesium has been investigated. The presence of Cs in the AAFA pastes, prepared using 8M NaOH solution as activator, showed no significant adverse effects on mechanical strength or microstructure, nor were significant quantities of Cs leached following application of the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 leaching protocols. Microstructural analysis shows Cs associated with the main reaction product in the AAFA suggesting that cesium is chemically bound rather than physically encapsulated. It is proposed that cesium is incorporated into the alkaline aluminosilicate gel, a precursor for zeolite formation.

  19. ``From seed-to-seed'' experiment with wheat plants under space-flight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashinsky, A.; Ivanova, I.; Derendyaeva, T.; Nechitailo, G.; Salisbury, F.

    1994-11-01

    An important goal with plant experiments in microgravity is to achieve a complete life cycle, the ``seed-to-seed experiment''. Some Soviet attempts to reach this goal are described, notably an experiment with the tiny mustard, Arabidopsis thaliana, in the Phyton 3 device on Salyut 7. Normal seeds were produced although yields were reduced and development was delayed. Several other experiments have shown abnormalities in plants grown in space. In recent work, plants of wheat (Triticum aestivum) were studied on the ground and then in a preliminary experiment in space. Biometric indices of vegetative space plants were 2 to 2.5 times lower than those of controls, levels of chlorophyll a and b were reduced (no change in the ratio of the two pigments), carotenoids were reduced, there was a serious imbalance in major minerals, and membrane lipids were reduced (no obvious change in lipid patterns). Following the preliminary studies, an attempt was made with the Svetoblock-M growth unit to grow a super-dwarf wheat cultivar through a life cycle. The experiment lasted 167 d on Mir. Growth halted from about day 40 to day 100, when new shoots appeared. Three heads had appeared in the boot (surrounded by leaves) when plants were returned to earth. One head was sterile, but 28 seeds matured on earth, and most of these have since produced normal plants and seeds. In principle, a seed-to-seed experiment with wheat should be successful in microgravity.

  20. "From seed-to-seed" experiment with wheat plants under space-flight conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashinsky, A; Ivanova, I; Derendyaeva, T; Nechitailo, G; Salisbury, F

    1994-11-01

    An important goal with plant experiments in microgravity is to achieve a complete life cycle, the "seed-to-seed experiment." Some Soviet attempts to reach this goal are described, notably an experiment with the tiny mustard, Arabidopsis thaliana, in the Phyton 3 device on Salyut 7. Normal seeds were produced although yields were reduced and development was delayed. Several other experiments have shown abnormalities in plants grown in space. In recent work, plants of wheat (Triticum aestivum) were studied on the ground and then in a preliminary experiment in space. Biometric indices of vegetative space plants were 2 to 2.5 times lower than those of controls, levels of chlorophyll a and b were reduced (no change in the ratio of the two pigments), carotenoids were reduced, there was a serious imbalance in major minerals, and membrane lipids were reduced (no obvious change in lipid patterns). Following the preliminary studies, an attempt was made with the Svetoblock-M growth unit to grow a super-dwarf wheat cultivar through a life cycle. The experiment lasted 167 d on Mir. Growth halted from about day 40 to day 100, when new shoots appeared. Three heads had appeared in the boot (surrounded by leaves) when plants were returned to earth. One head was sterile, but 28 seeds matured on earth, and most of these have since produced normal plants and seeds. In principle, a seed-to-seed experiment with wheat should be successful in microgravity.

  1. Thoughts on "Experience of Space in Japan." Implications for Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Mairiaux

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents thoughts on the experience of space, developed from a research study I have been doing during two years immersed in a very singular context where the familiar university environment contrasted with the – for me – completely unknown Japanese culture. The research study explains my motivation as well as my theme of the research: "the experience of space." The influence that my situation of being immersed in Japanese culture had on my hypothesis and research process are also developed. The study introduces some aspects of my experience of space in two different contexts: the context of everyday life experiences in Japan and the context of the butoh dance. Each context helped me to discover aspects of the experience of space, and possible implications for the music therapy context are then developed. In the study I sum up some of the discoveries underlining the negative and positive aspects this research process has led to. Finally, I evoke the learning of "humility," which is the dimension of the process most difficult to share in this article. The research study brought up some interesting subjects to investigate more in the future. One important discovery was the interdependency between perception and language (as a part of culture and the way this implies a special attention in the music therapy context. Another interesting remark concerns the concept of boundary, and I argue that the Japanese concept of "Ma" is precious in relation to the therapeutic challenge of approaching this concept with an open mind.

  2. The Impact of Space Experiments on our Knowledge of the Physics of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Franco; Sabau-Graziati, Lola

    2004-05-01

    With the advent of space experiments it was demonstrated that cosmic sources emit energy practically across all the electromagnetic spectrum via different physical processes. Several physical quantities give witness to these processes which usually are not stationary; those physical observable quantities are then generally variable. Therefore simultaneous multifrequency observations are strictly necessary in order to understand the actual behaviour of cosmic sources. Space experiments have opened practically all the electromagnetic windows on the Universe. A discussion of the most important results coming from multifrequency photonic astrophysics experiments will provide new inputs for the advance of the knowledge of the physics, very often in its more extreme conditions. A multitude of high quality data across practically the whole electromagnetic spectrum came at the scientific community's disposal a few years after the beginning of the Space Era. With these data we are attempting to explain the physics governing the Universe and, moreover, its origin, which has been and still is a matter of the greatest curiosity for humanity. In this paper we will try to describe the last steps of the investigation born with the advent of space experiments, to note upon the most important results and open problems still existing, and to comment upon the perspectives we can reasonably expect. Once the idea of this paper was well accepted by ourselves, we had the problem of how to plan the exposition. Indeed, the exposition of the results can be made in different ways, following several points of view, according to: - a division in diffuse and discrete sources; - different classes of cosmic sources; - different spectral ranges, which implies in turn a sub-classification in accordance with different techniques of observations; - different physical emission mechanisms of electromagnetic radiation; - different vehicles used for launching the experiments (aircraft, balloons, rockets

  3. An observer for a deployable antenna. [for large space structure flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waites, H. B.

    1981-01-01

    An observer is derived for use on an Orbiter-Deployable Antenna configuration. The unique feature of this observer design for this flight experiment is that all the plant inputs are not required to be directly accessible for the observer to ferret out the system states. The observer uses state and rate of the state information to reconstruct the plant states. Results are presented which show how effectively this observer design works for this large space structure flight experiment.

  4. Inhibition of sodium current by taurine magnesium coordination compound prevents cesium chloride-induced arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yongqiang; Wen, Ke; Wu, Yanna; Kang, Yi; Lou, Jianshi

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism(s) by which taurine magnesium coordination compound (TMCC) inhibits experimental arrhythmias remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of TMCC against cesium chloride-induced arrhythmia in the rabbit heart and find whether the antiarrhythmic activity is related to inhibition of sodium current. Early afterdepolarization was induced by 1.5 mM cesium chloride (1 ml kg(-1)) through intravenous injection. The monophasic action potentials (MAP) and electrocardiograms were simultaneously recorded. The effect of TMCC on functional refractory periods (FRPs) in the left atrium was also observed in vitro. Arrhythmias onset was significantly retarded by TMCC. The number of ventricular premature contractions and incidence of monophasic ventricular tachycardia and polyphasic ventricular tachycardia in 10 min were decreased by TMCC. These effects can be abolished by veratridine (10 μg kg(-1)). MAP duration at 90% repolarization was significantly prolonged by TMCC, which can be prolonged even longer by veratridine (10 μg kg(-1)). In vitro experiments showed that FRPs was prolonged by TMCC which can be cancelled by veratridine (10 μg kg(-1)). TMCC prevents cesium chloride-induced arrhythmias, and inhibition of sodium current, in part, contributes to the antiarrhythmic effect of TMCC.

  5. ION EXCHANGE MODELING FOR REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM HANFORD WASTE USING SUPERLIG 644 RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L

    2004-05-01

    The expected performance of a proposed ion exchange column using SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin for the removal of cesium from Hanford high level radioactive alkaline waste is discussed. This report represents a final report on the ability and knowledge with regard to modeling the Cesium-SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin ion exchange system. Only the loading phase of the cycle process is addressed within this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests and batch equilibrium experiments are addressed. The methodology employed and sensitivity analyses are also included (i.e., existing methodology employed is referenced to prior developmental efforts while updated methodology is discussed). Pilot-scale testing is not assessed since no pilot-scale testing was available at the time of this report. Column performance predictions are made considering three selected feed compositions under nominal operating conditions. The sensitivity analyses provided help to identify key parameters that aid in resin procurement acceptance criteria. The methodology and application presented within this report reflect the expected behavior of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin manufactured at the production-scale (i.e, 250 gallon batch size level). The primary objective of this work was, through modeling and verification based on experimental assessments, to predict the cesium removal performance of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin for application in the RPP pretreatment facility.

  6. Prussian blue as an antidote for radioactive thallium and cesium poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altagracia-Martinez M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Marina Altagracia-Martínez, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich, Juan Manuel Martínez-Núñez, Camilo Ríos-Castañeda, Francisco López-NaranjoDepartments of Biological Systems and Health Care, Biological and Health Sciences Division, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico DF, MexicoBackground: Following the attacks on the US on September 11, 2001, potentially millions of people might experience contamination from radioactive metals. However, before the specter of such accidents arose, Prussian blue was known only as an investigational agent for accidental thallium and cesium poisoning. The purpose of this review is to update the state of the art concerning use of Prussian blue as an effective and safe drug against possible bioterrorism attacks and to disseminate medical information in order to contribute to the production of Prussian blue as a biodefense drug.Methods: We compiled articles from a systematic review conducted from January 1, 1960 to March 30, 2011. The electronic databases consulted were Medline, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Scopus.Results: Prussian blue is effective and safe for use against radioactive intoxications involving cesium-137 and thallium. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved Prussian blue as a drug, but there is only one manufacturer providing Prussian blue to the US. Based on the evidence, Prussian blue is effective for use against radioactive intoxications involving cesium-137 and thallium, but additional clinical research on and production of Prussian blue are needed.Keywords: Prussian blue, radioactive cesium, thallium, intoxication, biodefense drug

  7. Biological responses to space: results of the experiment ``exobiological unit'' of ERA on EURECA I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.; Eschweiler, U.; Reitz, G.; Wehner, J.; Willimek, R.; Strauch, K.

    Spores of different strains of Bacillus subtilis and the Escherichia coli plasmid pUC19 were exposed to selected conditions of space (space vacuum and/or defined wavebands and intensities of solar ultraviolet radiation) in the experiment ER 161 ``Exobiological Unit'' of the Exobiology Radiation Assembly (ERA) on board of the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA). After the approximately 11 months lasting mission, their responses were studied in terms of survival, mutagenesis in the his (B. subtilis) or lac locus (pUC19), induction of DNA strand breaks, efficiency of DNA repair systems, and the role of external protective agents. The data were compared with those of a simultaneously running ground control experiment. The survival of spores treated with the vacuum of space, however shielded against solar radiation, is substantially increased, if they are exposed in multilayers and/or in the presence of glucose as protective, whereas all spores in ``artificial meteorites'', i.e. embedded in clays or simulated Martian soil, are killed. Vacuum treatment leads to an increase of mutation frequency in spores, but not in plasmid DNA. Extraterrestrial solar ultraviolet radiation is mutagenic, induces strand breaks in the DNA and reduces survival substantially; however, even at the highest fluences, i.e. 3 x 10^8 Jm^-2, a small but significant fraction of spores survives the insolation. Action spectroscopy confirms results of previous space experiments of a synergistic action of space vacuum and solar UV radiation with DNA being the critical target.

  8. Atmospheric transmission for cesium DPAL using TDLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Christopher A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2012-03-01

    The cesium (Cs) Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) operates near 894 nm, in the vicinity of atmospheric water vapor absorption lines. An open-path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption (TDLAS) system composed of narrow band (~300 kHz) diode laser fiber coupled to a 12" Ritchey-Chrétien transmit telescope has been used to study the atmospheric transmission characteristics of Cs DPALs over extended paths. The ruggedized system has been field deployed and tested for propagation distances of greater than 1 km. By scanning the diode laser across many free spectral ranges, many rotational absorption features are observed. Absolute laser frequency is monitored with a High Finesse wavemeter to an accuracy of less than 10 MHz. Phase sensitive detection is employed with an absorbance of less than 1% observable under field conditions.

  9. The large area crop inventory experiment: An experiment to demonstrate how space-age technology can contribute to solving critical problems here on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The large area crop inventory experiment is being developed to predict crop production through satellite photographs. This experiment demonstrates how space age technology can contribute to solving practical problems of agriculture management.

  10. Small-Scale Design Experiments as Working Space for Larger Mobile Communication Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Sarah; Stuedahl, Dagny

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a design experiment using Instagram as a cultural probe is submitted as a method for analyzing the challenges that arise when considering the implementation of social media within a distributed communication space. It outlines how small, iterative investigations can reveal deeper research questions relevant to the education of…

  11. Making Space for Racial Dialogue: Our Experience in a Marriage and Family Therapy Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Teresa; Fang, Shi-Ruei; Young, Cecilia Gomez; Khanna, Anchal; Sherman, Brooke; Brownlee, Kenya

    2003-01-01

    Marriage and family therapy (MFT) training programs need to create opportunities for all students to develop cultural competency by raising their racial awareness and sensitivity. Likewise, therapists of color need to be offered space in MFT programs to voice their experiences and venues for their voices to be heard. This article reports on the…

  12. Low-work-function surfaces produced by cesium carbonate decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, T. R.; Sommer, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    Cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) was heated to the decomposition temperature of approximately 600 C. The nonvolatile decomposition products were condensed on a nickel substrate while the carbon dioxide was removed by pumping. The deposited material is characterized by an effective work function of between 1.05 and 1.15 eV at 450 K and by photoemission in the visible and near-infrared region of the spectrum. It is suggested that the deposited material consists of Cs2O, possibly Cs2O2, and adsorbed cesium. Silver, evaporated from a heated silver bead, produced the typical photoemissive and thermionic properties of a silver-oxygen-cesium (S-1) photocathode. The material may be of interest for thermionic energy converters and for the formation of silver-oxygen-cesium photocathodes.

  13. The crystal structures of potassium and cesium trivanadates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, H.T.; Block, S.

    1966-01-01

    Potassium and cesium trivanadates are monoclinic and isomorphous, space group P21/m, with the following dimensions (Z = 2): KV3O8, a = 7.640 A, b = 8.380 A, c = 4.979 A, ??= 96?? 57???; CsV3O8, a = 8.176 A, b = 8.519 A, c = 4.988 A, ?? = 95?? 32???. The crystal structure of KV3O8 has been determined from hk0, 0kl, and h0l Weissenberg data with an R factor of 0.15. The structure of CsV3O8 has been refined with 1273 hkl Weissenberg data to an R factor of 0.089. The structures consist of corrugated sheets based on a linkage of distorted VO6, octahedra. Two of the vanadium atoms lie in double, square-pyramid groups V2O8, which are linked through opposite basal corners into chains along the b axis. The chains are joined laterally along the c axis into sheets by the third vanadium atom in VO groups, also forming part of a square-pyramid coordination. Various aspects of these structures are compared with other known oxovanadate structures.

  14. Whole Lichen Thalli Survive Exposure to Space Conditions: Results of Lithopanspermia Experiment with Aspicilia fruticulosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggio, J.; Pintado, A.; Ascaso, C.; De La Torre, R.; De Los Ríos, A.; Wierzchos, J.; Horneck, G.; Sancho, L. G.

    2011-05-01

    The Lithopanspermia space experiment was launched in 2007 with the European Biopan facility for a 10-day spaceflight on board a Russian Foton retrievable satellite. Lithopanspermia included for the first time the vagrant lichen species Aspicilia fruticulosa from Guadalajara steppic highlands (Central Spain), as well as other lichen species. During spaceflight, the samples were exposed to selected space conditions, that is, the space vacuum, cosmic radiation, and different spectral ranges of solar radiation (λ ≥ 110, ≥ 200, ≥ 290, or ≥ 400 nm, respectively). After retrieval, the algal and fungal metabolic integrity of the samples were evaluated in terms of chlorophyll a fluorescence, ultrastructure, and CO2 exchange rates. Whereas the space vacuum and cosmic radiation did not impair the metabolic activity of the lichens, solar electromagnetic radiation, especially in the wavelength range between 100 and 200 nm, caused reduced chlorophyll a yield fluorescence; however, there was a complete recovery after 72 h of reactivation. All samples showed positive rates of net photosynthesis and dark respiration in the gas exchange experiment. Although the ultrastructure of all flight samples showed some probable stress-induced changes (such as the presence of electron-dense bodies in cytoplasmic vacuoles and between the chloroplast thylakoids in photobiont cells as well as in cytoplasmic vacuoles of the mycobiont cells), we concluded that A. fruticulosa was capable of repairing all space-induced damage. Due to size limitations within the Lithopanspermia hardware, the possibility for replication on the sun-exposed samples was limited, and these first results on the resistance of the lichen symbiosis A. fruticulosa to space conditions and, in particular, on the spectral effectiveness of solar extraterrestrial radiation must be considered preliminary. Further testing in space and under space-simulated conditions will be required. Results of this study indicate that the

  15. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  16. The MicroBooNE Experiment and the Impact of Space Charge Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Mooney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    MicroBooNE is an experiment designed to both probe neutrino physics phenomena and develop the LArTPC (Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber) detector technology. The MicroBooNE experiment, which began taking data this year, is the first large LArTPC detector in the U.S. This experiment is the beginning of a path of detectors (both on the surface and underground) envisioned for the U.S. SBL (Short-BaseLine) and LBL (Long-BaseLine) programs. In order to interpret the data from the experiments on the surface, the impact of space charge effects must be simulated and calibrated. The space charge effect is the build-up of slow-moving positive ions in a detector due to, for instance, ionization from cosmic rays, leading to a distortion of the electric field within the detector. This effect leads to a displacement in the reconstructed position of signal ionization electrons in LArTPC detectors. The LArTPC utilized in the MicroBooNE experiment is expected to be modestly impacted from the space charge effect, with the e...

  17. The role of integral experiments and nuclear cross section evaluations in space nuclear reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, David L.; McKnight, Richard D.

    The importance of the nuclear and neutronic properties of candidate space reactor materials to the design process has been acknowledged as has been the use of benchmark reactor physics experiments to verify and qualify analytical tools used in design, safety, and performance evaluation. Since June 1966, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) has acted as an interagency forum for the assessment and evaluation of nuclear reaction data used in the nuclear design process. CSEWG data testing has involved the specification and calculation of benchmark experiments which are used widely for commercial reactor design and safety analysis. These benchmark experiments preceded the issuance of the industry standards for acceptance, but the benchmarks exceed the minimum acceptance criteria for such data. Thus, a starting place has been provided in assuring the accuracy and uncertainty of nuclear data important to space reactor applications.

  18. MICROGRAVITY EXPERIMENTS OF TWO-PHASE FLOW PATTERNS ABOARD MIR SPACE STATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建福; 解京昌; 林海; 胡文瑞; A.V. Ivanov; A.Yu. Belyaev

    2001-01-01

    A first experimental study on two-phase flow patterns at a long-term,steady microgravity condition was conducted on board the Russian Space Station "MIR" in August 1999. Carbogal and air are used as the liquid and the gas phase,respectively. Bubble, slug, slug-annular transitional, and annular flows are observed.A new region of annular flow with lower liquid superficial velocity is discovered,and the region of the slug-annular transitionalfiow is wider than that observed by experiments on board the parabolic aircraft. The main patterns are bubble, slug annular transitional and annular flows based on the experiments on board MIR space station. Some influences on the two-phase flow patterns in the present experiments are discussed.

  19. Experience with the Hubble Space Telescope: 20 years of an archetype

    CERN Document Server

    Lallo, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's mission is summarized, with special emphasis placed on the Space Telescope Science Institute's unique experience with Hubble's behavior as an astronomical telescope in the environment of low earth orbit for over two decades. Historical context and background are given, and the project's early scientific expectations are described. A general overview of the spacecraft is followed by a more detailed look at the optical design, both as intended and as built. Basic characteristics of the complete complement of science instruments are also summarized. Experience with the telescope on-orbit is reviewed, starting with the major initial problems, solutions, human servicing missions, and the associated expansion of the observatory's capabilities over this time. Specific attention is then given to understanding Hubble's optical quality and pointing/jitter performance, two fundamental characteristics of a telescope. Experience with-and the important mitigation of-radiation damage and contami...

  20. Application of high stability oscillators to radio science experiments using deep space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursinski, Emil R.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave telecommunication links between the earth and deep space probes have long been used to conduct radio science experiments which take advantage of the phase coherency and stability of these links. These experiments measure changes in the phase delay of the signals to infer electrical, magnetic and gravitational properties of the solar system environment and beyond through which the spacecraft and radio signals pass. The precision oscillators, from which the phase of the microwave signals are derived, play a key role in the stability of these links and therefore the sensitivity of these measurements. These experiments have become a driving force behind recent and future improvements in the Deep Space Network and spacecraft oscillators and frequency and time distribution systems. Three such experiments which are key to these improvements are briefly discussed and relationship between their sensitivity and the signal phase stability is described. The first is the remote sensing of planetary atmospheres by occultation in which the radio signal passes through the atmosphere and is refracted causing the signal pathlength to change from which the pressure and the temperature of the atmosphere can be derived. The second experiment is determination of the opacity of planetary rings by passage of the radio signals through the rings. The third experiment is the research for very low frequency gravitational radiation. The fractional frequency variation of the signal is comparable to the spatial strain amplitude the system is capable of detecting. A summary of past results and future possibilities for these experiments are presented.

  1. Study of the removal of cesium from aqueous solutions by graphene oxide; Estudo da remocao de cesio em solucoes aquosas por oxido de grafeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, Vanessa N.; Rodrigues, Debora F. [University of Houston (UH), Houston, TX (United States); Vitta, Patricia B. Di [Universidade de Sao Paulo (STRES/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Setor Tecnico de Residuos Quimicos e Solventes; Oshiro, Mauricio T.; Vicente, Roberto; Hiromoto, Goro; Potiens Junior, Ademar; Sakata, Solange K., E-mail: sksakata@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Graphene oxide, used in this work, was synthesized from the oxidation of graphite by Hummer method. The experiments were performed in batch and analyzed for the following parameters: contact time, pH, cesium ion concentration in aqueous solution and removing capacity of the graphene oxide. After the experiments the samples were vacuum filtered and the remaining cesium in solution was quantified by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). The equilibrium was reached after 60 minutes of contact in neutral solution. The percentage of removal was around 80%.

  2. Post-launch analysis of the deployment dynamics of a space web sounding rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Huina; Sinn, Thomas; Vasile, Massimiliano; Tibert, Gunnar

    2016-10-01

    Lightweight deployable space webs have been proposed as platforms or frames for a construction of structures in space where centrifugal forces enable deployment and stabilization. The Suaineadh project was aimed to deploy a 2 × 2m2 space web by centrifugal forces in milli-gravity conditions and act as a test bed for the space web technology. Data from former sounding rocket experiments, ground tests and simulations were used to design the structure, the folding pattern and control parameters. A developed control law and a reaction wheel were used to control the deployment. After ejection from the rocket, the web was deployed but entanglements occurred since the web did not start to deploy at the specified angular velocity. The deployment dynamics was reconstructed from the information recorded in inertial measurement units and cameras. The nonlinear torque of the motor used to drive the reaction wheel was calculated from the results. Simulations show that if the Suaineadh started to deploy at the specified angular velocity, the web would most likely have been deployed and stabilized in space by the motor, reaction wheel and controller used in the experiment.

  3. Prospects for ultrahigh-energy particle observation based on the lunar orbital LORD space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabov, V. A.; Chechin, V. A.; Gusev, G. A.; Maung, K. T.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of searching for highest-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos in the Universe is reviewed. Possibilities for using the radio method for detecting particles of energies above the GZK cut-off are analyzed. The method is based on the registration of coherent radio emission produced by cascades of most energetic particles in radio-transparent lunar regolith. The Luna-Resurs Orbiter space mission to be launched in the near future (2020) involves the Lunar Orbital Radio Detector (LORD). The design of the LORD space instrument and its scientific potentialities for registration of low-intense cosmic ray particle fluxes of energies above the GZK cut-off up to 1024eV are discussed. The designed LORD module (including the antenna, amplification, and data-acquisition systems) now is under construction. Exposure and capabilities of the LORD space experiment for detection of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos have been compared with those for well-known current and proposed experiments. The LORD space experiment will make it possible to obtain important information on the highest-energy particles in the Universe, to verify modern models for the origin and the propagation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos.

  4. PHARAO: A Space Clock with Cold Cesium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Fundamental Tests. [z] R. Vessot et al. 1980, Physical Review Letters , 45, 2081. IS] R. Vessot 1993, Proceedings of the 28th Moriond Conference. [4...World Scientific, Singapore), pp. 49-59. [6] M. Kasevich, E. Riis, S. Chu, and R. de Voe 1989, Physical Review Letters , 63, 612. 171 A. Clairon, C...Salomon, S. Guellati, and W. Phillips 1991, Europhysical Letters, 16, 165. [a] K Gibble, and S. Chu 1993, Physical Review Letters , 70, 177. [g] B

  5. The Mice Drawer System (MDS experiment and the space endurance record-breaking mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranieri Cancedda

    Full Text Available The Italian Space Agency, in line with its scientific strategies and the National Utilization Plan for the International Space Station (ISS, contracted Thales Alenia Space Italia to design and build a spaceflight payload for rodent research on ISS: the Mice Drawer System (MDS. The payload, to be integrated inside the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation and inside the Express Rack in the ISS during experiment execution, was designed to function autonomously for more than 3 months and to involve crew only for maintenance activities. In its first mission, three wild type (Wt and three transgenic male mice over-expressing pleiotrophin under the control of a bone-specific promoter (PTN-Tg were housed in the MDS. At the time of launch, animals were 2-months old. MDS reached the ISS on board of Shuttle Discovery Flight 17A/STS-128 on August 28(th, 2009. MDS returned to Earth on November 27(th, 2009 with Shuttle Atlantis Flight ULF3/STS-129 after 91 days, performing the longest permanence of mice in space. Unfortunately, during the MDS mission, one PTN-Tg and two Wt mice died due to health status or payload-related reasons. The remaining mice showed a normal behavior throughout the experiment and appeared in excellent health conditions at landing. During the experiment, the mice health conditions and their water and food consumption were daily checked. Upon landing mice were sacrificed, blood parameters measured and tissues dissected for subsequent analysis. To obtain as much information as possible on microgravity-induced tissue modifications, we organized a Tissue Sharing Program: 20 research groups from 6 countries participated. In order to distinguish between possible effects of the MDS housing conditions and effects due to the near-zero gravity environment, a ground replica of the flight experiment was performed at the University of Genova. Control tissues were collected also from mice maintained on Earth in standard vivarium cages.

  6. Simulations of the MATROSHKA experiment at the international space station using PHITS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihver, L; Sato, T; Puchalska, M; Reitz, G

    2010-08-01

    Concerns about the biological effects of space radiation are increasing rapidly due to the perspective of long-duration manned missions, both in relation to the International Space Station (ISS) and to manned interplanetary missions to Moon and Mars in the future. As a preparation for these long-duration space missions, it is important to ensure an excellent capability to evaluate the impact of space radiation on human health, in order to secure the safety of the astronauts/cosmonauts and minimize their risks. It is therefore necessary to measure the radiation load on the personnel both inside and outside the space vehicles and certify that organ- and tissue-equivalent doses can be simulated as accurate as possible. In this paper, simulations are presented using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) (Iwase et al. in J Nucl Sci Tech 39(11):1142-1151, 2002) of long-term dose measurements performed with the European Space Agency-supported MATROSHKA (MTR) experiment (Reitz and Berger in Radiat Prot Dosim 120:442-445, 2006). MATROSHKA is an anthropomorphic phantom containing over 6,000 radiation detectors, mimicking a human head and torso. The MTR experiment, led by the German Aerospace Center (DLR), was launched in January 2004 and has measured the absorbed doses from space radiation both inside and outside the ISS. Comparisons of simulations with measurements outside the ISS are presented. The results indicate that PHITS is a suitable tool for estimation of doses received from cosmic radiation and for study of the shielding of spacecraft against cosmic radiation.

  7. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS02) experiment on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behcet ALPAT

    2003-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment is realized in two phases. A precursor flight (STS-91)with a reduced experimental configuration (AMS01) has successfully flown on space shuttle Discovery in June 1998.The final version (AMS02) will be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) as an independent module inearly 2006 for an operational period of three years. The main scientific objectives of AMS02 include the searches forthe antimatter and dark matter in cosmic rays. In this work we will discuss the experimental details as well as the im-proved physics capabilities of AMS02 on ISS.

  8. The Sileye--Alteino experiment on board the International Space Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casolino, M. E-mail: casolino@roma2.infn.it; Bidoli, V.; Furano, G.; Minori, M.; Morselli, A.; Narici, L.; Picozza, P.; Reali, E.; Sparvoli, R.; Fuglesang, C.; Sannita, W.G.; Carlson, P.; Castellini, G.; Tesi, M.; Galper, A.; Korotkov, M.; Popov, A.; Vavilov, N.; Avdeev, S.; Benghin, V.; Salnitskii, V.P.; Shevchenko, O.I.; Petrov, V.P.; Trukhanov, K.A.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, W.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Mazzenga, G.; Ricci, M.; Spillantini, P

    2002-12-01

    The experiment Sileye-3/Alteino was placed on board the International Space Station on 27 April 2002. The instrument is constituted by a cosmic ray silicon detector and an electroencephalograph. The main scientific aims include the investigation of the Light Flash phenomenon, the study of astronaut brain activity in space when subject to cosmic rays, the measurement of the radiation environment and the nuclear abundances inside the ISS. The instrument cosmic ray detector was active for 130 hours. In addition 6 astronaut Light Flash observation sessions were held, resulting in the observation of this phenomenon on the ISS.

  9. Experiments with small animals in BIOLAB and EMCS on the international space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckmann, E.; Schiller, P.

    Two ESA facilities will be available for animal research and other biological experiments on the International Space Station: the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) in the US Lab "Destiny" and BIOLAB in the European "Columbus" Laboratory. Both facilities use standard Experiment Containers, mounted on two centrifuge rotors allowing either research in microgravity or acceleration studies with variable g-levels from 0.001 to 2.0x g. Standard interface plates provide each container with power and data lines, gas supply (controlled CO 2, O 2 concentration and relative humidity), and -for EMCS only- connectors to fresh and waste water reservoirs. The experiment hardware inside the containers will be developed by the user, but ESA conducted a feasibility study for several kinds of Experiment Support Equipment with potential use for research on small animals: design concepts for experiments with insects, with aquatic organisms like rotifers and nematodes, and with small aquatic animals (sea urchin larvae, tadpoles, fish youngsters) are described in detail in this presentation. Also ESA's initial steps to support experiments with rodents on the Space Station are presented.

  10. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. [magnetospheric experiments from space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Current work aimed at identifying the active magnetospheric experiments that can be performed from the Space Shuttle, and designing a laboratory to carry out these experiments is described. The laboratory, known as the PPEPL (Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory) consists of 35-ft pallet of instruments connected to a 25-ft pressurized control module. The systems deployed from the pallet are two 50-m booms, two subsatellites, a high-power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform. Missions are planned to last seven days, during which two scientists will carry out experiments from within the pressurized module. The type of experiments to be performed are outlined.

  11. Cesium-induced QT-interval prolongation in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Catherine E; Harik, Nada; James, Laura P; Seib, Paul M; Stowe, Cindy D

    2008-08-01

    Alternative medicine is becoming increasingly popular, especially with terminally ill patients. Most alternative remedies have not been adequately studied or proven effective for the diseases for which they are promoted. In the worst cases, these therapies are harmful. We describe a 16-year-old girl with metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma who experienced cesium-induced QT-interval prolongation after the start of a cesium chloride-based alternative treatment regimen. She had received seven courses of chemotherapy, with a cumulative doxorubicin dose of 500 mg/m(2) over 5 months, resulting in minimal tumor regression. Against the advice of her oncologist, she abandoned traditional therapy and started an alternative regimen that included cesium chloride supplements. Two weeks later, the patient went to a local emergency department after experiencing two brief syncopal episodes. An electrocardiogram revealed occasional premature ventricular contractions, a QTc interval of 683 msec (normal range for females 450-460 msec), and R on T phenomenon. She was admitted to the hospital and later experienced monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, which resolved spontaneously. Lidocaine therapy was started, and the patient was transferred to a cardiac intensive care unit at our hospital. Her plasma cesium level was 2400 microg/dl (normal cesium level was 1800 microg/dl, and her QTc interval was 494 msec. According to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, cesium was the probable cause of the patient's arrhythmia. In animal models, cesium chloride has induced cardiac arrhythmias, including torsade de pointes. It inhibits delayed rectifier potassium channels in the myocardium, causing delayed repolarization and QT-interval prolongation. Patients with cancer should be aware that alternative remedies may be harmful and ineffective. Because patients may be unlikely to self-report alternative remedies, health care providers should specifically ask their patients about any

  12. Thermal and orbital analysis of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killough, Brian D.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals of an Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous orbit are presented. A Sun-synchronous Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) was developed to calculate orbital parameters for an entire year. The output from this program provides the required input data for the TRASYS thermal radiation computer code, which in turn computes the infrared, solar and Earth albedo heat fluxes incident on a space experiment. Direct incident heat fluxes can be used as input to a generalized thermal analyzer program to size radiators and predict instrument operating temperatures. The SOAP computer code and its application to the thermal analysis methodology presented, should prove useful to the thermal engineer during the design phases of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments.

  13. Phase space density as a measure of cooling performance for the international muon ionization cooling experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment to demonstrate ionization cooling of a muon beam in a beamline that shares characteristics with one that might be used for a muon collider or neutrino factory. I describe a way to quantify cooling performance by examining the phase space density of muons, and determining how much that density increases. This contrasts with the more common methods that rely on the covariance matrix and compute emittances from that. I discuss why a direct measure of phase space density might be preferable to a covariance matrix method. I apply this technique to an early proposal for the MICE final step beamline. I discuss how matching impacts the measured performance.

  14. Sorption properties of cesium in soil%铯在土壤中的吸附性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李爽; 倪师军; 张成江; 吴虹霁

    2009-01-01

    The sorption properties of cesium in the soil of a nuclear waste repository were investigated by column method. The effects of pH value, granularity of the soil, concentration of cesium solution on the sorption properties were also studied. The experiment results show that the equilibrium adsorptive quantity increases with the increasing of pH value and the initial concentration of cesium solution and decreases with the increasing of the grain size of the soil. This has no orderliness between equilibrium adsorptive quantity and pH value, the grain size of the soil. The most sorption rate of cesium in the soil of the primary election nuclear waste disposal is 65.9%, and the sorption properties are not well. So, people must use something which can adsorb cesium well as a barrier before the disposition.%用动态法测定了铯在某放射性废物处置预选场址土壤中的平衡吸附量,研究了水相pH值、土壤粒度及铯溶液浓度对土壤吸附铯的影响.pH值、溶液浓度越大,土壤平衡吸附量越大;土壤粒度越小,土壤平衡吸附量越大.用常用的吸附动力学方程对实验数据进行了拟合,并对吸附机理进行了探讨.实验结果表明,该放射性废物处置预选场址土壤对铯的最大吸附率为65.9%,吸附性能较差.

  15. Free Space Laser Communication Experiments from Earth to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in Lunar Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Skillman, David R.; Hoffman, Evan D.; Mao, Dandan; McGarry, Jan F.; Zellar, Ronald S.; Fong, Wai H; Krainak, Michael A.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Laser communication and ranging experiments were successfully conducted from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in lunar orbit. The experiments used 4096-ary pulse position modulation (PPM) for the laser pulses during one-way LRO Laser Ranging (LR) operations. Reed-Solomon forward error correction codes were used to correct the PPM symbol errors due to atmosphere turbulence and pointing jitter. The signal fading was measured and the results were compared to the model.

  16. Race Has Always Mattered: An Intergeneration Look at Race, Space, Place, and Educational Experiences of Blacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise G. Yull

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Within school settings race continues to be one of the most formidable obstacles for Black children in the United States (US school system. This paper expands the discussions of race in education by exploring how the social links among race, space, and place provide a lens for understanding the persistence of racism in the educational experiences of Black children. This paper examines how differences in a rural versus urban geographical location influence a student’s experience with race, racism, and racial identity across four generations of Black people in the context of school and community. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  17. Free space laser communication experiments from Earth to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in lunar orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Skillman, David R; Hoffman, Evan D; Mao, Dandan; McGarry, Jan F; McIntire, Leva; Zellar, Ronald S; Davidson, Frederic M; Fong, Wai H; Krainak, Michael A; Neumann, Gregory A; Zuber, Maria T; Smith, David E

    2013-01-28

    Laser communication and ranging experiments were successfully conducted from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in lunar orbit. The experiments used 4096-ary pulse position modulation (PPM) for the laser pulses during one-way LRO Laser Ranging (LR) operations. Reed-Solomon forward error correction codes were used to correct the PPM symbol errors due to atmosphere turbulence and pointing jitter. The signal fading was measured and the results were compared to the model.

  18. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  19. Status of Animal Experiments on International Space Station, and Animal Care Activities in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Ryutaro; Ishioka, Noriaki; Yumoto, Akane; Ito, Isao; Shirakawa, Masaki

    We would like to introduce animal experiments status on International Space Station (ISS) of Japan. Aquatic Habitat (AQH) was launched at 2012 July, by H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV, ‘Kounotori’) from Tanegashima island in Japan, which could house small fish (Medaka, or Zebrafish) at most three months. First experiment using AQH was carried out for two months from Oct. 26, 2012, and second experiment would start from February, 2014. Mice housing hardware is now under development. For animal care activities, current topic in Japan is self-estimation for animal experiment status by each institute, and to open the result for public. JAXA conducted self-estimation of fiscal year 2011 (from 2011 April until 2012 March) for the first time, and would continue every fiscal year. JAXA already have its own animal care regulation, under animal care law and policy in Japan, and also referred COSPAR animal care guideline. And this year, JAXA made handbook for animal experiments in space (only Japanese).

  20. Training for life science experiments in space at the NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Annette T.; Maese, A. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    As this country prepares for exploration to other planets, the need to understand the affects of long duration exposure to microgravity is evident. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's Space Life Sciences Payloads Office is responsible for a number of non-human life sciences payloads on NASA's Space Shuttle's Spacelab. Included in this responsibility is the training of those individuals who will be conducting the experiments during flight, the astronauts. Preparing a crew to conduct such experiments requires training protocols that build on simple tasks. Once a defined degree of performance proficiency is met for each task, these tasks are combined to increase the complexity of the activities. As tasks are combined into in-flight operations, they are subjected to time constraints and the crew enhances their skills through repetition. The science objectives must be completely understood by the crew and are critical to the overall training program. Completion of the in-flight activities is proof of success. Because the crew is exposed to the background of early research and plans for post-flight analyses, they have a vested interest in the flight activities. The salient features of this training approach is that it allows for flexibility in implementation, consideration of individual differences, and a greater ability to retain experiment information. This training approach offers another effective alternative training tool to existing methodologies.

  1. Cesium toxicity: a case of self-treatment by alternate therapy gone awry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Andrew W; Mayhew, William J

    2003-02-01

    Cesium salts have been used in animal models to induce cardiac arrhythmias for several decades, but the sequelae of human cesium toxicity have seldom been described. The authors describe a case of cesium toxicity manifested by syncope, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, hypokalemia, and a QT interval prolonged to 650 milliseconds that resolved over 4 days following withdrawal of cesium. The patient had a 2-year history of colon cancer and had self-treated with cesium chloride, 3 g/d, for several weeks, using cesium as a form of alternate therapy for cancer. The authors describe the pathophysiologic correlates and risks of cesium consumption and conclude that cesium toxicity should be considered among the differential diagnoses of prolonged QT interval.

  2. A novel role for methyl cysteinate, a cysteine derivative, in cesium accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Eri; Miyazaki, Takae; Hayaishi-Satoh, Aya; Han, Minwoo; Kusano, Miyako; Khandelia, Himanshu; Saito, Kazuki; Shin, Ryoung

    2017-01-01

    Phytoaccumulation is a technique to extract metals from soil utilising ability of plants. Cesium is a valuable metal while radioactive isotopes of cesium can be hazardous. In order to establish a more efficient phytoaccumulation system, small molecules which promote plants to accumulate cesium were investigated. Through chemical library screening, 14 chemicals were isolated as ‘cesium accumulators’ in Arabidopsis thaliana. Of those, methyl cysteinate, a derivative of cysteine, was found to function within the plant to accumulate externally supplemented cesium. Moreover, metabolite profiling demonstrated that cesium treatment increased cysteine levels in Arabidopsis. The cesium accumulation effect was not observed for other cysteine derivatives or amino acids on the cysteine metabolic pathway tested. Our results suggest that methyl cysteinate, potentially metabolised from cysteine, binds with cesium on the surface of the roots or inside plant cells and improve phytoaccumulation. PMID:28230101

  3. Passive Thermal Design Approach for the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed Experiment on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamidis, John; Yuko, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Program Office at NASA Headquarters oversees all of NASAs space communications activities. SCaN manages and directs the ground-based facilities and services provided by the Deep Space Network (DSN), Near Earth Network (NEN), and the Space Network (SN). Through the SCaN Program Office, NASA GRC developed a Software Defined Radio (SDR) testbed experiment (SCaN testbed experiment) for use on the International Space Station (ISS). It is comprised of three different SDR radios, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) radio, Harris Corporation radio, and the General Dynamics Corporation radio. The SCaN testbed experiment provides an on-orbit, adaptable, SDR Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) - based facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance the Software Defined Radio, Space Telecommunications Radio Systems (STRS) standards, reduce risk (Technology Readiness Level (TRL) advancement) for candidate Constellation future space flight hardware software, and demonstrate space communication links critical to future NASA exploration missions. The SCaN testbed project provides NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, software defined radio platforms and the STRS Architecture.The SCaN testbed is resident on the P3 Express Logistics Carrier (ELC) on the exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN testbed payload launched on the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and was installed on the ISS P3 ELC located on the inboard RAM P3 site. The daily operations and testing are managed out of NASA GRC in the Telescience Support Center (TSC).

  4. Atomic parity violation in heavy alkalis: detection by stimulated emission for cesium and traps for cold francium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguinetti, St

    2004-07-01

    The present work deals with the recent advances of atomic spectroscopy experiments on cesium and francium, which aim at precise parity violation (PV) measurements in these atoms. Within the framework of a 'double-badged thesis', the candidate devoted himself on the one hand to the preliminary PV measurement (8% accuracy) of the present Cs experiment at the Kastler-Brossel laboratory in Paris and on the other hand to the preparation of a Fr radioactive atomic sample (production and trapping) at the LNL (INFN) in Italy. The two experiments are at very different stages. The measurements reported for cesium were actually made possible thanks to the work initiated in 1991, for the PV detection by stimulated emission. The Italian experiment is instead in a beginning stage: in order to probe the properties of francium, which is unstable, a number of atoms large enough has to be first produced and collected. The PV schemes which proved to be well suited for cesium are a solid starting point for the case of francium. (author)

  5. Parity violation in atomic cesium and alternatives to the standard model of electroweak interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C.A. (Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique)

    1983-08-18

    We study the implications of the recent observation of a parity violation in atomic cesium. After a discussion of the uncertainties associated with the atomic physics calculations we derive conservative bounds for the weak charge Qsub(W). These bounds are used to put constraints on alternatives to the standard electroweak model, involving an 'extra U(1)' gauge group. We analyze the possibility that the extra gauge boson might be very light and give, as a by-product, the typical range of momentum transfer explored in atomic parity violation experiments.

  6. Ion microscopy based on laser-cooled cesium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viteau, M.; Reveillard, M.; Kime, L.; Rasser, B.; Sudraud, P. [Orsay Physics, TESCAN Orsay, 95 Avenue des Monts Auréliens – ZA Saint-Charles – 13710 Fuveau (France); Bruneau, Y.; Khalili, G.; Pillet, P.; Comparat, D. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, ENS Cachan, Bât. 505, 91405 Orsay (France); Guerri, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fioretti, A., E-mail: andrea.fioretti@ino.it [Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO-CNR, U.O.S. ”Adriano Gozzini”, via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia, CNISM, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Ciampini, D.; Allegrini, M.; Fuso, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO-CNR, U.O.S. ”Adriano Gozzini”, via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia, CNISM, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate a prototype of a Focused Ion Beam machine based on the ionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam and adapted for imaging and modifying different surfaces in the few-tens nanometer range. Efficient atomic ionization is obtained by laser promoting ground-state atoms into a target excited Rydberg state, then field-ionizing them in an electric field gradient. The method allows obtaining ion currents up to 130 pA. Comparison with the standard direct photo-ionization of the atomic beam shows, in our conditions, a 40-times larger ion yield. Preliminary imaging results at ion energies in the 1–5 keV range are obtained with a resolution around 40 nm, in the present version of the prototype. Our ion beam is expected to be extremely monochromatic, with an energy spread of the order of the eV, offering great prospects for lithography, imaging and surface analysis. - Highlights: • We realize a Focused Ion Beam with an ionic source based on laser cooled cesium atoms. • Ionization involves excitation of the laser cooled atoms to Rydberg states. • We use the cesium FIB system to image different materials. • We use the cesium FIB to produce permanent modifications on surfaces. • In the present configuration, the focused probe size of the cesium FIB prototype is about 300 nm for beam energies in the 2–5 keV range.

  7. PhysioSpace: relating gene expression experiments from heterogeneous sources using shared physiological processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lenz

    Full Text Available Relating expression signatures from different sources such as cell lines, in vitro cultures from primary cells and biopsy material is an important task in drug development and translational medicine as well as for tracking of cell fate and disease progression. Especially the comparison of large scale gene expression changes to tissue or cell type specific signatures is of high interest for the tracking of cell fate in (trans- differentiation experiments and for cancer research, which increasingly focuses on shared processes and the involvement of the microenvironment. These signature relation approaches require robust statistical methods to account for the high biological heterogeneity in clinical data and must cope with small sample sizes in lab experiments and common patterns of co-expression in ubiquitous cellular processes. We describe a novel method, called PhysioSpace, to position dynamics of time series data derived from cellular differentiation and disease progression in a genome-wide expression space. The PhysioSpace is defined by a compendium of publicly available gene expression signatures representing a large set of biological phenotypes. The mapping of gene expression changes onto the PhysioSpace leads to a robust ranking of physiologically relevant signatures, as rigorously evaluated via sample-label permutations. A spherical transformation of the data improves the performance, leading to stable results even in case of small sample sizes. Using PhysioSpace with clinical cancer datasets reveals that such data exhibits large heterogeneity in the number of significant signature associations. This behavior was closely associated with the classification endpoint and cancer type under consideration, indicating shared biological functionalities in disease associated processes. Even though the time series data of cell line differentiation exhibited responses in larger clusters covering several biologically related patterns, top scoring

  8. Orbit Determination Analysis for a Joint UK-Australian Space Surveillance Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, M.; Harwood, N.; Bennett, J.; Donnelly, P.; Ash, A.; Eastment, J.; Ladd, D.; Gordon, N.; Bessell, T.; Smith, C.; Ritchie, I.

    2014-09-01

    In February 2014 the UK and Australia carried out a joint space surveillance target tracking, cueing, and sensor data fusion experiment involving the STFC Chilbolton Observatory radar in the UK, the EOS laser-ranging system in Australia and a small telescope operated by DSTO, also in Australia. The experiment, coordinated by DSTL (UK) and DSTO (Aus), was designed to explore the combination of several different, geographically separated sensors for space situational awareness. The primary goal of the experiment was to use data from the radar in the UK to generate an orbital cue to the EOS SLR. A variety of targets sizes and orbits were chosen, under the limitations of observability by both the radar and EOS SLR, in order to explore the variation of cueing accuracy with amount of data incorporated and timeliness from generation. As a secondary objective the effect on cue accuracy of targets in lower orbital regimes was examined. This paper examines the orbit determination techniques used to generate cues from radar and the refined orbits resulting from accumulating SLR data. The construction of tracks using data from all three sensors is explored. Analysis of the accuracy of the orbital reconstructions is made based on comparisons with the measured data and accurate ephemerides provided by the ILRS. The accuracy is tested against the cueing precision requirements for each sensor. Two companion papers describe the experimental goals, execution and achievements (Harwood et. al.) and the sensor aspects of the experiment (Eastment et al.).

  9. Analysis of data obtained from the liquid metal diffusion experiments on the MIR space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhanzadeh, Morteza

    Recent liquid metal diffusion data obtained using the Canadian Microgravity Vibration Isolation Mount (MIM) onboard the MIR space station have led to the proposal that suppression of gjitter may change the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient from a square law to a linear dependence. On the basis of these results, it was further concluded that the long capillary diffusion experiments in space were sensitive to vibration at levels below the current ISS specification for ARIS isolated racks. A thorough reanalysis of the original data leads to two principal findings: (i) a linear temperaturedependence does not emerge when all available diffusion data obtained on MIR in the isolation mode are considered in the analysis. This finding suggests that the linear relation that has been claimed for a number of dilute alloy systems may simply arise because very limited numbers of data were considered for analysis for each system; (ii) the measured diffusion coefficients obtained with MIM operating in isolation mode are widely scattered and the diffusion coefficient values are not consistently below the corresponding data obtained with MIM operating in non-isolated or driven modes. These facts suggest there is an uncontrolled source of experiment variation that is much stronger than the innate effect of g-jitter on the experiments. On the basis of these new findings, it is proposed that the results from the liquid metal diffusion experiments conducted on MIR do not support the conclusions drawn.

  10. Design and Implementation of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment on Space Shuttle Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, Theodoros A.; Micklos, Ann

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to better the understanding of high speed aerodynamics, a series of flight experiments were installed on Space Shuttle Discovery during the STS-119 and STS-128 missions. This experiment, known as the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLTFE), provided the technical community with actual entry flight data from a known height protuberance at Mach numbers at and above Mach 15. Any such data above Mach 15 is irreproducible in a laboratory setting. Years of effort have been invested in obtaining this valuable data, and many obstacles had to be overcome in order to ensure the success of implementing an Orbiter modification. Many Space Shuttle systems were involved in the installation of appropriate components that revealed 'concurrent engineering' was a key integration tool. This allowed the coordination of all various parts and pieces which had to be sequenced appropriately and installed at the right time. Several issues encountered include Orbiter configuration and access, design requirements versus current layout, implementing the modification versus typical processing timelines, and optimizing the engineering design cycles and changes. Open lines of communication within the entire modification team were essential to project success as the team was spread out across the United States, from NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida, to NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas, to Boeing Huntington Beach, California among others. The forum permits the discussion of processing concerns from the design phase to the implementation phase, which eventually saw the successful flights and data acquisition on STS-119 in March 2009 and on STS-128 in September 2009.

  11. The effect of organic amendment on mobility of cesium in tropical soils - The effect of organic amendment on sorption mechanisms for cesium and cobalt in tropical soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, M.A.V.; Santos-Oliveira, R. [Instituto de Engenharia nuclear/CNEN. Rua Helio de Almeida, 75. Cidade Universitaria - Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ. CEP 21941-906 (Brazil); Garcia, R.J.L.; Ferreira, A.C.M.; Rochedo, E.R.R.; Sobrinho, G.A.N. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria/CNEN. Av. Salvador Allende s /no. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. CEP: 22780-160 (Brazil); Perez, D.V. [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Solos/EMBRAPA. R. Jardim Botanico, 1024.Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP: 22460-000 (Brazil); Wasserman, J.C. [dUFF Network of Environment and Sustainable Development (REMADS-UFF), University Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in the sorption of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co as a function of the physico-chemical properties of some types of Brazilian soils and the changes on the behavior of these radionuclides due to changes in soil properties promoted by organic amendment. The experimental study was conducted in a controlled area, where pots containing different types of soils (Ferralsol, Nitisol and Histosol) and different doses of organic amendment (no amendment; 2 kg.m{sup -2} and 4 kg.m{sup -2}) were spiked with {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co. The organic amendment used in this experiment was obtained in the Unit of Compost of the Organic Material of Pinheiral (RJ, Brazil), where the compost is made up from the leaves swept from the streets of the Pinheiral city. The mobility of these radionuclides in the soil was assessed through sequential chemical extraction and desorption studies as a function of pH. The bioavailability was evaluated through the effective absorption of radionuclide by root crops (Raphanus sativus, L). This study evidenced that the organic amendment plays an important role in the desorption processes of cobalt and cesium, reducing desorption of both nuclides beneath higher organic amendment dose. This behavior was observed in acid conditions as well in alkaline. However extreme acid conditions may mobilize both radionuclides, although cobalt mobility was shown to be more sensitive to low pH than cesium. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of Airborne Precision Spacing in a Human-in-the-Loop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.

    2005-01-01

    A significant bottleneck in the current air traffic system occurs at the runway. Expanding airports and adding new runways will help solve this problem; however, this comes with significant costs: financially, politically and environmentally. A complementary solution is to safely increase the capacity of current runways. This can be achieved by precisely spacing aircraft at the runway threshold, with a resulting reduction in the spacing bu er required under today s operations. At NASA's Langley Research Center, the Airspace Systems program has been investigating airborne technologies and procedures that will assist the flight crew in achieving precise spacing behind another aircraft. A new spacing clearance allows the pilot to follow speed cues from a new on-board guidance system called Airborne Merging and Spacing for Terminal Arrivals (AMSTAR). AMSTAR receives Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) reports from an assigned, leading aircraft and calculates the appropriate speed for the ownship to fly to achieve the desired spacing interval, time- or distance-based, at the runway threshold. Since the goal is overall system capacity, the speed guidance algorithm is designed to provide system-wide benefits and stability to a string of arriving aircraft. An experiment was recently performed at the NASA Langley Air Traffic Operations Laboratory (ATOL) to test the flexibility of Airborne Precision Spacing operations under a variety of operational conditions. These included several types of merge and approach geometries along with the complementary merging and in-trail operations. Twelve airline pilots and four controllers participated in this simulation. Performance and questionnaire data were collected from a total of eighty-four individual arrivals. The pilots were able to achieve precise spacing with a mean error of 0.5 seconds and a standard deviation of 4.7 seconds. No statistically significant di erences in spacing performance were found between in

  13. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  14. Applications of cesium in the perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fengjun; Yang, Wenqiang; Luo, Deying; Zhu, Rui; Gong, Qihuang

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells have experienced an unprecedented rapid development in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) during the past 7 years, and the record PCE has been already comparable to the traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Presently, it is more urgent to address the challenge on device stability for the future commercial application. Recently, the inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite has been intensively studied as one of the alternative candidates to improve device stability through controlling the phase transition. The cesium (Cs)-doped perovskites show more superior stability comparing with organic methylammonium (MA) lead halide perovskite or formamidinium (FA) lead halide perovskite. Here, recent progress of the inorganic cesium application in organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells (PSCs) is highlighted from the viewpoints of the device efficiency and the device stability. Project supported by the 973 Program of China (No. 2015CB932203), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61377025, 91433203), and the Young 1000 Talents Global Recruitment Program of China.

  15. Controllable evaporation of cesium from a dispenser oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, U.; Friedl, R.; Fröschle, M.

    2012-12-01

    This instrument allows controlled evaporation of the alkali metal cesium over a wide range of evaporation rates. The oven has three unique features. The first is an alkali metal reservoir that uses a dispenser as a cesium source. The heating current of the dispenser controls the evaporation rate allowing generation of an adjustable and stable flow of pure cesium. The second is a blocking valve, which is fully metallic as is the body of the oven. This construction both reduces contamination of the dispenser and enables the oven to be operated up to 300 °C, with only small temperature variations (metal at a cold spot is significantly hindered. The last feature is an integral surface ionization detector for measuring and controlling the evaporation rate. The dispenser oven can be easily transferred to the other alkali-metals.

  16. Dating of mine waste in lacustrine sediments using cesium-137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rember, W. C.; Erdman, T. W.; Hoffmann, M. L.; Chamberlain, V. E.; Sprenke, K. F.

    1993-11-01

    For over a century Medicine Lake in northern Idaho has received heavy-metal-laden tailings from the Coeur d'Alene mining district. Establishing the depositional chronology of the lake bottom sediments provides information on the source and rate of deposition of the tailings. Cesium-137, an isotope produced in the atmosphere by nuclear bomb tests, was virtually absent in the environment prior to 1951, but reached its apex in 1964. Our analysis of cesium-137 in the sediments of Medicine Lake revealed that 14 cm of fine-grained tailings were deposited in the lake from 1951 to 1964 and tailing deposition downstream was greatly reduced by the installation of tailings dams in the district in 1968. Cesium-137 analysis is accomplished by a fairly simple gamma-ray counting technique and should be a valuable tool for analyzing sedimentation in any lacustrine environment that was active during the 1950s and 1960s.

  17. Variable Coding and Modulation Experiment Using NASA's Space Communication and Navigation Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Joseph A.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Evans, Michael A.; Tollis, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Space Communication and Navigation Testbed on the International Space Station provides a unique opportunity to evaluate advanced communication techniques in an operational system. The experimental nature of the Testbed allows for rapid demonstrations while using flight hardware in a deployed system within NASA's networks. One example is variable coding and modulation, which is a method to increase data-throughput in a communication link. This paper describes recent flight testing with variable coding and modulation over S-band using a direct-to-earth link between the SCaN Testbed and the Glenn Research Center. The testing leverages the established Digital Video Broadcasting Second Generation (DVB-S2) standard to provide various modulation and coding options. The experiment was conducted in a challenging environment due to the multipath and shadowing caused by the International Space Station structure. Performance of the variable coding and modulation system is evaluated and compared to the capacity of the link, as well as standard NASA waveforms.

  18. The LTP Experiment on LISA Pathfinder: Operational Definition of TT Gauge in Space

    CERN Document Server

    Armano, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are planning the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission in order to detect GW. The need of accurate testing of free-fall and knowledge of noise in a space environment similar to LISA's is considered mandatory a pre-phase for the project. Therefore the LISA Pathfinder mission has been designed by ESA to fly the LISA Technology Package (LTP), aiming at testing free-fall by measuring the residual acceleration between two test-bodies in the dynamical scheme we address as "drag-free". The spectral map of the residual acceleration as function of frequency will convey information on the local noise level, thus producing a picture of the environmental working conditions for LISA itself. The thesis contains abundant material on the problem of compensating static gravity, the development of a theory of orthogonalization of reference and cross-talk for the LTP experiment. The construction of the laser detection proced...

  19. Cesium in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.; Bauer, L.R.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

    1992-03-01

    Cesium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fourth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium, iodine, and uranium. Documents on plutonium, strontium, carbon, and technetium will be published in the future. These are dynamic documents and current plans call for revising and updating each one on a two-year schedule.Radiocesium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Radiocesium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. Several hundred curies of [sup 137]Cs was released into streams in the late 50s and 60s from leaking fuel elements. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 1400 Ci of [sup 137]Cs was released to seepage basins where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A much smaller quantity, about four Ci. was released to the atmosphere. Radiocesium concentration and mechanisms for atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 033 mrem (atmospheric) and 60 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Isotope [sup 137]Cs releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

  20. Cesium in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.; Bauer, L.R.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

    1992-03-01

    Cesium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fourth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium, iodine, and uranium. Documents on plutonium, strontium, carbon, and technetium will be published in the future. These are dynamic documents and current plans call for revising and updating each one on a two-year schedule.Radiocesium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Radiocesium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. Several hundred curies of {sup 137}Cs was released into streams in the late 50s and 60s from leaking fuel elements. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 1400 Ci of {sup 137}Cs was released to seepage basins where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A much smaller quantity, about four Ci. was released to the atmosphere. Radiocesium concentration and mechanisms for atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 033 mrem (atmospheric) and 60 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Isotope {sup 137}Cs releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

  1. Experiments in advanced control concepts for space robotics - An overview of the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollars, M. G.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Alexander, H. L.; Morse, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford University Aerospace Robotics Laboratory is actively developing and experimentally testing advanced robot control strategies for space robotic applications. Early experiments focused on control of very lightweight one-link manipulators and other flexible structures. The results are being extended to position and force control of mini-manipulators attached to flexible manipulators and multilink manipulators with flexible drive trains. Experimental results show that end-point sensing and careful dynamic modeling or adaptive control are key to the success of these control strategies. Free-flying space robot simulators that operate on an air cushion table have been built to test control strategies in which the dynamics of the base of the robot and the payload are important.

  2. Ignition of beam plasma discharge in the electron beam experiment in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1985-01-01

    An ignition of beam plasma discharge (BPD) in space was observed in a neutral gas-electron beam interaction experiment by Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 in 1983. An electron beam of 8 kV 100 mA was injected into a high dense nitrogen gas cloud of 10 to the 23rd molecules which was released during 100 msec from the Orbiter. The appearance of the beam and its surroundings observed by a low-light-level TV camera showed a local ignition of the beam plasma discharge in the gas cloud. The enhanced plasma production, generation of auroral emission, and associated wave emission were also detected by onboard diagnostic instruments.

  3. Coronagraphic demonstration experiment using aluminum mirrors for space infrared astronomical observations

    CERN Document Server

    Oseki, Shinji; Ishihara, Daisuke; Enya, Keigo; Haze, Kanae; Kotani, Takayuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nishiyama, Miho; Abe, Lyu; Yamamuro, Tomoyasu

    2015-01-01

    For future space infrared astronomical coronagraphy, we perform experimental studies on the application of aluminum mirrors to a coronagraph. Cooled reflective optics is required for broad-band mid-infrared observations in space, while high-precision optics is required for coronagraphy. For the coronagraph instrument originally proposed for the next-generation infrared astronomical satellite project SPICA (SCI: SPICA Coronagraph Instrument), we fabricated and evaluated the optics consisting of high-precision aluminum off-axis mirrors with diamond-turned surfaces, and conducted a coronagraphic demonstration experiment using the optics with a coronagraph mask. We first measured the wave front errors (WFEs) of the aluminum mirrors with a He-Ne Fizeau interferometer to confirm that the power spectral densities of the WFEs satisfy the SCI requirements. Then we integrated the mirrors into an optical system and evaluated the overall performance of the system. As a result, we estimate the total WFE of the optics to b...

  4. Near minimum-time maneuvers of the advanced space structures technology research experiment (ASTREX) test article: Theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadali, Srinivas R.; Carter, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory at the Edwards Air Force Base has developed the Advanced Space Structures Technology Research Experiment (ASTREX) facility to serve as a testbed for demonstrating the applicability of proven theories to the challenges of spacecraft maneuvers and structural control. This report describes the work performed on the ASTREX test article by Texas A&M University under contract NAS119373 as a part of the Control-Structure Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator Program. The focus of this work is on maneuvering the ASTREX test article with compressed air thrusters that can be throttled, while attenuating structural excitation. The theoretical foundation for designing the near minimum-time thrust commands is based on the generation of smooth, parameterized optimal open-loop control profiles, and the determination of control laws for final position regulation and tracking using Lyapunov stability theory. Details of the theory, mathematical modeling, model updating, and compensation for the presence of 'real world' effects are described and the experimental results are presented. The results show an excellent match between theory and experiments.

  5. A Hardware and Software Perspective of the Fifth Materials on the International Space Station Experiment (MISSE-5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowski, Michael; Greer, Lawrence; Flatico, Joseph; Jenkins, Phillip; Spina, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Conducting space experiments with small budgets is a fact of life for many design groups with low-visibility science programs. One major consequence is that specialized space grade electronic components are often too costly to incorporate into the design. Radiation mitigation now becomes more complex as a result of being restricted to the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts. Unique hardware and software design techniques are required to succeed in producing a viable instrument suited for use in space. This paper highlights some of the design challenges and associated solutions encountered in the production of a highly capable, low cost space experiment package.

  6. Calocube—A highly segmented calorimeter for a space based experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Alessandro, R., E-mail: candi@fi.infn.it [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); INFN Firenze, via B. Rossi 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Adriani, O. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); INFN Firenze, via B. Rossi 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Agnesi, A. [University of Pavia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' Informazione, Pavia (Italy); INFN Pavia, via A. Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Albergo, S. [University of Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [University of Messina, Department of Physics, sal. Sperone 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy); INFN Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Basti, A. [University of Siena, Department of Physical Sciences, Earth and Environment, I-53100 Siena (Italy); INFN Pisa, via F. Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Berti, E. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); INFN Firenze, via B. Rossi 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Bigongiari, G. [University of Siena, Department of Physical Sciences, Earth and Environment, I-53100 Siena (Italy); INFN Pisa, via F. Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bonechi, L. [INFN Firenze, via B. Rossi 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Bonechi, S. [University of Siena, Department of Physical Sciences, Earth and Environment, I-53100 Siena (Italy); INFN Pisa, via F. Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bongi, M. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); INFN Firenze, via B. Rossi 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [INFN Trieste, via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2016-07-11

    Future research in High Energy Cosmic Ray Physics concerns fundamental questions on their origin, acceleration mechanism, and composition. Unambiguous measurements of the energy spectra and of the composition of cosmic rays at the “knee” region could provide some of the answers to the above questions. Only ground based observations, which rely on sophisticated models describing high energy interactions in the earth's atmosphere, have been possible so far due to the extremely low particle rates at these energies. A calorimeter based space experiment can provide not only flux measurements but also energy spectra and particle identification, especially when coupled to a dE/dx measuring detector, and thus overcome some of the limitations plaguing ground based experiments. For this to be possible very large acceptances are needed if enough statistic is to be collected in a reasonable time. This contrasts with the lightness and compactness requirements for space based experiments. A novel idea in calorimetry is discussed here which addresses these issues while limiting the mass and volume of the detector. In fact a small prototype is currently being built and tested with ions. In this paper the results obtained will be presented in light of the simulations performed.

  7. CAFS: A Cesium Atomic Frequency Standard for GPS block IIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnia, Jeffry A.

    1993-01-01

    Kernco, Inc. was selected to design the Cesium Atomic Frequency Standards (CAFS) for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These spacecraft are scheduled to be launched in the mid-1990's to replenish and upgrade the existing constellation of Global Positioning System satellites. The Block IIR CAFS output frequency is 13.4003378 MHz, the 686th submultiple of the cesium atomic resonance frequency. Using an integer submultiple simplifies the design of the atomic frequency standard's rf multiplier circuits, eliminating the secondary frequency synthesizer needed in previous designs. The GPS Block IIR CAFS design, particularly the improvements made on our earlier Block II design is described. Test results are included.

  8. Genotoxicity Testing on the International Space Station: Preparatory Work on the Experiment TRIPLE-LUX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojicic, N.; Walrafen, D.; Rabbow, E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Rettberg, P.; Weisshaar, M. P.; Horneck, G.

    Harmful environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to influence future manned space missions. The Radiation Biology Unit at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of recognizing DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such a bioassay is the SWITCH test, which is part of the German space experiment ``Gene, immune and cellular responses to single and combined space flight conditions'' (TRIPLE-LUX) which has been selected by NASA to be performed on the International Space Station. It will supply basic information on the genotoxic response to radiation applied in microgravity. The biological end-point under investigation will depend on the bacterial SOS response brought about by genetically modified bacteria that are transformed with the pSWITCH plasmid (constructed from the plasmids pPLS-1 and pGFPuv). This luminescent/fluorescent bioassay for rapid toxicity (genotoxicity and cytotoxicity) testing, the SWITCH test (SWITCH: {S}almonella {W}eighting of {I}nduced {T}oxicity {C}yto/GenoTox for Human {H}ealth), makes use of two sensing and reporting systems for the two biological endpoints under investigation: the SOS-Lux test and the LAC-Fluoro test. The SWICH plasmid carries the promoterless lux operon of Photobacterium leiognathi as reporter element under the control of the DNA-damage dependent SOS promoter of ColD as sensor element (for genotoxicity testing) and the sequences for a hybrid protein consisting of ß-galactosidase and GFPuv of Aequorea victoria as reporter element under the control of the (in Salmonella constitutively active) LAC promoter of Escherichia coli as sensor element (for cytotoxicity testing). The system has worked properly for terrestrial applications during the first experiments. Experiments using X-rays and UV radiation of various qualities (from UVC to UVA) have given insights into cellular mechanisms

  9. Trends in Performance and Characteristics of Ultra-Stable Oscillators for Deep Space Radio Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, Sami

    1997-01-01

    Telecommunication systems of spacecraft on deep space missions also function as instruments for Radio Science experiments. Radio scientists utilize the telecommunication links between spacecraft and Earth to examine very small changes in the phase/frequency, amplitude, and/or polarization of radio signals to investigate a host of physical phenomena in the solar system. Several missions augmented the radio communication system with an Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) in order to provide a highly stable reference signal for oneway downlink. This configuration is used in order to enable better investigations of the atmospheres of the planets occulting the line-of-sight to the spacecraft; one-way communication was required and the transponders' built-in auxiliary oscillators were neither sufficiently stable nor spectrally pure for the occultation experiments. Since Radio Science instrumentation is distributed between the spacecraft and the ground stations, the Deep Space Network (DSN) is also equipped to function as a world-class instrument for Radio Science research. For a detailed account of Radio Science experiments, methodology, key discoveries, and the DSN's historical contribution to the field, see Asmar and Renzetti (1993). The tools of Radio Science can be and have also been utilized in addressing several mission engineering challenges; e.g., characterization of spacecraft nutation and anomalous motion, antenna calibrations, and communications during surface landing phases. Since the first quartz USO was flown on Voyager, the technology has advanced significantly, affording future missions higher sensitivity in reconstructing the temperature pressure profiles of the atmospheres under study as well as other physical phenomena of interest to Radio Science. This paper surveys the trends in stability and spectral purity performance, design characteristics including size and mass, as well as cost and history of these clocks in space.

  10. A space standards application to university-class microsatellites: The UNISAT experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Filippo; Piergentili, Fabrizio; Santoni, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    Hands-on education is recognized as an invaluable tool to improve students' skills, to stimulate their enthusiasm and to educate them to teamwork. University class satellite programs should be developed keeping in mind that education is the main goal and that university satellites are a unique opportunity to make involved students familiar with all the phases of space missions. Moreover university budgets for education programs are much lower than for industrial satellites programs. Therefore two main constraints must be respected: a time schedule fitting with the student course duration and a low economic budget. These have an impact on the standard which can be followed in university class satellite programs. In this paper university-class satellite standardization is discussed on the basis of UNISAT program experience, reporting successful project achievements and lessons learned through unsuccessful experiences. The UNISAT program was established at the Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale by the Group of Astrodynamics of the University of Rome "La Sapienza" (GAUSS) as a research and education program in which Ph.D. and graduate students have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience on small space missions. Four university satellites (UNISAT, UNISAT-2, UNISAT-3, UNISAT-4), weighing about 10 kg, have been designed, manufactured, tested and launched every two years since 2000 in the framework of this program In the paper, after a brief overview of new GAUSS programs, an analysis of the UNISAT satellites ground test campaign is carried out, identifying the most critical procedures and requirements to be fulfilled. Moreover a device for low earth orbit low-cost satellite end-of-life disposal is presented; this system (SIRDARIA) complies with the international guidelines on space debris.

  11. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) on the International Space Station (ISS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Gasbarre, Joseph; Eckman, Richard; Topiwala, Nandkishore; Rodriquez-Alvarez, Otilia; Cheek, Dianne; Hall, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will provide the science community with high-vertical resolution and nearly global observations of ozone, aerosols, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, and other trace gas species in the stratosphere and upper-troposphere. SAGE III/ISS measurements will extend the long-term Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) and SAGE data record begun in the 1970s. The multi-decadal SAGE ozone and aerosol data sets have undergone intense scrutiny and are considered the international standard for accuracy and stability. SAGE data have been used to monitor the effectiveness of the Montreal Protocol. Key objectives of the mission are to assess the state of the recovery in the distribution of ozone, to re-establish the aerosol measurements needed by both climate and ozone models, and to gain further insight into key processes contributing to ozone and aerosol variability. The space station mid-inclination orbit allows for a large range in latitude sampling and nearly continuous communications with payloads. The SAGE III instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring atmospheric constituents with high vertical resolution. The SAGE III instrument is a moderate resolution spectrometer covering wavelengths from 290 nm to 1550 nm. Science data is collected in solar occultation mode, lunar occultation mode, and limb scatter measurement mode. A SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle will provide access to space. Mounted in the unpressurized section of the Dragon trunk, SAGE III will be robotically removed from the Dragon and installed on the space station. SAGE III/ISS will be mounted to the ExPRESS Logistics Carrier-4 (ELC-4) location on the starboard side of the station. To facilitate a nadir view from this location, a Nadir Viewing Platform (NVP) payload was developed which mounts between the carrier and the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP).

  12. The AFP-675 Far Ultraviolet Cameras experiment - Observations of the far-UV space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, George R.; Morrill, Jeff S.; Dohne, Brian C.; Christensen, Susan A.

    1993-01-01

    The NRL's Far UV Cameras experiment flew aboard the Shuttle Orbiter on STS-39, in 1991: obtaining 105-200 nm measurements of the upper atmosphere, astronomical targets, and the Shuttle environment. Attention is presently given to observations of O2 density vs altitude in the nighttime atmosphere, the nocturnal ionosphere, Space Shuttle FUV glow, and photometry for both the stars and diffuse sources of 12 star fields at high and low galactic latitudes. The first FUV observations of the extended region of reflection nebulosity in Scorpius are included.

  13. Environmental control and life support systems analysis for a Space Station life sciences animal experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Kenneth T.; Hall, John B., Jr.; Thompson, Clifford D.

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Langley and Goddard facilities have evaluated the effects of animal science experiments on the Space Station's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) by means of computer-aided analysis, assuming an animal colony consisting of 96 rodents and eight squirrel monkeys. Thirteen ECLSS options were established for the reclamation of metabolic oxygen and waste water. Minimum cost and weight impacts on the ECLSS are found to accrue to the system's operation in off-nominal mode, using electrochemical CO2 removal and a static feed electrolyzer for O2 generation.

  14. Testing the effects of gravity and motion on quantum entanglement in space-based experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bruschi, David Edward; White, Angela; Baccetti, Valentina; Oi, Daniel K L; Fuentes, Ivette

    2013-01-01

    We propose an experiment to test the effects of gravity and acceleration on quantum entanglement in space-based setups. We show that the entanglement between transverse excitations of two Bose-Einstein condensates is degraded after one of them undergoes a change in the gravitational field strength. This prediction can be tested if the condensates are initially entangled in two separate satellites while being in the same orbit and then one of them moves to a different orbit. We show that the effect is observable in a typical orbital manoeuvre of nanosatellites like CanX4 and CanX5.

  15. Potential for EMU Fabric Damage by Electron Beam and Molten Metal During Space Welding for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1998-01-01

    As a consequence of preparations concerning the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), studies were performed to better understand the effect of molten metal contact and electron beam impingement with various fabrics for space suit applications. The question arose as to what would occur if the electron beam from the Ukrainian Universal Hand Tool (UHT) designed for welding in space were to impinge upon a piece of Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The expectation was that the electron beam would lay down a static charge pattern with no damage to the ceramic fabric. The electron beam is capable of spraying the fabric with enough negative charge to repel further electrons from the fabric before significant heating occurs. The static charge pattern would deflect any further charge accumulation except for a small initial amount of leakage to the grounded surface of the welder. However, when studies were made of the effect of the electron beam on the insulating ceramic fabric it was surprisingly found that the electron beam did indeed burn through the ceramic fabric. It was also found that the shorter electron beam standoff distances had longer burnthrough times than did some greater electron beam standoff distances. A possible explanation for the longer burnthrough times for the small electron beam standoff distance would be outgassing of the fabric which caused the electron beam hand-tool to cycle on and off to provide some protection for the cathodes. The electron beam hand tool was observed to cycle off at the short standoff distance of two inches likely due to vapors being outgassed. During the electron beam welding process there is an electron leakage, or current leakage, flow from the fabric. A static charge pattern is initially laid down by the electron beam current flow. The static charge makes up the current leakage flow which initially slightly heats up the fabric. The initially laid down surface charge leaks a

  16. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu; Shin, Ryoung

    2015-03-01

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs+) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs+ uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs+, chemical library screening was performed using Arabidopsis. Of 10,000 chemicals tested, five compounds were confirmed as Cs+ tolerance enhancers. Further investigation and quantum mechanical modelling revealed that one of these compounds reduced Cs+ concentrations in plants and that the imidazole moiety of this compound bound specifically to Cs+. Analysis of the analogous compounds indicated that the structure of the identified compound is important for the effect to be conferred. Taken together, Cs+ tolerance enhancer isolated here renders plants tolerant to Cs+ by inhibiting Cs+ entry into roots via specific binding to the ion thus, for instance, providing a basis for phytostabilisation of radiocesium-contaminated farmland.

  17. An Innovation Teaching Experience Following Guidelines of European Space of Higher Education in the Interactive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, M.; Rodríguez, M. L.; Ramos-Ridao, A. F.; Pasadas, M.; Priego, I.

    The Area of Environmental Technology in Department of Civil Engineering has developed an innovation education project, entitled Application of new Information and Communication Technologies in Area of Environmental Technology teaching, to create a Web site that benefits both parties concerned in teaching-learning process, teachers and students. Here teachers conduct a supervised teaching and students have necessary resources to guide their learning process according to their capacities and possibilities. The project has also included a pilot experience to introduce European Space of Higher Education (ESHE) new teaching concept based on student's work, in one subject of Environmental Science degree, considering interactive learning complementary to presence teaching. The experience has showed strength and weakness of the method and it is the beginning in a gradual process to guide e-learning education in future.

  18. The relative benefits of green versus lean office space: three field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, Marlon; Knight, Craig; Postmes, Tom; Haslam, S Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Principles of lean office management increasingly call for space to be stripped of extraneous decorations so that it can flexibly accommodate changing numbers of people and different office functions within the same area. Yet this practice is at odds with evidence that office workers' quality of life can be enriched by office landscaping that involves the use of plants that have no formal work-related function. To examine the impact of these competing approaches, 3 field experiments were conducted in large commercial offices in The Netherlands and the U.K. These examined the impact of lean and "green" offices on subjective perceptions of air quality, concentration, and workplace satisfaction as well as objective measures of productivity. Two studies were longitudinal, examining effects of interventions over subsequent weeks and months. In all 3 experiments enhanced outcomes were observed when offices were enriched by plants. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  19. International Space Station Attitude Control and Energy Storage Experiment: Effects of Flywheel Torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    1999-01-01

    The Attitude Control and Energy Storage Experiment is currently under development for the International Space Station; two counter-rotating flywheels will be levitated with magnetic bearings and placed in vacuum housings. The primary objective of the experiment is to store and discharge energy, in combination with existing batteries, into the electrical power system. The secondary objective is to use the flywheels to exert torque on the Station; a simple torque profile has been designed so that the Station's Control Moment Gyroscopes will be assisted in maintaining torque equilibrium attitude. Two energy storage contingencies could result in the inadvertent application of torque by the flywheels to the Station: an emergency shutdown of one flywheel rotor while the other remains spinning, and energy storage with only one rotor instead of the counterrotating pair. Analysis of these two contingencies shows that attitude control and the microgravity environment will not be adversely affected.

  20. Experimental contamination of pink shrimps by caesium 137; Contamination experimentale de crevettes roses par le cesium 137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancellin, J.; Michon, G.; Vilquin, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The authors describe first of all the technique used for the determination of cesium 137 concentration factors in the pink shrimp (Leander Serratus Pennant). Experiments over three months have shown that the specific activity of the shrimps becomes stable between the thirtieth and the fortieth day. The concentration factors then have values between 30 and 40. These results are similar to those obtained by other authors. (authors) [French] Les auteurs decrivent tout d'abord la technique utilisee pour la determination des facteurs de concentration du Cesium 137 chez la crevette rose (Leander Serratus Pennant). Le resultat des experimentations menees pendant trois mois montre que l'activite specifique des crevettes se stabilise entre le trentieme et le quarantieme jour. Les facteurs de concentration se situent alors entre 30 et 40, Ces donnees sont comparables a celles obtenues par d'autres auteurs. (auteur)

  1. Fluid Physical and Transport Phenomena Studies aboard the International Space Station: Planned Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments planned for the International Spare Station. NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Science and Applications has established a world-class research program in fluid physics and transport phenomena. This program combines the vast expertise of the world research community with NASA's unique microgravity facilities with the objectives of gaining new insight into fluid phenomena by removing the confounding effect of gravity. Due to its criticality to many terrestrial and space-based processes and phenomena, fluid physics and transport phenomena play a central role in the NASA's Microgravity Program. Through widely publicized research announcement and well established peer-reviews, the program has been able to attract a number of world-class researchers and acquired a critical mass of investigations that is now adding rapidly to this field. Currently there arc a total of 106 ground-based and 20 candidate flight principal investigators conducting research in four major thrust areas in the program: complex flows, multiphase flow and phase change, interfacial phenomena, and dynamics and instabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) to be launched in 1998, provides the microgravity research community with a unprecedented opportunity to conduct long-duration microgravity experiments which can be controlled and operated from the Principal Investigators' own laboratory. Frequent planned shuttle flights to the Station will provide opportunities to conduct many more experiments than were previously possible. NASA Lewis Research Center is in the process of designing a Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) to be located in the Laboratory Module of the ISS that will not only accommodate multiple users but, allow a broad range of fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments to be conducted in a cost effective manner.

  2. Experimental approaches to assessing the impact of a cesium chloride radiological dispersal device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Gibb, Snyder E.; Barzyk, J.; McGee, J.; Koenig, A.

    2008-01-01

    The US EPA, as a part of the Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI) project team, is currently working to assess the impacts of an urban radiological dispersion device (RDD) and to develop containment and decontamination strategies. Three efforts in this area are currently underway: development of a laboratory-scale cesium chloride deposition method to mimic a RDD; assessment of cesium (Cs) penetration depth and pathways in urban materials using two dimensional (2-D) mapping laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS); and experimental determination of distribution coefficients (kd) for Cs in water-building material systems. It is critical that, when performing laboratory-scale experiments to assess the fate of Cs from an RDD, the Cs particle deposition method mimics the RDD deposition. Once Cs particles are deposited onto urban surfaces, 2-D mapping of Cs concentrations using LA-ICP-MS is a critical tool for determining Cs transport pathways through these materials. Lastly, distribution coefficients are critical for understanding the transport of Cs in urban settings when direct measurements of its penetration depth are unavailable. An assessment of the newly developed deposition method along with preliminary results from the penetration experiments are presented in this paper.

  3. AMS experiment embarks on first leg of mission into space Geneva, 12 February 2010.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2010-01-01

    Geneva, 12 February 2010. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) left CERN1 this morning on the first leg of its journey to the International Space Station (ISS). A special convoy carrying the experiment is due to arrive at the European Space Agency's research and technology centre, ESTEC, at Noordwijk in the Netherlands in six days time. Once there, the detector will undergo testing of its ability to survive a shuttle lift-off and to operate in space. Twenty members of the AMS collaboration will accompany the detector on its journey. Construction of the AMS detector components was carried out by an international team with significant contributions from CERN Member States France, Germany, Italy, Portugal Spain and Switzerland, as well as China, China (Taipei) and the USA. Assembly was carried out at CERN with help from the Laboratory’s engineering services. From 4 February until Tuesday morning, the detector was put through its paces using a test beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron accelerator. This was t...

  4. Designing new collaborative learning spaces in clinical environments: experiences from a children's hospital in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bines, Julie E; Jamieson, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Hospitals are complex places that provide a rich learning environment for students, staff, patients and their families, professional groups and the community. The "new" Royal Children's Hospital opened in late 2011. Its mission is focused on improving health and well-being of children and adolescents through leadership in healthcare, research and education. Addressing the need to create "responsive learning environments" aligned with the shift to student-centred pedagogy, two distinct learning environments were developed within the new Royal Children's Hospital; (i) a dedicated education precinct providing a suite of physical environments to promote a more active, collaborative and social learning experience for education and training programs conducted on the Royal Children's Hospital campus and (ii) a suite of learning spaces embedded within clinical areas so that learning becomes an integral part of the daily activities of this busy Hospital environment. The aim of this article is to present the overarching educational principles that lead the design of these learning spaces and describe the opportunities and obstacles encountered in the development of collaborative learning spaces within a large hospital development.

  5. X-ray experiments for Space applications in intermediate energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, Vipin K; Nandi, Anuj; Palit, Sourav

    2009-01-01

    X-ray experiments in the intermediate energy range (1-50 keV) are carried out at the Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP), Kolkata for space application. The purpose is to carry out developmental studies of space instruments to observe energetic phenomena from compact objects (black hole and compact stars) and active stars and their testing and evaluation. The testing/evaluation setup primarily consists of an X-ray generator, various X-ray imaging masks, an X-ray imager (CMOS) and an X-ray spectrometer (Si-PIN photo-diode). The X-ray generator (Mo target) operates in 1-50 kV anode voltage, and 1-30 mA beam current. A 45 feet long shielded collimator is used to collimate the beam which leads to the detector chamber having a 30 arc-sec angular diameter. Two types of imaging masks are used - conventional Coded Aperture Masks (CAM) and Tungsten Fresnel half-period zone-plates (ZPs) having angular resolutions of a few tens of arc-sec. The Moire fringe pattern produced by the composite shadows of two ZPs is inver...

  6. NASA's Rodent Research Project: Validation of Capabilities for Conducting Long Duration Experiments in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungshin Y.; Cole, Nicolas; Reyes, America; Lai, San-Huei; Klotz, Rebecca; Beegle, Janet E.; Wigley, Cecilia L.; Pletcher, David; Globus, Ruth K.

    2015-01-01

    Research using rodents is an essential tool for advancing biomedical research on Earth and in space. Prior rodent experiments on the Shuttle were limited by the short flight duration. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a new platform for conducting rodent experiments under long duration conditions. Rodent Research (RR)-1 was conducted to validate flight hardware, operations, and science capabilities that were developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. Twenty C57BL6J adult female mice were launched on Sept 21, 2014 in a Dragon Capsule (SpaceX-4), then transferred to the ISS for a total time of 21-22 days (10 commercial mice) or 37 days (10 validation mice). Tissues collected on-orbit were either rapidly frozen or preserved in RNAlater at -80C (n2group) until their return to Earth. Remaining carcasses on-orbit were rapidly frozen for dissection post-flight. The three controls groups at Kennedy Space Center consisted of: Basal mice euthanized at the time of launch, Vivarium controls housed in standard cages, and Ground Controls (GC) housed in flight hardware within an environmental chamber. Upon return to Earth, there were no differences in body weights between Flight (FLT) and GC at the end of the 37 days in space. Liver enzyme activity levels of FLT mice and all control mice were similar in magnitude to those of the samples that were processed under optimal conditions in the laboratory. Liver samples dissected on-orbit yielded high quality RNA (RIN8.99+-0.59, n7). Liver samples dissected post-flight from the intact, frozen FLT carcasses yielded RIN of 7.27 +- 0.52 (n6). Additionally, wet weights of various tissues were measured. Adrenal glands and spleen showed no significant differences in FLT compared to GC although thymus and livers weights were significantly greater in FLT compared to GC. Over 3,000 tissue aliquots collected post-flight from the four groups of mice were deposited into the Ames Life Science Data Archives for future Biospecimen

  7. The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment: A successful student-run scientific spacecraft mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Q.; Li, X.; Palo, S. E.; Blum, L. W.; Gerhardt, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment is a spacecraft mission developed and operated by students at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The 3U CubeSat was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in September 2012. The massively successful mission far outlived its 4 month estimated lifetime and stopped transmitting data after over two years in orbit in December 2014. CSSWE has contributed to 15 scientific or engineering peer-reviewed journal publications. During the course of the project, over 65 undergraduate and graduate students from CU's Computer Science, Aerospace, and Mechanical Engineering Departments, as well as the Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences Department participated. The students were responsible for the design, development, build, integration, testing, and operations from component- to system-level. The variety of backgrounds on this unique project gave the students valuable experience in their own focus area, but also cross-discipline and system-level involvement. However, though the perseverance of the students brought the mission to fruition, it was only possible through the mentoring and support of professionals in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department and CU's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics.

  8. The Cold Atom Laboratory: a facility for ultracold atom experiments aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; CAL Team

    2016-05-01

    Spread across the globe there are many different experiments in cold quantum gases, enabling the creation and study of novel states of matter, as well as some of the most accurate inertial sensors currently known. The Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), being built at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), will be a multi-user facility that will allow the first study of ultracold quantum gases in the microgravity conditions of the International Space Station (ISS). The microgravity environment offers a wealth of advantages for studies of cold atoms, including expansion into extremely weak traps and achieving unearthly cold temperatures. It will also enable very long interaction times with released samples, thereby enhancing the sensitivity of cold atom interferometry. We will describe the CAL mission objectives and the flight hardware architecture. We will also report our ongoing technology development for the CAL mission, including the first microwave evaporation to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) on a miniaturized atom chip system, demonstrated in JPL's CAL Ground Testbed. We will present the design, setup, and operation of two experiments that reliably generate and probe BECs and dual-species mixtures of Rb-87 and K-39 (or K-41). CAL is scheduled to launch to the ISS in 2017. The CAL mission is supported by NASA's SLPS and ISS-PO. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under Contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Ben's perception of space and subitizing activity: a constructivist teaching experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Beth L.

    2015-12-01

    This 22-session constructivist teaching experiment set out to investigate a preschool student's number understanding relative to his subitizing activity. Subitizing, a quick apprehension of the numerosity of a small set of items, has been found to characterize perceptual and conceptual processes students rely on as their understanding of number develops. The purpose for this study is to investigate how a preschool student's, Ben, perceptual subitizing activity changed relative to the density of items and the development of his number understanding. Findings indicated that early on in the teaching experiment, Ben's perceptual subitizing activity was influenced by his primary reliance upon the perceived amount of space between items. Shifts in reasoning when perceptually subitizing indicated physiological and experiential development in Ben's number understanding, as Ben described the number of items increasing when the perceived amount of space between items decreased. Number conservation was considered as relevant to these findings because Ben's explanation for why a number could increase or decrease mirrored similar logic when unable to conserve number. Implications of this study suggest nuances in number understanding development which can explain preschool students' reliance upon a more refined set of perceptual subitizing.

  10. Space, place and atmosphere. Emotion and peripherical perception in architectural experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhani Pallasmaa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Architectural experiences are essentially multi-sensory and simultaneous, and a complex entity is usually grasped as an atmosphere, ambience or feeling. In fact, the judgement concerning the character of a space or place calls for categories of sensing that extend beyond the five Aristotelian senses, such as the embodied existential sense, and, as a result, the entity is perceived in a diffuse, peripheral and unconscious manner. Paradoxically, we grasp an atmosphere before we have consciously identified its constituent factors and ingredients. «We perceive atmospheres through our emotional sensibility – a form of perception that works incredibly quickly, and which we humans evidently need to help us survive», Peter Zumthor suggests. We are mentally and emotionally affected by works of art before we understand them, or we may not understand them intellectually at all. Sensitive artists and architects intuit experiential and emotive qualities of spaces, places and images. This capacity calls for a specific kind of imagination, an emphatic imagination. Atmospheres are percieved peripherally through diffuse vision interacting with other sense modalities, and they are experienced emotionally rather than intellectually. The studies on the differentiation of the two brain hemispheres suggest that atmospheres are perceived through the right hemisphere. Somewhat surprisingly, atmospheres are more conscious objectives in literature, cinema, theater, painting and music than in architecture, which has been traditionally approached formally and perceived primarily through focused vision. Yet, when we see a thing in focus, we are outsiders to it, whereas the experience of being in a space calls for peripheral and unfocused perception. One of the reasons for the experiential poverty of contemporary settings could be in the poverty of their peripheral stimuli.

  11. Project Based Learning experiences in the space engineering education at Technical University of Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jacobo; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; del Cura, Juan M.; Ezquerro, José M.; Lapuerta, Victoria; Cordero-Gracia, Marta

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the innovation activities performed in the field of space education since the academic year 2009/10 at the Technical University of Madrid (UPM), in collaboration with the Spanish User Support and Operations Center (E-USOC), the center assigned by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Spain to support the operations of scientific experiments on board the International Space Station. These activities have been integrated within the last year of the UPM Aerospace Engineering degree. A laboratory has been created, where students have to validate and integrate the subsystems of a microsatellite using demonstrator satellites. In parallel, the students participate in a Project Based Learning (PBL) training process in which they work in groups to develop the conceptual design of a space mission. One student in each group takes the role of project manager, another one is responsible for the mission design and the rest are each responsible for the design of one of the satellite subsystems. A ground station has also been set up with the help of students developing their final thesis, which will allow future students to perform training sessions and learn how to communicate with satellites, how to receive telemetry and how to process the data. Several surveys have been conducted along two academic years to evaluate the impact of these techniques in engineering learning. The surveys evaluate the acquisition of specific and generic competences, as well as the students' degree of satisfaction with respect to the use of these learning methodologies. The results of the surveys and the perception of the lecturers show that PBL encourages students' motivation and improves their results. They not only acquire better technical training, but also improve their transversal skills. It is also pointed out that this methodology requires more dedication from lecturers than traditional methods.

  12. Surface Electrical Conductivity of Single Crystal Spinel in Cesium Vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    magnesium aluminate spinel at temperatures ranging from 573K to 923K, in the presence of cesium vapour at pressures up to 1Torr. The interest in spinel has...in the core of a nuclear reactor. In contrast to magnesium oxide and alumina, electron irradiation of spinel produces no dislocation structures

  13. Detection of quadrupole relaxation in an optically pumped cesium vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabeu, E.; Tornos, J.

    1985-10-01

    The relaxation of quadrupole orientation induced by means of optical pumping in a cesium vapour is experimentally studied, and the results are compared to the theoretical predictions. The optical detection process of this type of orientation is also discussed as a function of the polarization and spectral profile of the detection light.

  14. Fundamental study of cesium decontamination from soil by superconducting magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Susumu, E-mail: igarashi@qb.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko, E-mail: yoko-ak@see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The method for the soil decontamination by the superconducting magnet is proposed. •Cesium ion can be absorbed by Prussian blue in potassium iodide wash fluid. •It is possible to recover Cs{sup +} ion-adsorbing Prussian blue with a high rate by HGMS. •It is expected that HGMS can be applied to the actual soil decontamination. -- Abstract: The radioactive substances have been spread out all over the surrounding area of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused by the accident in March 2011. Decontamination and volume reduction of radioactive substances, especially cesium ion, are desired issue. This study proposed a decontamination method of the soil by the magnetic separation using superconducting magnet. Cesium ion was adsorbed by Prussian blue in the potassium iodide solution. We succeeded in separating selectively the cesium ion-adsorbed Prussian blue out of the liquid phase by high gradient magnetic separation. High recovery ratio of the Prussian blue was achieved by this method.

  15. Membrane-based separation technologies for cesium, strontium, and technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kafka, T.

    1996-10-01

    This work is one of two parallel projects that are part of an ESP task to develop high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. In this subtask, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota, working in cooperation with IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah.

  16. Cesium-137 Levels Detected in Otters from Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutleb A.C.

    1991-02-01

    Full Text Available Pollution seems to be one of the most important causes for the decline of the European otter (Lutra lutra. The accident in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant added another aspect to environmental pollution. Few data on cesium-137 contents in otters are available, so levels were measured in 3 otters from Austria. All levels found were very low.

  17. Theoretical analysis of parity violation induced by neutral currents in atomic cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C.A.; Pignon, D. (Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique)

    1983-07-04

    In this paper we give a theoretical analysis of the parity violation phenomena in nS-n'S transitions in atomic cesium induced by the electron-nucleus neutral-current interaction. The actual observation of parity violation consists in the measurement of an interference between the p.v. electric dipole amplitude E/sub 1/sup(pv) with the electric amplitude induced by a static electric field. Our theoretical work must then include a calculation of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the states of atomic cesium. We have used a one-electron model proposed by Norcross which incorporates some many-body effects like the electric screening induced by the core polarization in a semi-empirical way. Our calculated values of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the nS states are in good agreement with the existing measurements; this confirms the already well-established success of the model in predicting the radiative transitions in cesium. We present theoretical arguments supported by detailed numerical computations showing that the one-particle matrix element of the parity-violating electron-nucleus interaction and the parity-violating electric dipole amplitude E/sub 1/sup(pv) itself weakly depend on the shape of the one-electron potential provided the binding energies of the valence states are reproduced accurately. Furthermore it turns out that because of a compensation mechanism, the parity-violating transition is induced by the radiation field outside the ion core region where the screening can be described simply in terms of the measurable cesium ion polarizability. Our results are then used to extract, from the Ecole Normale Superieure experiment, a value of the weak charge Qsub(w)= -57.1+-9.4 (r.m.s. statistical deviation) +-4.7 (systematic uncertainty). This number is to be compared with the prediction of the Weinberg-Salam model with electro-weak radiative corrections: Qsub(w)=-68.6+-3.0.

  18. A theoretical analysis of parity violation induced by neutral currents in atomic cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C. A.; Pignon, D.

    1983-07-01

    In this paper we give a theoretical analysis of the parity violation phenomena in nS - n'S transitions in atomic cesium induced by the electron-nucleus neutral-current interaction. The actual observation of parity violation consists in the measurement of an interference between the p.v. electric dipole amplitude Elpv with the electric amplitude induced by a static electric field. Our theoretical work must then include a calculation of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the states of atomic cesium. We have used a one-electron model proposed by Norcross which incorporates some many-body effects like the electric screening induced by the core polarization in a semi-empirical way. Our calculated values of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the nS states are in good agreement with the existing measurements; this confirms the already well-established success of the model in predicting the radiative transitions in cesium. We present theoretical arguments supported by detailed numerical computations showing that the one-particle matrix element of the parity-violating electron-nucleus interaction and the parity-violating electric dipole amplitude Elpv itself weakly depend on the shape of the one-electron potential provided the binding energies of the valence states are reproduced accurately. Furthermore it turns out that because of a compensation mechanism, the parity-violating transition is induced by the radiation field outside the ion core region where the screening can be described simply in terms of the measurable cesium ion polarizability. Our results are then used to extract, from the Ecole Normale Supérieure experiment, a value of the weak charge Qw = -57.1 ± 9.4 (r.m.s. statistical deviation) ± 4.7 (systematic uncertainty). This number is to be compared with the prediction of the Weinberg-Salam model with electro-weak radiative corrections: Qw = -68.6 ± 3.0. A general discussion of the uncertainties of the atomic physics

  19. Web technology in the separation of strontium and cesium from INEL-ICPP radioactive acid waste (WM-185)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, L.A.; Brown, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    Strontium and cesium were successfully removed from radioactive acidic waste (WM-185) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), with web technology from 3M and IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc. (IBC). A technical team from Pacific Northwest Laboratory, ICPP, 3M and IBC conducted a very successful series of experiments from August 15 through 18, 1994. The ICPP, Remote Analytical Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, provided the hot cell facilities and staff to complete these milestone experiments. The actual waste experiments duplicated the initial `cold` simulated waste results and confirmed the selective removal provided by ligand-particle web technology.

  20. Electromagnetic Emissions During Rock-fracturing Experiments Inside Magnetic Field Free Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, T.; Jin, H.

    2012-12-01

    Abnormal electromagnetic emission (EME) signal is one type of the most important precursors before earthquake, which has been widely observed and recorded before large earthquake, but the physical mechanism underlying the phenomenon is unclear and under controversy. Monitoring the EME signals during rock-fracturing experiments in laboratory is an effective way to study the phenomena and their underlying mechanism. Electromagnetic noise is everywhere because industrial and civilian electrical equipments have been widely used, which make difficulties to the in-lab experiments and field monitoring. To avoid the interference from electromagnetic noise, electromagnetic experiments must be carried out inside shielded space. Magnetic Field Free Space (MFFS) was constructed by Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration in 1980s. MFFS is a near-spherical polyhedron 'space' with 26 faces and inside diameter about 2.3 m. It is enclosed by 8-layer permalloy 1J85 for shielding magnetic field and 2-layer purified aluminium for shielding electric field. MFFS mainly shields static magnetic field by a factor of 160-4000 for the magnetic signals with the frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz. The intensity of magnetic field inside the space is less than 20 nT and its fluctuation is less than 0.3 nT in 90 hours. MFFS can dramatically shield EME signals in the frequency range of EME antennas utilized in our experiments, (several to ~320) kHz, by at least 90%, based on observation. Rock specimens (granite, marble) were fractured by two ways inside MFFS. 1) Cuboid bulk specimens were drilled, filled with static cracking agent, and then dilated from inside until fracture. 2) Cylindrical rock specimens were stressed until fracture by using a non-magnetic rock testing machine with the maximum testing force 300kN. EME, acoustic emission (AE) and strain signals were collected synchronously by the same data acquisitor, Acoustic Emission Workstation made by Physical Acoustics

  1. Isotopic Dilution Analysis and Secular Equilibrium Study: Two Complementary Radiochemistry Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Lipford, Levin C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a complementary pair of radiochemistry experiments for instruction of isotopic dilution analysis and secular equilibrium. Both experiments use the readily available cesium-137 nuclide and the simple precipitation technique for cesium with the tetraphenylborate anion. Procedures used and typical results obtained are provided and…

  2. Design and Preparation of a Particle Dynamics Space Flight Experiment, SHIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolinger, James; L'Esperance, Drew; Rangel, Roger; Coimbra, Carlos; Wiltherow, William

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper describes the flight experiment, supporting ground science, and the design rationale for project SHIVA (Spaceflight Holography Investigation in a Virtual Apparatus). SHIVA is a fundamental study of particle dynamics in fluids in microgravity. Gravity often dominates the equations of motion of a particle in a fluid, so microgravity provides an ideal environment to study the other forces, such as the pressure and viscous drag and especially the Basset history force. We have developed diagnostic recording methods using holography to save all of the particle field optical characteristics, essentially allowing the experiment to be transferred from space back to earth in what we call the "virtual apparatus" for on-earth microgravity experimentation. We can quantify precisely the three-dimensional motion of sets of particles, allowing us to test and apply new analytical solutions developed by members of the team as reported in the 2001 Conference (Banff, Canada). In addition to employing microgravity to augment the fundamental study of these forces, the resulting data will allow us to quantify and understand the ISS environment with great accuracy. This paper shows how we used both experiment and theory to identify and resolve critical issues and produce an optimal the study. We examined the response of particles of specific gravity from 0.1 to 20, with radii from 0.2 to 2mm. to fluid oscillation at frequencies up to 80 Hz with amplitudes up to 200 microns. To observe some of the interesting effects predicted by the new solutions requires the precise location of the position of a particle in three dimensions. To this end we have developed digital holography algorithms that enable particle position location to a small fraction of a pixel in a CCD array. The spaceflight system will record holograms both on film and electronically. The electronic holograms can be downlinked providing real time data, essentially acting like a remote window into the ISS

  3. Research on the space-borne coherent wind lidar technique and the prototype experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Long; Tao, Yuliang; An, Chao; Yang, Jukui; Du, Guojun; Zheng, Yongchao

    2016-10-01

    Space-borne coherent wind lidar technique is considered as one of the most promising and appropriate remote Sensing methods for successfully measuring the whole global vector wind profile between the lower atmosphere and the middle atmosphere. Compared with other traditional methods, the space-borne coherent wind lidar has some advantages, such as, the all-day operation; many lidar systems can be integrated into the same satellite because of the light-weight and the small size, eye-safe wavelength, and being insensitive to the background light. Therefore, this coherent lidar could be widely applied into the earth climate research, disaster monitoring, numerical weather forecast, environment protection. In this paper, the 2μm space-borne coherent wind lidar system for measuring the vector wind profile is proposed. And the technical parameters about the sub-system of the coherent wind lidar are simulated and the all sub-system schemes are proposed. For sake of validating the technical parameters of the space-borne coherent wind lidar system and the optical off-axis telescope, the weak laser signal detection technique, etc. The proto-type coherent wind lidar is produced and the experiments for checking the performance of this proto-type coherent wind lidar are finished with the hard-target and the soft target, and the horizontal wind and the vertical wind profile are measured and calibrated, respectively. For this proto-type coherent wind lidar, the wavelength is 1.54μm, the pulse energy 80μJ, the pulse width 300ns, the diameter of the off-axis telescope 120mm, the single wedge for cone scanning with the 40°angle, and the two dualbalanced InGaAs detector modules are used. The experiment results are well consisted with the simulation process, and these results show that the wind profile between the vertical altitude 4km can be measured, the accuracy of the wind velocity and the wind direction are better than 1m/s and +/-10°, respectively.

  4. PKE-Nefedov: plasma crystal experiments on the International Space Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefedov, Anatoli P [Institute for High Energy Densities, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Morfill, Gregor E [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Fortov, Vladimir E [Institute for High Energy Densities, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Thomas, Hubertus M [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Rothermel, Hermann [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Hagl, Tanja [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Ivlev, Alexei V [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Zuzic, Milenko [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Klumov, Boris A [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Lipaev, Andrey M [Institute for High Energy Densities, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Molotkov, Vladimir I [Institute for High Energy Densities, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Petrov, Oleg F [Institute for High Energy Densities, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gidzenko, Yuri P [Y Gagarin Cosmonauts Training Centre, 141160 Star City, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Krikalev, Sergey K [SP Korolev RSC Energia, Korolev 141070, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Shepherd, William [Expedition 1 Crew, International Space Station (ISS) (Country Unknown)] [and others

    2003-04-01

    The plasma crystal experiment PKE-Nefedov, the first basic science experiment on the International Space Station (ISS), was installed in February 2001 by the first permanent crew. It is designed for long-term investigations of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. 'Complex plasmas' contain ions, electrons, neutrals and small solid particles - normally in the micrometre range. These microparticles obtain thousands of elementary charges and interact with each other via a 'screened' Coulomb potential. Complex plasmas are of special interest, because they can form liquid and crystalline states (Thomas et al 1994 Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 652-5, Chu and I 1994 Phys. Rev. Lett. 72 4009-12) and are observable at the kinetic level. In experiments on Earth the microparticles are usually suspended against gravity in strong electric fields. This creates asymmetries, stresses and pseudo-equilibrium states with sufficient free energy to readily become unstable. Under microgravity conditions the microparticles move into the bulk of the plasma (Morfill et al 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 1598), experiencing much weaker volume forces than on Earth. This allows investigations of the thermodynamics of strongly coupled plasma states under substantially stress-free conditions. In this first paper we report our results on plasma crystals, in particular the first experimental observations of bcc lattice structures.

  5. Overview of the MISSE 7 Polymers and Zenith Polymers Experiments After 1.5 Years of Space Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Grace T.; de Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Haloua, Athena; Imka, Emily C.; Mitchell, Gianna G.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 7 (MISSE 7), two experiments called the Polymers Experiment and the Zenith Polymers Experiment were flown on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) and exposed to the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment for 1.5 years. The Polymers Experiment contained 47 samples, which were flown in a ram or wake flight orientation. The objectives of the Polymers Experiment were to determine the LEO atomic oxygen erosion yield (Ey, volume loss per incident oxygen atoms, given in cu cm/atom) of the polymers, and to determine if atomic oxygen erosion of high and low ash containing polymers is dependent on fluence. The Zenith Polymers Experiment was flown in a zenith flight orientation. The primary objective of the Zenith Polymers Experiment was to determine the effect of solar exposure on the erosion of fluoropolymers. Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) was flown in each experiment for atomic oxygen fluence determination. This paper provides an introduction to both the MISSE 7 Polymers Experiment and the MISSE 7 Zenith Polymers Experiment, and provides initial erosion yield results.

  6. A unified 3D default space consciousness model combining neurological and physiological processes that underlie conscious experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerath, Ravinder; Crawford, Molly W; Barnes, Vernon A

    2015-01-01

    The Global Workspace Theory and Information Integration Theory are two of the most currently accepted consciousness models; however, these models do not address many aspects of conscious experience. We compare these models to our previously proposed consciousness model in which the thalamus fills-in processed sensory information from corticothalamic feedback loops within a proposed 3D default space, resulting in the recreation of the internal and external worlds within the mind. This 3D default space is composed of all cells of the body, which communicate via gap junctions and electrical potentials to create this unified space. We use 3D illustrations to explain how both visual and non-visual sensory information may be filled-in within this dynamic space, creating a unified seamless conscious experience. This neural sensory memory space is likely generated by baseline neural oscillatory activity from the default mode network, other salient networks, brainstem, and reticular activating system.

  7. A unified 3D default space consciousness model combining neurological and physiological processes that underlie conscious experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder eJerath

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Global Workspace Theory and Information Integration Theory are two of the most currently accepted consciousness models; however, these models do not address many aspects of conscious experience. We compare these models to our previously proposed consciousness model in which the thalamus fills-in processed sensory information from corticothalamic feedback loops within a proposed 3D default space, resulting in the recreation of the internal and external worlds within the mind. This 3D default space is composed of all cells of the body, which communicate via gap junctions and electrical potentials to create this unified space. We use 3D illustrations to explain how both visual and non-visual sensory information is filled-in within this dynamic space, creating a unified seamless conscious experience. This neural sensory memory space is likely generated by baseline neural oscillatory activity from the default mode network, other salient networks, brainstem, and reticular activating system.

  8. Effect of electrode materials on a negative ion production in a cesium seeded negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takashi; Morishita, Takutoshi; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Hanada, Masaya; Iga, Takashi; Inoue, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Imai, Tsuyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    Effects of plasma grid materials on the negative ion production efficiency in a cesium seeded ion source have been experimentally studied. Grid materials of Au, Ag, Cu, Ni, and Mo were examined. A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source was utilized in the experiment to avoid contamination of tungsten from filament cathode. Relations between the negative ion currents and work functions of the grid were measured for these materials. Influence of the contamination by tungsten on the grid was also investigated. If was clarified that the negative ion production efficiency was determined only by the work function of the grid. The efficiency did not depend on the material itself. The lowest work function of 1.42 eV was obtained for Au grid with Cs, and a high H{sup -} production efficiency of 20.7 mA/kW was measured. This efficiency is about 1.3 times larger than that of Cs/Mo and Cs/Cu. Further improvement of the production efficiency was observed by covering the plasma grid with tungsten and cesium simultaneously. Such co-deposition of W and Cs on the plasma grid produced the negative ion production efficiency of 1.7 times higher than that from the tungsten grid simply covered with Cs. (author)

  9. Phase noise analysis of voltage controlled oscillator used in cesium atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Menghui; Tang, Liang; Qiao, Donghai

    2017-03-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) cesium frequency standard plays a significant role in precision guidance of missile and global positioning system (GPS). Low noise 4.596 GHz voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) is an indispensable part of microwave signal source in cesium frequency standard. Low-phase noise is also the most important and difficult performance indicator of VCO. Starting from phase noise analysis method proposed by Leeson, the formulas about the relationship between phase noise of output signal of oscillator feedback model and phase fluctuation spectrum of amplifier, phase noise of oscillator are derived in this paper. Finally, the asymptote model of microwave oscillator is proposed based on the formula derivation. The experiment shows that when the reverse bias voltage of variode is 1.8 V, the designed oscillation frequency of VCO is 4.596 GHz, the power is ‑1 dBm and the DC power consumption is 19.6 mW. The tendency of phase noise simulation curve and actual test curve conform to asymptote model. The phase noise in 1 and 10 kHz is, respectively, ‑60.86 and ‑86.58 dBc/Hz. The significance of the paper lies in determining the main factors influencing oscillator phase noise and providing guiding direction for the design of low-phase noise VCO.

  10. Regenerative water supply for an interplanetary space station: The experience gained on the space stations “Salut”, “Mir”, ISS and development prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobe, Leonid; Samsonov, Nikoly; Gavrilov, Lev; Novikov, Vladimir; Tomashpolskiy, Mihail; Andreychuk, Peter; Protasov, Nikoly; Synjak, Yury; Skuratov, Vladimir

    2007-06-01

    Based on the experience in operation of Russian space stations Salut, Mir and International space station ISS the station's water balance data, parameters and characteristics of the systems for water recovery have been obtained. Using the data design analysis an integrated water supply system for an interplanetary space station has been performed. A packaged physical/chemical system for water supply is composed of an integrated system for water recovery from humidity condensate, green house condensate, water from carbon dioxide reduction system and condensate from urine system; a system for water reclamation from urine; hygiene water processing system and a water storage system. The take off mass of the packaged water supply system (including expendables, redundancy hardware, equivalent mass of power consumption and of thermal control) is appropriate for Mars missions. The international space station is indispensable for verifying innovative processes and new water recovery systems intended for missions to Mars.

  11. Experience of Multisensory Environments in Public Space among People with Visual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin R. Jenkins

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study explored the role of sensory characteristics embedded in the built environment and whether they support or hinder people with visual impairment in their use of public spaces. An online survey link was e-mailed to the presidents and committee members of each state’s chapters and associations of the National Federation of the Blind in the United States, resulting in 451 direct invitations to participate. Written responses of the survey questions from 48 respondents with visual impairment were analyzed. Three main themes: Barriers, Supporters, and Context-Dependence emerged from the respondents’ experience of multisensory characteristics within the built environment. The four subthemes subsumed in Barriers were: (1 Population specific design, (2 Extreme sensory backgrounds, (3 Uneven ground surfaces and objects, and (4 Inconsistent lighting. For Supporters, respondents provided specific examples of various sensory characteristics in built environments, including audible cues and echoes, smells, tactile quality of the ground surface, and temperature. Context-Dependence referred to the effects of sensory characteristics embedded in public spaces depending on one’s vision condition, the proximity to the sensory cues and the purpose of the activities one was performing at that moment. Findings provide occupational therapy practitioners an in-depth understanding of the transactional relationship between embedded sensory characteristics in the built environment, occupations, and people with visual impairment in order to make appropriate modifications or removal of barriers that affect occupational performance and engagement. Suggestions for occupational therapists as well as architects, designers, planners, policy makers/legislators related to functional sensory cues in the design of built environments were provided to increase accessibility in the use of public spaces by people with visual impairment.

  12. Experience of Multisensory Environments in Public Space among People with Visual Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Gavin R; Yuen, Hon K; Vogtle, Laura K

    2015-07-23

    This qualitative study explored the role of sensory characteristics embedded in the built environment and whether they support or hinder people with visual impairment in their use of public spaces. An online survey link was e-mailed to the presidents and committee members of each state's chapters and associations of the National Federation of the Blind in the United States, resulting in 451 direct invitations to participate. Written responses of the survey questions from 48 respondents with visual impairment were analyzed. Three main themes: Barriers, Supporters, and Context-Dependence emerged from the respondents' experience of multisensory characteristics within the built environment. The four subthemes subsumed in Barriers were: (1) Population specific design, (2) Extreme sensory backgrounds, (3) Uneven ground surfaces and objects, and (4) Inconsistent lighting. For Supporters, respondents provided specific examples of various sensory characteristics in built environments, including audible cues and echoes, smells, tactile quality of the ground surface, and temperature. Context-Dependence referred to the effects of sensory characteristics embedded in public spaces depending on one's vision condition, the proximity to the sensory cues and the purpose of the activities one was performing at that moment. Findings provide occupational therapy practitioners an in-depth understanding of the transactional relationship between embedded sensory characteristics in the built environment, occupations, and people with visual impairment in order to make appropriate modifications or removal of barriers that affect occupational performance and engagement. Suggestions for occupational therapists as well as architects, designers, planners, policy makers/legislators related to functional sensory cues in the design of built environments were provided to increase accessibility in the use of public spaces by people with visual impairment.

  13. Performance of a radiatively cooled system for quantum optomechanical experiments in space

    CERN Document Server

    Pilan-Zanoni, André; Johann, Ulrich; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Hechenblaikner, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a radiatively cooled instrument is investigated in the context of optomechanical quantum experiments, where the environment of a macroscopic particle in a quantum-superposition has to be cooled to less than 20\\,K in deep space. A heat-transfer analysis between the components of the instrument as well as a transfer-function analysis on thermal oscillations induced by the spacecraft interior and by dissipative sources is performed. The thermal behaviour of the instrument in an orbit around a Lagrangian point and in a highly elliptical Earth orbit is discussed. Finally, we investigate further possible design improvements aiming at lower temperatures of the environment of the macroscopic particle. These include a mirror-based design of the imaging system on the optical bench and the extension of the heat shields.

  14. Thermal and Mechanical Testing of Neoprene Gloves Used in a Space Shuttle Microgravity Glove Box Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Neoprene gloves are used in a Space Shuttle Microgravity Glove Box (MGBX) experiment. In 1999, significant corrosion was observed in the work area and on the outer surface of the left glove ring. Analysis of the corrosion products showed that they contained chlorine. The Neoprene gloves used in this glove box were obtained in 1995, with a recommended shelf life of 3 years. After storage of these gloves in a cabinet drawer until 1999, significant signs of corrosion were also observed in the drawer. Mechanical and thermal properties were determined on samples cut from the finger and sleeve areas of the "good" and "bad" gloves. This data showed significant aging of the left-hand glove, particularly in the sleeve area. Thermal analysis data by DSC and TGA was complimentary to tensile data in showing this aging. However, this test data did not pinpoint the cause of the left-hand glove aging, or of the corrosion products.

  15. Development of a vibration isolation prototype system for microgravity space experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, K. A.; Grodsinsky, C. M.; Brown, G. V.

    Growing concern about the microgravity environment on the Space Shuttle orbiter has generated interest in vibration isolation systems for microgravity science experiments. The presence of small levels of low frequency accelerations on the orbiter has degraded this ``microgravity'' environment for the science community. This interest in systems capable of isolating against the acceleration environment on orbital carriers has directed most research, in these isolation systems, to active methods of compensation. In this paper the development of a magnetically suspended six degree-of-freedom (DOF) active vibration isolation prototype system capable of performing the needed compensation to the orbital environment is presented. A design for the magnetic actuators is described. Relative and inertial sensors are used in providing an inertial reference for isolating the payload. The control law for the prototype system is also described giving a non-intrusive inertial isolation response to the system.

  16. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, W.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. Onboard the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20-500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. International Space Station United States Orbital Segment Oxygen Generation System On-Orbit Operational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Howe, John, Jr.; Kulp, Galen W.; VanKeuren, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) was originally intended to be installed in ISS Node 3. The OGS rack delivery was accelerated, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006 and installed in the US Laboratory Module. Various modification kits were installed to provide its interfaces, and the OGS was first activated in July of 2007 for 15 hours, In October of 2007 it was again activated for 76 hours with varied production rates and day/night cycling. Operational time in each instance was limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Feedwater will be provided by PWR bag until the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) is delivered to SS in fall of 2008. This paper will discuss operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  18. 3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment, In Space Manufacturing (LPS, 4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Quincy; Cooper, Ken; Werkheiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    The 3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment has been an ongoing effort for several years. In June 2014 the technology demonstration 3D printer was launched to the International Space Station. In November 2014 the first 21 parts were manufactured in orbit marking the beginning of a paradigm shift that will allow astronauts to be more self-sufficient and pave the way to larger scale orbital manufacturing. Prior to launch the 21 parts were built on the ground with the flight unit with the same feedstock. These ground control samples are to be tested alongside the flight samples in order to determine if there is a measurable difference between parts built on the ground vs. parts built in space. As of this writing, testing has not yet commenced. Tests to be performed are structured light scanning for volume and geometric discrepancies, CT scanning for density measurement, destructive testing of mechanical samples, and SEM analysis for inter-laminar adhesion discrepancies. Additionally, an ABS material characterization was performed on mechanical samples built from the same CAD files as the flight and ground samples on different machine / feedstock combinations. The purpose of this testing was twofold: first to obtain mechanical data in order to have a baseline comparison for the flight and ground samples and second to ascertain if there is a measurable difference between machines and feedstock.

  19. Science Results from Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE): Energetic Particle Distribution in Near Earth Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlin

    2013-04-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) is a 3-unit (10cm x 10cm x 30cm) CubeSat mission funded by the National Science Foundation, launched into a low-Earth, polar orbit on 13 September 2012 as a secondary payload under NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. The science objectives of CSSWE are to investigate the relationship of the location, magnitude, and frequency of solar flares to the timing, duration, and energy spectrum of solar energetic particles reaching Earth, and to determine the precipitation loss and the evolution of the energy spectrum of trapped radiation belt electrons. CSSWE contains a single science payload, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), which is a miniaturization of the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) built at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics for NASA/Van Allen Probes mission, which consists of two identical spacecraft, launched 30 August 2012, that traverse the heart of the radiation belts in a low inclination orbit. CSSWE's REPTile is designed to measure the directional differential flux of protons ranging from 10 to 40 MeV and electrons from 0.5 to >3.3 MeV. The commissioning phase was completed and REPTile was activated on 4 October 2012. The data are very clean, far exceeding expectations! A number of engineering challenges had to be overcome to achieve such clean measurements under the mass and power limits of a CubeSat. The CSSWE is also an ideal class project, providing training for the next generation of engineers and scientists over the full life-cycle of a satellite project.

  20. The Virtual Glovebox (VGX): An Immersive Simulation System for Training Astronauts to Perform Glovebox Experiments in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey D.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The era of the International Space Station (ISS) has finally arrived, providing researchers on Earth a unique opportunity to study long-term effects of weightlessness and the space environment on structures, materials and living systems. Many of the physical, biological and material science experiments planned for ISS will require significant input and expertise from astronauts who must conduct the research, follow complicated assay procedures and collect data and samples in space. Containment is essential for Much of this work, both to protect astronauts from potentially harmful biological, chemical or material elements in the experiments as well as to protect the experiments from contamination by air-born particles In the Space Station environment. When astronauts must open the hardware containing such experiments, glovebox facilities provide the necessary barrier between astronaut and experiment. On Earth, astronauts are laced with the demanding task of preparing for the many glovebox experiments they will perform in space. Only a short time can be devoted to training for each experimental task and gl ovebox research only accounts for a small portion of overall training and mission objectives on any particular ISS mission. The quality of the research also must remain very high, requiring very detailed experience and knowledge of instrumentation, anatomy and specific scientific objectives for those who will conduct the research. This unique set of needs faced by NASA has stemmed the development of a new computer simulation tool, the Virtual Glovebox (VGB), which is designed to provide astronaut crews and support personnel with a means to quickly and accurately prepare and train for glovebox experiments in space.

  1. Mapping the thermal history of the Universe with the new generation of CMB spectrum space experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Burigana, C

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the implications of the new generation of CMB spectrum space experiments for our knowledge of the thermal history of the Universe. The combination of two experiments with the sensitivity and the frequency coverage jointly forseen for DIMES and FIRAS II will be able to greatly change our vision of the capability of the CMB spectrum information to constrain physical processes at different cosmic ages. The limits on the energy dissipations at the all cosmic times accessible to CMB spectrum investigations (z < z_therm) could be improved by about two order of magnitudes and even dissipation processes with DE/E ~ 10^-6 could be detected and possibly accurately studied. These results are possible because such levels of accuracy on a so wide frequency range allow to remove the approximate degeneracy both between free-free and Bose-Einstein (BE) like distortions and between Comptonization and BE-like distortions. Finally, we discussed the different signatures imprinted on the CMB spectrum by some la...

  2. Observing floods from space: Experience gained from COSMO-SkyMed observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdicca, N.; Pulvirenti, L.; Chini, M.; Guerriero, L.; Candela, L.

    2013-03-01

    The COSMO-SkyMed mission offers a unique opportunity to obtain all weather radar images characterized by short revisit time, thus being useful for flood evolution mapping. The COSMO-SkyMed system has been activated several times in the last few years in occasion of flood events all over the world in order to provide very high resolution X-band SAR images useful for flood detection purposes. This paper discusses the major outcomes of the experience gained, within the framework of the OPERA Pilot Project funded by the Italian Space Agency, from using COSMO-SkyMed data for the purpose of near real time generation of flood maps. A review of the mechanisms which determine the imprints of the inundation on the radar images and of the fundamental simulation tools able to predict these imprints and help image interpretation is provided. The approach developed to process the data and to generate the flood maps is also summarized. Then, the paper illustrates the experience gained with COSMO-SkyMed by describing and discussing a number of significant examples. These examples demonstrate the potential of the COSMO-SkyMed system and the suitability of the approach developed for generating the final products, but they also highlight some critical aspects that require further investigations to improve the reliability of the flood maps.

  3. Characterization of 3-dimensional superconductive thin film components for gravitational experiments in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hechler, S.; Nawrodt, R.; Nietzsche, S.; Vodel, W.; Seidel, P. [Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik; Dittus, H. [ZARM, Univ. Bremen (Germany); Loeffler, F. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are used for high precise gravitational experiments. One of the most impressive experiments is the satellite test of the equivalence principle (STEP) of NASA/ESA. The STEP mission aims to prove a possible violation of Einstein's equivalence principle at an extreme level of accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 18} in space. In this contribution we present an automatically working measurement equipment to characterize 3-dimensional superconducting thin film components like i.e. pick-up coils and test masses for STEP. The characterization is done by measurements of the transition temperature between the normal and the superconducting state using a special built anti-cryostat. Above all the setup was designed for use in normal LHe transport Dewars. The sample chamber has a volume of 150 cm{sup 3} and can be fully temperature controlled over a range from 4.2 K to 300 K with a resolution of better then 100 mK. (orig.)

  4. Working with Space and Shape in Early Childhood Education: Experiences in Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Luiza da Silva Fernandes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This report shows the experience of a work conducted with the Meli-Melo puzzle in two early childhood education classes at two different schools in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. With the work’s activities as a starting point, aspects related to space and shape, as well as quantities and measures, were approached. Children from two and a half to five years old participated in the playful activities, which had the following goals: to develop spatial and geometric skills, to allow measuring actions, to favor dialogue and to boost group work experience. There were several activities, like handling the pieces, assembling images freely or according with outlines and models, assembling three-dimensional figures, and the length game. The following questions were considered in the evaluation of the work: how was the children’s participation in large groups and small groups? How did children of different age groups engage in the different proposals? Which activities were easier or more difficult for each group? Which behaviors and conversations showed us new knowledge? The fulfillment of the planned activities showed that the children had several hypotheses regarding shapes and that they were able to identify similarities and differences, use geometry vocabulary, and discuss their thoughts, particularly when working in small groups, which favored the participation of nearly all children. We believe the work reported has allowed learnings and a contact with mathematics in early childhood education.

  5. The dependence of equilibrium partition coefficient of cesium and iodine between sodium pool and the inert cover gas on the concentration in the pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Shinya, E-mail: miyahara.shinya@jaea.go.jp [FBR Plant Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1 Shiraki, Tsuruga, Fukui 919-1279 (Japan); Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, 1-3-9 Bunkyo, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Nishimura, Masahiro, E-mail: nishimura.masahiro@jaea.go.jp [O-arai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Nakagiri, Toshio, E-mail: nakagiri.toshio@jaea.go.jp [FBR Plant Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1 Shiraki, Tsuruga, Fukui 919-1279 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured equilibrium partition coefficients of cesium and iodine between liquid sodium pool and the inert cover gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained empirical equations were consistent with Castleman's theoretical equations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of cesium concentration upon the partition coefficients was consistent with the theoretical values. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer That of iodine concentration was incompatible with the theoretical consideration due to the formation of Na{sub 2}I{sub 2} in the cover gas. - Abstract: Equilibrium partition coefficients were experimentally measured for volatile fission products of cesium and iodine between liquid sodium pool and the inert cover gas. In the experiments, the 'transpiration method' was utilized in which the saturation vapor of sodium with cesium and iodine vapor in an isothermal evaporation pot was transported by inert carrier gas and trapped by filters outside the pot. The objectives of the experiments are to: (a)obtain the equilibrium partition coefficients of cesium and iodine at high temperature between 600 and 850 Degree-Sign C and, (b)study the dependence of the partition coefficients upon the concentration in the sodium pool. From the results of previous work and this study, the following empirical equations between the partition coefficients of cesium and iodine and the sodium pool temperature could be obtained: logKd(Cs)=(2173)/T -1.0487(from450to850 Degree-Sign C), logKd(I)=(-215)/T -0.271(from450to850 Degree-Sign C). These equations are consistent with Castleman's theoretical equations. The partition coefficients of cesium measured at five different points of mole concentration in the pool were almost consistent with the theoretical values and decreased with the increase in the concentration. On the other hand, the measured partition coefficients of iodine increased with the increase in the concentration in the

  6. Kelvin Probe Studies of Cesium Telluride Photocathode for AWA Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, Eric; Yusof, Zikri; Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff; Harkay, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (~50 nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin Probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating.

  7. Nutrients and cancer: an introduction to cesium therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, H E

    1984-01-01

    A brief overview on the relevance in dietary factors in both development and prevention of cancer is presented. The pharmacologic properties of various food ingredients are discussed. Establishing of a special diet for the cancer patient is suggested. In addition, avoidance of certain foods is recommended to counteract mucus production of cancer cells. Evaluation of the nutrient content of certain diets in regions with low incidence of cancer has advanced the use of certain alkali metals, i.e., rubidium and cesium, as chemotherapeutic agents. The rationale for this approach termed the "high pH" therapy resides in changing the acidic pH range of the cancer cell by cesium towards weak alkalinity in which the survival of the cancer cell is endangered, and the formation of acidic and toxic materials, normally formed in cancer cells, is neutralized and eliminated.

  8. Cesium-137, a drama recounted; Cesio-137, um drama recontado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Suzane de Alencar

    2013-01-15

    The radiological accident with Cesium-137, which started on Goiania in 1987, did not stop with the end of radiological contamination and continues in a judicial, scientific and narrative process of identification and recognition of new victims. The drama occupies a central place on the dynamics of radiological event, as it extends its limits, inflects its intensity and updates the event. As a narrative of the event, the ethnography incorporates and brings up to date the drama as an analysis landmark and the description of the theme as it is absorbed by a dramatic process. Cesium-137, a drama recounted is a textual experimentation based on real events and characters picked out from statements reported in various narratives about the radiological accident. (author)

  9. Fiber laser system for cesium and rubidium atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Diboune, Clément; Bidel, Yannick; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative fiber laser system for both cesium and rubidium manipulation. The architecture is based on frequency conversion of two lasers at 1560 nm and 1878 nm. By taking advantage of existing fiber components at these wavelengths, we demonstrate an all fiber laser system delivering 350 mW at 780 nm for rubidium and 210 mW at 852 nm for cesium. This result highlights the promising nature of such laser system especially for Cs manipulation for which no fiber laser system has been reported. It offers new perspectives for the development of atomic instruments dedicated to onboard applications and opens the way to a new generation of atom interferometers involving three atomic species $^{85}$Rb, $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs for which we propose an original laser architecture.

  10. New thermodynamic regularity for cesium over the whole liquid range

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatee, M H

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we derive an equation of state for liquid cesium based on a suggested potential function in accord to the characteristics large attraction and soft repulsion at the asymptotes of interaction potentials. By considering the interaction of nearest adjacent atoms in dense fluid, the equation of state predicts that the isotherm is linear function of, where is the compression factor, is the molar volume, and is the molar density. The linear parameters are identified as interaction coefficients related to attraction and repulsion, and are used to evaluate the molecular parameters with interesting implications. The isotherm is intended to resolve the particular thermodynamic properties of alkali metals, which have been known for their unusual change of the nature of intermolecular force as the characteristic metal-nonmetal transition range is approached. When applied to liquid cesium, the isotherms persist linear over the whole liquid range including the metal non-metals transition range and at the crit...

  11. Spectrally selective optical pumping in Doppler-broadened cesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Hai; Zeng, Xian-Jin; Li, Qing-Meng; Huang, Qiang; Sun, Wei-Min

    2013-05-01

    The D1 line spectrally selective pumping process in Doppler-broadened cesium is analyzed by solving the optical Bloch equations. The process, described by a three-level model with the Λ scheme, shows that the saturation intensity of broadened atoms is three orders of magnitude larger than that of resting atoms. The |Fg = 3> → |Fe = 4> resonance pumping can result in the ground state |Fg = 4, mF = 4> sublevel having a maximum population of 0.157 and the population difference would be about 0.01 in two adjacent magnetic sublevels of the hyperfine (HF) state Fg = 4. To enhance the anisotropy in the ground state, we suggest employing dichromatic optical HF pumping by adding a laser to excite D1 line |Fg = 4> → |Fe = 3> transition, in which the cesium magnetometer sensitivity increases by half a magnitude and is unaffected by the nonlinear Zeeman effect even in Earth's average magnetic field.

  12. Test procedures and instructions for Hanford tank waste supernatant cesium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, D.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-31

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test using Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed supernatant liquor from tank 251-AW-101 in a bench-scale column.Cesium sorbents to be tested include resorcinol-formaldehyde resin and crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-022, Hanford Tank Waste Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  13. Test procedures and instructions for Hanford complexant concentrate supernatant cesium removal using CST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1997-01-08

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test, using Hanford Complexant Concentrate supernatant liquor from tank 241-AN-107, in a bench-scale column. The cesium sorbent to be tested is crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-023, Hanford Complexant Concentrate Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  14. Study About Origin of Radioactive Cesium in Wild Mushroom in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    鎌田, 素之; 角田, 光淳

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive cesium, released from the Fukushima I nuclear power plant that destroyed by Great East Japan Earthquake, has been detected from various agricultural products. Especially, wild mushrooms are known to assimilate radioactive cesium and other heavy metals. In this study, we focused on the concentration of radioactive cesium in wild mushrooms in Japan, calculated the ratio of 134Cs/137Cs and discussed on their origin whether they were released from the Fukushima I nuclear power plant o...

  15. Viewing the effective k-space coverage of MR images: phantom experiments with fast Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Jan; Helms, Gunther; Larsen, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate whether the effective k-space coverage of MR images can in principle be viewed after multidimensional Fourier transform back to k-space. A water-soaked sponge phantom providing homogeneous k-space pattern was imaged with different standard MR sequences, utilizing elliptic acquisitions, partial-Fourier acquisitions and elliptic filtering as imaging examples. The resulting MR images were Fourier-transformed to the spatial frequency domain (the k-space) to visualize their effective k-space coverage. These frequency domain images are named "backtransformed k-space images." For a quantitative assessment, the sponge phantom was imaged with three-dimensional partial-Fourier sequences while varying the partial acquisition parameters in slice and phase direction. By linear regression analysis, the k-space coverage as expected from the sequence menu parameters was compared to the effective k-space coverage as observed in the backtransformed k-space images. The k-space coverage of elliptic and partial-Fourier acquisitions became visible in the backtransformed k-space images, as well as the effect of elliptic filtering. The expected and the observed k-space coverage showed a highly significant correlation (r=.99, PFourier-transforming MR images of a sponge phantom back to k-space. This method could be used for several purposes including sequence parameter optimization, basic imaging research, and to enhance a visual understanding of k-space, especially in three-dimensional MR imaging.

  16. Displacement Damage Effects in Solar Cells: Mining Damage From the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Walters, R. J.; Morton, T. L.; Messenger, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to develop an improved space solar cell radiation response analysis capability and to produce a computer modeling tool which implements the analysis. This was accomplished through analysis of solar cell flight data taken on the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed experiment. This effort specifically addresses issues related to rapid technological change in the area of solar cells for space applications in order to enhance system performance, decrease risk, and reduce cost for future missions.

  17. Cesium pentazolate: A new nitrogen-rich energetic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Brad A.; Stavrous, Elissaios; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Radousky, Harry; Zaug, Joseph; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Oleynik, Ivan I.

    2017-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental evidence for a new class of high-nitrogen content energetic material compounds consisting of molecular pentazoles, which are stabilized in the crystal phase upon introduction of elemental cesium. First-principles structural predictions show that the material with composition CsN5 is thermodynamically stable above 15 GPa. Indexing of the measured X-ray diffraction spectra indicate the synthesis of this material at 60 GPa as well its stability upon decompression down to 24 GPa.

  18. MECHANISM OF CESIUM EXCHANGE WITH POTASSIUM TITANIUM HEXACYANOFERRATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuShiping; SunYongxia; 等

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of cesium exchange on potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate (KTiFC) is described in this paper.The dependence of the exchange rate on temperature,particle granule size,and shaking frequency is studied.The results show that ion exchange process is controlled by liquid film diffusion in granule particle.An exchange reaction occurs mainly between K+ in the exchanger and Cs+ in the solution.

  19. Studies on the Separation of Cesium From Fission Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANLi-juan; ZHANGSheng-dong; GUOJing-ru; CUIAn-zhi; YANGLei; WUWang-suo

    2003-01-01

    135Cs is a long-life fission product. When measuring its thermal cross section, we must separate radiochemical purity cesium from fission products. Except for decontaminating radio- nuclides, others which can be activated must be avoided to come into solution. So ion exchanger is used. Inorganic ion exchangers have received increased attention because of their high resistance to radiation and their very efficient separation of alkali metal ions.

  20. AMO EXPRESS: A Command and Control Experiment for Crew Autonomy Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetson, Howard K.; Haddock, Angie T.; Frank, Jeremy; Cornelius, Randy; Wang, Lui; Garner, Larry

    2015-01-01

    NASA is investigating a range of future human spaceflight missions, including both Mars-distance and Near Earth Object (NEO) targets. Of significant importance for these missions is the balance between crew autonomy and vehicle automation. As distance from Earth results in increasing communication delays, future crews need both the capability and authority to independently make decisions. However, small crews cannot take on all functions performed by ground today, and so vehicles must be more automated to reduce the crew workload for such missions. NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program funded Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) project conducted an autonomous command and control experiment on-board the International Space Station that demonstrated single action intelligent procedures for crew command and control. The target problem was to enable crew initialization of a facility class rack with power and thermal interfaces, and involving core and payload command and telemetry processing, without support from ground controllers. This autonomous operations capability is enabling in scenarios such as initialization of a medical facility to respond to a crew medical emergency, and representative of other spacecraft autonomy challenges. The experiment was conducted using the Expedite the Processing of Experiments for Space Station (EXPRESS) rack 7, which was located in the Port 2 location within the U.S Laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Activation and deactivation of this facility is time consuming and operationally intensive, requiring coordination of three flight control positions, 47 nominal steps, 57 commands, 276 telemetry checks, and coordination of multiple ISS systems (both core and payload). Utilization of Draper Laboratory's Timeliner software, deployed on-board the ISS within the Command and Control (C&C) computers and the Payload computers, allowed development of the automated procedures specific to ISS without having to certify

  1. Meaningful experiences in science education: Engaging the space researcher in a cultural transformation to greater science literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Cherilynn A.

    1993-01-01

    The visceral appeal of space science and exploration is a very powerful emotional connection to a very large and diverse collection of people, most of whom have little or no perspective about what it means to do science and engineering. Therein lies the potential of space for a substantially enhanced positive impact on culture through education. This essay suggests that through engaging more of the space research and development community in enabling unique and 'meaningful educational experiences' for educators and students at the pre-collegiate levels, space science and exploration can amplify its positive feedback on society and act as an important medium for cultural transformation to greater science literacy. I discuss the impact of space achievements on people and define what is meant by a 'meaningful educational experience,' all of which points to the need for educators and students to be closer to the practice of real science. I offer descriptions of two nascent science education programs associated with NASA which have the needed characteristics for providing meaningful experiences that can cultivate greater science literacy. Expansion of these efforts and others like it will be needed to have the desired impact on culture, but I suggest that the potential for the needed resources is there in the scientific research communities. A society in which more people appreciate and understand science and science methods would be especially conducive to human progress in space and on Earth.

  2. Cesium chloride protects cerebellar granule neurons from apoptosis induced by low potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jin; Yao, Weiguo; Lee, Weihua

    2007-10-01

    Neuronal apoptosis plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, and neuroprotective agents targeting apoptotic signaling could have therapeutic use. Here we report that cesium chloride, an alternative medicine in treating radiological poison and cancer, has neuroprotective actions. Serum and potassium deprivation induced cerebellar granule neurons to undergo apoptosis, which correlated with the activation of caspase-3. Cesium prevented both the activation of caspase-3 and neuronal apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Cesium at 8 mM increased the survival of neurons from 45 +/- 3% to 91 +/- 5% of control. Cesium's neuroprotection was not mediated by PI3/Akt or MAPK signaling pathways, since it was unable to activate either Akt or MAPK by phosphorylation. In addition, specific inhibitors of PI3 kinase and MAP kinase did not block cesium's neuroprotective effects. On the other hand, cesium inactivated GSK3beta by phosphorylation of serine-9 and GSK3beta-specific inhibitor SB415286 prevented neuronal apoptosis. These data indicate that cesium's neuroprotection is likely via inactivating GSK3beta. Furthermore, cesium also prevented H(2)O(2)-induced neuronal death (increased the survival of neurons from 72 +/- 4% to 89 +/- 3% of control). Given its relative safety and good penetration of the brain blood barrier, our findings support the potential therapeutic use of cesium in neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Radioactive cesium dynamics derived from hydrographic observations in the Abukuma River Estuary, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehi, Shigeho; Kaeriyama, Hideki; Ambe, Daisuke; Ono, Tsuneo; Ito, Shin-ichi; Shimizu, Yugo; Watanabe, Tomowo

    2016-03-01

    Large quantities of radioactive materials were released into the air and the ocean as a result of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, caused by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and the subsequent major tsunami off the Pacific coast. There is much concern about radioactive contamination in both the watershed of the Abukuma River, which flows through Fukushima Prefecture, and its estuary, where it discharges into the sea in Miyagi Prefecture. We investigated radioactive cesium dynamics using mixing diagrams obtained from hydrographic observations of the Abukuma River Estuary. Particulate radioactive cesium dominates the cesium load in the river, whereas the dissolved form dominates in the sea. As the salinity increased from <0.1 to 0.1-2.3, the mixing diagram showed that dissolved radioactive cesium concentrations increased, because of desorption. Desorption from suspended particles explained 36% of dissolved radioactive cesium in estuarine water. However, the dissolved and particulate radioactive cesium concentrations in the sea decreased sharply because of dilution. It is thought that more than 80% of the discharged particulate radioactive cesium was deposited off the river mouth, where the radioactive cesium concentrations in sediment were relatively high (217-2440 Bq kg(-1)). Radioactive cesium that was discharged to the sea was transported southward by currents driven by the density distribution.

  4. Cesium Toxicity Alters MicroRNA Processing and AGO1 Expressions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il Lae Jung

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short RNA fragments that play important roles in controlled gene silencing, thus regulating many biological processes in plants. Recent studies have indicated that plants modulate miRNAs to sustain their survival in response to a variety of environmental stimuli, such as biotic stresses, cold, drought, nutritional starvation, and toxic heavy metals. Cesium and radio-cesium contaminations have arisen as serious problems that both impede plant growth and enter the food chain through contaminated plants. Many studies have been performed to define plant responses against cesium intoxication. However, the complete profile of miRNAs in plants during cesium intoxication has not been established. Here we show the differential expression of the miRNAs that are mostly down-regulated during cesium intoxication. Furthermore, we found that cesium toxicity disrupts both the processing of pri-miRNAs and AGONOUTE 1 (AGO1-mediated gene silencing. AGO 1 seems to be especially destabilized by cesium toxicity, possibly through a proteolytic regulatory pathway. Our study presents a comprehensive profile of cesium-responsive miRNAs, which is distinct from that of potassium, and suggests two possible mechanisms underlying the cesium toxicity on miRNA metabolism.

  5. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  6. Laboratory experiments on the impact disruption of iron meteorites at temperature of near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Takekuni; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Takabe, Ayana; Okamoto, Takaya; Sangen, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Sunao; Liu, Xun; Mashimo, Tsutomu

    2014-10-01

    Iron meteorites and some M-class asteroids are generally understood to be fragments that were originally part of cores of differentiated planetesimals or part of local melt pools on primitive bodies. The parent bodies of iron meteorites may have formed in the terrestrial planet region, from which they were then scattered into the main belt (Bottke, W.F., Nesvorný, D., Grimm, R.E., Morbidelli, A., O'Brien, D.P. [2006]. Nature 439, 821-824). Therefore, a wide range of collisional events at different mass scales, temperatures, and impact velocities would have occurred between the time when the iron was segregated and the impact that eventually exposed the iron meteorites to interplanetary space. In this study, we performed impact disruption experiments of iron meteorite specimens as projectiles or targets at room temperature to increase understanding of the disruption process of iron bodies in near-Earth space. Our iron specimens (as projectiles or targets) were almost all smaller in size than their counterparts (as targets or projectiles, respectively). Experiments of impacts of steel specimens were also conducted for comparison. The fragment mass distribution of the iron material was different from that of rocks. In the iron fragmentation, a higher percentage of the mass was concentrated in larger fragments, probably due to the ductile nature of the material at room temperature. The largest fragment mass fraction f was dependent not only on the energy density but also on the size d of the specimen. We assumed a power-law dependence of the largest fragment mass fraction to initial peak pressure P0 normalized by a dynamic strength, Y, which was defined to be dependent on the size of the iron material. A least squares fit to the data of iron meteorite specimens resulted in the following relationship: f∝∝d, indicating a large size dependence of f. Additionally, the deformation of the iron materials in high-velocity shots was found to be most significant when the

  7. Ground-Laboratory to In-Space Atomic Oxygen Correlation for the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambler, Arielle H.; Inoshita, Karen E.; Roberts, Lily M.; Barbagallo, Claire E.; deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2) Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) polymers were exposed to the environment of low Earth orbit (LEO) for 3.95 years from 2001 to 2005. There were 41 different PEACE polymers, which were flown on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) in order to determine their atomic oxygen erosion yields. In LEO, atomic oxygen is an environmental durability threat, particularly for long duration mission exposures. Although spaceflight experiments, such as the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment, are ideal for determining LEO environmental durability of spacecraft materials, ground-laboratory testing is often relied upon for durability evaluation and prediction. Unfortunately, significant differences exist between LEO atomic oxygen exposure and atomic oxygen exposure in ground-laboratory facilities. These differences include variations in species, energies, thermal exposures and radiation exposures, all of which may result in different reactions and erosion rates. In an effort to improve the accuracy of ground-based durability testing, ground-laboratory to in-space atomic oxygen correlation experiments have been conducted. In these tests, the atomic oxygen erosion yields of the PEACE polymers were determined relative to Kapton H using a radio-frequency (RF) plasma asher (operated on air). The asher erosion yields were compared to the MISSE 2 PEACE erosion yields to determine the correlation between erosion rates in the two environments. This paper provides a summary of the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment; it reviews the specific polymers tested as well as the techniques used to determine erosion yield in the asher, and it provides a correlation between the space and ground laboratory erosion yield values. Using the PEACE polymers asher to in-space erosion yield ratios will allow more accurate in-space materials performance predictions to be made based on plasma asher durability evaluation.

  8. Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Nekovee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radio is being intensively researched as the enabling technology for license-exempt access to the so-called TV White Spaces (TVWS, large portions of spectrum in the UHF/VHF bands which become available on a geographical basis after digital switchover. Both in the US, and more recently, in the UK the regulators have given conditional endorsement to this new mode of access. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in technology, regulation, and standardisation of cognitive access to TVWS. It examines the spectrum opportunity and commercial use cases associated with this form of secondary access.

  9. Flat-space picture of gravity vs. General Relativity: a precision test for present ether-drift experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Consoli, M

    2007-01-01

    Modern ether-drift experiments in vacuum could in principle detect the tiny refractive index that, in a flat-space picture of gravity, is appropriate for an apparatus placed on the Earth's surface. In this picture, in fact, if there were a preferred reference frame, light on the Earth would exhibit a slight anisotropy with definite quantitative differences from General Relativity. By re-analyzing the data published by two modern experiments with rotating optical resonators, and concentrating on the part of the signal that should be free of spurious systematic effects, we have found evidences that would support the flat-space scenario.

  10. A Summer Camp Experience of Primary Student: Let's Learn Astronomy, Explore the Space Summer Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktamis, Hilal; Acar, Esin; Unal Coban, Gul

    2015-01-01

    It is important to structure children's knowledge and arouse their interest in subjects like astronomy and space. Although we now talk of travelling to the moon, space tourism etc., knowledge about astronomy and space is limited and perceptions of these subjects do not reflect scientific reality. Primary level students often have misconceptions…

  11. Radioactive cesium. Dynamics and transport in forestal food-webs; Radioaktivt cesium. Dynamik och transport i skogliga naeringsvaevar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palo, T.; Nelin, P. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Animal Ecology; Bergman, R.; Nylen, T. [FOA NBC Defence, Umeaa (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    This report summarises results from a radioecological study during 1994-1995 concerning turnover, redistribution and loss of radioactive Cesium (134 and 137) in boreal forest ecosystems, as well as uptake and transfer in important food-chains over moose, vole and vegetation. The basis for this report are 9 publications published 1994-95. These reports are presented in summary form. 9 refs, 17 figs.

  12. Experiment study of ATP system for free-space optical communications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yong-jun; LIU Yan-fei; DONG Ran; XIONG Zhun

    2011-01-01

    To meet the requirement of high tracking angular accuracy for the acquisition,tracking,and pointing (ATP) subsystem of the free-space optical communication,and provide the basis for the further optical communication between maritime mobile platforms,the experimental system,which executing part for the fine tracking is voice coil motor with high frequency and good performance for error compensation,is established,and the whole system can be controlled by personal computer.A series of experiments has been done for the simulation target of different uniform speed,and the data of tracking error for fine tracking and coarse tracking are collected,analyzed and evaluateds separately,and the real-time optical power of communication laser is also collected.The result shows that standard deviation for ATP system tracking error increases with the increase of target speed,while the range of tracking error appears to be no order.Furthermore,communication link can be hold for a long time.

  13. Salt balance: From space experiments to revolutionizing new clinical concepts on earth - A historical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzer, Rupert

    2014-11-01

    For a long time, sodium balance appeared to be a “done deal” and was thought to be well understood. However, experiments in preparation of space missions showed that the concept of osmotic sodium storage and close correlations of sodium with water balance are only part of the regulatory mechanisms of body salt. By now it has turned out that the human skin is an important storage place and regulator for sodium, that sodium storage involves macrophages which in turn salt-dependently co-regulate blood pressure, that body sodium also strongly influences bone and protein metabolism, and that immune functions are also strongly influenced by sodium. In addition, the aging process appears to lead to increased body sodium storage, which in turn might influence the aging process of the human body. The current review article summarizes the developments that have led to these revolutionizing new findings and concepts as well as consequences deriving from these findings. Therefore, it is not intended in this article to give a complete literature overview over the whole field but to focus on such key literature and considerations that led to the respective developments.

  14. Search for Cosmic-Ray Antiparticles with Balloon-borne and Space-borne Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, Ph

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses two different approaches for the measurement of cosmic-ray antiparticles in the GeV to TeV energy range. The first part of this thesis discusses the prospects of antiparticle flux measurements with the proposed PEBS detector. The project allots long duration balloon flights at one of Earth's poles at an altitude of 40 km. GEANT4 simulations were carried out which determine the atmospheric background and attenuation especially for antiparticles. The second part covers the AMS-02 experiment which will be installed in 2010 on the International Space Station at an altitude of about 400 km for about three years to measure cosmic rays without the influence of Earth's atmosphere. The present work focuses on the anticoincidence counter system (ACC). The ACC is needed to reduce the trigger rate during periods of high fluxes and to reject external particles crossing the tracker from the side or particles resulting from interactions within the detector which would otherwise disturb the clean charge...

  15. Caracas Seismological Museum: A space to develop an interactive experience between community and Venezuelan seismic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, D.; Galindo, L.; Granado, C.

    2009-05-01

    Caracas is a city with a relative high seismic hazard. The last damaged earthquake occurred in 1967. This is a fundamental fact to favor a policy that promote a scientific popularization center having as a prime mission, to spread knowledge about earth sciences, particularly seismology. Another face of this main purpose is to educate people about how to protect themselves in case of a natural seismic event occur. We present the characteristics and social impact of an effort to create in Caracas an open and alive space able to transform a visit in a meaningful experience, stimulating the interest in the natural history, the singular geological features and promoting dialogue and reflection among the visitors as a participants in a reality where awareness about the geological risks is a need to preserved live and ensure a right attitude towards decrease vulnerability among the population. One of the highlights of this project was to recover and to restore a diverse set of obsolete instruments as well as an old construction and its surrounding area, to design a playful and recreational spot to learn about seismic culture and vulnerability reduction with the community as a protagonist of their own social evolution by means of bolstering local resilience and improving earthquake preparedness.

  16. Parameters of optical signals registered with the AZT-33IK telescope in active Radar-Progress space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eselevich, Maksim; Khakhinov, Vitaliy; Klunko, Evgeniy

    2016-09-01

    Images of Progress cargo spacecraft (PCS) and areas around them were captured by the AZT-33IK optical telescope (Sayan Observatory of ISTP SB RAS) during sessions of the active Radar-Progress space experiment. We took images of exhaust and fuel jets when propulsion systems worked and after they were cut off, during fuel system purging. In different sessions of the experiment, PCS had different orientations relative to the telescope, thus allowing us to find some parameters of the observed phenomena. These parameters make it possible to determine instants of engine ignitions, to estimate velocities of the jets, and, if necessary, to control the geometry of the space experiment. The paper reports common features of optical signals from jets measured in these experiments.

  17. Subsurface Structure in the Martian Polar Layered Deposits: The Deep Space 2 Impact Accelerometry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moersch, J. E.; Lorenz, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    While primarily a technology demonstration mission, the New Millenium Mars Microprobes (also known as Deep Space 2, or simply DS2)will also provide the first in situ science measurements of the martian subsurface. The DS2 impact accelerometry experiment will provide both engineering data about the depth of probe emplacement and science data about the physical nature of the subsurface at the probes' landing sites. Little is known about the detailed physical properties or small-scale vertical structure of the subsurface at the DS2 landing site in the southern martian polar layered deposits. Imaging data from the Viking Orbiters and Mars Global Surveyor reveal alternating bands of light and dark material in this region with thicknesses at least as small as the limit of resolution, about 10 m. The overall composition of these layers is poorly constrained, but generally thought to be a mixture of dust and ice with the layers being caused by variations in the dust/ice ratio, or perhaps by dust deposits of different densities. Low thermal inertias in the region suggest that the top few centimeters of the surface are composed of a mantling of fine-grained dust. However, 3.5-cm radar returns indicate that the maximum depth of this dust is not greater than a few tens of centimeters. Thermal models generally agree that, while the layered deposits do provide a potential near-surface reservoir for ice, the uppermost few centimeters to meters in these regions are likely to be ice-free because of sublimation losses. Finally, while it is generally agreed that the layered deposits are the product of variations in the martian climate, no direct correlation has been made between band sequences and specific climate changes. Our intention is to shed light on some of these questions about the martian polar layered deposits by using the DS2 accelerometry experiment to determine the physical nature of the layered deposits, and to detect the presence of any subsurface layering of dust, ice

  18. Parity violation in atomic cesium and alternatives to the standard model of electroweak interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C. A.

    1983-08-01

    We study the implications of the recent observation of a parity violation in atomic cesium. After a discussion of the uncertainties associated with the atomic physics calculations we derive conservative bounds for the weak charge QW. These bounds are used to put constraints on alternatives to the standard electroweak model, involving an ``extra U(1)'' gauge group. We analyze the possibility that the extra gauge boson might be very and give, as a by-product, the typical range of momentum transfer explored in atomic parity violation experiments. Laboratoire Propre du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique associée à l'Ecole Normale Supérieure et à l'Université de Paris Sud.

  19. NASA's first in-space optical gyroscope: A technology experiment on the X ray Timing Explorer spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Glenn; Kaufman, David M.; Krainak, Michael; Sanders, Glenn; Taylor, Bill; Schulze, Norman R.

    1993-01-01

    A technology experiment on the X-ray Timing Explorer spacecraft to determine the feasibility of Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyroscopes for space flight navigation is described. The experiment consists of placing a medium grade fiber optic gyroscope in parallel with the spacecraft's inertial reference unit. The performance of the fiber optic gyroscope will be monitored and compared to the primary mechanical gyroscope's performance throughout the two-year mission life.

  20. Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) Cell Culture Unit (CCU) and incubator for International Space Station (ISS) cell culture experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriesche, Donald; Parrish, Joseph; Kirven-Brooks, Melissa; Fahlen, Thomas; Larenas, Patricia; Havens, Cindy; Nakamura, Gail; Sun, Liping; Krebs, Chris; de Luis, Javier; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Searby, Nancy D

    2004-03-01

    The CCU and Incubator are habitats under development by SSBRP for gravitational biology research on ISS. They will accommodate multiple specimen types and reside in either Habitat Holding Racks, or the Centrifuge Rotor, which provides selectable gravity levels of up to 2 g. The CCU can support multiple Cell Specimen Chambers, CSCs (18, 9 or 6 CSCs; 3, 10 or 30 mL in volume, respectively). CSCs are temperature controlled from 4-39 degrees C, with heat shock to 45 degrees C. CCU provides automated nutrient supply, magnetic stirring, pH/O2 monitoring, gas supply, specimen lighting, and video microscopy. Sixty sample containers holding up to 2 mL each, stored at 4-39 degrees C, are available for automated cell sampling, subculture, and injection of additives and fixatives. CSCs, sample containers, and fresh/spent media bags are crew-replaceable for long-term experiments. The Incubator provides a 4-45 degrees C controlled environment for life science experiments or storage of experimental reagents. Specimen containers and experiment unique equipment are experimenter-provided. The Specimen Chamber exchanges air with ISS cabin and has 18.8 liters of usable volume that can accommodate six trays and the following instrumentation: five relocatable thermometers, two 60 W power outlets, four analog ports, and one each relative humidity sensor, video port, ethernet port and digital input/output port.

  1. Simulation of organic molecule formation in solar system environments-The Miller-Urey Experiment in Space project overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, J. Michelle; Ehrenfruend, Pascale; Botta, Oliver; Blum, Jurgen; Schrapler, Rainer; van Dongen, Joost; Palmans, Anja; Sephton, Mark A.; Martins, Zita; Cleaves, Henderson J.; Ricco, Antonio

    The Miller-Urey Experiment in space (MUE) investigates the formation of potential prebiotic organic compounds in the early solar system environment. The MUE experiment will be sent to and retrieved from the International Space Station (ISS), where it will be performed inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). The goal of this space experiment is to understand prebiotic reactions in microgravity by simulating environments of the early solar nebula. The dynamic environment of the solar nebula with the simultaneous presence of gas, particles, and energetic processes, including shock waves, lightning, and radiation may trigger a rich organic chemistry leading to organic molecules. These environments will be simulated in six fabricated vials containing various gas mixtures as well as solid particles. Two gas mixture compositions will be tested and subjected to continuous spark discharges for 48, 96, and 192 hours. Silicate particles will serve as surfaces on which thin water ice mantles can accrete. The particles will move repeatedly through a high-voltage spark discharge in microgravity, enabling chemical re-actions analogous to the original Miller-Urey experiment. The experiment will be performed at low temperatures (-5 C), slowing hydrolysis and improving chances of detection of interme-diates, initial products, and their distributions. Executing the Miller-Urey experiment in the space environment (microgravity) allows us to simulate conditions that could have prevailed in the energetic early solar nebula and provides insights into the chemical pathways that may occur in forming planetary systems. Analysis will be performed post-flight using chemical analytical methods. The anticipated results will provide information about chemical reaction pathways to form organic compounds in space environment, emphasizing abiotic chemical pathways and mechanisms that could have been crucial in the formation of biologically relevant compounds such as amino acids and

  2. Development of partitioning method. Adsorption of cesium with mordenite in acidic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnet, L.; Morita, Yasuji; Yamagishi, Isao; Kubota, Masumitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    Adsorption of cesium with mordenite from a acidic solution, typically from a 0.5 mol/L nitric acid solution, was studied to examine the possibility to design a new separation scheme for partitioning of high-level liquid waste. Batch adsorption experiments showed that three mordenites examined (natural mordenite and two synthetic mordenites Zeolon 900Na and 900H) have very close behavior with the parameters of adsorption kinetics, the saturation capacity by Langmuir equation, the distribution coefficient of Cs and adsorption of other elements. In the Cs adsorption with the natural mordenite at 0.5 mol/L nitric acid, distribution coefficient was 1150 ml/g and the saturation capacity was 0.64 mmol/g. In the adsorption of Cs on column using the natural mordenite, the flow rate of the Cs solution modified only the 5% breakthrough point and gave no influence on the total capacity of Cs. Column experiments with a mixed solution of Cs, Rb, Na, Ba, Sr, Cr, Ni, Ru, Rh and Pd showed that cesium was adsorbed very selectively. Only about 4% of rubidium in a molar ratio were retained in the column. The total quantity of Cs and Rb adsorbed was 0.51 mmol/g at 0.5 mol/L nitric acid. Elution of Cs (and Rb) with 4 mol/L nitric acid was performed against the column of the loaded natural mordenite. The adsorbed Cs and Rb were well eluted, and a good mass balance was obtained between the adsorbed quantity by breakthrough curves and the quantity found in the eluate. (author)

  3. Autler-Townes doublet in the absorption spectra for the transition between excited states of cold cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Qiang-Bing; Yang Bao-Dong; Yang Jian-Feng; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2010-01-01

    Autler-Townes splitting in absorption spectra of the excited states 6 2P3/2 - 82S1/2 of cold cesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap has been observed.Experimental data of the Autler-Townes splitting fit well to the dressedatom theory,by which the fact of the cold atoms dressed by cooling/trapping laser beams is revealed.The results of the theoretical fitting with experiment not only told us the effective Rabi frequency cold atoms experienced,but also could be used for measuring the probability amplitudes of the dressed states.

  4. Further Analyses of the NASA Glenn Research Center Solar Cell and Photovoltaic Materials Experiment Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Matthew G.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Piszczor, Michael F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate air mass zero (AM0) measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has flown an experiment designed to measure the electrical performance of several solar cells onboard NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Mission's (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4) on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Four industry and government partners provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment was positioned on the exterior of the station for approximately eight months, and was completely self-contained, providing its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four-junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multi-Junction (IMM) cells were evaluated and the results will be compared to ground-based measurement methods.

  5. How to Draw on the Urban-rural Space Evolution Experience of Foreign Metropolis for Xi’an?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lufeng; DUAN

    2013-01-01

    "Space" is the place where people take social and economic activities,as well as the carrier supporting any public life style and rights and acts.Urban and rural places are the two main parts that comprise the regional economic system,and only when they are developed harmoniously can the overall economic optimization and social welfare maximization come true.On basis of analyzing the experience and mechanism of urban and rural spaces of London,New York and Tokyo 3 typical international metropolitan area and learning from their development experience,the study has proposed development strategies for the integration of urban-rural space of Xi’an City according to its current development situation.

  6. Service data acquisition and onboard control for “GRIS-BD” unit in “GRIS” space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyanenko, A. S.; Lupar, E. E.; Trofimov, Yu A.; Faradzhaev, R. M.; Yurov, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    Problems of onboard space scientific devices control, collecting auxiliary service information about working capacity, conditions of experiment carrying out and preliminary data processing for real time calibration and stabilizing of operational parameters are actual for any space devices. In this paper we describe and discuss service data acquisition and onboard control for “GRIS-BD” unit in “GRIS” space experiment onboard ISS. This system provides temperature measurements in different equipment parts (in power supplies, on scintillation crystals for energy ranges correction, etc.), precision thresholds measurements in discrimination circuits, status different switching on/off (in real time), precision control detector parameters by high-voltage regulation, fine thresholds changing (analog regulation), different switching on/off (in real time), statistical analysis of data flows and change of operation modes of the device.

  7. Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Particles studies from space: super-EUSO, a possible next-generation experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Petrolini, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    After the Pierre Auger Observatory, it is likely that space-based experiments might be required for next-generation studies of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Particles. An overview of this challenging task is presented, emphasizing the main design issues, the criticalities and the intermediate steps required to make this challenging task a reality.

  8. Space experiment TUS on board the Lomonosov satellite as pathfinder of JEM-EUSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    Space-based detectors for the study of extreme energy cosmic rays (EECR) are being prepared as a promising new method for detecting highest energy cosmic rays. A pioneering space device - the "tracking ultraviolet set-up" (TUS) - is in the last stage of its construction and testing. The TUS detector will collect preliminary data on EECR in the conditions of a space environment, which will be extremely useful for planning the major JEM-EUSO detector operation.

  9. Dedicated Slosh Dynamics Experiment on ISS using SPHERES (Advanced Space Operations in CR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Synchronized Position, Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites – VERTIGO (SPHERES-VERTIGO) developed by the Massachusetts Institute of...

  10. Multi scale Disaster Risk Reduction Systems Space and Community based Experiences over HKH Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, D. R.; Shrestha, M.; Shrestha, N.; Debnath, B.; Jishi, G.; Bajracharya, R.; Dhonju, H. K.; Pradhan, S.

    2014-11-01

    An increasing trend in the recurrence of natural disasters and associated impacts due to Floods, Glacier Lake out bursts, landslides and forest fire is reported over Hindu Kush Himalyan (HKH) region. Climate change and anthropogenic coupled factors are identified as primary factors for such increased vulnerability. The large degree of poverty, lack of infrastructure, poor accessibility and uncertainties involved in understanding high altitude land surface and climate dynamics poses serious challenges in reducing disaster vulnerability and mitigating disaster impacts. In this context effective development of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) protocols and mechanisms have been realized as an urgent need. The paper presents the adoption and experiences of multi scale DRR systems across different Himalayan member countries ranging from community based indigenous early warning to space based emergency response and decision support systems. The Establishment of a Regional Flood Information System (HKH-HYCOS) over Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) and Indus river basins promoted the timely exchange of flood data and information for the reduction of flood vulnerability within and among the participating countries. Satellite based forest fire alert systems evoked significant response among diverse stakeholders to optimize fire incidence and control. Satellite rainfall estimation products, satellite altimetry based flood early warning systems, flood inundation modelling and products, model derived hydrology flow products from different global data-sharing networks constitutes diverse information to support multi scale DRR systems. Community-based Flood Early Warning System (FEWS) enabled by wireless technology established over the Singara and Jiadhal rivers in Assam also stands as one of the promising examples of minimizing flood risk. Disaster database and information system and decision support tools in Nepal serves as potential tool to support diverse stakeholders.

  11. Lakes on Early Mars: A Space-for-Time Substitution Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    Lakes were abundant and active on early Mars for 100s millions of years. As global climate change prevented liquid water from remaining stable at the surface, they left behind key evidence of their past existence and duration in the landscape morphology, mineralogy, composition, and topography. As significant markers of environmental change, they have become critical exploration targets for our understanding of Mars past habitability potential, and the preservation potential of their sediments make them high-priority candidate landing sites for the upcoming NASA and ESA rover missions that will search for evidence of biosignatures on early Mars. Identifying and caching the most valuable samples with these missions will require to both recognize these signatures, the geological and environmental processes that may have modified them through time, the spatiotemporal constraints these processes could have imposed on a biogeological record, and their significance for biosignatures and their preservation potential. To help us understand where, what, and how to search on Mars, the Chilean Atacama desert, Altiplano, and the High Andes have provided robust analog study sites over the past 20 years. Exposed to the strongest solar irradiance measured so far on our planet, from sea level up to 6,000 m elevation, and from glacial regions to some of the most arid conditions on Earth, these unique sites allow us to perform a space-for-time substitution experiments that shows the likely evolution of martian lake habitats over time from the early Noachian to the Hesperian. The observed changes provide critical clues about plausible scenarios for the evolution of habitability and life potential. They also give us pointers on how increased environmental extremes linked to a thinning unstable atmosphere, increasing UV, desiccation, and geological and climate changes, may have impacted biodiversity at local and global scale.

  12. LIFE Experiment: Isolation of Cryptoendolithic Organisms from Antarctic Colonized Sandstone Exposed to Space and Simulated Mars Conditions on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzi, Giuliano; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Albertano, Patrizia; Onofri, Silvano

    2012-06-01

    Desiccated Antarctic rocks colonized by cryptoendolithic communities were exposed on the International Space Station (ISS) to space and simulated Mars conditions (LiFE— Lichens and Fungi Experiment). After 1.5 years in space samples were retrieved, rehydrated and spread on different culture media. Colonies of a green alga and a pink-coloured fungus developed on Malt-Agar medium; they were isolated from a sample exposed to simulated Mars conditions beneath a 0.1 % T Suprasil neutral density filter and from a sample exposed to space vacuum without solar radiation exposure, respectively. None of the other flight samples showed any growth after incubation. The two organisms able to grow were identified at genus level by Small SubUnit (SSU) and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) rDNA sequencing as Stichococcus sp. (green alga) and Acarospora sp. (lichenized fungal genus) respectively. The data in the present study provide experimental information on the possibility of eukaryotic life transfer from one planet to another by means of rocks and of survival in Mars environment.

  13. LIFE experiment: isolation of cryptoendolithic organisms from Antarctic colonized sandstone exposed to space and simulated Mars conditions on the international space station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzi, Giuliano; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Albertano, Patrizia; Onofri, Silvano

    2012-06-01

    Desiccated Antarctic rocks colonized by cryptoendolithic communities were exposed on the International Space Station (ISS) to space and simulated Mars conditions (LiFE-Lichens and Fungi Experiment). After 1.5 years in space samples were retrieved, rehydrated and spread on different culture media. Colonies of a green alga and a pink-coloured fungus developed on Malt-Agar medium; they were isolated from a sample exposed to simulated Mars conditions beneath a 0.1 % T Suprasil neutral density filter and from a sample exposed to space vacuum without solar radiation exposure, respectively. None of the other flight samples showed any growth after incubation. The two organisms able to grow were identified at genus level by Small SubUnit (SSU) and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) rDNA sequencing as Stichococcus sp. (green alga) and Acarospora sp. (lichenized fungal genus) respectively. The data in the present study provide experimental information on the possibility of eukaryotic life transfer from one planet to another by means of rocks and of survival in Mars environment.

  14. Three-dimensional growth of human endothelial cells in an automated cell culture experiment container during the SpaceX CRS-8 ISS space mission - The SPHEROIDS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Jessica; Gass, Samuel; Nebuloni, Stefano; Echegoyen, David; Riwaldt, Stefan; Baake, Christin; Bauer, Johann; Corydon, Thomas J; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Human endothelial cells (ECs) were sent to the International Space Station (ISS) to determine the impact of microgravity on the formation of three-dimensional structures. For this project, an automatic experiment unit (EU) was designed allowing cell culture in space. In order to enable a safe cell culture, cell nourishment and fixation after a pre-programmed timeframe, the materials used for construction of the EUs were tested in regard to their biocompatibility. These tests revealed a high biocompatibility for all parts of the EUs, which were in contact with the cells or the medium used. Most importantly, we found polyether ether ketones for surrounding the incubation chamber, which kept cellular viability above 80% and allowed the cells to adhere as long as they were exposed to normal gravity. After assembling the EU the ECs were cultured therein, where they showed good cell viability at least for 14 days. In addition, the functionality of the automatic medium exchange, and fixation procedures were confirmed. Two days before launch, the ECs were cultured in the EUs, which were afterwards mounted on the SpaceX CRS-8 rocket. 5 and 12 days after launch the cells were fixed. Subsequent analyses revealed a scaffold-free formation of spheroids in space.

  15. Expose-R experiment on effects of open space condition on survivorship in dormant stages of aquatic invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, Victor; Novikova, Nataliya; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Yusoff, Fatimah; Azuraidi, Osman

    2012-07-01

    Dormancy protects animals and plants in harsh environmental conditions from months up to hundred years. This phenomenon is perspective for space researches especially for interplanetary missions. Direct experiments in open space BYORYSK supported in principle the fact of survivorship of bacteria, fungi spores, seed of plants and crustacean dormant cysts. Even though the rate of survivorship in long-term treatments was low but good enough to conclude that biological invasion even to Mars is a real danger. As soon as the BYORYSK lunch was made of metal the possibility for resting stages to survive under UV treatment in vacuum without some protection was not clear. To test it an ESA and RSA equipment titled EXPOSE-R was applied. The EXPOSE-R facility was an external facility attached to the outside of the Zvezda Service Module in ISS in the end of November 2008. It had glace windows transparent for UV-radiation and possibility to measure temperature, space- and UV-radiation. Among a number of experiments requiring exposure to the open space environment it had a biological launch containing resting stages of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. These stages included dried ephippia of cladoceran Daphnia magna differentiated on size, dormant eggs of ostracode Eucypris ornate, cysts of fair-shrimp Streptocephalus torvicornis ( all from hemi desert Caspian area) and Artemis salina from salt lake Crimean populations. All dormant stages were kept in transparent to UV plastic bags placed in three layers. After about two years of exposing in open space dormant stages of 3 species A. salina, D. magna, S. torvicornis successfully survived at different scales but in second and third layers only . The highest level of survivorship was found in A. salina cysts. In preliminary land experiments that imitated land EXPOSE imitation of outside space station UV and vacuum conditions survivorship in resting eggs of D .magna, S. torvicornis and E. ornate was tested also. The total UV dose of

  16. Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Scott Lee

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is an update from the 2011 and 2012 talks given to Teachers in Space. These slides include some recent space weather issues that are hot topics, including the adding our USEWX and USEWX partners, and information relevant to GSFC researchers.

  17. Genelab: Scientific Partnerships and an Open-Access Database to Maximize Usage of Omics Data from Space Biology Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsch, S. S.; Galazka, J..; Berrios, D. C; Chakravarty, K.; Fogle, H.; Lai, S.; Bokyo, V.; Timucin, L. R.; Tran, P.; Skidmore, M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's mission includes expanding our understanding of biological systems to improve life on Earth and to enable long-duration human exploration of space. The GeneLab Data System (GLDS) is NASA's premier open-access omics data platform for biological experiments. GLDS houses standards-compliant, high-throughput sequencing and other omics data from spaceflight-relevant experiments. The GeneLab project at NASA-Ames Research Center is developing the database, and also partnering with spaceflight projects through sharing or augmentation of experiment samples to expand omics analyses on precious spaceflight samples. The partnerships ensure that the maximum amount of data is garnered from spaceflight experiments and made publically available as rapidly as possible via the GLDS. GLDS Version 1.0, went online in April 2015. Software updates and new data releases occur at least quarterly. As of October 2016, the GLDS contains 80 datasets and has search and download capabilities. Version 2.0 is slated for release in September of 2017 and will have expanded, integrated search capabilities leveraging other public omics databases (NCBI GEO, PRIDE, MG-RAST). Future versions in this multi-phase project will provide a collaborative platform for omics data analysis. Data from experiments that explore the biological effects of the spaceflight environment on a wide variety of model organisms are housed in the GLDS including data from rodents, invertebrates, plants and microbes. Human datasets are currently limited to those with anonymized data (e.g., from cultured cell lines). GeneLab ensures prompt release and open access to high-throughput genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics data from spaceflight and ground-based simulations of microgravity, radiation or other space environment factors. The data are meticulously curated to assure that accurate experimental and sample processing metadata are included with each data set. GLDS download volumes indicate strong

  18. Calibration Experiments for Identification of Space Heavy Ions by CR-39

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeiZengquan; N.Yasudab; XieHengmei; K.Fujitakab; M.T.Meic

    2003-01-01

    A subject "Study of mechanism and application of space radiation induced mutation breeding on rice" has been established in NSFC, China. In order to verify space heavy particles being main cause (in addition, microgravity, vacuum, magnetic field etc.) of induced biological effects in space and in order to study correlation of various mutation and its serious degree with different particle parameters, measurement and identification of the particles are necessary. CR-39 sheets are a part of a sandwich detecting system. The system consists of rice seeds and CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors. The seeds hit by space particles could be determined withetched tracks in CR-39. Furthermore, the space heavy particles could be identified with measured parameters of the tracks such as residual range and etch rate.

  19. Rational Design of Cesium-Selective Ionophores and Chemosensors: Dihydrocalix[4]arene Crown-6 Ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Engle, Nancy L.; Haverlock, Tamara J.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Urvoas, Agathe; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2003-12-15

    Molecular mechanics calculations performed on calix[4]arene crown-6 ethers predict that the 1,3-dihydro derivatives will exhibit greater complementarity for potassium and cesium ions than the parent 1,3-dialkoxy calix crowns. The X-ray crystal structures of 1,3-alt bis-octyloxycalix[4]arene benzocrown-6 ether, dihydrocalix[4]arene benzocrown-6 ether, and the cesium nitrate complex of dihydrocalix[4]arene benzocrown-6 ether were determined. The cesium complex structure corresponds closely to the structure predicted by molecular mechanics. The dihydrocalix[4]arene crown-6 ethers exhibit enhanced cesium selectivity in the extraction of alkali metal salts and provide a platform for a highly sensitive and selective cesium chemosensor.

  20. [Variation in amount of radioactive cesium before and after cooking dry shiitake and beef].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshi, Hiromi; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Hachisuka, Akiko; Matsuda, Rieko

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the change of radioactive cesium content in food due to cooking in order to estimate the internal radiation exposure due to from radioactive materials in food. Our results revealed that soaking dry shiitake in water decreased the radioactive cesium content by about 50%, compared with that present in uncooked shiitake. Radioactive cesium in beef was decreased by about 10%, 12%, 60-65% and 80% by grilling, frying, boiling and stewing, respectively, compared to uncooked beef. For cooked beef, the decrease in the ratio of radioactive cesium was significantly different among the types of cooking. The decrease ratio of radioactive cesium in boiled and stewed beef was 8 times higher than that in grilled and fried beef.

  1. Genotoxicity testing on the international space station: Preparatory work on the SOS-LUX test as part of the space experiment TRIPLE-LUX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojicic, Nevena; Walrafen, David; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Weisshaar, Maria-Paz; Horneck, Gerda

    Harmful environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to influence future manned space missions. The Radiation Biology Unit at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of recognizing DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such a bioassay is the SOS-LUX test, which represents the radiobiological part of the German space experiment "Gene, immune and cellular responses to single and combined space flight conditions (TRIPLE-LUX)" which has been selected by the IDI/USRA Peer Review Panel for NASA/ESA to be performed on the International Space Station (ISS). It will supply basic information on the genotoxic response to radiation applied in microgravity. The biological end-point under investigation will depend on the bacterial SOS response brought about by genetically modified bacteria that are transformed with the pSWITCH plasmid (constructed from the plasmids pPLS-1 and pGFPuv). The luminescent/fluorescent bioassay SWITCH (SWITCH: Salmonella Weighting of Induced Toxicity Cyto/GenoTox for Human Health) as successor of the SOS-LUX test for rapid toxicity (genotoxicity and cytotoxicity) testing, makes use of two sensing and reporting systems for the two biological endpoints under investigation: the SOS-LUX test and the LAC- Fluoro test. The SWITCH plasmid carries the promoterless lux operon of Photobacterium leiognathi as reporter element under the control of the DNA-damage-dependent SOS promoter of ColD as sensor element (for genotoxicity testing) and the sequences for a hybrid protein consisting of β-galactosidase and GFPuv of Aequorea victoria as reporter element under the control of the (in Salmonella constitutively active) LAC promoter of Escherichia coli as sensor element (for cytotoxicity testing). The system has worked properly for terrestrial applications during the first experiments. Experiments using X-rays and UV radiation

  2. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; GENG Tao; YAN Shubin; LI Gang; ZHANG Jing; WANG Junmin; PENG Kunchi; ZHANG Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  3. Materials Science Experiment Module Accommodation within the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, D. B.; Jayroe, R. R.; McCarley, K. S.

    2000-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack I (MSRR-1) of the Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) is a modular facility designed to accommodate two Experiment Modules (EM) simultaneously on board the International Space Station (ISS). One of these EMs will be the NASA/ESA EM being, developed collaboratively by NASA and the European Space Agency. The other EM position will be occupied by various multi-user EMs that will be exchanged in-orbit to accommodate a variety of materials science investigations. This paper discusses the resources, services, and allocations available to the EMs and briefly describes performance capabilities of the EMs currently planned for flight.

  4. Hands-on Space Experiments from Cradle to Grave: The Role of the Sounding Rocket Program in Developing Human Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, S.

    2005-12-01

    Sounding rockets in university research provide a unique opportunity to train future space scientists and engineers. Besides fitting the typical schedule of a student, they allow a small group of students to be involved in all aspects of a space project from its inception through execution to a conclusion involving scientific discovery. Furthermore, universities with sounding rocket programs are cradles of innovations where the interdisciplinary nature of space experimentation is nurtured. These programs have formed the core research of many of the current Principal Investigators of NASA Space Science Missions. Additionally, they typically involve a large number of undergraduate students who gain in-depth experience into well-defined and critical components of a space mission. Researchers involved in sounding rocket experiments typically develop the science payload consisting of one or more instrument with the NASA Sounding Rocket Program Office (SRPO) providing all support necessary to make the science program a success. Unlike satellite missions, the sounding rocket experiments offer an opportunity to take more risks in terms of their science return. Some of these risks come in the form of new technology invention and development. Sounding rockets, with their flexible schedule and fewer formal procedural requirements, thus play an important role in maturing technology and developing new capabilities for satellite missions. The Student Launch Program was designed by NASA to provide a new opportunity where space science took a back seat to education and training. The program required that the proposing team provide components such as the nose cone, power and telemetry systems, which are typically provided to rocket experimenters by SRPO. The students involved in such programs thus gained invaluable experience with "mini-satellite" missions. We believe that they are essential for the long-term vitality of the space program and maintaining a technology

  5. The results of the space technological experiments performed with the suprconducting and magnetic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailov, B. P.; Torchinova, R. S.; Bychkova, M. I.

    On board the orbital complex "Salyut-6-Soyuz" during long-term near 0-gravity space flight the technological experiments on synthesis of the superconducting MoGa 5, MO 3Ga and Nb 3Sn intermetallic compounds by means of liquid-phase diffusion and on bulk crystallization of the hypoeutectic superconducting Pb-Sn alloy and magnetically ordered Gd 3Co and (Gd 0.2Tb 0.8) 3Co compounds have been performed. During the process of the liquid-phase diffusion considerable changes of the formation of the reaction layers (mechanisms, phase composition, thickness, etc.) in the superconducting Mo-Ga and Nb-Sn systems were observed. MoGa 5, Nb 6Sn 5 and NbSn 2 phases were found in the ground-based samples while in the flight samples the formation of MoGa 5, Mo 3Ga, Nb 3Sn and Nb 6Sn 5 phases was observed. As a result of the changes of the phase composition of the diffusion layers in the flight samples two superconducting transitions at 18.3 and 5.7 K were established (only one transition at 6.9K was measured for the ground-based sample) (Savitsky et al., Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Metals5, 224-232, 1982; Zemskov et al., Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Physics49, 673-680, 1985). Considerable increasing of the critical current measured for the Pb-Sn flight sample has been observed (Savitsky et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR257, 102-104, 1981; Zemskov et al., 1985). Better homogeneity and crystal structure perfection of the flight Gd 3Co and (Gd 0.2Tb 0.8) 3Co samples have been established by means of the micro-zonde and low-temperature X-ray technique (Savitsky et al., Acta Astronautica11, 691-696, 1984; Zemskov et al., 1985). Different behaviour of the ground-based and flight samples in the process of magnetization and the displacements of the temperatures of the magnetic phase transitions have been observed.

  6. Resistance to Extreme Stresses in the Tardigrada: Experiments on Earth and in Space and Astrobiological Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecchi, L.; Altiero, T.; Guidetti, R.; Cesari, M.; Rizzo, A. M.; Bertolani, R.

    2010-04-01

    The ability of tardigrades to enter cryptobiosis al-lows them to resist to extreme stresses: very low or high temperatures, chemicals, high pressure, ionizing and UV radiations This has lead to propose tardigrades as suitable model in space research.

  7. Microorganisms and biomolecules in space environment experiment ES 029 on spacelab-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.; Bücker, H.; Reitz, G.; Requardt, H.; Dose, K.; Martens, K. D.; Bieger, A.; Mennigmann, H. D.; Weber, P.

    Bacterial spores are proper test organisms for studying problems of space biology and exobiology. During the Spacelab 1 mission, studies on the limiting factors for survival of Bacillus subtilis spores in free space have been performed. An exposure tray on the pallet of Spacelab 1 accomodated 316 samples of dry spores for treatment with space vacuum and/or the following selected wavelengths of solar UV: > 170 nm, 220 nm, 240nm, 260nm and 280 nm. After recovery, inactivation, mutation induction, reparability, and photochemical damages in DNA and protein have been studied. The results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of increased UV sensitivity of bacterial spores in vacuo and to a better assessment of the chance of survival of resistant forms in space and of interplanetary transfer of life.

  8. Designing Public Space for Mobility: Contestation, Negotiation and Experiment at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaeva, Anna

    2012-01-01

    the complexity and interdependency of the interests at stake in the airport design, as well the value of an airport terminal as an urban design exercise. This is particularly relevant in the discussion of the transformation of spaces of mobility, such as airports or railway stations, into multifunctional public......The paper investigates airport design, using the example of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, from the point of view of managers, architects and designers. It is argued that existing accounts of the airport as a space of transit as well as a place for shopping and entertainment have underrated...... spaces and may also be valid for urban spaces where mobilities are becoming increasingly important. The paper analyses the challenges and opportunities that arise in such design situations, tracing the recent transformations of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol from the perspective of professionals who have...

  9. The Kosmos-1129 biosatellite. [experiments in biological effects of space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    A number of experiments, designed by participating specialists from several countries, are described. The experiments included studies in biorhythm, stress, body parts, behavior, ontogenesis, and gravitational preference. The biological subjects of the experiments were retrieved immediately after the landing of the satellite and examined in a field laboratory.

  10. Making Space for Experimentation, Collaboration, and Play: Re-Imagining the Drop-in Visitor Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostov, Merilee

    2014-01-01

    In late 2006, the Columbus Museum of Art education department adopted a new framework that established creativity as the lens for learning and visitor experiences. But what does creativity look like in a gallery experience? What are visitor attitudes toward creativity? This article explores how the drop-in visitor experience was reimagined at the…

  11. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  12. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  13. Correction of the equilibrium temperature caused by slight evaporation of water in protein crystal growth cells during long-term space experiments at International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takahisa; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Murayama, Kenta; Fukuyama, Seijiro; Hosokawa, Kouhei; Oshi, Kentaro; Ito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Tachibana, Masaru; Miura, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    The normal growth rates of the {110} faces of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals, R, were measured as a function of the supersaturation σ parameter using a reflection type interferometer under μG at the International Space Station (NanoStep Project). Since water slightly evaporated from in situ observation cells during a long-term space station experiment for several months, equilibrium temperature T(e) changed, and the actual σ, however, significantly increased mainly due to the increase in salt concentration C(s). To correct σ, the actual C(s) and protein concentration C(p), which correctly represent the measured T(e) value in space, were first calculated. Second, a new solubility curve with the corrected C(s) was plotted. Finally, the revised σ was obtained from the new solubility curve. This correction method successfully revealed that the 2.8% water was evaporated from the solution, leading to 2.8% increase in the C(s) and C(p) of the solution.

  14. Field and photo-emission in a short-pulse, high-charge Cesium telluride RF photoinjector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Eric E.

    A new high-charge RF gun is now operating at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The 1.5 cell 1.3 GHz gun uses a Cesium telluride photocathode driven with a 248 nm laser to provide short-pulse, high charge electron beams for the new 75 MeV drive beamline. The high-gradient RF gun (peak field on the cathode > 80MV/m) is a key piece of the facility upgrade. The large Cs2Te photocathode (diameter > 30 mm) was fabricated in-house. The photo-injector will be used to generate high-charge, short pulse, single bunches (Q > 100 nC) and bunch-trains (Q > 1000 nC) for wakefield experiments, typically involving dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Details of the photocathode fabrication process and the results of associated diagnostic measurements are presented, including QE measurements and work function measurements performed with a Kelvin probe. Fieldemitted dark current from the Cs2Te cathode was measured during RF conditioning and characterized. Fowler-Nordheim plots of the data are presented and compared to similar measurements made using a copper cathode in the initial phase of conditioning. The results for cesium telluride exhibited non-linear regions within the Fowler-Nordheim plots similar to previous experimental results for other p-type semiconductors. Results of quantum efficiency (QE) studies are presented with the cathode operating in both single and bunch-train modes. QE uniformity and lifetime studies are presented. During commissioning, the cesium telluride photocathode produced bunch-charge of 100 nC, breaking the previous record. No evidence of bunch-train position-dependence of QE was found when generating four-bunch trains with total charge up to 200 nC.

  15. Uranium and cesium accumulation in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) and its potential for uranium rhizofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minjune; Jawitz, James W; Lee, Minhee

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory scale rhizofiltration experiments were performed to investigate uranium and cesium accumulation in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) and its potential for treatment of uranium contaminated groundwater. During 72 h of rhizofiltration, the roots of the bean accumulated uranium and cesium to concentrations 317-1019 times above the initial concentrations, which ranged from 100 to 700 μg l(-1) in artificially contaminated solutions. When the pH of the solution was adjusted to 3, the ability to accumulate uranium was 1.6 times higher than it was for solutions of pH 7 and pH 9. With an initial uranium concentration of 240 μg l(-1) in genuine groundwater at pH 5, the bean reduced the uranium concentration by 90.2% (to 23.6 μg l(-1)) within 12 h and by 98.9% (to 2.8 μg l(-1)) within 72 h. A laboratory scale continuous clean-up system reduced uranium concentrations from 240 μg l(-1) to below 10 μg l(-1) in 56 h; the whole uranium concentration in the bean roots during system operation was more than 2600 μg g(-1) on a dry weight basis. Using SEM and EDS analyses, the uranium removal in solution at pH 7 was determined based on adsorption and precipitation on the root surface in the form of insoluble uranium compounds. The present results demonstrate that the rhizofiltration technique using beans efficiently removes uranium and cesium from groundwater as an eco-friendly and cost-effective method.

  16. The Affect of the Space Environment on the Survival of Halorubrum Chaoviator and Synechococcus (Nageli): Data from the Space Experiment OSMO on EXPOSE-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown using ESA's Biopan facility flown in Earth orbit that when exposed to the space environment for 2 weeks the survival rate of Synechococcus (Nageli), a halophilic cyanobacterium isolated from the evaporitic gypsum-halite crusts that form along the marine intertidal, and Halorubrum chaoviator a member of the Halobacteriaceae isolated from an evaporitic NaCl crystal obtained from a salt evaporation pond, were higher than all other test organisms except Bacillus spores. These results led to the EXPOSE-R mission to extend and refine these experiments as part of the experimental package for the external platform space exposure facility on the ISS. The experiment was flown in February 2009 and the organisms were exposed to low-Earth orbit for nearly 2 years. Samples were either exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV)-radiation (lambda is greater than 110 nm or lambda is greater than 200 nm, cosmic radiation (dosage range 225-320 mGy), or kept in darkness shielded from solar UV-radiation. Half of each of the UV-radiation exposed samples and dark samples were exposed to space vacuum and half kept at 105 pascals in argon. Duplicate samples were kept in the laboratory to serve as unexposed controls. Ground simulation control experiments were also performed. After retrieval, organism viability was tested using Molecular Probes Live-Dead Bac-Lite stain and by their reproduction capability. Samples kept in the dark, but exposed to space vacuum had a 90 +/- 5% survival rate compared to the ground controls. Samples exposed to full UV-radiation for over a year were bleached and although results from Molecular Probes Live-Dead stain suggested approximately 10% survival, the data indicate that no survival was detected using cell growth and division using the most probable number method. Those samples exposed to attenuated UV-radiation exhibited limited survival. Results from of this study are relevant to understanding adaptation and evolution of life, the future of life

  17. SAYSOY- Space Apparatus to Yield SOY sprouts: Growing sprouts in a growth support system for experiments on unmanned platforms in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Micco, Veronica; Aronne, Giovanna; Scala, Michele; Eduardo, Pasquale; Haladich, Marco; Castagnolo, Dario; Fortezza, Raimondo

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to design and develop an automatic growth support system for sprouts production in Space addressing a main biological requirement: seedling development had to occur completely under microgravity conditions from seed imbibition until chemical fixation of seedlings. This research is placed within the scenario of producing sprouts of soy, and other species, on board of Space platforms to integrate astronauts' diet with fresh food.The project SAYSOY was submitted within the Education programmes of ESA and was selected for the flight onboard of FOTON M2 satellite. The experiment is based on previous tests conducted on ground in simulated low-gravity conditions where emphasis was addressed to the effect of altered gravity on biological processes that affect nutritional value (metabolism of phenolics) and taste satisfaction (hydration of tissues, vascular differentiation and lignification affecting turgidity and softness of sprouts). The hardware was developed according to the specifications of the FOTON capsule and biological requirements in the sight of the planned analyses of biometrical anatomy on the recovered seedlings. The experiment SAYSOY was successfully conducted flying from May 31st to June 16th, 2005.

  18. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation. Small-Scale Demonstration and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Irreversible Wash Aid Additive process has been under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). This process for radioactive cesium mitigation consists of a solution to wash down contaminated structures, roadways, and vehicles and a sequestering agent to bind the radionuclides from the wash water and render them environmentally immobile. The purpose of this process is to restore functionality to basic services and immediately reduce the consequences of a radiologically-contaminated urban environment. Research and development have resulted in a down-selection of technologies for integration and demonstration at the pilot-scale level as part of the Wide Area Recovery and Resiliency Program (WARRP) under the Department of Homeland Security and the Denver Urban Area Security Initiative. As part of developing the methods for performing a pilot-scale demonstration at the WARRP conference in Denver in 2012, Argonne conducted small-scale field experiments at Separmatic Systems. The main purpose of these experiments was to refine the wash water collection and separations systems and demonstrate key unit operations to help in planning for the large scale demonstration in Denver. Since the purpose of these tests was to demonstrate the operations of the system, we used no radioactive materials. After a brief set of experiments with the LAKOS unit to familiarize ourselves with its operation, two experiments were completed on two separate dates with the Separmatic systems.

  19. Real-time monitoring of genetically modified Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during the Foton M3 space mission and ground irradiation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambreva, Maya; Rea, Giuseppina; Antonacci, Amina; Serafini, Agnese; Damasso, Mario; Margonelli, Andrea; Johanningmeier, Udo; Bertalan, Ivo; Pezzotti, Gianni; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    developed to measure the chlorophyll fluorescence and to provide a living conditions for 24 different algae strains. Twelve different C. reinhardtii strains were analytically selected and two replications for each strain were brought to space, among them, some mutants modified at the level of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of xanthophylls. We analysed the hourly changes and the daily light/dark trend in the maximum quantum yield of PSII photochemistry as well as some physiological parameters that characterize the post-flight effect on algae viability and photosynthetic performance. The ground control experiments were performed following the same protocol for the sample preparation and the temperature recorded during the pre-flight, flight and post-flight phases. The space flight results in comparison to the ground simulations are discussed.

  20. Adsorption of sodium and cesium on aggregates of C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnisch, Martina; Daxner, Matthias; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2016-09-01

    We explore the formation of C60 sodium and C60 cesium complexes in superfluid helium nanodroplets. Anomalies in mass spectra of these doped droplets reveal anomalies in the stability of ions. (C60) m Cs+ n ions ( m ≤ 6) are particularly abundant if they contain n = 6 m + 1 cesium atoms; (C60) m Cs2+ n dications ( m ≤ 3 or 5) are abundant if n = 6 m + 2. These findings are consistent with the notion that alkali metal atoms (A) transfer their valence electrons into the three-fold degenerate lowest unoccupied orbital of C60, resulting in particularly stable C60A6 building blocks. However, (C60) 4CsCs2+ n dications display an entirely different pattern; instead of an expected anomaly at n = 6 × 4 + 2 = 26 we observe a strong odd-even alternation starting at n = 6. Also surprising is the effect of adding one H2O or CO2 molecule to (C60) m Cs n mono- or dications; anomalies shift by two units as if the impurity were acting as an acceptor for two valence electrons from the alkali metal atoms.

  1. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Eric E., E-mail: ewisniew@anl.gov [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Velazquez, Daniel [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Yusof, Zikri, E-mail: zyusof@hawk.iit.edu [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Sarkar, Tapash J. [Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Harkay, Katherine [Accelerator Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-05-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (≈50nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating. -- Highlights: ► The correlation between Quantum Efficiency (QE) and work function. ► How QE and work function evolve together. ► Rejuvenation of the photocathode via heating and the effect on work function. ► The effects on the work function due to exposure to UV light.

  2. Morphological and electrical properties of zirconium vanadate doped with cesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa F. Elkady

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cesium doped zirconium vanadate ZrV2O7 with different Cs dopant content (Cs/Zr varied from 0 to 0.5 in weight ratio were fabricated by hydrothermal technique at 120 °C for 60 min. The synthesized materials are thermally treated using microwave technique. The structural and morphological properties of the synthesized materials and thermally treated samples were investigated using XRD and SEM respectively. It was evident that all synthesized specimens have cubic phase structural without any extra phase but after heat treatment Orthorhombic phase appear with doped samples. However, the morphological structure of the doped synthesized materials has transferred from nanoparticles into rods aspect with heat treatment for the different dopant ratio. Moreover, the electrical properties of both the synthesized and thermally treated materials are studied by AC impedance measurements. The results indicated that the ionic conductivity of Cs-doped ZrV2O7 materials decreased by increasing the dopant ratio while that thermally treated samples the ionic conductivity increase by increasing the dopant ratio. Finally, the concentration of cesium dopants is found to play crucial role in tuning the morphology and electrical properties of nanostructures.

  3. Structure and bonding in crystalline cesium uranyl tetrachloride under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Hussien H; Pertierra, Pilar; Salvadó, Miguel A; Izquierdo-Ruiz, F; Recio, J M

    2016-07-21

    A thorough investigation of pressure effects on the structural properties of crystalline cesium uranyl chloride was performed by means of first-principles calculations within the density functional theory framework. Total energies, equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies were computed at selected pressures up to 50 GPa. Zero pressure results present good agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. Our calculated equation of state parameters reveal that Cs2UO2Cl4 is a high compressible material, similar to other ionic compounds with cesium cations, and displays a structural anisotropic behavior guided by the uranyl moiety. An unexpected variation of the U-O bond length, dUO, is detected as pressure is applied. It leads to a dUO-stretching frequency relationship that cannot be described by the traditional Badger's rule. Interestingly enough, it can be explained in terms of a change in the main factor controlling dUO. At low pressure, the charge transferred to the uranyl cation induces an increase of the bond length and a red shift of the stretching frequencies, whereas it is the mechanical effect of the applied pressure above 10 GPa that is the dominant factor that leads to a shortening of dUO and a blue shift of the stretching frequencies.

  4. Spectrally selective optical pumping in Doppler-broadened cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jun-Hai; Zeng Xian-Jin; Li Qing-Meng; Huang Qiang; Sun Wei-Min

    2013-01-01

    The D1 line spectrally selective pumping process in Doppler-broadened cesium is analyzed by solving the optical Bloch equations.The process,described by a three-level model with the A scheme,shows that the saturation intensity of broadened atoms is three orders of magnitude larger than that of resting atoms.The |Fg =3> → |Fe-4> resonance pumping can result in the ground state |Fg =4,mF =4> sublevel having a maximum population of 0.157 and the population difference would be about 0.01 in two adjacent magnetic sublevels of the hyperfine (HF) state Fg =4.To enhance the anisotropy in the ground state,we suggest employing dichromatic optical HF pumping by adding a laser to excite D1 line |Fg =4> → |Fe =3>transition,in which the cesium magnetometer sensitivity increases by half a magnitude and is unaffected by the nonlinear Zeeman effect even in Earth's average magnetic field.

  5. Irrelevance of Bell's Theorem for experiments involving correlations in space and time: a specific loophole-free computer-example

    CERN Document Server

    De Raedt, Hans; Hess, Karl

    2016-01-01

    John Bell is generally credited to have accomplished the remarkable "proof" that any theory of physics, which is both Einstein-local and "realistic" (counterfactually definite), results in a strong upper bound to the correlations that are measured in space and time. He thus predicts that Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiments cannot violate Bell- type inequalities. We present a counterexample to this claim, based on discrete-event computer simulations. Our model-results fully agree with the predictions of quantum theory for Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiments and are free of the detection- or a coincidence-loophole.

  6. Traffic model for commercial payloads in the Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA). [market research in commercial space processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietzel, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    One hundred individuals representing universities, technical institutes, government agencies, and industrial facilities were surveyed to determine potential commercial use of a self-contained, automated assembly for the space processing of materials during frequent shuttle flights for the 1981 to 1987 period. The approach used and the results of the study are summarized. A time time-phased projection (traffic model) of commercial usage of the materials experiment assembly is provided.

  7. Solidification under zero gravity: A Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment for an early space shuttle mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. A.; Whitfield, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    The preliminary design of two series of simple experiments the objectives of which are to determine the effect of an absence of gravity on (1) the general morphology of the structure, (2) location of ullage space, and (3) magnitude of surface tension driven convection, during the solidification of several metallic and nonmetallic systems is described. Details of the investigative approach, experimental procedure, experimental hardware, data reduction and analysis, and anticipated results are given.

  8. The effect of the low Earth orbit environment on space solar cells: Results of the Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment (S0014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinker, David J.; Hickey, John R.; Scheiman, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The results of post-flight performance testing of the solar cells flown on the Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment are reported. Comparison of post-flight current-voltage characteristics with similar pre-flight data revealed little or no change in solar cell conversion efficiency, confirming the reliability and endurance of space photovoltaic cells. This finding is in agreement with the lack of significant physical changes in the solar cells despite nearly six years in the low Earth orbit environment.

  9. Integration and use of Microgravity Research Facility: Lessons learned by the crystals by vapor transport experiment and Space Experiments Facility programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heizer, Barbara L.

    1992-01-01

    The Crystals by Vapor Transport Experiment (CVTE) and Space Experiments Facility (SEF) are materials processing facilities designed and built for use on the Space Shuttle mid deck. The CVTE was built as a commercial facility owned by the Boeing Company. The SEF was built under contract to the UAH Center for Commercial Development of Space (CCDS). Both facilities include up to three furnaces capable of reaching 850 C minimum, stand-alone electronics and software, and independent cooling control. In addition, the CVTE includes a dedicated stowage locker for cameras, a laptop computer, and other ancillary equipment. Both systems are designed to fly in a Middeck Accommodations Rack (MAR), though the SEF is currently being integrated into a Spacehab rack. The CVTE hardware includes two transparent furnaces capable of achieving temperatures in the 850 to 870 C range. The transparent feature allows scientists/astronauts to directly observe and affect crystal growth both on the ground and in space. Cameras mounted to the rack provide photodocumentation of the crystal growth. The basic design of the furnace allows for modification to accommodate techniques other than vapor crystal growth. Early in the CVTE program, the decision was made to assign a principal scientist to develop the experiment plan, affect the hardware/software design, run the ground and flight research effort, and interface with the scientific community. The principal scientist is responsible to the program manager and is a critical member of the engineering development team. As a result of this decision, the hardware/experiment requirements were established in such a way as to balance the engineering and science demands on the equipment. Program schedules for hardware development, experiment definition and material selection, flight operations development and crew training, both ground support and astronauts, were all planned and carried out with the understanding that the success of the program science

  10. The formation of organic molecules in solar system environments: The Miller-Urey Experiment in Space preflight overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Martins, Z.; Ricco, A.; Blum, J.; Schraepler, R.; van Dongen, J.; Palmans, A.; Sephton, M.; Cleaves, H. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Miller-Urey Experiment in space (MUE) will investigate the formation of prebiotic organic compounds in the early solar system environment when it is sent to, and later retrieved from, the International Space Station in 2012. The dynamic environment of the solar nebula with the simultaneous presence of gas, particles, and energetic processes, including shock waves, electrical discharges, and radiation may trigger a rich organic chemistry leading to organic molecules. Two gas mixture compositions (CH4, NH3, H2 and N2, H2, CO) will be tested and subjected to continuous spark discharges for 48, 96, and 192 hours. Silicate particles will serve as surfaces on which thin water ice mantles can accrete. The experiment will be performed at low temperatures (-5 °C), slowing hydrolysis and improving chances of detection of initial products, intermediates and their abundances. Conducting the Miller-Urey experiment in the space environment (microgravity) allows us to simulate conditions that could have prevailed in the low gravity, energetic early solar nebula and provides insights into the chemical pathways that may occur as planetary systems form.

  11. The determination of Fukushima-derived cesium-134 and cesium-137 in Japanese green tea samples and their distribution subsequent to simulated beverage preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matthew C; Stukel, Matthew J; Zhang, Weihua; Mercier, Jean-Francois; Cooke, Michael W

    2016-03-01

    Health Canada's Radiation Protection Bureau has identified trace quantities of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in commercially available green tea products of Japanese origin. Referenced to March 11, 2011, the activity ratio ((134)Cs/(137)Cs) has been determined to be 1:1, which supports an origin from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The upper limits of typical tea beverage preparation conditions were applied to the most contaminated of these green tea samples to determine the proportion of radiocesium contamination that would be available for human consumption. The distribution of radiocesium among the components of the extraction experiments (water, residual tea solid, and filter media) was determined by both conventional and Compton-suppressed gamma spectroscopy. The latter aided tremendously in providing a more complete radiocesium distribution profile, particularly for the shorter-lived (134)Cs. Cesium extraction efficiencies of 64 ± 7% and 64 ± 5% were determined based on (134)Cs and (137)Cs, respectively. Annual, effective dose estimates from ingestion of (137)Cs and (134)Cs (1.8-3.7 μSv), arising from the consumption of tea beverages prepared from the most contaminated of these samples, are insignificant relative to both total (∼ 2.4 mSv) and ingested (∼ 0.28 mSv) annual effective doses received from naturally occurring radioactive sources. As such, there is no health concern arising from the consumption of green tea beverages contaminated with radiocesium at the levels encountered in this study.

  12. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation.

  13. Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment for space plasmas—CoDICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M. I.; Ogasawara, K.; Ebert, R. W.; Allegrini, F.; McComas, D. J.; Livi, S.; Weidner, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    The Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment—CoDICE—simultaneously provides high-quality plasma and energetic ion composition measurements over six decades in energy in a wide variety of space plasma environments. CoDICE measures two critical ion populations in space plasmas: (1) Elemental and charge state composition, and 3-D velocity distributions of 10 MeV energetic ions. CoDICE uses a novel, integrated, common time-of-flight subsystem that provides several advantages over the commonly used separate plasma and energetic ion sensors currently flying on several space missions. These advantages include reduced mass and volume compared to two separate instruments, reduced shielding in high-radiation environments, and simplified spacecraft interface and accommodation requirements. This paper describes the operation principles, electro-optic simulation results and applies the CoDICE concept for measuring plasma and energetic ion populations in Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  14. Free-Operant Field Experiences: Differentially Reinforcing Successive Approximations to Behavior Analysis through a ShaperSpace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee L . Mason

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years an increasing number of schools and community organizations have developed transformative learning spaces referred to as “MakerSpaces” for research and training purposes. MakerSpaces are organizations in which members sharing similar interests in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM gather to work on self-selected projects. Proponents of MakerSpaces highlight the implicit benefits arising from participants’ increased engagement with complex technical content in a voluntary, authentic context. We extend the MakerSpace concept to applications of training special education teachers to address the needs of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. Applied behavior analysis (ABA has vast empirical support for treating ASD. We believe the MakerSpace model provides a platform for developing a new generation of special education teachers. However, rather than making novel products, the focus is on shaping the behavior-analytic repertoires of special education teachers. In the field of ABA, the term “shaping” describes the differential reinforcement of successive approximations to a target behavior. Accordingly, we propose the name ShaperSpace to describe a novel clinical training approach to developing special education teachers who employ research-validated interventions for individuals with ASD. The supervision model described in this article is provided, not as a recommendation, but as an exemplar that has developed over four years’ contingency shaping and continues to be refined. We appeal to the reader to consider the ShaperSpace as a starting point from which skills developed through free-operant field experiences will ultimately be shaped and selected by the naturally occurring contingencies of the environment.

  15. Cratering and penetration experiments in aluminum and teflon: Implications for space-exposed surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörz, Friedrich

    2012-04-01

    Whether a target is penetrated or not during hypervelocity impact depends strongly on typical impactor dimensions (Dp) relative to the absolute target thickness (T). We have therefore conducted impact experiments in aluminum1100 and TeflonFEP targets that systematically varied Dp/T (=D*), ranging from genuine cratering events in thick targets (Dp > T). The objectives were to (1) delineate the transition from cratering to penetration events, (2) characterize the diameter of the penetration hole (Dh) as a function of D*, and (3) determine the threshold target thickness that yields Dh = Dp. We employed spherical soda-lime glass (SLG) projectiles of Dp = 50-3175 μm at impact velocities (V) from 1 to 7 km s-1, and varied target thicknesses from microns to centimeters. The transition from cratering to penetration processes in thick targets forms a continuum in all morphologic aspects. The entrance side of the target resembles that of a standard crater even when the back of the target suffers substantial, physical perforations via spallation and plastic deformation. We thus suggest that the cratering-to-penetration transition does not occur when the target becomes physically perforated (i.e., at the "ballistic limit"), but when the shock pulse duration in the projectile (tp) is identical to that in the target (tt), i.e., tp = tt. This condition is readily calculated from equation-of-state data. As a consequence, in reconstructing impactor dimensions from observations of space-exposed substrates, we recommend that crater size (Dc) be used for the case of tp tt. The morphologic evolution of the penetration hole and its size also forms a continuum that strongly depends on both the scaled parameter D* and on V, but it is independent of the absolute scale. The condition of Dh = Dp is approached at D* > 50. The dependence of Dh on T and V, however, is very systematic. This has led to new and detailed calibration curves, permitting the reconstruction of Dp from the measurement

  16. The AMINO experiment: exposure of amino acids in the EXPOSE-R experiment on the International Space Station and in laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Marylène; Chabin, Annie; Colas, Cyril; Cadène, Martine; Chaput, Didier; Brack, Andre; Cottin, Herve

    2015-01-01

    In order to confirm the results of previous experiments concerning the chemical behaviour of organic molecules in the space environment, organic molecules (amino acids and a dipeptide) in pure form and embedded in meteorite powder were exposed in the AMINO experiment in the EXPOSE-R facility onboard the International Space Station. After exposure to space conditions for 24 months (2843 h of irradiation), the samples were returned to the Earth and analysed in the laboratory for reactions caused by solar ultraviolet (UV) and other electromagnetic radiation. Laboratory UV exposure was carried out in parallel in the Cologne DLR Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft und Raumfahrt). The molecules were extracted from the sample holder and then (1) derivatized by silylation and analysed by gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) in order to quantify the rate of degradation of the compounds and (2) analysed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) in order to understand the chemical reactions that occurred. The GC-MS results confirm that resistance to irradiation is a function of the chemical nature of the exposed molecules and of the wavelengths of the UV light. They also confirm the protective effect of a coating of meteorite powder. The most altered compounds were the dipeptides and aspartic acid while the most robust were compounds with a hydrocarbon chain. The MS analyses document the products of reactions, such as decarboxylation and decarbonylation of aspartic acid, taking place after UV exposure. Given the universality of chemistry in space, our results have a broader implication for the fate of organic molecules that seeded the planets as soon as they became habitable as well as for the effects of UV radiation on exposed molecules at the surface of Mars, for example.

  17. Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D. [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan); Sawada, K. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

  18. Inquiry-Based Learning in Remote Sensing: A Space Balloon Educational Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountrakis, Giorgos; Triantakonstantis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Teaching remote sensing in higher education has been traditionally restricted in lecture and computer-aided laboratory activities. This paper presents and evaluates an engaging inquiry-based educational experiment. The experiment was incorporated in an introductory remote sensing undergraduate course to bridge the gap between theory and…

  19. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    Airborne research management and shuttle sortie planning at the Ames Research Center are reported. Topics discussed include: basic criteria and procedures for the formulation and approval of airborne missions; ASO management structure and procedures; experiment design, development, and testing aircraft characteristics and experiment interfaces; information handling for airborne science missions; mission documentation requirements; and airborne science methods and shuttle sortie planning.

  20. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    The management concepts and operating procedures are documented as they apply to the planning of shuttle spacelab operations. Areas discussed include: airborne missions; formulation of missions; management procedures; experimenter involvement; experiment development and performance; data handling; safety procedures; and applications to shuttle spacelab planning. Characteristics of the airborne science experience are listed, and references and figures are included.

  1. CRRES/SPACERAD (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite/Space Radiation Effects Program) Experiment Descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-24

    A., Hertzberg, E., Battel, S.J., Altwegg-Von Burg, K., and Balsiger, H. (1984) AMPTE/CCE hot plasma composition experiment (HPCE), submitted to IEEE...CCE hot plasma composition experiment (HPCE), submitted to IEEE Trans. Remote Sensing. 151 iL Contents 1. Scientific Objectives 153 2. Applications 154

  2. Space Resources for Teachers: Biology, Including Suggestions for Classroom Activities and Laboratory Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tom E.; And Others

    This compilation of resource units concerns the latest developments in space biology. Some of the topics included are oxygen consumption, temperature, radiation, rhythms, weightlessness, acceleration and vibration stress, toxicity, and sensory and perceptual problems. Many of the topics are interdisciplinary and relate biology, physiology,…

  3. Technical issues in the conduct of large space platform experiments in plasma physics and geoplasma sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuszczewicz, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    Large, permanently-manned space platforms can provide exciting opportunities for discoveries in basic plasma and geoplasma sciences. The potential for these discoveries will depend very critically on the properties of the platform, its subsystems, and their abilities to fulfill a spectrum of scientific requirements. With this in mind, the planning of space station research initiatives and the development of attendant platform engineering should allow for the identification of critical science and technology issues that must be clarified far in advance of space station program implementation. An attempt is made to contribute to that process, with a perspective that looks to the development of the space station as a permanently-manned Spaceborne Ionospheric Weather Station. The development of this concept requires a synergism of science and technology which leads to several critical design issues. To explore the identification of these issues, the development of the concept of an Ionospheric Weather Station will necessarily touch upon a number of diverse areas. These areas are discussed.

  4. Observing at-surface irradiance and albedo from space: the Tibet experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roupioz, L.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the solar radiation budget on a daily basis is a prerequisite to study land surface processes, especially in climatology and hydrology, and in derived applications like drought early warning. Current space-born radiometers can provide daily observations to derive surface radiative fluxes

  5. Bacterial monitoring with adhesive sheet in the international space station-"Kibo", the Japanese experiment module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Hieda, Hatsuki; Ishihara, Rie; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological monitoring is important to assure microbiological safety, especially in long-duration space habitation. We have been continuously monitoring the abundance and diversity of bacteria in the International Space Station (ISS)-"Kibo" module to accumulate knowledge on microbes in the ISS. In this study, we used a new sampling device, a microbe-collecting adhesive sheet developed in our laboratory. This adhesive sheet has high operability, needs no water for sampling, and is easy to transport and store. We first validated the adhesive sheet as a sampling device to be used in a space habitat with regard to the stability of the bacterial number on the sheet during prolonged storage of up to 12 months. Bacterial abundance on the surfaces in Kibo was then determined and was lower than on the surfaces in our laboratory (10(5) cells [cm(2)](-1)), except for the return air grill, and the bacteria detected in Kibo were human skin microflora. From these aspects of microbial abundance and their phylogenetic affiliation, we concluded that Kibo has been microbiologically well maintained; however, microbial abundance may increase with the prolonged stay of astronauts. To ensure crew safety and understand bacterial dynamics in space habitation environments, continuous bacterial monitoring in Kibo is required.

  6. High voltage holding in the negative ion sources with cesium deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belchenko, Yu.; Abdrashitov, G.; Ivanov, A.; Sanin, A.; Sotnikov, O., E-mail: O.Z.Sotnikov@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    High voltage holding of the large surface-plasma negative ion source with cesium deposition was studied. It was found that heating of ion-optical system electrodes to temperature >100 °C facilitates the source conditioning by high voltage pulses in vacuum and by beam shots. The procedure of electrode conditioning and the data on high-voltage holding in the negative ion source with small cesium seed are described. The mechanism of high voltage holding improvement by depletion of cesium coverage is discussed.

  7. The Diagnostics Of Hydrogen-Cesium Plasma Using Fully Relativistic Electron Impact Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti, Priti; Dipti, Dipti; Gangwar, Reetesh; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    Electron excitation cross-sections and rate coefficients have been calculated using fully relativistic distorted wave theory for several fine-structure transitions from the ground as well as excited states of cesium atom in the wide range of incident electron energy. These processes play dominant role in low pressure hydrogen-cesium plasma relevant to the negative ion based neutral beam injectors for the ITER project. The calculated cross-sections are used to construct a reliable collisional radiative (CR) model to characterize the hydrogen-cesium plasma. The calculated plasma parameters are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  8. Comparative analysis of cesium and potassium uptake in onion Allium cepa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, P. Ł.; Bystrzejewska-Piotrowska, G.

    2003-01-01

    Cesium uptake in onion (from 0.3 mM CsCl solution traced with 137CsCl) has been examined. The highest uptake occurred at pH 4-5 and it decreased with increasing pH. The intensity of Cs translocation depended on acidity of the solution. For acidic solutions, translocation of cesium into bulbs and leaves was greater than in case of alkaline solutions, where most of the cesium remained in the roots. Addition of potassium into the solutions (millimolar K concentrations) inhibits Cs uptake. The potassium pH-influx/efflux characteristic does not coincide with the Cs uptake.

  9. Fission of Multiply Charged Cesium and Potassium Clusters in Helium Droplets - Approaching the Rayleigh Limit

    OpenAIRE

    Renzler, Michael; Harnisch, Martina; Daxner, Matthias; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Kuhn, Martin; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Electron ionization of helium droplets doped with cesium or potassium results in doubly and, for cesium, triply charged cluster ions. The smallest observable doubly charged clusters are $Cs_{9}^{2+}$ and $K_{11}^{2+}$; they are a factor two smaller than reported previously. The size of potassium dications approaches the Rayleigh limit nRay for which the fission barrier is calculated to vanish, i.e. their fissilities are close to 1. Cesium dications are even smaller than nRay, implying that th...

  10. Test procedures and instructions for single shell tank saltcake cesium removal with crystalline silicotitanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1997-01-07

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test, using Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake from tanks 24 t -BY- I 10, 24 1 -U- 108, 24 1 -U- 109, 24 1 -A- I 0 1, and 24 t - S-102, in a bench-scale column. The cesium sorbent to be tested is crystalline siticotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-024, Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  11. Effect of Rare Earth Elements on Exchange Performances of Cesium Ion-Sieve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张惠源; 王榕树; 林灿生; 张先业

    2003-01-01

    The exchange performances and the distribution coefficient of Cesium Ion-Sieve (Cs-IS) for cesium and for some rare earth elements were compared. In particular, the effects of neodymium on the cesium ion exchange and the Cs+ selectivity variation on Cs-IS owing to introduction of rare earth elements into HLLW were studied. Though rare earth elements exhibit a small influence on the distribution coefficient for Cs+, they impair Cs-exchange capacity of Cs-IS to some extent. This interruption on the selectivity to Cs+ can be significantly eliminated provided an appropriate ratio of liquid to solid V:m is used.

  12. Cesium leaching from {gamma}-irradiated CsA and CsX zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Enrique [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, A. P. 55-532, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186 Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: lima@xanum.uam.mx; Ibarra, Ilich A.; Lara, Victor [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, A. P. 55-532, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186 Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bosch, Pedro [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, A. P. 70-360, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bulbulian, Silvia [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, Col. Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    The present study discusses the effect of {gamma}-irradiation on Cs{sup +}-exchanged X and A zeolites. The incorporation of Cs{sup +} ions into A and X zeolites was performed using three different cesium salts (chloride, nitrate or acetate). Cs{sup +} ions immobilized into the vitrified zeolites by thermal treatment are located in different sites of the zeolite networks. It is found that {gamma}-irradiation favors cesium retention depending on the cesium precursor salt used in the cationic exchange step.

  13. Application of Cesium isotopes in daily life; Aplicacoes dos isotopos do Cesio no cotidiano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordao, B.O.; Quaresma, D.S.; Carvalho, R.J., E-mail: bjordan@on.br, E-mail: dansq@on.br, E-mail: carvalho@on.br [Observatorio Nacional (ON/LPTF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Tempo e Frequencia; Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: guilherm@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes

    2014-07-01

    In the world of science, the desire of the scientific community to discover new chemical elements is crucial for the development of new technologies in various fields of knowledge. And the main chemical element addressed by this article is Cesium, but specifically {sup 133}Cesium isotope and radioisotope {sup 137}Cesium, exemplifying their physical and chemical characteristics, and their applications. This article will also show how these isotopes have provided researchers a breakthrough in the field of radiological medicine and in time and frequency metrology. (author)

  14. A New Pumping-Probing Scheme for the Optically Pumped Cesium Beam Frequency Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈景标; 朱程锦; 王凤芝; 杨东海

    2001-01-01

    A new pumping-probing scheme for the optically pumped cesium beam frequency standard has been experimentally tested in our laboratory. The stability of the optically pumped cesium beam frequency standard was measured by comparing its 10 MHz output with an HP5071A commercial cesium atomic clock. The result shows that the frequency stability for the 1 s and 30000s sample times are 1.2 × 10-11 and 3.7 × 10-13, respectively. It was proved that the new pumping scheme works well.

  15. Study of energetic particle dynamics in Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX) on Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhibin, W.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, X.; Xiao, C.; Zheng, J.; E, P.; Ji, H.; Ding, W.; Lu, Q.; Ren, Y.; Mao, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zhibin Wang1, Qingmei Xiao1, Xiaogang Wang1, Chijie Xiao2, Jinxing Zheng3, Peng E1, Hantao Ji1,5, Weixing Ding4, Quaming Lu6, Y. Ren1,5, Aohua Mao11 Laboratory for Space Environment and Physical Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China 150001 2 State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics & Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China 100871 3ASIPP, Hefei, China, 230031 4University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 5Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 6University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, 230026 A new terrella device for laboratory studies of space physics relevant to the inner magnetospheric plasmas, Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX), is scheduled to be built at Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), China. HDX is one of two essential parts of Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF), which is a major national research facility for space physics studies. HDX is designed to provide a laboratory experimental platform to reproduce the earth's magnetospheric structure for investigations on the mechanism of acceleration/loss and wave-particle interaction of energetic particles in radiation belt, and on the influence of magnetic storms on the inner magnetosphere. It can be operated together with Harbin Reconnection eXperiment (HRX), which is another part of SPERF, to study the fundamental processes during interactions between solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. In this presentation, the scientific goals and experimental plans for HDX, together with the means applied to generate the plasma with desired parameters, including multiple plasma sources and different kinds of coils with specific functions, as well as advanced diagnostics designed to be equipped to the facility for multi-functions, are reviewed. Three typical scenarios of HDX with operations of various coils and plasma sources to study specific physical processes in space plasmas will also be

  16. A experiment on radio location of objects in the near-Earth space with VLBI in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaeva, M.; Antipenko, A.; Bezrukovs, V.; Bezrukov, D.; Dementjev, A.; Dugin, N.; Konovalenko, A.; Kulishenko, V.; Liu, X.; Nabatov, A.; Nesteruk, V.; Pupillo, G.; Reznichenko, A.; Salerno, E.; Shmeld, I.; Shulga, O.; Sybiryakova, Y.; Tikhomirov, Yu.; Tkachenko, A.; Volvach, A.; Yang, W.-J.

    An experiment on radar location of space debris objects using of the method of VLBI was carried out in April, 2012. The radar VLBI experiment consisted in irradiation of some space debris objects (4 rocket stages and 5 inactive satellites) with a signal of the transmitter with RT-70 in Evpatoria, Ukraine. Reflected signals were received by a complex of radio telescopes in the VLBI mode. The following VLBI stations took part in the observations: Ventspils (RT-32), Urumqi (RT-25), Medicina (RT-32) and Simeiz (RT-22). The experiment included measurements of the Doppler frequency shift and the delay for orbit refining, and measurements of the rotation period and sizes of objects by the amplitudes of output interferometer signals. The cross-correlation of VLBI-data is performed at a correlator NIRFI-4 of Radiophysical Research Institute (Nizhny Novgorod). Preliminary data processing resulted in the series of Doppler frequency shifts, which comprised the information on radial velocities of the objects. Some results of the experiment are presented.

  17. Quantifying the Relationship between Strike-slip Fault Spacing and Brittle Crust Thickness in Continental Settings based on Sandbox Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Zuza, A. V.; Yin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Parallel and evenly spaced strike-slip faults occur widely in continental settings. The fault spacing varies from 10s of km along transform fault systems (e.g., southern California and New Zealand) to 200-400 km in continental interiors (e.g., central Tibet, central Asia, and North China plains). In order to understand the role of the brittle crust rheology and thickness in controlling the fault spacing in continental settings, we performed a series of sandbox experiments using medium-grained dry sand under strike-slip simple-shear conditions. With a self-built sliding device, we determined the yield strength of the dry sand to follow a Coulomb fracture relationship: Tn = 0.5173Sn + 15.475(Pa), with R2 = 0.936, where Tn is the shear stress, Sn is the normal stress, R is the coefficient of linear correlation, and 15.475 Pa is the cohesive strength. In our experiments, we created parallel Riedel shears in a simple shear zone with sand layer thickness varying from 1 cm to 6 cm. The relationship between the fault spacing (S) and the sand layer thickness (T) fits a linear equation of S = 0.5528T + 4.765, with R2 = 0.975. Assuming that the cohesive strength of the continental crust is 1-5 MPa and neglecting the density difference between rock and sand, the scaling relationship between sand and crustal thickness can be approximated as 1:1 X 105 to 1:5 X 105, which means that our experiments simulate a range of crustal thicknesses from 1 km to 30 km. The relevance of the S-T relationship obtained from this study will be tested in areas of active strike-slip tectonics, where the thickness of the brittle crust can be determined by the thickness of the seismogenic zones.

  18. Offering architects insights into experiences of living with dementia: A case study on orientation in space, time, and identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steenwinkel, Iris; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Heylighen, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Due to memory loss, people with dementia are increasingly disorientated in space, time, and identity, which causes profound experiences of insecurity, anxiety, and homesickness. In the case study presented in this article, we explored how architecture can support people in coping with this challenge. We took a novel approach to offer architects insights into experiences of living with dementia. Starting from a critical realist and constructionist approach, we combined ethnographic techniques with an architectural analysis. This case study offers insights into the experiences and activities of a woman living with dementia within the architectural context of her home. We describe how the physical and social environment provided her guidance through sequences of day-to-day activities. This study highlights how architecture can support people with dementia in orientating by accommodating places for (1) everyday activities and (2) privacy and togetherness.

  19. a Biokinetic Model for CESIUM-137 in the Fetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Karen Lynn

    1995-01-01

    Previously, there was no method to determine the dose to the embryo, fetus, fetal organs or placenta from radionuclides within the embryo, fetus, or placenta. In the past, the dose to the fetus was assumed to be equivalent to the dose to the uterus. Watson estimated specific absorbed fractions from various maternal organs to the uterine contents which included the fetus, placenta, and amniotic fluid and Sikov estimated the absorbed dose to the embryo/fetus after assuming 1 uCi of radioactivity was made available to the maternal blood.^{1,2} However, this method did not allow for the calculation of a dose to individual fetal organs or the placenta. The radiation dose to the embryo or fetus from Cs-137 in the fetus and placenta due to a chronic ingestion by the mother was determined. The fraction of Cs-137 in the maternal plasma crossing the placenta to the fetal plasma was estimated. The absorbed dose from Cs-137 in each modelled fetal organ was estimated. Since there has been more research regarding potassium in the human body, and particularly in the pregnant woman, a biokinetic model for potassium was developed first and used as a basis and confirmation of the cesium model. Available pertinent information in physiology, embryology, biokinetics, and radiation dosimetry was utilized. Due to the rapid growth of the fetus and placenta, the pregnancy was divided into four gestational periods. The numerous physiological changes that occurred during pregnancy were considered and an appropriate biokinetic model was developed for each of the gestational periods. The amount of cesium in the placenta, embryo, and fetus was estimated for each period. The dose to the fetus from cesium deposited in the embryo or fetus and in the placenta was determined for each period using Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) methodology. An uncertainty analysis was also performed to account for the variability of the parameters in the biokinetic model based on the experimental data

  20. The blue drama: narratives of the victim's suffering of Cesium-137 radiological event; O drama azul: narrativas sobre o sofrimento das vitimas do evento radiologico do Cesio-137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Suzane de Alencar

    2014-07-01

    This research presents a dramatic approach to the Cesium-137 Radiological Event. The event, which started on Goiania in 1987, did not stop with the end of radiological contamination and continues in a judicial, scientific and narrative process of identification and recognition of new victims. The ethnography’s output follows a theoretical experiment with the notions of drama and event. In order to better understand the pattern of this event, I analyzed narratives such as romances, arts, photographs, news, documentaries, films, academic bibliography and stories that emerged from the research field. I argue that the narratives politicize the discourses of victimization and the suffering experience. The dramatic form of narratives and symbols concentrates on emotions and promotes the emotional commitment of the subjects on the trial. The drama articulates the relationship between the narratives and the event and creates a tactful space that arouses the recognition of victims through the narrative form and the suffering language. The drama occupies a central place on the dynamics of radiological event, as it extends its limits, inflects its intensity and updates the event. As a narrative of the event, the ethnography incorporates and brings up to date the drama as an analysis landmark and the description of the theme as it is absorbed by a dramatic process. (author)

  1. Creating the Public Connection: Interactive Experiences with Real-Time Earth and Space Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, Patricia H.; Ledley, Tamara S.; Sumners, Carolyn; Wyatt, Ryan

    1995-01-01

    The Houston Museum of Natural Sciences is less than two miles from Rice University, a major hub on the Internet. This project links these two institutions so that NASA real-time data and imagery can flow via Rice to the Museum where it reaches the public in the form of planetarium programs, computer based interactive kiosks, and space and Earth science problem solving simulation. Through this program at least 200,000 visitors annually (including every 4th and 7th grader in the Houston Independent School District) will have direct exposure to the Earth and space research being conducted by NASA and available over the Internet. Each information conduit established between Rice University and the Houston Museum of Natural Science will become a model for public information dissemination that can be replicated nationally in museums, planetariums, Challenger Centers, and schools.

  2. Experience Transitioning Models and Data at the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center has a long history of transitioning research data and models into operations and with the validation activities required. The first stage in this process involves demonstrating that the capability has sufficient value to customers to justify the cost needed to transition it and to run it continuously and reliably in operations. Once the overall value is demonstrated, a substantial effort is then required to develop the operational software from the research codes. The next stage is to implement and test the software and product generation on the operational computers. Finally, effort must be devoted to establishing long-term measures of performance, maintaining the software, and working with forecasters, customers, and researchers to improve over time the operational capabilities. This multi-stage process of identifying, transitioning, and improving operational space weather capabilities will be discussed using recent examples. Plans for future activities will also be described.

  3. Validation of Wall Friction Model in SPACE-3D Module with Two-Phase Cross Flow Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chi-Jin; Yang, Jin-Hwa; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu; Park, Goon-Cher [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Euh, Dong-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, SPACE-3D was used to simulate the Yang's experiment, and obtained the local variables. Then, the wall friction model used in SPACE-3D was validated by comparing the two-phase cross flow experimental results with the calculated local variables. In this study, the two-phase cross flow experiment was modeled by SPACE-3D to validate the wall friction model in multi-dimensional module. Considering the realistic phenomena in the reactor, however, recent trends in safety analysis codes have tended to adopt multi-dimensional module to simulate the complex flow more accurately. Even though the module was applied to deal the multi-dimensional phenomena, implemented models in that are one-dimensional empirical models. Therefore, prior to applying the multi-dimensional module, the constitutive models implemented in the codes need to be validated. In the downcomer of Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400) which has direct vessel injection (DVI) lines as an emergency core cooling system, multi-dimensional two-phase flow may occur due to the Loss-of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA). The accurate prediction about that is high relevance to evaluation of the integrity of the reactor core. For this reason, Yang performed an experiment that was to investigate the two-dimensional film flow which simulated the two-phase cross flow in the upper downcomer, and obtained the local liquid film velocity and thickness data. From these data, it could be possible to validate the friction models in multi-dimensional module of system analysis codes. Compared with the experiment, SPACE-3D underestimated the liquid film velocity and overestimated the liquid film thickness. From these results, it was clarified that the Wallis correlation which is used as a wall friction model in SPACE-3D overestimates the wall friction. On the other hand, H.T.F.S. correlation which is used as the wall friction in MARS-multiD underestimates the wall friction.

  4. Space-flight experience and life test performance of a synthetic hydrocarbon lubricant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialke, Bill

    1995-01-01

    An alternative wet lubricant known as Pennzane(TM) SHF X-2000 is recommended for some spaceflight bearing systems. The performance characteristics between Pennzane(TM) SHF X-2000 and Bray 815Z were compared. The life tests showed excellent performances with continuous operation approaching three years in conservative operating environments. Space flight performance data are provided for several of the tested mechanisms which are operating in-orbit since February 1994.

  5. Effects of high density on spacing behaviour and reproduction in Akodon azarae: A fencing experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Belén; Bonatto, Florencia; Priotto, José; Steinmann, Andrea R.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the short term spacing behavioural responses of Pampean grassland mouse (Akodon azarae) with regard to population density in four 0.25 ha enclosures (two control and two experimental) in the 2011 breeding season. Based on the hypothesis that A. azarae breeding females exhibit spacing behaviour, and breeding males show a fusion spatial response, we tested the following predictions: (1) home range size and intrasexual overlap degree of females are independent of population density values; (2) at high population density, home range size of males decreases and the intrasexual home range overlap degree increases. To determine if female reproductive success decreases at high population density, we analyzed pregnancy rate, size and weight of litters, and period until fecundation in both low and high enclosure population density. We found that both males and females varied their home range size in relation to population density. Although male home ranges were always bigger than those of females in populations with high density, home range sizes of both sexes decreased. Females kept exclusive home ranges independent of density values meanwhile males decreased home range overlap in high breeding density populations. Although females produced litters of similar size in both treatments, weight of litter, pregnant rate and period until fecundation varied in relation to population density. Our results did not support the hypothesis that at high density females of A. azarae exhibit spacing behaviour neither that males exhibit a fusion spatial response.

  6. High Voltage Solar Concentrator Experiment with Implications for Future Space Missions - S6a-35

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, I. S. Mehdi P. J.; O'Neill, M.; Matson, R.; Borckschmidt, A.

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the design, development, fabrication, and test of a high performance, high voltage solar concentrator array. This assembly is believed to be the first ever terrestrial triple-junction-cell solar array rated at over 1 kW. The concentrator provides over 200 W/square meter power output at a nominal 600 Vdc while operating under terrestrial sunlight. Space-quality materials and fabrication techniques were used for the array, and the 3005-meter elevation installation below the Tropic of Cancer allowed testing as close as possible to space deployment without an actual launch. The array includes two concentrator modules, each with a 3 square meter aperture area. Each concentrator module uses a linear Fresnel lens to focus sunlight onto a photovoltaic receiver that uses 240 series-connected triple-junction solar cells. Operation of the two receivers in series can provide 1200 Vdc which would be adequate for the "direct drive" of some ion engines or microwave transmitters in space. Lens aperture width is 84 cm and the cell active width is 3.2 cm, corresponding to a geometric concentration ratio of 26X. The evaluation includes the concentrator modules, the solar cells, and the materials and techniques used to attach the solar cells to the receiver heat sink. For terrestrial applications, a finned aluminum extrusion was used for the heat sink for the solar cells, maintaining a low cell temperature so that solar cell efficiency remains high.

  7. Solubilities ,Densities and Refractive Indices of Rubidium Chloride or Cesium Chloride in Ethanol Aqueous Solutions at Different Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO,Wen-Xia; HU,Man-Cheng; JIANG,Yu-Cheng; LI,Shu-Ni

    2007-01-01

    The data of solubilities.densities and refractive indices of rubidium chloride or cesium chloride in the system C2H5OH-H2O were measured by using a simple accurate analytical method at different temperatures,with mass fractions of ethanol in the range of O to 1.0.In all cases,the presence of ethanol significantly reduced the solubility of rubidium chloride and cesium chloride in aqueous solution.The solubilities of the saturated solutions were fitted via polynomial equations as a function of the mass fraction of ethanol.The CsCl-C2H5OH-H2O temary system appeared in two liquid phases:alcoholic phase and water phase.when the mass fractions of ethanol were in the range of 10.37% to 49.59%at 35℃.Density and refractive index were also determined for the same ternary systems with varied unsaturated salt concentrations.Values for both experiment and theory were correlated with the salt concentrations and proportions of alcohol in the solutions.The equations proposed could also account for the saturated solutions.

  8. 5-Lipoxygenase-dependent apoptosis of human lymphocytes in the International Space Station: data from the ROALD experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Natalia; Meloni, Maria A; Bari, Monica; Mastrangelo, Nicolina; Galleri, Grazia; Rapino, Cinzia; Dainese, Enrico; Agrò, Alessandro Finazzi; Pippia, Proto; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-05-01

    The functional adaptation of the immune system to the surrounding environment is also a fundamental issue in space. It has been suggested that a decreased number of lymphocytes might be a cause of immunosuppression, possibly due to the induction of apoptosis. Early activation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) might play a central role in the initiation of the apoptotic program. The goal of the role of apoptosis in lymphocyte depression (ROALD) experiment, flown on the International Space Station as part of the BIO-4 mission of the European Space Agency, was to ascertain the induction of apoptosis in human lymphocytes under authentic microgravity, and to elucidate the possible involvement of 5-LOX. Our results demonstrate that exposure of human lymphocytes to microgravity for 48 h onboard the ISS remarkably increased apoptotic hallmarks such as DNA fragmentation (∼3-fold compared to ground-based controls) and cleaved-poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expression (∼3-fold), as well as mRNA levels of apoptosis-related markers such as p53 (∼3-fold) and calpain (∼4-fold); these changes were paralleled by an early increase of 5-LOX activity (∼2-fold). Our findings provide a molecular background for the immune dysfunction observed in astronauts during space missions, and reveal potential new markers to monitor health status of ISS crew members.

  9. Experiments in Nonlinear Adaptive Control of Multi-Manipulator, Free-Flying Space Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vincent Wei-Kang

    1992-01-01

    Sophisticated robots can greatly enhance the role of humans in space by relieving astronauts of low level, tedious assembly and maintenance chores and allowing them to concentrate on higher level tasks. Robots and astronauts can work together efficiently, as a team; but the robot must be capable of accomplishing complex operations and yet be easy to use. Multiple cooperating manipulators are essential to dexterity and can broaden greatly the types of activities the robot can achieve; adding adaptive control can ease greatly robot usage by allowing the robot to change its own controller actions, without human intervention, in response to changes in its environment. Previous work in the Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) have shown the usefulness of a space robot with cooperating manipulators. The research presented in this dissertation extends that work by adding adaptive control. To help achieve this high level of robot sophistication, this research made several advances to the field of nonlinear adaptive control of robotic systems. A nonlinear adaptive control algorithm developed originally for control of robots, but requiring joint positions as inputs, was extended here to handle the much more general case of manipulator endpoint-position commands. A new system modelling technique, called system concatenation was developed to simplify the generation of a system model for complicated systems, such as a free-flying multiple-manipulator robot system. Finally, the task-space concept was introduced wherein the operator's inputs specify only the robot's task. The robot's subsequent autonomous performance of each task still involves, of course, endpoint positions and joint configurations as subsets. The combination of these developments resulted in a new adaptive control framework that is capable of continuously providing full adaptation capability to the complex space-robot system in all modes of operation. The new adaptive control algorithm easily handles free

  10. Ion microscopy based on laser-cooled cesium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteau, M; Reveillard, M; Kime, L; Rasser, B; Sudraud, P; Bruneau, Y; Khalili, G; Pillet, P; Comparat, D; Guerri, I; Fioretti, A; Ciampini, D; Allegrini, M; Fuso, F

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a prototype of a Focused Ion Beam machine based on the ionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam and adapted for imaging and modifying different surfaces in the few-tens nanometer range. Efficient atomic ionization is obtained by laser promoting ground-state atoms into a target excited Rydberg state, then field-ionizing them in an electric field gradient. The method allows obtaining ion currents up to 130pA. Comparison with the standard direct photo-ionization of the atomic beam shows, in our conditions, a 40-times larger ion yield. Preliminary imaging results at ion energies in the 1-5keV range are obtained with a resolution around 40nm, in the present version of the prototype. Our ion beam is expected to be extremely monochromatic, with an energy spread of the order of the eV, offering great prospects for lithography, imaging and surface analysis.

  11. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, D; Sayrin, C; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-06-14

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized ∼ 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time of T(2)(*) = 0.6 ms and an irreversible dephasing time of T(2)(') = 3.7 ms. By modeling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, T(2)(*) and T(2)(') are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  12. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Reitz, D; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time $T_2^\\ast=0.6$ ms and an irreversible dephasing time $T_2^\\prime=3.7$ ms. By theoretically modelling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, $T_2^\\ast$ and $T_2^\\prime$ are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  13. Morphological effects in the quantum yield of cesium iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, J. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Barbo, F. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Bertolo, M. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Bianco, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Braem, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Cerasari, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Coluzza, C. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Dell`Orto, T. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Fontana, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Nappi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy); Paic, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Piuz, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Sanjines, R. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Scognetti, T. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy); Sgobba, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments

    1995-07-15

    We demonstrated that polycrystalline cesium iodide (CsI) on large area Ni/Au coated printed board provides a quantum efficiency (QE) higher by a factor of 2 than the films deposited on the standard Cu/Au printed circuits. This is the most important result of the present systematic study of the QE lateral inhomogeneity for CsI on different substrates. We found a strong correlation between the QE lateral variation and the morphological homogeneity of the films. The QE was measured by UV photoelectron emission microscopy and spatially resolved X-ray photoemission, and the morphology studies were performed by secondary electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. (orig.).

  14. Hyperfine relaxation of an optically pumped cesium vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornos, J.; Amare, J.C.

    1986-07-01

    The relaxation of hyperfine orientation indirectly induced by optical pumping with a sigma-polarized D/sub 1/-light in a cesium vapor in the presence of Ar is experimentally studied. The detection technique ensures the absence of quadrupole relaxation contributions in the relaxation signals. The results from the dependences of the hyperfine relaxation rate on the temperature and argon pressure are: diffusion coefficient of Cs in Ar, D/sub 0/ = 0.101 +- 0.010 cm/sup 2/s/sup -1/ at 0/sup 0/C and 760 Torr; relaxation cross section by Cs-Ar collisions, sigma/sub c/ = (104 +- 5) x 10/sup -23/ cm/sup 2/; relaxation cross section by Cs-Cs (spin exchange) collisions, sigma/sub e//sub x/ = (1.63 +- 0.13) x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 2/.

  15. New Efimov resonances in an ultracold cesium gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenesini, Alessandro; Berninger, Martin; Besler, Stefan; Naegerl, Hanns-Christoph; Ferlaino, Francesca [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huang, Bo; Grimm, Rudolf [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2011-07-01

    Efimov trimer states represent the paradigm of universality in few-body physics. Although these exotic three-body weakly-bound states have been experimentally investigated in an increasing number of ultracold atomic systems, many fundamental aspects remain unclear. An intriguing open question is related to how short-range physics influences the Efimov effect in real systems. Short range contributions are commonly included in universal theory via a single parameter, known as ''three-body parameter''. An open question is whether this parameter is constant or whether it can vary significantly when Feshbach resonances are employed for interaction tuning. Cesium is a very promising candidate to address this issue because of the many broad and narrow Feshbach resonances with different partial-wave character. Our experimental results reveal new Efimov features close to different Feshbach resonances and shed new light on the three-body parameter.

  16. Mercury and cesium-137 in urban gray squirrels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, J.H. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens); Davis, A.H.; Bigler, W.J.; Hoff, G.L.

    1980-08-01

    Recent emphasis upon the revitalization of major cities has underscored a need for urban wildlife management. Intensive management of the wildlife populations indigenous to metropolitan areas will enhance our quality of life in many ways. One important benefit is that certain species can serve as sensitive indicators of environmental change. The gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is usually abundant in cities and they are often subject to a variety of destructive environmental factors. In an attempt to evaluate the gray squirrel as an indicator of zoonoses and pollutants, the Health Program Office of the Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services conducted a multifaceted study in Jacksonvlle, Florida during 1974. This report presents baseline measurements of body burdens of mercury and cesium-137.

  17. Trade study for the disposition of cesium and strontium capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claghorn, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    This trade study analyzes alternatives for the eventual disposal of cesium and strontium capsules currently stored at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility as by-product. However, for purposes of this study, it is assumed that at some time in the future, the capsules will be declared high-level waste and therefore will require disposal at an offsite geologic repository. The study considered numerous alternatives and selected three for detailed analysis: (1) overpack and storage at high-level waste canister storage building, (2) overpack at the high-level waste vitrification facility followed by storage at a high-level waste canister storage building, and (3) blend capsule contents with other high-level waste feed streams and vitrify at the high-level waste vitrification facility.

  18. Thermal mathematical model correlation through genetic algorithms of an experiment conducted on board the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Iñaki; Anglada, Eva

    2016-05-01

    Genetic algorithms have been used for matching temperature values generated using thermal mathematical models against actual temperatures measured in thermal testing of spacecrafts and space instruments. Up to now, results for small models have been very encouraging. This work will examine the correlation of a small-medium size model, whose thermal test results were available, by means of genetic algorithms. The thermal mathematical model reviewed herein corresponds to Tribolab, a materials experiment deployed on board the International Space Station and subjected to preflight thermal testing. This paper will also discuss in great detail the influence of both the number of reference temperatures available and the number of thermal parameters included in the correlation, taking into account the presence of heat sources and the maximum range of temperature mismatch. Conclusions and recommendations for the thermal test design will be provided, as well as some indications for future improvements.

  19. Autonomous spatially adaptive sampling in experiments based on curvature, statistical error and sample spacing with applications in LDA measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Raf; Kadosh, Jesse S.; Allen, Christian B.

    2015-06-01

    Spatially varying signals are typically sampled by collecting uniformly spaced samples irrespective of the signal content. For signals with inhomogeneous information content, this leads to unnecessarily dense sampling in regions of low interest or insufficient sample density at important features, or both. A new adaptive sampling technique is presented directing sample collection in proportion to local information content, capturing adequately the short-period features while sparsely sampling less dynamic regions. The proposed method incorporates a data-adapted sampling strategy on the basis of signal curvature, sample space-filling, variable experimental uncertainty and iterative improvement. Numerical assessment has indicated a reduction in the number of samples required to achieve a predefined uncertainty level overall while improving local accuracy for important features. The potential of the proposed method has been further demonstrated on the basis of Laser Doppler Anemometry experiments examining the wake behind a NACA0012 airfoil and the boundary layer characterisation of a flat plate.

  20. Fission of Multiply Charged Cesium and Potassium Clusters in Helium Droplets - Approaching the Rayleigh Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Renzler, Michael; Daxner, Matthias; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Kuhn, Martin; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Electron ionization of helium droplets doped with cesium or potassium results in doubly and, for cesium, triply charged cluster ions. The smallest observable doubly charged clusters are $Cs_{9}^{2+}$ and $K_{11}^{2+}$; they are a factor two smaller than reported previously. The size of potassium dications approaches the Rayleigh limit nRay for which the fission barrier is calculated to vanish, i.e. their fissilities are close to 1. Cesium dications are even smaller than nRay, implying that their fissilities have been significantly overestimated. Triply charged cesium clusters as small as $Cs_{19}^{3+}$ are observed; they are a factor 2.6 smaller than previously reported. Mechanisms that may be responsible for enhanced formation of clusters with high fissilities are discussed.

  1. Biological effects of cesium-137 injected in beagle dogs of different ages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikula, K.J.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Griffith, W.C. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The toxicity of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) in the Beagle dog was investigated at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as part of a program to evaluate the biological effects of internally deposited radionuclides. The toxicity and health effects of {sup 137}Cs are important to understand because {sup 137}Cs is produced in large amounts in light-water nuclear reactors. Large quantities of cesium radioisotopes have entered the human food chain as a result of atmospheric nuclear weapons test, and additional cesium radioisotopes were released during the Chernobyl accident. Although the final analyses are not complete, three findings are significant: older dogs dies significantly earlier than juvenile and young adult dogs; greater occurrence of sarcomas in the cesium-137 injected dogs; the major nonneoplastic effect in dogs surviving beyond 52 d appears to be testicular atrophy.

  2. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

    2008-08-26

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

  3. Preparation, structure and application of a new ecomaterials cesium ion-sieve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new ecomaterials cesium ion-sieve (Cs-IS), which has high selectivity to cesium and excellent acid resistance, is prepared with zirconyl molybdopyrophosphate as its matrix by specific chemical sieve-making means. Cs-IS has large exchange capacity ( 1.83mmol@g-1) and high distribution coefficient (4.09 x 104 mL@ L-1) in the medium of 3 mol@ L- 1 HNO3. In the static exchange with strongly acidic high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW) (3 mol@ L-1 HNO3), Cs-IS exhibits high exchange rate for cesium (above 96.53 % ) and large separation factor (greater than 958.41). These indicate the possible use of Cs-IS in cesium-137 selective removal and recovery from highly saline acidic HLLW system.

  4. Synthesis of novel calix[4]crown telomers and selective extraction of cesium ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Bing Li; Yuan Yin Chen; De Jun Xiong; Jun Yan Zhan; Cui Ping Han

    2007-01-01

    p-tert-Butylcalix[4]diazacrown-4 telomer, which contains hard and soft ion binding sites, was synthesized. It exhibited high selectivity toward cesium ions. The binding sites may complex alkali metal ions selectively.

  5. Prussian blue caged in spongiform adsorbents using diatomite and carbon nanotubes for elimination of cesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Baiyang; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Yu, Hongwen; Abe, Yoshiteru

    2012-05-30

    We developed a spongiform adsorbent that contains Prussian blue, which showed a high capacity for eliminating cesium. An in situ synthesizing approach was used to synthesize Prussian blue inside diatomite cavities. Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used to form CNT networks that coated the diatomite to seal in the Prussian blue particles. These ternary (CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue) composites were mixed with polyurethane (PU) prepolymers to produce a quaternary (PU/CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue), spongiform adsorbent with an in situ foaming procedure. Prussian blue was permanently immobilized in the cell walls of the spongiform matrix and preferentially adsorbed cesium with a theoretical capacity of 167 mg/g cesium. Cesium was absorbed primarily by an ion-exchange mechanism, and the absorption was accomplished by self-uptake of radioactive water by the quaternary spongiform adsorbent.

  6. Total deposition of cesium-137 measured in Finland during the exercise `RESUME 95` in August 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, L.E. De; Vintersved, I.; Arntsing, R. [National Defence Research Establisment, Nuclear Detection Group, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    In the exercise called `RESUME 95` the Nuclear Detection Group from the National Defence Research Establishment in Stockholm participated with field gamma ray measurements combined with soil sampling and profile measurements. The results are presented in this report for the measurements of cesium-137. We considered the measurements of cesium-137 at the airfield the most important part of the in-situ exercise. Data was of course collected also for cesium-134 and natural radionuclides but time has not permitted a full analysis of these radionuclides. The methodology would, however, be the same as applied for cesium-137. Less attention was paid for area II and due to limited personnel resources the search exercise was not fully carried out. (au).

  7. Lessons from the GP-B Experience for Future Fundamental Physics Missions in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffery

    2006-01-01

    Gravity Probe B launched in April 2004 and completed its science data collection in September 2005, with the objective of sub-milliarcsec measurement of two General Relativistic effects on the spin axis orientation of orbiting gyroscopes. Much of the technology required by GP-B has potential application in future missions intended to make precision measurements. The philosophical approach and experiment design principles developed for GP-B are equally adaptable to these mission concepts. This talk will discuss GP-B's experimental approach and the technological and philosophical lessons learned that apply to future experiments in fundamental physics. Measurement of fundamental constants to high precision, probes of short-range forces, searches for equivalence principle violations, and detection of gravitational waves are examples of concepts and missions that will benefit kern GP-B's experience.

  8. AMPS data management concepts. [Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasma in Space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzelaar, P. N.

    1975-01-01

    Five typical AMPS experiments were formulated to allow simulation studies to verify data management concepts. Design studies were conducted to analyze these experiments in terms of the applicable procedures, data processing and displaying functions. Design concepts for AMPS data management system are presented which permit both automatic repetitive measurement sequences and experimenter-controlled step-by-step procedures. Extensive use is made of a cathode ray tube display, the experimenters' alphanumeric keyboard, and the computer. The types of computer software required by the system and the possible choices of control and display procedures available to the experimenter are described for several examples. An electromagnetic wave transmission experiment illustrates the methods used to analyze data processing requirements.

  9. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  10. Adaptation of Motility Analysis Apparatus for Space Science and Microgravity Ground-Based Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jacqueline U.

    1996-01-01

    Previous space flight studies have described unfavorable effects of microgravity on testicular morphology and spermatogenesis (Cosmos 1887 Biosputnik flight, 9/29/87 - 10/12/87). The flight animals demonstrated small reductions in testicular and epididymal size, the phenomenon explained as resulting water loss. Yet, light microscopic histological preparations revealed few spermatozoa in the rete testis of the flight males compared to control animals. The cause for this finding was subjectively assessed to be due to "the anatomical dislocation of the organs... and a disturbance in testicular blood supply". Unfortunately, the reported effects of microgravity on the reproductive processes (particularly within males) are few and divergent. If habitation in space is a futuristic goal, more objective testing (of male and female gametes) in a microgravity environment will provide insight to the developmental potential of these reproductive cells. As part of the Marshall Space Flight Centers' Summer Faculty Fellowship Program within the Biophysics Branch, a key component of the research investigation was to develop a test to evaluate individual cell motility and orientation in varying gravitational environments, using computerized assessment of sperm cell concentration, morphology and motility to provide objective, quantitative experimental control. In previous work performed jointly by the author and a NASA colleague, it has been shown that macroscopic motile aggregates of spermatozoa were not altered by the absence of microgravity. Variations in the number of normal versus abnormal sperm due to microgravity influences have yet to be established. It is therefore of interest to monitor the cytoskeletal matrix (microtubulin) of these organisms as a possible indicator of cell viability and/or function.

  11. Time and motion, experiment M151. [human performance and space flight stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, J. F.; Elrod, J. T.; Rusnak, R.; Mcbride, G. H.; Barnes, J. E.; Saxon, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut work performance during the preparation and execution of experiments in simulated Skylab tests was analyzed according to time and motion in order to evaluate the efficiency and consistency of performance (adaptation function) for several different types of activity over the course of the mission; to evaluate the procedures to be used by the same experiment in Skylab; to generate characteristic adaptation functions for later comparison with Skylab data; and to examine astronaut performance for any behavioral stress due to the environment. The overall results indicate that the anticipated adaptation function was obtained both for individual and for averaged data.

  12. Deregulating 'the rural'; threatening land management regime. Experiences of space in the Tuscan countryside

    CERN Document Server

    Orsini, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    In this research the relationships between landownership and the use of rural land are investigated and analyzed through an empirical study, conducted in Tuscany, which was based on interviews with landowners. Through the development of farmers' typologies, the results highlight a general process of decoupling form land, which appears through disinvestments in farming activity and changing the intended uses of rural land and buildings. The dynamic of liberalization (and urbanization) of rural space arises challenges to the future of land management system, which seems to be going to suffer a radical restructuring. Another relevant and connected issue emerges by this case study, that is the volatility of rural land development practices.

  13. Design Considerations for Remotely Operated Welding in Space: Task Definition and Visual Weld Monitoring Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    61 Figure 4.4 Unit for transformable truss unfolding /folding [23] ........ 63 9 Figure 4.5 Prototype joint for use in space - MIT...system modules. Among the most prominent modules are the three 20 j V- AL., CL C) *0 C4 CD M C 0, E a, 0~ -. L CO~ C C0m~ .c.m UI- 0c 21E photovoltaic ...control panel 30 board ith spc men JJ Figure 3.2 Versatile EB hand tool system (URI) [28] 1 - wire-mesh container; 2 - work tool; 3 - pressurized

  14. Ion Exchange Modeling Of Cesium Removal From Hanford Waste Using Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2007-06-27

    This report discusses the expected performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline Hanford radioactive waste. Predictions of full scale column performance in a carousel mode are made for the Hot Commissioning, Envelope B, and Subsequent Operations waste compositions under nominal operating conditions and for perturbations from the nominal. Only the loading phase of the process cycle is addressed in this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests, kinetic experiments, and batch equilibrium experiments are used to estimate model parameters and to benchmark the ion-exchange model. The methodology and application presented in this report reflect the expected behavior of spherical RF resin manufactured at the intermediate-scale (i.e., approximately 100 gallon batch size; batch 5E-370/641). It is generally believed that scale-up to production-scale in resin manufacturing will result in similarly behaving resin batches whose chemical selectivity is unaffected while total capacity per gram of resin may vary some. As such, the full-scale facility predictions provided within this report should provide reasonable estimates of production-scale column performance.

  15. Cesium Iodide Crystal Calorimeter of the Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaghian, Jessica; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Colby, Brian; Rykalin, Victor; Hurley, Ford

    2009-11-01

    Researchers at SCIPP, LLMU and NIU have collaborated to make a functioning proton imager. Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) is designated to be applied in proton therapy of human cancer systems. It will image head-sized phantom objects and provide excellent space and energy resolution using a silicon microstrip tracker and crystal calorimetry. The residual energy could be measured with precision of a few percent using a Cesium Iodide crystal calorimeter. A single element of the CsI(TI) calorimeter was tested in order to understand the behavior of the future calorimeter system. We present test results on a CsI(TI) calorimeter element with proton beams of 35, 100 and 200MeV. The detector element was designed to comply with the demands of high energy resolution of a few percent and a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude (1-300MeV) under a counting rate of 10 kHz per channel. We also report on cosmic measurement results of each crystal of the future calorimeter matrix. A detailed description of the calorimeter data acquisition system will be given.

  16. Structural characterization of hollandite-type material intended for the specific containment of cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinekugel-le-Cocq, A.Y.; Deniard, P.; Jobic, S.; Bart, F.; Evain, M.; Gautier, E

    2004-07-01

    Investigations on the Ba{sub 1}Cs{sub 0.28}Fe{sub 0.82}Al{sub 1.46}Ti{sub 5.72}O{sub 16} hollandite powdered compound, used as potential host for radioactive cesium waste, highlight an incommensurate modulated structure and the presence of an amorphous phase. On XRD pattern, this modulation leads to two wide peaks (2 {theta} =19.5 and 27 angle, {lambda} = 1.54059 A). The space group I4/m(0 0 {gamma}) 0 0 was determined thanks to the X-Ray of single crystal analysis on a simplified Ba{sub 1.16}Al{sub 2.32}Ti{sub 5.68}O{sub 16} material. The electron diffraction confirmed that this result could be transposed to our formulation Ba{sub 1}Cs{sub 0.28}Fe{sub 0.82}Al{sub 1.46}Ti{sub 5.72}O{sub 16}. This material exhibits a distribution of modulation vectors ranging from q = (0 0 0.30) to (0 0 0.48) explaining perfectly the two wide XRD peaks. In addition, an amorphous phase is observed and has been quantified (about 13%wt). (authors)

  17. Calculation of fully relativistic cross sections for electron excitation of cesium atom and its application to the diagnostics of hydrogen-cesium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti; Dipti; Gangwar, R. K.; Srivastava, R.

    2017-01-01

    Electron impact excitation cross-sections and rate coefficients have been calculated using fully relativistic distorted wave theory for several fine-structure transitions from the ground as well as excited states of cesium atom in the wide range of incident electron energy. These processes play dominant role in low pressure hydrogen-cesium plasma, which is relevant to the negative ion based neutral beam injectors for the ITER project. As an application, the calculated detailed cross-sections are used to construct a reliable collisional radiative (CR) model to characterize the hydrogen-cesium plasma. Other processes such as radiative population transfer, electron impact ionization and mutual neutralization of Cs+ ion with negative hydrogen ion along with their reverse processes are also taken into account. The calculated cross-sections and the extracted plasma parameters from the present model are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  18. Kinetic resolution of oxazinones: rational exploration of chemical space through the design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, Polyssena; Kronig, Christel; Carlone, Armando; Eröksüz, Serap; Berkessel, Albrecht; Bella, Marco

    2014-09-08

    The organocatalytic kinetic resolution of 4-substituted oxazinones has been optimised (selectivity factor S up to 98, chiral oxazinone ee values up to 99.6 % (1 a-g) and product ee values up to 90 % (3 a-g)) in a rational way by applying the Design of Experiments (DoE) approach.

  19. Field Biology Experiences of Undergraduate Students: The Impact of Novelty Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Debby R. E.; Cotton, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Fieldwork is generally considered an essential aspect of teaching and learning about biology, at both school and university level. However, previous research suggests that the novelty of being in an unfamiliar field environment can negatively, as well as positively, impact on the student experience and learning. This research uses the framework of…

  20. Bioassay of body fluids, experiment M073. [biochemical changes caused by space flight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Body fluids were assayed in this experiment to demonstrate changes which might have occurred during the 56-day chamber study in fluid and electrolyte balance, in regulation of calcium metabolism, in overall physiological and emotional adaptation to the environment, and in regulation of metabolic processes.