WorldWideScience

Sample records for cesium isotope ratio

  1. Radioactive cesium isotope ratios as a tool for determining dispersal and re-dispersal mechanisms downwind from the Nevada Nuclear Security Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractionation of the two longer-lived radioactive cesium isotopes (135Cs and 137Cs) produced by above ground nuclear tests have been measured and used to clarify the dispersal mechanisms of cesium deposited in the area between the Nevada Nuclear Security Site and Lake Mead in the southwestern United States. Fractionation of these isotopes is due to the 135-decay chain requiring several days to completely decay to 135Cs, and the 137-decay chain less than one hour decay to 137Cs. Since the Cs precursors are gases, iodine and xenon, the 135Cs plume was deposited farther downwind than the 137Cs plume. Sediment core samples were obtained from the Las Vegas arm of Lake Mead, sub-sampled and analyzed for 135Cs/137Cs ratios by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The layers proved to have nearly identical highly fractionated isotope ratios. This information is consistent with a model where the cesium was initially deposited onto the land area draining into Lake Mead and the composite from all of the above ground shots subsequently washed onto Lake Mead by high intensity rain and wind storms producing a layering of Cs activity, where each layer is a portion of the composite. - Highlights: ► We measure 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios by mass spectrometry in environmental samples. ► Isotopic fraction between Cs isotopes is documented. ► Cs isotopic data are consistent with re-distribution of sediment around Lake Mead.

  2. Application of Cesium isotopes in daily life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the world of science, the desire of the scientific community to discover new chemical elements is crucial for the development of new technologies in various fields of knowledge. And the main chemical element addressed by this article is Cesium, but specifically 133Cesium isotope and radioisotope 137Cesium, exemplifying their physical and chemical characteristics, and their applications. This article will also show how these isotopes have provided researchers a breakthrough in the field of radiological medicine and in time and frequency metrology. (author)

  3. Deciphering the measured ratios of Iodine-131 to Cesium-137 at the Fukushima reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsui, T

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the relative abundance of the radioactive isotopes Iodine-131 and Cesium-137 produced by nuclear fission in reactors and compare it with data taken at the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The ratio of radioactivities of these two isotopes can be used to obtain information about when the nuclear reactions terminated.

  4. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Discovery of Cesium, Lanthanum, Praseodymium and Promethium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    May, E.; Thoennessen, M

    2011-01-01

    Currently, forty-one cesium, thirty-five lanthanum, thirty-two praseodymium, and thirty-one promethium, isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  6. Cesium 137 and natural radioactive isotopes in the sediments of lake Zarzar in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study comprises both natural and industrial radioactive isotopes in the sediments of lake Zarzar. The study utilises the measurements obtained for uranium and thorium concentration in the sediments and the ratio of their isotopes. The decrease in Lead 210 activity with the depth of sediments, and the analysis of cesium concentrations measured to determine the level of the radioactive contamination caused by Thiocarbonyl accident and to accurately calculate sedimentation rate. The study revealed that both uranium and thorium concentrations in lake Zarzar sediments were very near to the normal international values. It also showed that average 234U/238U ratio were 1 indicating later uranium accumulation in reduced water. Cesium measurements revealed the presence of high levels of 137 Cs in sediment which was attributed to the Thiocarbamoyl accident. The rate of sedimentation calculated from cesium and 210Pb measurements were approximately similar (0.81 cm/year for cesium and 0.65 cm/year for lead). This helped in verifying the accuracy of the methods used in obtaining these measurements in this study. (author)

  7. Radiation doses resulting from incorporated radioactive cesium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Age-dependent dose factors are given for inhaled or ingested cesium isotopes, which have been calculated on the basis of published data on the biokinetics of cesium in the human organism. Tabulated data are presented for Cs-129, Cs-130, Cs-131, Cs-132, Cs-134, Cs-135, Cs-136, Cs-137(+Ba-137m), and Cs-138. Comparison of results obtained for adults with relevant data published by the ICRP (1978), the NCRP (1977), and Schwarz (1982) shows very good agreement. More significant deviations are however found when comparing the results with data given in the Federal German Radiation Protection Ordinance, both with regard to adults and to infants, particularly refering to the lung data and to those for the gastro-intestinal tract and the skeleton. These discrepancies are primarily due to improved models developed since the time the Radiation Protection Ordinance has been issued, (respiratory and gastro-intestinal tracts), and to improvements achieved with the dosimetric concepts (calculation of dose for bone surfaces instead of the whole skeleton). The dose factors for newborn given by the publication in hand are significantly lower than those given in the Ordinance (for infants); this is a result of age-dependent retention functions having been considered for this publication. The reliability of the dose factor calculations for various ages, pregnant women and fetuses is discussed and quantified. (orig./HP)

  8. Hanford Isotope Project strategic business analysis Cesium-137 (Cs-137)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this business analysis is to address the beneficial reuse of Cesium 137 (Cs-137) in order to utilize a valuable national asset and possibly save millions of tax dollars. Food irradiation is the front runner application along with other uses. This business analysis supports the objectives of the Department of Energy National Isotope Strategy distributed in August 1994 which describes the DOE plans for the production and distribution of isotope products and services. As part of the Department`s mission as stated in that document. ``The Department of Energy will also continue to produce and distribute other radioisotopes and enriched stable isotopes for medical diagnostics and therapeutics, industrial, agricultural, and other useful applications on a businesslike basis. This is consistent with the goals and objectives of the National Performance Review. The Department will endeavor to look at opportunities for private sector to co-fund or invest in new ventures. Also, the Department will seek to divest from ventures that can more profitably or reliably be operated by the private sector.``

  9. Hanford Isotope Project strategic business analysis Cesium-137 (Cs-137)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this business analysis is to address the beneficial reuse of Cesium 137 (Cs-137) in order to utilize a valuable national asset and possibly save millions of tax dollars. Food irradiation is the front runner application along with other uses. This business analysis supports the objectives of the Department of Energy National Isotope Strategy distributed in August 1994 which describes the DOE plans for the production and distribution of isotope products and services. As part of the Department's mission as stated in that document. ''The Department of Energy will also continue to produce and distribute other radioisotopes and enriched stable isotopes for medical diagnostics and therapeutics, industrial, agricultural, and other useful applications on a businesslike basis. This is consistent with the goals and objectives of the National Performance Review. The Department will endeavor to look at opportunities for private sector to co-fund or invest in new ventures. Also, the Department will seek to divest from ventures that can more profitably or reliably be operated by the private sector.''

  10. Calculations of neutron and proton radii of cesium isotopes. Final report, April 23--September 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This task involved the calculation of neutron and proton radii of cesium isotopes. The author has written a computer code that calculates radii according to two models: Myers 1983 and FRDM 1992. Results of calculations in both these models for both cesium and francium isotopes are attached as figures. He is currently interpreting these results in collaboration with D. Vieira and J.R. Nix, and they expect to use the computer code for further studies of nuclear radii

  11. Carbon, cesium and iodine isotopes in Japanese cedar leaves from Iwaki, Fukushima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T.; Cresswell, Alan J.;

    2016-01-01

    Japanese cedar leaves from Iwaki, Fukushima were analyzed for carbon, cesium and iodine isotopic compositions before and after the 2011 nuclear accident. The Δ14C values reflect ambient atmospheric 14C concentrations during the year the leaves were sampled/defoliated, and also previous year(s). The...... elevated 129I and 134,137Cs concentrations are attributed to direct exposure to the radioactive fallout for the pre-fallout-expended leaves and to internal translocation from older parts of the tree for post-fallout-expended leaves. 134Cs/137Cs and 129I/137Cs activity ratios suggest insignificant isotopic...... and elemental fractionation during translocation. However, fractionation between radioiodine and radiocesium is significant during transportation from the source....

  12. Application of Cesium isotopes in daily life; Aplicacoes dos isotopos do Cesio no cotidiano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordao, B.O.; Quaresma, D.S.; Carvalho, R.J., E-mail: bjordan@on.br, E-mail: dansq@on.br, E-mail: carvalho@on.br [Observatorio Nacional (ON/LPTF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Tempo e Frequencia; Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: guilherm@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes

    2014-07-01

    In the world of science, the desire of the scientific community to discover new chemical elements is crucial for the development of new technologies in various fields of knowledge. And the main chemical element addressed by this article is Cesium, but specifically {sup 133}Cesium isotope and radioisotope {sup 137}Cesium, exemplifying their physical and chemical characteristics, and their applications. This article will also show how these isotopes have provided researchers a breakthrough in the field of radiological medicine and in time and frequency metrology. (author)

  13. possibilities of isotope separation of radioactive cesium by ion cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transmutation of radioactive wastes is of high interest in order to reduce as much as possible the difficulties induced by their storage. In the case of radioactive cesium waste, cesium 137 which presents a short life time (30 years) is difficult to handle due to its high thermal load and and radiation level; cesium 135 is a long life time isotope with high mobility in storage glasses. As the processes of transmutation are different for cesium 135 and cesium 137 and as the neutron consumption is very high, it would be necessary to proceed to a preliminary isotope separation and it would not be worth to transmute the stable 133 isotope of cesium. Peculiar problems linked with cesium physico-chemical properties such as ionisation rat, vapour pressure, cooling of the components of the separation elements, especially the collector part, are discussed. It is shown that a high density plasma (1012 cm -3), with low ionic temperature (1 eV), good for isotope separation, can be achieved easily. It must be noticed that the cooling with water has to be avoided due to chemical reactions. After having defined the unitary separative element, different enrichment strategies and arrangements of the separative elements are proposed. An economic estimation with our code RICAN is given. (author)

  14. Recent development in isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the limited of this review the following topics will be briefly discussed: a) Accuracy, precision, internal relative standard deviation (RISD) and external relative standard deviation (RESD) of isotope ratio measurements. With advanced instrumentation and use of standard reference materials, high accuracy and RESD = 0.002% (or better) may be achieved; b) The advantages of modern automatic isotope ratio mass spectrometer are briefly described. Computer controlled operation and data acquisition, and multiple ion collection are the recent important improvement; c) The isotopic fractionation during the course of isotope ratio measurement is considered as a major source of errors in thermal ionization of metallic elements. The phenomenon in strontium, neodymium, uranium, lead and calcium and methods to correct the measured data are discussed; d) Applications of isotope ratio mass spectrometry in atomic weight determinations, the isotope dilution technique, isotope geology, and isotope effects in biological systems are described together with specific applications in various research and technology area. (author)

  15. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry in oceanic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is an important and well established method in many scientific fields as analytical chemistry (isotope dilution MS), physical chemistry, nuclear sciences and technology, environmental, agricultural, geological isotope dating, archaeometric, cosmic, bioavailability and nutrition studies, food authentication and adulteration control, elucidation of chemical reaction mechanism, isotope effect studies on chemical reactions and isotope enrichment/separation processes. This paper is aimed to provide a brief summary of IRMS contribution to sea and oceanic studies

  16. Direct mass measurements on rubidium, cesium and francium isotopes far from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double focusing mass spectrometer has been set on line with the ISOLDE isotope separator at CERN in order to measure directly the masses of the short lived isotopes which are produced there. The first experiments have been performed on the heaviest alkali elements rubidium, cesium and francium. Unpublished results obtained for the francium isotopes 204-210, 224-228Fr are briefly presented. (orig./AH)

  17. Isotopic ratios in the solar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This colloquium is aimed at presentation of isotope ratio measurements in different objects of solar system and surrounding interstellar space and evaluation of what information on composition and structure of primitive solar nebula and on chemical evolution of interstellar space in this part of the galaxy can be deduced from it. Isotope ratio in solar system got from laboratory study of extraterrestrial materials is a subject of this colloquium. Then isotope ratio measured in solar wind, planets and comets. Measurements either are made in-situ by mass spectrometry of ions in solar wind or planetery atmosphere gases either are remote measurements of spectra emitted by giant planets and comets. At last, planetology and astrophysics implications are presented and reviewed. Consraints for solar system formation model can be deduced from isotope ratio measurement. Particularly, isotope anomalies are marks of the processes, which have influenced the primitive solar nebula contraction

  18. Advances in optical water isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometers routinely achieve impressive measurement precision and high throughput. In spite of this, a number of fundamental and practical problems are encountered. These are most notable in the case of water, arguably the most important molecule in the environment. Optical techniques to measure stable isotope ratios are able to address at least some of these issues; particularly, in relation to sample pretreatment and the difficulty of in-situ measurements. After discussing some general design criteria for infrared laser-based isotope ratio spectrometers, the case made above will be illustrated with a number of different instruments in applications from earthbound to the atmospheric: From laboratory based ice-core water isotope analyses to in-situ water isotope measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. (author)

  19. The beta strength function structure in \\beta + decay of lutecium, thulium and cesium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Alkhazov, G D; Naumov, Yu V; Orlov, S Yu; Vitman, V D

    1981-01-01

    The spectra of total gamma -absorption in the decays of some lutetium, thulium and cesium isotopes have been measured. The probabilities for level population in the decay of the isotopes have been determined. The deduced beta strength functions reveal pronounced structure. Calculations of the strength functions using the Saxon-Woods potential and the residual Gamow-Teller interaction are presented. It is shown that in beta /sup +/ decay of light thulium and cesium isotopes the strength function comprises more than 70% of the Gamow-Teller excitations with mu /sub tau /=+1. This result is the first direct observation of the Gamov-Teller resonance in beta /sup +/ decay of nuclei with T/sub z/>0. (21 refs).

  20. Isotope ratio in stellar atmospheres and nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of isotopic ratios in stellar atmospheres is studied. The isotopic shift of atomic and molecular lines of different species of a certain element is examined. CH and MgH lines are observed in order to obtain the 12C: 13C and 24Mg: 25Mg: 26Mg isotpic ratios. The formation of lines in stellar atmospheres is computed and the resulting synthetic spectra are employed to determine the isotopic abundances. The results obtained for the isotopic ratios are compared to predictions of nucleosynthesis theories. Finally, the concept of primary and secondary element is discussed, and these definitions are applied to the observed variations in the abundance of elements as a function of metallicity. (author)

  1. An isotope dilution-precipitation process for removing radioactive cesium from wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Harold, E-mail: rogers22@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Bowers, John; Gates-Anderson, Dianne [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developed an isotope dilution-precipitation treatment process for Cs-137 contaminated water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste seeded with non-radioactive Cs-133 prior to precipitation with sodium tetraphenylborate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Final Cs-137 concentrations below DOE discharge limit of 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} {mu}Ci/mL can be achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthetic wastewater, and industrial low level radioactive proof of principle studies completed. - Abstract: A novel isotope dilution-precipitation method has been developed to remove cesium-137 from radioactive wastewater. The process involves adding stable cesium chloride to wastewater in order to raise the total cesium concentration, which then allows both the stable and radioactive cesium ions to be precipitated together using sodium tetraphenylborate. This process was investigated utilizing laboratory solutions to determine stable cesium dose rates, mixing times, effects of pH, and filtration requirements. Once optimized, the process was then tested on synthetic wastewater and aqueous low-level waste. Experiments showed the reaction to be very quick and stable in the pH range tested, 2.5-11.5. The wastewater may need to be filtered using a 0.45-{mu}m filter, though ferric sulfate has been shown to promote coagulation and settling, thereby eliminating the necessity for filtration. This investigation showed that this isotope dilution-precipitation process can remove Cs-37 levels below the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Derived Concentration Standard (DCS) of 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} {mu}Ci/mL using a single dosage, potentially allowing the wastewater to be discharged directly to sanitary sewers.

  2. Radium-based estimates of cesium isotope transport and total direct ocean discharges from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident

    OpenAIRE

    Charette, M.A.; Breier, C. F.; P. B. Henderson; S. M. Pike; I. I. Rypina; S. R. Jayne; Buesseler, K. O.

    2013-01-01

    Radium has four naturally occurring isotopes that have proven useful in constraining water mass source, age, and mixing rates in the coastal and open ocean. In this study, we used radium isotopes to determine the fate and flux of runoff-derived cesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP). During a June 2011 cruise, the highest cesium (Cs) concentrations were found along the eastern shelf of northern Japan, from Fukushima south, to the edge of the Kuroshio C...

  3. The CN isotopic ratios in comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfroid, J.; Jehin, E.; Hutsemékers, D.; Cochran, A.; Zucconi, J.-M.; Arpigny, C.; Schulz, R.; Stüwe, J. A.; Ilyin, I.

    2009-08-01

    Our aim is to determine the isotopic ratios 12C/13C and 14N/15N in a variety of comets and link these measurements to the formation and evolution of the solar system. The 12C/13C and 14N/15N isotopic ratios are measured for the CN radical by means of high-resolution optical spectra of the R branch of the B-X (0, 0) violet band. 23 comets from different dynamical classes have been observed, sometimes at various heliocentric and nucleocentric distances, in order to estimate possible variations of the isotopic ratios in parent molecules. The 12C/13C and 14N/15N isotopic ratios in CN are remarkably constant (average values of, respectively, 91.0 ± 3.6 and 147.8 ± 5.7) within our measurement errors, for all comets whatever their origin or heliocentric distance. While the carbon isotopic ratio does agree with the terrestrial value (89), the nitrogen ratio is a factor of two lower than the terrestrial value (272), indicating a fractionation in the early solar system, or in the protosolar nebula, common to all the comets of our sample. This points towards a common origin of the comets independently of their birthplaces, and a relationship between HCN and CN. Appendices and Table [see full textsee full textsee full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programmes ID 268.C-5570, 270.C-5043, 073.C-0525, 274.C-5015 and 075.C-0355(A).

  4. Sulphur isotope ratios in Philippine geothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents data on sulfur isotope ratios in dissolved sulfate, H2S gas, anhydrite and pyrite minerals in four Philippine geothermal fields - Palinpinon, Mahanagdong, Mt. Apo and Bacon-Manito. Isotope ratios are used to determine the source of sulfur species in each geothermal system. Fluid temperature estimates using sulfur pairs are also included in the discussion. Finally, oxygen isotope distribution in dissolved sulfate, anhydrite and water is introduced. Dissolved sulfate sulfur isotope ratios can be divided into three groups: heavy (δ34S>15 per mille CDT), light (∼ 0 per mille) and transitional or mixed ratios (1-15 per mille). The heavy samples represent waters that have attained some degree of isotopic equilibrium with co-existing sulfides, either in the present geothermal environments or at deeper, hotter levels of the hydrothermal systems. Most of the well fluids in Palinpinon, Mahanagdong and Bacon-Manito belong to this group. Light fluids, on the other hand, are typical of surface and shallow thermal features, where H2S gas is oxidized and converted to SO4. The δ34SSO4 ratios here mirror that of the source H2S. Slightly heavy ratios, characteristic of Mt. Apo well waters, are apparently produced by dilution of 'heavy' fluids with 'light' waters, in this specific case the light end-member being steam condensate. δ34SH2S of well samples in Palinpinon, Mahanagdong and Bacon-Manito are in the vicinity of 0 per mille, similar to that of magmatic H2S and H2S produced from SO2 disproportionation. This implies that geothermal H2S in these fields are derived either directly or indirectly from a magmatic source. In Mt. Apo, δ34SH2S are depleted at -3 to -4 per mille. Although the ultimate source is still magmatic in origin, the depleted ratios are thought to be effects of extensive degassing of an originally δ34S-enriched reservoir fluid. Sulfur ratios in anhydrite are similar to those of dissolved SO4, suggesting that dissolved sulfate is the

  5. Feasibility of Isotopic Measurements: Graphite Isotopic Ratio Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Gerlach, David C.; Reid, Bruce D.; Morgan, W. C.

    2001-04-30

    This report addresses the feasibility of the laboratory measurements of isotopic ratios for selected trace constituents in irradiated nuclear-grade graphite, based on the results of a proof-of-principal experiment completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 1994. The estimation of graphite fluence through measurement of isotopic ratio changes in the impurity elements in the nuclear-grade graphite is referred to as the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). Combined with reactor core and fuel information, GIRM measurements can be employed to estimate cumulative materials production in graphite moderated reactors. This report documents the laboratory procedures and results from the initial measurements of irradiated graphite samples. The irradiated graphite samples were obtained from the C Reactor (one of several production reactors at Hanford) and from the French G-2 Reactor located at Marcoule. Analysis of the irradiated graphite samples indicated that replicable measurements of isotope ratios could be obtained from the fluence sensitive elements of Ti, Ca, Sr, and Ba. While these impurity elements are present in the nuclear-grade graphite in very low concentrations, measurement precision was typically on the order of a few tenths of a percent to just over 1 percent. Replicability of the measurements was also very good with measured values differing by less than 0.5 percent. The overall results of this initial proof-of-principal experiment are sufficiently encouraging that a demonstration of GIRM on a reactor scale basis is planned for FY-95.

  6. Cesium isotopes distribution in a soil-ground profile of aeration zone at meliorative systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesium isotopes redistribution in soil layer in time (from august 1986) at 7 experimental sections of meliorative systems are studied. Sections are at different outlying from industrial site and in different directions. It is shown, that radioisotopes distribution on surface is non uniform in quantity as well as in composition. Soil surface is contaminated more in several orders than ground layer even at a depth of 5-10 cm. It is ascertained, that flooding causes the radionuclide introduction into the ground waters level in large quantities. 7 refs.; 1 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  8. Worldwide lead-isotope ratio in bivalves and sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Mørk; Jacobsen, Gitte; Strand, Jakob;

    The lead-isotope ratio have been used to assess and identify impact of leaded gasoline, coal combustion and  mineral activities[ref 1] due to the difference in 206Pb (~52%), 207Pb (~24%) and 208Pb (~23%) isotope ratios. The source of these differences is the decaying of the parent isotopes of 238U...

  9. Temperature measurements from oxygen isotope ratios of fish otoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, I

    1967-03-31

    Measurements have shown that the temperature of a fish's habitat can be deduced from the Oxygen isotope ratio of its otoliths (ear bones). Isotope ratios Obtained from fossil otoliths indicate a water temperature which agrees wiht that found by isotope measurements on associated benthonic foraminifera. PMID:6020293

  10. Laser Spectroscopic Measurement of Helium Isotope Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, L B; Holt, R J; Lu, Z T; O'Connor, T P; Sano, Y; Sturchio, N C

    2003-01-01

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of 3He/4He = 10^-7 - 10^-5. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable 3He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of 4He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3-sigma detection limit of 3He in helium is 4 x 10^-9. This demonstration required a 200 micro-L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  11. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of 3He/4He = 10-7--10-5. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable 3He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of 4He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3σ detection limit of 3He in helium is 4 x 10-9. This demonstration required a 200 μL STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  12. Isotope ratio precision analysis using the Varian 820-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Scientific disciplines like food chemistry, geochemistry, paleontology are not only interested in the total concentration of an element but also in the isotope ratio of either two isotopes of the same element or isotopes of different elements. The research is focused on elements like selenium, zirconium, strontium, lead and uranium. The knowledge of the isotope ratio 10B/11B is essential for nuclear power plants. In addition to achieve accurate results, the challenge for ICPQMS is to obtain a required precision below 0.1 %. Different approaches to improve the precision of the isotope ratio analysis with ICPQMS are discussed. (author)

  13. Stable Isotope Ratios and Forensic Analysis of Microorganisms▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Jarman, Kristin H.

    2007-01-01

    In the aftermath of the anthrax letters of 2001, researchers have been exploring various analytical signatures for the purpose of characterizing the production environment of microorganisms. One such signature is stable isotope ratios, which in heterotrophs, are a function of nutrient and water sources. Here we discuss the use of stable isotope ratios in microbial forensics, using as a database the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen stable isotope ratios of 247 separate cultures of Bacill...

  14. Fabrication of silicon nanotip arrays with high aspect ratio by cesium chloride self-assembly and dry etching

    OpenAIRE

    Xinshuai Zhang; Jing Liu; Bo Wang; Tianchong Zhang; Futing Yi

    2014-01-01

    Nanotip arrays with high aspect ratio, which have attracted much attention due to their potential applications, have been fabricated by many methods. Dry etching combined with self-assembly masks is widely used because of the convenience of dry etching and high throughput of self-assembly. In this paper, we report a method combining Cesium Chloride (CsCl) self-assembly with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) dry etching to fabricate silicon nanotip arrays with high aspect ratio and silicon nano...

  15. Determination of fission gas yields from isotope ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a method of calculating the actual fission yield of Kr and Xe in nuclear fuel including the effect of neutron capture reactions and decay. The bases for this calculation are the cumulative yields (ref. 1) of Kr and Xe isotopes (or pairs of isotopes) which are unaffected by...... neutron capture reactions, and measured Kr and Xe isotope ratios. Also the burnup contribution from the different fissile heavy isotopes must be known in order to get accurate fission gas yields....

  16. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of brines - comparing isotope ratio mass spectrometry and isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Christian; Koeniger, Paul; van Geldern, Robert; Stadler, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Today's standard analytical methods for high precision stable isotope analysis of fluids are gas-water equilibration and high temperature pyrolysis coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometers (IRMS). In recent years, relatively new laser-based analytical instruments entered the market that are said to allow high isotope precision data on nearly every media. This optical technique is referred to as isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). The objective of this study is to evaluate the capability of this new instrument type for highly saline solutions and a comparison of the analytical results with traditional IRMS analysis. It has been shown for the equilibration method that the presence of salts influences the measured isotope values depending on the salt concentration (see Lécuyer et al, 2009; Martineau, 2012). This so-called 'isotope salt effect' depends on the salt type and salt concentration. These factors change the activity in the fluid and therefore shift the isotope ratios measured by the equilibration method. Consequently, correction factors have to be applied to these analytical data. Direct conversion techniques like pyrolysis or the new laser instruments allow the measurement of the water molecule from the sample directly and should therefore not suffer from the salt effect, i.e. no corrections of raw values are necessary. However, due to high salt concentrations this might cause technical problems with the analytical hardware and may require labor-intensive sample preparation (e.g. vacuum distillation). This study evaluates the salt isotope effect for the IRMS equilibration technique (Thermo Gasbench II coupled to Delta Plus XP) and the laser-based IRIS instruments with liquid injection (Picarro L2120-i). Synthetic salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, MgSO4, CaSO4) and natural brines collected from the Stassfurt Salt Anticline (Germany; Stadler et al., 2012) were analysed with both techniques. Salt concentrations ranged from seawater salinity

  17. Fabrication of silicon nanotip arrays with high aspect ratio by cesium chloride self-assembly and dry etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinshuai Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotip arrays with high aspect ratio, which have attracted much attention due to their potential applications, have been fabricated by many methods. Dry etching combined with self-assembly masks is widely used because of the convenience of dry etching and high throughput of self-assembly. In this paper, we report a method combining Cesium Chloride (CsCl self-assembly with inductively coupled plasma (ICP dry etching to fabricate silicon nanotip arrays with high aspect ratio and silicon nanotip arrays with aspect ratio 15 have been achieved after optimization of all parameters.

  18. Radium-based estimates of cesium isotope transport and total direct ocean discharges from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident

    OpenAIRE

    Charette, M.A.; Breier, C. F.; P. B. Henderson; S. M. Pike; I. I. Rypina; S. R. Jayne; Buesseler, K. O.

    2012-01-01

    Radium has four naturally occurring isotopes that have proven useful in constraining water mass source, age, and mixing rates in the coastal and open ocean. In this study, we used radium isotopes to determine the fate and flux of runoff-derived cesium from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). During a June 2011 cruise, the highest Cs concentrations were found along the eastern shelf of northern Japan, from Fukushima south, to the edge of the Kuroshio current, and in an eddy ∼ 1...

  19. THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS COMMISSION AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO DETERMINATIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-07

    Following Thomson's discovery of stable isotopes in non-radioactive chemical elements, the derivation of atomic weight values from mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic abundance ratios moved very slowly. Forty years later, only 3 1/2 % of the recommended values were based on mass spectrometric measurements and only 38% in the first half century. It might be noted that two chemical elements (tellurium and mercury) are still based on chemical measurements, where the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement either agrees with the value from the chemical measurement or the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement falls within the uncertainty of the chemical measurement of the atomic weight. Of the 19 chemical elements, whose atomic weight is based on non-corrected relative isotopic abundance measurements, five of these are two isotope systems (indium, iridium, lanthanum, lutetium and tantalum) and one is a three-isotope system (oxygen).

  20. High-precision mass spectrometric hydrogen isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical capabilities of mass spectrometric ion-current measurement systems are described on both a theoretical and a practical basis. From the theoretical standpoint, a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) model that evaluated the fundamental sources of noise present in ion-current measurement systems was developed. Use of this model accurately predicted the performance (precision) for ion-current ratio measurements made by two isotope ratio mass spectrometers, one designed for carbon isotopic measurements, and the other designed for hydrogen isotopic measurements. Isotope ratio measurements differ from current-ratio measurements in that the observed ion-current ratio must be corrected to reflect the ratio of the ion currents due to the isotopic species of interest, which, for hydrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry, are HD+ and H2+. Interfaces to these two ion currents are described in detail. To compensate for H3+ three measurement procedures, the two-standard calibration, the one-standard differential measurement with electronic H3+ compensation, and the two-standard differential measurement, are described. The one- and two-standard differential measurements were successfully used for measurement of isotopic abundances. Results of a collaborative investigation to validate the use of 18O in place of D as an isotopic label for total body water measurements are presented. In this research both 18O and D were administered simultaneously to several subjects. The weight of total body water of these subjects as measured by the dilution of D into the body water was in good agreement with the results of the 18O measurements. A brief description of the laboratory computer system is also given

  1. Pu600 energy window arithmetic of plutonium isotopes ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of calculating plutonium isotopes ratio using Pu600 energy window (630-670 keV) was put forward by the LLNL. And plutonium isotopes ratio arithmetic on Pu600 energy window was developed in this paper. Some γ energy spectra of two plutonium samples were calculated on this arithmetic, and the results are consistent with the results from PC/FRAM. (authors)

  2. Isotope analytics for the evaluation of the feeding influence on the isotope ratio in beef samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information about the origin of food and associated production systems has a high significance for food control. An extremely promising approach to obtain such information is the determination of isotope ratios of different elements. In this study the correlation of the isotope ratios C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, Mg-25/Mg-24, and Sr-87/Sr-86 in bovine samples (milk and urine) and the corresponding isotope ratios in feed was investigated. It was shown that in the bovine samples all four isotope ratios correlate with the isotope composition of the feed. The isotope ratios of strontium and magnesium have the advantage that they directly reflect the isotope ratios of the ingested feed since there is no isotope fractionation in the bovine organism which is in contrast to the case of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. From the present feeding study it is evident, that a feed change leads to a significant change in the delta C-13 values in milk and urine within 10 days already. For the deltaN-15 values the feed change was only visible in the bovine urine after 49 days. Investigations of cows from two different regions (Berlin/Germany and Goestling/Austria) kept at different feeding regimes revealed no differences in the N-15/N-14 and Mg-26/Mg-24 isotope ratios. The strongest correlation between the isotope ratio of the bovine samples and the kind of ingested feed was observed for the carbon isotope ratio. With this ratio even smallest differences in the feed composition were traceable in the bovine samples. Since different regions usually coincide with different feeding regimes, carbon isotope ratios can be used to distinguish bovine samples from different regions if the delta C-13 values of the ingested feed are different. Furthermore, the determination of strontium isotope ratios revealed significant differences between bovine and feed samples of Berlin and Goestling due to the different geologic realities. Hence the carbon and strontium isotope ratios allow the best

  3. Development of TIMS for isotopic ratio analysis of boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A magnetic sector based Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) has been developed at Technical Physics Division, for high precision isotope ratio analysis of Boron (in the form of Sodium Meta-borate) at the Boron enrichment facility, Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru. The performance of this indigenously developed TIMS has been tested for sensitivity, isotope ratio precision and accuracy for different levels of enrichment in the plant samples. The sensitivity of this instrument was found to be 1 ion per 200 atoms. The internal and external precision for natural concentration levels Boron isotopes were better than 0.05%. (author)

  4. Isotope yield ratios as a probe of the reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopically resolved yields of particles and complex fragments from 12C and 18O induced reactions on 53Ni, 54Ni, Ag, and 197Au in the intermediate range of bombarding energies 30 MeV ≤ E/A ≤ 84 MeV were measured. The systematic variation of the deduced isotope yield ratios with projectile and target is used to determine the degree of N/Z equilibration achieved and to establish time scales for the reaction process. A quantum statistical model is employed in order to derive entropies of the emitting systems from the measured isotope yield ratios. (orig.)

  5. Determining lead sources in Mexico using the lead isotope ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary-Webb Madhu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Lead poisoning can, in some cases, be traced to a specific route or source of exposure on the basis of the individual's blood lead isotope ratio. To assess the major source of lead exposure among women residing in Mexico City, we compared blood, ceramic, and gasoline lead isotope ratios. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study population, randomly selected from participants of a large trial, (1/1996-12/1996 comprised of 16 women whose lead levels exceeded 10 µg/dl and who reported using lead-glazed ceramics. Lead isotope ratios were performed on a Perkin Elmer 5000 Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS interfaced with a Perkin Elmer HGA-600MS Electrothermal Vaporization System (ETV. RESULTS: The isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb of both the blood specimens and their corresponding ceramic specimens were highly correlated, with r=0.9979, r²=0.9958, r=0.9957, r²=0.9915 and r=0.9945, r²=0.9890 values for the three isotope ratios, respectively, suggesting that the lead exposure most likely resulted from the use of these ceramic. Measurements of lead isotope ratios from leaded gasoline in use at the time of blood sampling, differed from those in blood and ceramics. CONCLUSIONS: Determining lead isotope ratios can be an efficient tool to identify a major source of lead exposure and to support the implementation of public health prevention and control measures.

  6. Isotope ratios as pollutant source and behaviour indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent years have witnessed significant advances in isotope techniques for identifying origins and for studying the behaviour of trace contaminants and pollutants of the environment under actual existing environmental conditions. Improvements in the supply of stable isotopes and their labelled compounds, instrumental analysis and information on stable or radioactive isotopic ratios of existing environmental contaminants as a function of origin or behaviour have provided relatively new tools for the environmental scientist. While variations in natural or existing environmental stable and radioactive nuclides could be regarded as 'background noise' in conventional tracer experiments they promised unique information about sources and behaviour to those who listened carefully. (author)

  7. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values

  8. Cesium (Cs) particle formation based on a laser photochemical reaction with a self-injection-seeded Ti:sapphire laser for Cs isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied laser isotope separation of cesium (Cs) on the basis of a laser photochemical reaction and two-photon excitation scheme using a narrow line width Ti:sapphire laser to reduce long-term radioactive toxicity of a long-lived fission product. Using resonant laser irradiation to Cs atoms in hydrogen gas, we observed cesium hydride fine particles and confirmed the formation by calculations using rate equations. Our results show that the process seems promising for efficient Cs isotope separation. (author)

  9. Tracing gas accretion in the Galactic center using isotopic ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Riquelme, D; Martin-Pintado, J; Mauersberger, R; Martin, S; Bronfman, L

    2010-01-01

    Ams: We study the 12C/13C isotopic ratio in the disk of the central molecular zone and in the halo to trace gas accretion toward the Galactic center region in the Milky Way. Methods: Using the IRAM 30m telescope, we observe the J=1-0 rotational transition of HCO+, HCN, HNC and their 13C isotopic substitutions in order to measure the 12C/13C isotopic ratio. We observe 9 positions selected throughout the Galactic center region, including clouds at high latitude; locations where the X1 and X2 orbits associated with the barred potential are expected to intersect; and typical Galactic center molecular clouds. Results: We find a systematically higher 12C/13C isotopic ratio (>40) toward the halo and the X1 orbits than for the Galactic center molecular clouds (20-25). Our results point out to molecular gas which has undergone a different degree of nuclear processing than that observed in the gas towards the inner Galactic center region. Conclusions: The high isotopic ratios are consistent with the accretion of the ga...

  10. Calcium isotope ratios in animal and human bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynard, L. M.; Henderson, G. M.; Hedges, R. E. M.

    2010-07-01

    Calcium isotopes in tissues are thought to be influenced by an individual's diet, reflecting parameters such as trophic level and dairy consumption, but this has not been carefully assessed. We report the calcium isotope ratios (δ 44/42Ca) of modern and archaeological animal and human bone ( n = 216). Modern sheep raised at the same location show 0.14 ± 0.08‰ higher δ 44/42Ca in females than in males, which we attribute to lactation by the ewes. In the archaeological bone samples the calcium isotope ratios of the herbivorous fauna vary by location. At a single site, the archaeological fauna do not show a trophic level effect. Humans have lower δ 44/42Ca than the mean site fauna by 0.22 ± 0.22‰, and the humans have a greater δ 44/42Ca range than the animals. No effect of sex or age on the calcium isotope ratios was found, and intra-individual skeletal δ 44/42Ca variability is negligible. We rule out dairy consumption as the main cause of the lower human δ 44/42Ca, based on results from sites pre-dating animal domestication and dairy availability, and suggest instead that individual physiology and calcium intake may be important in determining bone calcium isotope ratios.

  11. Oxygen isotopic ratios toward molecular clouds in the Galactic disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present our observations of the J = 1 − 0 rotation transitions in molecular isotopes C18O and C17O toward a sample of molecular clouds with different galactocentric distances, using the Delingha 13.7m (DLH 13.7 m) telescope, administered by Purple Mountain Observatory, and its 9-beam SIS receiver. Complementary observations toward several sources with large galactocentric distance are obtained with the IRAM 30m and Mopra 22m telescopes. C18O/C17O abundance ratios reflecting the 18O/17O isotope ratios are obtained from integrated intensity ratios of C18O and C17O. We derived the ratio value for 13 sources covering a galactocentric distance range of 3kpc to 16kpc. In combination with our mapping results that provide a ratio value of 3.01±0.14 in the Galactic center region, it shows that the abundance ratio tends to increase with galactocentric distance, i.e., it supports a radial gradient along the Galactic disk for the abundance ratio. This is consistent with the inside-out formation scenario of our Galaxy. However, our results may suffer from small samples with large galactocentric distance. Combining our data with multi-transition lines of C18O and C17O will be helpful for constraining opacities and abundances and further confirming the Galactic radial gradient shown by the isotope ratio 18O/17O. (paper)

  12. Stable Isotope Ratio Measurement by NAA for Environmental Source Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gone, Jeckong; Olmez, Ilhan; Ames, Michael R.

    1999-06-06

    The purpose of applying neutron activation analysis to the study of isotopic ratios is to examine whether ratios could be measured that are difficult to determine by other means and that could be used to distinguish between materials from different types of sources. The NAA is a sensitive analytical method for many elements that are typically present in levels too low to measure by other techniques, and because NAA is based on nuclear rather than chemical or physical reactions, the analytical signals from the two isotopes are readily distinguishable.

  13. Stable Isotope Ratio Measurement by NAA for Environmental Source Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of applying neutron activation analysis to the study of isotopic ratios is to examine whether ratios could be measured that are difficult to determine by other means and that could be used to distinguish between materials from different types of sources. The NAA is a sensitive analytical method for many elements that are typically present in levels too low to measure by other techniques, and because NAA is based on nuclear rather than chemical or physical reactions, the analytical signals from the two isotopes are readily distinguishable

  14. Determining the isotopic ratio of 10B/11B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic ratios can be very exactly determined by mass spectrometry. Using a mass spectrometer with an induction-coupled plasma as the excitation source (ICP-MS), radioactive contamination of the sample feeding system and the interface will result in very high blank readout. However, transforming the boron to the volatile boric acid trimethyl ester, the isotopic ratio can be measured with low blind value interference using a modified gas chromatographic mass spectrometer with thermal ionization (GC-MS). Space-charge effects also discussed in the paper have an influence on the accuracy of results, so that particular attention must be paid to calibration work. (orig./CB)

  15. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Bot, A.; Mirel, V.

    2013-11-01

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ13C between batches from -29.7 to -31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between -31.3 to -34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  16. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Mirel, V., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ{sup 13}C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  17. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ13C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures

  18. Use of plutonium isotope activity ratios in dating recent sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of plutonium presently in the biosphere has come from the testing of nuclear devices. In the early 1950s, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratio of fallout debris was > 0.04; in the more extensive test series of 1961 to 1962, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratios were quite consistent at 0.02 to 0.03 and maximum fallout delivery occurred in mid-1963. A significant perturbation in Pu isotope activity ratios occurred in mid-1966 with the deposition of Pu-238 from the SNAP-9A reentry and burn-up. Recently deposited sediments have recorded these events and where accumulation rates are rapid (> 1 cm/y), changes in Pu isotope activity ratios can be used as a geochronological tool

  19. A continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry method for high precision determination of dissolved gas ratios and isotopic composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charoenpong, C. N.; Bristow, L. A.; Altabet, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved gas ratios and isotopic compositions provide essential information about the biological and physical mechanisms influencing N-2, O-2, and Ar in aquatic systems. Current methods available are either limited by overall cost, labor-intensive sample collection and analysis, or insufficient...... precision. Here, we present a new highly accurate and robust method for sample collection and subsequent simultaneous measurement of the dissolved gas ratios (N-2/Ar and O-2/Ar) and isotopic compositions (delta N-15(2) and delta O-18(2)) in seawater. The relatively simple sampling procedure using low cost...

  20. Fractionation of cesium isotopes and 90Sr in snowmelt run-off and lake waters from a contaminated Norwegian mountain catchment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesium isotopes and 90Sr have been determined in the inflow and outflow rivers of a Norwegian subalpine lake. The lake is situated in an area contaminated by Chernobyl fallout. Sampling was carried out during the spring peak discharge period associated with snowmelt. Transported coarse particulate plant material was collected by traps. Particles and colloids were removed from water samples by hollow fibre ultrafiltration. The results illustrate that run-off during the spring snowmelt is an important pathway for these radionuclides. The cesium isotopes are predominantly transported as colloids, while 90Sr is present in the form of low molecular weight mobile species. Based on lake budget calculations, more than 50% of the cesium input is retained in the lake, while more than 90% of the 90Sr is transported through the lake and into lower parts of the drainage system. (author) 16 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 tabs

  1. Uranium isotope ratio measurements using diode laser optogalvanic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional methods for measuring isotope ratios are seldom amenable to field use. In particular, thermal ionization mass spectrometry, while a very accurate and precise technique for measuring isotope ratios, requires instrumentation that is typically too cumbersome for field use. As an alternative to the use of conventional mass spectrometers, the authors have been pursuing glow discharge atomization coupled with high resolution optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS) for quantification of uranium isotope ratios. This approach has been considered by others, but the authors have focussed on demountable discharge cells for practical ratio measurements. Further, the authors wish to make use of diode lasers for excitation. A field instrument does not require the accuracy and precision of a laboratory mass spectrometer, but must be sensitive to changes in sample isotopic composition, be free from interferences, and have sufficient precision for a decision to be made about the fate of the field sample; i.e., does the sample warrant further laboratory analysis? The technique ideally should require a minimum of sample preparation, and should at the same time be amenable to a variety of sample types. The glow discharge meets these requirements

  2. Isotope Ratios Reveal Trickery in the Produce Aisle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for the proper checking and banning of organic food items is proposed. The analysis of the nitrogen isotope ratio present in the food is found to be a perfect standard for the organic checking of the food products.

  3. Setting of cesium residual ratio of molten solidified waste produced in Japan Atomic Power Company Tokai and Tokai No.2 Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JNES investigated the appropriateness of a view of the Japan Nuclear Fuel Co. on cesium residual content and the radioactivity measurement precision regarding the molten solidified (with lowered inorganic salt used) radioactive wastes which were produced from Japan Atomic Power Company Tokai and Tokai No. 2 Power Stations. Based on the written performance report from the request and past disposal confirmation experience, a view of the JNFC is confirmed as appropriate that setting of 15% cesium residual ratio for molten solidified with volume ratio larger than 4% and less than 10% cases. (S. Ohno)

  4. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Appenzeller

    Full Text Available Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.

  5. Radium-based estimates of cesium isotope transport and total direct ocean discharges from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Charette

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Radium has four naturally occurring isotopes that have proven useful in constraining water mass source, age, and mixing rates in the coastal and open ocean. In this study, we used radium isotopes to determine the fate and flux of runoff-derived cesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP. During a June 2011 cruise, the highest cesium (Cs concentrations were found along the eastern shelf of northern Japan, from Fukushima south, to the edge of the Kuroshio Current, and in an eddy ~ 130 km from the FNPP site. Locations with the highest cesium also had some of the highest radium activities, suggesting much of the direct ocean discharges of Cs remained in the coastal zone 2–3 months after the accident. We used a short-lived Ra isotope (223Ra, t1/2 = 11.4 d to derive an average water mass age (Tr in the coastal zone of 32 days. To ground-truth the Ra age model, we conducted a direct, station-by-station comparison of water mass ages with a numerical oceanographic model and found them to be in excellent agreement (model avg. Tr = 27 days. From these independent Tr values and the inventory of Cs within the water column at the time of our cruise, we were able to calculate an offshore 134Cs flux of 3.9–4.6 × 1013 Bq d−1. Radium-228 (t1/2 = 5.75 yr was used to derive a vertical eddy diffusivity (Kz of 0.7 m2 d−1 (0.1 cm2 s−1; from this Kz and 134Cs inventory, we estimated a 134Cs flux across the pycnocline of 1.8 × 104 Bq d−1 for the same time period. On average, our results show that horizontal mixing loss of Cs from the coastal zone was ~ 109 greater than vertical exchange below the surface mixed layer. Finally, a mixing/dilution model that utilized our Ra-based and oceanographic model water mass ages produced a direct ocean discharge of 134Cs from the FNPP of 11–16 PBq at the time of the peak release in early April 2011. Our results can be used to calculate discharge of other water-soluble radionuclides that were released

  6. Radium-based estimates of cesium isotope transport and total direct ocean discharges from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charette, M. A.; Breier, C. F.; Henderson, P. B.; Pike, S. M.; Rypina, I. I.; Jayne, S. R.; Buesseler, K. O.

    2013-03-01

    Radium has four naturally occurring isotopes that have proven useful in constraining water mass source, age, and mixing rates in the coastal and open ocean. In this study, we used radium isotopes to determine the fate and flux of runoff-derived cesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP). During a June 2011 cruise, the highest cesium (Cs) concentrations were found along the eastern shelf of northern Japan, from Fukushima south, to the edge of the Kuroshio Current, and in an eddy ~ 130 km from the FNPP site. Locations with the highest cesium also had some of the highest radium activities, suggesting much of the direct ocean discharges of Cs remained in the coastal zone 2-3 months after the accident. We used a short-lived Ra isotope (223Ra, t1/2 = 11.4 d) to derive an average water mass age (Tr) in the coastal zone of 32 days. To ground-truth the Ra age model, we conducted a direct, station-by-station comparison of water mass ages with a numerical oceanographic model and found them to be in excellent agreement (model avg. Tr = 27 days). From these independent Tr values and the inventory of Cs within the water column at the time of our cruise, we were able to calculate an offshore 134Cs flux of 3.9-4.6 × 1013 Bq d-1. Radium-228 (t1/2 = 5.75 yr) was used to derive a vertical eddy diffusivity (Kz) of 0.7 m2 d-1 (0.1 cm2 s-1); from this Kz and 134Cs inventory, we estimated a 134Cs flux across the pycnocline of 1.8 × 104 Bq d-1 for the same time period. On average, our results show that horizontal mixing loss of Cs from the coastal zone was ~ 109 greater than vertical exchange below the surface mixed layer. Finally, a mixing/dilution model that utilized our Ra-based and oceanographic model water mass ages produced a direct ocean discharge of 134Cs from the FNPP of 11-16 PBq at the time of the peak release in early April 2011. Our results can be used to calculate discharge of other water-soluble radionuclides that were released to the ocean directly

  7. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Schierbeek, H.; Houtekamer, M; Engeland, T.; D. Derrien; Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2015-01-01

    We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of d13C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence, although LC/IRMS is expected to be more accurate and precise, no direct comparison has been reported

  8. NUSIMEP-7: uranium isotope amount ratios in uranium particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) has extensive experience in the development of isotopic reference materials and the organization of interlaboratory comparisons (ILC) for nuclear measurements in compliance with the respective international guidelines (ISO Guide 34:2009 and ISO/IEC 17043:2010). The IRMM Nuclear Signatures Interlaboratory Measurement Evaluation Program (NUSIMEP) is an external quality control program with the objective of providing materials for measurements of trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental matrices. Measurements of the isotopic ratios of the elements uranium and plutonium in small amounts, typical of those found in environmental samples, are required for nuclear safeguards and security, for the control of environmental contamination and for the detection of nuclear proliferation. The measurement results of participants in NUSIMEP are evaluated according to international guidelines in comparison to independent external certified reference values with demonstrated metrological traceability and uncertainty. NUSIMEP-7 focused on measurements of uranium isotope amount ratios in uranium particles aiming to support European Safeguards Directorate General for Energy (DG ENER), the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) network of analytical laboratories for environmental sampling (NWAL) and laboratories in the field of particle analysis. Each participant was provided two certified test samples: one with single and one with double isotopic enrichment. These NUSIMEP test samples were prepared by controlled hydrolysis of certified uranium hexafluoride in a specially designed aerosol deposition chamber at IRMM. Laboratories participating in NUSIMEP-7 received the test samples of uranium particles on two graphite disks with undisclosed isotopic ratio values n(234U)/n(238U), n(235U)/n(238U) and n(236U)/n(238U). The uranium isotope ratios had to be measured using their routine analytical procedures

  9. Finite mixture models for the computation of isotope ratios in mixed isotopic samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Daniel; Laaha, Gregor; Leisch, Friedrich; Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Finite mixture models have been used for more than 100 years, but have seen a real boost in popularity over the last two decades due to the tremendous increase in available computing power. The areas of application of mixture models range from biology and medicine to physics, economics and marketing. These models can be applied to data where observations originate from various groups and where group affiliations are not known, as is the case for multiple isotope ratios present in mixed isotopic samples. Recently, the potential of finite mixture models for the computation of 235U/238U isotope ratios from transient signals measured in individual (sub-)µm-sized particles by laser ablation - multi-collector - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS) was demonstrated by Kappel et al. [1]. The particles, which were deposited on the same substrate, were certified with respect to their isotopic compositions. Here, we focus on the statistical model and its application to isotope data in ecogeochemistry. Commonly applied evaluation approaches for mixed isotopic samples are time-consuming and are dependent on the judgement of the analyst. Thus, isotopic compositions may be overlooked due to the presence of more dominant constituents. Evaluation using finite mixture models can be accomplished unsupervised and automatically. The models try to fit several linear models (regression lines) to subgroups of data taking the respective slope as estimation for the isotope ratio. The finite mixture models are parameterised by: • The number of different ratios. • Number of points belonging to each ratio-group. • The ratios (i.e. slopes) of each group. Fitting of the parameters is done by maximising the log-likelihood function using an iterative expectation-maximisation (EM) algorithm. In each iteration step, groups of size smaller than a control parameter are dropped; thereby the number of different ratios is determined. The analyst only influences some control

  10. Magnesium Isotope Ratios in omega Centauri Red Giants

    CERN Document Server

    Da Costa, G S; Yong, David

    2013-01-01

    We have used high resolution observations obtained at the AAT with UHRF (R ~ 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R ~ 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven omega Centauri red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = --1.78 to --0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The omega Centauri stars sample both the "primordial" (i.e., O-rich, Na and Al-poor) and the "extreme" (O-depleted, Na and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both omega Centauri and M4 show (25Mg, 26Mg)/24 Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the omega Centauri extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the 26Mg/24Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < --1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values....

  11. High precision isotopic ratio analysis of volatile metal chelates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High precision isotope ratio measurements have been made for a series of volatile alkaline earth and transition metal chelates using conventional GC/MS instrumentation. Electron ionization was used for alkaline earth chelates, whereas isobutane chemical ionization was used for transition metal studies. Natural isotopic abundances were determined for a series of Mg, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Zn chelates. Absolute accuracy ranged between 0.01 and 1.19 at. %. Absolute precision ranged between +-0.01-0.27 at. % (RSD +- 0.07-10.26%) for elements that contained as many as eight natural isotopes. Calibration curves were prepared using natural abundance metals and their enriched 50Cr, 60Ni, and 65Cu isotopes covering the range 0.1-1010.7 at. % excess. A separate multiple isotope calibration curve was similarly prepared using enriched 60Ni (0.02-2.15 at. % excess) and 62Ni (0.23-18.5 at. % excess). The samples were analyzed by GC/CI/MS. Human plasma, containing enriched 26Mg and 44Ca, was analyzed by EI/MS. 1 figure, 5 tables

  12. Development of a new TIMS for boron isotopic ratio analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry is the widely used technique for precise isotopic ratio measurements of materials of interest in the fields of nuclear technology and geochronology. The basic evaluation of the instrument shows that the instrument is suitable for precise isotopic ratio measurements for Boron. It can be used for other masses falling in the mass range of 1-200 amu. The sensitivity and precision obtained are highly satisfactory for the analysis of Boron samples. Analysis time involved in measurement on one sample is 30-35 minutes. Moreover, the provision of turret with 12 filament assemblies increases the throughput of the system and makes it more useful for the plant where the operator has to routinely analyse more number of samples

  13. Predicting the isotopic ratio of western European Precipitation using an isotope trajectory model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Spatial and seasonal variations of isotopic ratios in precipitation across Western Europe are well documented. Locations of moisture uptake, transport pathways, condensation temperatures, and surface temperatures at source region and precipitation location all influence the water isotope cycle. Isotope cycle modelling has been included in Global Circulation Models (GCMs) in order to model all of the controlling factors. However, the relative importance of each of these processes remains unclear due to the difficulties in decoupling these processes in GCMs. A combination of a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model and an extended Rayleigh distillation theory model allows the effects of different atmospheric processes on isotopic fractionation to be investigated. This method has previously been used to model precipitation in Antarctica and Greenland with excellent results. However, there are added complications involved when modelling rainfall rather than snowfall, such as isotopic re-equilibration between falling raindrops and the surrounding water vapour. Lower latitude locations also experience more evaporation and re-evaporation along the path of a moist air parcel, increasing opportunities for fractionation. These models have been used to predict the hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of rainfall in the U.K and Ireland. The model results have been compared with measured isotopic data from daily rainfall samples in order to test how the modelled processes interact. A case study is presented which incorporates observed data collected throughout November 2005 at stations in Norwich, Birmingham and Dublin, together with the corresponding temporal model predictions at these localities. (author)

  14. Nitrate pollution in groundwater: source identification using isotope ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratios for identification of pollutant source is an emerging scientific tool. An investigation was carried out to find out the origin of nitrate in groundwater in an area which receives pollutant of different origin like inorganic fertilizers, organic manures besides urban wastes. The δ15N values of nitrate clearly indicated the possibility of groundwater pollution by nitrate originating from human and animal wastes. (author)

  15. Daily Variation of Isotope Ratios in Mars Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Timothy A.; Kostiuk, Theodor; Kolasinski, John R.; Hewagama, Tilak; Henning, Wade G.; Sornig, Manuela; Stangier, Tobias; Krause, Pia; Sonnabend, Guido; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2014-11-01

    The atmosphere of Mars has been shown by ground based high-resolution infrared spectroscopy and in situ measurements with the Phoenix lander and Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover to be enriched in C and O heavy isotopes, consistent with preferential loss of light isotopes in eroding Mars’ primordial atmosphere. The relative abundance of heavy isotopes, combined with contemporary measurements of loss rates to be obtained with MAVEN, will enable estimating the primordial atmospheric inventory on Mars. IR spectroscopy of Mars collected in May 2012 as well as in March and May of 2014 from the NASA IRTF has resolved transitions of all three singly-substituted minor isotopologues of carbon dioxide in addition to the normal isotope, enabling remote measurements of all the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios as a function of latitude, longitude, and time of day. Earlier measurements obtained in October 2007 demonstrated that the relative abundance of O-18 increased linearly with increasing surface temperature over a relatively warm early-afternoon temperature range, but did not extend far enough to inspect the effect of late-afternoon cooling. These results imply that isotopically enriched gas is sequestered overnight when surface temperature is minimum and desorbs through the course of the day as temperature increases. Current spectroscopic constants indicate that the peak isotopic enrichment could be significantly greater than what has been measured in situ, apparently due to sampling the atmosphere at different time of day and surface temperature. The observing runs in 2012 and 2014 measured O-18 enrichment at several local times in both morning and afternoon sectors as well as at the subsolar, equatorial, and anti-subsolar latitudes. The two runs in 2014 have additionally observed O-17 and C-13 transitions in the morning sector, from local dawn to noon. These observations include a limited sampling of measurements over Gale Crater, which can be compared with

  16. Ratio of the dose factors of the isotopes of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio of dose factors occurring during inhalation and ingestion to the respective dose factors of I-129 is calculated for the isotopes of I-123 to I-126 and I-129 to I-135. All the dose factors refer to the thyroid as the critical organ. A distinction is made between adults and infants up to 1 year of age. To calculate the ratios only the effective energies and the effective half-lives in the human body and on grass are required. Most of the data have been taken from the literature. The effective energies of I-123 and I-125 have been calculated as examples. (orig.)

  17. New laser spectroscopic technique for stable-isotope ratio analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to stable-isotope ratio analysis based on atomic hyperfine structure is demonstrated. This laser spectroscopic scheme is virtually interference-free. A minor constituent in a complex matrix can be selectively analyzed without extensive sample preparation. A single-frequency tunable cw ring dye laser is used as the excitation source and a demountable cathode discharge is used as the atomizer and detector. Samples are electrodeposited on the demountable cathode and hyperfine profiles are collected by optogalvanic detection. By spectral deconvolution, the relative abundances of all isotopes present can be determined with good accuracy and precision. The technique is demonstrated for copper contents as low as 1.6 ppM, using the atomic hyperfine structure of Cu I 578.2 nm non-resonance transition. It is also successfully tested for analysis of copper isotopes in human blood. The sensitivity of doppler-free polarization spectroscopy in atomic flames is showed to be competitive with other sensitive laser techniques such as the fluorescence spectrometric methods. Improved detectability of polarization rotation and excellent suppression of flame background noise enable this method to achieve detection limits of parts per trillion levels of sodium and 37 ppB of barium. The spectral resolution is suitable for isotopic analysis, and the technique offers excellent selectivity and minimum spectral interference

  18. New laser spectroscopic technique for stable-isotope ratio analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable and safe application of isotopes as tracers is important in many areas, including biomedical, environmental and geochronological sciences. A new approach to stable-isotope ratio analysis based on atomic hyperfine structure is demonstrated. This laser spectroscopic scheme is virtually interference-free because of the highly selective and specific nature of hyperfine structures. Hence, a minor constituent in a complex matrix can be selectively analyzed without extensive sample preparation. A single-frequency tunable cw ring dye laser is used as the excitation source and a specially designed and constructed demountable cathode discharge is used as the atomizer and detector. Samples are electrodeposited on the demountable cathode and hyperfine profiles are collected by optogalvanic detection. By spectral deconvolution, the relative abundances of all isotopes present can be determined with good accuracy and precision. The technique is demonstrated for copper concentrations as low as 1.6 ppm, using the atomic hyperfine structure of CuI 578.2 nm non-resonance transition. It is also successfully tested for analysis of copper isotopes in human blood

  19. Total flash evaporation studies for uranium isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate isotopic ratio measurements on uranium samples are essential for nuclear material accounting, enrichment programs and for geochemical research applications. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry is widely followed for these measurements. Conventional measurement technique involving Faraday Cups demands larger samples and fractionation correction for the measured data when accurate data are required. Total evaporation or total flash evaporation technique (TFE) is reported to circumvent these difficulties. The technique consists of heating the sample to exhaustion while simultaneously acquiring intensities of all the isotopes at respective cups and then computing the isotope ratios from the summed up intensities. A brief account of literature on this technique is given in a recent paper. TFE studies were conducted by us on NBS -uranium standard solution (SRMU-010) and on a depleted uranium sample solution with an objective to explore the possibility of using a relatively small quantities in the range 300-350 ng, compared to 2 μg of uranium generally required for routine measurements using Faraday Cups. The methodology followed and the results obtained are presented in this paper

  20. Constraints on Weathering from Riverine Magnesium Isotope Ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiechert, Uwe; Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Meixner, Anette;

    Weathering of rocks and its impact on the atmospheric carbon budget have been calculated from chemical compositions of large rivers. Here we present chemical compositions and magnesium isotope ratios for the dissolved and suspended loads of the rivers Danube, Elbe, and Rhine, and investigate...... whether magnesium isotopes can contribute to the quantification of weathering rates in their catchments. The d26Mg of the dissolved and solid loads vary from -0.93 to -1.85 ‰ and -0.98 to +0.01 ‰ relative to the reference material DSM3, respectively. Although these rivers run through highly populated...... and industrialized regions, the d26Mg values mirror the lithologies of the catchment areas: the Danubian catchment is dominated by carbonatic lithologies and in the Danube dissolved magnesium exhibits the most negative d26Mg values between -1.85 and -1.70 ‰. The mainly siliceous catchment of the river Elbe causes...

  1. Determination of cesium-137 soil-to-plant concentration ratios for vegetables in Goiania City, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological accident that occurred in Goiania City, Brazil, in September 1987, led to the spreading of 137Cs in the urban area. Even after the decontamination procedure, there was a reminiscence of 137Cs activity in the soil of residential gardens. This activity was enough to conduct preliminary experiments for determination of soil to vegetable concentration ratios. Experiments were conducted for carrots, lettuce and radishes. Two types of experimental patterns were used to determine the concentration ratios: lysimeters cultivation under greenhouse condition and soil cultivation in open field plot. The concentration ratios measured for cultivation under greenhouse and field plot conditions are considerably higher than those mentioned in the International Union of Radioecologist (IUR) data bank for the same vegetables and cultivation condition. (author) 5 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  2. Stable strontium isotopic ratios from archaeological organic remains from the Thorsberg peat bog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech; von Carnap-Bornheim, Claus; Grupe, Gisela;

    2007-01-01

    Pilot study analysing stable strontium isotopic ratios from Iron Age textile and leather finds from the Thorsberg peat bog.......Pilot study analysing stable strontium isotopic ratios from Iron Age textile and leather finds from the Thorsberg peat bog....

  3. Carbon abundances and isotope ratios in 70 bright M giants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximate carbon abundances and 12C/13C isotope ratios are obtained for 70 M giant stars from intermediate-resolution spectrophotometry of the CO bands near 2.3 μm. A low mean carbon abundance ([C/H]=-0.64±0.29) is obtained, suggesting that standard mixing is insufficient to explain atmospheric abundances in M giants. HR 8795 appears to be exceptionally carbon deficient, and is worthy of further study as a possible weak G-band star descendant. (author)

  4. Carbon abundances and isotope ratios in 70 bright M giants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, C. (Inst. de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain)); Lynas-Gray, A.E. (University Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Clegg, R.E.S. (Royal Greenwich Observatory, Cambridge (UK)); Mountain, C.M.; Zadrozny, A. (Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (UK))

    1991-03-01

    Approximate carbon abundances and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratios are obtained for 70 M giant stars from intermediate-resolution spectrophotometry of the CO bands near 2.3 {mu}m. A low mean carbon abundance ((C/H)=-0.64+-0.29) is obtained, suggesting that standard mixing is insufficient to explain atmospheric abundances in M giants. HR 8795 appears to be exceptionally carbon deficient, and is worthy of further study as a possible weak G-band star descendant. (author).

  5. Carbon isotope ratios and isotopic correlations between components in fruit juices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzchnicki, Ryszard

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays food products are defined by geographical origin, method of production and by some regulations concerning terms of their authenticity. Important data for confirm the authenticity of product are providing by isotopic methods of food control. The method checks crucial criteria which characterize the authenticity of inspected product. The European Union Regulations clearly show the tendency for application of the isotopic methods for food authenticity control (wine, honey, juice). The aim of the legislation steps is the protection of European market from possibility of the commercial frauds. Method of isotope ratio mass spectrometry is very effective tool for the use distinguishably the food products of various geographical origin. The basic problem for identification of the sample origin is the lack of databases of isotopic composition of components and information about the correlations of the data. The subject of the work was study the isotopic correlations existing between components of fruits. The chemical and instrumental methods of separation: water, sugars, organic acids and pulp from fruit were implemented. IRMS technique was used to measure isotopic composition of samples. The final results for original samples of fruits (apple, strawberry etc.) will be presented and discussed. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education under grant NR12-0043-10/2010.

  6. New isomers and their decay in odd-odd neutron-deficient cesium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By a systematic on-line cesium mass separation from A = 122 to A = 132 and subsequent gamma and electron decay spectroscopy at very low energy, new isomers have been precisely identified: sup(122m)Cs(Tsub(1/2) = 0.36 +- 0.02 seconds), sup(124m)Cs(Tsub(1/2) = 6.3 +- 0.2 seconds) and sup(130m)Cs(Tsub(1/2) = 3.46 +- 0.06 minutes). Detailed level schemes are given for both sup(124m)Cs and sup(130m)Cs. Comparison of excited levels known in the odd-odd nuclei of the same region shows that more experimental informations are needed to propose a clear and realistic picture of the nuclear states structure

  7. The measurement of the isotope ratios and concentrations of zinc by thermal ionization mass spectrometry using double isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotope ratios and concentrations of zinc are measured by silicagel-thermal ionization mass spectrometry using the double isotope spikers. The double isotope spikers (70Zn and 67Zn-enriched isotopes) are used to correct the isotope mass fractionation for the zinc isotope ratios, and to certify the zinc concentrations in the unknown samples. The zinc concentrations of these double isotope spikers are surveyed by a spiker made of pure (99.99%) natural zinc metal powder. The correcting factors (fa, ft and fn) of the zinc isotope ratios in the spiked mixture, spike and unspiked samples for the isotope mass fractionation, and the spike-to-unspiked ratios (Xr) of the zinc isotope r in the spiked mixture samples can be obtained to solve the matrix equations by numerical approximation. The natural zinc isotope ratios are: 64Zn/67Zn = 11.8498, 66Zn/67Zn = 6.7977, 68Zn/67Zn = 4.5730 and 70Zn/67Zn = 0.1520. The uncertainties determined of the isotope ratios and concentrations of zinc are +- 0.16% and +-0.31%, respectively

  8. The lithium isotopic ratio in very metal-poor stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lind, Karin; Asplund, Martin; Collet, Remo; Magic, Zazralt

    2013-01-01

    Un-evolved, very metal-poor stars are the most important tracers of the cosmic abundance of lithium in the early universe. Combining the standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis model with Galactic production through cosmic ray spallation, these stars at [Fe/H]<-2 are expected to show an undetectably small 6Li/7Li isotopic signature. Evidence to the contrary may necessitate an additional pre-galactic production source or a revision of the standard model of Big Bang nucleosynthesis. We revisit the isotopic analysis of four halo stars, two with claimed 6Li-detections in the literature, to investigate the influence of improved model atmospheres and line formation treatment. For the first time, a combined 3D, NLTE (non-local thermodynamic equilibrium) modelling technique for Li, Na, and Ca lines is utilised to constrain the intrinsic line-broadening and to determine the Li isotopic ratio. We discuss the influence of 3D NLTE effects on line profile shapes and assess the realism of our modelling using the Ca excitation...

  9. Isotope ratio monitoring of small molecules and macromolecules by liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Hau, Jörg; Fay, Laurent-Bernard; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2005-01-01

    In the field of isotope ratio mass spectrometry, the introduction of an interface allowing the connection of liquid chromatography (LC) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has opened a range of new perspectives. The LC interface is based on a chemical oxidation, producing CO2 from organic molecules. While first results were obtained from the analysis of low molecular weight compounds, the application of compound-specific isotope analysis by irm-LC/MS to other molecules, in particular biomolecules, is presented here. The influence of the LC flow rate on the CO2 signal and on the observed delta13C values is demonstrated. The limits of quantification for angiotensin III and for leucine were 100 and 38 pmol, respectively, with a standard deviation of the delta13C values better than 0.4 per thousand. Also, accuracy and precision of delta13C values for elemental analyser-IRMS and flow injection analysis-IRMS (FIA-LC/MS) were compared. For compounds with molecular weights ranging from 131 to 66,390 Da, precision was better than 0.3 per thousand, and accuracy varied from 0.1 to 0.7 per thousand. In a second part of the work, a two-dimensional (2D)-LC method for the separation of 15 underivatised amino acids is demonstrated; the precision of delta13C values for several amino acids by irm-LC/MS was better than 0.3 per thousand at natural abundance. For labelled mixtures, the coefficient of variation was between 1% at 0.07 atom % excess (APE) for threonine and alanine, and around 10% at 0.03 APE for valine and phenylalanine. The application of irm-LC/MS to the determination of the isotopic enrichment of 13C-threonine in an extract of rat colon mucosa demonstrated a precision of 0.5 per thousand, or 0.001 atom %. PMID:16124031

  10. Source and migration of light hydrocarbons indicated by carbon isotopic ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon isotopic ratios can distinguish among different sources of methane and can be used to correlate maturity of sediments with the methane. This technique has been applied to several wells and the isotopic values have been used to suggest the sources of the methane and whether the methane migrated into the area. Comparison of the isotopic ratio changes in ethane, propane, and butanes indicated that isotopic fractionation of methane by migration is not a major factor. The significant changes in methane isotopic ratio and the small changes in the isotopic ratios of these heavier hydrocarbons suggest that, although diffusion is not the sole process in migration, the time for migration is moderate

  11. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs yield a constant 13C/12C ratio with RSD of better than 0.5 ‰ . Using the natural diamond as calibratrant, a preliminary result on a selected diamond from the four kimberlitic sample suites yields a δ13C in range between -3 to -7 ‰ . Reference: Howell, D., O'Neill, C. J., Grant, K. J., Griffin, W. L., Pearson, N. J., & O'Reilly, S. Y. (2012). μ-FTIR mapping: Distribution of impurities in different types of diamond growth. Diamond and Related Materials, 29, 29-36. doi:10.1016/j.diamond.2012.06.003.

  12. Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial abyssal seawater oxygen isotopic ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Carl

    2016-06-01

    An earlier analysis of pore-water salinity (chlorinity) in two deep-sea cores, using terminal constraint methods of control theory, concluded that although a salinity amplification in the abyss was possible during the LGM, it was not required by the data. Here the same methodology is applied to δ18Ow in the upper 100 m of four deep-sea cores. An ice volume amplification to the isotopic ratio is, again, consistent with the data but not required by it. In particular, results are very sensitive, with conventional diffusion values, to the assumed initial conditions at -100 ky and a long list of noise (uncertainty) assumptions. If the calcite values of δ18O are fully reliable, then published enriched values of the ratio in seawater are necessary to preclude sub-freezing temperatures, but the seawater δ18O in pore fluids does not independently require the conclusion.

  13. Determination of uranium and its isotopic ratios in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the determination of uranium and its isotopic ratios ( sup(235)U/ sup(238)U and sup(234U/ sup(238)U) is established in the present work. The method can be applied in environmental monitoring programs of uranium enrichment facilities. The proposed method is based on the alpha spectrometry technique which is applied after a purification of the sample by using an ionic exchange resin. The total yield achieved was (91 + 5)% with a precision of 5%, an accuracy of 8% and a lower limit of detection of 7,9 x 10 sup(-4)Bq. The uranium determination in samples containing high concentration of iron, which is an interfering element present in environmental samples, particularly in soil and sediment, was also studied. The results obtained by using artificial samples containing iron and uranium in the ratio 1000:1, were considered satisfactory. (author)

  14. Evaluation on nitrogen isotopes analysis in high-C/N-ratio plants using elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) has been widely applied to analyze the 15N/14N isotope composition (δ15N) of plants and soils, but the δ15N results may be inaccurate due to incomplete combustion of the high-C/N-ratio plant samples by EA. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method to solve the problem of imperfect combustion. In this study, we used two methods: 1) adding copper oxide powder to the samples, and 2) increasing the O2 flow (from 100 mL min-1 to 200 mL min-1) for the auto sampler inlet purge line of the EA. The δ15N values of the plant samples became more positive and tended to be stable after complete combustion. Also, the required blank samples for each plant sample decreased with increasing amount of the added CuO powder. However, at 200 mL min-1 of the oxygen flow in the EA, complete combustion could not be achieved without adding copper oxide, but this was done with decreased amount of CuO powder. Therefore, mixing cupric oxide into the high-C/N-ratio samples was an efficient, simple and convenient way to solve the problem of imperfect combustion in the EA. (authors)

  15. Stable isotope ratios and sulphate/methane interaction in lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study concerns sulphate ion and methane from about 50 freshwater aquifers from Poland. Samples have been collected dominantly in the late August and early September 1993. Eutrophic lakes show high δ34S(SO42-) and δ18O(SO42-) values as compared to clean oligotrophic or mesotrophic lakes. All lake sulphates fall into a restricted field and evolve along a positive δ34S(SO42-) and δ18O(SO42-) correlation line (R2 = is 0.4, n = 147). The points behind the field represent rain from Wroclaw downtown (SW Poland) or surficial lakewater collected during or just after heavy rains (Jedrysek 2000). In general, increase both in sulphur and oxygen isotope ratios results from: (i) bacterial reduction of the dissolved sulphate; or/and (ii) presence of oceanic origin sulphate - when δ18O(SO42-) value do not exceed much more than 10 per mille. Lakes and rivers from NE and SE Poland represent mesotrophic conditions and receive the lowermost in Poland acid rain impact. Consequently, they show lowermost δ34S and δ18O values. However, relatively high concentration of sulphate as compared to the low δ34S value suggest that the sulphur, in these systems, comes mostly from acid rain or forms due to oxidation of some reduced forms of sulphur. The low δ18O value evidences the second scenario. Thus, one can believe that the sulphate in the clean lakes is dominantly of natural origin. The relatively high isotope signatures in some of NE Poland lakes result, most probably, from advanced reduction of the sulphate. On the other hand, low δ18O as compared to sulphate concentration may suggest sulphide oxidation. The advanced reduction may result from the fact that the lake is very deep and narrow (width/depth ratio is about 0.1). Thus, the reduction in the bottom zone may proceed simultaneously to an active oxidation in shallower zone. Mountainous lakes (SW and SE Poland) are expected to show strictly oligotrophic parameters. However, all of them show relatively high isotope values

  16. Field Sample Preparation Method Development for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-proliferation and International Security (NA-241) established a working group of researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to evaluate the utilization of in-field mass spectrometry for safeguards applications. The survey of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) mass spectrometers (MS) revealed no instrumentation existed capable of meeting all the potential safeguards requirements for performance, portability, and ease of use. Additionally, fieldable instruments are unlikely to meet the International Target Values (ITVs) for accuracy and precision for isotope ratio measurements achieved with laboratory methods. The major gaps identified for in-field actinide isotope ratio analysis were in the areas of: 1. sample preparation and/or sample introduction, 2. size reduction of mass analyzers and ionization sources, 3. system automation, and 4. decreased system cost. Development work in 2 through 4, numerated above continues, in the private and public sector. LANL is focusing on developing sample preparation/sample introduction methods for use with the different sample types anticipated for safeguard applications. Addressing sample handling and sample preparation methods for MS analysis will enable use of new MS instrumentation as it becomes commercially available. As one example, we have developed a rapid, sample preparation method for dissolution of uranium and plutonium oxides using ammonium bifluoride (ABF). ABF is a significantly safer and faster alternative to digestion with boiling combinations of highly concentrated mineral acids. Actinides digested with ABF yield fluorides, which can then be analyzed directly or chemically converted and separated using established column chromatography techniques as needed prior to isotope analysis. The reagent volumes and the sample processing steps associated with ABF sample digestion lend themselves to automation and field

  17. Isotope ratio analysis of individual uranium particles for safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) was qualified, in January 2003, as a member of the IAEA network analytical laboratories (NWALs) for particle and bulk analyses of safeguards environmental samples. The particle analysis gives more detailed information on nuclear facility operation than the bulk analysis because the isotope ratios of nuclear materials in the samples collected inside nuclear facilities (swipe samples) can be determined for individual particles. We applied secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to the uranium isotope ratio measurement for particle analysis. Prior to the SIMS analysis, the particles in a swipe sample are recovered onto a carrier by impaction. The carriers with the recovered particles are then screened by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. We integrated these techniques into a standard procedure, which is applied to domestic and IAEA swipe samples routinely. For the analysis of the particles with the diameter smaller than 1 μm, with which the SIMS has insufficient sensitivity, we are developing a more sensitive method, the combination of fission track detection and thermal ionization mass spectrometry. (author)

  18. Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios for nearby miras

    CERN Document Server

    Hinkle, K H; Straniero, O

    2016-01-01

    C and O isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable AGB stars. Vibration-rotation 1st and 2nd overtone CO lines in 1.5 to 2.5 $\\mu$m spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of the M stars had main sequence masses < 2 Msun and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the 6 C stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of the third dredge-up. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars...

  19. Oxygen-18 Carbon Dioxide Isotope Ratio in Mars Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.; Smith, R.; Fast, K. E.; Annen, J.; Sonnabend, G.; Sornig, M.

    2012-09-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios on Mars is important to the study of atmospheric evolution [1]. The relative abundance of isotopes of CO2 provides insight into the loss of Mars' primordial atmosphere. Isotopic ratios also provide markers in the study of geochemistry of Mars meteorites and future returned samples formed in equilibrium with ambient atmosphere, and are probes of biogenic and abiotic chemistry, which differ in isotope fractionation. Due to its lesser gravity and relatively thin residual atmosphere, Mars' atmosphere should be enriched in heavy isotopes [1]. However Viking [2] results indicated an Earth-like singly substituted oxygen-18 CO2 isotopic ratio, 18OCO/OCO, with δ18O = 0±50‰ relative to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW). By comparison, isotopic ratios in Earth atmospheric CO2 are not uniquely defined due to seasonal and biotic variability, but have a range 0-41‰ relative to VSMOW [3, 4]. Phoenix lander TEGA [3] measurements found a modest enrichment of δ18O = 31.0±5.7‰. Only the Viking and Phoenix landers have carried a mass spectrometer to Mars, so far, until the arrival of Mars Science Laboratory in August 2012. Using ground-based spectroscopic techniques Krasnopolsky et al. [5] also found modest enrichment δ18O = 18±18‰. We present results from fully resolved spectroscopic measurements near 10.6 μm of both the normal and singly substituted oxygen- 18 CO2 lines, taken with the Goddard Space Flight Center Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Winds And Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Measurements with spectral resolving power λ/Δλ=107 were obtained in October 2007 with an instantaneous field-of-view on the planet of ~1 arcsec, at the locations shown in Fig. 1 as open squares. The solid and broken line tracks show Mars SPICAM measurements of ozone corresponding to ozone measurements also obtained with HIPWAC and shown as hatched and solid regions [6]. Figure 1

  20. Understanding radioxenon isotopical ratios originating from radiopharmaceutical facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saey, P. R. J.; Ringbom, A.; Bowyer, T. W.; Becker, A.; de Geer, L.-E.; Nikkinen, M.; Payne, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    It was recently shown that radiopharmaceutical facilities (RPF) are major contributors to the general background of 133Xe and other xenon isotopes both in the northern and southern hemisphere. To distinguish a nuclear explosion signal from releases from civil nuclear facilities, not only the activity concentrations but also the ratios of the four different CTBT relevant radioxenon isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) have to be well understood. First measurements taken recently in and around two of the world's largest RPF's: NTP at Pelindaba, South Africa and IRE at Fleurus, Belgium have been presented. At both sites, also stack samples were taken in close cooperation with the facility operators. The radioxenon in Belgium could be classified in four classes: the normal European background (133Xe activity between 0 - 5 mBq/m3) on one hand and then the samples where all four isotopes were detected with 133mXe/131mXe > 1. In northern South Africa the Pelindaba RPF is in practice the sole source of radioxenon. It generated a background of 133Xe at the measurement site some 230 km to the west of the RPF of 0 - 5 mBq/m3. In the cases where the air from the Pelindaba facility reached the measurement site directly and in a short time period, the 133Xe was higher, also 135Xe was present and in some samples 133mXe as well. The ratios of the activity concentrations of 135Xe/133Xe vs. 133mXe/131mXe (Multiple Isotope Ratio Plot - MIRC) have been analysed. For both facilities, the possible theoretical ratio's for different scenarios were calculated with the information available and compared with the measurements. It was found that there is an excess of 131mXe present in the European samples compared to theoretical calculations. A similar excess has also been seen in samples measured in northern America. In South Africa, neither the environmental samples nor the stack ones contained 131mXe at measurable levels. This can probably be explained by different processes and

  1. Sulfur isotope ratios and the origins of the aerosols and cloud droplets in California stratus

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, F. L.

    2011-01-01

    Marine aerosols often have sulfur-to-chloride ratios greater than that found in seawater. Sulfur isotope ratios (34S/32S) were measured in aerosol and cloud droplet samples collected in the San Francisco Bay Area in an attempt to understand the processes that produce the observed sulfur-to-chloride ratios. Seawater sulfur usually has very high sulfur isotope ratios; fossil fuel sulfur tends to have smaller isotope ratios and sulfur of bacteriogenic origin still smaller. Samples collected in u...

  2. Sulfur isotope in nature. Determination of sulfur isotope ratios in coal and petroleum by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elementary sulfur or in chemical compounds is one of the elements widespread in the earth's crust and biosphere. Its participation in earth's crust amounts to 0.26 % by weight. Measurement of isotope composition of natural samples can deliver many information about origin, creation and transformation ranges of rocks and minerals. Sulfur isotope ratio contained in minerals is variable and for this reason investigation of isotope sulfur composition can deliver useful information about the geochemistry of each component. Therefore in the investigated sample it is necessary to determine not only the content of sulfur but also the isotope composition of each component. Differentiation of contents of sulfur-34 in natural sulfur compounds can reach up to 110 per mile. So large divergences can be explained by a kinetic effect or by bacterial reduction of sulphates. In this report a wide review of the results of investigations of isotope sulfur compositions in coal and petroleum are presented as well as the methods for the preparation of samples for mass spectrometry analysis are proposed. (author)

  3. Measurement system analysis (MSA) of the isotopic ratio for uranium isotope enrichment process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, one of the stages in nuclear fuel cycle development is the process of uranium isotope enrichment, which will provide the amount of low enriched uranium for the nuclear fuel production to supply 100% Angra 1 and 20% Angra 2 demands. Determination of isotopic ration n(235U)/n(238U) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6 - used as process gas) is essential in order to control of enrichment process of isotopic separation by gaseous centrifugation cascades. The uranium hexafluoride process is performed by gas continuous feeding in separation unit which uses the centrifuge force principle, establishing a density gradient in a gas containing components of different molecular weights. The elemental separation effect occurs in a single ultracentrifuge that results in a partial separation of the feed in two fractions: an enriched on (product) and another depleted (waste) in the desired isotope (235UF6). Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB) has used quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) by electron impact (EI) to perform isotopic ratio n(235U)/n(238U) analysis in the process. The decision of adjustments and change te input variables are based on the results presented in these analysis. A study of stability, bias and linearity determination has been performed in order to evaluate the applied method, variations and systematic errors in the measurement system. The software used to analyze the techniques above was the Minitab 15. (author)

  4. Sulfur isotopic ratio of DMS and DMSP from Lake Kinneret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Adler, Michal; Said-Ahmad, Ward; Eckert, Werner; Kamyshny, Alexey; Sivan, Orit; Amrani, Alon

    2014-05-01

    Volatile Organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) such as dimethylsulfide (DMS) are an important source of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere. The main precursor of DMS is dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a common osmolyte in marine algae. Atmospheric release of VOS compounds contributes to the formation of sulfate aerosols. The latter are of global importance due to their role as cloud-condensation nuclei. VOSC are abundant in terrestrial environments as well and may be involved in important biogeochemical cycles. In lake sediments, another mechanism for the formation of DMS by H2S methylation may be important. The 34S/32S ratio (d34S values) of DMSP of marine surface water around the globe is very homogeneous ranging between +18.9 o to +20.3 o and the fractionation between DMSP and DMS is water algae by using sulfur isotope ratios. Water column samples and sediment samples from Lake Kinneret were purged and trap in order to extract the VOSC and then introduced to a GC/MC-ICPMS for isotopic measurements (Amrani et al. 2013). The δ34S of DMSP in the water and sediment columns of Lake Kinneret a mesotrophic monomictic lake were measured. Our preliminary results show δ34S values for DMSP ranged between +10.3 o and +13.4 o in the water column. The sulfate δ34S values ranged between +12.6 o to +14.9 o. δ34S -DMSP in the sediment column showed similar values between +9.4 o and +13.0 o, indicating a similar sulfur source. Similar δ34S values obtain for other VOSC such as ethanethiol that contributes significantly to the VOSC of Lake Kinneret sediments. Amrani, A., W. Said-Ahmad,Y. Shaked, and R. P. Kiene. 2013. Sulfur isotopes homogeneity of oceanic DMSP and DMS. PNAS 110(46):18413-18418. Oduro, H., Kamyshny, A. Jr.,W. Guo, and J. Farquhar. 2011. Multiple sulfur isotopes analysis of volatile organic sulfur compounds and their sulfonium precursors in marine coastal environments. Marine Chemistry 124:78-89.

  5. High-accuracy mass determination of unstable cesium and barium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Audi, G.; Beck, D. [and others; ISOLDE Collaboration

    1999-02-01

    Direct mass measurements of short-lived Cs and Ba isotopes have been performed with the tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP installed at the on-line isotope separator ISOLDE at CERN. Typically, a mass resolving power of 600000 and an accuracy of {delta}m {approx} 13 keV have been obtained. The masses of {sup 123,124,126}Ba and {sup 122m}Cs were measured for the first time. A least-squares adjustment has been performed and the experimental masses are compared with theoretical ones, particularly in the frame of a macroscopic-microscopic model. (orig.)

  6. Using Oxygen Isotopes in Fish Scale Apatite to Reconstruct Past Temperatures and Water Isotope Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, T. D.; Paytan, A.

    2009-12-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of apatite phosphate in fish bones and teeth vary according to the temperature and δ18O of water during formation. Since isotope ratios in apatite are often well preserved over geologic timescales, fish bones and teeth have been used to determine past environmental conditions. Fish scales offer several advantages over bones and teeth: they are relatively common in certain sedimentary basins, and they are more easily identified to species level. Analysis of paired bone and scale samples will be presented. The data indicate that fish scale apatite similarly records environmental conditions during growth. Thus δ18O of apatite phosphate in fish scales may provide useful paleoecological information and also indicate past environmental conditions.

  7. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annewandter, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced gas transport and subsequent soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Generally, gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of radioxenons and radioiodines in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open peer-reviewed literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the multiple isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radionuclides, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different mass diffusivities due to mass differences between the radionuclides. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures or highly conductive faults which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a so-called ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which is recognized by the oil industry as leading in Discrete Fracture-Matrix (DFM) simulations. It has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations, fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, and Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic differential equations by a complementary finite

  8. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration–rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5–2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2–2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected

  9. A New Multi Collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhans, A. D.; Olson, J. E.; Ward, M. B.; Dahl, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    With the goal of improving the sensitivity of isotope ratio measurements, particularly for actinides, a new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes up to seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously has been designed, constructed and is in the early stages of testing. The design is based on a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated by 35 mm; this allows a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used for each beam. The ion dispersion lens (US patents 6,297,501 and pending) is a two element electrostatic 90 degree sector device that causes the beam-to-beam dispersion to increase faster than the intra-beam dispersion. Each of the multipliers is housed in an isolated case and is equipped with a deflector/condenser lens at the entrance to optimize pulse generation. The instrument includes a 9-sample filament cartridge mounted on a micro-manipulator X-Y stage that enables adjustment of the filament position with 10 micron resolution within the ion lens. Initial testing has shown that the instrument is performing as predicted by the ion optics model of the design.

  10. The thermal history of char as disclosed by carbon isotope ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Ambus, Per; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper;

    pyrolysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The results demonstrate that the temperature history of the char is reflected in the fine variation of carbon isotopes. The compound classes responsible for the variation were identified. Key words: Isotope ratio, flash pyrolysis, hot gas cleaning...

  11. Romanian wines characterization with CF-IRMS (Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) isotopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wine growing has been known for centuries long in Romania. The country has been favored by its geographical position in south-eastern Europe, by its proximity to the Black Sea, as well as by the specificity of the local soil and climate. Alongside France, Italy, Spain, Germany, countries in this area like Romania could also be called 'a vine homeland' in Europe. High quality wines produced in this region were object of trade ever since ancient times. Under current EU research projects, it is necessary to develop new methods of evidencing wine adulteration and safety. The use of mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the ratios of stable isotopes in bio-molecules now provides the means to prove the botanical and geographical origin of a wide variety of foodstuffs - and therefore, to authenticate and eliminate fraud. Isotope analysis has been officially adopted by the EU as a means of controlling adulteration of wine. Adulteration of wine can happen in many ways, e.g. addition of non-grape ethanol, addition of non-grape sugar, water or other unauthorized substances, undeclared mixing of wines from different wards, geographical areas or countries, mislabelling of variety and age. The present paper emphasize the isotopic analysis for D/H, 18O/16O, 13C/12C from wines, using a new generation Isotope Ratio MS, Finnigan Delta V Plus, coupling with a three flexible continuous flow preparation device (GasBench II, TC Elemental Analyser and GC-C/TC). Therefore authentication of wines is an important problem to which isotopic analysis has made a significant contribution. (authors)

  12. Role of mesoscale eddies in transport of Fukushima-derived cesium isotopes in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budyansky, M. V.; Goryachev, V. A.; Kaplunenko, D. D.; Lobanov, V. B.; Prants, S. V.; Sergeev, A. F.; Shlyk, N. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of in situ measurements of 134Cs and 137Cs released from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) collected at surface and different depths in the western North Pacific in June and July 2012. It was found that 15 month after the incident concentrations of radiocesium in the Japan and Okhotsk seas were at background or slightly increased level, while they had increased values in the subarctic front area east of Japan. The highest concentrations of 134Cs and 137Cs up to 13.5±0.9 and 22.7±1.5 Bq m-3 have been found to exceed ten times the background levels before the accident. Maximal content of radiocesium was observed within subsurface and intermediate water layers inside the cores of anticyclonic eddies (100-500 m). Even slightly increased content of radiocesium was found at some eddies at depth of 1000 m. It is expected that convergence and subduction of surface water inside eddies are main mechanisms of downward transport of radionuclides. In situ observations are compared with the results of simulated advection of these radioisotopes by the AVISO altimetric velocity field. Different Lagrangian diagnostics are used to reconstruct the history and origin of synthetic tracers imitating measured seawater samples collected in each of those eddies. The results of observations are consistent with the simulated results. It is shown that the tracers, simulating water samples with increased radioactivity to be measured in the cruise, really visited the areas with presumably high level of contamination. Fast water advection between anticyclonic eddies and convergence of surface water inside eddies makes them responsible for spreading, accumulation and downward transport of cesium rich water to the intermediate depth in the frontal zone.

  13. Radium-based estimates of cesium isotope transport and total direct ocean discharges from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Charette

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Radium has four naturally occurring isotopes that have proven useful in constraining water mass source, age, and mixing rates in the coastal and open ocean. In this study, we used radium isotopes to determine the fate and flux of runoff-derived cesium from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (NPP. During a June 2011 cruise, the highest Cs concentrations were found along the eastern shelf of northern Japan, from Fukushima south, to the edge of the Kuroshio current, and in an eddy ∼ 130 km from the NPP site. Locations with the highest cesium also had some of the highest radium activities, suggesting much of the direct ocean discharges of Cs remained in the coastal zone 2–3 months after the accident. We used a short-lived Ra isotope (223Ra, t1/2 = 11.4 d to derive an average water mass age (Tr in the coastal zone of 32 days. To ground-truth the Ra age model, we conducted a direct, station-by-station comparison of water mass ages with a numerical oceanographic model and found them to be in excellent agreement (model avg. Tr = 27 days. From these independent Tr values and the inventory of Cs within the water column at the time of our cruise, we were able to calculate an offshore 134Cs flux of 3.9–4.6 × 1013 Bq d−1. Radium-228 (t1/2 = 5.75 yr was used to derive a vertical eddy diffusivity (Kz of 0.7 m2 d−1 (0.1 cm2 s−1; from this Kz and 134Cs inventory, we estimated a 134Cs flux across the pycnocline of 1.8 × 104 Bq d−1 for the same time period. On average, our results show that horizontal mixing loss of Cs from the coastal zone was ∼ 109 greater than vertical exchange below the surface mixed layer. Finally, a mixing/dilution model that utilized our Ra-based and

  14. Beta-delayed particle emission from neutron-deficient tellurium, iodine, xenon, cesium and barium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using 58Ni, 63Cu(58Ni, xp yn) reactions and on-line mass separation the β-delayed proton and α-particle emission from neutron-deficient isotopes with 52113Xe, (protons), 114Cs (protons and α-particles) and 117Ba (protons). Coincidences between positons and β-delayed protons were recorded for 113Xe and 114Cs, yielding Qsub(EC)-Ssub(p) values of 7.92(15) and 8.73(15) MeV, respectively. The results are discussed within the statistical model. (orig.)

  15. Boron isotope ratios of surface waters in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louvat, Pascale, E-mail: louvat@ipgp.fr [Geochimie et Cosmochimie, IPGP, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, UMR 7154 CNRS, 75005 Paris (France); Gaillardet, Jerome; Paris, Guillaume; Dessert, Celine [Geochimie et Cosmochimie, IPGP, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, UMR 7154 CNRS, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Rivers outer of hydrothermal areas have d11B around 40 per mille and [B] of 10-31 {mu}g/L. > Thermal springs have d11B of 8-15 per mille and [B] between 250 and 1000 {mu}g/L. > With Na, SO{sub 4} and Cl, boron shows mixing of rain, low and high-T weathering inputs. > Guadeloupe rivers and thermal springs have d11B 20-40 per mille higher than the local rocks. > Solid-solution fractionation during weathering pathways may explain this gap of d11B. - Abstract: Large variations are reported in the B concentrations and isotopic ratios of river and thermal spring waters in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles. Rivers have {delta}{sup 11}B values around 40 per mille and B concentrations lower than 30 {mu}g/L, while thermal springs have {delta}{sup 11}B of 8-15 per mille and B concentrations of 250-1000 {mu}g/L. River samples strongly impacted by hydrothermal inputs have intermediate {delta}{sup 11}B and B contents. None of these surface water samples have {delta}{sup 11}B comparable to the local unweathered volcanic rocks (around 0 per mille), implying that a huge isotopic fractionation of 40 per mille takes place during rock weathering, which could be explained by preferential incorporation of {sup 10}B during secondary mineral formation and adsorption on clays, during rock weathering or in the soils. The soil-vegetation B cycle could also be a cause for such a fractionation. Atmospheric B with {delta}{sup 11}B of 45 per mille represents 25-95% of the river B content. The variety of the thermal spring chemical composition renders the understanding of B behavior in Guadeloupe hydrothermal system quite difficult. Complementary geochemical tracers would be helpful.

  16. Detailed assessment of isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the stable isotope analysis of plant and soil waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangju; Xiao, Honglang; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Lixin; Cheng, Guodong; Zhou, Maoxian; Yin, Li; McCabe, Matthew F

    2011-10-30

    As an alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), the isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) approach has the advantage of low cost, continuous measurement and the capacity for field-based application for the analysis of the stable isotopes of water. Recent studies have indicated that there are potential issues of organic contamination of the spectral signal in the IRIS method, resulting in incorrect results for leaf samples. To gain a more thorough understanding of the effects of sample type (e.g., leaf, root, stem and soil), sample species, sampling time and climatic condition (dry vs. wet) on water isotope estimates using IRIS, we collected soil samples and plant components from a number of major species at a fine temporal resolution (every 2 h for 24-48 h) across three locations with different climatic conditions in the Heihe River Basin, China. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the extracted water from these samples were measured using both an IRMS and an IRIS instrument. The results show that the mean discrepancies between the IRMS and IRIS approaches for δ(18) O and δD, respectively, were: -5.6‰ and -75.7‰ for leaf water; -4.0‰ and -23.3‰ for stem water; -3.4‰ and -28.2‰ for root water; -0.5‰ and -6.7‰ for xylem water; -0.06‰ and -0.3‰ for xylem flow; and -0.1‰ and 0.3‰ for soil water. The order of the discrepancy was: leaf > stem ≈ root > xylem > xylem flow ≈ soil. In general, species of the same functional types (e.g., woody vs. herbaceous) within similar habitats showed similar deviations. For different functional types, the differences were large. Sampling at nighttime did not remove the observed deviations. PMID:21953962

  17. Detailed assessment of isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the stable isotope analysis of plant and soil waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Xiao, H.; Zhou, J.; Wang, L.; Cheng, G.; Zhou, M.; Yin, L.; McCabe, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    As an alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) the isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) approach has the advantage of low cost, continuous measurement and capacity for field based application for the analysis of stable water isotopes. Recent studies have indicated that there are potential issues of organic contamination of the spectral signal in the IRIS method, resulting in errant readings for leaf samples. To gain a more thorough understanding of the effects of sample type (e.g., leaf, root, stem and soil), sample species, sampling time and climatic condition (dry vs. wet) on water isotope estimates using IRIS, we collected soil samples and plant components from a number of major species at a fine temporal resolution (every two hours for 24-48 hours) across three locations with different climatic conditions in the Heihe River Basin, China. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of the extracted water from these samples was measured using both an IRMS and IRIS instrument. Results show that the mean discrepancy between the IRMS and IRIS approach, for δ18O and δD respectively, was: -5.6% and -75.7% for leaf water; -4.0% and -23.3% for stem water; -3.4% and -28.2% for root water; -6.7% and -0.5% for xylem water; -0.06% and -0.3% for xylem flow; and -0.1% and 0.3% for soil water. The order of the discrepancy followed: leaf > stem ≈ root > xylem > xylem flow ≈ soil. In general, species of the same functional types (e.g., woody vs. herbaceous) within similar habitats showed similar deviations. For different functional types, the differences were large. Sampling during the nighttime did not remove the observed deviations.

  18. Comparison of water isotope analysis between cavity ring-down spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    δD and δ18O of natural waters with δ18O ranging from -24 to -6‰ were measured using a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) in order to confirm that the CRDS method can be an alternative to conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The deviations of δD and δ18O values obtained using the CRDS and IRMS methods are less than 0.8‰ and 0.3‰, respectively, which are practically sufficient for geochemical/environmental researches of natural waters, indicating that the CRDS method can be an alternative to the IRMS methods for environmental liquid water samples. (author)

  19. Development, optimisation, and application of ICP-SFMS methods for the measurement of isotope ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuerup, S

    2000-07-01

    The measurement of isotopic composition and isotope ratios in biological and environmental samples requires sensitive, precise, and accurate analytical techniques. The analytical techniques used are traditionally based on mass spectrometry, among these techniques is the ICP-SFMS technique, which became commercially available in the mid 1990s. This technique is characterised by high sensitivity, low background, and the ability to separate analyte signals from spectral interferences. These features are beneficial for the measurement of isotope ratios and enable the measurement of isotope ratios of elements, which it has not previously been possible to measure due to either spectral interferences or poor sensitivity. The overall purpose of the project was to investigate the potential of the single detector ICP-SFMS technique for the measurement of isotope ratios in biological and environmental samples. One part of the work has focused on the fundamental aspects of the ICP-SFMS technique with special emphasize on the features important to the measurement of isotope ratios, while another part has focused on the development, optimisation and application of specific methods for the measurement of isotope ratios of elements of nutritional interest and radionuclides. The fundamental aspects of the ICP-SFMS technique were investigated theoretically and experimentally by the measurement of isotope ratios applying different experimental conditions. It was demonstrated that isotope ratios could be measured reliably using ICP-SFMS by educated choice of acquisition parameters, scanning mode, mass discrimination correction, and by eliminating the influence of detector dead time. Applying the knowledge gained through the fundamental study, ICP-SFMS methods for the measurement of isotope ratios of calcium, zinc, molybdenum and iron in human samples and a method for the measurement of plutonium isotope ratios and ultratrace levels of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

  20. Development, optimisation, and application of ICP-SFMS methods for the measurement of isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of isotopic composition and isotope ratios in biological and environmental samples requires sensitive, precise, and accurate analytical techniques. The analytical techniques used are traditionally based on mass spectrometry, among these techniques is the ICP-SFMS technique, which became commercially available in the mid 1990s. This technique is characterised by high sensitivity, low background, and the ability to separate analyte signals from spectral interferences. These features are beneficial for the measurement of isotope ratios and enable the measurement of isotope ratios of elements, which it has not previously been possible to measure due to either spectral interferences or poor sensitivity. The overall purpose of the project was to investigate the potential of the single detector ICP-SFMS technique for the measurement of isotope ratios in biological and environmental samples. One part of the work has focused on the fundamental aspects of the ICP-SFMS technique with special emphasize on the features important to the measurement of isotope ratios, while another part has focused on the development, optimisation and application of specific methods for the measurement of isotope ratios of elements of nutritional interest and radionuclides. The fundamental aspects of the ICP-SFMS technique were investigated theoretically and experimentally by the measurement of isotope ratios applying different experimental conditions. It was demonstrated that isotope ratios could be measured reliably using ICP-SFMS by educated choice of acquisition parameters, scanning mode, mass discrimination correction, and by eliminating the influence of detector dead time. Applying the knowledge gained through the fundamental study, ICP-SFMS methods for the measurement of isotope ratios of calcium, zinc, molybdenum and iron in human samples and a method for the measurement of plutonium isotope ratios and ultratrace levels of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

  1. Discrepancies between isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the stable isotope analysis of plant and soil waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Adam G; Goldsmith, Gregory R; Brooks, Paul D; Dawson, Todd E

    2010-07-30

    The use of isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) for the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of water is increasing. While IRIS has many advantages over traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), it may also be prone to errors that do not impact upon IRMS analyses. Of particular concern is the potential for contaminants in the water sample to interfere with the spectroscopy, thus leading to erroneous stable isotope data. Water extracted from plant and soil samples may often contain organic contaminants. The extent to which contaminants may interfere with IRIS and thus impact upon data quality is presently unknown. We tested the performance of IRIS relative to IRMS for water extracted from 11 plant species and one organic soil horizon. IRIS deviated considerably from IRMS for over half of the samples tested, with deviations as large as 46 per thousand (delta(2)H) and 15.4 per thousand (delta(18)O) being measured. This effect was reduced somewhat by using activated charcoal to remove organics from the water; however, deviations as large as 35 per thousand (delta(2)H) and 11.8 per thousand (delta(18)O) were still measured for these cleaned samples. Interestingly, the use of activated charcoal to clean water samples had less effect than previously thought for IRMS analyses. Our data show that extreme caution is required when using IRIS to analyse water samples that may contain organic contaminants. We suggest that the development of new cleaning techniques for removing organic contaminants together with instrument-based software to flag potentially problematic samples are necessary to ensure accurate plant and soil water analyses using IRIS. PMID:20552579

  2. Isotopic ratios at z=0.68 from molecular absorption lines toward B 0218+357

    CERN Document Server

    Wallstrom, S H J; Guelin, M

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic ratios of heavy elements are a key signature of the nucleosynthesis processes in stellar interiors. The contribution of successive generations of stars to the metal enrichment of the Universe is imprinted on the evolution of isotopic ratios over time. We investigate the isotopic ratios of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur through millimeter molecular absorption lines arising in the z=0.68 absorber toward the blazar B 0218+357. We find that these ratios differ from those observed in the Galactic interstellar medium, but are remarkably close to those in the only other source at intermediate redshift for which isotopic ratios have been measured to date, the z=0.89 absorber in front of PKS1830-211. The isotopic ratios in these two absorbers should reflect enrichment mostly from massive stars, and they are indeed close to the values observed toward local starburst galaxies. Our measurements set constraints on nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution models.

  3. An analytical system for stable isotope analysis on carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathirana, S. L.; Van Der Veen, C.; Popa, M. E.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-01-01

    A fully automated system for the determination of δ13C and δ18O in atmospheric CO has been developed. CO is extracted from an air sample and converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent. The isotopic composition is determined with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) technique.

  4. Zinc isotope ratios as indicators of diet and trophic level in Arctic marine mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Klervia Jaouen; Paul Szpak; Richards, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen are an established method for dietary reconstruction, but this method is limited by the protein preservation. Zinc (Zn) is found in bioapatite and the isotopic compositions of this element constitute a very promising dietary indicator. The extent of fractionation of Zn isotopes in marine environments, however, remains unknown. We report here on the measurement of zinc, carbon and nitrogen isotopes in 47 marine mammals from the archaeo...

  5. Automatic isotope ratio measurements with a double collector magnetic mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a measuring procedure and the instrumentation of automatic measurements of isotope ratios with double collector magnetic mass spectrometers. This is essentially achieved by discriminating the desired peak plateau for ion current integration during the high voltage variation. The resolution is nearly uneffected by offset drifts of the electronic system. Prior to every isotope ratio measurement the offset values are determined, digitally stored, and finally compensated when the isotope ratio is calculated with an arithmetic unit. Several mass spectrometers have been compared on the basis of an uranium isotope analysis in a long time experiment. The developed system proved reliable and showed the same resolution as more sophisticated spectrometer systems. (orig.)

  6. Stable isotope ratio determination of the origin of vanillin in vanilla extracts and its relationship to vanillin/potassium ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for isolating vanillin from vanilla extract, followed by stable isotope ratio analysis to determine the amount of natural vanillin contained in adulterated vanilla extracts. After the potassium content is determined, the percent Madagascar and/or Java vanilla beans incorporated into the extract may then be approximated from the vanillin/potassium ratio

  7. Dynamical and Microphysical Controls on Subtropical Water Vapor Isotope Ratios: Using New Spectroscopic Measurements to Link Isotopic and Climatic Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudzens Bailey, A.; Nusbaumer, J. M.; Sato, P.; Noone, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Water vapor isotope ratios are critical in shaping the isotopic composition of paleo-proxies used to interpret past climate. Indeed, previous research suggests speleothems are sensitive to water vapor transport, and experiments currently underway are evaluating the role of Greenlandic vapor in setting the isotopic record of the ice sheet. The recent and rapid spread of commercial vapor isotopic analyzers—based on cavity-enhanced near-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy—is creating unparalleled opportunities to elucidate which climatic factors control the vapor isotopic composition globally. This presentation describes both an exciting application of this new technology and relevant limitations imposed by measurement uncertainties associated with long-term field deployments. Using three years of continuous water vapor isotope ratio observations from Hawaii's Mauna Loa Observatory—one of the longest records of its kind—we evaluate the influence of large-scale dynamics and cloud microphysical processes in establishing the isotopic composition of water vapor during strong convective activity. Despite the fact that vapor isotope ratios tend to decrease with latitude, greater enrichment in Mauna Loa vapor is associated with a westward retraction of the jet stream, which funnels Asiatic outflow southward, while greater depletion is associated with southwesterly low-level flow. Differences in precipitation efficiency—which are verified by differences in aerosol concentration and total scattering—cause this apparent discrepancy. These results suggest local cloud and precipitation processes are more influential than airmass origin in setting the isotope ratios observed during these strong convective events. The length of the Mauna Loa record, meanwhile, presents a unique opportunity to evaluate long-term stability of biases associated with laser-based isotopic analyzers and to discuss calibration strategies best suited for monitoring programs designed to

  8. On the isotope ratio of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental investigations of the isotope ratio of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in urine of persons living at different locations show considerable variations. A distinct relation to the isotope ratio of the local drinking water has only been observed in the case of hydrogen. The variations are far from being within the experimental limits of error. Therefore, they are decisive in selecting the relative abundance of the labelling isotope in tracer experiments on human metabolism. (author)

  9. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotopic ratios of fish otoliths have been used in numerous studies as natural tags or markers to aid the study of connectivity among fish populations. We investigated the use of spatial and temporal changes in the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of otoliths to different...

  10. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the determination of 13C-valine isotopic ratios in complex biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Breuillé, Denis; Obled, Christiane; Papet, Isabelle; Schierbeek, Henk; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent-Bernard

    2008-10-01

    On-line gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is commonly used to measure isotopic ratios at natural abundance as well as for tracer studies in nutritional and medical research. However, high-precision (13)C isotopic enrichment can also be measured by liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). Indeed, LC-IRMS can be used, as shown by the new method reported here, to obtain a baseline separation and to measure (13)C isotopic enrichment of underivatised amino acids (Asp, Thr-Ser, Glu, Pro, Gly, Ala, Cys and Val). In case of Val, at natural abundance, the SD(delta(13)C) reported with this method was found to be below 1 per thousand . Another key feature of the new LC-IRMS method reported in this paper is the comparison of the LC-IRMS approach with the conventional GC-C-IRMS determination. To perform this comparative study, isotopic enrichments were measured from underivatised Val and its N(O, S)-ethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivative. Between 0.0 and 1.0 molar percent excess (MPE) (delta(13)C= -12.3 to 150.8 per thousand), the calculated root-mean-square (rms) of SD was 0.38 and 0.46 per thousand and the calculated rms of accuracy was 0.023 and 0.005 MPE, respectively, for GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS. Both systems measured accurately low isotopic enrichments (0.002 atom percent excess (APE)) with an SD (APE) of 0.0004. To correlate the relative (delta(13)C) and absolute (atom%, APE and MPE) isotopic enrichment of Val measured by the GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS devices, mathematical equations showing the slope and intercept of the curves were established and validated with experimental data between 0.0 to 2.3 MPE. Finally, both GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS instruments were also used to assess isotopic enrichment of protein-bound (13)C-Val in tibial epiphysis in a tracer study performed in rats. Isotopic enrichments measured by LC-IRMS and GC-C-IRMS were not statistically different (p>0.05). The results of this work indicate that

  11. Tree cellulose 13C/12C isotope ratios and climatic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because tree cellulose is formed from carbon acquired through photosynthesis, its 13C/12C isotope ratio reflects that of atmospheric CO2. Fractionation changes related to photosynthetic reactions also influence 13C/12C values, and an offset between atmospheric and tree cellulose isotope ratios results. Here, we measured the pre-1850 cellulose 13C/12C isotope ratios of 19 North American coniferous trees and found a strong dependency of the ratios on latitude. Relative humidity and perhaps temperature appear to be important for this relationship. Assuming climate change to be the dominant factor influencing pre-1850 tree cellulose isotope ratios, we compare a 2,000-yr-long record of 13C/12C isotope change with existing records of ice acidity and temperature. When accepting a lag in 13C/12C response to climatic change of 70 to 90 yr, correlation coefficients of 0.8 are found for the 1100–1850 interval

  12. Forensic Applications of Light-Element Stable Isotope Ratios of Ricinus communis Seeds and Ricin Preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; West, Jason B.; Ehleringer, James

    2013-01-01

    Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis, also known as castor beans, are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We have tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin prepared by various methods can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples from locations around the world and measured the C, N, O, and H stable isotope ratios of the whole seeds, oil, and three types of ricin preparations. Our results demonstrate that N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pair-wise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations.

  13. Reducing and correcting for contamination of ecosystem water stable isotopes measured by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Markus; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Lett, Céline; Biron, Philippe; Richard, Patricia; Bariac, Thierry; Seibt, Ulli

    2012-01-30

    Concern exists about the suitability of laser spectroscopic instruments for the measurement of the (18)O/(16)O and (2)H/(1)H values of liquid samples other than pure water. It is possible to derive erroneous isotope values due to optical interference by certain organic compounds, including some commonly present in ecosystem-derived samples such as leaf or soil waters. Here we investigated the reliability of wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) (18)O/(16)O and (2)H/(1)H measurements from a range of ecosystem-derived waters, through comparison with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We tested the residual of the spectral fit S(r) calculated by the CRDS instrument as a means to quantify the difference between the CRDS and IRMS δ-values. There was very good overall agreement between the CRDS and IRMS values for both isotopes, but differences of up to 2.3‰ (δ(18)O values) and 23‰ (δ(2)H values) were observed in leaf water extracts from Citrus limon and Alnus cordata. The S(r) statistic successfully detected contaminated samples. Treatment of Citrus leaf water with activated charcoal reduced, but did not eliminate, δ(2)H(CRDS) - δ(2)H(IRMS) linearly for the tested range of 0-20% charcoal. The effect of distillation temperature on the degree of contamination was large, particularly for δ(2)H values but variable, resulting in positive, negative or no correlation with distillation temperature. S(r) and δ(CRDS) - δ(IRMS) were highly correlated, in particular for δ(2)H values, across the range of samples that we tested, indicating the potential to use this relationship to correct the δ-values of contaminated plant water extracts. We also examined the sensitivity of the CRDS system to changes in the temperature of its operating environment. We found that temperature changes ≥4 °C for δ(18)O values and ≥10 °C for δ(2)H values resulted in errors larger than the CRDS precision for the respective isotopes and advise the use of such

  14. Isotope ratio as a tracer for investigation of anthropogenic sulfur sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents studies concerned possibility of application of sulfur isotope ratio to investigate the sulfur pollution, coming from coal combustion process. The samples of hard coal and lignite, slag and ashes were taken from power station Kaweczyn and Belchatow to determine sulfur isotope ratio changes in the products of coal combustion process. Additionally, sulfur from outlet gas was absorbed to determine sulfur isotope fractionation in desulfurization process. Sulfate from outlet gases are enriched in light isotope 32S in comparison to coal which was used in power plants. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes between inlet and outlet gases was observed. The stable sulfur compositions of sulfur compounds in industrial origin, present in atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, groundwater, soil ets., may differ from those for natural sources. Sulfur isotope ratio can be treated as an environmental tracer, and may be applied to study the sulfur pollution distribution from coal combustion process, in the environment. (author)

  15. The response of oxygen isotope ratios in precipitation to changes in global atmospheric circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen present in water are known to undergo fractionation at phase transitions, with heavy isotopes tending to evaporate less readily and to undergo condensation more readily than lighter isotopes. The combination of fractionation processes for a given air parcel therefore produces the known relationships between precipitation amount, surface temperature and the isotopic ratio in precipitation. An additional factor in determining the isotopic ratio is the effect of changes in vapour source region and vapour path due to changes in atmospheric circulation. In order to explore the effect of changes in circulation related to El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, an atmospheric general circulation model fitted with a diagnostic module to predict the stable isotopic ratios of meteoric water (both HDO and H218O) is used to investigate the effect of warm sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies on moisture transport and hence on isotopic ratios in precipitation. Observed isotopic ratios obtained from the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) are also correlated with Troup SOI values and compared with the model results. Copyright (1999) Geological Society of Australia

  16. Applications of stable Isotope ratios determinations in fruit juice authentication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Adulteration of a product consists in making it impure by fraudulent addition of a foreign or inferior substance. The result is either an alteration of the product and of its quality or a falsification. The falsification is a voluntary act with the intention of abuse. The falsification may be more or less sophisticated and its sophistication as well as its costs increases with the improvement of analytical methods. Vacuum concentration with aroma does not affect the chemical composition of fruit juices and therefore the determination of deuterium (D) and oxygen-18 content in waters is the most confident procedure for differentiating between a natural single strength juice and a juice rediluted from a concentrate. This technique is based on the fact that when absorbed by a plant, the rainwater or the irrigation water is fractionated by evapotranspiration, and enriched in the heavy isotopes (deuterium and oxygen-18) with respect to the light isotope (hydrogen and oxygen-16, respectively). It is known that climatic conditions affect the isotope content of rain waters and therefore that of fruit juices waters: the warmer climate, the higher the deuterium and oxygen-18 contents in water. Rainwater and tap water have nearly the same isotopic content and the water of fruit juices derived from concentrate by dilution with tap water has an isotopic content close to that of tap water. This makes it easy to distinguish diluted concentrates from the isotopically more enriched water of authentic single strength juice. In this study, single strength juice, in Romanian fruits, were investigated by mean of stable isotope measurements (oxygen, hydrogen and carbon) in order to offer a discussion basis for the authenticity of some fruit juices currently available on Romanian market. (authors)

  17. Decorporation of cesium-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesium radio-isotopes, especially cesium-137 (137Cs) are among the radionuclides of main importance produced by a fission reaction in reactor or a nuclear weapon explosion. In the environment, 137Cs is a major contaminant which can cause severe β, γirradiations and contaminations. 137Cs is distributed widely and relatively uniformly throughout the body with the highest concentration in skeletal muscles. A treatment becomes difficult afterwards. The purposes of this report are Firstly to compare the Prussian blue verses cobalt and potassium ferrocyanide (D.I. blue) efficiency for the 137Cs decorporation and secondly to assess a chronological treatment with D.I. blue. (author)

  18. Anomalous lead isotope ratios and provenance of offshore sediments, Gulf of Carpentaria, northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous Pb isotope ratios measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry in terrigenous marine sediments (208Pb/206Pb and low 207Pb/206Pb. This interpretation is supported by strong correlations between Pb isotope ratio and Th, U and light rare-earth element concentrations in the sediments as well as by monazite compositional data. A likely source of the detrital monazite is the western portion of the Georgetown Inlier of mainly Proterozoic S-type granitic rocks. A clear distinction between Pb isotope ratios in sediments deposited from the Norman and Bynoe Rivers in the southeast Gulf of Carpentaria and the persistence of catchment-specific Pb isotope ratios 45 km offshore suggest that Pb isotope data are useful in tracing the provenance of terrigenous offshore sediments when the source rocks of catchments show sufficient chemical and/or mineralogical variation. Copyright (2000) Geological Society of Australia

  19. Stable isotope ratio measurements in atmospheric sulfate studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric sulfate has been determined by a number of workers and the results interpreted in terms of contributing sources and mechanisms of origin. A correlation between the 18O enrichment of atmospheric water and airborne particulate sulfate has been observed. Laboratory preparations of sulfate made from sulfur dioxide by two sets of sequential reactions, hydrolysis followed by oxidation and oxidation followed by hydrolysis, yielded products of distinguishable oxygen-isotope composition. Oxygen isotopic analysis of simultaneously collected field samples of ambient sulfate, sulfur dioxide, and water vapor indicated seasonal trends for all of the major constituents of atmospheric sulfation processes. Some isotopic data were also obtained on precipitation and precipitation sulfates. Field results suggest that ambient sulfates collected in the area of Argonne correpond more closely in oxygen isotope composition to a sulfate molecule containing two oxygens originating from sulfur dioxide, one oxygen from air and one oxygen from condensed-phased atmospheric water, SO/sub s/O/sub s/O/sub cw/O2-/sub a/, than to the molecule SO/sub s/O/sub s/O/sub wv/O2/sub a/ in which one oxygen originates from vapor-phase atmospheric water

  20. Stable isotope ratio measurements in atmospheric sulphate studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric sulphate has been determined by a number of workers and the results interpreted in terms of contributing sources and mechanisms of origin. A correlation between the 18O enrichment of atmospheric water airborne particulate sulphate has been observed. Laboratory preparations of sulphate made from sulphur dioxide by two sets of sequential reactions, (1) hydrolysis followed by oxidation and (2) oxidation followed by hydrolysis, yielded products of distinguishable oxygen-isotope composition. Oxygen isotopic analysis of simultaneously collected field samples of ambient sulphate, sulphur dioxide, and water vapour indicated seasonal trends for all of the major constituents of atmospheric sulphation processes. Some isotopic data were also obtained on precipitation and precipitation sulphates. Field results suggest that ambient sulphates collected in the area of Argonne correspond more closely in oxygen isotope composition to a sulphate molecule containing two oxygens originating from sulphur dioxide, one oxygen from air and one oxygen from condensed-phase atmospheric water than to the molecule in which one oxygen originates from vapourphase atmospheric water. (author)

  1. Sulfur isotope ratios and the origins of the aerosols and cloud droplets in California stratus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine aerosols often have sulfur-to-chloride ratios greater than that found in seawater. Sulfur isotope ratios (34S/32S) were measured in aerosol and cloud droplet samples collected in the San Francisco Bay Area in an attempt to understand the processes that produce the observed sulfur-to-chloride ratios. Seawater sulfur usually has very high sulfur isotope ratios: fossil fuel sulfur tends to have smaller isotope ratios and sulfur of bacteriogenic origin still smaller. Samples collected in unpolluted marine air over the hills south of San Francisco had sulfur ratios that were significantly lower than the values for samples collected in nearby areas that were subject to urban pollution. The highest sulfur isotope ratios were found in the offshore seawater. The results suggest bacteriogenic origins, of the marine air sulfur aerosol material. The low isotope ratios in the marine air cannot be explained as a mixture of seawater sulfur and pollutant sulfur, because both tend to have higher isotope ratios. (Auth.)

  2. Online stable carbon isotope ratio measurement in formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol in water by high performance liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A suitable analysis condition was determined for high performance liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC-IRMS) while making sequential measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios of δ13C in formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol dissolved in water. For this online column separation method, organic reagents are not applicable due to carbon contamination; thus, water and KH2PO4 at low concentrations were tested as mobile phase in combination with a HyPURITY AQUASTARTM column. Formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol were separated when 2 mM KH2PO4 aqueous solution was used. Under the determined analysis condition for HPLC-IRMS, carbon concentrations could be measured quantitatively as well as carbon isotope ratio when carbon concentration was higher than 0.4 mM L for each chemical

  3. Global modelling of H2 mixing ratios and isotopic compositions with the TM5 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Langenfelds

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen (H2 contains independent information for constraining the global H2 budget. To explore this, we have implemented hydrogen sources and sinks, including their stable isotopic composition and isotope fractionation constants, into the global chemistry transport model TM5. For the first time, a global model now includes a simplified but explicit isotope reaction scheme for the photochemical production of H2. We present a comparison of modelled results for the H2 mixing ratio and isotope composition with available measurements on seasonal to inter annual time scales for the years 2001–2007. The base model results agree well with observations for H2 mixing ratios. For δD[H2], modelled values are slightly lower than measurements. A detailed sensitivity study is performed to identify the most important parameters for modelling the isotopic composition of H2. The results show that on the global scale, the discrepancy between model and measurements can be closed by adjusting the default values of the isotope effects in deposition, photochemistry and the stratosphere-troposphere exchange within the known range of uncertainty. However, the available isotope data do not provide sufficient information to uniquely constrain the global isotope budget. Therefore, additional studies focussing on the isotopic composition near the tropopause and on the isotope effects in the photochemistry and deposition are recommended.

  4. Feasibility study for the processing of Hanford Site cesium and strontium isotopic sources in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final environmental impact statement for the disposal of defense-related wastes at the Hanford Site (Final Environmental Impact Statement: Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes [HDW-EIS] [DOE 1987]) states that the preferred alternative for disposal of cesium and strontium wastes at the Hanford Site will be to package and ship these wastes to the commercial high-level waste repository. The Record of Decision for this EIS states that before shipment to a geologic repository, these wastes will be packaged in accordance with repository waste acceptance criteria. However, the high cost per canister for repository disposal and uncertainty about the acceptability of overpacked capsules by the repository suggest that additional alternative means of disposal be considered. Vitrification of the cesium and strontium salts in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) has been identified as a possible alternative to overpacking. Subsequently, Westinghouse Hanford Company's (Westinghouse Hanford) Projects Technical Support Office undertook a feasibility study to determine if any significant technical issues preclude the vitrification of the cesium and strontium salts. Based on the information presented in this report, it is considered technically feasible to blend the cesium chloride and strontium fluoride salts with neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) and/or complexant concentrate (CC) waste feedstreams, or to blend the salts with fresh frit and process the waste through the HWVP

  5. Improved isotope ratio measurement performance in liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry by removing excess oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettmann, Elena; Brand, Willi A; Gleixner, Gerd

    2007-01-01

    A low dead volume oxygen scrubbing system was introduced in a commercially available liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) interface to enhance the analytical capability of the system. In the LC/IRMS interface carbon from organic samples is converted into CO(2) inside the mobile phase by wet chemical oxidation using peroxodisulfate (Na(2)S(2)O(8)). After passing the hot reaction zone, surplus oxygen (O(2)) remains dissolved in the liquid phase. Both CO(2) and O(2) diffuse through a transfer membrane into the helium carrier and are transferred to the mass spectrometer. The presence of O(2) in the ion source may have detrimental effects on measurement accuracy and precision as well as on filament lifetime. As a remedy, a new on-line O(2)-removing device has been incorporated into the system. The new O(2) scrubber consists of two parallel hot copper reduction reactors (0.8 mm i.d., active length 120 mm) and a switch-over valve between them. One reactor is regenerated using He/H(2) while the other is actively scavenging O(2) from the gas stream. The capacity of each reduction reactor, expressed as usage time, is between 40 and 50 min. This is sufficient for a single LC run for sugars and organic acids. A further increase of the reduction capacity is accompanied by a peak broadening of about 100%. After switching to a freshly reduced reactor the oxygen background and the delta(13)C values of the reference gas need up to 500 s to stabilize. For repeated injections the delta(13)C values of sucrose remain constant (+/-0.1 per thousand) for about 3000 s. The long-term stability for measurements of sucrose was 0.11 per thousand without the reduction oven and improved slightly to 0.08 per thousand with the reduction oven. The filament lifetime improved by more than 600%, thereby improving the long-term system stability and analytical efficiency. In addition the costs per analysis were reduced considerably. PMID:18041012

  6. Results from an interlaboratory exercise on the determination of plutonium isotopic ratios by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results form interlaboratory comparison measurements on the determination of plutonium isotopic ratios by gamma spectrometry, organized by the ESARDA Working Group on Techniques and Standards for Nondestructive Analysis, are presented and discussed. Nine laboratories from nine countries or international organizations participated in the intercomparison exercise, which included both laboratories' own measurements on the plutonium isotopic reference materials NBS-SRM 946, 947, 948 and comparison analyses of gamma spectra from these materials distributed to the participating laboratories. Results from the intercomparison analyses have been used to reevaluate some gamma branching intensity ratios required for plutonium isotopic ratio measurements. (orig.)

  7. Sulfur isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICPMS of boon or bane?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The variation of the isotopic composition of sulfur is influenced by biological and anthropogenic activities. Thus it proved to be a suitable tracer in provenance studies of food and beverages. Nonetheless, mass bias and interferences hamper the accurate and precise determination of the isotopic composition. Different ICPMS instruments were investigated for their potential to assess sulfur isotope ratios for food provenance studies, and were applied to a variety of food matrices. (author)

  8. Chlorine Isotope Effects from Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Suggest Intramolecular C-Cl Bond Competition in Trichloroethene (TCE Reductive Dehalogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Cretnik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (biochemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i of tetrachloroethene (PCE to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were −19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE and −12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE (95% confidence intervals. Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (−5.0‰ ± 0.1‰ and TCE (−3.6‰ ± 0.2‰. In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by −16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of −2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of −6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals. A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect. These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition. This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  9. Environmental Isotope Ratios of River Water in the Danube Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the Danube study were documentation of existing data and completion of long term data sets (2H, 3H, 18O), continuation of monthly sampling of river water, investigation of short term influences, and preliminary interpretation of long term isotope records of river water with respect to hydrological processes, meteorological conditions and environmental changes. Furthermore, this report includes the complete 3H and 18O data set for the Danube at Vienna (1963-2005) and a summary of the results from the Joint Danube Survey 2 (2007). δ18O values of JDS2 river water samples ranged from -13.1 per mille (Inn, alpine river) up to -6.4 per mille (River Sio, evap oration influence). The δ18O value of the Danube increased from -10.8 per mille after the confluence of the Inn River with the upper Danube up to -9.6 per mille at the mouth, with a major change after the inflow of Tisa and Sava. The isotopic composition of river water in the Danube Basin is mainly governed by the isotopic composition of precipitation in the catchment area, while evaporation effects play only a minor role. Short term and long term isotope signals from precipitation are thus transmitted through the whole catchment. Tritium concentrations in most parts of the Danube river system lay around 10 TU during the JDS2 period and reflected the actual 3H content of precipitation in Central Europe, but 3H values up to 40 TU in the Danube and up to 250 TU in some tributaries are clear evi dence for discontinuous releases of 3H from local sources (nuclear power plants) into the rivers. (author)

  10. NUSIMEP-7: Uranium isotope amount ratios in uranium particles

    OpenAIRE

    TRUYENS Jan; STEFANIAK Elzbieta; MIALLE SÉBASTIEN; Aregbe, Yetunde

    2011-01-01

    The Additional Protocol (AP) authorizes safeguards authorities to verify the absence of undeclared nuclear activities in all parts of a state’s nuclear fuel cycle as well as any other location where nuclear material is or may be present. As part of the Additional Protocol, environmental sampling has become an important tool for the detection of non-declared nuclear activities. In environmental sampling micrometer-sized uranium particles with an isotopic composition characteristic for the proc...

  11. Stable carbon isotope ratios of toluene in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wintel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios in VOC are a powerful tool to identify sources or to track both dynamical and chemical processes. During the field campaign ZEPTER-2 in autumn 2008 whole air samples were collected on board a Zeppelin NT airship in the planetary boundary layer and the lower free troposphere over south-west Germany. These samples were analysed with respect to VOC mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios using a gas chromatograph combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In this study we present the results for toluene, one of the major anthropogenic pollutants. In the boundary layer we observed rather fresh emissions mixing into the background and derived a toluene source isotope ratio of δ13C = −28.2 ± 0.5 ‰. Using the concept of the effective kinetic isotope effect, we were able to separate the effects of dilution processes and photochemical degradation in the free troposphere. We estimated the photochemical age of toluene in the atmosphere in two different ways (using isotope ratios and mixing ratios, respectively. The results differ strongly in the planetary boundary layer, probably due to mixing processes, but are compatible with each other in the free troposphere.

  12. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-09-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all with substantial secondary formation from the photooxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), was conducted in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and in PM alone. Their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and, consequently, a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33 ‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9 ‰ and approximately 20 % of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban center with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in summer, a substantial difference is observed. This

  13. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Analysis of U-Bearing Particulates By SIMS in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper measurement method of uranium isotope ratio of uranium-bearing particles in swipe samples was introduced; Swipe sample screening program was proposed on the basis of studying various destructive assay and non-destructive assays. Scanning electron microscope(SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence(XRF) system was applied to located the deposited uranium-containning particles on the graphite support, particle's composition and size can be identified. Some isotope ratio results were compared with those of other bulk analytical methods; By measuring the same prepared sample, we got the U-particle isotopic ratio data similar to those from IAEA NWAL, indication that our operation parameters and experimental conditions are viable and can be used for measurement of U-particle isotope ratio from swipe samples

  14. Study of the Potential Impact of Gamma-Induced Radiolytic Gases on Loading of Cesium Onto Crystalline Silicotitanate Sorbent at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, A.J.

    2001-02-12

    The use of an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate as a potential sorbent for the removal and concentration of cesium from the high-level waste at the Savannah River Site was investigated. Results conclusively showed this sorbent to be unaffected by gamma-induced radiolytic gas formation during column loading. Closely controlled column-loading experiments were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in a gamma field with a conservative dose rate expected to exceed that in a full-scale column by a factor of nearly 16. Operation of column loading under expected nominal full-scale field conditions in the HFIR pool showed that radiolytic gases were formed at a previously calculated generation rate of 0.4 mL per liter of feed solution. When the resulting cesium-loading curve in the gamma field was compared with that of a control experiment in the absence of a gamma field, no discernable difference in the curves (within analytical error) was detected. Both curves were in good agreement with the VERSE computer-generated curve. Results conclusively indicate that the production of radiolytic gases within a full-scale column is not expected to result in reduced capacity or associated gas generation problems during operation at the Savannah River Site.

  15. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry in forensic science and food adulteration research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (SIRMS) is an established technique for the determination of origin of geological, biological, chemical and physio-chemical samples/materials. With the development of highly precise mass spectrometers, the stable isotope ratio determination of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen have gained considerable interest in the fields of forensic science and food authentication. Natural variations in the isotopic composition of lighter elements occur due to fractionation effects, resulting in the finger printing of specific isotope ratio values that are characteristic of the origin, purity, and manufacturing processes of the products and their constituents. Forensic science uses scientific and technical methods to investigate traceable evidence of criminal acts. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry has been applied to numerous aspects of the forensic science. The analysis of explosives such as ammonium nitrate, gun powder and tri-nitro-toluene (TNT), cases of murder, armed robbery, drug smuggling, terrorism, arson and hit and run traffic accidents are a few of them. The main types of geological evidences in such cases are mud, soil, rocks, sand, gravel, dust particles, biological materials, organic particles and anthropogenic components. Stable isotopes are used as tools to corroborate and confirm the evidential leads in the investigation of such crimes. The variation in natural abundances of carbon and nitrogen and their isotopic ratios δ13C and δ15N can identify links between items found at crime scene with those of suspect. The paper discusses the applications of SIRMS in the field of forensic science and food adulteration research

  16. Lead isotope ratios as a tracer for lead contamination sources: A lake Andong case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Y. H

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate stable Pb isotope signatures as a tracer for Pb contamination in Lake Andong. For Pb isotope analysis, we collected water and sediment from Lake Andong, particles in the air, soils, and stream water, mine tailings, sludge and wastewater from zinc smelting around lake Andong watershed. The results showed that Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb for zinc concentrate were 18.809 ± 0.322, 15.650 ± 0.062, and 38.728 ± 0.421, respectively. In wastewater, isotopic ratio values (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb were 17.363 ± 0.133, 15.550 ± 0.025, and 37.217 ± 0.092, respectively. Additionally, isotopic ratio values (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb for sludge were 17.515 ± 0.155, 15.537 ± 0.018, and 37.357 ± 0.173, respectively. These values were similar to those in zinc and lead concentrate originated from Canada and South America. In contrast, Pb isotope ratios of soil, tailings and sediment from Lake Andong were similar to those of Korean ore. Atmospheric particles showed different patterns of Pb isotope ratios from sediments, soils, and zinc smelting and this needs further investigation in order to identify atmospheric Pb sources.

  17. Accuracy of delta 18O isotope ratio measurements on the same sample by continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The doubly labeled water method is considered the reference method to measure energy expenditure. Conventional mass spectrometry requires a separate aliquot of the same sample to be prepared and analyzed separately. With continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, the same sample could be analy...

  18. Isotope ratios of uranium using high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actinide element isotope ratios have been determined in environmental samples using high resolution ICP-MS with ultrasonic nebulization. Precisions as low as 0.1% RSD have been achieved using various methods of acquisition. The methodology has been used for environmental monitoring of uranium isotope ratios as an indicator of nuclear activity. Also, it has been applied to calcite dating studies as a measure of past geochemical disturbances

  19. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept

  20. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Phenolic Compounds in Secondary Particulate Organic Matter Formed by Photooxidation of Toluene

    CERN Document Server

    Irei, Satoshi; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary particulate organic matter (POM) formed by photooxidation of toluene were studied. Secondary POM generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 cubic meter indoor smog chamber was collected, and then extracted with acetonitrile. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined by a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of the products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5 to 6 permil compared to the initial isotope ratio for toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4_nitrophenol remained the same as the initial isotope ratio for toluene. Based on the reaction mechanisms postulated in literature, stable carbon isotope ratios of these produc...

  1. Differentiation of endogenous and exogenous steroids by gas chromatography-combustion-mass spectrometry isotope ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urinary steroids profiles are used to control the misuse of endogenous steroids such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. The testosterone/epistestosterone ratio, measured by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, is used to control testosterone administration. When T/E ratio is higher than 4, consumption of testosterone or its precursors is suspected. Recent researches have demonstrated the effectiveness of Carbon Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry to detect and confirm endogenous steroids administration. The ratio of the two stable carbon isotopes 13C and 12C allows the differentiation of natural and synthetic steroids because synthetic steroids have lower 13C abundance. In fact, the carbon isotope ratios can be used to determine endogenous steroids administration even when testosterone/epistestosterone ratio is at its normal value. In the current work, some of the most important aspects related to differentiation of endogenous and exogenous steroids by means of Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry are discussed. Also, this article provides a review about the purification and sample preparation previous to the analysis, and diet effects on carbon isotope ratio of endogenous anabolics steroids is presented too

  2. Comparison of mass spectrometric methods (TE, MTE and conventional) for uranium isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotope ratio measurement techniques - total evaporation (TE), modified total evaporation (MTE), and conventional - used for characterization measurements of certified reference materials by thermal ionization mass spectrometer instruments are compared. The advantages of each method, the fractionation profiles resulting from the measurement techniques, and factors affecting systematic components of bias in the isotope ratio measurements are discussed. The TE and MTE techniques yield major ratios and the conventional and MTE techniques yield minor ratios of comparable quality (in terms of precision and accuracy). (author)

  3. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    CERN Document Server

    Gkinis, V; Blunier, T; Bigler, M; Schüpbach, S; Kettner, E; Johnsen, S J

    2014-01-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneous water isotopic analysis of $\\delta^{18}$O and $\\delta$D on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub ${\\mu}$l amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a home made oven. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW--SLAP scale. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 permil and 0.5 permil for $\\delta^{18}$O and $\\delta$D, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sampl...

  4. Method for the determination of concentration and stable carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric phenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saccon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A method for the determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrophenols in the gas and particulate phases is presented. It has been proposed to use the combination of concentration and isotope ratio measurements of precursor and product to test the applicability of results of laboratory studies to the atmosphere. Nitrophenols are suspected to be secondary products formed specifically from the photooxidation of volatile organic compounds. XAD-4™ resin was used as an adsorbent on quartz filters to sample ambient phenols using conventional high-volume air samplers at York University in Toronto, Canada. Filters were extracted in acetonitrile, with a HPLC clean-up step and a solid phase extraction step prior to derivatization with BSTFA. Concentration measurements were done with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used for isotope ratio analysis. The technique presented allows for atmospheric compound-specific isotopic composition measurements for five semi-volatile phenols with an estimated accuracy of 0.3‰ to 0.5‰ at atmospheric concentrations exceeding 0.1 ng m−3 while the detection limits for concentration measurements are in the pg m−3 range. Isotopic fractionation throughout the entire extraction procedure and analysis was proven to be below the precision of the isotope ratio measurements. The method was tested by conducting ambient measurements from September to December 2011.

  5. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a ‘Nu Plasma HR’ multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10–20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abundant 236U/238U isotope ratios (i.e. 10−5). In addition, a data processing procedure was developed for evaluation of transient signals, which is of potential use for routine application of the developed method. We demonstrate that the developed method is reliable and well suited for determining U isotope ratios of individual particles. Analyses of twenty-eight S1 glass particles, measured under optimized conditions, yielded average biases of less than 0.6% from the certified values for 234U/238U and 235U/238U ratios. Experimental results obtained for 236U/238U isotope ratios deviated by less than −2.5% from the certified values. Expanded relative total combined standard uncertainties Uc (k = 2) of 2.6%, 1.4% and 5.8% were calculated for 234U/238U, 235U/238U and 236U/238U, respectively. - Highlights: ► LA-MC-ICP-MS was fully validated for the direct analysis of individual particles. ► Traceability was established by using an IRMM glass particle reference material. ► Measured U isotope ratios were in agreement with the certified range. ► A comprehensive total combined uncertainty evaluation was performed. ► The analysis of 236U/238U isotope ratios was improved by using a deceleration filter.

  6. Oxygen isotope ratios from tree rings containing compression wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen isotope determinations on the alpha-cellulose of tree rings cut from two leaning Picea engelmannii revealed significant differences between results from normal and compression wood radii. Nine samples (10-year periods) from the normal wood radius (1721-1953) in one tree showed good agreement with proxy climate information and maximum differences of 1.80/00 between the ''warmest'' and ''coolest'' decades sampled. Differences of equivalent magnitude were found between samples from the same decade from normal and compression wood radii. These differences are strongly related to the amount and/or density of compression wood present and suggest that sampling for paleoclimatic work should be restricted to complacent, erect trees without compression wood rings. (author)

  7. D/H Isotope Ratio Measurements of Atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisehen, Thomas; Bühler, Fred; Koppmann, Ralf; Krebsbach, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of isotope ratios in atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC) is a reliable method to allocate their sources, to estimate atmospheric residence times and investigate physical and chemical processes on various temporal and spatial scales. Most investigations yet focus on carbon isotope ratios. Certainly more detailed information can be gained by the ratio of deuterium (D) to hydrogen (H) in VOC, especially due to the high mass ratio. Combining measurements of carbon and hydrogen isotopes could lead to considerable improvement in our understanding of atmospheric processes. For this purpose we set up and thoroughly characterised a gas chromatograph pyrolysis isotope ratio mass spectrometer to measure the D/H ratio in atmospheric VOC. From a custom-made gas standard mixture VOC were adsorbed on Tenax®TA which has the advantage that CO2 is not preconcentrated when measuring ambient air samples. Our results show that the pyrolysis method has significant impact on the D/H ratios. A pyrolysis temperature of at least 1723 K and conditioning of the ceramic tube on a regular basis is essential to obtain reproducible D/H isotope ratios. For an independent comparison D/H ratios of the pure VOC used in the gas standard were determined using elemental analysis by Agroisolab (Jülich, Germany). Comparisons of 10 VOC show perfect agreement within the standard deviations of our measurements and the errors given by Agroisolab, e.g. for n-pentane, toluene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone and n-octane. A slight mean difference of 5.1 o was obtained for n-heptane while significant mean differences of 15.5 o and 20.3 o arose for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and isoprene, respectively. We further demonstrate the stability of our system and show that the sample preparation does not affect the isotope ratios. Moreover the applicability of our system to ambient air samples is demonstrated.

  8. The use of composite ferrocyanide materials for treatment of high salinity liquid radioactive wastes rich in cesium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropov, Andrey S. [National Nuclear Centre of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Shakarim Semey State Univ. (Kazakhstan); Satayeva, Aliya R. [Shakarim Semey State Univ. (Kazakhstan); Mikhalovsky, Sergey [Nazarbayev Univ. (Kazakhstan); Brighton Univ. (United Kingdom); Cundy, Andrew B. [Brighton Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The use of composite materials based on metal ferrocyanides combined with natural mineral sorbents for treatment of high salinity Cs-containing liquid radioactive waste (LRW) was investigated. The study indicated that among the investigated composites, the best sorption characteristics for Cs were shown by materials based on copper ferrocyanide. Several factors affecting the removal of cesium from LRW, namely total salt content, pH and organic matter content, were also investigated. High concentrations of complexing organic matter significantly reduced the sorption capacity of ferrocyanide sorbents.

  9. The use of composite ferrocyanide materials for treatment of high salinity liquid radioactive wastes rich in cesium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of composite materials based on metal ferrocyanides combined with natural mineral sorbents for treatment of high salinity Cs-containing liquid radioactive waste (LRW) was investigated. The study indicated that among the investigated composites, the best sorption characteristics for Cs were shown by materials based on copper ferrocyanide. Several factors affecting the removal of cesium from LRW, namely total salt content, pH and organic matter content, were also investigated. High concentrations of complexing organic matter significantly reduced the sorption capacity of ferrocyanide sorbents.

  10. Development and evaluation of a regression-based model to predict cesium concentration ratios for freshwater fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from published studies and World Wide Web sources were combined to produce and test a regression model to predict Cs concentration ratios for freshwater fish species. The accuracies of predicted concentration ratios, which were computed using 1) species trophic levels obtained from random resampling of known food items and 2) K concentrations in the water for 207 fish from 44 species and 43 locations, were tested against independent observations of ratios for 57 fish from 17 species from 25 locations. Accuracy was assessed as the percent of observed to predicted ratios within factors of 2 or 3. Conservatism, expressed as the lack of under prediction, was assessed as the percent of observed to predicted ratios that were less than 2 or less than 3. The model's median observed to predicted ratio was 1.26, which was not significantly different from 1, and 50% of the ratios were between 0.73 and 1.85. The percentages of ratios within factors of 2 or 3 were 67 and 82%, respectively. The percentages of ratios that were <2 or <3 were 79 and 88%, respectively. An example for Perca fluviatilis demonstrated that increased prediction accuracy could be obtained when more detailed knowledge of diet was available to estimate trophic level. - Highlights: • We developed a model to predict Cs concentration ratios for freshwater fish species. • The model uses only two variables to predict a species CR for any location. • One variable is the K concentration in the freshwater. • The other is a species mean trophic level measure easily obtained from (fishbase.org). • The median observed to predicted ratio for 57 independent test cases was 1.26

  11. A Plant-Based Proxy for the Oxygen Isotope Ratio of Atmospheric Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliker, B.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a major component of the global hydrological cycle, but the isotopic balance of vapor is largely unknown. It is shown here that the oxygen isotope ratio of leaf water in the epiphytic Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Tillandsia usneoides (Spanish Moss) is controlled by the oxygen isotope ratio of atmospheric water vapor in both field and lab studies. Assuming that the leaf-water isotopic signature (and hence the atmospheric water vapor signature) is recorded in plant organic material, the atmospheric water vapor oxygen isotope ratios for Miami, Florida (USA) were reconstructed for several years from 1878 to 2005 using contemporary and herbarium specimens. T. usneoides ranges from Virginia, USA southwards through the tropics to Argentina, and the CAM epiphytic lifeform is widespread in other species. Therefore, epiphytes may be used to reconstruct the isotope ratio of atmospheric water for spatial scales that span over 60° of latitude and temporal scales that cover the last century of global temperature increase.

  12. Measurement of isotope ratios on transient signals by MC-ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements are an important task in many applications such as isotope-dilution mass spectrometry, bioavailability studies, or the determination of isotope variations in geological or nuclear samples. The technique of MC-ICP-MS has attracted much attention because it permits the precise measurement of isotope compositions for a wide range of elements combined with excellent detection limits due to high ionisation efficiencies. However, the results are based mainly on measurements using continuous sample introduction. In the present study the determination of isotope ratios on various transient signals with a time duration of 30 to 60 s has been achieved by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography to a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. In order to investigate the origin of ratio drifts across the transient signals for this hyphenated technique, measurements with the same standard solutions were also carried out using a flow-injection device for sample introduction. As a result of this application it could be concluded that the main source of the bias in the measured isotope ratios is within the ICP-MS instead of fractionation effects on the chromatographic column material. Preliminary studies on short transient signals of gaseous samples (dry plasma) showed a reverse fractionation effect compared with wet plasma conditions (flow injection and HPLC). (orig.)

  13. Stable isotope ratios of organic substances: sample preparation and mass spectrometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio of the stable isotopes (13 C/12 C, D/H, 15 N/14 N) in organic materials varies slightly around the average values as a results of isotopic fractionation during physical, chemical and biological processes. The differences between materials in the range of 1 to 10 parts per thousand in 13 C, 15 N, D content are often significant to biologists, and differences of 0.1 parts per thousand are often significant to climatologists of paleolithic and geochemists. In order to make use of these small, but significant variations, stable isotope ratios (13 C/12 C, D/H, 15 N/14 N) must be measured with extremely high precision. We developed the method capable of such high precision measurements. This method consists of conversion of organic samples to CO2, N2 and H2O by combustion in an excess of oxygen and the determination of stable isotope ratios by a dual-inlet gas isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The method was checked on methane and acetic acid with known isotopic composition. The reproducibility of the method was good and the precision was 0.1 o/oo. (authors)

  14. Analysis of the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of beverage waters without prior water extraction using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Lesley A; Bowen, Gabriel J; Ehleringer, James R

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogen (δ(2)H) and oxygen (δ(18)O) stable isotope analysis is useful when tracing the origin of water in beverages, but traditional analytical techniques are limited to pure or extracted waters. We measured the isotopic composition of extracted beverage water using both isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS; specifically, wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We also analyzed beer, sodas, juices, and milk 'as is' using IRIS. For IRIS analysis, four sequential injections of each sample were measured and data were corrected for sample-to-sample memory using injections (a) 1-4, (b) 2-4, and (c) 3-4. The variation between δ(2)H and δ(18)O values calculated using the three correction methods was larger for unextracted (i.e., complex) beverages than for waters. The memory correction was smallest when using injections 3-4. Beverage water δ(2)H and δ(18)O values generally fit the Global Meteoric Water Line, with the exception of water from fruit juices. The beverage water stable isotope ratios measured using IRIS agreed well with the IRMS data and fit 1:1 lines, with the exception of sodas and juices (δ(2)H values) and beers (δ(18)O values). The δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of waters extracted from beer, soda, juice, and milk were correlated with complex beverage δ(2)H and δ(18)O values (r = 0.998 and 0.997, respectively) and generally fit 1:1 lines. We conclude that it is possible to analyze complex beverages, without water extraction, using IRIS although caution is needed when analyzing beverages containing sugars, which can clog the syringe and increase memory, or alcohol, a known spectral interference. PMID:20941769

  15. Determination of the sulfur isotope ratio in carbonyl sulfide using gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry on fragment ions 32S+, 33S+, and 34S+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shohei; Toyoda, Akari; Toyoda, Sakae; Ishino, Sakiko; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the sulfur isotopic composition of carbonyl sulfide (OCS), the most abundant atmospheric sulfur species. We present a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions (δ(33)S, δ(34)S, and Δ(33)S) of OCS using nanomole level samples. The direct isotopic analytical technique consists of two parts: a concentration line and online gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions (32)S(+), (33)S(+), and (34)S(+). The current levels of measurement precision for OCS samples greater than 8 nmol are 0.42‰, 0.62‰, and 0.23‰ for δ(33)S, δ(34)S, and Δ(33)S, respectively. These δ and Δ values show a slight dependence on the amount of injected OCS for volumes smaller than 8 nmol. The isotope values obtained from the GC-IRMS method were calibrated against those measured by a conventional SF6 method. We report the first measurement of the sulfur isotopic composition of OCS in air collected at Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan. The δ(34)S value obtained for OCS (4.9 ± 0.3‰) was lower than the previous estimate of 11‰. When the δ(34)S value for OCS from the atmospheric sample is postulated as the global signal, this finding, coupled with isotopic fractionation for OCS sink reactions in the stratosphere, explains the reported δ(34)S for background stratospheric sulfate. This suggests that OCS is a potentially important source for background (nonepisodic or nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosols. PMID:25439590

  16. Isotope Ratio Analysis on Micron-Sized Particles in Complex Matrices by Laser Ablation - Absorption Ratio Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser ablation has been combined with dual tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry to measure 152Gd:160Gd isotope ratios in micron-size particles. The diode lasers are tuned to specific isotopes in two different atomic transitions at 405.9 nm (152Gd) and 413.4 nm (160Gd) and directed collinearly through the laser ablation plume, separated on a diffraction grating, and detected with photodiodes to monitor transient absorption signals on a shot-by-shot basis. The method has been characterized first using Gd metal foil and then with particles of GdCl3 x H20 as binary and ternary mixtures with 152Gd:160Gd isotope ratios ranging from 0.01 to 0.43. These particulate mixtures have been diluted with Columbia River sediment powder (SRM 4350B) to simulate environmental samples and we show the method is capable of detecting a few highly enriched particles in the presence of > 100-fold excess of low-enrichment particles, even when the Gd-bearing particles are a minor component (0.08%) in the SRM powder and widely dispersed (1178 particles detected in 800 000 ablation laser shots). The implications for monitoring 235U:238U enrichment ratios, as related to the nuclear industry, are discussed

  17. Isotope ratio analysis on micron-sized particles in complex matrices by Laser Ablation-Absorption Ratio Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser ablation has been combined with dual tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry to measure 152Gd:160Gd isotope ratios in micron-size particles. The diode lasers are tuned to specific isotopes in two different atomic transitions at 405.9 nm (152Gd) and 413.4 nm (160Gd) and directed collinearly through the laser ablation plume, separated on a diffraction grating, and detected with photodiodes to monitor transient absorption signals on a shot-by-shot basis. The method has been characterized first using Gd metal foil and then with particles of GdCl3.xH20 as binary and ternary mixtures with 152Gd:160Gd isotope ratios ranging from 0.01 to 0.43. These particulate mixtures have been diluted with Columbia River sediment powder (SRM 4350B) to simulate environmental samples and we show the method is capable of detecting a few highly-enriched particles in the presence of a >100-fold excess of low-enrichment particles, even when the Gd-bearing particles are a minor component (0.08%) in the SRM powder and widely dispersed (1178 particles detected in 800,000 ablation laser shots). The implications for monitoring 235U:238U enrichment ratios in airborne particle samples, as related to the nuclear industry, are discussed.

  18. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to ...

  19. Development and application of liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotope analysis has found widespread applications in various disciplines such as archaeology, geochemistry, biology, food authenticity, and forensic science. Coupling chromatography to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a trend, as it provides several advantages over bulk isotope analysis, e.g., relatively simple sample preparation, the ability to measure individual compounds in a complex mixture in one run, and the reduced sample size required for precise isotope analysis. Gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) has been well-established for compound-specific isotope analysis of volatile organic compounds within the last two decades. However, an interface combining liquid chromatography with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) was not commercially available until 2004. The current design of the interface requires using a carbon-free eluent in chromatographic separation. This requirement limits the application of the most frequently used reversed-phase liquid chromatography in CSIA, because the elution strength of water at room temperature is too low to serve as mobile phase in reversed-phase separations. In order to increase the elution strength of water, we propose using high temperature water for chromatographic elution. The polarity of water decreases with an increase of temperature, yielding increased elution strength in reversed-phase columns. Therefore, high temperature water can be used as eluent instead of organic solvent for combining reversed-phase liquid chromatography with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (RPLC/IRMS). Additionally, temperature gradients can replace organic solvent gradients to increase chromatographic resolution. This is very important for LC/IRMS analysis, as precise isotope analysis requires baseline separation of analytes. In this thesis, high-temperature reversed-phase liquid chromatography was coupled to, and for the first time carefully

  20. Development and application of liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lijun

    2014-02-19

    Stable isotope analysis has found widespread applications in various disciplines such as archaeology, geochemistry, biology, food authenticity, and forensic science. Coupling chromatography to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a trend, as it provides several advantages over bulk isotope analysis, e.g., relatively simple sample preparation, the ability to measure individual compounds in a complex mixture in one run, and the reduced sample size required for precise isotope analysis. Gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) has been well-established for compound-specific isotope analysis of volatile organic compounds within the last two decades. However, an interface combining liquid chromatography with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) was not commercially available until 2004. The current design of the interface requires using a carbon-free eluent in chromatographic separation. This requirement limits the application of the most frequently used reversed-phase liquid chromatography in CSIA, because the elution strength of water at room temperature is too low to serve as mobile phase in reversed-phase separations. In order to increase the elution strength of water, we propose using high temperature water for chromatographic elution. The polarity of water decreases with an increase of temperature, yielding increased elution strength in reversed-phase columns. Therefore, high temperature water can be used as eluent instead of organic solvent for combining reversed-phase liquid chromatography with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (RPLC/IRMS). Additionally, temperature gradients can replace organic solvent gradients to increase chromatographic resolution. This is very important for LC/IRMS analysis, as precise isotope analysis requires baseline separation of analytes. In this thesis, high-temperature reversed-phase liquid chromatography was coupled to, and for the first time carefully

  1. An analytical system for stable isotope analysis on carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    S. L. Pathirana; C. van der Veen; Popa, M. E.; T. Röckmann

    2015-01-01

    A fully automated system for the determination of δ13C and δ18O in atmospheric CO has been developed. CO is extracted from an air sample and converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent. The isotopic composition is determined with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) technique. The entire system is continuously flushed with high-purity helium (He), the carrier gas. The blank signal of the Schütze reagent is ~ 4 nmol mol−1, or 1–3 % of the typical sam...

  2. Assessment of primary production in a eutrophic lake from carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of a carnivorous fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of Hypomesus transpacificus (a pond smelt) in a eutrophic lake, Lake Suwa, were measured from April to September in 1986 and 1987. The differences in the isotope ratios between these two years were observed. The stable isotopes were transferred from phytoplankton to zooplankton and pond smelt, associated with organic matters. Therefore, the difference in the isotope ratios in two years seemed to reflect the differences of the proceeding of primary production. It was suggested that the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of animal, whose trophic level is far from primary producer, can be the qualitative indicators for assessing the primary production in a lake ecosystem. (author)

  3. Absolute measurement of the isotopic ratio of a water sample with very low deuterium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of H3+ ions which are indistinguishable from HD+ ions presents the principal difficulty encountered in the measurement of isotopic ratios of water samples with very low deuterium contents using a mass spectrometer. Thus, when the sample contains no deuterium, the mass spectrometer does not indicate zero. By producing, in situ, from the sample to be measured, water vapor with an isotopic ratio very close to zero using a small distilling column, this difficulty is overcome. This column, its operating parameters, as well as the way in which the measurements are made are described. An arrangement is employed in which the isotopic ratios can be measured with a sensitivity better than 0.01 x 10-6. The method is applied to the determination of the isotopic ratios of three low deuterium content water samples. The results obtained permit one to assign to the sample with the lowest deuterium content an absolute value equal to 1.71 ± 0.03 ppm. This water sample is a primary standard from which is determined the isotopic ratio of a natural water sample which serves as the laboratory standard. (author)

  4. Isotope ratio determination of lithium in acidic medium employing Li2BO2+ by TIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium isotopic composition data are required in many fields such as geochemistry, astrophysics, nuclear technology and biomedicine. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and in the recent years, MC-ICPMS are the two popular techniques used for obtaining information on 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation, especially for elements of low atomic masses like lithium degrades the precision of isotope ratios. A number of approaches using atomic (Li+) or molecular (Li2BO2+ or Li2F+) ion, single or multiple filament loading procedures have been followed to improve the precision of TIMS analysis. Existing sample preparation and filament loading techniques require modification depending on the history of the sample or treatment procedures followed. Our laboratory has followed the Li2BO2+ method using single filament assembly due to the reasonably high precision obtained at masses 55 to 57 as compared to Li+ at masses 6 and 7

  5. Research Progress of Series of Uranium Isotope Ratios Measured by AMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN; De-yu; WANG; Chen; HUANG; Guo-rui; DONG; Ke-jun; HE; Ming; RUAN; Xiang-dong; WU; Shao-yong; ZHAO; Yong-gang; LI; Li-li; DOU; Liang; XIE; Lin-bo; WANG; Xiao-bo; YANG; Xu-ran; WANG; Xiao-ming; LAN; Xiao-xi; JIANG; Shan

    2012-01-01

    <正>The nuclear safeguards system which is used to monitor compliance with the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty relies to a significant degree on the analysis of environmental samples. Undeclared nuclear activities can be detected through determination of the isotopic ratios of uranium and plutonium in such samples. It is necessary to be able to measure the full suite of uranium isotopes (234U,

  6. Isotope ratio analysis by a combination of element analyzer and mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur as analytical tool in many fields of research is of growing interest. A method has therefore been developed, consisting in essential of coupling an Elemental Analyzer with an Isotope Mass Spectrometer, which enables the gas preparation of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and sulfur dioxide from any solid or liquid sample in a fast and easy way. Results of carbon isotope measurements in food analysis are presented, whereat it is possible to check origin and treatment of sugar, oils, fats, mineral waters, spirituous liquors etc. and to detect adulterations as well. Also applications in the field of environmental research are given. (Author)

  7. Atmospheric circulation controls on the inter-annual variability in precipitation isotope ratio in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kurita

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the primary driver of variations of precipitation isotopes at multiple temporal scales (event, seasonal and inter-annual scales to provide a greater depth of interpretation for isotope proxy records in Japan. A one-year record of the isotopic composition of event-based precipitation at Nagoya in central Japan showed less seasonal variation, but there is large isotopic variability on a storm-to-storm basis. In the summer, southerly flows transport isotopically enriched moisture from subtropical marine regions with the result that the rainfall produced by the subtropical air, or warm rainfall, was relatively enriched in heavy isotopes in comparison with the other rainfall events. In the winter, storm tracks are the dominant driver of storm-to-storm isotopic variation, and relatively lower isotopic values occurred when northerly winds in association with extratropical cyclones passing off the south coast of Japan (Nangan cyclone brings cold precipitation. Using the historical 17 year record of monthly isotopes in precipitation at Tokyo station, we explored if the factors controlling event-scale isotopic variability can account for inter-annual isotopic variability. The relatively higher isotopes in summer precipitation were attributed to the higher contribution of the warm rainfall to the total summer precipitation. On the other hand, year-to-year variation of isotopic values in winter precipitation was negatively correlated with the relative ratio of the Nangan cyclone rainfall to the total winter precipitation. The 17 year precipitation history demonstrates that event-scale isotopic variability related to changes in meridional moisture transport is the primary driver of inter-annual isotopic variability in winter and summer precipitation. The meridional moisture transport to central Japan is likely linked to the activity of the western North Pacific subtropical high in summer and the intensity of the East Asian winter monsoon

  8. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ??? in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) ??2H reproducibility (1?? standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ??? to 0.58 ???. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2010 by the American Chemical Society.

  9. A study of isotope ratio measurement by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has the benefits of ionising all metallic elements, simplifying sample preparation and reducing analysis time, when compared with thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS). However, the use of ICP-MS in isotopic ratio studies has been somewhat restricted by its failure to offer the precision and accuracy required by a variety of applications. The precision achievable by ICP-MS, typically 0.2 to 0.3% RSD, for isotopic ratios, has generally been regarded as being primarily limited by instrumental instability. An investigation of the sources of instrumental noise in ICP-MS has been undertaken, utilising noise spectral analysis as a diagnostic aid. Study of parametric variation upon noise production has identified the methods by which modulation of the ion signal occurs. Noise spectral analysis has allowed an understanding of the limitations imposed upon measurement precision by the various contributing noise sources to be established. (author)

  10. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  11. Carbon Isotope Measurements of Experimentally-Derived Hydrothermal Mineral-Catalyzed Organic Products by Pyrolysis-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socki, Richard A.; Fu, Qi; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of experiments to measure the C isotope composition of mineral catalyzed organic compounds derived from high temperature and high pressure synthesis. These experiments make use of an innovative pyrolysis technique designed to extract and measure C isotopes. To date, our experiments have focused on the pyrolysis and C isotope ratio measurements of low-molecular weight intermediary hydrocarbons (organic acids and alcohols) and serve as a proof of concept for making C and H isotope measurements on more complicated mixtures of solid-phase hydrocarbons and intermediary products produced during high temperature and high pressure synthesis on mineral-catalyzed surfaces. The impetus for this work stems from recently reported observations of methane detected within the Martian atmosphere [1-4], coupled with evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction during Martian history [5-7]. Methane production on Mars could be the result of synthesis by mineral surface-catalyzed reduction of CO2 and/or CO by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) reactions during serpentization reactions [8,9]. Others have conducted experimental studies to show that FTT reactions are plausible mechanisms for low-molecular weight hydrocarbon formation in hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean ridges [10-12]. Further, recent experiments by Fu et al. [13] focus on examining detailed C isotope measurements of hydrocarbons produced by surface-catalyzed mineral reactions. Work described in this paper details the experimental techniques used to measure intermediary organic reaction products (alcohols and organic acids).

  12. Lithologically inherited variation in Pb isotope ratios in sedimentary soils in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We present a Pb isotope survey of ∼350 rural subsoils covering the Netherlands. • The great majority (∼90%) of the subsoils shows no evidence of enhanced Pb content. • The lithologies – sand, clay, peat and loess – have distinct Pb isotope signatures. • The observed variation is explained by the textural and mineralogical variation. • The Al and Zr content are predictors for the observed Pb isotope variability. - Abstract: Knowledge on the lithologically inherited variation in present day Pb isotope ratios in soils is remarkably limited. Such information is essential to determine the anthropogenic Pb fraction and anthropogenic Pb sources in Pb-polluted soils. This study presents results of a survey of subsoil samples from approximately 350 rural locations covering the entire Netherlands, for which the bulk geochemical and Pb isotope composition was determined. The sample density was approximately 1 site per 70 km2. The aim was to establish a geochemical reference for the lithologically inherited variation in Pb isotope ratios in Dutch soils based on the subsoil samples, with which to compare the topsoils (companion paper in this journal issue). The lithologically inherited variation in Pb isotope ratios of the subsoils in The Netherlands is established at 1.175–1.221, 2.441–2.494 and 0.478–0.492 for 206Pb/207Pb, 207Pb/208Pb and 206Pb/208Pb respectively. The four main lithologies distinguished, sand, clay, peat and loess, have distinct Pb isotope signatures. No significant difference in isotope signature was found between marine and fluviatile clays. Multiple regression analysis established that the observed variation can be primarily explained by the textural and mineralogical variation within Dutch subsoils, with Al and Zr content representing useful predictors for the observed Pb isotope variability. Clay soils are characterised by a radiogenic Pb isotope signature that is notably low in 207Pb. Soils with a high Zr content

  13. Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios of carbon dioxide of a stratospheric profile over Japan

    OpenAIRE

    GAMO, Toshitaka; Tsutsumi, Makoto; SAKAI, Hitoshi; NAKAZAWA, Takakiyo; Tanaka, Masayuki; Honda, Hideyuki; Kubo, Haruya; ITOH, Tomizo

    2011-01-01

    Four stratospheric air samples from 19 to 25 km altitudes over Japan were collected by using a balloon-borne cryogenic sampling system to measure the vertical profiles of carbon and oxygen stable isotopic ratios of the lower stratospheric CO2. The δ13C value of the stratospheric CO2 increased with increasing altitude, while the CO2 mixing ratios decreased, in accordance with anthropogenic input of the isotopically light, fuel CO2 into the atmosphere. However, the relationship between δ13C an...

  14. On the cross-sensitivity between water vapor mixing ratio and stable isotope measurements of in-situ analyzers

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing amount of water vapor stable isotope data collected using in-situ instrumentation. A number of papers have characterized the performance of these in-situ analyzers and suggested methods for calibrating raw measurements. The cross-sensitivity of the isotopic measurements on the mixing ratio has been shown to be a major uncertainty and a variety of techniques have been suggested to characterize this inaccuracy. However, most of these are based on relating isotopic ratios to water vapor mixing ratios from in-situ analyzers when the mixing ratio is varied and the isotopic composition kept constant. An additional correction for the span of the isotopic ratio scale is then applied by measuring different isotopic standards. Here we argue that the water vapor cross-sensitivity arises from different instrument responses (span and offset) of the parent H2O isotope and the heavier isotopes, rather than spectral overlap that could cause a true variation in the isotopic ratio with mixing ratio. This is especially relevant for commercial laser optical instruments where absorption lines are well resolved. Thus, the cross-sensitivity determined using more conventional techniques is dependent on the isotopic ratio of the standard used for the characterization, although errors are expected to be small. Consequently, the cross-sensitivity should be determined by characterizing the span and zero offset of each isotope mixing ratio. In fact, this technique makes the span correction for the isotopic ratio redundant. In this work we model the impact of changes in the span and offset of the heavy and light isotopes and illustrate the impact on the cross-sensitivity of the isotopic ratios on water vapor. This clearly shows the importance of determining the zero offset for the two isotopes. The cross-sensitivity of the isotopic ratios on water vapor is then characterized by determining the instrument response for the individual isotopes for a

  15. Detection of the actinides and cesium from environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Mathew Spencer

    Detection of the actinides and cesium in the environment is important for a variety of applications ranging from environmental remediation to safeguards and nuclear forensics. The utilization of multiple different elemental concentrations and isotopic ratios together can significantly improve the ability to attribute contamination to a unique source term and/or generation process; however, the utilization of multiple elemental "signatures" together from environmental samples requires knowledge of the impact of chemical fractionation for various elements under a variety of environmental conditions (including predominantly aqueous versus arid conditions). The research reported in this dissertation focuses on three major areas: 1. Improving the understanding of actinide-mineral interactions at ultra-low concentrations. Chapter 2 reports a batch sorption and modeling study of Np(V) sorption to the mineral goethite from attomolar to micromolar concentrations. 2. Improving the detection capabilities for Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) analyses of ultra-trace cesium from environmental samples. Chapter 4 reports a new method which significantly improves the chemical yields, purification, sample processing time, and ultimately, the detection limits for TIMS analyses of femtogram quantities of cesium from a variety of environmental sample matrices. 3. Demonstrating how actinide and cesium concentrations and isotopic ratios from environmental samples can be utilized together to determine a wealth of information including environmental transport mechanisms (e.g. aqueous versus arid transport) and information on the processes which generated the original material. Chapters1, 3 and 5 demonstrate these principles using Pu, Am, Np, and Cs concentrations and isotopic ratios from contaminated soils taken near the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) (a low level radioactive waste disposal site in southeastern Idaho).

  16. Isotope analytics for the evaluation of the feeding influence on the isotope ratio in beef samples; Isotopenanalytik zur Bestimmung des Einflusses der Ernaehrung auf die Isotopenzusammensetzung in Rinderproben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herwig, Nadine

    2010-11-17

    Information about the origin of food and associated production systems has a high significance for food control. An extremely promising approach to obtain such information is the determination of isotope ratios of different elements. In this study the correlation of the isotope ratios C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, Mg-25/Mg-24, and Sr-87/Sr-86 in bovine samples (milk and urine) and the corresponding isotope ratios in feed was investigated. It was shown that in the bovine samples all four isotope ratios correlate with the isotope composition of the feed. The isotope ratios of strontium and magnesium have the advantage that they directly reflect the isotope ratios of the ingested feed since there is no isotope fractionation in the bovine organism which is in contrast to the case of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. From the present feeding study it is evident, that a feed change leads to a significant change in the delta C-13 values in milk and urine within 10 days already. For the deltaN-15 values the feed change was only visible in the bovine urine after 49 days. Investigations of cows from two different regions (Berlin/Germany and Goestling/Austria) kept at different feeding regimes revealed no differences in the N-15/N-14 and Mg-26/Mg-24 isotope ratios. The strongest correlation between the isotope ratio of the bovine samples and the kind of ingested feed was observed for the carbon isotope ratio. With this ratio even smallest differences in the feed composition were traceable in the bovine samples. Since different regions usually coincide with different feeding regimes, carbon isotope ratios can be used to distinguish bovine samples from different regions if the delta C-13 values of the ingested feed are different. Furthermore, the determination of strontium isotope ratios revealed significant differences between bovine and feed samples of Berlin and Goestling due to the different geologic realities. Hence the carbon and strontium isotope ratios allow the best

  17. Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Moukhtar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter (PM is presented. It has been found in numerous laboratory studies that these compounds are photooxidation products of toluene in PM. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. PM was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers for PM 2.5. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and solid phase extraction (SPE. The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (BSTFA, was added to the solution for Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS analysis. The second half of the sample was stored at low temperature. When GC/MS analysis showed high enough concentrations the remaining sample was derivatized with BSTFA and analysed for stable isotope ratio using a Gas Chromatography/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-IRMS.

    In all atmospheric PM samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol. Nevertheless, due to low pollution levels occurring in the rural area, no samples had concentrations high enough to perform stable carbon isotope composition measurements of the methylnitrophenols. Samples collected in the suburban area could be analysed for carbon stable isotope ratio using GC-IRMS.

    The procedure described in this paper provides a very sensitive and selective method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric PM at concentrations as low as 1 pg m−3. For accurate (within ±0.5‰ stable isotope ratio analysis significantly higher concentrations in the range of 100 pg m−3 or more are required.

  18. Determination of the isotopic ratio 235U/238U in UF6 using quadrupole mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work measurements of isotope ratios 235U / 23'8U in uranium hexafluoride are carried out using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The operational parameters, which affect the final precision of the results, are standardized. Optimized procedures for the preparation of uranium hexafluoride samples by fluorination of uranium oxides using cobalt trifluoride method are established. Careful attention is given to the process of purification of uranium hexafluoride samples by fractional distillation. Adequate statistical methods for analysing the results obtained for single ratio measurements as well as the ratio ' of isotopic ratios of sample and standard ar.e developed. A precision of about 10-4 for single ratio measurements and accuracy of about 0,3% for the ratio of sample and standard ratios are obtained. These results agree with the values which have been obtained using magnetic mass spectrometers. The procedures and methods established in this work can be employed in the systematic uranium isotope analysis in UF6 form. (author)

  19. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry of nanogram quantities of boron and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Michael Eugene

    1998-09-01

    Instrumentation and analytical techniques were developed to measure isotope abundances from nanograms of sulfur and boron. Sulfur isotope compositions were determined employing continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (CF-IRMS) procedures and AsS+ thermal ionization mass spectrometry techniques (AsS+-TIMS). Boron isotope abundances were determined by BO2/sp--TIMS. CF-IRMS measurements realized δ34S values from 10 μg sulfur with precisions of ±0.3/perthous. To extend sulfur isotope measurements to much smaller samples, a TIMS procedure was developed to measure 75As32S+ and 75As34S+ at masses 108 and 109 from 200 ng S on a Finnigan MAT 262 with an ion counter. This is possibly the smallest amount of sulfur which has been successfully analyzed isotopically. The internal precision of 32S/34S ratios measured by AsS+-TIMS was better than ±0.15 percent. δ34S-values calculated relative to the measured 32S/34S value of an IAEA AG2S standard (S-1) agreed with those determined by CF-IRMS to within ±3/perthous. The increasing sensitivity of S-isotope analyses permits hiterto impossible investigations e.g. sulfur in tree rings and ice cores. Boron isotope abundances were measured as BO2/sp- from 50 ng B using an older thermal ionization mass spectrometer which had been extensively upgraded including the addition of computer control electronics, sensitive ion current amplification and fiber optic data bus. The internal precisions of the measured 11B/10B ratios were ±0.15 percent and the precisions of δ11B values calculated relative to the accepted international standard (SRM-951) were ±3/perthous. Two applications of boron isotope abundance variations were initiated (1) ground waters of Northern Alberta and (2) coffee beans in different regions of the world. In the first it was demonstrated that boron isotopes could be used to trace boron released during steam injection of oil sands into the surrounding environment. Data from the second study suggest that boron

  20. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Measurements of U3O8 Reference Materials by Atom Probe Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahey, Albert J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Arey, Bruce W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-01-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural.

  1. Proportions of convective and stratiform precipitation revealed in water isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Pradeep K.; Romatschke, Ulrike; Araguas-Araguas, Luis; Belachew, Dagnachew; Longstaffe, Frederick J.; Berg, Peter; Schumacher, Courtney; Funk, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    Tropical and midlatitude precipitation is fundamentally of two types, spatially limited and high-intensity convective or widespread and lower-intensity stratiform, owing to differences in vertical air motions and microphysical processes governing rain formation. These processes are difficult to observe or model and precipitation partitioning into rain types is critical for understanding how the water cycle responds to changes in climate. Here, we combine two independent data sets--convective and stratiform precipitation fractions, derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite or synoptic cloud observations, and stable isotope and tritium compositions of surface precipitation, derived from a global network--to show that isotope ratios reflect rain type proportions and are negatively correlated with stratiform fractions. Condensation and riming associated with boundary layer moisture produces higher isotope ratios in convective rain, along with higher tritium when riming in deep convection occurs with entrained air at higher altitudes. On the basis of our data, stable isotope ratios can be used to monitor changes in the character of precipitation in response to periodic variability or changes in climate. Our results also provide observational constraints for an improved simulation of convection in climate models and a better understanding of isotope variations in proxy archives, such as speleothems and tropical ice.

  2. Spectral analysis software improves confidence in plant and soil water stable isotope analyses performed by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A G; Goldsmith, G R; Matimati, I; Dawson, T E

    2011-08-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for large errors to occur when analyzing waters containing organic contaminants using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). In an attempt to address this problem, IRIS manufacturers now provide post-processing spectral analysis software capable of identifying samples with the types of spectral interference that compromises their stable isotope analysis. Here we report two independent tests of this post-processing spectral analysis software on two IRIS systems, OA-ICOS (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and WS-CRDS (Picarro Inc.). Following a similar methodology to a previous study, we cryogenically extracted plant leaf water and soil water and measured the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of identical samples by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and IRIS. As an additional test, we analyzed plant stem waters and tap waters by IRMS and IRIS in an independent laboratory. For all tests we assumed that the IRMS value represented the "true" value against which we could compare the stable isotope results from the IRIS methods. Samples showing significant deviations from the IRMS value (>2σ) were considered to be contaminated and representative of spectral interference in the IRIS measurement. Over the two studies, 83% of plant species were considered contaminated on OA-ICOS and 58% on WS-CRDS. Post-analysis, spectra were analyzed using the manufacturer's spectral analysis software, in order to see if the software correctly identified contaminated samples. In our tests the software performed well, identifying all the samples with major errors. However, some false negatives indicate that user evaluation and testing of the software are necessary. Repeat sampling of plants showed considerable variation in the discrepancies between IRIS and IRMS. As such, we recommend that spectral analysis of IRIS data must be incorporated into standard post-processing routines. Furthermore, we suggest that the results from spectral analysis be

  3. Isotope ratio determinations by inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry for zinc bioavailability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for the measurement of 67Zn/68Zn and 70Zn/68Zn ratios by inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry with ultrasonic nebulization. The method provides sufficient accuracy and precision for zinc bioavailability studies that use samples of human feces or blood plasma. Extraction of zinc from ashed samples yields aqueous solutions sufficiently devoid of matrix ions that could affect count rates and isotope ratios. Effects of sodium matrix, zinc concentration, and instrumental parameters on the precision of isotope ratio determinations are documented. Additions of spikes enriched in 67Zn and 70Zn to natural-abundance fecal samples verify that ratios can be determined on solutions 30 μM in zinc (70Zn and to 84 atom% excess of 67Zn. (Auth.)

  4. Measurement of sulfur isotope ratios in micrometer-sized samples by NanoSIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfur isotope ratios of atmospheric aerosol particles can provide detailed information with regard to the origin and the transport of sulfur in the environment. The new Cameca NanoSIMS 50 ion microprobe technique permits analysis of individual aerosol particles with volumes down to 0.5 μm3 and a precision for δ34S of 3-10 per mille (2σ). This technique will set new standards in the analysis of isotope ratios in atmospheric aerosol. For the first time it is possible to directly compare chemical and isotopic composition of individual aerosol particles, identify internal and external mixtures and investigate reactions of anthropogenic gases with natural aerosol such as sea salt and mineral dust

  5. The first protocol of stable isotope ratio assessment in tumor tissues based on original research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Katarzyna; Frączek, Toma; Kamiński, Rafal; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Kobos, Jozef; Paneth, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Thanks to proteomics and metabolomics, for the past several years there has been a real explosion of information on the biology of cancer, which has been achieved by spectroscopic methods, including mass spectrometry. These modern techniques can provide answers to key questions about tissue structure and mechanisms of its pathological changes. However, despite the thousands of spectroscopic studies in medicine, there is no consensus on issues ranging from the choice of research tools, acquisition and preparation of test material to the interpretation and validation of the results, which greatly reduces the possibility of transforming the achieved knowledge to progress in the treatment of individual patients. The aim of this study was to verify the utility of isotope ratio mass spectrometry in the evaluation of tumor tissues. Based on experimentation on animal tissues and human neoplasms, the first protocol of stable isotope ratio assessment of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in tumor tissues was established. PMID:26619108

  6. Locally Grown, Natural Ingredients? The Isotope Ratio Can Reveal a Lot!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossier, Joël S; Maury, Valérie; Pfammatter, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    This communication gives an overview of selected isotope analyses applied to food authenticity assessment. Different isotope ratio detection technologies such as isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) are briefly described. It will be explained how δ(18)O of water contained in fruits and vegetables can be used to assess their country of production. It will be explained why asparagus grown in Valais, in the centre of the Alps carries much less heavy water than asparagus grown closer to the sea coast. On the other hand, the use of δ(13)C can reveal whether a product is natural or adulterated. Applications including honey or sparkling wine adulteration detection will be briefly presented. PMID:27198812

  7. Studies on treatment methods of the safeguards swipe samples for uranium isotope ratio measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the environmental sampling and analyses for safeguards, an accurate isotope ratio of uranium at trace levels is required for detection of undeclared nuclear activities. Currently, swipe (smear) samples are being taken by IAEA from nuclear facilities. The amount of uranium collected on the cotton swipe is expected to be in the wide range including the order of nano-gram or less. In order to measure the isotope ratios by ICP-MS, we have studied sample preparation procedures for the trace amount of uranium. Elements causing spectroscopic and non-spectroscopic interferences in ICP-MS measurement were sufficiently removed by anion-exchange of hydrochloric acid media. The uranium contamination introduced throughout the process the sample preparation was below 10 pg uranium per sample. The applicability of the treatment process for uranium isotope measurement up to 100 pico-grams was proposed. (author)

  8. Long- Term Stability Study of Isotope Ratio Measurements Uranium and Thorium by Quadrupole Icp Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise isotope ratio measurements of long-lived actinides at trace concentration levels are requite for the characterization of environmental samples (e.g. evidence and extent of 236U contaminate from radioactive waste; geological samples for dating, using the U-Pb method), and radioactive waste material

  9. Homogeneous diet of contemporary Japanese inferred from stable isotope ratios of hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, Soichiro; Ishimaru, Eriko; Hyodo, Fujio; Gakuhari, Takashi; Yoneda, Minoru; Yumoto, Takakazu; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The globalization of food production and distribution has homogenized human dietary patterns irrespective of geography, but it is uncertain how far this homogenization has progressed. This study investigated the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in the scalp hair of 1305 contemporary Japanese and found values of -19.4 ± 0.6‰ and 9.4 ± 0.6‰ (mean ± SD), respectively. Within Japan, the inter-regional differences for both isotope ratios was less than 1‰, which indicates low dietary heterogeneity among prefectural divisions. The carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of the hair showed a significant correlation with the results of questionnaires on self-reported dietary habits. The carbon isotope ratios from Japan were lower than those in samples from the USA but higher than those in samples from Europe. These differences stem from the varying dietary proportions of food products originally derived from C3 and C4 plants. The dietary variation of Japan is as small as those of Europe and USA and smaller than those of some Asian countries. These results indicate that dietary homogeneity has progressed in Japan, which may indicate the influence from the spread of the Western-style diet and food globalization, although dietary heterogeneity among countries is still preserved. PMID:27616586

  10. Laser-mass spectrometric studies on measurement of isotopic ratios Sm and Nd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of isotopic ratio is important in many areas of research such as nuclear technology, geochemistry etc. However, depending on the nature of application of such data, the required accuracy and precision will also vary. For instance, in geochemistry, with subnanogram foraminifera samples, one needs to measure the ratio to within a very small variation (± 50‰) compared to natural isotopic composition. Whereas, in the boron enrichment plant (20-90 atom %), the accuracy needed is about ± 1 atom %. In the former case, one needs to make measurements using an expensive instruments such as a magnetic sector mass spectrometer coupled with a suitable ionization method. For the latter application, one can use less expensive instruments such as, quadrupole mass filer (QMF) or time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) etc. In the present work the effect of pulse width of Nd-YAG laser on the measurement of isotopic ratio of Sm and Nd is studied using an in-house developed Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometer (LIMS) facility. The picosecond Cps) laser seems to provide better data compared to nanosecond (ns) laser. This LIMS method is a relatively simple method to measure the isotope ratios to within ± 1%. (author)

  11. Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratio bi-variate distribution for marble artifacts quarry assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical description, by a Gaussian bi-variate probability distribution of 13 C/12 C and 18 O/16 O isotopic ratios in the ancient marble quarries has been done and the new method for obtaining the confidence level quarry assignment for marble artifacts has been presented. (author) 8 figs., 3 tabs., 4 refs

  12. A quantitative evaluation of spurious results in the infrared spectroscopic measurement of CO2 isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible generation of spurious results, arising from the application of infrared spectroscopic techniques to the measurement of carbon isotope ratios in breath, due to coincident absorption bands has been re-examined. An earlier investigation, which approached the problem qualitatively, fulfilled its aspirations in providing an unambiguous assurance that 13C16O2/12C16O2 ratios can be confidently measured for isotopic breath tests using instruments based on infrared absorption. Although this conclusion still stands, subsequent quantitative investigation has revealed an important exception that necessitates a strict adherence to sample collection protocol. The results show that concentrations and decay rates of the coincident breath trace compounds acetonitrile and carbon monoxide, found in the breath sample of a heavy smoker, can produce spurious results. Hence, findings from this investigation justify the concern that breath trace compounds present a risk to the accurate measurement of carbon isotope ratios in breath when using broadband, non-dispersive, ground state absorption infrared spectroscopy. It provides recommendations on the length of smoking abstention required to avoid generation of spurious results and also reaffirms, through quantitative argument, the validity of using infrared absorption spectroscopy to measure CO2 isotope ratios in breath. (author)

  13. Towards a better understanding of magnesium-isotope ratios from marine skeletal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Dorothee; Buhl, Dieter; Witbaard, Rob; Richter, Detlev K.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2009-10-01

    This study presents magnesium stable-isotope compositions of various biogenic carbonates of several marine calcifying organisms and an algae species, seawater samples collected from the western Dutch Wadden Sea, and reference materials. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of mineralogy, taxonomy and environmental factors (e.g., seawater isotopic composition, temperature, salinity) on magnesium-isotopic (δ 26Mg) ratios of skeletal carbonates. Using high-precision multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we observed that the magnesium-isotopic composition of seawater from the semi-enclosed Dutch Wadden Sea is identical to that of open marine seawater. We further found that a considerable component of the observed variability in δ 26Mg values of marine skeletal carbonates can be attributed to differences in mineralogy. Furthermore, magnesium-isotope fractionation is species-dependent, with all skeletal carbonates being isotopically lighter than seawater. While δ 26Mg values of skeletal aragonite and high-magnesium calcite of coralline red algae indicate the absence or negligibility of metabolic influences, the δ 26Mg values of echinoids, brachiopods and bivalves likely result from a taxon-specific level of control on Mg-isotope incorporation during biocalcification. Moreover, no resolvable salinity and temperature effect were observed for coralline red algae and echinoids. In contrast, Mg-isotope data of bivalves yield ambiguous results, which require further validation. The data presented here, point to a limited use of Mg isotopes as temperature proxy, but highlight the method's potential as tracer of seawater chemistry through Earth's history.

  14. Tracing contamination sources in soils with Cu and Zn isotopic ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) are naturally present and ubiquitous in soils and are important micronutrients. Human activities contribute to the input of these metals to soils in different chemical forms, which can sometimes reach a toxic level for soil organisms and plants. Isotopic signatures could be used to trace sources of anthropogenic Cu and Zn pollution. The aim of this paper is to determine whether it is possible to identify (i) Cu and Zn contamination in soils and their sources, on the basis of their isotopic signatures, and (ii) situations that are a priori favorable or not for tracing Cu and Zn pollution using the isotopic approach. Therefore, we compiled data from the literature on Cu and Zn isotopes in soils, rocks and pollutants and added to this database the results of our own research. As only a few studies have dealt with agricultural contamination, we also studied a soil toposequence from Brittany, France, that experienced spreading of pig slurry for tens of years. In the surface horizons of the natural soils, the δ65Cu values vary from − 0.15 to 0.44‰ and the δ66Zn from − 0.03 to 0.43‰. Furthermore, vertical variations along soil profiles range from − 0.95 to 0.44‰ for δ65Cu and from − 0.53 to 0.64‰ for δ66Zn values. We concluded that pedogenetic processes can produce isotopic fractionation, yet, it is not always discernible and can be overprinted by an exogenous isotopic signature. Furthermore, some contaminants are enriched in heavy Cu or in light Zn compared to the rock or soil, but no generalization can be made. The anthropogenic inputs can be identified based on stable Cu and Zn isotope ratios if the isotope ratios of the sources are different from those of the soil, which needs to be tested for each individual case. - Highlights: • Pedogenetic processes produce some Cu and Zn isotope fractionation. • Pollution with distinct isotopic signatures can be traced using Cu and Zn isotopes. • Tracing of the metal

  15. Tracing contamination sources in soils with Cu and Zn isotopic ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekiacova, Z.; Cornu, S. [INRA, UR 1119 Géochimie des Sols et des Eaux, F-13100 Aix en Provence (France); Pichat, S. [Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon (LGL-TPE), Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5276, 69007 Lyon (France)

    2015-06-01

    Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) are naturally present and ubiquitous in soils and are important micronutrients. Human activities contribute to the input of these metals to soils in different chemical forms, which can sometimes reach a toxic level for soil organisms and plants. Isotopic signatures could be used to trace sources of anthropogenic Cu and Zn pollution. The aim of this paper is to determine whether it is possible to identify (i) Cu and Zn contamination in soils and their sources, on the basis of their isotopic signatures, and (ii) situations that are a priori favorable or not for tracing Cu and Zn pollution using the isotopic approach. Therefore, we compiled data from the literature on Cu and Zn isotopes in soils, rocks and pollutants and added to this database the results of our own research. As only a few studies have dealt with agricultural contamination, we also studied a soil toposequence from Brittany, France, that experienced spreading of pig slurry for tens of years. In the surface horizons of the natural soils, the δ{sup 65}Cu values vary from − 0.15 to 0.44‰ and the δ{sup 66}Zn from − 0.03 to 0.43‰. Furthermore, vertical variations along soil profiles range from − 0.95 to 0.44‰ for δ{sup 65}Cu and from − 0.53 to 0.64‰ for δ{sup 66}Zn values. We concluded that pedogenetic processes can produce isotopic fractionation, yet, it is not always discernible and can be overprinted by an exogenous isotopic signature. Furthermore, some contaminants are enriched in heavy Cu or in light Zn compared to the rock or soil, but no generalization can be made. The anthropogenic inputs can be identified based on stable Cu and Zn isotope ratios if the isotope ratios of the sources are different from those of the soil, which needs to be tested for each individual case. - Highlights: • Pedogenetic processes produce some Cu and Zn isotope fractionation. • Pollution with distinct isotopic signatures can be traced using Cu and Zn isotopes. • Tracing

  16. Simulating oxygen isotope ratios in tree ring cellulose using a dynamic global vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Sonja G.; Joos, Fortunat; Spahni, Renato; Saurer, Matthias; Weigt, Rosemarie B.; Klesse, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Records of stable oxygen isotope ratios in tree rings are valuable tools to reconstruct past climatic conditions and investigate the response of trees to those conditions. So far the use of stable oxygen isotope signatures of tree rings has not been systematically evaluated in dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). DGVMs integrate many hydrological and physiological processes and their application could improve proxy-model comparisons and the interpretation of oxygen isotope records. Here we present an approach to simulate leaf water and stem cellulose δ18O of trees using the LPX-Bern DGVM (LPX-Bern). Our results lie within a few per mil of measured tree ring δ18O of 31 different forest stands mainly located in Europe. Temporal means over the last 5 decades as well as interannual variations for a subset of sites in Switzerland are captured. A sensitivity analysis reveals that relative humidity, temperature, and the water isotope boundary conditions have the largest influence on simulated stem cellulose δ18O, followed by all climatic factors combined, whereas increasing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen deposition exert no impact. We conclude that simulations with LPX-Bern are useful for investigating large-scale oxygen isotope patterns of tree ring cellulose to elucidate the importance of different environmental factors on isotope variations and therefore help to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of δ18O of tree rings.

  17. Zinc Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Diet and Trophic Level in Arctic Marine Mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klervia Jaouen

    Full Text Available Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen are an established method for dietary reconstruction, but this method is limited by the protein preservation. Zinc (Zn is found in bioapatite and the isotopic compositions of this element constitute a very promising dietary indicator. The extent of fractionation of Zn isotopes in marine environments, however, remains unknown. We report here on the measurement of zinc, carbon and nitrogen isotopes in 47 marine mammals from the archaeological site of Arvik in the Canadian Arctic. We undertook this study to test and demonstrate the utility of Zn isotopes in recent mammal bone minerals as a dietary indicator by comparing them to other isotopic dietary tracers. We found a correlation between δ66Zn values and trophic level for most species, with the exception of walruses, which may be caused by their large seasonal movements. δ6Zn values can therefore be used as a dietary indicator in marine ecosystems for both modern and recent mammals.

  18. Zinc Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Diet and Trophic Level in Arctic Marine Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Szpak, Paul; Richards, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen are an established method for dietary reconstruction, but this method is limited by the protein preservation. Zinc (Zn) is found in bioapatite and the isotopic compositions of this element constitute a very promising dietary indicator. The extent of fractionation of Zn isotopes in marine environments, however, remains unknown. We report here on the measurement of zinc, carbon and nitrogen isotopes in 47 marine mammals from the archaeological site of Arvik in the Canadian Arctic. We undertook this study to test and demonstrate the utility of Zn isotopes in recent mammal bone minerals as a dietary indicator by comparing them to other isotopic dietary tracers. We found a correlation between δ66Zn values and trophic level for most species, with the exception of walruses, which may be caused by their large seasonal movements. δ6Zn values can therefore be used as a dietary indicator in marine ecosystems for both modern and recent mammals. PMID:27010907

  19. Precise determination of stable chlorine isotopic ratios in low-concentration natural samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenheim, A. J.; Spivack, A. J.; Volpe, C.; Ransom, B.

    1994-07-01

    Investigation of stable chlorine isotopes in geological materials has been hindered by large sample requirements and/or lack of analytical precision. Here we describe precise methods for the extraction, isolation, and isotopic analysis of low levels of chlorine in both silicate and aerosol samples. Our standard procedure uses 2 μg of Cl for each isotopic analysis. External reproducibility (1 σ) is 0.25%. for the 37Cl /35Cl measurements. Chlorine is extracted from silicate samples (typically containing at least 20 μg of Cl) via pyrohydrolysis using induction heating and water vapor as the carrier, and the volatilized chlorine is condensed in aqueous solution. Atmospheric aerosols collected on filters are simply dissolved in water. Prior to isotopic measurement, removal of high levels of SO 42-, F -, and organic compounds is necessary for the production of stable ion beams. Sulfate is removed by BaSCO 4 precipitation, F - by CaF 2 precipitation, and organic compounds are extracted with activated carbon. Chlorine is converted to stoichiometric CsCl by cation exchange, and isotopic ratios are determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of Cs 2Cl +. We demonstrate that the sensitivity and precision of this method allow resolution of natural variations in chlorine isotopic composition, and thereby provide insight to some fundamental aspects of chlorine geochemistry.

  20. Uncertainties achievable for uranium isotope-amount ratios. Estimates based on the precision and accuracy of recent characterization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) recently characterized by the NBL for isotope-amount ratios are: (i) CRM 112-A, Uranium (normal) Metal Assay and Isotopic Standard, (ii) CRM 115, Uranium (depleted) Metal Assay and Isotopic Standard, and (iii) CRM 116-A, Uranium (enriched) Metal Assay and Isotopic Standard. NBL also completed re-characterization of the isotope-amount ratios in CRM 125-A, Uranium (UO2) Pellet Assay, Isotopic, and Radio-chronometric Standard. Three different TIMS analytical techniques were employed for the characterization analyses. The total evaporation technique was used for the major isotope-amount ratio measurement, the modified total evaporation technique was used for both the major and minor isotope-amount ratios, and minor isotope-amount ratios were also measured using a Conventional technique. Uncertainties for the characterization studies were calculated from the combined TIMS data sets following the ISO Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement. The uncertainty components for the isotope-amount ratio values are discussed. (author)

  1. Frontiers of QC Laser spectroscopy for high precision isotope ratio analysis of greenhouse gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmenegger, Lukas; Mohn, Joachim; Harris, Eliza; Eyer, Simon; Ibraim, Erkan; Tuzson, Béla

    2016-04-01

    An important milestone for laser spectroscopy was achieved when isotope ratios of greenhouse gases were reported at precision levels that allow addressing research questions in environmental sciences. Real-time data with high temporal resolution at moderate cost and instrument size make the optical approach highly attractive, complementary to the well-established isotope-ratio mass-spectrometry (IRMS) method. Especially appealing, in comparison to IRMS, is the inherent specificity to structural isomers having the same molecular mass. Direct absorption in the MIR in single or dual QCL configuration has proven highly reliable for the sta-ble isotopes of CO2, N2O and CH4. The longest time series of real-time measurements is currently available for δ13C and δ18O in CO2 at the high-alpine station Jung-fraujoch. At this well-equipped site, QCL based direct absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) measurements are ongoing since 2008 1,2. Applications of QCLAS for N2O and CH4 stable isotopes are considerably more challenging because of the lower atmospheric mixing ratios, especially for the less abundant species, such as N218O and CH3D. For high precision (emissions and nitrous oxide isotopic composition from waste incineration in Switzerland. Waste Management 35, 135-140 (2015). 6 Harris, E. et al. Isotopic evidence for nitrous oxide production pathways in a partial nitritation-anammox reactor. Water Research 83, 258-270 (2015). 7 Eyer, S. et al. Real-time analysis of δ13C- and δ D-CH4 in ambient air with laser spectroscopy: method development and first intercomparison results. Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss. 8, 8925-8970 (2015).

  2. Identifying the change in atmospheric sulfur sources in China using isotopic ratios in mosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua-Yun; Tang, Cong-Guo; Xiao, Hong-Wei; Liu, Xue-Yan; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2009-08-01

    A considerable number of studies on rainwater sulfur isotopic ratios (δ34Srain) have been conducted to trace sulfur sources at a large number of sites in the past. If longitudinal studies on the isotope composition of precipitation sulfate were conducted, it is possible to relate that to changes in sulfur emissions. But direct measurement needs considerable labor and time. So, in this study, sulfur isotopic ratios in rainwater and mosses were analyzed at Guiyang and Nanchang to evaluate the possibility of using mosses as a substitute for rainwater. We found that present moss sulfur isotopic ratios were comparable to those of present rainwater. Additionally, we investigated the changes of atmospheric sulfur sources and sulfur concentrations using an isotopic graphic analysis at five industrial cities, two forested areas, and two remote areas in China. Mosses in industrial cities show a wide range of δ34S values, with the highest occurring at Chongqing (+3.9‰) and the lowest at Guiyang (-3.1‰). But as compared to those in forested and remote areas, δ34S values of mosses in all the five industrial cities are lower. On the basis of isotopic comparisons between past rainwater (reported in the literature) and present mosses, in the plot of δ34Smoss versus δ34Srain, six zones indicating different atmospheric sulfur change are separated by the 1:1 line and δ34S values of potential sulfur sources. Our results indicate that atmospheric sulfur pollution in most of the industrial cities decreased, while at the two forested areas, no significant changes were observed, and a new anxiousness coming from new energy sources (e.g., oil) appeared in some cities. Studies on the change of ambient SO2 concentrations support these results.

  3. Dietary heterogeneity among Western industrialized countries reflected in the stable isotope ratios of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Luciano O; Chesson, Lesley A; Bowen, Gabriel J; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2012-01-01

    Although the globalization of food production is often assumed to result in a homogenization of consumption patterns with a convergence towards a Western style diet, the resources used to make global food products may still be locally produced (glocalization). Stable isotope ratios of human hair can quantify the extent to which residents of industrialized nations have converged on a standardized diet or whether there is persistent heterogeneity and glocalization among countries as a result of different dietary patterns and the use of local food products. Here we report isotopic differences among carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope ratios of human hair collected in thirteen Western European countries and in the USA. European hair samples had significantly lower δ(13)C values (-22.7 to -18.3‰), and significantly higher δ(15)N (7.8 to 10.3‰) and δ(34)S (4.8 to 8.3‰) values than samples from the USA (δ(13)C: -21.9 to -15.0‰, δ(15)N: 6.7 to 9.9‰, δ(34)S: -1.2 to 9.9‰). Within Europe, we detected differences in hair δ(13)C and δ(34)S values among countries and covariation of isotope ratios with latitude and longitude. This geographic structuring of isotopic data suggests heterogeneity in the food resources used by citizens of industrialized nations and supports the presence of different dietary patterns within Western Europe despite globalization trends. Here we showed the potential of stable isotope analysis as a population-wide tool for dietary screening, particularly as a complement of dietary surveys, that can provide additional information on assimilated macronutrients and independent verification of data obtained by those self-reporting instruments. PMID:22479574

  4. Activity of cesium-134 and cesium-137 in game and mushrooms in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity of cesium-134 and cesium-137 was measured in mushrooms and game in 1986-1991. The samples were collected all over Poland and most of the measurements were carried out for export purposes. The results indicate that the activity ratio of cesium-137 to cesium-134 in some samples is not comparable to that with fallout after the Chernobyl accident. The analysis of some samples of mushrooms from 1985 showed that the activity of cesium-137 was higher compared to any other foodstuff. The level of contamination varied greatly throughout Poland

  5. Calculation of reduced partition function ratios of isotopically substituted molecules on a quantum chemical base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of the semiempirical quantum chemical MINDO/3- and MNDO-MO-methods it is possible to perform calculations for use in evaluation or interpretation of isotope effects to such an extent that would not be rationally fossible by corresponding experiments. But only the calculated reduced partition function ratios of isotopically substituted molecules can be applied with sufficient reliability for discussions. The temperature dependence of the reduced partition function ratios of over 100 molecules, ions, and radicals regarding the H/D, 12C/13C-, 14N/15N-, 16O/18O-, 28Si/30Si-, 32S/34S-, and 35Cl/37Cl-substitution has been calculated. From these results general conclusions concerning the dependence of isotope effects from the chemical structure of the corresponding molecules have been drawn. In particular, a relationship between the reduced partition function ratio and the electronic charge of the substituted atom has been found. In addition, examples are given for the application of the calculation algorithm used above in connection with combined isotopic substitutions, radical cations, and transition states of chemical reactions. (author)

  6. Oxygen stable isotopic ratios of precipitations and river waters in Niigata prefecture in recent years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen stable isotopic ratios (δ18O) of the precipitation and some river water samples in Niigata prefecture were measured from 1999 to 2002. Isotopic measurements were performed by a stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Consequently, the following matters were found. The mean δ18O value of precipitations was -9 per mille, and the variation of ±7 per mille was shown throughout the year. All of 9 observation points, the seasonal behavior of isotopic ratio was similar to each other. In June and January, δ18O value of precipitations was small, and was large in August. In January, the relationship between the temperature of observation points and δ18O values in precipitation was most remarkably found throughout the year. The variation of δ18O values in precipitations in winter is smaller than that in the other seasons. The mean δ18O value of river waters in Niigata prefecture was about -11 per mille to -10 per mille, and the variation was not so large (±2 per mille) throughout the year. δ18O values of river waters may vary when the melted snow or the precipitation flow into the rivers. The variation of δ18O values in groundwater was smaller than that in river waters. (author)

  7. Study on Hydrological Processes in Lena River Basin using Stable Isotope Ratios of River Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lena river water was sampled at Yakutsk and its isotope ratios were observed. The isotopic composition of river water showed a clear seasonality, with a pulse of low δ values due to runoff of snow meltwater, and following an increase in δvalues during summer, which may be caused by a recession of snow meltwater and runoff originating from summer precipitation with more positive δ values. The isotope ratios of river water slightly decreased again during the freezing period, when there was low discharge. As the freezing process of the ground progresses from the surface down, the soil layers producing runoff may become deeper. This may cause the gradual decrease in δ values observed in winter. It has been pointed out that winter discharge showed an increasing trend in eastern Siberia. An increasing trend is most obvious in the area covered by permafrost. Monitoring of isotope ratios of river water may improve our understanding of the source and process of increasing winter discharge. (author)

  8. Postmortem study of stable carbon isotope ratios in human cerebellar DNA: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is observed that 13C/12C ratios in tissue specimens removed postmortem in the United States and Canada are significantly different from corresponding ratios in European specimens. On the basis of this information, measurements of carbon isotope ratios in DNA isolated from cerebella of native-born and European-born North Americans are in progress with the goal of estimating the average lifetime rate of DNA turnover in human neurons. Preliminary results from twenty postmortem examinations are consistent with the hypothesis that a significant proportion of human cerebellar DNA is renewed during the lifetime of an individual

  9. Development of On-Line Direct Current Glow Discharge Source for Analysis of Isotope Ratio of Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The present research is focused on the analysis of isotope ratio of the hydrogen by measuring an intensity ratio of hydrogen/deuterium/tritium fluxes. The direct current glow discharge tube may provide a

  10. Isotope Ratio Method Nonproliferation Tool for Independent Verification of Research Reactor Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) develops technologies to aid in the implementation of international nuclear nonproliferation. The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) was successfully developed in 2005 - 2007 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Republic of Georgia's Andronikashvili Institute of Physics as a generic technology to verify the declared operation of water-moderated research reactors, independent of spent fuel inventory. IRM estimates the energy produced over the operating lifetime of a fission reactor by measuring the ratios of the isotopes of trace impurity elements in non-fuel reactor components. Trace impurities are present at the parts-per-billion level or higher, and their isotopes are transmuted by neutron irradiation in a predictable manner. Extremely sensitive mass-spectrometric methods currently available allow accurate and precise measurements of the altered impurity element isotope ratios. Standard reactor modeling methods are then used to relate the isotope ratios to the reactor's cumulative energy production. To establish IRM's accuracy and sensitivity, samples the Republic of Georgia's IRT-M research reactor were acquired and analyzed to produce an estimate of the energy produced over the reactor's operating lifetime. The results are in good agreement with the actual operating history of the reactor, and demonstrate that the IRM is capable of both accurately estimating total reactor energy and detecting relatively small departures from declared reactor operation. The next step is to establish IRM viability at a fully operational research reactor, and demonstrate the functional performance of the IRM sampling tool in the field. Accordingly, an IRM sampling campaign is planned at the Institute of Nuclear Physics WWR-CM research reactor in Tashkent. (author)

  11. Geospatial modeling of plant stable isotope ratios - the development of isoscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. B.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Hurley, J. M.; Cerling, T. E.

    2007-12-01

    Large-scale spatial variation in stable isotope ratios can yield critical insights into the spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical cycles, animal movements, and shifts in climate, as well as anthropogenic activities such as commerce, resource utilization, and forensic investigation. Interpreting these signals requires that we understand and model the variation. We report progress in our development of plant stable isotope ratio landscapes (isoscapes). Our approach utilizes a GIS, gridded datasets, a range of modeling approaches, and spatially distributed observations. We synthesize findings from four studies to illustrate the general utility of the approach, its ability to represent observed spatio-temporal variability in plant stable isotope ratios, and also outline some specific areas of uncertainty. We also address two basic, but critical questions central to our ability to model plant stable isotope ratios using this approach: 1. Do the continuous precipitation isotope ratio grids represent reasonable proxies for plant source water?, and 2. Do continuous climate grids (as is or modified) represent a reasonable proxy for the climate experienced by plants? Plant components modeled include leaf water, grape water (extracted from wine), bulk leaf material ( Cannabis sativa; marijuana), and seed oil ( Ricinus communis; castor bean). Our approaches to modeling the isotope ratios of these components varied from highly sophisticated process models to simple one-step fractionation models to regression approaches. The leaf water isosocapes were produced using steady-state models of enrichment and continuous grids of annual average precipitation isotope ratios and climate. These were compared to other modeling efforts, as well as a relatively sparse, but geographically distributed dataset from the literature. The latitudinal distributions and global averages compared favorably to other modeling efforts and the observational data compared well to model predictions

  12. Emerging Techniques in Vegetable Oil Analysis Using Stable Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, S. D.; Rhodes, C.

    2002-07-01

    As the practice of vegetable oil adulteration becomes more sophisticated, the possibility to subvert detection using established techniques such as capillary gas chromatography is increasing. One of the most powerful techniques to be used in food authenticity studies is stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (SIRMS) which utilises differences in the natural abundance of the stable isotopes of the light bio elements hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, oxygen and sulfur to detect food fraud. SIRMS has found application in the authentication of a wide range of foodstuffs, including fruit juices, wines, spirits, honey and to detect the adulteration of flavour compounds with synthetic analogues. This papers reviews the current state-of-the-art for the authentication of vegetable oils using SIRMS and highlights emergent techniques such as compound-an position specific-isotope mass spectrometry. These latter developments offer the potential to provide more rapid and improved detection of the economic adulteration of vegetable oils. (Author) 38 refs.

  13. Isotope ratio measurement of individual fine particles containing nuclear materials in safeguards environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratio measurement for individual particles containing uranium in swipe samples taken at nuclear facilities is a powerful tool to verify the absence of undeclared nuclear activities. In order to develop the analysis technique, we have investigated a series of methods: particle recovery from the swipe sample, particle screening and isotope ratio analysis for individual particles. An aspiration method as a new approach for particle recovery was introduced and found to be more suitable for subsequent SIMS analysis than conventional methods (adhesion, ultrasoneration and plasma ashing). For the particle screening, we applied total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) to the estimation of the amount of nuclear materials in the sample. Here, a molybdenum X-ray beam was used for the excitation. The result showed that the detection limit of uranium was about 20 pg when silicon was used as the sample carrier material. The value was improved by five orders of magnitude compared with that by conventional X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The isotope ratio measurement for individual particles was performed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with microprobe mode. The particle was irradiated with a primary ion beam of O2+ of 15 keV and 30 nA. As the result, the 235U/238U ratio was determined with the relative standard deviation within 2.0% for the particle with a diameter of 1 μm. (author)

  14. Lead isotope ratio analysis of bullet samples by using quadrupole ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement conditions for the precise analysis of the lead stable isotope ratio by using an ICP-MS equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer were studied in order to apply the technique to the forensic identification of bullet samples. The values of the relative standard deviation obtained for the ratio of 208Pb/206Pb, 207Pb/206Pb and 204Pb/206Pb were lower than 0.2% after optimization of the analytical conditions, including the optimum lead concentration of the sample solution to be about 70 ppb and an integration time for 1 m/s of 15 s. This method was applied to an analysis of lead in bullets for rifles and handguns; a stable isotope ratio of lead was found to be suitable for the identification of bullets. This study has demonstrated that the lead isotope ratio measured by using a quadrupole ICP-MS was useful for a practical analysis of bullet samples in forensic science. (author)

  15. Boron abundances and isotopic ratios of olivine grains on Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiya, Wataru; Hoppe, Peter; Ott, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    We report the B abundances and isotopic ratios of two olivine grains from the S-type asteroid Itokawa sampled by the Hayabusa spacecraft. Olivine grains from the Dar al Gani (DaG) 989 LL6 chondrite were used as a reference. Since we analyzed polished thin sections in both cases, we expect the contribution from the solar wind B (rich in 10B) to be minimal because the solar wind was implanted only within very thin layers of the grain surface. The Itokawa and DaG 989 olivine grains have homogeneous B abundances (~400 ppb) and 11B/10B ratios compatible with the terrestrial standard and bulk chondrites. The observed homogeneous B abundances and isotopic ratios of the Itokawa olivine grains are likely the result of thermal metamorphism which occurred in the parent asteroid of Itokawa, which had a similar composition as LL chondrites. The chondritic B isotopic ratios of the Itokawa samples suggest that they contain little cosmogenic B (from cosmic-ray spallation reactions) rich in 10B. This observation is consistent with the short cosmic-ray exposure ages of Itokawa samples inferred from the small concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne. If other Itokawa samples have little cosmogenic B as well, the enrichment in 10B found previously on the surface of another Itokawa particle (as opposed to the bulk grain study here) may be attributed to implanted solar wind B.

  16. Stable carbon isotope ratios as proxies for CO2 migration: An experimental approach with analogue fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrttinen, A.; Becker, V.; Mayer, B.; Barth, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios have proven to be highly sensitive tracers of CO2 migration in the subsurface, provided that the δ13C value of injected CO2 is distinct from that of baseline carbon in the reservoir and in shallow aquifers. This is of great importance for tracing the movement and the fate of injected CO2 in storage reservoirs where fluid and gas samples for chemical and isotope analyses can be obtained. One fundamental aspect that needs to be considered is carbon isotope fractionation between the various dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species and sub- or super-critical CO2. Such isotope fractionation may occur at various stages of CO2 migration including, the initial stages of injection during CO2 dissolution; during possible CO2 desiccation in pores; during CO2 migration within the reservoir or even during potential leakage into the near-surface environment. The magnitude and direction of carbon isotope fractionation (1000lnαDIC-CO2) between the DIC species and the injected CO2 depends highly on temperature and pH. At shallow depths, where temperatures are moderate and pH values are typically close to neutral, HCO3- is the dominant form of DIC. Carbon isotope fractionation between CO2 and DIC is therefore expected to reach ~ +10 ‰, resulting in a more positive δ13C value of DIC compared to that of the injected CO2. On the other hand, during injection, elevated temperatures and pH values of below 6 are usually observed. Here, H2CO3 is the dominant form of DIC and carbon isotope fractionation of close to -1 ‰ is expected. However, literature data on isotope fractionation values between H2CO3 and CO2 at temperatures above ˜ 60 °C are limited. In order to investigate the effects of pH and temperature on carbon isotope fractionation at various subsurface conditions, including elevated temperatures and pressures typical for CO2 reservoirs, laboratory experiments with analogue fluids were conducted within the framework of the CO2ISO-LABEL project

  17. Fractionation in position-specific isotope composition during vaporization of environmental pollutants measured with isotope ratio monitoring by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic fractionation of pollutants in terrestrial or aqueous environments is a well-recognized means by which to track different processes during remediation. As a complement to the common practice of measuring the change in isotope ratio for the whole molecule using isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS), position-specific isotope analysis (PSIA) can provide further information that can be exploited to investigate source and remediation of soil and water pollutants. Position-specific fractionation originates from either degradative or partitioning processes. We show that isotope ratio monitoring by 13C NMR (irm-13C NMR) spectrometry can be effectively applied to methyl tert-butylether, toluene, ethanol and trichloroethene to obtain this position-specific data for partitioning. It is found that each compound exhibits characteristic position-specific isotope fractionation patterns, and that these are modulated by the type of evaporative process occurring. Such data should help refine models of how remediation is taking place, hence back-tracking to identify pollutant sources. - Highlights: • Position-Specific Isotope Analysis (PSIA) by 13C NMR spectrometry. • PSIA on isotope fractionation during several vaporization processes. • PSIA for isotope profiling in environment pollutants. • Intramolecular 13C reveal normal and inverse effects, bulk values being unchanged. - PSIA in pollutants during evaporation processes shows more detailed information for discerning the nature of the process involved than does bulk isotope measurements

  18. Determination of copper isotope ratios by LA-MC-ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The stable isotope ratios of metals commonly found in sulphide ore deposits (e.g., Cu, Zn. Fe, Sb, Ag) may be fractionated significantly during ore-forming processes (redox reactions, etc.) and thus provide important information on the source, transport and depositional mechanisms of these metals. However, little work has been done on these isotopic systems because of past analytical difficulties in making precise measurements. Recently developed laser ablation (LA)-multi-collector (MC)-ICP-MS technology now allows routine rapid, in situ determination of the isotope ratios of these metals. This study reports on: (a) the development of an analytical protocol for the measurement of the 65Cu/63Cu ratio of chalcopyrite, (b) preliminary data for samples from a wide range of copper-bearing mineral deposits, and (c) a preliminary study of the spatial distribution of Cu isotope ratios within the Cadia Hill porphyry Cu-Au deposit. The instrumentation used in this study was a Merchantek LUV266 laser sampler operated with either Ar or He as the sample carrier gas. The ablated material was transported into a Plasma MC-ICP-MS for isotopic determination. Instrumental mass bias was corrected using the measured 66Zn/64Zn ratio of a Zn-bearing aerosol added continuously to the ablated sample carrier gas flow via a T-junction. The isotopes of copper (and other metals) are fractionated significantly by volatilisation and condensation processes operative during the laser sampling/transport processes, both of which favour depletion of 65Cu relative to 63Cu in the transported material. This fractionation may be reduced by using high laser pulse energies, low repetition rates and, most significantly, by ablation in He, which reduces dramatically the condensation blanket of sulphidic material around the ablation site. Using these conditions, relatively stable Cu isotope ratios may be maintained over a long ablation period (up to 4 minutes). However, absolute ratios are still

  19. Carbon isotope ratios in assessing the origin of water in dam leakage problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of the origin and dynamics of groundwater in the vicinity of dams and reservoirs is a major concern of the responsible authorities in case of important leakage problems. In most cases, local groundwater and water related tot he leakage emerge downstream of the dam with a complex mixing pattern. The proper characterization of the flow rate and flow patterns of water derived from the reservoir requires the use of several hydrological techniques, including environmental isotopes and artificial tracers. Among the common isotope tools, oxygen-18 deuterium and tritium are routinely used. The different origin of surface waters stored in the reservoir, and local groundwaters, usually derived from local recharge, result in distinct isotope signatures, allowing a proper characterization of each water type. However, practical work in investigating this type of problems under different geographic and climatic conditions has shown that in many cases, hydrochemistry and these isotopes do not provide a convincing and complete evidence about the origin and mixing patterns of the two types of waters. The proximity of the recharge areas and the short transit time of local groundwater do not result in significant differences in the chemical and/or isotope contents. 13C/12C ratios in the Total Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (TDIC) has been successfully used to investigate some aspects of leakage problems in several dams located in temperate and tropical climates

  20. Interlaboratory comparison for boron isotope ratio measurement with inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron isotope ratios were analyzed in seven domestic analytical labs for boric acid solutions with various compositions of boron isotope abundances, using an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (ICP-QMS). Five sample solutions with different isotope abundances of 10B were prepared in the range of 10 to 20 % by mixing two boric acid solutions containing natural B and enriched 11B, respectively. Then, the 10B isotope abundances of each sample were certified by analyzing with thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TI-MS) according to ASTM-C791-04. Results obtained from each lab have indicated good coincidences with TI-MS results. Also, the relative standard deviations of results with ICP-QMS of seven analytical labs were 0.11 to 0.81 %. The measurement precision for ICP-QMS would be sufficient in terms of practical use, while taking into consideration a valid requirement required for verifying a depletion of the 10B isotope abundance in the PWR coolant, while this is greater than a nominal analytical error (relative value : 0.22 %) for TI-MS shown in ASTM-C791-04. (author)

  1. The use of LA-SF-ICP-MS for nuclear forensics purposes. Uranium isotope ratio analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the utilization of the laser ablation sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-SF-ICP-MS) technique for the determination of uranium isotopic composition in a highly enriched uranium sample. The measurements were performed on a continuous ablation with low energy density and defocusing, which demonstrated to be the optimum to reach the best signal stability. The measurements were improved by adjusting the following parameters: RF power, laser beam diameter, defocusing of laser beam, laser energy, laser energy density, auxiliary gas and sample gas. The 235U/238U isotope ratio with its respective uncertainty was 16.36 ± 0.15 and its precision was 1.12 % relative standard deviation. The uncertainties were estimated following the ISO GUM, with a confidence level of 95.45 % (k = 2.00). When compared the isotope abundances to the Round Robin Exercise Number 3's average results a difference of 0.46 % has been found and when compared to supplier's value, the difference was 0.41 %. The results presented by the measurements revealed that the LA-ICP-MS technique offers a rapid and accurate alternative to measure uranium isotope ratios without any sample preparation, since it allows carrying out the measurements straight on the sample. Moreover, it preserves the testimony-very important for safeguards and nuclear forensics purposes. (author)

  2. Applications of compound-specific carbon isotope ratios in organic contaminant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper results are presented on the application of compound-specific isotope ratios measurements to assess biodegradation of chlorinated solvents, in particularly on microbial dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). Analytical aspects and isotope data from laboratory and field studies are discussed. The analytical tests showed that both headspace and SPME techniques provide accurate δ13C values with a similar precision for a wide range of chlorinated solvents. However, the SPME method is generally more sensitive. The microcosm experiments show that a significant isotopic fractionation occurs during dechlorination of PCE and TCE to ethene. The largest fractionation factors are observed in the steps DCE-VC and VC-Ethene. In general, the δ13C of each dechlorination product was always more negative than the δ13C of the corresponding precursor. In addition, the δ13C values of each compound increased with time. A similar pattern was observed for dechlorination of PCE at a field site. These results show that compound-specific carbon isotope ratios technology is a very sensitive tool for evaluation of natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater. (author)

  3. Determination of integrated neutron flux by the measurement of the isotopic ratios of cadmium and gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the possibility of the indirect determination of the integrated neutron flux, through the change of isotopic ratios of cadmium and gadolinium was investigated. The samples of cadmium we/e gadolinium were irradiated in the IEA-Rl reactor. These elements were chosen because they have high thermal neutron absorption cross section which permit the change in the isotopic composition during a short irradiation time to be measured accurately. The isotopic ratios were measured with a thermionic mass spectrometer the silica-gel technique and arrangement with single filament were used for the cadmium analysis, where as the oxi - reduction technique and arrangement with double filaments were used for gadolinium analysis. The mass fractionation effects for cadmium and gadolinium were corrected respectively by the exponential and potential expansion of the isotopic fractionation factor per atomic mass unit. The flux values supplied by the Centro de Operacao e Utilizacao do Reator de Pesquisas do IPEN were extrapolated. These values and the integrated flux values obtained experimentally were compared. (author)

  4. Isotope ratio analysis of lead in biological materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) allowed 0.2-0.3% imprecision (1 sigma) in 204Pb/206Pb 207Pb/'206Pb, and 208Pb/206Pb measurements at the 20-100 ppb level, which was precise enough to detect some of the isotopic variations observed in nature. Mass discrimination could be corrected within ±0.5% of the true value by periodical analysis of standard reference material of known lead isotopic composition. As a separation method for lead in human bone, which contains enormous amounts of calcium and phosphorus, anion exchange of the Pb-Br complex was found to be effective. Lead isotope ratios in bone, measured by ICP-MS after separation, were consistent with those measured by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Hair matrix did not have any influence on the accuracy and precision of the analysis; a digested sample could be directly analyzed and this offered rapid sample throughput. Preliminary data on lead isotope ratios in bone and hair from prehistoric and contemporary Japanese are presented. (author)

  5. Identification of Marchfeld asparagus using Sr isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, S; Brunner, M; Boulyga, S F; Galler, P; Horacek, M; Prohaska, T

    2008-01-01

    This work focuses on testing and application of Sr isotope signatures for the fast and reliable authentication and traceability of Asparagus officinalis originating from Marchfeld, Austria, using multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after optimised Rb/Sr separation. The major sample pool comprises freeze-dried and microwave-digested asparagus samples from Hungary and Slovakia which are compared with Austrian asparagus originating from the Marchfeld region, which is a protected geographical indication. Additional samples from Peru, The Netherlands and Germany were limited in number and allowed therefore only restricted statistical evaluation. Asparagus samples from Marchfeld were harvested within two subsequent years in order to investigate the annual variation. The results show that the Sr isotope ratio is consistent within these 2 years of investigation. Moreover, the Sr isotope ratio of total Sr in soil was found to be significantly higher than in an NH4NO3 extract, reflecting the mobile (bioavailable) phase. The isotope composition in the latter extract corresponds well to the range found in the asparagus samples in Marchfeld, even though the concentration of Sr in asparagus shows no direct correlation to the concentration of Sr in the mobile phase of the soil. The major question was whether the 'Marchfelder Spargel' can be distinguished from samples from the neighbouring countries of Hungary and Slovakia. According to our findings, they can be clearly (100%) singled out from the Hungarian samples and can be distinguished from the Slovakian asparagus samples with a probability of more than 80%. PMID:17874075

  6. Discussion on the Key Factors of Abundance Ratios About Zn Isotope Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of Zn isotope analysis is well known in geochemistry and diet study. An inter-lab comparison of five samples with isotopic ratio covering from 0.02 to 15.00 was organized in order to develop measurement ability and keep consistency of the results of isotopic ratios measurement among the participants. Multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) were used. For MC-ICP-MS, blank-corrected and blank-no corrected results were submitted. For MC-TIMS, total evaporation method (TE) was applied to the samples while a certified reference material IRMM3702 was analyzed together. All the results showed that the uncertainties were 1.29%-0.03% for 64Zn/66Zn, and the uncertainty was obviously relative to isotopic abundances. The blank-corrected and blank-no corrected and the influence of blank and non-linear of K factor of mass discrimination for MC-ICP-MS were convinced of contributing to the unsatisfied uncertainties. (authors)

  7. Actinides ultra traces detection and isotopic ratio measurements by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the mass spectrometry techniques used in the frame of the environmental monitoring of the centres of CEA, and non proliferation programmes, for the detection of ultra-traces of actinides (U and Pu), and for measurement of the corresponding isotopic ratios. They are plasma source (ICP-MS), thermo-ionization (TIMS), and secondary ions (SINS) mass spectrometry techniques. As the analyzed samples contain only tiny amounts of nuclear materials, from the femto-gram (10-15 g) to the pico-gram (10-12 g) range, these instruments must present excellent performances in terms of sensitivity and precision on isotopic ratio measurements. We describe the methodological and instrumental developments carried out on the spectrometers to obtain instrumental detection limits below the femto-gram. (authors)

  8. Late Miocene evolution of the Black Sea: insights from palynology and strontium isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, Arjen; van Baak, Christiaan; Vasiliev, Iuliana; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Stoica, Marius; Krijgsman, Wout

    2016-04-01

    During the late Miocene, the connection(s) between the Mediterranean Basin and the Atlantic Ocean deteriorated, which ultimately culminated in thick evaporite deposits and a water level drop in the Mediterranean Basin during the so-called Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.97 - 5.33 Ma). It has been claimed that Black Sea, in response to the MSC, also desiccated but these claims have been proven incorrectly. Here we present palynological (dinoflagellate cysts and pollen) and strontium isotope ratios from two Black Sea records: the Zheleznyi Rog outcrop section and Deep Sea Drilling Project Hole 380A. Organic walled cyst-producing dinoflagellates are highly sensitive to even small changes in surface waters and strontium isotope ratios are excellent recorders of changing connectivity. Our records provide therefore more insights in the sensitivity of the Black Sea to Messinian Salinity Crisis and the general evolution of the late Miocene Black Sea.

  9. Stable isotope ratios of tap water in the contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Gabriel J.; Ehleringer, James R.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Stange, Erik; Cerling, Thure E.

    2007-03-01

    Understanding links between water consumers and climatological (precipitation) sources is essential for developing strategies to ensure the long-term sustainability of water supplies. In pursing this understanding a need exists for tools to study and monitor complex human-hydrological systems that involve high levels of spatial connectivity and supply problems that are regional, rather than local, in nature. Here we report the first national-level survey of stable isotope ratios in tap water, including spatially and temporally explicit samples from a large number of cities and towns across the contiguous United States. We show that intra-annual ranges of tap water isotope ratios are relatively small (e.g., systems and as a tool for applied forensics and traceability studies.

  10. Improving the isotope ratio capabilities of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this work, a systematic study investigating some of the strategies used for improving the performance of isotope ratio determinations by means of LA-ICPMS (i.e. the use of an inert gas in a collision/reaction cell, a dual spray chamber for wetting the plasma, or a sector-field instrument) is presented. Lead isotope ratios have been selected for the study due to their widespread use in various fields of applications. The glasses NIST612, NIST610 and BCR126A with different lead concentrations have been considered. The influence of the different methodologies on the precision and accuracy of the results will be presented and critically evaluated. (author)

  11. Detection of exogenous citric acid in fruit juices by stable isotope ratio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, Eric; Martin, Frédérique; Santamaria-Fernandez, Rebeca; Lees, Michèle

    2005-06-29

    A new method has been developed for measuring the D/H ratio of the nonexchangeable sites of citric acid by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Pure citric acid is transformed into its calcium salt and subsequently analyzed by pyrolysis-IRMS. The citric acid isolated from authentic fruit juices (citrus, pineapple, and red fruits) systematically shows higher D/H values than its nonfruit counterpart produced by fermentation of various sugar sources. The discrimination obtained with this simplified method is similar to that obtained previously by applying site specific isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to an ester derivative of citric acid. The combination of carbon 13 and deuterium measurements of extracted citric acid is proposed as a routine method for an optimum detection of exogenous citric acid in all kinds of fruit juices. PMID:15969486

  12. Direct isotope ratio analysis of individual uranium–plutonium mixed particles with various U/Pu ratios by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium and plutonium isotope ratios in individual uranium–plutonium (U–Pu) mixed particles with various U/Pu atomic ratios were analyzed without prior chemical separation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Prior to measurement, micron-sized particles with U/Pu ratios of 1, 5, 10, 18, and 70 were produced from uranium and plutonium certified reference materials. In the TIMS analysis, the peaks of americium, plutonium, and uranium ion signals were successfully separated by continuously increasing the evaporation filament current. Consequently, the uranium and plutonium isotope ratios, except the 238Pu/239Pu ratio, were successfully determined for the particles at all U/Pu ratios. This indicates that TIMS direct analysis allows for the measurement of individual U–Pu mixed particles without prior chemical separation. - Highlights: • U–Pu mixed particles with U/Pu ratios of 1, 5, 10, 18 and 70 were produced. • U and Pu isotope ratios were determined by TIMS for particles without prior chemical separation. • Accurate values were obtained for all isotope ratios, except the 238Pu/239Pu ratio

  13. Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Moukhtar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter is presented. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. Particulate matter was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and solid phase extraction. The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide, was added for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis. The second half of the sample was stored in a refrigerator. For samples with concentrations exceeding 1 ng μl−1, the second half of the sample was used for measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios by Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    The procedure described in this paper provides a method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter at concentrations as low as 0.3 pg m−3 and for stable isotope ratios with an accuracy of better than ±0.5‰ for concentrations exceeding 100 pg m−3.

    In all atmospheric particulate matter samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol, with concentrations ranging from the low pg m−3 range in rural areas to more than 200 pg m−3 in some samples from a suburban location.

  14. Traceability of synthetic drugs by position-specific deuterium isotope ratio analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of fluoxetine of different origin were submitted to natural abundance 2H NMR spectroscopy. The deuterium content at the various sites of the molecule was found to depend on its synthetic history. Hints on the synthetic procedure can be obtained by comparison with standard compounds, whose synthesis is known. These preliminary results give an idea of the potential of site-specific isotope ratio analysis in the fight against patent infringement and drug counterfeiting

  15. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumann, F. A.; Batenburg, A. M.; Pieterse, G.; Gerbig, C.; Krol, M. C.; Röckmann, T.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H2) over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H2 and several other species as well as the H2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia) aircraft campaign during the dry season. We derive a relative H2 emission ratio with respect to carbon monoxide (CO) of 0.31 ± 0.04 ppb ppb-1 and an isotopic source signature of -280 ± 41‰ in the air masses influenced by tropical biomass burning. In order to retrieve a clear source signal that is not influenced by the soil uptake of H2, we exclude samples from the atmospheric boundary layer. This procedure is supported by data from a global chemistry transport model. The ΔH2 / ΔCO emission ratio is significantly lower than some earlier estimates for the tropical rainforest. In addition, our results confirm the lower values of the previously conflicting estimates of the H2 isotopic source signature from biomass burning. These values for the emission ratio and isotopic source signatures of H2 from tropical biomass burning can be used in future bottom-up and top-down approaches aiming to constrain the strength of the biomass-burning source for H2. Hitherto, these two quantities relied only on combustion experiments or on statistical relations, since no direct signal had been obtained from in-situ observations.

  16. A physicochemical study on isotope abundance ratio of lithium contained in a few minerals of pegmatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium samples for mass spectrometric measurement were prepared from biotite, quartz, albite, and microcline which were separated each other from pegmatite in Naegi, Nakatsugawa, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. Lithium isotope abundance ratio (7Li/6Li) of the lithium samples were measured by mass spectrometry using surface ionization ion source. Significant difference has been found among the (7Li/6Li) values of biotite, quartz, albite, and microcline samples. The results have been briefly discussed from physicochemical and geological viewpoint. (author)

  17. Determination of boron isotope ratios in boron carbide by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the direct determination of boron isotope ratios in the boron carbide powder by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The technique for sample loading, the procedure for heating and the eliminating of effects induced by oxygen are studied. The study indicates that the preparing process for the sample will be shorted, and the time for determination and the exposure dose of the laboratory assistant will be reduced for the reason of directly determination of boron carbide. (authors)

  18. Determination of uranium and thorium isotope ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements conditions were selected and a procedure was proposed for determining the 234U/238U and 230Th/232Th isotope ratios using an ELEMENT single-channel double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The procedure was tested in analyzing bottom sediments from Lake Baikal with the extraction preconcentration of uranium and thorium. The accuracy of the procedure was verified using certified reference materials and a model solution by comparing the results obtained with the data of α spectrometry

  19. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Haumann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H2 over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H2 and several other species as well as the H2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia aircraft campaign during the dry season. We derive a relative H2 emission ratio with respect to carbon monoxide (CO of 0.31 ± 0.04 ppb ppb−1 and an isotopic source signature of −280 ± 41‰ in the air masses influenced by tropical biomass burning. In order to retrieve a clear source signal that is not influenced by the soil uptake of H2, we exclude samples from the atmospheric boundary layer. This procedure is supported by data from a global chemistry transport model. The ΔH2 / ΔCO emission ratio is significantly lower than some earlier estimates for the tropical rainforest. In addition, our results confirm the lower values of the previously conflicting estimates of the H2 isotopic source signature from biomass burning. These values for the emission ratio and isotopic source signatures of H2 from tropical biomass burning can be used in future bottom-up and top-down approaches aiming to constrain the strength of the biomass-burning source for H2. Hitherto, these two quantities relied only on combustion experiments or on statistical relations, since no direct signal had been obtained from in-situ observations.

  20. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Haumann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H2 over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H2 and several other species as well as the H2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia aircraft campaign during the dry season. We derive a relative H2 emission ratio with respect to carbon monoxide (CO of 0.31 ± 0.04 ppb/ppb and an isotopic source signature of −280 ± 41‰ in the air masses influenced by tropical biomass burning. In order to retrieve a clear source signal that is not influenced by the soil uptake of H2, we exclude samples from the atmospheric boundary layer. This procedure is supported by data from a global chemistry transport model. The ΔH2/ΔCO emission ratio is significantly lower than some earlier estimates for the tropical rainforest. In addition, our results confirm the lower values of the previously conflicting estimates of the H2 isotopic source signature from biomass burning. These values for the emission ratio and isotopic source signatures of H2 from tropical biomass burning can be used in future bottom-up and top-down approaches aiming to constrain the strength of the biomass-burning source for H2. Hitherto, these two quantities relied only on combustion experiments or on statistical relations, since no direct signal had been obtained from in-situ observations.

  1. Dietary Heterogeneity among Western Industrialized Countries Reflected in the Stable Isotope Ratios of Human Hair

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, Luciano O.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Cerling, Thure E.; Ehleringer, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Although the globalization of food production is often assumed to result in a homogenization of consumption patterns with a convergence towards a Western style diet, the resources used to make global food products may still be locally produced (glocalization). Stable isotope ratios of human hair can quantify the extent to which residents of industrialized nations have converged on a standardized diet or whether there is persistent heterogeneity and glocalization among countries as a result of...

  2. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  3. A Widely Tunable Infrared Laser Spectrometer for Measurements of Isotopic Ratios of Carbon Cycle Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joanne H. Shorter; J. Barry McManus; David D. Nelson; Charles E. Kolb; Mark S. Zahniser; Ray Bambha; Uwe Lehmann; Tomas Kulp; Stanley C. Tyler

    2005-01-31

    The atmospheric abundances of carbon dioxide and methane have increased dramatically during the industrial era. Measurements of the isotopic composition of these gases can provide a powerful tool for quantifying their sources and sinks. This report describes the development of a portable instrument for isotopic analysis CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} using tunable infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. This instrument combines novel optical design and signal processing methods with a widely tunable mid-infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) which will can access spectral regions for all the isotopes of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} with a single instrument. The instrument design compensates for the large difference in concentration between major and minor isotopes by measuring them with path lengths which differ by a factor of 100 within the same multipass cell. During Phase I we demonstrated the basic optical design and signal processing by determining {sup 13}CO{sub 2} isotopic ratios with precisions as small as 0.2{per_thousand} using a conventional lead salt diode laser. During Phase II, the DFG laser source was coupled with the optical instrument and was demonstrated to detect {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} ratios with a precision of 0.5{per_thousand} and an averaging time of 20 s using concentrated methane in air with a mixing ratio of 2700 ppm. Methods for concentrating ambient air for isotopic analysis using this technique have been evaluated. Extensions of this instrument to other species such as {sup 13}CO{sub 2}, C{sup 18}OO, and CH{sub 3}D are possible by substituting lasers at other wavelengths in the DFG source module. The immediate commercial application of this instrument will be to compete with existing mass spectrometric isotope instruments which are expensive, large and relatively slow. The novel infrared source developed in this project can be applied to the measurement of many other gas species and will have wide

  4. Temperature-programmed high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent

    2008-09-15

    The utility of liquid chromatography coupled to the isotope ratio mass spectrometry technique (LC-IRMS) has already been established through a variety of successful applications. However, the analytical constraint related to the use of aqueous mobile phases limits the LC separation mechanism. We report here a new strategy for high-precision (13)C isotopic analyses based on temperature-programmed LC-IRMS using aqueous mobile phases. Under these conditions, the isotopic precision and accuracy were studied. On one hand, experiments were carried out with phenolic acids using isothermal LC conditions at high temperature (170 degrees C); on the other hand, several experiments were performed by ramping the temperature, as conventionally used in a gas chromatography-based method with hydrosoluble fatty acids and pulses of CO 2 reference gas. In isothermal conditions at 170 degrees C, despite the increase of the CO 2 background, p-coumaric acid and its glucuronide conjugate gave reliable isotopic ratios compared to flow injection analysis-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (FIA-IRMS) analyses (isotopic precision and accuracy are lower than 0.3 per thousand). On the opposite, for its sulfate conjugate, the isotopic accuracy is affected by its coelution with p-coumaric acid. Not surprisingly, this study also demonstrates that at high temperature (170 degrees C), a compound eluting with long residence time (i.e., ferulic acid) is degraded, affecting thus the delta (13)C (drift of 3 per thousand) and the peak area (compared to FIA-IRMS analysis at room temperature). Quantitation is also reported in isothermal conditions for p-coumaric acid in the range of 10-400 ng/mL and with benzoic acid as an internal standard. For temperature gradient LC-IRMS, in the area of the LC gradient (set up at 20 degrees C/min), the drift of the background observed produces a nonlinearity of SD (delta (13)C) approximately 0.01 per thousand/mV. To circumvent this drift, which impacts severely the

  5. Vertical Profiles and Isotopic Ratios in HCN and its Isotopologues from ALMA Observations of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molter, Edward M.; Nixon, Conor A.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Serigano, Joseph; Teanby, Nicholas A.

    2015-11-01

    The photodissociation of methane (CH4) and molecular nitrogen (N2) provides the raw materials to create a suite of nitriles in Titan's atmosphere; the simplest and most abundant of these is hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The unprecedented sensitivity and spectral resolution of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) permits the characterization of rotational transitions in this molecule and many of its isotopologues. In this study we leverage publicly available ALMA calibration observations of Titan taken between April and July 2014, each lasting around 160 seconds. We report the detection of a new HCN isotopologue on Titan, H13C15N, and use this along with high signal-to-noise observations of HCN, H13CN, HC15N, and DCN to determine the isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 15N/14N, and D/H. Isotopic ratios are known to diverge throughout the solar system in planetary atmospheres due to a variety of processes, including mass-dependent escape, photochemistry, and condensation. Therefore, accurate knowledge of isotopic ratios can provide important constraints on models of the origin and evolution of planetary atmospheres.

  6. DoE optimization of a mercury isotope ratio determination method for environmental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, Alex; Baschieri, Carlo; Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea; Marchetti, Andrea; Manzini, Daniela; Berto, Daniela; Rampazzo, Federico

    2016-05-15

    By using the experimental design (DoE) technique, we optimized an analytical method for the determination of mercury isotope ratios by means of cold-vapor multicollector ICP-MS (CV-MC-ICP-MS) to provide absolute Hg isotopic ratio measurements with a suitable internal precision. By running 32 experiments, the influence of mercury and thallium internal standard concentrations, total measuring time and sample flow rate was evaluated. Method was optimized varying Hg concentration between 2 and 20ngg(-1). The model finds out some correlations within the parameters affect the measurements precision and predicts suitable sample measurement precisions for Hg concentrations from 5ngg(-1) Hg upwards. The method was successfully applied to samples of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) coming from the Marano and Grado lagoon (NE Italy), a coastal environment affected by long term mercury contamination mainly due to mining activity. Results show different extents of both mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) phenomena in clams according to their size and sampling sites in the lagoon. The method is fit for determinations on real samples, allowing for the use of Hg isotopic ratios to study mercury biogeochemical cycles in complex ecosystems. PMID:26992509

  7. The Kranz syndrome in the Eragrostideae (Chloridoideae, Poaceae) as indicated by carbon isotopic ratios*

    OpenAIRE

    Hector O. Panarello; Evangelina Sanchez

    1984-01-01

    13C/12C ratios are generally regarded as being very reliable indicators of C3 or C4 photosynthesis. These relative carbon isotope ratios are expressed as a negative δ 3C and fall into two distinct groups: Kranz (or C4) plants with δ between -9°/00 no and -18°/00 and non-Kranz (C3) plants with δ between -22°/00 and -280/00 no. In this paper, 29 taxa, representing 12 genera, of the tribe Eragrostideae were examined by mass spectrometry for their δ 13C in dried leaf tissue. All these taxa prove...

  8. Depth profiles of potassium and its isotope ratio (40K/K) in several forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depth profiles potassium and its isotope ratio (40K/K)were investigated in several forest soils from different geological and climatic backgrounds. The ratio was found not to be constant (0.0117%) but varied appreciably from 0.0085% to 0.0167% among different soils. Possible factors affecting variability of 40K/K values were considered by a multivariate factor analysis which suggested that aqueous parameters like humidity and pH might be a controlling factor in the surface soils. The amount (and probably chemical forms) of iron oxide may be another one influencing 40K/K values in mineral components at deeper portions. (author)

  9. Source Attribution of Cyanides Using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S; Fraga, Carlos G; Carman, April J; Moran, James J

    2016-02-01

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs), such as cyanides, are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. Herein, stocks of KCN and NaCN were analyzed for trace anions by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC), carbon stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The collected analytical data were evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least-squares (iPLS), genetic algorithm-based partial least-squares (GAPLS), partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminant analysis (SVMDA). HCA of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported countries of origin resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries each having one known solid cyanide factory: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). Classification errors for two validation studies using anion impurity profiles collected over five years on different instruments were as low as zero for KNN and SVMDA, demonstrating the excellent reliability associated with using anion impurities for matching a cyanide sample to its factory using our current cyanide stocks. Variable selection methods reduced errors for those classification methods having errors greater than zero; iPLS-forward selection and F-ratio typically provided the lowest errors. Finally, using anion profiles to classify cyanides to a specific stock

  10. High precision Faraday collector MC-ICPMS thorium isotope ratio determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Emma-Kate; Stirling, Claudine H.; Andersen, Morten B.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2005-12-01

    Uranium-series dating of carbonate materials requires precise determination of the spike sample thorium isotope ratio, 230Th/229Th. This ratio is commonly measured using ion counting techniques, however the precision of analyses using ion counting devices suffers from beam intensity limitations, drift in multiplier gain and non-linearities in electron multiplier response. Here, we describe the application of multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) to determine thorium isotope ratios at hitherto unattained precision. For the first time, thorium isotope analyses were performed using only Faraday collectors coupled to 1011 [Omega] feedback resistors in the amplifier system. Spiked thorium solutions were concentrated to produce 230Th and 229Th signal intensities of around 50 mV and 100 mV, respectively (across a 1011 [Omega] resistor) and are run at high intensity for a short period of time (~1 min). These analyses yield a 230Th/229Th external reproducibility of better than 0.3[per mille sign] for ~25-30 pg of consumed 230Th. This is a factor of two better than the best published thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and MC-ICPMS techniques for similar sample sizes, and represents up to an order of magnitude improvement over many other established protocols. Combined with new techniques for high precision Faraday measurement of uranium isotopic composition [1], this permits improvements in the uncertainty of U-series ages to better than 0.1 thousand years (ka) at 100 ka and 1 ka at 300 ka. It should also be possible to resolve events to ~14 ka at 600 ka. Using these techniques, the U-series dating limit can be extended from 500-600 ka to 800 ka enabling a more detailed study of the frequency of late Pleistocene climate events.

  11. Development of pre-concentration procedure for the determination of Hg isotope ratios in seawater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The method for the quantitative pre-concentration of Hg from seawater was developed. • First report of Hg isotope ratios in seawater is presented. • A unique mass independent 200Hg isotope fractionation was observed. • This fractionation has unique potential to distinguish anthropogenic and natural Hg. - Abstract: Hg concentrations in seawater are usually too low to allow direct (without pre-concentration and removal of salt matrix) measurement of its isotope ratios with multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Therefore, a new method for the pre-concentration of Hg from large volumes of seawater was developed. The final method allows for relatively fast (about 2.5 L h−1) and quantitative pre-concentration of Hg from seawater samples with an average Hg recovery of 98 ± 6%. Using this newly developed method we determined Hg isotope ratios in seawater. Reference seawater samples were compared to samples potentially impacted by anthropogenic activity. The results show negative mass dependent fractionation relative to the NIST 3133 Hg standard with δ202Hg values in the range from −0.50‰ to −1.50‰. In addition, positive mass independent fractionation of 200Hg was observed for samples from reference sites, while impacted sites did not show significant Δ200Hg values. Although the influence of the impacted sediments is limited to the seawater and particulate matter in very close proximity to the sediment, this observation may raise the possibility of using Δ200Hg to distinguish between samples from impacted and reference sites

  12. Variation in oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved orthophosphate induced by uptake process in natural coral holobionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Charissa M.; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Umezawa, Yu; Morimoto, Naoko; San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A model incubation experiment using natural zooxanthellate corals was conducted to evaluate the influence of phosphate uptake by coral holobionts on oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved PO4 3- (δ18Op). Live coral samples of Acropora digitifera, Porites cylindrica, and Heliopora coerulea were collected from coral reefs around Ishigaki Island (Okinawa, Japan) and Bolinao (northern Luzon, Philippines) and incubated for 3-5 d after acclimatization under natural light conditions with elevated concentrations of PO4 3-. Phosphate uptake by corals behaved linearly with incubation time, with uptake rate depending on temperature. δ18Op usually increased with time toward the equilibrium value with respect to oxygen isotope exchange with ambient seawater, but sometimes became higher than equilibrium value at the end of incubation. The magnitude of the isotope effect associated with uptake depended on coral species; the greatest effect was in A. digitifera and the smallest in H. coerulea. However, it varied even within samples of a single coral species, which suggests multiple uptake processes with different isotope effects operating simultaneously with varying relative contributions in the coral holobionts used. In natural environments where concentrations of PO4 3- are much lower than those used during incubation, PO4 3- is presumably turned over much faster and the δ18Op easily altered by corals and other major primary producers. This should be taken into consideration when using δ18Op as an indicator of external PO4 3- sources in coastal ecosystems.

  13. Concentrations and activity ratios of uranium isotopes in groundwater from Donana National Park, South of Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The levels and distribution of natural radionuclides in groundwaters from the unconfined Almonte-Marismas aquifer, upon which Donana National Park is located, have been analysed. Most sampled points were multiple piezometers trying to study the vertical distribution of the hydrogeochemical characteristics in the aquifer. Temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and redox potential were determined in the field. A large number of parameters, physico-chemical properties, major and minor ions, trace elements and natural radionuclides (U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, Ra-isotopes and 210Po), were also analysed. In the southern zone, where aeolian sands crop out, water composition is of the sodium chloride type, and the lower U-isotopes concentrations have been obtained. As water circulates through the aquifer, bicarbonate and calcium concentrations increase slightly, and higher radionuclides concentrations were measured. Finally, we have demonstrated that 234U/238U activity ratios can be used as markers of the type of groundwater and bedrock, as it has been the case for old waters with marine origin confined by a marsh in the south-east part of aquifer

  14. Zn/Cd ratios and cadmium isotope evidence for the classification of lead-zinc deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hanjie; Zhu, Chuanwei; Zhang, Yuxu; Cloquet, Christophe; Fan, Haifeng; Fu, Shaohong

    2016-04-01

    Lead-zinc deposits are often difficult to classify because clear criteria are lacking. In recent years, new tools, such as Cd and Zn isotopes, have been used to better understand the ore-formation processes and to classify Pb-Zn deposits. Herein, we investigate Cd concentrations, Cd isotope systematics and Zn/Cd ratios in sphalerite from nine Pb-Zn deposits divided into high-temperature systems (e.g., porphyry), low-temperature systems (e.g., Mississippi Valley type [MVT]) and exhalative systems (e.g., sedimentary exhalative [SEDEX]). Our results showed little evidence of fractionation in the high-temperature systems. In the low-temperature systems, Cd concentrations were the highest, but were also highly variable, a result consistent with the higher fractionation of Cd at low temperatures. The δ114/110Cd values in low-temperature systems were enriched in heavier isotopes (mean of 0.32 ± 0.31‰). Exhalative systems had the lowest Cd concentrations, with a mean δ114/110Cd value of 0.12 ± 0.50‰. We thus conclude that different ore-formation systems result in different characteristic Cd concentrations and fraction levels and that low-temperature processes lead to the most significant fractionation of Cd. Therefore, Cd distribution and isotopic studies can support better understanding of the geochemistry of ore-formation processes and the classification of Pb-Zn deposits.

  15. A new concept for sensitive in situ stable isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy based on sample modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Peter; Dyroff, Christoph; Zahn, Andreas; Mazzinghi, Piero; D'amato, Francesco

    2005-12-01

    Diode-laser absorption spectroscopy finds increasing applications in the emerging field of stable isotope research. To meet the requirements of the water isotopes measurement challenge in environmental research, ways have to be found to cope with the present limitations of spectroscopic systems. In this article, we discuss an approach based on the Stark effect in molecular spectra to reduce the influence of time-dependent, unwanted background structures generally superimposed on the desired signal from the spectral feature under investigation. A road map to high-sensitivity isotopic ratio measurements of water isotopes is presented. On the basis of an Allan Variance analysis of measured data, the detection limits have been calculated as a function of the integration time. To achieve the required optical density of about 6 x 10(-7) for H(2)(17)O measurements, the duty cycle has to be optimized and the implementation of a sample modulation within an optical multipass cell is a promising approach to increase the stability of spectroscopic instrumentation required for ecosystem research and airborne atmospheric platforms. PMID:16543188

  16. An analytical approach to Sr isotope ratio determination in Lambrusco wines for geographical traceability purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Caterina; Baschieri, Carlo; Bertacchini, Lucia; Bertelli, Davide; Cocchi, Marina; Marchetti, Andrea; Manzini, Daniela; Papotti, Giulia; Sighinolfi, Simona

    2015-04-15

    Geographical origin and authenticity of food are topics of interest for both consumers and producers. Among the different indicators used for traceability studies, (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotopic ratio has provided excellent results. In this study, two analytical approaches for wine sample pre-treatment, microwave and low temperature mineralisation, were investigated to develop accurate and precise analytical method for (87)Sr/(86)Sr determination. The two procedures led to comparable results (paired t-test, with tisotopic values were compared with isotopic data coming from (i) soils of their territory of origin and (ii) wines obtained by same grape varieties cultivated in different districts. The obtained results have shown no significant variability among the different vintages of wines and a perfect agreement between the isotopic range of the soils and wines has been observed. Nevertheless, the investigated indicator was not enough powerful to discriminate between similar products. To this regard, it is worth to note that more soil samples as well as wines coming from different districts will be considered to obtain more trustworthy results. PMID:25466059

  17. Tunable Diode Laser Measurements of Leaf-scale Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Ecosystem Respired Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in a Semi-arid Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, N.; Chris, B.; Hanson, D.; Kern, S.; Meyer, C.; Pockman, W.; Powers, H.

    2005-12-01

    We present results and speculative interpretation of leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination and ecosystem respired carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from a semi-arid, C3/C4 woodland located in northern New Mexico, USA. Overstory leaf area index (LAI) is dominated by live juniper (Juniperus monosperma) trees with an LAI value of approximately 1.0 m2 per m2 ground area, and has a seasonally dynamic understory of mixed C3 forbs and C4 grasses and cacti, with a maximum LAI of 0.30 m2 per m2 ground area. Ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios showed values characteristic of C3 dominated photosynthesis (Keeling plot intercepts of -35 to -22 per mil). Seasonal variation was typical of that found in wetter, C3 dominated forests, as was the dependence on climate (e.g. relationships with vapor pressure deficit, soil water content, and canopy conductance). Leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination of the junipers, measured by coupling a Li-Cor 6400 photosynthesis system to the TDL, provided discrimination-Ci and discrimination-vpd relationships consistent with measured ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration was dependent on rain water isotope composition, but was correlated with soil water content during rain-free periods. The cumulative effect of vapor pressure deficit after a rain event was tightly correlated with the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration, suggesting the primary drivers are evaporative enrichment of soil water and perhaps nocturnal leaf enrichment. Instrument precision for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of carbon dioxide is 0.06 to 0.18 per mil; however, overall precision is somewhat lower due to pressure and sampling effects.

  18. Can stable isotope ratios provide for community-wide measures of trophic structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Craig A; Arrington, D Albrey; Montaña, Carmen G; Post, David M

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios (typically of carbon and nitrogen) provide one representation of an organism's trophic niche and are widely used to examine aspects of food web structure. Yet stable isotopes have not been applied to quantitatively characterize community-wide aspects of trophic structure (i.e., at the level of an entire food web). We propose quantitative metrics that can be used to this end, drawing on similar approaches from ecomorphology research. For example, the convex hull area occupied by species in delta13C-delta15N niche space is a representation of the total extent of trophic diversity within a food web, whereas mean nearest neighbor distance among all species pairs is a measure of species packing within trophic niche space. To facilitate discussion of opportunities and limitations of the metrics, we provide empirical and conceptual examples drawn from Bahamian tidal creek food webs. These examples illustrate how this methodology can be used to quantify trophic diversity and trophic redundancy in food webs, as well as to link individual species to characteristics of the food web in which they are embedded. Building from extensive applications of stable isotope ratios by ecologists, the community-wide metrics may provide a new perspective on food web structure, function, and dynamics. PMID:17489452

  19. Development and Airborne Operation of a Compact Water Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Rosario Q.; Kassi, Samir; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Chenevier, Marc; Romanini, Daniele; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Dhaniyala, Suresh; Snels, Marcel; Kerstel, Erik R. T.

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive laser spectrometer, named IRIS (water isotope ratio infrared spectrometer), was developed for the in situ detection of the isotopic composition of water vapour in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere. Isotope ratio measurements can be used to quantify troposphere stratosphere exchange, and to study the water chemistry in the stratosphere. IRIS is based on the technique of optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. It uses a room temperature near-infrared laser, and does not require cryogenic cooling of laser or detectors. The instrument weighs 51 kg including its support structure. Airborne operation was demonstrated during three flights aboard the European M55-Geophysica stratospheric research aircraft, as part of the AMMA/SCOUT-03 (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis/Stratospheric Climate links with emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and lower stratosphere) campaign in Burkina Faso in August 2006. The data are discussed with reference to a Rayleigh distillation model. As expected, there is no indication of non-mass-dependent fractionation (also known as mass-independent fractionation) in the troposphere. Furthermore, improvements to the thermal management system and a move to a (cryogen-free) longer-wavelength laser source are discussed, which together should result in approximately two orders of magnitude improvement of the sensitivity

  20. Isotope-ratio infrared spectroscopy: a reliable tool for the investigation of plant-water sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gómez, Paula; Barbeta, Adrià; Voltas, Jordi; Peñuelas, Josep; Dennis, Kate; Palacio, Sara; Dawson, Todd E; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Stable isotopes are extensively used as tracers for the study of plant-water sources. Isotope-ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) offers a cheaper alternative to isotope-ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS), but its use in studying plant and soil water is limited by the spectral interference caused by organic contaminants. Here, we examine two approaches to cope with contaminated samples in IRIS: on-line oxidation of organic compounds (MCM) and post-processing correction. We assessed these methods compared to IRMS across 136 samples of xylem and soil water, and a set of ethanol- and methanol-water mixtures. A post-processing correction significantly improved IRIS accuracy in both natural samples and alcohol dilutions, being effective with concentrations up to 8% of ethanol and 0.4% of methanol. MCM outperformed the post-processing correction in removing methanol interference, but did not effectively remove interference for high concentrations of ethanol. By using both approaches, IRIS can overcome with reasonable accuracy the analytical uncertainties associated with most organic contaminants found in soil and xylem water. We recommend the post-processing correction as the first choice for analysis of samples of unknown contamination. Nevertheless, MCM can be more effective for evaluating samples containing contaminants responsible for strong spectral interferences at low concentrations, such as methanol. PMID:25790288

  1. Variations in the 13C/12C isotopic ratio in the animal metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the work undertaken by Duchesne et al., a synthesis of the results obtained since 1968 is presented. Differences up to 10 per mil are observed in the isotopic ratio 13C/12C of the CO2 exhaled by various animals as a function of their diet and especially of the presence in their diet of vegetables characterized by a C4 photosynehetic pathway (such as maize). Weak but significant variations of the CO2 isotopic ratio are also observed during starvation, after injection of hormones which regulate the glycaemia or even simply in relation to the metabolic rhythms of normal digestion; these variations seem to be correlated with the modifications arising in the relative proportion of substrates from which carbon dioxide is formed. Small isotopic fractionations, appearing mainly in bones and fats, were also shown by combustion of various tissues. Moreover, a change in diet (use of corn) affects clearly, not only the exhaled CO2, but also, within a few days, the mean 13C content of organs, mainly in the case of the liver. These metabolic fractionations remain, however, limited enough to use the 13C content, naturally a little higher, of C4 photosynthetic vegetables as a tracer in order to follow some metabolic processes. An application of this is presented by way of a flucose tolerance test

  2. The assesment of the food quality by 13 C isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon 13 analysis can be a key analytical technique used in the fight to detect undeclared addition of low cost adulterants to high value foods. The natural abundance of 13 C in food is related to how the plant fix the carbon during photosynthesis. Plants that use a C3 photosynthetic cycle discriminate against 13 C more than plants with C4 cycle. We developed a method for analysis of 13 C isotope in organic samples. Because of instrumental requirements carbon must be converted to CO2 for stable isotope ratio measurements. Conversion of organic samples to CO2 was accomplished by combustion in an excess oxygen atmosphere. This technique involves the combustion of individual samples in sealed, evacuated quartz tubes containing CuO as the oxygen source. Because each sample is prepared in its own container, there is no chance for memory effects. The method was tested for sensitivity (the smallest increment of the isotope ratio that must be detected with confidence), sample size (the minimum quantity of a pure molecular species available to achieve the desired accuracy) and precision. The method was utilised for the detection of a synthetic flavour from natural one, namely the natural oil bitter almond from the synthetic benzaldehyde. The method can be validated for the detection or establishment of authenticity in food products. (authors)

  3. An analytical system for stable isotope analysis on carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, S. L.; van der Veen, C.; Popa, M. E.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-12-01

    A fully automated system for the determination of δ13C and δ18O in atmospheric CO has been developed. CO is extracted from an air sample and converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent. The isotopic composition is determined with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) technique. The entire system is continuously flushed with high-purity helium (He), the carrier gas. The blank signal of the Schütze reagent is ~ 4 nmol mol-1, or 1-3 % of the typical sample size. The repeatability is 0.1 ‰ for δ13C and 0.2 ‰ for δ18O. The peak area allows for simultaneous determination of the mole fraction with an analytical repeatability of ~ 0.7 nmol mol-1 for 100 mL of ambient air (185.4 nmol mol-1 of CO). An automated single measurement is performed in only 18 min, and the achieved time efficiency (and small volume of sample air) allows for repetitive measurements practically.

  4. Isotopic 32S/33S ratio as a diagnostic of presolar grains from novae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parikh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of sulphur isotopes in presolar grains can help to identify the astrophysical sites in which these grains were formed. A more precise thermonuclear rate of the 33S(p,γ34Cl reaction is required, however, to assess the diagnostic ability of sulphur isotopic ratios. We have studied the 33S(3He,d34Cl proton-transfer reaction at 25 MeV using a high-resolution quadrupole–dipole–dipole–dipole magnetic spectrograph. Deuteron spectra were measured at ten scattering angles between 10° and 55°. Twenty-four levels in 34Cl over Ex=4.6–5.9 MeV were observed, including three levels for the first time. Proton spectroscopic factors were extracted for the first time for levels above the 33S + p threshold, spanning the energy range required for calculations of the thermonuclear 33S(p,γ34Cl rate in classical nova explosions. We have determined a new 33S(p,γ34Cl rate using a Monte Carlo method and have performed new hydrodynamic nova simulations to determine the impact on nova nucleosynthesis of remaining nuclear physics uncertainties in the reaction rate. We find that these uncertainties lead to a factor of ≤5 variation in the 33S(p,γ34Cl rate over typical nova peak temperatures, and variation in the ejected nova yields of SCa isotopes by ≤20%. In particular, the predicted 32S/33S ratio is 110–130 for the nova model considered, compared to 110–440 with previous rate uncertainties. As recent type II supernova models predict ratios of 130–200, the 32S/33S ratio may be used to distinguish between grains of nova and supernova origin.

  5. Geographical variations in Sr and Nd isotopic ratios of cryoconite on Asian glaciers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryoconite is a dark-coloured surface dust deposited on glaciers that consists of wind-blown mineral particles, as well as organic matter derived from microbes living on glaciers. In this paper, we analyse the Sr and Nd isotopic ratios of four mineral fractions (i.e., the saline, carbonate, phosphate, and silicate mineral fractions), as well as the organic fraction, of cryoconite samples obtained from six Asian glaciers (the Altai, Pamir, Tien Shan, Qillian Shan, and Himalayan regions), and discuss their geographical variations in terms of the geological origins of the mineral particles and the biogeochemical processes on the glaciers. The silicate mineral fraction showed lower Sr and higher Nd ratios for the glaciers located to the north (Altai, 87Sr/86Sr: 0.713 490–0.715 284, εNd(0): −6.4 to −5.6), while higher Sr and lower Nd ratios for the glaciers located to the south (Himalayas, 87Sr/86Sr: 0.740 121–0.742 088, εNd(0): −16.4 to −15.7); the ratios were similar to those of desert sand, loess, and river sediments in the respective regions of the glaciers. This result suggests that the silicate minerals within the cryoconites were derived from different sources depending on the geographical locations of the glaciers. The isotopic ratios of the saline, carbonate, and phosphate mineral fractions were distinct from those of the silicate fraction, and were similar to those of evaporites and apatite deposits from the Asian deserts, but also varied geographically, indicating that they are likely to reflect their geological origin. The Sr isotopic ratios of the organic fraction were similar to those of the saline and carbonate fractions from glaciers in the central area (Tien Shan and Qillian Shan), but were higher than those of the saline and carbonate fractions, and lower than the phosphate mineral fraction, in the northern and southern areas. The ratios of organic fraction may be determined from the mixing ratio of calcium sources incorporated by

  6. Application of high-precision isotope ratio monitoring mass spectrometry to identify the biosynthetic origins of proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Apostol, Izydor; Brooks, Paul D.; Mathews, Antony J.

    2001-01-01

    Isotope ratio monitoring (IRM) mass spectrometry was used to measure the relative abundance of stable isotopes in several samples of adult human hemoglobin expressed in E. coli, yeast, and human blood. The results showed significant differences in the distribution of 15N and 13C isotopes among hemoglobin samples produced in these organisms. This indicates that IRM mass spectrometry can be used in forensic protein chemistry to identify the origin of protein expression.

  7. The influence of analytical and technological procedures on the 13C/12C isotope ratio of orange oil compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of chromatographic and technological procedures on the 13C-isotope value of flavour compounds from orange oils was investigated. In order to avoid misinterpretations of isotopic data, quantitative yields during sample clean-up must be ascertained. Ordinary as well as deterpenated orange oils were not influenced by the technological processing. In the case of special products containing single compounds concentrated up to more than 70%, a shift in the 13C/12C-isotope ratio was detectable. (orig.)

  8. Controls of oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate formed during nitrification in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic composition of nitrate is increasingly used to determine sources and transformations of nitrogen in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate appear to be particularly useful, since they allow the differentiation between nitrate from atmospheric deposition (δ18Onitrate between +25 and +70 per mille), nitrate from fertilizers (δ18Onitrate +23 per mille), and nitrate derived from nitrification processes in soils (δ18Onitrate 3 molecule derive from H2O (with negative δ18O values dependent upon location) and one oxygen derives from atmospheric O2 (δ18O = +23.5 per mille).. The objective of this study was to experimentally determine the extent to which water oxygen controls the δ18O value of nitrate, which is formed during nitrification in soils

  9. Oxygen isotopic ratio of the diatom siliceous valves: development of a new method in quantitative paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new method allowing the measurement of the 18O/16O ratio of the biogenic silica oxygen, which takes into account the effects due to the organic matter and hydration water associated with this type of silica. By isotopic exchange with enriched water, we have been able to fix a treatment which eliminate all contamination and memory effects. This has permitted us to study the temperature dependance of the hydrated silica-water oxygen isotopic fractionation. As application, we present a study of the variations of the delta 18O of fossil diatoms valves along an Equatorial Pacific sediment core covering the last 20.000 years. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the delta 18O of the diatom silica for paleoclimatic investigations

  10. Direct isotope ratio analysis of individual uranium-plutonium mixed particles with various U/Pu ratios by thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-02-01

    Uranium and plutonium isotope ratios in individual uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) mixed particles with various U/Pu atomic ratios were analyzed without prior chemical separation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Prior to measurement, micron-sized particles with U/Pu ratios of 1, 5, 10, 18, and 70 were produced from uranium and plutonium certified reference materials. In the TIMS analysis, the peaks of americium, plutonium, and uranium ion signals were successfully separated by continuously increasing the evaporation filament current. Consequently, the uranium and plutonium isotope ratios, except the (238)Pu/(239)Pu ratio, were successfully determined for the particles at all U/Pu ratios. This indicates that TIMS direct analysis allows for the measurement of individual U-Pu mixed particles without prior chemical separation. PMID:25479434

  11. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of hydrothermal minerals from Yellowstone drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Keith, T.E.C.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199??C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The ??18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, ??-cristobalite, and ??-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8???. About one third of the silica 7samples have ??18O values that are consistent with isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters; most of the other silica samples appear to have precipitated from water enriched in 18O (up to 4.7???) relative to present thermal water, assuming precipitation at present in situ temperatures. Available data on fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures in hydrothermal quartz indicate that silica precipitation occurred mostly at temperatures above those measured during drilling and imply that 15O enrichments in water during silica precipitation were generally larger than those estimated from present conditions. Similarly, clay minerals (celadonite and smectite) have ??18O values higher (by 3.5 to 7.9???) than equilibrium values under present conditions. In contrast, all eight analyzed calcite samples are close to isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters. The frequent incidence of apparent 18O enrichment in thermal water from which the hydrothermal minerals precipitated may indicate that a higher proportion of strongly 18O-enriched deep hydrothermal fluid once circulated through shallow portions of the Yellowstone system, or that a recurring transient 18O-enrichment effect occurs at shallow depths and is caused either by sudden decompressional boiling or by isotopic exchange at low water/rock ratios in new fractures. The mineralogy and apparent 18O enrichments of hydrothermal fracture-filling minerals are consistent with deposition

  12. Cryogenic separation of oxygen-argon mixture in natural air samples for isotopic and molecular ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeeb Rahman, Keedakkadan; Abe, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of mass independent isotope fractionation in oxygen during the formation of ozone in the stratosphere has initiated a wide application in isotope geochemistry field. Separation of oxygen-argon mixture has become the foundation of high precision analysis of Δ17O and δ(O2/Ar) for geochemical applications. Here we present precise and simplified cryogenic separation of argon oxygen mixture from the atmospheric and dissolved air using 30/60 mesh 5A molecular sieve zeolite. A pioneer study of this method was conducted by Thiemens and Meagher in 1984. The column which is made of glass tube contains about 1.1 grams of molecular sieve zeolite and both ends of column was filled with glass wools. The experimental set up was tested for different combination of molecular sieves and slurry temperatures. We found the most efficient condition for the separation was at a column temperature of -103°C. For complete transfer of O2 and Ar mixture usually takes in 15-20 minutes time. The isotopic ratios of oxygen were analyzed using mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer Delta Plus) relative to reference oxygen-argon mixture at 3V of m/z 32 for both sample and reference side. The signals of m/z 28, 32, and 40 were measured by dynamically to determine oxygen -argon ratio and to check nitrogen contamination. Repeated measurements of atmospheric air yielded a reproducibility (SE n=80) of 0.006, 0.004 and 0.19‰ for δ17O, δ18O and δO2/Ar respectively. The isotopic and molecular fractionation of argon- oxygen mixture during gas adsorption and desorption while using molecular sieve under liquid nitrogen temperature was studied. We have established a linear relationship governing the effect of 13X and 5A molecular sieves on molecular fractionation. And suggested the use of single 1/8" pellet 13X molecular sieve provided a negligible fractionation.

  13. Early Eocene SST recorded in clumped isotopic ratios of fish otoliths of North Sea Basin, Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, P.; Vanhove, D.; Ghosh, P.

    2012-12-01

    Application of clumped isotope thermometry (Ghosh et al., 2007) in well preserved fish otoliths reveals environmental temperature. Fossil specimen of otoliths from marginal marine sedimentary sequence belonging to Ypresian (ca. 50.9 Ma) age reveals environmental temperature and salinity at the time of deposition. Fossil otoliths from two demersal, non-migratory species belonging to genuses namely Neobythitinorum subregularis and Paraconger papoiniti are considered here for this study. Intertaxon clumped isotope ratios allows to distinguish between the temperature habitat of fishes considered. Sedimentary record from the study area suggests large sea level changes and deposition close to shore line (Steurbaut, 2006). It was estimated that 150 kys was the time taken for deposition of the sequence from which the otolith fossils were retrieved (Steurbaut, 2006). The clumped isotope ratio and temperature estimates based on the otoliths composition are classified into two categories. Firstly, genus Neobythitinorum subregularis registering both low temperature (2 and 5°C) and high temperature (30 and 36°C) observed in eight specimens analysed. Secondly, genus Paraconger papoiniti registers warm water condition with consistent temperature of 32±2° C observed in six specimens analysed in this study. Based on the temperature estimates we conclude that North Sea water temperature was 20°C warmer compared to present day record of long time average during early Eocene. This estimate is consistent with previous estimates (Vanhove et al., 2011) based on stable isotope composition. Several hypotheses proposed previously will be explained and the inter-taxonomic variability will be explored in this presentation.

  14. Identification of Marchfeld asparagus using Sr isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swoboda, S.; Brunner, M.; Boulyga, S.F.; Galler, P.; Prohaska, T. [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry-VIRIS Project, Vienna (Austria); Horacek, M. [Austrian Research Centers GmbH, Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2008-01-15

    This work focuses on testing and application of Sr isotope signatures for the fast and reliable authentication and traceability of Asparagus officinalis originating from Marchfeld, Austria, using multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after optimised Rb/Sr separation. The major sample pool comprises freeze-dried and microwave-digested asparagus samples from Hungary and Slovakia which are compared with Austrian asparagus originating from the Marchfeld region, which is a protected geographical indication. Additional samples from Peru, the Netherlands and Germany were limited in number and allowed therefore only restricted statistical evaluation. Asparagus samples from Marchfeld were harvested within two subsequent years in order to investigate the annual variation. The results show that the Sr isotope ratio is consistent within these 2 years of investigation. Moreover, the Sr isotope ratio of total Sr in soil was found to be significantly higher than in an NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} extract, reflecting the mobile (bioavailable) phase. The isotope composition in the latter extract corresponds well to the range found in the asparagus samples in Marchfeld, even though the concentration of Sr in asparagus shows no direct correlation to the concentration of Sr in the mobile phase of the soil. The major question was whether the 'Marchfelder Spargel' can be distinguished from samples from the neighbouring countries of Hungary and Slovakia. According to our findings, they can be clearly (100%) singled out from the Hungarian samples and can be distinguished from the Slovakian asparagus samples with a probability of more than 80%. (orig.)

  15. Acidification processes and soil leaching influenced by agricultural practices revealed by strontium isotopic ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine; Aquilina, Luc; Weyer, Christina; Molénat, Jérôme; Lischeid, Gunnar

    2009-08-01

    In natural river systems, the chemical and isotopic composition of stream- and ground waters are mainly controlled by the geology and water-rock interactions. The leaching of major cations from soils has been recognized as a possible consequence of acidic deposition from atmosphere for over 30 years. Moreover, in agricultural areas, the application of physiological acid fertilizers and nitrogen fertilizers in the ammonia form may enhance the cation leaching through the soil profile into ground- and surface waters. This origin of leached cations has been studied on two small and adjacent agricultural catchments in Brittany, western France. The study catchments are drained by two first-order streams, and mainly covered with cambisoils, issued from the alteration and weathering of a granodiorite basement. Precipitations, soil water- and NH 4 acetate-leachates, separated minerals, and stream waters have been investigated. Chemical element ratios, such as Ba/Sr, Na/Sr and Ca/Sr ratios, as well as Sr isotopic ratios are used to constrain the relative contribution from potential sources of stream water elements. Based on Sr isotopic ratio and element concentration, soil water- and NH 4 acetate leaching indicates (1) a dominant manure/slurry contribution in the top soil, representing a cation concentrated pool, with low 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios; (2) in subsoils, mineral dissolution is enhanced by fertilizer application, becoming the unique source of cations in the saprolite. The relatively high weathering rates encountered implies significant sources of cations which are not accessory minerals, but rather plagioclase and biotite dissolution. Stream water has a very different isotopic and chemical composition compared to soil water leaching suggesting that stream water chemistry is dominated by elements issued from mineral and rock weathering. Agriculture, by applications of chemical and organic fertilizers, can influence the export of major base cations, such as Na +. Plagioclase

  16. Extraction of radioactive cesium from tea leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive contamination of foodstuffs attributed to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster has become a social problem. This study investigated the extraction of radioactive cesium from the contaminated leaves to the tea. The green tea was brewed twice reusing the same leaves to study the difference in extraction of cesium between the first and second brew. Moreover, the extraction of cesium was studied in correlation to brewing time. The concentration of radioactive cesium was determined with gamma spectrometry, and the concentration of caffeine was determined with absorption spectrometry. About 40% of cesium was extracted from leaves in the first brew, and about 80% was extracted in the second brew. The extraction of cesium increased over time, and it reached about 80% after 10 minutes brew. The ratio of radioactive cesium to caffeine decreased linearly over time. This study revealed that the extraction of cesium was higher for the second brew, and a rapid increase in extraction was seen as the tea was brewed for 6 minutes and more. Therefore, the first brew of green tea, which was brewed within 5 minutes, contained the least extraction of radioactive cesium from the contaminated leaves. (author)

  17. Simultaneous determination of the quantity and isotopic ratios of uranium in individual micro-particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Ho; Choi, Eun-Ju

    2016-11-01

    A method to determine the quantity and isotopic ratios of uranium in individual micro-particles simultaneously by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) has been developed. This method consists of sequential sample and spike loading, ID-TIMS for isotopic measurement, and application of a series of mathematical procedures to remove the contribution of uranium in the spike. The homogeneity of evaporation and ionization of uranium content was confirmed by the consistent ratio of n((233)U)/n((238)U) determined by TIMS measurements. Verification of the method was performed using U030 solution droplets and U030 particles. Good agreements of resulting uranium quantity, n((235)U)/n((238)U), and n((236)U)/n((238)U) with the estimated or certified values showed the validity of this newly developed method for particle analysis when simultaneous determination of the quantity and isotopic ratios of uranium is required. PMID:27591656

  18. Stable carbon isotope ratios of intact GDGTs indicate heterogeneous sources to marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Ann; Hurley, Sarah J.; Walter, Sunita R. Shah; Kusch, Stephanie; Lichtin, Samantha; Zhang, Yi Ge

    2016-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota, the major sources of marine glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The δ13C values of GDGTs (δ13CGDGT) may be powerful tools for reconstructing variations in the ocean carbon cycle, including paleoproductivity and water mass circulation, if they can be related to values of δ13CDIC. To date, isotope measurements primarily are made on the C40 biphytane skeletons of GDGTs, rather than on complete tetraether structures. This approach erases information revealed by the isotopic heterogeneity of GDGTs within a sample and may impart an isotopic fractionation associated with the ether cleavage. To circumvent these issues, we present δ13C values for GDGTs from twelve recent sediments representing ten continental margin locations. Samples are purified by orthogonal dimensions of HPLC, followed by measurement of δ13C values by Spooling Wire Microcombustion (SWiM)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with 1σ precision and accuracy of ±0.25‰. Using this approach, we confirm that GDGTs, generally around -19‰, are isotopically "heavy" compared to other marine lipids. However, measured δ13CGDGT values are inconsistent with predicted values based on the 13C content of DIC in the overlying water column and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation for a pure culture of an autotrophic marine thaumarchaeon. In some sediments, the isotopic composition of individual GDGTs differs, indicating multiple source inputs. The data appear to confirm that crenarchaeol primarily is a biomarker for Thaumarchaeota, but its δ13C values still cannot be explained solely by autotrophic carbon fixation. Overall the complexity of the results suggests that both organic carbon assimilation (ca. 25% of total carbon) and multiple source(s) of exogenous GDGTs (contributing generally <30% of input to sediments) are necessary to explain the observed

  19. Determination of 206/207Pb isotope ratios by ICP-MS in particulate matter from the North Sea environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of lead isotope ratios can be used for source and pathway characterization of lead in the environment. The suitability of inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was evaluated for the measurement of 206/207Pb isotope ratios in several marine compartments as marine aerosols from different source regions and suspended particulate matter from the North Sea. Two different ICP-MS systems were used to carry out these investigations. First optimization studies have been performed to yield a sufficient precision (RSD<0.5%) incombination with a reasonable measuring time. This study has been carried out using the standard reference material NBS 981 with certified lead isotope ratios. Furthermore, it could be shown for marine environmental samples, that a precision of less than 0.5% RSD is attainable for counting rates of above approximately 50000 cps. As the following measurements of lead isotope ratios in marine aerosols from main source regions surrounding the North Sea demonstrated, this precision is sufficient to determine significant differences due to the origin of atmospheric lead. The analysis of aerosol samples revealed isotope ratios varying from as low as 1.10, which is close to that ratio for leaded gasoline in Europe to near background (modern lead) values of 1.20. The lead isotope ratios for the investigated suspended particulate matter ranges between 1.13 and 1.18. These values can be related to the solid discharge, the urban density and anthropogenic activity of the drainage basin. (orig.)

  20. Investigation of two technical toxaphene products by using isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, W.; Armbruster, W. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Lebensmittelchemie; Gleixner, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biogeochemie, Jena (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Organochlorine compounds have been used in high quantities throughout the past 60 years. Being long-lived in the environment and toxic to humans and wildlife, some of them were classified as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). One of the POPs of special concern is toxaphene which is produced by the chlorination of the natural product camphene (or {alpha}-pinene). The technical products consist of several hundred compounds, mainly of chlorobornanes with an average number of eight chlorine substituents. Toxaphene has been produced in high quantities in different parts of the world. Even though the use has been discontinued during the last two decades, there are still several ecosystems which are heavily contaminated with this chloropesticide. Due to the huge variety of the technical products accompanied with a severe change of composition in the environment, analytical tracing back of toxaphene residues to a specific product has not yet been achieved. One of the potential analytical tools for distinguishing substances that differ only in their way of production is the determination of ratios of stable isotopes ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C; {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H; {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N). Since the synthesis of toxaphene is starting from natural compounds obtained from different continents, the technical products could have different ratios of stable isotopes. In this study, we investigated the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of two former major toxaphene products.

  1. Measurement of the natural variation of 13C/12C isotope ratio in organic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic ratio analysis for 13C/12C by mass spectrometry using a 'Working standard' allows the study of 13C natural variation in organic material, with a total analytical error of less than 0,2%. Equations were derived in order to determine 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios related to the 'working standard' CENA-std and to the international standard PDB. Isotope ratio values obtained with samples prepared in two different combustion apparatus were compared; also the values obtained preparing samples by acid decomposition of carbonaceous materials were compared with the values obtained in different international laboratories. Utilizing the methodology proposed, several leaves collected at different heights of different vegetal species, found 'inside' and 'outside' of the Ducke Forest Reserve, located in the Amazon region, are analysed. It is found that the 13C natural variation depends upon metabolic process and environmental factors, both being factors which may be qualified as parcial influences on the CO2 cycle in the forest. (author)

  2. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  3. Source Attribution of Cyanides using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Carman, April J.; Moran, James J.

    2016-01-08

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs) are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. In a previous study, anionic impurity profiles developed using high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) were demonstrated as CAS for matching samples from eight potassium cyanide (KCN) stocks to their reported countries of origin. Herein, a larger number of solid KCN stocks (n = 13) and, for the first time, solid sodium cyanide (NaCN) stocks (n = 15) were examined to determine what additional sourcing information can be obtained through anion, carbon stable isotope, and elemental analyses of cyanide stocks by HPIC, isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), respectively. The HPIC anion data was evaluated using the variable selection methods of Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least squares (iPLS), and genetic algorithm-based partial least squares (GAPLS) and the classification methods of partial least squares discriminate analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminate analysis (SVMDA). In summary, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported country of origins resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three country groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries with known solid cyanide factories. Both the anion and elemental CAS are believed to originate from the aqueous alkali hydroxides used in cyanide manufacture. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). The carbon isotope CAS is believed to

  4. Using Lead Concentrations and Stable Lead Isotope Ratios to Identify Contamination Events in Alluvial Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Diane Saint-Laurent; Julien St-Laurent; Marlies Hähni; Bassam Ghaleb; Camille Chapados

    2010-01-01

    Soils contaminated with hydrocarbons (C10–C50), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and other contaminants (e.g., As, Cd, Cu, Pb) were recently discovered on the banks of the Saint-François and Massawippi rivers. Alluvial soils are contaminated over a distance of 100 kilometers, and the level of the contaminated-hydrocarbon layer in the soil profiles is among the highest at the Windsor and Richmond sites. Concentrations of lead and stable lead isotope ratios (204Pb/206Pb, 207Pb/206Pb, 20...

  5. Unusual stable isotope ratios in amino acid and carboxylic acid extracts from the Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, S.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Yuen, G. U.

    1987-01-01

    The isotopic composition of hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon in amino acid and monocarboxylic acid extracts from the Murchison meteorite has been determined. The unusually high D/H and N-15/N-14 ratios in the amino acid fraction are uniquely characteristic of known interstellar organic materials. The delta D value of the monocarboxylic acid fraction is lower but still consistent with an interstellar origin. These results confirm the extraterrestrial origin of both classes of compound and provide the first evidence suggesting a direct relationship between the massive organosynthesis occurring in interstellar clouds and the presence of prebiotic compounds in primitive planetary bodies.

  6. High-sensitivity measurement of 3He-4He isotopic ratios for ultracold neutron experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, H. P.; Huber, M. G.; Bauder, W.; Abrams, N.; Deibel, C. M.; Huffer, C. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Schelhammer, K. W.; Janssens, R.; Jiang, C. L.; Scott, R. H.; Pardo, R. C.; Rehm, K. E.; Vondrasek, R.; Swank, C. M.; O'Shaughnessy, C. M.; Paul, M.; Yang, L.

    2016-06-01

    Research efforts ranging from studies of solid helium to searches for a neutron electric dipole moment require isotopically purified helium with a ratio of 3He to 4He at levels below that which can be measured using traditional mass spectroscopy techniques. We demonstrate an approach to such a measurement using accelerator mass spectroscopy, reaching the 10-14 level of sensitivity, several orders of magnitude more sensitive than other techniques. Measurements of 3He/4He in samples relevant to the measurement of the neutron lifetime indicate the need for substantial corrections. We also argue that there is a clear path forward to sensitivity increases of at least another order of magnitude.

  7. Recent measurements of 234U/238U isotope ratio in spring waters from the Hadzici area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidic, Alfred; Ilić, Zorana; Benedik, Ljudmila

    2013-06-01

    The Hadzici area has become interesting for investigation since depleted uranium ammunition had been employed in 1995 during the NATO air strike campaign in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The purpose of this study is to determine uranium concentration and (234)U/(238)U activity ratio in the spring waters of this area and to investigate their relationship, as well as spatial variations. The spring water samples were taken at 18 sites in total. For the determination of uranium radioisotopes, radiochemical separation procedure followed by alpha-particle spectrometry was applied. Uranium concentration in analyzed waters range from 0.15 to 1.12 μg/L. Spring waters from carbonate based sediments have a lower uranium concentration of between 0.15 and 0.43 μg/L, in comparison to waters sampled within sandstone-based sediments ranging from 0.53 to 1.12 μg/L. Dissolved uranium shows significant spatial variability and correlation with bedrock type confirmed by Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis. The majority of the analyzed waters have a (234)U/(238)U activity ratio ranging from 1.02 to 1.90, of which half of the results range between 1.02 and 1.16. No apparent depleted uranium (DU) contamination was observed, as (234)U/(238)U activity ratio is dependent on geochemical conditions in the environment. Even though the tested spring waters demonstrate significant variability in uranium concentration, (234)U/(238)U activity ratio and (234)U excess, waters with similar uranium isotopic signatures are observable within the region. The guidelines on the spatial redistribution of dissolved uranium (corresponding to (238)U mass concentration), along with (234)U/(238)U activity ratios were provided by the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) method. Waters having similar isotopic signature have been delineated. PMID:23410592

  8. Cesium-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with Cesium-137

  9. On-line coupling of the MAT 251 with a Carlo Erba elemental analyzer for carbon isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For carbon isotope investigations with a moderate precision demand of about 0.2 per mil in the isotope ratio fast and reliable results are attained by on line combination of the ANA 1500 Elemental Analyzer and the MAT 251 Isotope Mass Spectrometer. The crucial point hereof is the gas splitting device. By proper design and adjustment of the analytical parameters, good sample efficiency and a sharp CO2 bulk within the He stream is reached. The main characteristics of this combined equipment are described and some isotopic results of organic and anorganic carbon in lake sediment-samples are given as well as deltasup13C-analyses of spiritous liquors. (Author)

  10. Intra-Shell boron isotope ratios in benthic foraminifera: Implications for paleo-pH reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollion-Bard, C.; Erez, J.

    2009-12-01

    The boron isotope composition of marine carbonates is considered to be a seawater pH proxy. Nevertheless, the use of δ11B has some limitations: 1) the knowledge of fractionation factor (α4-3) between the two boron dissolved species (boric acid and borate ion), 2) the δ11B of seawater may have varied with time and 3) the amplitude of the "vital effects" of this proxy. Using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), we looked at the internal variability in the boron isotope ratio of the shallow water, symbionts bearing foraminiferan Amphistegina lobifera. Specimens were cultured at constant temperature (24±0.1 °C) in seawater with pH ranging between 7.90 and 8.45. We performed 6 to 8 measurements of δ11B in each foraminifera. Intra-shell boron isotopes show large variability with an upper threshold value of pH ~ 9. The ranges of the skeletal calculated pH values in different cultured foraminifera, show strong correlation with the culture pH values and may thus serve as proxy for pH in the past ocean.

  11. Tracing the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon in artificial groundwater recharge using carbon isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reducing the concentration of dissolved organic C (DOC) in water is one of the main challenges in the process of artificial groundwater recharge. At the Tuusula waterworks in southern Finland, surface water is artificially recharged into an esker by pond infiltration and an equal amount of groundwater is daily pumped from the aquifer. This groundwater study was conducted to consider the role of redox processes in the decomposition of DOC. The isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic C (δ 13CDIC) in the recharged water was used as a tracer for redox reactions. The isotopic composition of O and H in water was determined in order to calculate mixing ratios between the local groundwater and the infiltrated surface water. Three distinct processes in the reduction of the DOC content were traced using isotopic methods and concentration analyses of DIC and DOC: (1) the decomposition of DOC (2) adsorption of DOC on mineral matter, and (3) the dilution of artificially recharged water by mixing with local groundwater. The largest decrease (44%) in the DOC content occurred during the early stage of subsurface flow, within 350 m of the infiltration ponds. The reduction of DOC was accompanied by an equal increase in DIC and a significant drop in δ 13CDIC. This change is attributed to the oxidative decomposition of DOC. A further 23% decrease in DOC is attributed to adsorption and a final drop of 14% to dilution with local groundwater

  12. Stable isotope ratio analysis to differentiate temporal diets of a free-ranging herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, W D; Leslie, D M

    2009-07-01

    Stable isotope ratio analysis (SIRA) of carbon (delta13C) and nitrogen (delta15N) in tissue samples of herbivores can identify photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs. C4) of plants consumed. We present results from free-ranging Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) that highlight the ability to differentiate diets using tissue delta13C and delta15N. The signatures of delta13C and delta15N differed in tissues of varying metabolic activity: muscle, a short-term dietary indicator (i.e., 1-2 months) and hoof, a long-term dietary indicator (i.e., 3-12 months). We also documented that delta13C and delta15N values along elk hooves (proximal, middle, distal sections) elucidated temporal shifts in dietary selection. The carbon isotopes of the composite hoof were similar to those of the middle section, but the composite hoof differed in delta(13)C from the distal and proximal sections. The delta13C and delta15N signatures also differed among elk populations, indicating temporal dietary shifts of individuals occupying disparate native range and human-derived agricultural landscapes. Analyses of stable isotopes in various tissues highlighted carbon and nitrogen assimilation through time and differences in the foraging ecology of a rangeland herbivore. PMID:19530151

  13. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios for Giant Stars in the Globular Cluster M13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jaehyon; Pilachowski, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, our paradigm for the formation and evolution of globular clusters has shifted. We now understand that the majority of present-day stars in globular clusters formed as second-generation stars, primarily from the ejecta of first-generation AGB stars, while the majority of first generation, less centrally concentrated stars, have been dynamically lost to the cluster (D'Ercole et al. 2011). This paradigm explains the observed star-to-star variations in the abundances of light element observed in globular clusters, and suggests that the carbon isotope ratio should be similarly differentiated between first and second generation stars. In an effort to verify this scenario, we have recently utilized the Gemini/NIFS to determine carbon isotope abundances (12C and 13C) for 18 giant stars in the globular clusters M13 through medium-resolution (R ˜ 5300) infrared spectroscopy of the first-overtone CO bands near 2.3 μm. Our program stars are distributed from the tip of the RGB to the BLF (the bump in the luminosity function) of M13, and their Na, Mg, and Al abundances are already known from homogeneous data set analysis. Therefore, adding reliable abundances of the stable carbon isotopes to this homogeneous spectroscopic sample permits systematic tests of cluster chemical evolution models. We report preliminary results of the carbon abundance analysis for our NIFS K-band spectra and present an overview of our ongoing effort with other globular clusters.

  14. Application of a widely tunable near-infrared laser instrument for stable isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this paper, we report on the development and the application of a widely tunable near-infrared laser spectrometer for trace gas and isotope analysis. The spectrometer was based on fiber-coupled continuous-wave (cw) Telecom external cavity laser (ECDL, Tunics Plus) that is continuously tunable from 1500 to 1640 nm (C and L band) with an output power up to 3 mW and a tuning resolution of 0.001 nm (∼ 4 x 10-3 cm-1). The effective laser linewidth is less than 1 MHz. A multipass cell (New Focus - model 5612) in Herriott configuration with an optical path of 100 m was used to enhance the detection sensitivity. The developed instrument has been used for isotopic composition analysis in woodbased combustion emission and in human breath. In a wood-based combustion, the measured 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 emission is found to be (1.1011 ± 0.0040) % for the full burn operation regime. The corresponding value relative to PDB standard is (-20.17 ± 3.53) %o that is in good agreement with the typical value of (-25 ± 2) %o for wood. (author)

  15. Taking into account absorbed doses in tooth enamel due to internal irradiation of human body by radioactive cesium isotopes at analysis EPR dosimetry data: Calculation by Monte-Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borysheva, N. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Ivannikov, A. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: Ivannikov-Alexander@yandex.ru; Tikunov, D.; Orlenko, S.; Skvortsov, V.; Stepanenko, V. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    By Monte-Carlo simulation of ionizing particles transport, for a realistic mathematical phantom of a man supplemented by a dental region, absorbed doses in teeth enamel and whole body doses are calculated for cases of internal irradiation by {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs isotopes incorporated in the human body resulted from staying in radioactive contaminated territory. It is shown that dose in enamel constitutes (40{+-}4)% and (59{+-}6)% of whole body dose resulted from the decay of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs isotopes, respectively. The results of calculations may be used for conversion of absorbed dose in enamel obtained by the tooth enamel EPR spectroscopy method to whole body dose for dosimetric investigation of population of territories contaminated by the radioactive cesium, which is specific for the Chernobyl accident.

  16. Re-suspension of Cesium-134/137 into the Canadian Environment and the Contribution Stemming from the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Jean-Francois; Zhang, Weihua; Loignon-Houle, Francis; Cooke, Michael W.; Ungar, Kurt R.; Pellerin, Eric R.

    2013-04-01

    Cesium-137 (t1/2 = 30 yr) and cesium-134 (t1/2 = 2yr) constitute major fission by-products observed as the result of a nuclear incident. Such radioisotopes become integrated into the soil and biomass, and can therefore undergo re-suspension into the environment via activities such as forest fires. The Canadian Radiological Monitoring Network (CRMN), which consists of 26 environmental monitoring stations spread across the country, commonly observes cesium-137 in air filters due to re-suspension of material originating from long-past weapons testing. Cesium-134 is not observed owing to its relatively short half-life. The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant incident of March 2011 caused a major release of radioactive materials into the environment. In Canada, small quantities of both cesium-137 and cesium-134 fallout were detected with great frequency in the weeks which followed, falling off rapidly beginning in July 2011. Since September 2011, the CRMN has detected both cesium-137 and cesium-134 from air filters collected at Yellowknife, Resolute, and Quebec City locations. Using the known initial cesium-134/cesium-137 ratio stemming from this incident, along with a statistical assessment of the normality of the data distribution, we herein present evidence that strongly suggests that these activity spikes are due to re-suspended hot particles originating from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant incident. Moreover, we have evidence to suggest that this re-suspension is localized in nature. This study provided empirical insight into the transport and uptake of radionuclides over vast distances, and it demonstrates that the CRMN was able to detect evidence of a re-suspension of Fukushima-Daiichi related isotopes.

  17. Maintaining high precision of isotope ratio analysis over extended periods of time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The measurement of stable isotope ratios from natural material often requires a very high precision. This is especially true when the isotopic signatures in question are small, e.g. when - studying water stress in plants through investigation of δ13C in tree rings (up to 3 per mille variation); - following the addition of fossil carbon in atmospheric CO2 (increase of 0.025 per mille/year); - investigating δ18O or δD of water in ice cores in order to reconstruct climatic change in the past (1-2 per mille and 20-40 per mille respectively). In order to maintain such high precision over extended periods of time we have installed a rigorous quality control of isotopic measurements in our isotope laboratory. The most important guideline for establishing such a scheme is to understand the measurement process in great detail and to treat samples and reference material in a closely identical fashion. For examples tree ring isotopes are determined in a Laser Ablation experiment where the sample material is ablated and transported to combustion furnace for conversion to CO2. In the same chamber, we include cellulose as an internal reference. In between sample ablation shots we hit the cellulose and use the resulting CO2 for scale correction. δ13C analysis of CO2 in air samples from around the globe is based on whole air standards measured on the same multi-sample carousel on a daily basis. External precision of 0.013 per mille has been maintained over a record of the last four years, monitored through a daily measurement of a quality control air through the same inlet line. Water isotopic analysis is made using injection of plain water into a high temperature (>1400 deg. C) reactor filled with (glassy) carbon using a gas tight syringe. The precision for both, 18O and D/H is monitored by injecting local reference water samples interspersed with the normal sample water. Examples of the techniques and the associated QA scheme will be presented and discussed

  18. Measuring induced and natural variation in isotope ratios using single-collector and multi-collector ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The capability of providing isotopic information on the target elements is an important asset of ICPMS. In this presentation, the isotope ratio capabilities of various types of instrumentation (equipped with a quadrupole filter, a time-of-flight analyzer or a double-focusing sector field mass spectrometer and, in the latter case, outfitted with either a single detector or a multi-collector array) will be reviewed. Next, applications from either the author's lab or described in the literature will be deployed for illustrating the many circumstances in which isotope ratio analysis provides information, not accessible using elemental assay. (author)

  19. Stable lead isotope ratios from distinct anthropogenic sources in fish otoliths: a potential nursery ground stock marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, K; Shafer, D J; Gauldie, R W; DeCarlo, E H

    2000-11-01

    Variations measured in the lead (Pb) stable isotope ratios in otoliths of juvenile tropical reef fish Scarus perspiculatus, Abudefduf abdominalis and Dascyllus albisella reflect mixing of anthropogenic lead from the Kaneohe Bay watershed and 'background' lead characteristic of the adjacent ocean. The otoliths and water samples collected in a transect across the bay demonstrated nearly identical Pb isotopic trends. The Pb isotopic composition of the watershed has a low 206Pb/204Pb signature primarily reflecting past combustion of tetra-ethyl Pb additive in fuels. Ocean water not contaminated by this watershed signature has a different, high 206Pb/204Pb isotopic composition, similar to previously measured Asian anthropogenic aerosols and natural eolian dusts, where the anthropogenic signal dominates. Where a history of past anthropogenic Pb contamination exists, it may be possible to use the ratios of Pb stable isotopes in fish otoliths to reconstruct the nursery grounds of fish. PMID:11118937

  20. Platinum stable isotope ratio measurements by double-spike multiple collector ICPMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creech, J.; Baker, J.; Handler, M.;

    2013-01-01

    as the parts per million difference in Pt/PtPt ratios (μPt). Repeated measurements of the IRMM-010 Pt standard in two different laboratories, consuming ca. 40-85 ng of Pt, show that a long-term external reproducibility for μPt of ≤40 ppm (2 sd; equivalent to ≤10 ppm u, where u is the unified atomic.......29% and Pt = 7.308%) results in a redefined Pt atomic weight of 195.08395 ± 0.00068. Using our technique we have measured small, reproducible and statistically significant offsets in Pt stable isotope ratios between different Pt element standards and the IRMM-010 standard, which potentially indicates that...

  1. Chemometrical exploration of an isotopic ratio data set of acetylsalicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanimirova, I. [ChemoAC, FABI, Analytical Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Technology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel-VUB, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090 Brussels (Belgium); Daszykowski, M. [ChemoAC, FABI, Analytical Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Technology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel-VUB, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090 Brussels (Belgium); Van Gyseghem, E. [Eurofins Scientific Analytics, Rue Pierre Adolphe Bobierre, 44323 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Bensaid, F.F. [Eurofins Scientific Analytics, Rue Pierre Adolphe Bobierre, 44323 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Lees, M. [Eurofins Scientific Analytics, Rue Pierre Adolphe Bobierre, 44323 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Smeyers-Verbeke, J. [ChemoAC, FABI, Analytical Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Technology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel-VUB, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090 Brussels (Belgium); Massart, D.L. [ChemoAC, FABI, Analytical Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Technology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel-VUB, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090 Brussels (Belgium); Vander Heyden, Y. [ChemoAC, FABI, Analytical Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Technology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel-VUB, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: yvanvdh@vub.ac.be

    2005-11-03

    A data set consisting of fourteen isotopic ratios or quantities derived from such ratios for samples of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), commercialized by various pharmaceutical companies from different countries, was analyzed. The goal of the data analysis was to explore whether results can be linked to geographical origin or other features such as different manufacturing processes, of the samples. The methods of data analysis used were principal component analysis (PCA), robust principal component analysis (RPCA), projection pursuit (PP) and multiple factor analysis (MFA). The results do not seem to depend on geographic origin, except for some samples from India. They do depend on the pharmaceutical companies. Moreover, it seems that the samples from certain pharmaceutical companies form clusters of similar samples, suggesting that there is some common feature between those pharmaceutical companies. Variable selection performed by means of MFA showed that the number of variables can be reduced to five without loss of information.

  2. Recent measurements of 234U/238U isotope ratio in spring waters from the Hadzici area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hadzici area has become interesting for investigation since depleted uranium ammunition had been employed in 1995 during the NATO air strike campaign in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The purpose of this study is to determine uranium concentration and 234U/238U activity ratio in the spring waters of this area and to investigate their relationship, as well as spatial variations. The spring water samples were taken at 18 sites in total. For the determination of uranium radioisotopes, radiochemical separation procedure followed by alpha-particle spectrometry was applied. Uranium concentration in analyzed waters range from 0.15 to 1.12 μg/L. Spring waters from carbonate based sediments have a lower uranium concentration of between 0.15 and 0.43 μg/L, in comparison to waters sampled within sandstone-based sediments ranging from 0.53 to 1.12 μg/L. Dissolved uranium shows significant spatial variability and correlation with bedrock type confirmed by Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis. The majority of the analyzed waters have a 234U/238U activity ratio ranging from 1.02 to 1.90, of which half of the results range between 1.02 and 1.16. No apparent depleted uranium (DU) contamination was observed, as 234U/238U activity ratio is dependent on geochemical conditions in the environment. Even though the tested spring waters demonstrate significant variability in uranium concentration, 234U/238U activity ratio and 234U excess, waters with similar uranium isotopic signatures are observable within the region. The guidelines on the spatial redistribution of dissolved uranium (corresponding to 238U mass concentration), along with 234U/238U activity ratios were provided by the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) method. Waters having similar isotopic signature have been delineated. -- Highlights: ► Uranium concentration in analyzed spring waters ranges from 0.15 to 1.12 μg/L. ► Dissolved uranium shows correlation with bedrock type. ► Low 234U/238U

  3. Stable isotope ratios of atmospheric CO_{2} and CH_{4} over Siberia measured at ZOTTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhina, Anastasiya; Prokushkin, Anatily; Lavric, Jost; Heimann, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The boreal and arctic zones of Siberia housing the large amounts of carbon stored in the living biomass of forests and wetlands, as well as in soils and specifically permafrost, play a crucial role in earth's global carbon cycle. The long-term studies of greenhouse gases (GHG) concentrations are important instruments to analyze the response of these systems to climate warming. In parallel to GHG observations, the measurements of their stable isotopic composition can provide useful information for distinguishing contribution of individual GHG source to their atmospheric variations, since each source has its own isotopic signature. In this study we report first results of laboratory analyses of the CO2 and CH4 concentrations, the stable isotope ratio of δ13C-CO2, δ18O-CO2, δ13C-CH4, δD-CH4 measured in one-liter glass flasks which were obtained from 301 height of ZOTTO (Zotino Tall Tower Observatory, near 60° N, 90° E, about 20 km west of the Yenisei River) during 2008 - 2013 and 2010 - 2013 for stable isotope composition of CO2 and CH4. The magnitudes of δ13C-CO2 and δ18O-CO2 in a seasonal cycle are -1.4±0.1‰ (-7.6 - -9.0‰) and -2.2±0.2‰ (-0.1 - -2.3‰), respectively. The δ13C-CO2 seasonal pattern opposes the CO2 concentrations, with a gradual enrichment in heavy isotope occurring during May - July, reflecting its discrimination in photosynthesis, and further depletion in August - September as photosynthetic activity decreases comparatively to ecosystem respiration. Relationship between the CO2 concentrations and respective δ13C-CO2 (Keeling plot) reveals isotopic source signature for growing season (May - September) -27.3±1.4‰ and -30.4±2.5‰ for winter (January - March). The behavior of δ18O-CO2 associated with both high photosynthetic rate in the June (enrichment of atmospheric CO2 by 18O as consequence of CO2 equilibrium with "heavy" leaf water) and respiratory activity of forest floor in June - October (depletion of respired CO2 by 18O

  4. Stable isotope ratio analysis: A potential analytical tool for the authentication of South African lamb meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Sara Wilhelmina; Muller, Magdalena; van der Rijst, Marieta; Hoffman, Louwrens Christiaan

    2016-02-01

    Stable isotope ratios ((13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N) of South African Dorper lambs from farms with different vegetation types were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), to evaluate it as a tool for the authentication of origin and feeding regime. Homogenised and defatted meat of the Longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle of lambs from seven different farms was assessed. The δ(13)C values were affected by the origin of the meat, mainly reflecting the diet. The Rûens and Free State farms had the lowest (p ⩽ 0.05) δ(15)N values, followed by the Northern Cape farms, with Hantam Karoo/Calvinia having the highest δ(15)N values. Discriminant analysis showed δ(13)C and δ(15)N differences as promising results for the use of IRMS as a reliable analytical tool for lamb meat authentication. The results suggest that diet, linked to origin, is an important factor to consider regarding region of origin classification for South African lamb. PMID:26304440

  5. Single-step method for hydrogen isotope ratio measurement of water in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.V.; Gailitis, V.

    1988-06-01

    The standard zinc reduction technique for stable hydrogen isotope analysis has been modified to a single-step method which enables rapid measurement of the deuterium to hydrogen (/sup 2/H//sup 1/H) ratio in water from porous media. The novel feature of the method is microdistillation of water from the porous medium within the zinc reduction tube. The need for such a technique arose from a requirement for /sup 2/H//sup 1/H ratio measurement on microliter quantities of water from unsaturated porous media. Conventional methods using reduction of water over zinc or uranium require free water which must be extracted from the porous medium by either immiscible fluid displacement, vacuum distillation, azeotropic distillation, or squeezing. Each of these methods is time-consuming, can present extraction difficulties at low water content, and may lead to isotope fractionation where phase changes occur during the extraction procedure. Because the technique presented here requires only 100-300 mg, of sample (5-30 mg of water, depending on water content) it has a wide application to experimental studies of water movement in porous media using water either artificially enriched in deuterium or of natural abundance. The authors have used the method successfully in field and laboratory experiments at both environmental and enriched concentrations of deuterium. The method is equally applicable to saturated porous media and also gives a measure of the water content of the sample.

  6. Use of sulfur isotope ratios to determine anthropogenic sulfur signals in a grassland ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archived soil and herbage samples from the control plot of the Rothamsted Park Grass Experiment, established in 1856, were used to investigate the effects of dramatically changing SO2 pollution inputs on the concentrations and stable isotope ratios of S in the samples. Both herbage S concentrations and δ34S showed clear trends over the last 135 years. Herbage S concentrations correlated positively with annual total SO2 emissions in the U.K. (R2 = 0.61), whereas herbage δ34S correlated negatively with SO2 emissions (R2 = 0.83). These results indicate that local variations of anthropogenic S inputs were not important at the site and verify the usefulness of this unique sample set for environmental monitoring. In contrast, the concentrations of total and extractable S in the topsoil were less sensitive to the changing pollution, although the δ34S values of soil S also decreased significantly, particularly during the period 1900−1970. Based on these S isotope ratios, we estimated that anthropogenic S contributed up to 50% of the herbage S uptake at the peak of SO2 emissions and still accounts for about 30% of the S presently stored in the topsoil. (author)

  7. Mg isotopic ratios in giant stars of the globular cluster NGC 6752

    CERN Document Server

    Yong, D; Lambert, D L; Nissen, P E; Shetrone, M; Yong, David; Grundahl, Frank; Lambert, David L.; Nissen, Poul Erik; Shetrone, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Mg isotopic abundance ratios are measured in 20 bright red giants in globular cluster NGC 6752 based on very high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with UVES on the VLT. There is a considerable spread in the ratio 24Mg:25Mg:26Mg with values ranging from 53:9:39 to 83:10:7. We measured the abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, and Fe combining our sample with 21 RGB bump stars (Grundahl et al. 2002). The abundances of the samples are consistent and exhibit the usual anticorrelations between O-Na and Mg-Al. A positive correlation is found between 26Mg and Al, a mild anticorrelation is found between 24Mg and Al, while no correlation is found between 25Mg and Al. None of the elemental or isotopic abundances show a dependence on evolutionary status and, as shown by Gratton et al. (2001), the abundance variations exist even in main sequence stars. This strongly suggests that the star-to-star abundance variations are a result of varying degrees of pollution with intermediate mass AGB stars being likely pollut...

  8. On reactivity of metallic zinc used for preparation of samples for hydrogen isotope ratio measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the reagent which is suitable to the reduction of water to hydrogen for preparing the samples for hydrogen isotope ratio measurement, the supply of the zinc of BDH Co. which has been widely used so far was stopped, consequently, for the purpose of searching for its substitute, several kinds of metallic zinc were obtained, and their reactivity was examined. As the criteria of the reactivity, the points that the experimental setup used so far can be used and that the accuracy of measurement and efficiency similar to those of heretofore can be obtained were selected, then, it was found that the zinc made by Bio Geochemical Laboratory, Indiana University, and the powder zinc on the market satisfied the criteria. In order to measure hydrogen isotope ratio within the measurement error of ±1%, it is necessary to maintain the quantities of zinc and water to be used and reaction temperature constant, to prepare the standard sample and an unknown sample under the same conditions, and to do the mass analysis as quickly as possible. The researches carried out so far, the reactivity test on various kinds of zinc and so on are reported. The optimum reaction conditions are shown. (K.I.)

  9. Dependence of the precision of uranium isotope ratio on particle diameter in individual particle analysis with SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of the precision of uranium isotope ratio on particle diameter in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was investigated. Each uranium particle in certified reference materials with different isotopic composition (235U/238U = 0.01-1.00) was observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transferred by a manipulator on a glassy-carbon planchet for subsequent isotope ratio analysis with SIMS. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of uranium isotope ratios varied with particle diameter, the amount of less abundant uranium isotope and the number of measurement cycles. For the particle with the diameter less than 1.0 μm, the RSD significantly increased with increasing the number of measurement cycles, which is due to the difficulty of obtaining constant signals for a long duration. In contrast, no significant increase in the RSD was observed in the analysis of the particle with the diameter larger than 2.0 μm. As the results, it is estimated that the 235U amount of 4.5 fg is sufficient to obtain the 235U/238U ratio with the RSD within 5.0%. For the analysis of minor isotopes, the 234U amount of 0.42 fg and the 236U amount of 1.1 fg are sufficient to obtain the 234U/238U and 236U/238U ratios with the RSD within 20%, respectively

  10. The isotopic composition of lead in man and the environment in Finland: isotope ratios of lead as indicators of pollutant source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic composition of lead was determined in samples from the Helsinki area: in emission sources (gasoline, incinerator and lead smelter emissions, coal), in sources of intake to man (air, diet), in samples representing long-term deposition (lichen, soil, lake sediments) and in human tissue. The measurements of the isotope ratios 206Pb/204Pb and 206Pb/207Pb were done by thermal ionization mass spectrometry after chemical separation of lead by anion exchange and cathodic electrodeposition. The origin of lead in man and the environment in the Helsinki area was evaluated by using the differences in the measured isotope ratios as an indicator. The means of the ratios in gasoline (206Pb/207Pb 1.124+-0.026, 206Pb/204Pb 17.45+-0.42) and the ratios in other emission sources in Helsinki (206Pb/207Pb 1.149-1.226, 206Pb/204Pb 17.94-19.24) were significantly different. Lead in air samples from Helsinki (1.123+-0.013) could be attributed to gasoline, as lead in soil near a highway (1.136+-0.003). By contrast, isotope ratios measured in lichen (1.148+-0.006) indicated considerable amounts of lead from sources with higher 206Pb abundances, evidently industrial sources. The isotope ratios in human liver, lung, and bone (206Pb/207Pb 1.142+-0.015, 1.151+-0.011, and 1.156+-0.013, respectively and 206Pb/204Pb 17.76+-0.28, 17.91+-0.20, and 17.96+-0.09, respectively) were practically the same and no significant dependence of the isotope ratios on age or concentration of lead was seen. In lake sediment cores a correlation was found between the isotope ratios, lead concentration, and depth. The non-anthropogenic lead of high isotope ratios from bedrock was the major component at depths dated older than 100 years. At the surface of the sediment atmospheric lead prevailed, with ratios similar to those of gasoline, air samples and lichen. In the post-1900 layers, anthropogenic lead made up about 40-60% of the total sedimentary lead

  11. Measurement of lead isotope ratios in wine by ICP-MS and its applications to the determination of lead concentration by isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods are described for the accurate and precise determination of lead concentrations and the isotopic composition of lead in wine samples using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). This method needs little sample preparation. A comparison with lead isotope ratios measured by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) in three wine samples reveals a good agreement between the two techniques. The lead concentration in three certified wine samples were measured by isotope dilution (ID) and the results are compared with those obtained by external calibration ICP-MS. (orig.). With 1 fig., 4 tabs

  12. Is modern climate variability reflected in compund specific hydrogen isotope ratios of sedimentary biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, D.; Radke, J.; Gleixner, G.

    2003-04-01

    Compound specific hydrogen isotope ratios are emerging as a new palaeoclimatic and palaeohydrological proxy. First reconstructions of palaeoclimate using D/H ratios from n-alkanes are available (Andersen et al. 2001, Sauer et al. 2001, Sachse et al. 2003). However, a systematic approach comparing recent sedimentary biomarkers with climate data is still lacking. We are establishing an ecosystem study of small, ground water fed lakes with known limnology. Nearly all lakes are close to a long-term climate-monitoring site (CARBOEUROPE flux tower site, IAEA precipitation monitoring) delivering ecophysiological and climatic data as temperature, precipitation, evapotranspiration etc. Water, primary biomass, plant, soil and sediment were sampled from lakes and the surrounding ecosystem along a climatic and isotopic gradient in meteoric waters from northern Finland (deltaD: -130 permil vs. VSMOW) to southern Italy (deltaD: -30 permil vs. VSMOW, IAEA 2001). Biomarkers were extracted from the samples to test if climatic variability is reflected in their D/H ratios. First results of the factors influencing the hydrogen isotope composition of sedimentary biomarkers and their use as palaeoclimatic and palaeohydrological proxy will be presented. Andersen N, Paul HA, Bernasconi SM, McKenzie JA, Behrens A, Schaeffer P, Albrecht P (2001) Large and rapid climate variability during the Messinian salinity crisis: Evidence from deuterium concentrations of individual biomarkers. Geology 29:799-802 IAEA (2001) GNIP Maps and Animations. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. Accessible at http://isohis.iaea.org Sachse D, Radke J, Gaupp R, Schwark L, Lüniger G, Gleixner G (2003) Reconstruction of palaeohydrological conditions in a lagoon during the 2nd Zechstein cycle through simultaneous use of deltaD values of individual n-alkanes and delta18O and delta13C values of carbonates. International Journal of Earth Sciences, submitted Sauer PE, Eglington TI, Hayes JM, Schimmelman A

  13. Spins and magnetic moments of rubidium and cesium nuclides far from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies at ISOLDE have concerned spins and magnetic moments of neutron-deficient rubidium and cesium isotopes. Here, the main results obtained, and, in the case of cesium, new moment measurements are briefly discussed also the results from measurements on neutron-rich nuclides of rubidium and cesium. (orig./AH)

  14. Estimating the distribution of strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr in the Precambrian of Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kaislaniemi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A method to estimate the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of a rock based on its age and Rb/Sr ratio is presented. This method, together with data from the Rock Geochemical Database of Finland (n=6544 is used to estimate the 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Precambrian of Finland and in its different major units. A generalization to cover the whole area of Finland is achieved by smoothing of estimation points. The estimation method is evaluated by comparing its results to published Rb-Sr isotope analyses (n=138 obtained on the Finnish Precambrian. The results show correspondence to different geological units of Finland,but no systematic difference between Archaean and younger areas is evident. Evaluation of the method shows that most of the estimates are reliable and accurate to be used as background material for provenance studies in archaeology, paleontology and sedimentology. However, some granitic rocks may have large (>1.0 % relative errors.Strontium concentration weighted average of the estimates differs only by 0.001 from the average 87Sr/86Sr ratio (0.730 of the rivers on the Fennoscandian shield.

  15. What climate information is recorded in stable isotope ratios of wood lignin methoxyl groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greule, Markus; Keppler, Frank

    2010-05-01

    The stable isotope composition of the bioelements C, O, H and N in plant organic matter is known to be a very powerful for various environmental impacts. Particularly tree rings are suitable for this analysis because they exhibit a "climate archive" with a yearly or even biannual resolution. One of the most determined wood compounds is cellulose which amongst others is used to reconstruct the temperature due to measurement of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Therefore cellulose is converted into cellulose nitrate to eliminate the exchangeable hydroxyl hydrogen or equilibration methods are used. However, a general problem associated with the determination of the stable hydrogen values of marker compounds for the study of climate and environmental conditions is the isolation of the pure compound for analysis by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Exploitation of components of wood as markers, in particular, has been restricted by the very labour intensive and time consuming preparation of samples (e.g. cellulose nitrate). An alternative way to record climate information from tree rings was recently proposed by Keppler et al. (2007) who measured the stable hydrogen values of methoxyl groups in wood. Lignin methoxyl groups are considered to be stable, i.e. the hydrogen atoms of the methoxyl moiety do not exchange with those of plant water during ongoing metabolic reactions in the plant. Thus the initial deuterium content of the methoxyl groups of lignin in woody tissue at formation is retained throughout the lifetime of the tree and in preserved tissue. The methoxyl content of lignin in wood is usually determined by the Zeisel method (Zeisel, 1885) - the reaction between methyl ethers and hydroiodic acid to form methyl iodide. Exploiting this reaction for the measurement of stable hydrogen values of lignin methoxyl groups ensures that during the entire analytical procedure the isotope signal is preserved since no isotopic exchange occurs between the methyl groups and

  16. Potential effect of algal productivity in the San Joaquin River on nitrate concentrations and isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Young, M. B.; Volkmar, E. C.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Borglin, S. E.; Stringfellow, W. T.

    2008-12-01

    The d15N of algae in nitrate-rich rivers is often about 4 to 5 permil lower than the d15N of the nitrate used by the algae. In cases where the algal productivity significantly depletes the available nitrate pool, the uptake of nitrate can cause significant increases in the d15N and d18O of the residual nitrate, resulting in isotope values similar to what would be expected for a major contribution of human or animal waste to the river. Furthermore, progressive algal uptake also causes nitrate d18O and d15N values that plot along slopes of about 1:2, consistent with assimilation and/or denitrification. One way to resolve the question of whether the high nitrate d15N and d18O values reflect a waste source, assimilation, or denitrification is to compare the simultaneous changes in nitrate concentrations, algal quality and loads, nitrate d15N and d18O, and the d15N, d13C, and C:N of the particulate organic matter, which is often dominated by algae in large rivers. As part of a recent investigation of nitrate and organic matter sources to the San Joaquin River (SJR), samples were collected twice-weekly to monthly for over 2 years from 7 mainstem sites (as well as many major and minor tributary sites) and analyzed for a wide range of chemical constituents and isotope ratios. The average nitrate d15N of mainstem sites was +11 permil, with a range of +2 to +17; the average d18O was +5 permil, with a range of -1 to +18. The potential impact of algal uptake on isotope ratios in the SJR was modeled using isotope and chemical data from 2 Lagrangian experiments in the San Luis Drain, a simple concrete-lined canal which drains into the SJR, has only a single input of water, and has algae similar to that in the SJR and a high productivity rate (Volkmar et al., in prep.).

  17. Seasonal changes in stable carbon isotope ratios within annual growth rings of Pinus radiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stable isotope composition of photosynthetically assimilated carbon (δ13C) is determined by the ratio of the leaf internal CO2 concentration (ci) to that of the ambient air (ca), and so reflects the contribution of both stomatal conductance (gs) and the rate of photosynthesis (A). Assimilated carbon which is subsequently laid down as wood in annual growth rings may therefore represent a time integrated record of physiological responses by the whole tree to seasonal changes in the environmental variables regulating growth. We analysed the stable carbon isotope composition of Pinus radiata wood collected from two plantation forest sites in New Zealand which differ markedly in temperature, rainfall and soil characteristics. For both sites, discs were cut from the stem of several trees near ground level and whole wood samples were taken from within individual annual growth rings over a number of years. At one site, diameter bands were installed over the 1994 - 1996 growing seasons in order to date precisely the formation of wood during that time. Trees at each site consistently showed a seasonal pattern in the stable isotope composition of wood within individual growth rings. The amplitude of seasonal δ13C variation at the wet and dry sites were 1-2 per thousand and 4 per thousand respectively. Mean δ13C values from the wet site were 3 per thousand more 13C depleted than those from the dry site implying lower water-use efficiency (carbon assimilation per unit transpiration). A process-based, model of stomatal conductance and CO2 assimilation was combined with a soil-water balance model to estimate the average daily leaf-level intercellular CO2 concentration (ci). Over two growing seasons at each site there was generally good agreement between mean canopy-level ci derived from the tree-ring δ13C data and modelled leaf-level ci levels. Further, the ratio of annual CO2 assimilation to transpiration estimated by the model for each site correlated with the

  18. Application of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry to the determination of uranium isotope ratios in individual particles for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the determination of uranium isotope ratios in individual particles was determined. For this purpose, we developed an experimental procedure including single particle transfer with a manipulator, chemical dissolution and isotope ratio analysis, and applied to the analysis of individual uranium particles in certified reference materials (NBL CRM U050 and U350). As the result, the 235U/238U isotope ratio for the particle with the diameter between 0.5 and 3.9 μm was successfully determined with the deviation from the certified ratio within 1.8%. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of the 235U/238U isotope ratio was within 4.2%. Although the analysis of 234U/238U and 236U/238U isotope ratios gave the results with inferior precision, the R.S.D. within 20% was possible for the measurement of the particle with the diameter more than 2.1 μm. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of a simulated environmental sample prepared from a mixture of indoor dust (NIST SRM 2583) and uranium particles (NBL CRM U050, U350 and U950a). From the results, the proposed procedure was found to be an alternative analytical tool for nuclear safeguards

  19. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of water for 1D2/1H1 ratio analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) has been investigated for optical isotopic analysis of the deuterium to protium ratio in enriched water samples in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. Multivariate PLSR (Partial Least Squares Regression) based calibrations were carried out and validated using multiple statistical parameters. Comparisons of results are reported using two spectrometers having two orders of magnitude difference in spectral resolution. The accuracy and precision of isotopic analysis depends on the spectral resolution and the inherent isotope shift of the elements. The requirements for spectral resolution of the measurement system can be significantly relaxed when the isotopic abundance ratio is determined using chemometric processing of the spectra. Large isotopic shifts in the individual rotational branches of OH/OD molecular emission spectra were measured. Optimized temporal conditions for LAMIS measurements were established. Several sub-regions of spectra were used for PLSR calibration and the results demonstrate that both the emission intensity and degree of spectral differentiation affect the quality of the PLSR calibration. LAMIS results also were compared with traditional LIBS results obtained using PLSR and a spectral deconvolution method, demonstrating the advantages of LAMIS over LIBS with respect to isotopic composition determination. - Highlights: • D/H isotopic ratio in water over a large dynamic range was measured by LAMIS. • PLSR based multivariate calibration was used for construction of calibrations. • Region of interest significantly affects the analytical results of isotopic ratio. • LAMIS has improved results over LIBS irrespective of the spectrometer resolution. • The superiority is more prominent in the case using low resolution spectrometer

  20. Strontium isotope ratios - a possible tool to study the authenticity of Indian tea using MC-ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, an analytical procedure based on determination of the Sr isotope ratio 87Sr/86Sr in the Indian tea samples by MC-ICP-MS was developed and applied to 28 tea samples from four different Indian regions. The 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio of the tea samples in different Indian regions is strongly dependent on the soil and growth environment condition. The analysis results of 28 Indian tea samples revealed that 87Sr/86Sr atom ratio follows the order Darjeeling > Kangra > Assam > Munnar

  1. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isselhardt, Brett H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  2. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    employing a quadrupole MS system for compound identification and an isotope ratio MS for measuring the stable isotope ratios of deuterium and hydrogen (D/H) in fatty acids. Finally, the method for analyzing the compound abundance data is included. This study indicates that removal of ricinoleic acid is a conserved consequence of each processing step we tested. Furthermore, the stable isotope D/H ratio of ricinoleic acid distinguished between two of the three castor seed sources. Concentrations of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucosamine and myo-inositol differentiated between crude or acetone extracted samples and samples produced by protein precipitation. Taken together these data illustrate the ability to distinguish between processes used to purify a ricin sample as well as potentially the source seeds.

  3. Performance and optimization of a combustion interface for isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, D. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, M. P.; Studley, S. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Conditions and systems for on-line combustion of effluents from capillary gas chromatographic columns and for removal of water vapor from product streams were tested. Organic carbon in gas chromatographic peaks 15 s wide and containing up to 30 nanomoles of carbon was quantitatively converted to CO2 by tubular combustion reactors, 200 x 0.5 mm, packed with CuO or NiO. No auxiliary source of O2 was required because oxygen was supplied by metal oxides. Spontaneous degradation of CuO limited the life of CuO reactors at T > 850 degrees C. Since NiO does not spontaneously degrade, its use might be favored, but Ni-bound carbon phases form and lead to inaccurate isotopic results at T CuO at 850 degrees C, NiO + O2 (gas-phase mole fraction, 10(-3)) at 1050 degrees C and NiO at 1150 degrees C. The combustion interface did not contribute additional analytical uncertainty, thus observed standard deviations of 13C/12C ratios were within a factor of 2 of shot-noise limits. For combustion and isotopic analyses of CH4, in which quantitative combustion required T approximately 950 degrees C, NiO-based systems are preferred, and precision is approximately 2 times lower than that observed for other analytes. Water must be removed from the gas stream transmitted to the mass spectrometer or else protonation of CO2 will lead to inaccuracy in isotopic analyses. Although thresholds for this effect vary between mass spectrometers, differential permeation of H2O through Nafion tubing was effective in both cases tested, but the required length of the Nafion membrane was 4 times greater for the more sensitive mass spectrometer.

  4. Decorporation of cesium-137; Decorporation du cesium-137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fleche, Ph.; Destombe, C.; Grasseau, A.; Mathieu, J.; Chancerelle, Y.; Mestries, J.C. [GMR, Direction des Recherches, Etudes et Techniques, 94 - Arcueil (France)

    1997-12-31

    Cesium radio-isotopes, especially cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) are among the radionuclides of main importance produced by a fission reaction in reactor or a nuclear weapon explosion. In the environment, {sup 137}Cs is a major contaminant which can cause severe {beta}, {gamma}irradiations and contaminations. {sup 137}Cs is distributed widely and relatively uniformly throughout the body with the highest concentration in skeletal muscles. A treatment becomes difficult afterwards. The purposes of this report are Firstly to compare the Prussian blue verses cobalt and potassium ferrocyanide (D.I. blue) efficiency for the {sup 137}Cs decorporation and secondly to assess a chronological treatment with D.I. blue. (author)

  5. Continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry of carbon dioxide trapped as strontium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic signal provided by differential discrimination against atmospheric carbon dioxide (13CO2) by C3 and C4 plant photosynthetic pathways is being widely used to study the processes of carbon (C) fixation, soil organic matter formation, and mineralization in nature. These studies have been facilitated by the availability of automated C and nitrogen (N) combustion analyzers (ANCA) combined with continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometers (CFIRMS). Analysis of 13CO2 in these instruments requires consistent sample mass for best precision, a requirement that is easily satisfied for soil and tissue samples by adjusting sample weight. Consistent CO2 sample size is much more difficult to achieve using gas handling systems for samples of headspace gases when CO2 concentrations vary widely. Long storage of gaseous samples also is difficult. Extended respiration studies are most easily conducted by trapping CO2 in alkali and conversion to an insoluble carbonate. Thermal decomposition of the carbonate in an on-line ANCA allows consistent and optimal CO2 sample mass to be obtained. The use of precipitated carbonates also facilitates storage of samples and enables full automation of sample analysis using an ANCA interfaced to a CFIRMS. Calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) carbonates were tested. Strontium carbonate (SrCO3) with the addition of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) as a combustion catalyst was found most suitable

  6. Analysis of isotopic ratio 235U/238U of UF6 with quadrupole mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium enrichment assay is vital to the research and development of uranium enrichment technology. In order to develop a small, light and high speed mass scanning quadrupole mass spectrometer as an on-line mass spectrometer, the design and trial fabrication of the system have been carried out, together with various performance evaluation tests. For the system, it is desirable to select the structure capable of making the preliminary experiments for on-line assay. The essential conditions for the uranium enrichment assay include enough resolution to identify uranium isotopes; good accuracy and precision; and small memory effect. The mass spectrometer fabricated for trial was confirmed to nearly satisfy these requirements. Residual UF6 in the ionization chamber reaches 1/50,000 in three minutes after evacuation, so that the memory effect is negligible. The necessary conditions for the on-line assay include the stable operation of the system for long time and small consumption of UF6. The measurement of reproducibility of isotopic ratio was made by introducing UF6 continuously and operating the system for long time. While the quadrupole mass spectrometer fabricated for trial was judged to be applicable to uranium enrichment test, the applicability as an on-line mass spectrometer will be evaluated in the field test of the cascade in future. (Kobatake, H.)

  7. The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM): A Plutonium Production Verification Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the lifetime of a production reactor, neutrons from the fission process not only convert U-238 into plutonium but also bring about changes in the elements of the reactor's core components. Components such as shielding, pressure vessels, coolant piping, control rods, structural supports, and, in the case of graphite moderated reactors, the solid graphite moderator are all affected. Because a reactor's total plutonium production is directly related to total neutron fluence, and, likewise, changes in the elements and isotopes of a reactor's core components are directly related to fluence; it was argued that measuring these changes could provide an accurate estimate of a reactor's total plutonium production. The U.S. Department of Energy funds a project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop this concept into a practical plutonium production verification tool for graphite moderated reactors. The following sections describe the GIRM project development process. The purpose of this document is to provide a simple, concise description of the graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) for use as a verification tool in estimating a graphite-moderated reactor's total plutonium production. The description covers the theory behind the technique and how the method is actually applied.

  8. Method based on isotope ratio mass spectrometry for evaluation of carbon activation in the reactor graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general idea of this work is to introduce an evaluation method to restore the irradiation parameters of graphite or other carbonaceous materials using experimental and modelling results of 13C generation in the irradiated material. The method is based on coupling of stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry and computer modelling of the reactor core to evaluate the realistic characteristics of the reactor core such as the neutron fluence in any position of the reactor graphite stack or other graphite constructions. The generation of carbon isotopes 13C and 14C in the irradiated graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor has been estimated by modelling of the reactor core with computer codes MCNPX and CINDER90. Good agreement of simulated and measured Δ13C/12C values in graphite of the central part of the reactor core indicates that the neutron flux (1.40 x 1014 n/cm2 s) is modelled accurately in the graphite sleeve of the fuel channel. The simulated activity of 14C is compared with the one measured by the β spectrometry technique. Results indicate that production of 14C from 14N in the RBMK-1500 reactor is considerable and has to be taken into account in order to make proper evaluation of 14C activity. Measured 14C specific activity values correspond to 15 ± 4 ppm impurity of 14N in graphite samples from the RBMK-1500 reactor core.

  9. Carbon isotope ratios in crassulacean Acid metabolism plants: seasonal patterns from plants in natural stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarek, S R

    1976-09-01

    A year round study of photosynthesis and carbon isotope fractionation was conducted with plants of Opuntia phaeacantha Engelm. and Yucca baccata Torr. occurring in natural stands at elevations of 525, 970, 1450 and 1900 m. Plant water potentials and the daytime pattern of (14)CO(2) photosynthesis were similar for all cacti along the elevational gradient, despite significant differences in temperature regime and soil water status. Carbon isotope ratios of total tissue and soluble extract fractions were relatively constant throughtout the entire year. Additionally, the sigma(13)C values were similar in all plants of the same species along the elevational gradient, i.e. -12.5 +/- 0.86 per thousand for O. phaeacantha and -15.7 +/- 0.95 per thousand for Y. baccata. The results of this study indicate Crassulacean acid metabolism predominates as the major carbon pathway of these plants, which do not facultatively utilize the reductive pentose phosphate cycle of photosynthesis as the primary carboxylation reaction. PMID:16659680

  10. Trapping characteristics for gaseous cesium generated from different cesium compounds by fly ash filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the fly ash ceramic foam filter to trap gaseous cesium generated during the OREOX and sintering processes of DUPIC green pellets. The trapping experiments of gaseous cesium generated from different cesium compounds using fly ash filters were carried out in a two-zone furnace under air and hydrogen (Ar/4% H2) conditions. XRD and SEM analyses were used to analyze reaction products of different cesium compounds with fly ash filters. To manufacture ceramic foam filters, fly ash with a Si/Al mole ratio of 2.1 and polyvinyl alcohol as binder were used. Reaction products formed by the trapping reaction of different cesium compounds with fly ash filters were investigated. The major reaction products of gaseous cesium generated from cesium silicate and CsI by fly ash filters indicated that pollucite (CsAlSi2O6) phase was formed under air and hydrogen conditions when the carrier gas velocity was 2 cm/sec. The minimum reaction temperature of fly ash filter with gaseous cesium was determined as about 600 deg. C. Finally, off-gas treatment system of sintering process in a hot cell of lMEF was explained as an application example of fly ash filter for trapping gaseous cesium. (author)

  11. Extraction of Water from Soil and Plant Samples for 18O/16O and D/H Isotope Ratio Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for a rapid, inexpensive technique for routine extraction of water from plant and soil samples for Oxygen-18/Oxygen-16 (18O/16O) and Hydrogen-2/Hydrogen-1 (D/H) isotope ratio measurements is increasing due to the greater demand for isotopic data in agroecological, soil water, evaporation and transpiration partitioning and hydrological studies. The common sample extraction technique is vacuum distillation. Most of the current techniques are laborious, time consuming and involve complicated setups with specially-made glass apparatus. In addition, liquid nitrogen or dry ice is needed to freeze and trap water vapour evaporated during extraction. Both of these cooling agents can be difficult to acquire in many developing countries. With water isotope analyses becoming cheaper, easier and faster (e.g. through the development of modern laser isotope analysers), the bottleneck in sample throughput is often the water extraction time from the soil and plant samples instead of the isotopic analysis of water

  12. Development and Deployment of Retrofit PolarisQ Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Isotope Ratio Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) FY15 progress in support of National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Portable Mass Spectrometer project. A retrofit PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometer (RPMS) has been assembled from components of two PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometers used in previous isotope ratio programs. The retrofit mass spectrometer includes a custom Hastelloy vacuum chamber which is about ¼ the size of the standard aluminum vacuum chamber and reduces the instrument weight from the original by nine pounds. In addition, the new vacuum chamber can be independently heated to reduce impurities such as water, which reacts with UF6 to produce HF in the vacuum chamber. The analyzer and all components requiring service are mounted on the chamber lid, facilitating quick and easy replacement of consumable components such as the filament and electron multiplier.

  13. Nitrogen isotope ratio analysis of small samples: sample preparation and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the preparation of samples in the range of 14-100 μg of organic and precipitated N for mass spectrometric isotope ratio analysis is described. In vacuo combustion and molecular sieve trapping of the sample gas into a 0.5 mL mass spectrometer inlet volume are employed. Samples can be processed at a rate of two to three per hour. The standard deviation of 12 analyses of a peptone preparation was 0.10%. The results of an interlaboratory calibration effort are presented. The materials tested were peptone, thiourea, histidine, kerogen, and two (NH4)2SO4 standards. The results of these comparisons were with the range +/-0.12 delta15N or less. Peptone was found to provide a more rigorous test of the combustion and preparation system than nitrogen salts and organic compounds of lower molecular weight. 20 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  14. Biomedical and Forensic Applications of Combined Catalytic Hydrogenation-Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Sephton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of biological molecules such as fatty acids and the steroid hormones have the potential to benefit enormously from stable carbon isotope ratio measurements of individual molecules. In their natural form, however, the body’s molecules interact too readily with laboratory equipment designed to separate them for accurate measurements to be made.Some methods overcome this problem by adding carbon to the target molecule, but this can irreversibly overprint the carbon source ‘signal’. Hydropyrolysis is a newly-applied catalytic technique that delicately strips molecules of their functional groups but retains their carbon skeletons and stereochemistries intact, allowing precise determination of the carbon source. By solving analytical problems, the new technique is increasing the ability of scientists to pinpoint molecular indicators of disease, elucidate metabolic pathways and recognise administered substances in forensic investigations.

  15. Nitrogen stable isotope ratio in the manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, reflects eutrophication levels in tidal flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the effects of anthropogenic eutrophication on coastal fisheries may help in the enhancement of fishery production by effective utilization of sewage effluents, as well as in the consequent reduction of eutrophication. In this study, it was revealed that the nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in the soft tissues of the manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, can be used as an indicator of anthropogenic eutrophication levels in tidal flat environments by investigation of δ15N in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), particulate organic matter (POM), sedimentary organic matter (SOM) and soft tissues of the clam in five tidal flats in Japan with different levels of DIN concentration. In addition, it was found that the acid insoluble fraction of the shell organic matrix, conchiolin, can be used as a proxy for the soft tissues in δ15N analyses. This will contribute in easier storage handling and the expansion of chances for sample acquisition.

  16. Nitrogen stable isotope ratio in the manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, reflects eutrophication levels in tidal flats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Kodama, Masashi; Fukuda, Masaaki

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the effects of anthropogenic eutrophication on coastal fisheries may help in the enhancement of fishery production by effective utilization of sewage effluents, as well as in the consequent reduction of eutrophication. In this study, it was revealed that the nitrogen stable isotope ratio (delta(15)N) in the soft tissues of the manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, can be used as an indicator of anthropogenic eutrophication levels in tidal flat environments by investigation of delta(15)N in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), particulate organic matter (POM), sedimentary organic matter (SOM) and soft tissues of the clam in five tidal flats in Japan with different levels of DIN concentration. In addition, it was found that the acid insoluble fraction of the shell organic matrix, conchiolin, can be used as a proxy for the soft tissues in delta(15)N analyses. This will contribute in easier storage handling and the expansion of chances for sample acquisition. PMID:19647270

  17. Analysis of carbon isotope ratio variation in CO2 efflux from forest floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To model carbon cycle in surface soil, variation of carbon-14 isotope ratio in soil-respired CO2 efflux from a larch forest floor was investigated by field measurements with an accumulation chamber, laboratory experiments on soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and numerical simulations. The field measurements showed a characteristic variation in δ14C with large amplitude of diurnal variation in winter. From laboratory experiments, SOM decomposition was modeled as a function of soil temperature, CO2 concentration in ambient air and soil depth at a fixed soil moisture condition typical of the objective forest. An inversely proportional dependency on CO2 concentration was found. Less efficient SOM decomposition in deeper soil per unit content of SOM was also modeled. By using these results on SOM decomposition, numerical simulations were carried out to show that the diurnal and annual variation in δ14C found in the field measurements could be explained by change in depth profile of SOM decomposition. (author)

  18. An improved selected ion recording system for precise isotope ratio determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved analog four-channel selected ion recording system is described, in which major modifications permit a decrease in the dwell time to 33 ms per channel, thus minimizing the mass cycling error. Synchronization with a sinusoidal sweep voltage superimposed on the normal accelerating voltage (8 kV) enables two channels to be monitored simultaneously in real time and each mass to be recorded continuously. These improvements allow measurement of ion current ratios with a precision of 0.2% over a wide dynamic range, permitting accurate determination of isotopic enrichment in biomedical assays even when this enrichment is derived from a single label. Use of the system is illustrated by the analysis of palmitate turnover in dogs (using [1 - 13C] palmitic acid) with an average standard deviation corresponding to the detection of 0.04% excess of [1 - 13C] palmitate. (author)

  19. Development and Deployment of Retrofit PolarisQ Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Isotope Ratio Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Cyril V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitten, William B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) FY15 progress in support of National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Portable Mass Spectrometer project. A retrofit PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometer (RPMS) has been assembled from components of two PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometers used in previous isotope ratio programs. The retrofit mass spectrometer includes a custom Hastelloy vacuum chamber which is about ¼ the size of the standard aluminum vacuum chamber and reduces the instrument weight from the original by nine pounds. In addition, the new vacuum chamber can be independently heated to reduce impurities such as water, which reacts with UF6 to produce HF in the vacuum chamber. The analyzer and all components requiring service are mounted on the chamber lid, facilitating quick and easy replacement of consumable components such as the filament and electron multiplier.

  20. Climate and habitat reconstruction using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of collagen in prehistoric herbivore teeth from Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Stanley H.; DeNiro, Michael J.

    1989-05-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios have been determined for tooth collagen of 27 prehistoric herbivores from a rock shelter in the central Rift Valley of Kenya. Collagen samples whose isotope ratios were not altered by diagenesis were identified using several analytical methods. During the later Holocene, when the climate was as dry or drier than at present, the isotopic compositions of individual animals are similar to those of modern individuals of the same species. During the earlier Holocene, when the climate was wetter than at present, the δ 15N and δ 13C values are lower than those for their modern counterparts. When diagenetic factors can be discounted and adequate modern comparative data are available, stable isotope analysis of herbivore teeth and bones can be used to evaluate prehistoric climate and habitat conditions.

  1. Introduction to Body Composition Assessment Using the Deuterium Dilution Technique with Analysis of Urine Samples by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has fostered the more widespread use of a stable isotope technique to assess body composition in different population groups to address priority areas in public health nutrition in Member States. It has done this by supporting national and regional nutrition projects through its technical cooperation programme and coordinated research projects over many years. This publication was developed by an international group of experts to provide practical hands-on guidance in the use of this technique in settings where analysis of stable isotope ratios in biological samples is to be made by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The publication is targeted at new users of this technique, for example nutritionists, analytical chemists and other professionals. More detailed information on the theoretical background and the practical applications of state of the art methodologies to monitor changes in body composition can be found in IAEA Human Health Series No. 3, Assessment of Body Composition and Total Energy Expenditure in Humans by Stable Isotope Techniques

  2. Using Lead Concentrations and Stable Lead Isotope Ratios to Identify Contamination Events in Alluvial Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soils contaminated with hydrocarbons (C10,C50), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and other contaminants (e.g., As, Cd, Cu, Pb) were recently discovered on the banks of the Saint-Francois and Massawippi rivers. Alluvial soils are contaminated over a distance of 100 kilometers, and the level of the contaminated-hydrocarbon layer in the soil profiles is among the highest at the Windsor and Richmond sites. Concentrations of lead and stable lead isotope ratios (204Pb/206Pb, 206Pb/207Pb, 208Pb/20'6Pb) are also used to identify contamination events. The maximum and minimum values detected in soil profiles for arsenic, cadmium, and lead vary from 3.01 to 37.88?mg kg-1 (As), 0.11 to 0.81?mg kg-1 (Cd) 12.32 to 149.13?mg kg-1 (Pb), respectively, while the 207Pb/206Pb isotopic ratio values are between 0.8545 and 0.8724 for all the profiles. The highest values of trace elements (As, Pb and Zn) were detected in the hydrocarbon layer (C10,C50), most often located at the bottom of the profiles (160, 200, and 220 cm in depth). The various peaks recorded in the soils and the position of the profiles suggest that various contaminants were transported by the river on several occasions and infiltrated the soil matrix or deposited on flood plains during successive floods. Atmospheric particles which entered the river or deposited on riverbanks must also be considered as another source of pollution recorded in soils

  3. Transhydrogenase and Growth Substrate Influence Lipid Hydrogen Isotope Ratios in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, William D; Flynn, Theodore M; Suess, Melanie K; Bradley, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fatty acids preserve metabolic and environmental information in their hydrogen isotope ratios ((2)H/(1)H). This ratio is influenced by parameters that include the (2)H/(1)H of water in the microbial growth environment, and biosynthetic fractionations between water and lipid. In some microbes, this biosynthetic fractionation has been shown to vary systematically with central energy metabolism, and controls on fatty acid (2)H/(1)H may be linked to the intracellular production of NADPH. We examined the apparent fractionation between media water and the fatty acids produced by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Growth was in batch culture with malate as an electron donor for sulfate respiration, and with pyruvate and fumarate as substrates for fermentation and for sulfate respiration. A larger fractionation was observed as a consequence of respiratory or fermentative growth on pyruvate than growth on fumarate or malate. This difference correlates with opposite apparent flows of electrons through the electron bifurcating/confurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB. When grown on malate or fumarate, mutant strains of D. alaskensis G20 containing transposon disruptions in a copy of nfnAB show different fractionations than the wild type strain. This phenotype is muted during fermentative growth on pyruvate, and it is absent when pyruvate is a substrate for sulfate reduction. All strains and conditions produced similar fatty acid profiles, and the (2)H/(1)H of individual lipids changed in concert with the mass-weighted average. Unsaturated fatty acids were generally depleted in (2)H relative to their saturated homologs, and anteiso-branched fatty acids were generally depleted in (2)H relative to straight-chain fatty acids. Fractionation correlated with growth rate, a pattern that has also been observed in the fractionation of sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:27445998

  4. Using Lead Concentrations and Stable Lead Isotope Ratios to Identify Contamination Events in Alluvial Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Saint-Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils contaminated with hydrocarbons (C10–C50, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, and other contaminants (e.g., As, Cd, Cu, Pb were recently discovered on the banks of the Saint-François and Massawippi rivers. Alluvial soils are contaminated over a distance of 100 kilometers, and the level of the contaminated-hydrocarbon layer in the soil profiles is among the highest at the Windsor and Richmond sites. Concentrations of lead and stable lead isotope ratios (204Pb/206Pb, 207Pb/206Pb, 208Pb/206Pb are also used to identify contamination events. The maximum and minimum values detected in soil profiles for arsenic, cadmium, and lead vary from 3.01 to 37.88 mg kg-1 (As, 0.11 to 0.81 mg kg-1 (Cd 12.32 to 149.13 mg kg-1 (Pb, respectively, while the 207Pb/206Pb isotopic ratio values are between 0.8545 and 0.8724 for all the profiles. The highest values of trace elements (As, Pb and Zn were detected in the hydrocarbon layer (C10–C50, most often located at the bottom of the profiles (160, 200, and 220 cm in depth. The various peaks recorded in the soils and the position of the profiles suggest that various contaminants were transported by the river on several occasions and infiltrated the soil matrix or deposited on floodplains during successive floods. Atmospheric particles which entered the river or deposited on riverbanks must also be considered as another source of pollution recorded in soils.

  5. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Isselhardt, Brett Hallen

    2011-01-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with aut...

  6. Online technique for isotope and mixing ratios of CH4, N2O, Xe and mixing ratios of organic trace gases on a single ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmitt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Polar ice cores enclosing trace gas species offer a unique archive to study changes in the past atmosphere and in terrestrial/marine source regions. Here we present a new online technique for ice core and air samples to measure a suite of isotope ratios and mixing ratios of trace gas species on a single small sample. Isotope ratios are determined on methane, nitrous oxide and xenon with reproducibilities for ice core samples of 0.15‰ for δ13C-CH4, 0.22‰ for δ15N-N2O, 0.34 ‰ for δ18O-N2O, and 0.05‰ for δ136Xe. Mixing ratios are determined on methane, nitrous oxide, xenon, ethane, propane, methyl chloride and dichloro-difluoromethane with reproducibilities of 7 ppb for CH4, 3 ppb for N2O, 50 ppt for 136Xe, 70 ppt for C2H6, 70 ppt for C3H8, 20 ppt for CH3Cl, and 2 ppt for CCl2F2. The system consists of a vacuum extraction device, a preconcentration unit and a gas chromatograph coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. CH4 is combusted to CO2 prior to detection while we bypassed the oven for all other species. The highly automated system uses only ~160 g ice, equivalent to ~16 mL air, which is less than previous methods. This large suite of parameters on a single ice sample is new and helpful to study phase relationships of parameters which are usually not measured together. A multi-parameter dataset is also key to understand in situ production processes of organic species in the ice, a critical issue observable in many organic trace gases. Novel is the determination of xenon isotope ratios using doubly charged Xe ions. The attained precision for δ136Xe is suitable to correct the isotopic ratios and mixing ratios for gravitational firn effects, with the benefit that this information is derived from the same sample. Lastly, anomalies in the Xe mixing ratio, δXe/air, can be used to detect melt layers.

  7. Online technique for isotope and mixing ratios of CH4, N2O, Xe and mixing ratios of organic trace gases on a single ice core sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J.; Seth, B.; Bock, M.; Fischer, H.

    2014-08-01

    Firn and polar ice cores enclosing trace gas species offer a unique archive to study changes in the past atmosphere and in terrestrial/marine source regions. Here we present a new online technique for ice core and air samples to measure a suite of isotope ratios and mixing ratios of trace gas species on a single sample. Isotope ratios are determined on methane, nitrous oxide and xenon with reproducibilities for ice core samples of 0.15‰ for δ13C-CH4, 0.22‰ for δ15N-N2O, 0.34‰ for δ18O-N2O, and 0.05‰ per mass difference for δ136Xe for typical concentrations of glacial ice. Mixing ratios are determined on methane, nitrous oxide, xenon, ethane, propane, methyl chloride and dichlorodifluoromethane with reproducibilities of 7 ppb for CH4, 3 ppb for N2O, 70 ppt for C2H6, 70 ppt for C3H8, 20 ppt for CH3Cl, and 2 ppt for CCl2F2. However, the blank contribution for C2H6 and C3H8 is large in view of the measured values for Antarctic ice samples. The system consists of a vacuum extraction device, a preconcentration unit and a gas chromatograph coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. CH4 is combusted to CO2 prior to detection while we bypass the oven for all other species. The highly automated system uses only ~ 160 g of ice, equivalent to ~ 16 mL air, which is less than previous methods. The measurement of this large suite of parameters on a single ice sample is new and key to understanding phase relationships of parameters which are usually not measured together. A multi-parameter data set is also key to understand in situ production processes of organic species in the ice, a critical issue observed in many organic trace gases. Novel is the determination of xenon isotope ratios using doubly charged Xe ions. The attained precision for δ136Xe is suitable to correct the isotopic ratios and mixing ratios for gravitational firn diffusion effects, with the benefit that this information is derived from the same sample. Lastly, anomalies in the Xe mixing ratio,

  8. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ18O and δ2H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ18O and δ2H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source

  9. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Cordea, D. V.; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V.; Mihaiu, M.

    2013-11-01

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ18O and δ2H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ18O and δ2H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

  10. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordea, D. V.; Mihaiu, M. [University of Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Calea Manastur, 400372 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

  11. Zinc isotope ratios of bones and teeth as new dietary indicators: results from a modern food web (Koobi Fora, Kenya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Beasley, Melanie; Schoeninger, Margaret; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Richards, Michael P.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the possibilities of using zinc (Zn) stable isotope ratios as dietary indicators, we report here on the measurements of the ratio of stable isotopes of zinc (66Zn/64Zn, expressed here as δ66Zn) in bioapatite (bone and dental enamel) of animals from a modern food web in the Koobi Fora region of the Turkana Basin in Kenya. We demonstrate that δ66Zn values in both bone and enamel allow a clear distinction between carnivores and herbivores from this food web. Differences were also observed between browsers and grazers as well as between carnivores that consumed bone (i.e. hyenas) compared to those that largely consume flesh (i.e. lions). We conclude that Zn isotope ratio measurements of bone and teeth are a new and promising dietary indicator.

  12. Zinc isotope ratios of bones and teeth as new dietary indicators: results from a modern food web (Koobi Fora, Kenya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Beasley, Melanie; Schoeninger, Margaret; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Richards, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the possibilities of using zinc (Zn) stable isotope ratios as dietary indicators, we report here on the measurements of the ratio of stable isotopes of zinc (66Zn/64Zn, expressed here as δ66Zn) in bioapatite (bone and dental enamel) of animals from a modern food web in the Koobi Fora region of the Turkana Basin in Kenya. We demonstrate that δ66Zn values in both bone and enamel allow a clear distinction between carnivores and herbivores from this food web. Differences were also observed between browsers and grazers as well as between carnivores that consumed bone (i.e. hyenas) compared to those that largely consume flesh (i.e. lions). We conclude that Zn isotope ratio measurements of bone and teeth are a new and promising dietary indicator. PMID:27189145

  13. Zinc isotope ratios of bones and teeth as new dietary indicators: results from a modern food web (Koobi Fora, Kenya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Beasley, Melanie; Schoeninger, Margaret; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Richards, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the possibilities of using zinc (Zn) stable isotope ratios as dietary indicators, we report here on the measurements of the ratio of stable isotopes of zinc ((66)Zn/(64)Zn, expressed here as δ(66)Zn) in bioapatite (bone and dental enamel) of animals from a modern food web in the Koobi Fora region of the Turkana Basin in Kenya. We demonstrate that δ(66)Zn values in both bone and enamel allow a clear distinction between carnivores and herbivores from this food web. Differences were also observed between browsers and grazers as well as between carnivores that consumed bone (i.e. hyenas) compared to those that largely consume flesh (i.e. lions). We conclude that Zn isotope ratio measurements of bone and teeth are a new and promising dietary indicator. PMID:27189145

  14. Measurements of water vapor isotope ratios with wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy technology: new insights and important caveats for deuterium excess measurements in tropical areas in comparison with isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremoy, Guillaume; Vimeux, Françoise; Cattani, Olivier; Mayaki, Salla; Souley, Ide; Favreau, Guillaume

    2011-12-15

    The new infrared laser spectroscopic techniques enable us to measure the isotopic composition (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) of atmospheric water vapor. With the objective of monitoring the isotopic composition of tropical water vapor (West Africa, South America), and to discuss deuterium excess variability (d=δ(2)H - 8δ(18)O) with an accuracy similar to measurements arising from isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), we have conducted a number of tests and calibrations using a wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) technique. We focus in this paper on four main aspects regarding (1) the tubing material, (2) the humidity calibration of the instrument, (3) the water vapor concentration effects on δ, and (4) the isotopic calibration of the instrument. First, we show that Synflex tubing strongly affects δ(2)H measurements and thus leads to unusable d values. Second, we show that the mixing ratio as measured by WS-CRDS has to be calibrated versus atmospheric mixing ratio measurements and we also suggest possible non-linear effects over the whole mixing ratio range (~2 to 20 g/kg). Third, we show that significant non-linear effects are induced by water vapor concentration variations on δ measurements, especially for mixing ratios lower than ~5 g/kg. This effect induces a 5 to 10‰ error in deuterium excess and is instrument-dependent. Finally, we show that an isotopic calibration (comparison between measured and true values of isotopic water standards) is needed to avoid errors on deuterium excess that can attain ~10‰. PMID:22095494

  15. The identification of lead ammunition as a source of lead exposure in First Nations: The use of lead isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of lead shotshell to hunt water birds has been associated with lead-contamination in game meat. However, evidence illustrating that lead shotshell is a source of lead exposure in subsistence hunting groups cannot be deemed definitive. This study seeks to determine whether lead shotshell constitutes a source of lead exposure using lead isotope ratios. We examined stable lead isotope ratios for lichens, lead shotshell and bullets, and blood from residents of Fort Albany and Kashechewan First Nations, and the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and regression analyses. ANOVA of isotope ratios for blood revealed significant differences with respect to location, but not sex. Hamilton differed from both Kashechewan and Fort Albany; however, the First Nations did not differ from each other. ANOVA of the isotope ratios for lead ammunition and lichens revealed no significant differences between lichen groups (north and south) and for the lead ammunition sources (pellets and bullets). A plot of 206Pb/204Pb and 206Pb/207Pb values illustrated that lichens and lead ammunition were distinct groupings and only the 95% confidence ellipse of the First Nations group overlapped that of lead ammunition. In addition, partial correlations between blood-lead levels (adjusted for age) and isotope ratios revealed significant (p 206Pb/204Pb and 206Pb/207Pb, and a significant negative correlation for 208Pb/206Pb, as predicted if leaded ammunition were the source of lead exposure. In conclusion, lead ammunition was identified as a source of lead exposure for First Nations people; however, the isotope ratios for lead shotshell pellets and bullets were indistinguishable. Thus, lead-contaminated meat from game harvested with lead bullets may also be contributing to the lead body burden

  16. THE NEW DETECTIONS OF 7Li/6Li ISOTOPIC RATIO IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have determined the isotopic abundance ratio of 7Li/6Li in the interstellar media (ISMs) along lines of sight to HD169454 and HD250290 using the High-Dispersion Spectrograph on the Subaru Telescope. We also observed ζ Oph for comparison with previous data. The observed abundance ratios were 7Li/6Li = 8.1+3.6-1.8 and 6.3+3.0-1.7 for HD169454 and HD250290, respectively. These values are in reasonable agreement with those observed previously in the solar neighborhood ISMs within ±2σ error bars and are also consistent with our measurement of 7Li/6Li = 7.1+2.9-1.6 for a cloud along the line of sight to ζ Oph. This is good evidence for homogeneous mixing and instantaneous recycling of the gas component in the Galactic disk. We also discuss several source compositions of 7Li, Galactic cosmic-ray interactions, stellar nucleosynthesis, and big bang nucleosynthesis.

  17. Isotopic Ratios of Carbon and Oxygen in Titan's CO using ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Serigano, Joseph; Cordiner, Martin A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Teanby, Nicholas A; Charnley, Steven B; Lindberg, Johan E

    2016-01-01

    We report interferometric observations of carbon monoxide (CO) and its isotopologues in Titan's atmosphere using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The following transitions were detected: CO (J = 1-0, 2-1, 3-2, 6-5), $^{13}$CO (J = 2-1, 3-2, 6-5), C$^{18}$O (J = 2-1, 3-2), and C$^{17}$O (J = 3-2). Molecular abundances and the vertical atmospheric temperature profile were derived by modeling the observed emission line profiles using NEMESIS, a line-by-line radiative transfer code. We present the first spectroscopic detection of $^{17}$O in the outer solar system with C$^{17}$O detected at > 8$\\sigma$ confidence. The abundance of CO was determined to be 49.6 ${\\pm}$ 1.8 ppm, assumed to be constant with altitude, with isotopic ratios $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C = 89.9 ${\\pm}$ 3.4, $^{16}$O/$^{18}$O = 486 ${\\pm}$ 22, and $^{16}$O/$^{17}$O = 2917${\\pm}$359. The measurements of $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C and $^{16}$O/$^{18}$O ratios are the most precise values obtained in Titan's atmospheric CO to date. Our res...

  18. Tracing the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon in artificial recharge by carbon isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the challenges in artificial recharge for drinking water purposes is to decrease the relatively high content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters. Two processes have been suggested to have an effect on diminishing the concentrations of DOC in infiltrated water during artificial recharge: 1) Either organic matter is adsorbed on the surfaces of soil particles, or 2) DOC is oxidized and decomposed by bacterially mediated processes. Geochemical concentration and microbiological activity data have, however, proved to be insufficient for getting quantitative evidence for comparison of these models. We applied the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the recharged water as a tracer for redox processes and decomposition of DOC. The study site is an artificial groundwater plant at Janiksenlinna in southern Finland. Surface water is artificially recharged into an unconfined shallow aquifer by pond infiltration. Infiltrated surface water is derived from Lake Paijanne, a large lake in middle Finland. Water samples were collected from infiltrated surface water and groundwater at varying distances from the infiltration plant. The samples were analysed for the contents of the major dissolved components, DOC and the isotopic composition of carbon in DIC. In addition, the 18O/16O and D/H ratios of water were determined in order to calculate mixing ratios between local groundwater and infiltrated surface water. The δ18O and δD end member compositions for mixing calculations were based on a monitoring period of two years. The δ13CDIC value in recharge waters was -10.4 per mille, which differed significantly from the composition of local groundwaters, with δ13CDIC at -20.8 per mille. The recharged water recorded a considerable decrease in δ13CDIC from -10.4 per mille in the pond to -16.3 per mille in the first observation well, at a distance of 30 metres. No admixture of local groundwater was observed in this well based on oxygen and

  19. Tracing the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon in artificial recharge by carbon isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the challenges in artificial recharge for drinking water purposes is to decrease the relatively high content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters. Two processes have been suggested to have an effect on diminishing the concentrations of DOC in infiltrated water during artificial recharge: 1) Either organic matter is adsorbed on the surfaces of soil particles, or 2) DOC is oxidized and decomposed by bacterially mediated processes. Geochemical concentration and microbiological activity data have, however, proved to be insufficient for getting quantitative evidence for comparison of these models. We applied the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the recharged water as a tracer for redox processes and decomposition of DOC. The study site is an artificial groundwater plant at Janiksenlinna in southern Finland. Surface water is artificially recharged into an unconfined shallow aquifer by pond infiltration. Infiltrated surface water is derived from Lake Paijanne, a large lake in middle Finland. Water samples were collected from infiltrated surface water and groundwater at varying distances from the infiltration plant. The samples were analysed for the contents of the major dissolved components, DOC and the isotopic composition of carbon in DIC. In addition, the δ18O/16O and D/H ratios of water were determined in order to calculate mixing ratios between local groundwater and infiltrated surface water. The 18O and δD end member compositions for mixing calculations were based on a monitoring period of two years. The δ13CDIC value in recharge waters was -10.4 per mille, which differed significantly from the composition of local groundwaters, with δ13CDIC at -20.8 per mille. The recharged water recorded a considerable decrease in δ13CDIC from -10.4 per mille in the pond to -16.3 per mille in the first observation well, at a distance of 30 metres. No admixture of local groundwater was observed in this well based on oxygen and

  20. Determination of 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios in Kara Sea and Novaya Zemlya sediments using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been used to determine Pu activity concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios in sediments from the Kara Sea and radioactive waste dumping sites at Novaya Zemlya. Measured 239,240Pu activities ranged from 0.06 - 9.8 Bq/kg dry weight, 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.13 to 0.28, and 238Pu/239,240Pu activity ratios from 0.02 to 0.6. Perturbations from global fallout isotope ratios were evident at three sites: the Yenisey Estuary and Abrosimov Fjords where 240Pu/239Pu ratios were lower (0.13-0.14); and Stepovogo Fjord sediments where ratios were higher (up to 0.28) than fallout ratios. Based on procedural blanks, detection limits for AMS were below 1 fg Pu and the method showed good precision for isotope ratio measurements, minimal matrix, interference and memory effects. For high level samples, comparison between alpha spectrometry and AMS gave good agreement for measurement of 239,240Pu activity concentrations. (author)

  1. Uranium content and 235U/238U isotopic ratio in dental porcelain powders determined by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium contents and 235U/238U isotopic ratios in 48 dental porcelain powders of 8 brands marketed in Japan were determined by non-destructive neutron activation analysis. The photopeak counts of 277.6 keV of 239Np formed by the 238U(n,γ)239U (yield to)239Np + β- reaction and at 1.595.2 keV of 140La produced by 235U fission were measured with a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector system to determine the uranium content and 235U/238U isotopic ratio. The results of the analysis are tabulated and their significance discussed. (author)

  2. Hf isotope ratio analysis using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: an evaluation of isobaric interference corrections

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, N-C.; Taylor, R N; Chavagnac, V.; Nesbitt, R.W.; Boella, R.M.; Milton, J.A.; German, C.R.; Bayon, G.; Burton, K

    2002-01-01

    From measurements of Hf–Yb mixtures, we have found that the correction of isobaric interferences involving accepted Yb isotope ratios and reasonable estimates of mass bias result in a significantly under-corrected 176Hf, which is proportional to the amount of Yb added. This can be explained by (1) a significant difference in the instrumental mass bias between Hf and Yb, and (2) that the accepted values for isotopic ratios within the Yb and/or Hf systems are incorrect. We have evaluated these ...

  3. Evaluation of the Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Biofield Energy Treated Resorcinol Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra; Branton, Alice; Trivedi, Dahryn; Nayak, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotope ratio analysis is widely used in several scientific fields such as agricultural, food authenticity, biochemistry, metabolism, medical research, etc. Resorcinol is one of the most versatile chemicals used for the synthesis of several pharmaceuticals, dyes, polymers, organic compounds, etc. The current research work was designed to investigate the impact of the biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance ratios of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 17O/16O (P 18O/16O (P M+1/PM) and ...

  4. Improved environmental and forensics measurements using multiple ion counters in isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new detector system designed for isotope ratio mass spectrometers provides improved precision on measurements of samples with very low amounts (-11 g) of analyte. An array of continuous dynode electron multipliers has been installed on a new ThermoFinnigan MAT Triton thermal ionization mass spectrometer acquired by the New Brunswick Laboratory. These ion counters are modifications of miniaturized, commercially available continuous dynode electron multipliers. They can be readily installed to replace individual Faraday cups in a multidetector mass spectrometer or bundled together and located along the detector plane with a set of Faraday cups. On the New Brunswick Laboratory mass spectrometer, nine Faraday cups, one conventional discrete dynode electron multiplier and seven miniaturized ion counters were installed. The size of the miniaturized ion counters is identical to the standard Faraday cups, and thus the ion counters can be aligned with unit mass spacing for the measurement of high mass elements such as uranium and plutonium. Six of the small ion counters were bundled together and positioned on the low mass side of the Low 4 Faraday cup. One additional ion counter was positioned on the high mass side of the Low 4 Faraday cup. This arrangement allows simultaneous measurement of either all uranium (including 233U) or plutonium (including 244Pu) isotopes, also a combination of the two, and allows the measurement of larger 238U intensities on the Faraday cup, if needed. Compensation for small mass dispersion differences at unit mass spacing of uranium, plutonium or other actinides with slightly different masses is readily achieved by the use of a mass dispersion zoom lens. The advantage of multiple ion counting is the simultaneous collection of isotopes. It overcomes many of the problems such as transient signal variation in sample emission and ionization, which would significantly reduce the attainable precision of a single collector measurement. For a given

  5. Global modelling of H2 mixing ratios and isotopic compositions with the TM5 model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, G.; Krol, M.C.; Batenburg, A.M.; Steele, L.P.; Krummel, P.B.; Langenfelds, R.L.; Röckmann, T.

    2011-01-01

    The isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen (H2) contains independent information for constraining the global H2 budget. To explore this, we have implemented hydrogen sources and sinks, including their stable isotopic composition and isotope fractionation constants, into the global chemistry tran

  6. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E

    2016-05-24

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition-including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism-based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the (18)O/(16)O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ∼30-40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered. PMID:27170190

  7. Alternatives to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the measurement of deuterium content of body water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of breast milk intake using the isotope dilution techniques is now well established. The methodology involves the administration of a bolus of tracer followed by observation of the kinetics of its passage though the system. For example in the popular 'dose to the mother' method a dose of labeled water is administered to the mother, and over the following days samples of body fluids are taken and the concentration of tracer determined in order to establish the rate of loss of tracer from her body. Likewise samples are taken from the breast fed infant in order to determine the rates of tracer intake and subsequent loss. Deuterium is the tracer of choice for these experiments since it is non-radioactive, and therefore suitable for use in these vulnerable subject groups, and also because of its relative cheapness. Conventionally isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been used for the determination of the amount of deuterium in the body fluids. However this methodology is expensive (an instrument might typically cost US$ 150,000), and it requires a considerable amount of dedicated technical expertise for its operation. Consequently such instrumentation is not widely available, and this has limited the number and scope of studies using this technique. Recently there have been reports of possible alternative technologies for the determination of deuterium in body water which appear attractive because of the wider general availability of the equipment required. It is the purpose of this report to assess these reported methods for their suitability for breast milk intake measurements

  8. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ˜30–40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered.

  9. In-situ Hafnium isotope ratio analyses by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS: methodology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lutetium-Hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotopic system is a powerful and innovative tool for geochronology and isotopic studies. Lu-Hf in situ isotopic analyses of zircon by LA-MC-ICP-MS enables characterization of the host magma from which it crystallized providing important information on sediment provenance and crustal evolution studies. In this paper authors describe the methodology of Lu-Hf in situ analysis, using LA-MC-ICP-MS National Facility at CSIR-National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad and report the results obtained on two zircon standards: GJ-l (GEMOC, Australia zircon standard from African pegmatites) and MT (Mud Tank zircon from Mud Tank carbonatite) by repeated analysis of 176Hf/177Hf isotope ratios. The GJ-l zircon standard yielded 176Hf/177Hf isotope ratio of 0.281996±5 (2σ, n=84), while MT zircon standard value is 0.282503±14 (2σ, n=25). Also, the study present the results of analyses of zircons for Hf isotopic compositions from 11 charnockite orthogneisses from the Madurai, Trivandrum and Nagercoil blocks

  10. Role of Wind and Sea Surface Temperature Over Moisture Source Region in Determining the Stable Isotopic Ratios in Rainwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, P.; Ghosh, P.

    2012-12-01

    Rainwater stable isotope ratio is controlled by several factors such as distance from the coast, latitudinal location, altitudes, temperature and amount of rainfall (Dansgard 1964;Rozanski 1993). Amount of rainfall plays a significant role in controlling the distribution of stable isotopes especially in the tropics experiencing seasonal precipitation from monsoonal wind circulation. In recent years with more observations on rainfall stable isotopes being documented from tropical regions, the effect of parameters like wind, sea surface temperature, drop size distribution on stable isotopic composition of rainwater are better understood (Wright et al 2001;Vochon et al 2009; Rao et al 2006; Srivastava et al 2012). The isotopic compositions of 2010 ISMR (Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall) from Bangalore, India along with a few other observations of similar kind retrieved from the literatures are studied for amount effect relationship. Bangalore region provide nice opportunity to understand the different monsoonal influence due to its location ( ~300 km ) from coastal boundaries in east and west. The air parcel back trajectories obtained from NOAA HYSPLIT shows Arabian Sea region as the prominent source of moisture for the rainfall occurring during Southwest Monsoon (SWM). In this study we investigated the role of Sea Surface temperature (SST) and wind conditions over the moisture source and its effect on the intra seasonal variability of rainfall isotopic composition recorded at Bangalore region. The isotope analysis of δ18O in rainwater during the Indian summer monsoon rainfall shows a range of values from 2.77‰ to -9.07‰ over a period covering June to September. The observations fail to establish any relationship between stable isotope ratio and rainfall amount. We observed that the temporal variability of SST and wind over Arabian Sea region having strong role in driving the isotopic composition of rainwater. The relationship between SST and isotope ratio is found

  11. The quality control of fruit juices by using the stable isotope ratios and trace metal elements concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdas, D. A.; Dehelean, A.; Puscas, R.; Cristea, G.; Tusa, F.; Voica, C.

    2012-02-01

    In the last years, a growing number of research articles detailing the use of natural abundance light stable isotopes variations and trace metal elements concentration as geographic "tracers" to determine the provenance of food have been published. These investigations exploit the systematic global variations of stable hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in (combination) relation with trace metal element concentrations. The trace metal elements content of plants and also their light stable isotopic ratios are mainly related to the geological and pedoclimatic characteristics of the site of growth. The interpretation of such analysis requires an important number of data for authentic natural juices regarding the same seasonal and regional origin, because the isotopic analysis parameters of fruit juices show remarkable variability depending on climatologically factors. In this work was mesured H, C, O stable isotope ratios and the concentrations of 16 elements (P, K, Mg, Na, Ca, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Pb, Co, As, Cd, Mn, Fe and Hg) from 12 single strength juices. The natural variations that appear due to different environmental and climatic conditions are presented and discussed.

  12. Estimation of food composition of Hodotermes mossambicus (Isoptera: Hodotermitidae) based on observations and stable carbon isotope ratios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Craig T. Symes; Stephan Woodborne

    2011-01-01

    The diet of the harvester termite Hodotermes mossambicus was investigated at two sites with distinct dietary components: C4 grasses (δ13 C isotope values, -13.8‰to -14.0‰) and C3 plants (δ13C isotope values, -25.6‰ to -27.1‰). By comparing observations of food items carried into the colony by the termites and carbon isotope ratios of whole termites (that determined assimilated carbon), the relative proportion of the C3 and C4 plant food components of the termite diet was estimated. There was agreement between the observational data and stable carbon isotopic data, with grass representing approximately 93% of the diet of H, mossambicus at two study sites (urban and rural) on the South African highveld. However, when correcting for mass of food items, that is, C3 and C4, carried by termites, the proportion of grass (C4) in the diet may be underestimated.

  13. ISOTOPIC RATIOS IN TITAN's METHANE: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Temelso, B. [Dean' s Office, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Coustenis, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen' s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Mandt, K. E. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Sherrill, C. D. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Drive NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (United States); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Flasar, F. M. [Planetary Systems Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere ({approx}6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of {approx}20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH{sub 4} collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D, and {sup 13}CH{sub 3}D. From these we compute estimates of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C = 86.5 {+-} 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 {+-} 0.33) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH{sub 4} + C{sub 2}H {yields} CH{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH{sub 4}), we find that the present-day {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C implies that the CH{sub 4} entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing. We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall

  14. Isotope ratio analysis of individual plutonium and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide particles by thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a continuous heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratio analysis of individual plutonium and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) particles was performed using a combination of single particle transfer and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) with a continuous heating method, namely the particles were measured without any chemical treatment. Accurate values were obtained for all isotope ratios of the individual particles prepared from standard solution. As a consequence, it is confirmed that the combination method is useful for isotope ratio analysis of individual plutonium and MOX particles. (author)

  15. Pliocene diatom and sponge spicule oxygen isotope ratios from the Bering Sea: isotopic offsets and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Snelling

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen isotope analyses of different size fractions of Pliocene diatoms (δ18Odiatom from the Bering Sea show no evidence of an isotope offset and support the use of bulk diatom species samples for palaeoceanographic reconstructions. Additional samples containing concentrations of sponge spicules produce δ18O values several per mille lower than δ18Odiatom with a calculated mean offset of 3.6‰ ± 0.7. This difference is significantly greater than modern day variations in water δ18O through the regional water column. Despite the potential for oxygen isotope disequilibrium within δ18Osponge, there appears to be some similarity between δ18Osponge and a global stacked benthic δ18Oforam record. This highlights the potential for δ18Osponge in palaeoenvironmental research at sites where carbonates are not readily preserved.

  16. Stable isotope ratios of the atmospheric CH4, CO2 and N2O in Tokai-mura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results and interpretation of stable isotope ratios of the atmospheric CH4, CO2 and N2O from a variety of sources in Tokai-mura. The seasonal changes of δ13CH4, δ13CO2 and δ15N2O were determined under in-situ conditions in four sampling sites and one control site. Such measurements are expected to provide a useful means of estimating the transport mechanisms of the three trace gases in the environment. These isotopic signatures were analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS, Micromass Isoprime). Our data showed the significant seasonal fluctuation in the Hosoura rice paddy during the entire growing season in 1999. Possible causes for the variation are postulated. Additional measurements on soil properties and on organic δ13C in rice plant are suggested. Cited outstanding original papers are summarized in the references. (author)

  17. Discrimination of geographical origin of lentils (Lens culinaris Medik.) using isotope ratio mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardi, F; Casiello, G; Cortese, M; Perini, M; Camin, F; Catucci, L; Agostiano, A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the geographic origin of lentils by using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in combination with chemometrics. Lentil samples from two origins, i.e. Italy and Canada, were analysed obtaining the stable isotope ratios of δ(13)C, δ(15)N, δ(2)H, δ(18)O, and δ(34)S. A comparison between median values (U-test) highlighted statistically significant differences (plentils produced in these two different geographic areas, except for δ(15)N. Applying principal component analysis, grouping of samples was observed on the basis of origin but with overlapping zones; consequently, two supervised discriminant techniques, i.e. partial least squares discriminant analysis and k-nearest neighbours algorithm were used. Both models showed good performances with external prediction abilities of about 93% demonstrating the suitability of the methods developed. Subsequently, isotopic determinations were also performed on the protein and starch fractions and the relevant results are reported. PMID:26041202

  18. Removal method of fluorescent dyes as pretreatment for measurement of major ion concentrations and hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major ion concentration and isotope ratio of hydrogen and oxygen can provide important information for migration of groundwater. Sometimes, quantitative estimation of these chemical and isotopic characteristics of solution is necessary for groundwater containing fluorescent dyes, which are used in drilling borehole and tracer experiments. However, sometimes correct estimation is disturbed by dyes and they become a cause of troubles for measurement equipments. Thus development of method to remove dyes is required so that the characteristics of groundwater can be estimated without the negative effect of dyes on measurement or equipments. In this study, removal of four representative dyes (Uranin, Eosin, Naphthalenesulfonic acid sodium(NAP) and Amino G acid potassium salt (AG)) was investigated. Uranin and Eosin were found to be removed by non-ionic synthetic resin: HP2MG. 99.99% of the dyes were removed from initial solutions containing dyes with 10 mg/L after contact with resin, while the contact had little effect on ion concentrations and oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. Thus the chemical and isotopic characteristics of groundwater samples containing Uranin and Eosin can be obtained by using the HP2MG resin. On the other hand, the NAP and AG were found to be difficult to remove by the HP2MG resin but they were able to be removed by anion exchange resin (Dowex 1x8). Though contact of solution with Dowex 1x8 did not affect cation concentrations and hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios, anion concentrations were changed by the contact. Therefore the Dowex 1x8 is only applicable to estimation of the cation concentrations and isotope ratio of hydrogen and oxygen. When both anion and cation concentrations from the samples were necessary, Uranin or Eosin were recommended as a tracer in drilling or tracer experiments. (author)

  19. The Titan N/N and C/C isotopic ratios in HCN from Cassini/CIRS

    OpenAIRE

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Nixon, Conor A.

    2007-01-01

    The Titan 14N/15N and 12C/13C isotopic ratios in HCN from Cassini/CIRS (Vinatier, Sandrine) LESIA--> , Observatoire de Paris--> , 5 place Jules Janssen--> , F-92195 Meudon--> - FRANCE (Vinatier, Sandrine) LESIA--> , Observatoire de Paris--> , 5 place Jules Janssen--> , F-92195 Meudon--> - FRANCE (Bezard, Bruno) Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park - MD 2...

  20. Interannual climate variability in the Miocene: high resolution trace element and stable isotope ratios in giant clams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, S.J.; Reichart, G.-J.; Jilbert, T.; Janse, Max; Wesselingh, F.P.; Renema, Willem

    2011-01-01

    High resolution stable isotope and trace elemental ratios of a recent Tridacna squamosa from Vietnam and a Middle to Late Miocene (10–13 Ma) Tridacna gigas from Indonesia are presented. The seasonal pattern of modern sea surface temperature (SST) variability offshore Vietnam is faithfully recorded i

  1. The application of stable isotope ratio analysis to determine the geographical origin of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Donghui; Dong, Hao; Luo, Haiying; Xian, Yanping; Wan, Juan; Guo, Xindong; Wu, Yuluan

    2015-05-01

    In this work, in order to discriminate the geographical origin of wheat, δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of 35 wheat samples originated from different regions were determined, using the method of element analyser-stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The results indicated that wheat from Australia, the USA, Canada and China could be potentially discriminated by using analyte δ(13)C and δ(15)N. δ(13)C values of wheat were ranged from -25.647‰ to -22.326‰, the δ(15)N values of 35 wheat samples were calculated between 1.859‰ and 7.712‰. Moreover, the results illustrated regional distributions of δ(15)N values of wheat as Australia>The USA>Jiangsu province of China>Shandong province of China>Canada. So δ(13)C and δ(15)N analysis would be potentially useful for rapid and routine analyses of geographical origin of wheat, even the cereal grains. In order to confirm the discrimination capability of δ(13)C and δ(15)N, a follow-up work will use this method to analyse a larger set of samples. PMID:25529670

  2. Cu Purification Using an Extraction Resin for Determination of Isotope Ratios by Multicollector ICP-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Makishima

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A new simple and quick method has been established for separation of Cu from solutions using an extraction chromatographic resin utilizing Aliquat® 336 (commercially available as TEVA™ resin and Cu(I. This method involves the use of a one milliliter column containing 0.33 mL TEVA™ resin on 0.67 mL Amberchrom® CG-71C acrylic resin. Copper was adsorbed on the column by forming Cu(I with 0.15% ascorbic acid in 0.05 mol·L−1 HBr, while other major elements except Zn showed no adsorption. After removal of the major elements (Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni, Cu was recovered using 2 mol·L−1 HNO3. The recovery yield and total blank were 102% ± 2% and 0.25 ng, respectively. To evaluate the separation method, Cu isotope ratios were determined by a standard-sample-standard bracketing method using multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, with a repeatability of 0.04‰ and 0.25‰ (SD, for the standard solution and the solutions from low S (<0.1% S silicate standards, respectively.

  3. Ion-optical studies for improved ion transmission in multistage isotope-ratio mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical and experimental ion-optical studies of multistage isotope-ratio mass spectrometers were conducted to determine what improvement in ion transmission efficiency might be attainable through design changes. The computer program GIOS (General Ion Optical Systems) was used to perform theoretical calculations of focusing properties and ion transmission efficiency. Actual transmission through multiple-sector instruments was determined from measurements of the ion beam vertical profile at the focus of each stage. For existing mass spectrometers with tandem magnets of normal geometry, our studies determined a feasible design change that significantly increases ion transmission through the analyzer. The use of a cylindrical einzel lens or an electrostatic quadrupole lens near the focal point between the magnets provides vertical focusing of the ion beam to achieve the improved transmission. We also established a new mass spectrometer design that give 100% transmission through tandem magnetic analyzers and through a third-stage electrostatic analyzer without the use of an intermediate focusing lens. Non-normal magnetic field boundaries provide ion beam focusing in the vertical plant to achieve this complete transmission. 19 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Fast and accurate dating of nuclear events using La-140/Ba-140 isotopic activity ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamba, Kassoum; Sanogo, Oumar; Kalinowski, Martin B; Nikkinen, Mika; Koulidiati, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This study reports on a fast and accurate assessment of zero time of certain nuclear events using La-140/Ba-140 isotopic activity ratio. For a non-steady nuclear fission reaction, the dating is not possible. For the hypothesis of a nuclear explosion and for a release from a steady state nuclear fission reaction the zero-times will differ. This assessment is fast, because we propose some constants that can be used directly for the calculation of zero time and its upper and lower age limits. The assessment is accurate because of the calculation of zero time using a mathematical method, namely the weighted least-squares method, to evaluate an average value of the age of a nuclear event. This was done using two databases that exhibit differences between the values of some nuclear parameters. As an example, the calculation method is applied for the detection of radionuclides La-140 and Ba-140 in May 2010 at the radionuclides station JPP37 (Okinawa Island, Japan). PMID:27058322

  5. Hydrologic control of the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration in a semi-arid woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Shim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We conducted high frequency measurements of the δ18O value of atmospheric CO2 from a juniper (Juniperus monosperma woodland in New Mexico, USA, over a four-year period to investigate climatic and physiological regulation of the δ18O value of ecosystem respiration (δR. Rain pulses reset δR with the dominant water source isotope composition, followed by progressive enrichment of δR. Transpiration (ET was significantly related to post-pulse δR enrichment because the leaf water δ18O value showed strong enrichment with increasing vapor pressure deficit that occurs following rain. Post-pulse δR enrichment was correlated with both ET and the ratio of ET to soil evaporation (ET/ES. In contrast, the soil water δ18O value was relatively stable and δR enrichment was not correlated with ES. Model simulations captured the large post-pulse δR enrichments only when the offset between xylem and leaf water δ18O value was modeled explicitly and when a gross flux model for CO2 retro-diffusion was included. Drought impacts δR through the balance between evaporative demand, which enriches δR, and low soil moisture availability, which attenuates δR enrichment through reduced ET. The net result, observed throughout all four years of our study, was a negative correlation of post-precipitation δR enrichment with increasing drought.

  6. Isotope ratio analysis of actinides, fission products, and geolocators by high-efficiency multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ThermoFisher 'Triton' multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometer (MC-TIMS) was evaluated for trace and ultra-trace level isotoperatioanalysis of actinides (uranium, plutonium, and americium), fission products and geolocators (strontium, cesium, and neodymium). Total efficiencies (atoms loaded to ions detected) of up to 0.5-2% for U, Pu, and Am, and 1-30% for Sr, Cs, and Nd can be reported employing resin bead load techniques onto flat ribbon Re filaments or resin beads loaded into a millimeter-sized cavity drilled into a Re rod. This results in detection limits of 4 atoms to 105 atoms) for 239-242+244Pu, 233+236U, 241-243Am, 89,90Sr, and 134,135,137Cs, and (le) 1 pg for natural Nd isotopes (limited by the chemical processing blank) using a secondary electron multiplier (SEM) or multiple-ion counters (MICs). Relative standard deviations (RSD) as small as 0.1% and abundance sensitivities of 1 x 106 or better using a SEM are reported here. Precisions of RSD ∼ 0.01-0.001% using a multi-collector Faraday cup array can be achieved at sub-nanogram concentrations for strontium and neodymium and are suitable to gain crucial geolocation information. The analytical protocols reported herein are of particular value for nuclear forensic and nuclear safeguard applications.

  7. Precise isotope ratio measurements for uranium, thorium and plutonium by quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise long-term measurements of uranium and thorium isotope ratios was carried out in 1 μg/L solutions using a quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS). The isotopic ratios of uranium (235U/ 238U = 1, 0.02 and 0.00725) were determined using a cross-flow nebulizer (CFN, at solution uptake rate of 1 mL/min) and a low-flow microconcentric nebulizer (MCN, at solution uptake rate of 0.2 mL/min) over 20 h. For 1 μg/L uranium solution (235U/238U = 1) relative external standard deviations (RESDs) of 0.05% and 0.044% using CFN and MCN, respectively, can be achieved. Additional short term isotope ratio measurements using a direct injection high-efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN) of 1 μg/L uranium solution (235U/238U = 1) at a solution uptake rate of 0.1 mL/min yielded an RSD of 0.06-0.08%. The sensitivity of solution introduction by DIHEN for uranium, thorium and plutonium (145 MHz/ppm, 150 MHz/ppm and 177 MHz/ppm, respectively) increased significantly compared to CFN and MCN and the solution uptake rate can be reduced to 1 μL/ min in DIHEN-ICP-MS. Isotope ratio measurements at an ultralow concentration level (e.g. determination of 240Pu/ 239Pu isotope ratio in a 10 ng/L Pu waste solution) were carried out for the characterization of radioactive waste and environmental samples. (orig.)

  8. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry of polyethylene

    OpenAIRE

    González-Pérez, José Antonio; Jiménez Morillo, N. T.; Rosa Arranz, José M. de la; Almendros Martín, Gonzalo; González-Vila, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Polyethylene is probably the most used plastic material in daily life and its accurate analysis is of importance. In this communication the chemical structure of polyethylenes is studied in detail using conventional analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS), bulk stable isotopic analysis (IRMS) and pyrolysis compound specific stable isotopic analysis (Py-CSIA) to measure stable isotope proportions (δ13C, δ15N and δD) of polyethylene pyrolysis compounds. Polyethylene pyrolysis yield...

  9. Assessment of international reference materials for isotope-ratio analysis (IUPAC Technical Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Vogl, Jochen; Rosner, Martin; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, the number of international measurement standards for anchoring stable isotope delta scales has mushroomed from 3 to more than 30, expanding to more than 25 chemical elements. With the development of new instrumentation, along with new and improved measurement procedures for studying naturally occurring isotopic abundance variations in natural and technical samples, the number of internationally distributed, secondary isotopic reference materials with a specified delta value has blossomed in the last six decades to more than 150 materials. More than half of these isotopic reference materials were produced for isotope-delta measurements of seven elements: H, Li, B, C, N, O, and S. The number of isotopic reference materials for other, heavier elements has grown considerably over the last decade. Nevertheless, even primary international measurement standards for isotope-delta measurements are still needed for some elements, including Mg, Fe, Te, Sb, Mo, and Ge. It is recommended that authors publish the delta values of internationally distributed, secondary isotopic reference materials that were used for anchoring their measurement results to the respective primary stable isotope scale.

  10. Trends and problems on the studies by stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry for verifying the geographical origin of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-stable isotopic analysis method has employed to solve food authenticity problems. Stable isotope ratio of the light elements such as H, C, N, and O in food samples (e.g., rice, beef, and eel) were precisely analyzed by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Those samples were mainly taken from four different countries; Japan, United States of America, Australia, and China as comparison. All the rice samples were grown in the presence of either natural and or artificial fertilizer. The beef samples were taken from three different countries; Japan, United States of America, and Australia. Imported beef samples were also presented from the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Japan, and compared with a correlation equation. The eel samples were taken from the three different countries and areas; Japan, China, and Taiwan. δX values showing some differences, all the Japanese food samples were clearly distinctive from the United States of America, Australia, China, and Taiwan samples. The results may be explained by the regional differences in isotope signatures of the climate, utilized nutrition, and/or quality of irrigation water among the farming countries. The statistical distinction could be one of the useful metrics to extract the food samples (rice, meat, fish, etc.) grown in Japan from those grown in the other countries. The dynamics analysis studies on stable isotopic behavior (i.e., Isotopomics) in human metabolism may be looking forward to establish a new science in near future. (author)

  11. Application of multi-isotope ratios to study the source and quality of urban groundwater in Metro Manila, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To characterize water quality in terms of dissolved elements and to investigate both the origin of the water and the source and behavior of groundwater contaminants in Metro Manila, 33 water (groundwater and surface water) samples were analyzed for ion and element concentrations, H and O isotope ratios (δD-H2O and δ18O-H2O), SO42- isotope ratios (δ34S-SO42- and δ18O-SO42-), and Sr isotope ratio (87Sr/86Sr). The chemical measurements showed that the primary important environmental concerns within Metro Manila are groundwater salinization for both shallow and deep aquifers, and As concentrations (up to 22.5 μg/L) in shallow groundwaters. Comparison of SO42- and Sr isotope values with possible source materials revealed that contamination by man-made materials such as fertilizers and detergents are present in some shallow groundwaters. Shallow groundwater having higher δD-H2O and δ18O-H2O values (av. -44 per mille ± 5.6 per mille and -6.8 per mille ± 0.6 per mille, respectively, n = 15) than deep groundwater (av. -48 per mille ± 4.4 per mille and -7.4 per mille ± 0.7 per mille, respectively, n = 7) suggests that the origins of H2O in both groundwaters are different from each other. Since the mixing of shallow and deep groundwater does not commonly occur under Metro Manila, the contaminants in the shallow aquifers are unlikely to be transported into the deep aquifers. Sulfate reduction by bacterial activity was observed for some groundwaters, resulting in a maximum elevation in δ34S-SO42- values of around 10 per mille. By using SO42- isotope ratios as an indicator of changes in redox conditions and Sr isotope ratio as a source indicator, it was shown that As was dissolved from unconsolidated sedimentary deposits of volcanic origin which enclose shallow unconfined aquifers, but was not the result of changes in redox conditions. The study demonstrated that multi-isotope ratios are useful for evaluating water quality problems in urban groundwaters.

  12. {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N isotopic ratio and statistical analysis: an efficient way of linking seized Ecstasy tablets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palhol, Fabien; Lamoureux, Catherine; Chabrillat, Martine; Naulet, Norbert

    2004-05-10

    In this study, the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N isotopic ratios of 106 samples of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) extracted from Ecstasy tablets are presented. These ratios, measured using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS), show a large discrimination between samples with a range of {delta}{sup 15}N values between -17 and +19%o, depending on the precursors and the method used in clandestine laboratories. Thus, {delta}{sup 15}N values can be used in a statistical analysis carried out in order to link Ecstasy tablets prepared with the same precursors and synthetic pathway. The similarity index obtained after principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis appears to be an efficient way to group tablets seized in different places.

  13. 15N/14N isotopic ratio and statistical analysis: an efficient way of linking seized Ecstasy tablets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the 15N/14N isotopic ratios of 106 samples of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) extracted from Ecstasy tablets are presented. These ratios, measured using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS), show a large discrimination between samples with a range of δ15N values between -17 and +19%o, depending on the precursors and the method used in clandestine laboratories. Thus, δ15N values can be used in a statistical analysis carried out in order to link Ecstasy tablets prepared with the same precursors and synthetic pathway. The similarity index obtained after principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis appears to be an efficient way to group tablets seized in different places

  14. Emerging techniques in vegetable oil analysis using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes, Christopher

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available As the practice of vegetable oil adulteration becomes more sophisticated, the possibility to subvert detection using established techniques such as capillary gas chromatography is increasing. One of the most powerful techniques to be used in food authenticity studies is stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (SIRMS which utilises differences in the natural abundance of the stable isotopes of the ‘light’ bio-elements hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, oxygen and sulfur to detect food fraud. SIRMS has found application in the authentication of a wide range of foodstuffs, including fruit juices, wines, spirits, honey and to detect the adulteration of flavour compounds with synthetic analogues. This papers reviews the current state-of-the-art for the authentication of vegetable oils using SIRMS and highlights emergent techniques such as compound- and position specific-isotope mass spectrometry. These latter developments offer the potential to provide more rapid and improved detection of the economic adulteration of vegetable oils.A medida que la práctica de la adulteración de aceites vegetales se hace más sofisticada, las posibilidades de evitar la detección utilizando técnicas tradicionales como la cromatografía de gases en columna capilar aumentan. Una de las técnicas más poderosas que más se utilizan en los estudios de autentificación de alimentos es la espectrometría de masas de relaciones isotópicas, que utiliza diferencias en la abundancia natural de isótopos estables de elementos ligeros biológicos hidrógeno, nitrógeno, carbón, oxigeno y azufre para detectar fraude en los alimentos. La espectrometría de masas de relaciones isotópicas ha encontrado aplicación en la autentificación de una amplia gama de alimentos, incluyendo zumos de frutas, vinos, bebidas alcohólicas de alta graduación, miel, y en la detección de la adulteración de los compuestos aromáticos con sus análogos de origen sintético. Este trabajo

  15. Isotope ratio analysis of lead in blood and environmental samples by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely recognized that lead (Pb) affects children's cognitive function, even at relatively low blood lead levels (-1). The determination of the source of Pb in children is essential for effective risk management. The use of multi-collector ICPMS (MC-ICPMS) for isotope ratio measurements of Pb in environmental and biological samples was examined for this purpose. MC-ICPMS with an instrumental mass fractionation correction by Tl allowed accurate isotope ratio measurements of the Pb isotopic reference material NIST SRM 981. However, the presence of matrix elements (Al, Ca, Fe and Na) at more than 10 mg kg-1 in the sample solution significantly deteriorated the accuracy. The separation of Pb from the matrix is necessary for accurate measurements of the isotope ratio of Pb in environmental and biological samples. Bromide-complexation, followed by anion exchange was found to be satisfactory in terms of the recovery of Pb (90 to 104%) and the efficiency of matrix separation. The procedure was applied to a preliminary source analysis of Pb in the blood of Japanese children, and a significant contribution of indoor dust was demonstrated. (author)

  16. Use of Isotope Ratio Determination ((13)C/(12)C) to Assess the Production Method of Sparkling Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossier, Joël S; Maury, Valérie; Gaillard, Laetitia; Pfammatter, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    The production of a sparkling wine can be performed with different methods taking from a few weeks to several years, which often justifies a difference in added value for the consumer. This paper presents the use of isotope ratio δ(13)C measurements combined with physico-chemical analyses for the determination of mislabelling of sparkling wines produced by 'ancestral', 'traditional', 'closed tank' or 'gasification' methods. This work shows that the isotope composition of CO2 compared with that of the corresponding dried residue of wine (DRW) can assess whether carbonate CO2 in a sparkling wine originates from alcohol fermentation or from artificial gas addition. Isotopic ratios expressed as δ(13)CCO2 and δ(13)CDRW measurements have been obtained for each wine by gasbench isotopic ratio mass spectroscopy and cavity ring down infrared spectroscopy, respectively. When the difference between δ(13)CCO2 and δ(13)CDRW is negative, the presence of artificial CO2 can be undoubtedly inferred, which would exclude the production methods 'ancestral' or 'traditional' for instance. Other parameters such as alcohol content, sugar and acid distributions are also important to complete the analytical panel to aid fraud tracking. PMID:27198811

  17. Application of the isotopic ratio based method for discrimination between nuclear tests and nuclear reactors on various data sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monitoring of atmospheric radioxenon is a crucial element in the verification of the comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty (CTBT). In order to discriminate between legitimate nuclear reactor emissions and nuclear explosions, the isotopic activity ratios can be used. Various data sets are used to demonstrate the discrimination capability of the isotopic radio method. These include daily and annual emission reports from nuclear power plants and atmospheric observations at various sites. Five air samples are of special interest. They were measured a few days after the North Korean nuclear test in October 2006

  18. Lead concentrations and isotope ratios in speleothems as proxies for atmospheric metal pollution since the Industrial Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, Mohammed; Fagel, Nathalie; Van Rampelbergh, Maïte; Baldini, James; Riotte, Jean; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, Lawrence; Gillikin, David; Quinif, Yves; Verheyden, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Lead concentrations and isotope ratios from two speleothems from the Han-sur-Lesse cave in southern Belgium were measured in order to study the ability of speleothems to act as archives of atmospheric pollution. To address this aim we analyzed trace elemental Al and Pb compositions by LA-ICP-MS and ICP-MS as well as Pb isotopes by MC-ICP-MS. The results help to identify three intervals characterized by particularly high enrichment of Pb: from 1880 to 1905 AD, from 1945 to 1965 AD, and from 19...

  19. Analysis of the uranium isotope ratio in black rain from the Hiroshima A-bomb. Analytical precision and future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the performance of ICP quadrupole mass spectrometry regarding U-234, 235 and 238 isotope ratio measurement in nano-gram uranium samples, thorough analysis of fourteen soil samples from a nuclear test site. The study was motivated by the need to analyze the minor uranium isotopes in exhibitions in Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, with minimum consumption of precious historic samples. The comparison of the obtained U-235/U-238 and U-234/U-238 data between our group and a national laboratory in US showed that the relative discrepancy was <0.5% and <2% when 16-40 ng uranium was used for the analysis. (author)

  20. Relations between oxygen stable isotopic ratios in precipitation and relevant meteorological factors in southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The correlations of isotopic ratios in precipitation with temperature, air pressure and humidity at dif- ferent altitudes, in southwest China, are analyzed. There appear marked negative correlations for the δ 18O in precipitation with precipitation amount, vapor pressure and atmospheric precipitable water (PW) at Mengzi, Simao and Tengchong stations on synoptic timescale; the marked negative correlations between the δ 18O in precipitation and the diurnal mean temperature at 400 hPa, 500 hPa, 700 hPa and 850 hPa are different from the temperature effect in middle-high-latitude inland. Moreover, the notable positive correlation between the δ 18O in precipitation and the dew-point deficit △Td at different altitudes is found at the three stations. On annual timescale, the annual precipitation amount weighted mean δ 18O display the negative correlations not only with annual precipitation but also with annual mean temperature at 500 hPa. It can be deduced that, in the years with abnormally strong summer monsoon, more warm and wet air from low-latitude oceans is transported northward along the vapor channel located in southwest China and generates abnormally strong rainfall on the way. Meanwhile, the ab- normally strong condensation process will release more condensed latent heat into atmosphere, and lead to the rise of atmospheric temperature during rainfall, but decline of the δ 18O in precipitation. On the contrary, in the years with abnormally weak summer monsoon, the abnormally weak condensation process will release less condensed latent heat into atmosphere, and lead to the decline of atmos- pheric temperature during rainfall, but increase of the δ 18O in precipitation.

  1. The carbon isotope ratios and contents of mineral elements in leaves of Chinese medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaf carbon isotope ratios and 13 kinds of mineral elements were measured on 36 species of common Chinese medicinal plants in a subtropical monsoon forest of Ding Hu Shan in Guangdong Province. The .delta.13C value were from -26.4 to -32.6%, indicating that all of the species belonged the photosynthetic C3 types. The relative lower value of δ13C was observed in the life form of shrubs. The contents of 7 elements (N, P, K, Ca, Na Mg, Si) were dependent upon the species, life form, medicinal function and medicinal part. Herb type medicine and the used medicinal part of leaves or whole plant showed higher levels of above elements than the others. Among the nine groups with different medicinal functions, it was found that more nitrogen was in the leaves of medicinal plants for hemophthisis, hypertension and stomachic troubles, more phosphorus and potassium were in the leaves for cancer and snake bite medicines, but more calcium and magnesium were in the leaves for curing rheumatics. Ferric, aluminium and manganese were the main composition of microelements in leaves. There were higher content of ferric in leaves for hemophthisis medicine, higher zinc in leaves for cold and hypertension medicine, and higher Cup in leaves of stomachic medicine. It was suggested that the pattern of mineral elements in leaves of Chinese medicinal plants reflected the different properties of absorption and accumulation. Some additional effect due to the high content of certain element might be associated with the main function of that medicine

  2. Elemental and isotopic characterization of Japanese and Philippine polished rice samples using instrumental neutron activation analysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice is a staple food for most Asian countries such as the Philippines and Japan and as such its elemental and isotopic content are of interest to the consumers. Its elemental content may reflect the macro nutrient reduction during milling or probable toxic elements uptake. Three Japanese and four Philippine polished rice samples in his study mostly came from rice bought from supermarkets.These rice samples were washed, dried and ground to fine powder. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), a very sensitive non-destructive multi-element analytical technique, was used for the elemental analysis of the samples and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) was used to obtain the isotopic signatures of the samples. Results show that compared with the unpolished rice standard NIES CRM10b, the polished Japanese and Philippine rice sampled show reduced concentrations of elements by as much as 1/3 to 1/10 of Mg, Mn, K and Na. Levels of Ca and Zn are not greatly affected. Arsenic is found in all the Japanese rice tested at an average concentration of 0.103 μg/g and three out of four of the Philippine rice at an average concentration of 0.070 μg/g. Arsenic contamination may have been introduced from the fertilizer used in rice fields. Higher levels of Br are seen in two of the Philippine rice at 14 and 34 μg/g with the most probable source being the pesticide methyl bromide. Isotopic ratio of ae13C show signature of a C3 plant with possible narrow distinguishable signature of Japanese rice within -27.5 to -28.5 while Philippine rice within -29 to -30. More rice samples will be analyzed to gain better understanding of isotopic signatures to distinguish inter-varietal and/or geographical differences. Elemental composition of soil samples of rice samples sources will be determined for better understanding of uptake mechanisms. (author)

  3. Diet selection by steers using microhistological and stable carbon isotope ratio analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, L L; Hammond, A C; Williams, M J; Chase, C C; Kunkle, W E

    1999-08-01

    Two methods of determining diet botanical composition, microhistological (MH), and stable carbon isotope ratio (CR) analyses were used to determine botanical composition of ingesta and fecal grab samples in steers grazing rhizoma peanut-mixed tropical grass pastures. Three pastures were used over two grazing seasons, 1992 and 1993, in Brooksville, FL. A weighted-disc double-sampling technique was used to determine forage mass and botanical composition, percentage of rhizoma peanut (Arachis glabrata), grass (Paspalum notatum and Cynodon dactlyon), and forb (primarily Chenopodium ambrosioides) on offer every 28 d throughout the grazing seasons. There was an effect of sampling date (P<.001), sampling date x pasture (P<.001), and sampling date x year (P<.001) on forage mass on offer. There was a pasture x year x sampling date interaction (P<.001) for all botanical components. In 1992 and 1993, using cannulated steers sampled every 56 d, there were interactions with year for rhizoma peanut and forb (P<.05), but not for grass with MH analysis (components: rhizoma peanut, grass, and forb). Ingesta and fecal rhizoma peanut (r = .73 and .92 for 1992 and 1993, respectively) and ingesta and fecal forb (r = .86 and .98 for 1992 and 1993, respectively) were positively correlated (P<.001). Ingesta and fecal grass were positively correlated (r = .52, P<.001), but the correlation was not as high. With the CR analysis (components: Calvin cycle [C3] plants and C4-dicarboxylic acid pathway [C4] plants), ingesta and corrected fecal (corrected for in vitro organic matter digestibility [IVOMD]) C3 plants were positively correlated (r = .62; P<.001). Diet composition of fecal grab samples from noncannulated steers, collected on the same sampling schedule as for hand-clipped pasture samples, differed at times due to the complexity of the sward (both rhizoma peanut and forb constituted a single component, C3, in the CR analysis). Based on these results, if there is a substantial

  4. Development of a system for determination of the 13C/12C isotopic ratio with high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable carbon isotopes play an important role in the interpretation of biological activity, particularly when the fossil record is studied. In combination with morphological and chemical data, isotopic information can be useful in paleontology and astrobiology. In this paper the development of a microanalytical ion beam system for the measurement of the carbon isotope ratio with high spatial resolution and good statistics is presented. The technique used is elastic scattering of alpha particles with an energy of 2.75 MeV. At this energy the 13C cross-section is enhanced relative to the Rutherford cross-section and while the 12C cross-section is reduced. The optimisation of the system is described, including sample preparation and the design of the particle detection system for high efficiency combined with good energy resolution. Finally, some results from the initial test run of the system are shown and discussed

  5. Variations of sulfur isotope ratios in a single lichen thallus: A potential historical archive for sulfur pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Misuk, E-mail: yun@cc.umanitoba.c [Department of Earth Sciences and Environmental Science Program, Memorial University, St. John' s, NL, A1B 3X5 (Canada); Wadleigh, Moire A. [Department of Earth Sciences and Environmental Science Program, Memorial University, St. John' s, NL, A1B 3X5 (Canada); Mayer, Bernhard [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Utilizing the analytical capability to measure S isotope ratios of small quantities of S in biological material without any chemical pretreatment, the variation of {delta}{sup 34}S within a lichen thallus was investigated using old and young segments of fruticose lichen thalli (Alectoria sarmentosa) from an oil refinery area in Come-By-Chance and two coastal areas, Newfoundland, Canada. Old segments of lichen samples from the oil refinery area showed significantly higher {delta}{sup 34}S values (1.0-2.5 per mille) than their corresponding young segments. Lichen samples from two coastal areas showed no noticeable differences in {delta}{sup 34}S values between old and young segments. These results demonstrate that lichen thalli record temporal changes in the isotopic composition of atmospheric S and hence constitute a historical archive of atmospheric S pollution. - Lichen thalli record temporal changes in the isotopic composition of atmospheric S and hence constitute a suitable historical archive for biomonitoring.

  6. Variations of sulfur isotope ratios in a single lichen thallus: A potential historical archive for sulfur pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilizing the analytical capability to measure S isotope ratios of small quantities of S in biological material without any chemical pretreatment, the variation of δ34S within a lichen thallus was investigated using old and young segments of fruticose lichen thalli (Alectoria sarmentosa) from an oil refinery area in Come-By-Chance and two coastal areas, Newfoundland, Canada. Old segments of lichen samples from the oil refinery area showed significantly higher δ34S values (1.0-2.5 per mille ) than their corresponding young segments. Lichen samples from two coastal areas showed no noticeable differences in δ34S values between old and young segments. These results demonstrate that lichen thalli record temporal changes in the isotopic composition of atmospheric S and hence constitute a historical archive of atmospheric S pollution. - Lichen thalli record temporal changes in the isotopic composition of atmospheric S and hence constitute a suitable historical archive for biomonitoring.

  7. Concentration and activity ratio of thorium isotopes in surface soil around proposed uranium mining site in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unconformity type of uranium deposits at Lambapur and Peddagattu located in Nalgonda District of Andhra Pradesh, India has been reported. Soil surveillance for isotopic thorium belonging to two different radioactive decay chains provide information on characterization of soil formation due to weathering of underlying host rocks. Thorium concentration and their isotopic activity ratio in localized soil samples were assessed. Thorium concentration and 230Th/232Th activity ratio were observed to be in the range of 15 ±3 mg/kg to 132 ± 15 mg/kg and 0.21± 0.07-0.68 ± 0.05, respectively. A significant wide variation in thorium concentration and that of activity ratio for localized area soil indicates the soil development due to a different type of underlying host rocks. Activity ratio of 228Th/232Th in the soil samples of the study area are observed to vary from 0.87 ± 0.05 to 1.07 ± 0.15 with a mean of 0.96 ± 0.02, indicating secular equilibrium between 232Th and its daughter product 228Th. The study describes the application of isotopic thorium activity as a chronological indicator for geological characterization. (author)

  8. Nitrate source identification in the Baltic Sea using its isotopic ratios in combination with a Bayesian isotope mixing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, F.; Deutsch, B.; Frey, C.; Moros, C.; Voss, M.

    2014-09-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is the major nutrient responsible for coastal eutrophication worldwide and its production is related to intensive food production and fossil-fuel combustion. In the Baltic Sea NO3- inputs have increased 4-fold over recent decades and now remain constantly high. NO3- source identification is therefore an important consideration in environmental management strategies. In this study focusing on the Baltic Sea, we used a method to estimate the proportional contributions of NO3- from atmospheric deposition, N2 fixation, and runoff from pristine soils as well as from agricultural land. Our approach combines data on the dual isotopes of NO3- (δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-) in winter surface waters with a Bayesian isotope mixing model (Stable Isotope Analysis in R, SIAR). Based on data gathered from 47 sampling locations over the entire Baltic Sea, the majority of the NO3- in the southern Baltic was shown to derive from runoff from agricultural land (33-100%), whereas in the northern Baltic, i.e. the Gulf of Bothnia, NO3- originates from nitrification in pristine soils (34-100%). Atmospheric deposition accounts for only a small percentage of NO3- levels in the Baltic Sea, except for contributions from northern rivers, where the levels of atmospheric NO3- are higher. An additional important source in the central Baltic Sea is N2 fixation by diazotrophs, which contributes 49-65% of the overall NO3- pool at this site. The results obtained with this method are in good agreement with source estimates based upon δ15N values in sediments and a three-dimensional ecosystem model, ERGOM. We suggest that this approach can be easily modified to determine NO3- sources in other marginal seas or larger near-coastal areas where NO3- is abundant in winter surface waters when fractionation processes are minor.

  9. Protein Stable Isotope Fingerprinting (P-SIF): Multidimensional Protein Chromatography Coupled to Stable Isotope-Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, A.; Bovee, R. J.; Mohr, W.; Tang, T.

    2012-12-01

    As metagenomics increases our insight into microbial community diversity and metabolic potential, new approaches are required to determine the biogeochemical expression of this potential within ecosystems. Because stable isotopic analysis of the major bioactive elements (C, N) has been used historically to map flows of substrates and energy among macroscopic food webs, similar principles may apply to microbes. To address this challenge, we have developed a new analytical approach called Protein Stable Isotope Fingerprinting (P-SIF). P-SIF generates natural stable isotopic fingerprints of microbial individual or community proteomes. The main advantage of P-SIF is the potential to bridge the gap between diversity and function, thereby providing a window into the "black box" of environmental microbiology and helping to decipher the roles of uncultivated species. Our method implements a three-way, orthogonal scheme to separate mixtures of whole proteins into subfractions dominated by single or closely-related proteins. Protein extracts first are isoelectrically focused in a gel-free technique that yields 12 fractions separated over a gradient of pH 3-10. Each fraction then is separated by size-exclusion chromatography into 20 pools, ranging from >100kD to ~10kD. Finally, each of these pools is subjected to HPLC and collected in 40 time-slices based on protein hydrophobicity. Theoretical calculation reveals that the true chromatographic resolution of the total scheme is 5000, somewhat less than the 9600 resulting fractions. High-yielding fractions are subjected to δ13C analysis by spooling-wire microcombustion irMS (SWiM-irMS) optimized for samples containing 1-5 nmol carbon. Here we will present the method, results for a variety of pure cultures, and preliminary data for a sample of mixed environmental proteins. The data show the promise of this method for unraveling the metabolic complexity hidden within microbial communities.

  10. Potential of using stable nitrogen isotope ratio measurements to resolve fuel and thermal NOx in coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenggong Sun; Janos Lakatos; Colin E. Snape; Tony Fallick [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering (SChEME)

    2003-07-01

    In order to examine the potential of applying isotopic analysis to apportion NOx formation from different mechanisms, stable nitrogen isotope ratio measurements have been conducted on a number of thermal/prompt (diesel) and actual (coal) PF NO samples generated from a 1MW test facility at Powergen (UK), together with measurements on a range of pyrolysis and combustion chars obtained from a drop-tube reactor. A highly effective nitrogen-free sorbent, derived from white sugar with Mn as promoter, has been developed using an innovative procedure. This adsorbent has facilitated, for the first time, the determination of {delta}{sup 15}N values without background corrections. The isotopic data indicate that the thermal/prompt NOx collected during start-up with diesel as fuel has a {delta}{sup 15}N of close to 6.5(per thousand) compared to +15(per thousand) for the actual PF sample analysed. Thus, differences of up to ca. 20(per thousand) have been found to exist between thermal and PF fuel (char) NOx isotopic values. This augurs very well for the further development of the approach in order to help quantify the extent of thermal/prompt NOx formation in PF combustion. Measurements on chars have indicated that the extent of isotopic fractionation that occurs between coal-N and NOx from char is related to the reactivity of coals. Further, it would appear that much of the isotopic fractionation that occurs between coal nitrogen and fuel NO arises in the formation of char, although further fractionation can be inferred to occur during char combustion. In contrast, a lesser degree of isotopic fractionation is associated with the formation of thermal NO (ca. 6(per thousand)), atmospheric nitrogen having a value of 0(per thousand). 4 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. High-precision measurement of variations in calcium isotope ratios in urine by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J.L.L.; Gordon, G.W.; Arrua, R.C.; Skulan, J.L.; Anbar, A.D.; Bullen, T.D.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new chemical separation method to isolate Ca from other matrix elements in biological samples, developed with the long-term goal of making high-precision measurement of natural stable Ca isotope variations a clinically applicable tool to assess bone mineral balance. A new two-column procedure utilizing HBr achieves the purity required to accurately and precisely measure two Ca isotope ratios (44Ca/42Ca and 44Ca/43Ca) on a Neptune multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) in urine. Purification requirements for Sr, Ti, and K (Ca/Sr > 10000; Ca/Ti > 10000000; and Ca/K > 10) were determined by addition of these elements to Ca standards of known isotopic composition. Accuracy was determined by (1) comparing Ca isotope results for samples and standards to published data obtained using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), (2) adding a Ca standard of known isotopic composition to a urine sample purified of Ca, and (3) analyzing mixtures of urine samples and standards in varying proportions. The accuracy and precision of δ44/42Ca measurements of purified samples containing 25 μg of Ca can be determined with typical errors less than ±0.2‰ (2σ).

  12. Using Gas Chromatography/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry to Determine the Fractionation Factor for H2 Production by Hydrogenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible formation of H2, and they are key enzymes in the biological cycling of H2. H isotopes should be a very useful tool in quantifying proton trafficking in biological H2 production processes, but there are several obstacles that have thus far limited the use of this tool. In this manuscript, we describe a new method that overcomes some of these barriers and is specifically designed to measure isotopic fractionation during enzyme-catalyzed H2 evolution. A key feature of this technique is that purified hydrogenases are employed, allowing precise control over the reaction conditions and therefore a high level of precision. A custom-designed high-throughput gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometer is employed to measure the isotope ratio of the H2. Using this method, we determined that the fractionation factor of H2 production by the (NiFe)-hydrogenase from Desulfivibrio fructosovran is 0.27. This result indicates that, as expected, protons are highly favored over deuterons during H2 evolution. Potential applications of this new method are discussed.

  13. Isotope ratio measurement of uranium in safeguards environmental samples by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to measure isotope ratio of uranium in safeguards environmental samples with ICP-MS precisely, production of polyatomic ions of IrAr, PtAr and AuAr was measured and mass bias of ICP-MS is investigated by using isotopic standards of uranium and lead. The intensities of IrAr, PtAr and AuAr relative to the atomic ions were found to be 1.8 x 10-6, 1.6 x 10-5 and 4.1 x 10-5, respectively. The production of 193Ir40Ar is too small to interfere with the measurement of 233U, if the concentration of Ir is the same level as that of 233U. However, there is possibility that the presence of Pt and Au interferes with the measurement of minor isotopes of uranium and 237Np. On the other hand, the mass biases of 235U/238U and 208Pb/206Pb were measured with the parameter of 238U16O/238U. Since unexpected change of the mass bias during measurements causes frequently erroneous results, the monitoring of 238U16O/238U is effective for the precise isotope ratio measurement. (author)

  14. Assessing diet in savanna herbivores using stable carbon isotope ratios of faeces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Codron

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In African savannas, browse-based resources (@3 plants are isotopically distinct from grasses (@4 plants. The carbon isotopic composition of the basic plant diet is recorded in animal tissues. Mammal faeces are a readily accessible, non-invasive, sample material for temporally resolved dietary reconstructions. Faeces, however, include both undigested plant matter and waste, hence accuracy of dietary calculations could potentially be compromised by shifts in plant isotopic values related to seasonal or spatial differences, or by variability in the isotopic differences between faeces and diet. A controlled feeding study of four ungulate species showed a small, consistent difference between diet and faeces of-0.9 o, irrespective of whether the diet was @3 or C4-based. Results from faeces oftaxa known to be pure grazers, pure browsers, and mixed-feeders from the Kruger National Park were entirely consistent with their diets, but the accuracy of dietary reconstructions is enhanced with data from local plant communities.

  15. Cesium-137 as a radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Byproducts Utilization Program (BUP) seeks to develop and encourage widespread commercial use of defense byproducts that are produced by DOE. Cesium-l37 is one such byproduct that is radioactive and decays with emission of gamma rays. The beneficial use of this radiation to disinfect sewage sludge or disinfest food commodities is actively being pursued by the program. The radiation produced by cesium-l37(Cs-l37) is identical in form to that produced by cobalt-60(Co-60), an isotope that is widely used in commercial applications such as medical product sterilization. The choice of isotope to use depends on several factors ranging from inherent properties of the isotopes to availability and cost. The BUP, although centrally concerned with the beneficial use of Cs-l37, by investigating and assessing the feasibility of various uses hopes to define appropriate circumstances where cesium or cobalt might best be used to accomplish specific objectives. This paper discusses some of the factors that should be considered when evaluating potential uses for isotopic sources

  16. Estimation on soil erosion dynamics using stable isotope ratios of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Gergely; Zacháry, Dóra; Szalai, Zoltán; Ringer, Marianna; Szabó, Judit

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotopes are a powerful and widely used tool for tracing biogeochemical processes across the ecosystem. Measuring the stable carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of CO2 and H2O compounds and organic matter is useful for examining the soil, plant and atmospheric carbon and water pools as they isotopic composition is altered during vegetation-soil-atmosphere exchange processes (e.g., evapotranspiration, carbon assimilation and respiration). Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes can serve as a tracer for C and N input by plants into the soil, C turnover and soil organic matter studies. In addition, coupling of isotopic tracers with molecular biology approaches and biomarkers can lead to a better understanding of the soil ecosystem processes. This study aims to estimate soil erosion deposition and redistribution processes at catena scale on the basis of stable isotope results. Soil samples were taken from the total depth of the solum along two catenas on an intensively tilled arable Cambisol. Highest δC13 values were found on the most eroded spots, while on the deposition areas significant differences were measured among the sedimented layers. The lowest δC13 value was in the buried horizon at around 120 cm depth. From this horizon δC13 values slightly increased in both upward and downward directions. However the total organic carbon concentration was highly fluctuated in the deposited profiles and have not reached its maximum in this horizon isotope results suggest that this horizon could have been the original soil surface prior to the main erosion events. In this way the use of stable isotope changes in space can provide additional information on soil redistribution due to tillage erosion. National Hungarian Research Found K100180, G. Jakab was supported by the János Bolyai fellowship of the HAS.

  17. New approaches for stable isotope ratio measurements. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes a summary of discussions at the meeting and contributions on isotope applications in a range of specific biogeochemical fields using the new analytical techniques. It is expected to serve as a useful reference for researchers and laboratory managers who plan to develop or apply state-of-the-art stable isotope techniques. Individual contributions contained in this book have been indexed separately

  18. Influence of Reproduction on Stable-Isotope Ratios: Nitrogen and Carbon Isotope Discrimination between Mothers, Fetuses, and Milk in the Fin Whale, a Capital Breeder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, A; Gómez-Campos, E; Aguilar, A

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the influence of gestation and lactation on the tissue stable-isotope ratios of females, fetuses, and milk remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the incidence of these events on δ(13)C and δ(15)N values in fin whales sampled off northwestern Spain between 1983 and 1985. The effect of gestation on tissue stable-isotope ratios was examined in the muscle of pregnant females (n = 13) and their fetuses (n = 10) and that of lactation in the muscle of nursing females (n = 21) and their milk (n = 25). Results suggest that fetuses are enriched compared to their mothers in both (15)N (Δ(15)N = 1.5‰) and (13)C (Δ(13)C =1.1‰), while, compared to muscle, milk is enriched in (15)N (Δ(15)N = 0.3‰) but depleted in (13)C (Δ(13)C = -0.62‰). This pattern is consistent with that previously observed for other species that, like the fin whale, rely on endogenous energy during reproduction, and it substantiates a general difference in the physiological processing of nitrogen and carbon balances between income and capital breeders. These findings are relevant to the understanding of the energetic balance of mammals during gestation and lactation and are central when inferences on trophic ecology are drawn from isotopic values of reproductive females. PMID:27082523

  19. Stable isotope ratios in meteoric recharge and groundwater at Mt. Vulture volcano, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternoster, M.; Liotta, M.; Favara, R.

    2008-01-01

    SummaryA rain gauge network consisting of five sites located at different altitudes, ranging from 320 to 1285 m.a.s.l., was installed at Mt. Vulture volcano (southern Italy). Rain water samples were collected monthly over a two-year period and their isotopic composition (δ 18O and δD) was analyzed. During the same period, circulating groundwater was sampled from 24 springs and wells distributed throughout the study area. Monthly isotopic composition values were used to determine the local meteoric water line (LMWL). Its slope is slightly lower than the relationship defined by Longinelli and Selmo (Longinelli, A., Selmo, E., 2003. Isotopic composition of precipitation in Italy: a first overall map. J. Hydrol. 270, 75-88) for southern Italy. The groundwater samples analyzed were distributed essentially along the LMWL. The weighted local meteoric water line (WLMWL), defined through the mean values weighted by the rainfall amount, however, may define in a short range the meteoric end-member in the local hydrological cycle more precisely. Since most of the groundwater sampling locations do not show seasonal variations in their stable isotope values, the flow system appears to be relatively homogeneous. The mean altitude of the recharge by rainfall infiltration was estimated on the basis of the local vertical isotopic gradient δ 18O. A few springs, which show anomalous isotopic values, reveal more regional circulation systems, associated with tectonic structures responsible for the ascent of deeper water.

  20. Improving the accuracy of isotope ratio determination by statistical treatment of data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a research concerning the separation of uranium isotopes on ion exchanging resins, the problem of very precise isotopic analysis appeared. A thermal ionisation mass spectrometer built in our institute in 1986 was used. It is equipped with a two filaments ion source and a single ion collector based on a secondary electron multiplier. In 1986, during the certification procedure, the accuracy was established to be 1% of the measured value. The aim of this work is to overpass this instrumental limitation. The measuring error occurs through the superposition of four causes. The first consists in the variations of the ion current supplied by the ion. While measuring contribution of the 235 U+ ion current, the total ion current intensity may differ from the same intensity, while the 238 U+ ion current is collected. The second cause will be the isotopic effects on evaporation: the lighter isotope evaporates faster than the heavier one. So the isotopic content of the vapour phase may not be representative for the isotopic content of the solid sample. The third cause is the diffusion of the ion beam on the residual gas in the mass spectrometer vacuum. It produces the superposition of an unknown fraction of the 238 U+ ion signal over the 235 U+ signal. Finally, the electronic measuring chain produces electrical noise. Complex software for the data acquisition and processing was elaborated in order to decrease the importance of these effects. The accuracy obtained by the proposed analytical method is sufficient to put in evidence separation effects. (authors)

  1. Ultra-low level (pg/L) actinide determinations and superior isotope ratio precisions by quadrupole ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very high sensitivity, quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been developed and employed to measure very low concentrations (pg/L) of various actinides in solution. The detection capabilities of the instrument are shown using a variety of sample introduction methods, including simple direct sample nebulization, higher efficiency sample nebulization, and column preconcentration. This allowed three sigma detection limits in the range from 33 to 0.07 pg/L to be achieved, using short integration times, for a number of actinides. In addition, the improved sensitivity allowed isotope ratio measurements to be undertaken with good precision, (0.05 to 0.2%) at low concentrations (0.5 to 5 microg/L), without requiring long acquisition times. The results of isotope ratio measurements on silver, lead, and NIST natural lead standard SRM 981 will be reported

  2. Tracing sewage and natural freshwater input in a Northwest Mediterranean bay: Evidence obtained from isotopic ratios in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental carbon and nitrogen levels and isotope ratios were assessed in different biological compartments of a Northwest (NW) Mediterranean bay to trace the various sources of nutrient input from natural (river runoffs) and anthropogenic (harbor outflows, fish farms and urban sewage outfall) sources. Samples from transplanted mussels and natural sea grass communities (Posidonia oceanica leaves and epiphytes) were harvested from different locations throughout the bay during the touristic summer and rainy seasons. The results from the nitrogen analysis revealed that sewage and harbor outflow promote higher nitrogen levels, enrichment of 15N in the tissues, and a higher seasonal variability in sea grass and epiphytes. In mussel tissues, the δ15N was also influenced by sewage and harbor outflow, whereas δ13C was influenced by terrestrial inputs. These results suggest that natural and anthropogenic nutrient inputs have a temporary and localized influence and affect the sensitivity of natural isotopic ratios to changes in hydrologic conditions, especially to rain and tourism.

  3. Isotopic distributions, element ratios, and element mass fractions from enrichment-meter-type gamma-ray measurements of MOX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma-ray spectra from ''infinitely'' thick mixed oxide samples have been measured. The plutonium isotopics, the U/Pu ratio, the high-Z mass fractions (assuming only plutonium, uranium, and americium), and the low-Z mass fraction (assuming the matrix is only oxygen) can be determined by carefully analyzing the data. The results agree well with the chemical determination of these parameters. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of subtidal benthic invertebrates in an estuarine mangrove ecosystem (Andhra Pradesh, India)

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillon, Steven; Raman, AV; Dauby, P; F. Dehairs

    2002-01-01

    In order to assess the relative trophic importance of mangrove litterfall and aquatic primary production in the mangrove creeks of the Coringa Wildlife Sanctuary (Andhra Pradesh, India) and the adjacent semi-enclosed Kakinada Bay, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were determined in a variety of benthic invertebrate species collected at 22 sites during the pre-monsoon period (May-June) of 1997 and 1999. delta(13)C values showed little interspecific variation at any given location, but...

  5. Cesium chemistry in irradiated fuel; cesium uranates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physico-chemical behaviour of fission products in nuclear fuel during and after irradiation has been studied extensively during the past decades. In spite of the large amount of chemical, crystallographic and thermodynamic data available, the knowledge on the very complicated UO2-fission product system is still far from complete. The paper discusses the multi variant character of uranium in cesium uranates, which has been assessed by a systematic X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) study of a series of cesium uranates

  6. The application of inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry for measurement of selenium isotopes, isotope ratios and chromatographic detection of selenoamino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    2000-01-01

    orders of magnitude by using methane as reactive cell gas in the DRC. By using 3% v/v methanol in water for carbon-enhanced ionisation of selenium, the sensitivity of Se-80 was 10(4) counts s(-1) per ng ml(-1) of selenium, and the estimated limit of detection was 6 pg ml(-1). The precision of the isotope...... ratios. Deuterated methane used as the DRC gas showed that hydrogen transfer from methane was not involved in the formation of SeH as SeD was absent in the mass spectrum. The almost interference-free detection of selenium by ICP-DRC-MS made the detection of the Se-80 isotope possible for detection of...

  7. Hydrologic control of the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration in a semi-arid woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Shim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted high frequency measurements of the δ18O value of atmospheric CO2 from a juniper (Juniperus monosperma woodland in New Mexico, USA, over a four-year period to investigate climatic and physiological regulation of the δ18O value of ecosystem respiration (δR. Rain pulses reset δR with the dominant water source isotope composition, followed by progressive enrichment of δR. Transpiration (ET was significantly related to post-pulse δR enrichment because leaf water δ18O value showed strong enrichment with increasing vapor pressure deficit that occurs following rain. Post-pulse δR enrichment was correlated with both ET and the ratio of ET to soil evaporation (ET / ES. In contrast, soil water δ18O value was relatively stable and δR enrichment was not correlated with ES. Model simulations captured the large post-pulse δR enrichments only when the offset between xylem and leaf water δ18O value was modeled explicitly and when a gross flux model for CO2 retro-diffusion was included. Drought impacts δR through the balance between evaporative demand, which enriches δR, and low soil moisture availability, which attenuates δR enrichment through reduced ET. The net result, observed throughout all four years of our study, was a negative correlation of post-precipitation δR enrichment with increasing drought.

  8. On-line analytical system developed for the ACEP to determine uranium concentration and uranium isotopic abundance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An on-line analytical system was developed to rapidly determine total uranium concentration and isotopic abundance ratio of 235U to 238U in a uranium solution which passes through a pipe in the chemical exchange uranium enrichment process. The isotopic abundance ratio is calculated by time with a computer using two analytical results, the determination of 235U and that of total uranium. A new method, in which the concentration of uranium could be quickly measured by detecting the absorption of γ-rays due to uranium, was investigated for the determination of uranium. The concentration of 235U was measured by the 185 keV of γ-rays obtained from the disintegration of 235U. The reproducibility of the isotopic abundance ratio analysis was improved less than 2% with relative standard deviation when more than 0.1 mol·dm-3 of natural uranium was analyzed. The analytical information on uranium can be obtained without any treatment in the enrichment equipment. (author)

  9. Use of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios to assess the effects of environmental contaminants on aquatic food webs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the value of carbon (δ 13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) stable isotope ratios were determined in nymphs of a top-predator, the common backswimmer (Notonecta glauca L.), collected in 18 m3 outdoor freshwater mesocosms used to assess the fate and ecotoxicological effects of a diphenyl ether herbicide, fomesafen, applied alone or in combination with Agral 90[reg] (mixture of polyethoxylated derivatives of nonylphenol). Both treatments had a negative effect on δ 13C values which may reflect changes in carbon fluxes across food webs in the treated ponds associated with a shift in phytoplankton structure. A decrease in δ 15N values was observed in the nymphs collected in mixture-treated ponds, which was presumably due to an increase in the abundance of rotifers and Chironominae larvae in these ponds. These preliminary results indicate that stable isotope ratios may be used as shortcuts to detect qualitative or quantitative shifts in the structure of aquatic food webs caused by pollutants. - Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios may be used to detect the impact of pollutants on aquatic food webs

  10. Some triple-filament lead isotope ratio measurements and an absolute growth curve for single-stage leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, J.S.; Delevaux, M.E.; Ulrych, T.J.

    1969-01-01

    Triple-filament analyses of three standard lead samples are used to calibrate a mass spectrometer in an absolute sense. The bias we measure is 0.0155 percent per mass unit, and the precision (for 95% confidence limits) is ??0.13% or less for all ratios relative to 204Pb. Although its precision is not quite so good as that of the lead-tetramethyl method in the analysis of large samples, the triple-filament method is less complex and is an attractive alternative for smaller sample sizes down to 500 ??g. Triple-filament data are presented for six possibly single-stage lead ores and one feldspar. These new data for ores are combined with corrected tetramethyl data for stratiform lead deposits to compute absolute parameters for a universal single-stage lead isotope growth curve. Absolute isotopic ratios for primeval lead have been determined by Oversby and because all the previous data for both meteorites and lead ores were similarly fractionated, the absolute value of 238U 204Pb = 9.09 ?? 0.06 for stratiform leads is little different from the value 8.99 ?? 0.05 originally computed by Ostic, Russell and Stanton. Absolute values for lead isotope ratios for all interlaboratory standard samples presently available from the literature are tabulated. ?? 1969.

  11. Classifying wine according to geographical origin via quadrupole-based ICP-mass spectrometry measurements of boron isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of quadrupole-based ICP-MS as a tool for B-isotopic analysis of wines and its usefulness in provenance determinations were assessed. A precision of 0.1-0.25% RSD (corresponding to a relative standard deviation of the mean of three replicate measurements of 0.06-0.12%) was sufficient to establish small differences in the B isotope ratios in wines from different geographical origins. Each sample measurement was bracketed by measurements of a standard and mass bias drift correction made by interpolation. Sample preparation was kept to a minimum to avoid possible fractionation. Dilution of the wine samples by a factor of 100 with 0.65% HNO3 was found to reduce matrix-induced mass discrimination substantially. Wines from three wine-producing regions, Stellenbosch, Robertson, and Swartland, in the Western Cape Province of South Africa, and wines from specific regions in France (Bergerac) and Italy (Valpolicella) were analyzed by ICP-QMS for their B-isotopic compositions. It was concluded that the 11B/10B ratios can be used to characterize wines from different geographical origins. Average 11B/10B ratios in red wines from South Africa (Stellenbosch), France (Bergerac), and Italy (Valpolicella) were found to differ by between 0.5 and 1.5%. (orig.)

  12. Tracing the transport of anthropogenic lead in the atmosphere and in soils using isotopic ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erel, Yigal; Veron, Alain; Halicz, Ludwik

    1997-11-01

    The isotopic composition of lead in aerosols and soils in Israel is used to characterize the sources of anthropogenic lead in the region, to ascertain the isotopic composition of natural, rock-derived lead in specific areas, and to determine rates of anthropogenic lead migration in soils. The isotopic composition of lead currently emitted from cars in Israel ( 206Pb /207Pb = 1.115 ± 2 ) is controlled by alkyl-lead produced in France and Germany. In addition to petrol-lead, two more sources of anthropogenic lead can be detected in sampled aerosols: the first one has low concentrations of lead (˜4 ng/m 3) and 206Pb /207Pb ˜ 1.157 , and is most likely lead, emitted in Turkey, that traveled across the eastern Mediterranean basin; the second type of aerosols contains a mixture of lead emitted in several countries including Turkey, Greece, and Ukraine ( 206Pb /207Pb value of 1.155-1.160; [Pb] ˜ 20-30 ng/m 3). Anthropogenic lead is more accessible for acid leaching than natural lead, therefore, it is more labile in the soil. The isotopic composition of lead in the acid-leached fraction of near-road soil profiles record the histor of alkyl-lead emission in the country. Based on changes in the isotopic composition of lead with soil depth, it is estimated that anthropogenic lead migrates into the soil at approximately 0.5 cm/y. A soil profile from a relatively remote area is less contaminated by anthropogenic lead and displays a different distribution of lead isotopic values with depth. The isotopic composition of lead suggests that natural lead in soils developed on carbonate bedrock is derived from clays, either from the rock-esidue (the clay fraction in the carbonate bedrock), or from airborne clay, but not from lead released from the carbonate fraction in the rock.

  13. The 16OH/18OH and OD/OH isotope ratios in comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Hutsemékers, D; Jehin, E; Zucconi, J -M; Arpigny, C

    2008-01-01

    The 16OH/18OH and OD/OH isotope ratios are measured in the Oort-Cloud comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) through ground-based observations of the OH ultraviolet bands at 3063 A (0,0) and 3121 A (1,1) secured with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) feeding the Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). From the 16OH/18OH ratio, we find 16O/18O = 425 +/- 55, equal within the uncertainties to the terrestrial value and to the ratio measured in other comets, although marginally smaller. We also estimate OD/OH from which we derive D/H = 2.5 +/- 0.7 10-4 in water. This value is compatible with the water D/H ratios evaluated in other comets and marginally higher than the terrestrial value.

  14. Geochemical information and isotopic ratios in pinpointing the rates of contamination processes generated at mine sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Kaisa; Kittilä, Anniina; Backnäs, Soile; Pasanen, Antti; Hendriksson, Nina

    2015-04-01

    The isotopic composition of water is an important fingerprinting method for tracing recharge sources, distribution processes and possible hydraulic connections of mine waters. However, since, the isotopes alone do not indicate the contamination derived from mining activities; also a set of geochemical analysis of harmful substance in water is acquired. This complex approach will allow a detailed insight in migration of potentially harmful substances, their reactions, mixing and dilution in ground and surface waters. The data can be applied also when comparing geogenic and anthropogenic emissions. Isotopic methods are rather new approach to estimate mining related emissions in Finland and thus, a novel approach of isotopic methods for investigation and monitoring of migration of harmful substances from mine sites are tested in two mine sites in Finland. The aim of this study is to assess the emission sources, flow paths and interaction between mine waters, groundwater and surface waters. A set of isotopic data, including S, Li, Mg, U, Sr, Pb, O, and H, will be combined with chemical information and physical parameters of water in order to assess the source and extent of possible contamination as well as the rates of processes that generate or at best attenuate the contamination. The results obtained from water analyses and field measurements will be used in hydrogeochemical modelling for the prediction of chemical transformation and long-term impacts of mining at study site and its surroundings.

  15. Laser-based measurements of 18O/16O stable isotope ratios (δ18O in wine samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Manish Gupta,1 J Brian Leen,1 Elena Simone Franklin Berman,1 Aldo Ciambotti2 1Los Gatos Research, Mountain View, CA, USA; 2Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Centro di Ricerca per l'Enologia, Asti, Italy Abstract: Wine counterfeiting is an international, multi-billion dollar issue, with some estimates suggesting that up to 5% of wines sold at auctions or secondary markets are fraudulent. Isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS measurements of the 18O/16O stable isotope ratio (δ18O of water-in-wine have been used for wine authentication; however, these analyses are time-consuming and costly. In this preliminary study, off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS is used to quantify δ18O in wines. This laser-based method has been extensively used to study water isotopes for hydrological and medical applications. Recently, the development of a spectral contaminant identifier (SCI has extended the application of these OA-ICOS analyzers to contaminated water samples (eg, plant, soil, and leaf waters. Here, we utilize OA-ICOS with the SCI to characterize wine samples (9%–15% ethanol, and show that the laser-based instrument provides a δ18O measurement precision of ±0.07‰ (1σ and agrees with IRMS to within ±0.63‰ (1σ. Moreover, by training the SCI on isotopically-characterized wines, the agreement with IRMS improves to within ±0.30‰ (1σ. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated by measuring watered and mixed wines. The method presented here can be readily extended to address other food authentication applications. Keywords: wine isotopes, wine fraud, counterfeit wines, OA-ICOS

  16. Seasonal dynamics of stable isotopes and element ratios in authigenic calcites during their precipitation and dissolution, Sacrower See (northeastern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd ZOLITSCHKA

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal evolution of chemical and physical water properties as well as particle fluxes was monitored in Sacrower See (northeastern Germany during two consecutive years (Oct 2003 - Oct 2005. Additonally, we measured δ18O and δ13C as well as Sr:Ca and Mg:Ca ratios of authigenic calcites that were collected in sequencing sediment traps in order to disentangle environmental and climatic factors controlling these parameters. In particular, our aim was to find out if element ratios and the isotopic composition of calcites reflect changes in water and air temperatures. Lake water is highly enriched in 18O (-1.3 to -2.5‰ VSMOW with an evaporative increase of 0.6‰ during summer. Values are 5-6‰ more positive than groundwater values and 4-5‰ more positive than long-term weighted annual means of precipitation. During spring and summer, high amounts of dissolved phosphate cause eutrophic conditions and calcite precipitation in isotopic disequilibrium. Measured values are depleted in 18O by 2 to 10‰ compared to calculated equilibrium values. Resuspension and partial dissolution of calcite in the water column contribute to this isotopic divergence in summer and autumn as δ18Oca and δ13C values increased in the hypolimnion during this time. Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca ratios are altered by dissolution as well. In the hypolimnion these ratios were higher than in the epilimnion. Another reason for the huge deviation between measured and theoretical δ18Oca values during summer is the occurrence of large amounts of Phacotus lenticularis in the carbonate fraction. High amounts of Phacotus lead to more negative δ18Oca and more positive δ13C values. Several characteristics of δ18Oca and δ13C are also reflected by Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca ratios and isotopic composition of oxygen and carbon were influenced by the onset and stability of stratification. Especially the earlier onset of stratification in 2005 caused higher sediment fluxes and more positive carbon and

  17. Coupling groundwater residence time and 234U/238U isotopic ratios in a granitic catchment (Vosges, Eastern France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viville, Daniel; Aquilina, Luc; Ackerer, Julien; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Pierret, Marie-Claire; Granet, Mathieu; Perrone, Thierry; Chabaux, François

    2016-04-01

    Weathering processes are active in surface waters but groundwater also represents no neglectable chemical fluxes. As residence-time in groundwater are high, silicate weathering might take place and control Si, Ca and C fluxes. Weathering processes can be deduced from U isotopic ratios but the kinetics of these processes remain relatively poorly constrained. In order to better characterize these processes, we have coupled residence-times deduced from anthropogenic gases (CFC and SF6) analysis and 234U/238U isotopic ratios determination. Samples were collected in the Strengbach catchment (Hydro-geochemical Observatory OHGE, Vosges, eastern France). Two campaigns were carried out in May and August 2015 during two highly contrasted hydro-climatic periods. Both springs and boreholes down to 80 m depth have been sampled. A very clear geochemical distinction is observed between groundwater from surface springs and deeper groundwater from boreholes. Springs show much lower residence-time (few years) and specific chemical composition. Deeper groundwater have residence-time of several decades and different geochemical composition. A clear SF6 production is observed with increasing SF6 concentrations with residence-time. The campaign of May is characterized by highly groundwater levels and spring fluxes. All groundwater show very low residence time, except in the boreholes at depth greater than 40 m. Conversely, during low groundwater-level period in August, the residence times are much higher and CFC concentrations indicate a large mixing process between surface groundwater and deeper levels. The 234U/238U isotopic ratios confirm this vertical zonation in the boreholes, with much higher activity ratios in the deep ground-waters from borehole than in the surface and spring waters; Such high U activity ratios are indicative of long water-rock interactions, which is consistent with the long residence times deducted from the CFC and SF6 data.

  18. Elucidation of C2 and CN formation mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas through correlation analysis of carbon isotopic ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS) was recently reported for rapid isotopic analysis by measuring molecular emission from laser-induced plasmas at atmospheric pressure. With 13C-labeled benzoic acid as a model sample, this research utilized the LAMIS approach to clarify the formation mechanisms of C2 and CN molecules during laser ablation of organic materials. Because the isotopic ratios in the molecular bands could deviate from statistical distribution depending on their formation pathways, the dominant mechanism can be identified through a comparison of the experimental observed isotopic patterns in the molecular emission with the theoretical statistical pattern. For C2 formation, the experimental 12C12C/13C12C ratios not only support a recombination mechanism through atomic carbon at early delay time but also indicate the presence of other operating mechanisms as the plasma evolves; it is proposed that some of the C2 molecules are released directly from the aromatic ring of the sample as molecular fragments. In contrast, the temporal profiles in the 12C/13C ratios derived from CN emission exhibited opposite behavior with those derived from C2 emission, which unambiguously refutes mechanisms that require C2 as a precursor for CN formation; CN formation likely involves atomic carbon or species with a single carbon atom. - Highlights: • C2 and CN formation mechanisms during laser ablation of organic material studied • Some C2 molecules are directly desorbed from the organic compound. • C2 molecules are not important precursor for CN-radical formation

  19. In-situ Pb Isotope Ratio Measurements in Glasses and Melt Inclusions by LA-SF-ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, K. P.; Stoll, B.; Herwig, K.; Amini, M.; Abouchami, W.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed a technique to determine Pb isotopes in glass fragments and melt inclusions by laser ablation (LA) - sector field (SF) - ICPMS. The measurements were done with a New Wave UP-213 laser system and an ELEMENT2 ICP mass spectrometer using the electrical scan mode. The geological MPI-DING reference glasses (Jochum et al., 2000), for which TIMS and MC-ICPMS Pb triple spike (TS) data are now available, were used to test our technique. Our LA-SF-ICPMS data for 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb agree with the high-precision Pb data within 0.2 %. Polished 150 μ m thick sections were used for the analysis of melt inclusions from samples of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP). Inclusions were ablated for 10 - 30 s in single spots (40 - 80 μ m diameter). Each analysis consisted of 100 to 300 measurements of 206Pb, 207Pb and 208Pb. Typical in-run precision (1 RSE) ranged from 0.2 - 0.4 %. These values are similar to those obtained by SIMS (Saal et al., 1998). The 208Pb/206Pb (1.91 - 2.13) and 207Pb/206Pb (0.778 - 0.877) in the melt inclusions show large and systematic variations. The range of variability in Pb isotope ratios is similar to that reported in melt inclusions from Mangaia and Tahaa basalts (Saal et al., 1998). The Pb isotope arrays (in 208Pb/206Pb vs 207Pb/206Pb) can be explained by mixing of at least two end members. Groundmass values are uniform and similar to the whole rock data and plot within the melt inclusion fields. LA-SF-ICPMS has also been applied for determining Pb isotope ratios and trace element concentrations in carefully handpicked 200 - 500 μ m large glass fragments from 19 samples of the submarine section of HSDP-2. Precision of the Pb isotope data was about 0.2 - 0.3 %. Most LA-SF-ICPMS data agree with high-precision TIMS data using aliquots of about 50 mg. Both data sets confirm the temporal Pb isotope variations found in the HSDP-2 core based on the whole-rock TS Pb isotope data (Eisele et al., 2003).

  20. Assessment of natural variation of iron and zinc isotope ratios during an iron intervention study in lactating women of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high proportion of people living in developing countries are deficient in Fe and Zn. Accurate markers for Fe status are available, but we lack effective markers to measure Zn status. Due to limitations of any single reliable method to determine zinc status, specific information on the prevalence of deficiency in particular settings is still lacking. State of art research indicates that the isotope ratios of Zn in human tissues are not in isotopic equilibrium. Differences in readings are expected to vary by up to 20 per mille in human tissues. In this study, we will examine natural variations in Fe and Zn isotope ratios in biological samples to provide new tools to assess Fe and Zn status of individuals. During the first 18 months a pilot study will be conducted with 16 lactating women in Bangladesh. Specific objectives of this study are (a) to assess the variation in the natural isotopic composition of iron and zinc isotopes in human biological samples before and after a three-month iron supplementation period and (b) to determine the natural variation of Fe and Zn isotopes in Bangladesh diet. There will be two study groups: One malnourished and one well-nourished group. Each group will consist of mothers in two subgroups: (1) iron supplementation, (2) no supplementation. Natural variation of Fe and Zn isotope will be determined in both well-nourished and malnourished women. Fe and Zn levels in blood, faeces, urine, hair and nails, will be determined. Hemoglobin, serum ferritin and serum transferrin receptor level will be measured to determine iron status. Subjects will be followed up at home weekly to ensure the continuity of supplementation. Blood, urine, stool, hair, and nail samples will be collected on in regular intervals from day 0 to 80 with special care to limit contamination, as Zn is especially prone to environmental contamination. Representative samples of Bangladeshi foods (meat, fish, vegetables, pulses, rice) will be collected from each of the two

  1. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) in the Black Sea water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çoban-Yıldız, Yeşim; Altabet, Mark A.; Yılmaz, Ayşen; Tuğrul, Süleyman

    2006-08-01

    Carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios ( δ15N and δ13C) of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) in the water column of the Black Sea were measured at a total of nine stations in September-October (autumn) 1999 and May 2001. For comparison, a station in the Mediterranean Sea and one in the Sea of Marmara were sampled in October 1999. Large-sized particle samples, as well as samples of surface sediment were also collected for N and C isotopic analysis. The results revealed important vertical and regional variations in N and C isotopic composition. Seasonal variations in SPOM δ15N and δ13C were not apparent. SPOM in the euphotic zone (EZ), oxycline, and suboxic/anoxic interface layers of the water column was characterized by distinct isotopic composition. In the EZ, the N and C isotopic ratios of SPOM were in the range typically observed for plankton-derived SPOM in the surface ocean (EZ means ranged from 2.7‰ to 5.9‰ for δ15N and from -24.0‰ to -21.5‰ for δ13C). Shelf region SPOM had higher δ15N and lower δ13C (EZ means of 5.9‰ and -24.0‰, respectively). Large-sized particles (LPOM) collected by zooplankton net tows had ˜3‰ higher δ15N values compared to SPOM, indicating fractionation during trophic transfer of nitrogen. SPOM in the oxycline increased by 3-6‰ for δ15N, while δ13C decreased by -2‰ to -4‰, which may be attributed to greater lipid content. In the suboxic/anoxic interface zone, SPOM isotopic ratios ( δ15N as low as 0.0‰ to -8.0‰) suggest chemoautotrophic production leading to dominance of new, in situ produced organic matter. The location of the most negative δ15N values indicates that chemoautotrophic production is most intense at the shelf-break regions, possibly enhanced by mixing of oxygenated and nitrate-rich Mediterranean inflow waters with suboxic/anoxic Black Sea water.

  2. Effectiveness of leaded petrol phase-out in Tianjin, China based on the aerosol lead concentration and isotope abundance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase-out of leaded petrol has been a measure widely used to reduce atmospheric lead pollution. Since the 1980s, China began to promote unleaded petrol. In order to assess the effectiveness of the measure an isotope fingerprint technique was applied for aerosol samples in the city of Tianjin. After dilute acid leaching, the lead concentration and isotope abundance ratios were determined for 123 samples collected in Tianjin during eight years (1994-2001). The 206Pb / 207Pb ratio was lower in summer, when coal combustion emission was low and vehicle exhaust became more important, indicating that the 206Pb / 207Pb ratio of leaded petrol in Tianjin is lower than that of aerosol samples. The 206Pb / 207Pb ratio gradually increased from 1994 to 2001, a trend that suggests that the contribution from vehicle exhaust was diminishing. Overall, the measurements matched well with national statistical data of leaded and unleaded petrol production. After the nationwide switch to unleaded gasoline, comprehensive control measures are urgently needed to reduce air lead pollution in China, as aerosol lead reduced slightly but remains at a relatively high level

  3. Nuclear Spectroscopy with Copper Isotopes of Extreme N/Z Ratios

    CERN Multimedia

    La commara, M; Roeckl, E; Van duppen, P L E; Schmidt, K A; Lettry, J

    2002-01-01

    The collaboration aims to obtain detailed nuclear spectroscopy information on isotopes close to the magic proton number Z=28 Very neutron-rich and neutron-deficient copper isotopes are ionized with the ISOLDE resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) to provide beams with low cross contamination.\\\\ \\\\On the neutron-deficient side the high $Q_\\beta$-values of $^{56}$Cu (15~MeV) and $^{57}$Cu (8.8~MeV) allow to study levels at high excitation energies in the doubly magic nucleus $^{56}$Ni and the neighbouring $^{57}$Ni. On the neutron-rich side the spectroscopy with separated copper isotopes allows presently the closest approach to the doubly magic $^{78}$Ni at an ISOL facility. Up to now no suitable target material with a rapid release was found for nickel itself. A slow release behaviour has to be assumed also for the chemically similar elements iron and cobalt.\\\\ \\\\Using a narrow-bandwidth dye laser and tuning of the laser frequency allows to scan the hyperfine splittings of the copper isotopes and isome...

  4. Improving the accuracy of atomic emission determination of europium isotope ratio without reference samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed of determining the isotopic composition of europium without standard reference samples. The estimation of the analysis accuracy has shown a statistically negligible systematic error. The confidence level of single determination (P0.95) is ± 0.3 at.% at 151Eu levels from 47.47 to 98.2 at.%

  5. An analytical system for studying the stable isotopes of carbon monoxide using continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Pathirana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the atmosphere, carbon monoxide (CO is the major sink for the hydroxyl radical (OH •, has multiple anthropogenic and natural sources and considerable spatial and seasonal variability. Measurements of CO isotopic composition are useful in constraining the strengths of its individual source and sink processes and thus its global cycle. A fully automated system for δ13C and δ18O analysis has been developed to extract CO from an air sample, convert CO into carbon dioxide (CO2 using the Schütze reagent, and then determine the isotopic composition in an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS. The entire system is continuously flushed with high-purity helium (He, the carrier gas. The blank signal of the Schütze reagent is only 1–3% of the typical sample size. The repeatability is 0.1‰ for δ13C and 0.2‰ for δ18O. The peak area allows simultaneous determination of the mole fraction with an analytical repeatability of ~0.7 nmol mol−1 for 100 mL of typical ambient air (185.4 nmol mol−1 of CO. A single, automated, measurement is performed in 18 min, so multiple measurements can be combined conveniently to improve precision.

  6. Performance of human mass balance studies with stable isotope-labeled drug and continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry: a progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, T R; Szabo, G K; Ajami, A; Browne, D G

    1998-04-01

    We propose performing human mass balance studies by administering stable isotope labeled (13C or 15N) drug and quantitating excess (above background) 13C or 15N in urine, serum, and feces by continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS). Theoretical calculations and empirical data (dynamic range, linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy) are presented to establish that commercially available CF-IRMS instruments can quantitate stable isotope labeled (one or two 15N or 13C labels) drug concentrations of 1.0 microg/mL or greater in urine, serum (15N), or feces. More than two 13C labels may be necessary to quantitate 1.0 microg/mL of drug in serum. Three volunteers received 650 mg of 15N13C2-acetaminophen, and urine was collected for 72 hours. Percent of administered label recovered in urine from the three subjects was 97.4, 78.9, and 95.4 for 13C and 90.3, 77.0, and 90.6 for 15N. Fecal recovery of label for one subject was 0.9% (13C2) and 1.1% (15N). Serum pharmacokinetic values obtained by counting 13C or 15N in one subject were as expected for acetaminophen. This method appears to be promising, and further validation is ongoing. PMID:9590457

  7. The application of infrared spectroscopy to breath CO2 isotope ratio measurements and the risk of spurious results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable CO2 isotope breath tests are established as a valuable tool in diagnostic and investigative medicine with the potential to become more prominent in the future. However, their development and widespread clinical use is limited by the requirement of isotope ratio mass spectroscopic analysis. To overcome this restriction alternative analytical techniques have been developed; the most promising, offering relative simplicity and lower costs, are those instruments using infrared spectroscopy. Clinical investigations using such instruments show them to perform well but very little attention has been given to the possibility of interference from the infrared absorption spectrum of other compounds in the breath. To provide an unambiguous answer to this concern we have analysed literature on over 200 detected breath compounds and their infrared absorption spectra to identify any absorption bands coincident with the ν3 absorption band of CO2. It was found that only five breath trace compounds possess coincident fundamental absorption bands, none of which pose the risk of spurious results. We conclude that the 13C16O2/12C16O2 ratio can confidently be measured for isotopic breath tests using an infrared spectrometer, the position of the ν3 absorption band of CO2 in the infrared spectrum precluding any discernible risk of spurious measurements due to coincidental absorption bands. (author)

  8. Genuineness assessment of mandarin essential oils employing gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio MS (GC-C-IRMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipilliti, Luisa; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Sciarrone, Danilo; Russo, Marina; Dugo, Paola; Dugo, Giovanni; Mondello, Luigi

    2010-03-01

    Cold-pressed mandarin essential oils are products of great economic importance in many parts of the world and are used in perfumery, as well as in food products. Reconstituted mandarin oils are easy to find on the market; useful information on essential oil authenticity, quality, extraction technique, geographic origin and biogenesis can be attained through high-resolution GC of the volatile fraction, or enantioselective GC, using different chiral stationary phases. Stable isotope ratio analysis has gained considerable interest for the unveiling of citrus oil adulteration, detecting small differences in the isotopic carbon composition and providing plenty of information concerning the discrimination among products of different geographical origin and the adulteration of natural essential oils with synthetic or natural compounds. In the present research, the authenticity of several mandarin essential oils was assessed through the employment of GC hyphenated to isotope ratio MS, conventional GC flame ionization detector, enantioselective GC and HPLC. Commercial mandarin oils and industrial natural (declared as such) mandarin essential oils, characterized by different harvest periods and geographic origins, were subjected to analysis. The results attained were compared with those of genuine cold-pressed Italian mandarin oils, obtained during the 2008-2009 harvest season. PMID:20112303

  9. The influence of photochemical fractionation on the evolution of the nitrogen isotope ratios - detailed analysis of current photochemical loss rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, K. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Westlake, J.; Magee, B.; Liang, M. C.; Bell, J.

    2012-04-01

    Tracking the evolution of molecular nitrogen over geologic time scales requires an understanding of the loss rates of both isotopologues (14N2 and 14N15N) as a function of time (e.g. Mandt et al., 2009). The relative loss rates, if different, “fractionate” the isotopes so that the ratios change as a function of time, and rate at which the ratio changes due to a loss process is determined by the “fractionation factor.” Photochemistry is known to fractionate the nitrogen isotopes in Titan’s atmosphere by preferentially removing the heavy isotope from the molecular nitrogen inventory and increasing the ratio (heavy/light) in one of the primary photochemical products, HCN. This fractionation occurs due to a selective shielding during photodissociation where the photons that dissociate 14N15N penetrate deeper into the atmosphere (Liang et al., 2007) than the photons that dissociate 14N14N. Two methods can be used to determine the photochemical fractionation factor, f. The first approach for calculating f is based on the isotopic ratios of the photochemical source and product, as measured by the Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) (Niemann et al., 2010) and the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) (Vinatier et al., 2007), respectively. The second method uses the loss rates and the ratio of the source and requires detailed photochemical modeling to ensure that the loss rates are calculated accurately. We compare these two methods for calculating the photochemical fractionation factor for N2 by using measurements of the isotopic ratios of N2 and HCN combined with an updated coupled ion-neutral-thermal model (De la Haye et al., 2008). We find that accurate magnetospheric electron fluxes and a rotating model that accounts for diurnal variations are essential for accurate calculations of the HCN densities and for determination of the fractionation factor through photochemical modeling. References: De La Haye, V., J. H. Waite, Jr., T. E. Cravens, I. P

  10. Uranium isotopic ratio measurements (235U/238U) by laser ablation high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for environmental radioactivity monitoring - 235U/238U isotope ratio analysis by LA-ICP-MS-HR for environmental radioactivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protection of the aquatic and terrestrial environments from a broad range of contaminants spread by nuclear activities (nuclear plants, weapon tests or mining) require continuous monitoring of long-lives radionuclides that were released into the environment. The precise determination of uranium isotope ratios in both natural and potential contaminated samples is of primary concern for the nuclear safeguards and the control of environmental contamination. As an example, analysis of environmental samples around nuclear plants are carried out to detect the traces in the environment originating from nuclear technology activities. This study deals with the direct analysis of 235U/238U isotope ratios in real environmental solid samples performed with laser ablation (LA)-HR-ICP-MS. A similar technique has already been reported for the analysis of biological samples or uranium oxide particles [1,2] but to our knowledge, this was never applied on real environmental samples. The high sensitivity, rapid acquisition time and low detection limits are the main advantages of high resolution ICP-MS for accurate and precise isotope ratio measurements of uranium at trace and ultra-trace levels. In addition, the use of laser ablation allows the analysis of solid samples with minimal preparation. A a consequence, this technique is very attractive for conducting rapid direct 235U/238U isotope ratio analysis on a large set of various matrix samples likely to be encountered in environmental monitoring such as corals, soils, sands, sediments, terrestrial and marine bio-indicators. For the present study, LA-ICP-MS-HR analyses are performed using a New Wave UP213 nano-second Nd:YAG laser coupled to a Thermo Element-XR high resolution mass spectrometer. Powdered samples are compacted with an hydraulic press (5 tons) in order to obtain disk-shaped pellet (10-13 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness). The NIST612 reference glass is used for LA-ICP-MS-HR tuning and as standard control during

  11. Use of isotope ratio mass spectrometry to differentiate between endogenous steroids and synthetic homologues in cattle: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, Geert, E-mail: Geert.janssens@favv.be [Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain, Directorate General Laboratories, Kruidtuinlaan 55, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Courtheyn, Dirk [Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain, Directorate General Laboratories, Kruidtuinlaan 55, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Mangelinckx, Sven [Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Prévost, Stéphanie; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Monteau, Fabrice [LUNAM Université, Oniris, Laboratoire d’Etude des Résidus et Contaminants dans les Aliments (LABERCA), F-44307 Nantes (France); De Poorter, Geert [Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain, Directorate General Laboratories, Kruidtuinlaan 55, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); De Kimpe, Norbert [Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Le Bizec, Bruno [LUNAM Université, Oniris, Laboratoire d’Etude des Résidus et Contaminants dans les Aliments (LABERCA), F-44307 Nantes (France)

    2013-04-15

    Graphical abstract: Scheme: Representation of the observed isotope ratios and the relation to exogenous and endogenous natural steroids. AS stands for “amount of steroid”. Highlights: ► The difference between endogenous and exogenous steroids is thoroughly laid out. ► Factors influencing the carbon ratio and the use of Δ{sup 13}C-values are explained. ► Implementation of GC/C/IRMS to detect steroid abuse in cattle is reviewed. ► Alternative methods and upcoming techniques are discussed. ► The differences and similarities with sports doping control are highlighted. -- Abstract: Although substantial technical advances have been achieved during the past decades to extend and facilitate the analysis of growth promoters in cattle, the detection of abuse of synthetic analogs of naturally occurring hormones has remained a challenging issue. When it became clear that the exogenous origin of steroid hormones could be traced based on the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C isotope ratio of the substances, GC/C/IRMS has been successfully implemented to this aim since the end of the past century. However, due to the costly character of the instrumental setup, the susceptibility of the equipment to errors and the complex and time consuming sample preparation, this method is up until now only applied by a limited number of laboratories. In this review, the general principles as well as the practical application of GC/C/IRMS to differentiate between endogenous steroids and exogenously synthesized homologous compounds in cattle will be discussed in detail, and will be placed next to other existing and to be developed methods based on isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Finally, the link will be made with the field of sports doping, where GC/C/IRMS has been established within the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) approved methods as the official technique to differentiate between exogenous and endogenous steroids over the past few years.

  12. Use of isotope ratio mass spectrometry to differentiate between endogenous steroids and synthetic homologues in cattle: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Scheme: Representation of the observed isotope ratios and the relation to exogenous and endogenous natural steroids. AS stands for “amount of steroid”. Highlights: ► The difference between endogenous and exogenous steroids is thoroughly laid out. ► Factors influencing the carbon ratio and the use of Δ13C-values are explained. ► Implementation of GC/C/IRMS to detect steroid abuse in cattle is reviewed. ► Alternative methods and upcoming techniques are discussed. ► The differences and similarities with sports doping control are highlighted. -- Abstract: Although substantial technical advances have been achieved during the past decades to extend and facilitate the analysis of growth promoters in cattle, the detection of abuse of synthetic analogs of naturally occurring hormones has remained a challenging issue. When it became clear that the exogenous origin of steroid hormones could be traced based on the 13C/12C isotope ratio of the substances, GC/C/IRMS has been successfully implemented to this aim since the end of the past century. However, due to the costly character of the instrumental setup, the susceptibility of the equipment to errors and the complex and time consuming sample preparation, this method is up until now only applied by a limited number of laboratories. In this review, the general principles as well as the practical application of GC/C/IRMS to differentiate between endogenous steroids and exogenously synthesized homologous compounds in cattle will be discussed in detail, and will be placed next to other existing and to be developed methods based on isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Finally, the link will be made with the field of sports doping, where GC/C/IRMS has been established within the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) approved methods as the official technique to differentiate between exogenous and endogenous steroids over the past few years

  13. The Movement Ecology of the Straw-Colored Fruit Bat, Eidolon helvum, in Sub-Saharan Africa Assessed by Stable Isotope Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Ossa, Gonzalo; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Peel, Alison J.; Scharf, Anne K.; Voigt, Christian C.

    2012-01-01

    Flying foxes (Pteropodidae) are key seed dispersers on the African continent, yet their migratory behavior is largely unknown. Here, we studied the movement ecology of the straw-colored fruit bat, Eidolon helvum, and other fruit bats by analyzing stable isotope ratios in fur collected from museum specimens. In a triple-isotope approach based on samples of two ecologically similar non-migratory pteropodids, we first confirmed that a stable isotope approach is capable of delineating between geo...

  14. Determination of the parameter ratio H02/K of closed thermal diffusion columns for polynary isotopic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the experimental determination of the H02/K ratio of the constants for prototype thermal diffusion columns from initial state mole fraction measurements there was a lack of sufficiently exact simple evaluation methods for polynary isotopic mixtures. The investigation of mole fraction changes at closed ends obtained by numerical integration of the corresponding system of second order partial differential equations resulted in a concept of approximation which allows to utilize approximative analytical solutions originally developed for binary isotopic mixtures. In the approximation the initial mole fractions are indirectly represented by the mean mass number of the initial mixture. Thus, the measured mole fraction changes can be attributed to the difference between the actual mass number of the components and the mean mass number of the enclosed mixture. By simple regression analysis a partial derivative can be obtained which can be attributed to the approximative analytical solutions for binary mixtures. (orig.)

  15. An apparatus for isotopic ratio measurement in UF5 formed by infrared multiphoton dissociation of UF6 in molecular beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Separation factor was measured in isotopically selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) of supercooled UF6 in a supersonic expansion by multiphoton ionization (MPI) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). A pulsed free-jet nozzle was used to generate a UF6-molecular beam seeded in Ar (∼10-7 Torr in UF6 partial pressure). Two-frequency p-H2 Raman laser beams around 16 μm were used for the dissociation of UF6 under collisionless conditions in the molecular beam where the flow velocity for UF6 is about 500 m/s. The 235U/238U isotopic ratios in nascent UF5 photoproducts were determined by selective MPI of UF5 at 532 nm followed by TOFMS with a mass resolution as high as 1200. A separation factor of about 2 was observed under the experimental conditions chosen for the demonstration of this method. (author)

  16. On the interference of 86Kr2+ during carbon isotope analysis of atmospheric methane using continuous flow combustion – isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Stable carbon isotope analysis of methane (δ13C of CH4 on atmospheric samples is one key method to constrain the current and past atmospheric CH4 budget. A frequently applied measurement technique is gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to a combustion-preconcentration unit. This report shows that the atmospheric trace gas krypton can severely interfere during the mass spectrometric measurement leading to significant biases in δ13C of CH4 if krypton is not sufficiently separated during the analysis. The effect comes about by the lateral tailing of the peak of doubly charged 86Kr in the neighbouring m/z, 44, 45, and 46 Faraday cups. Accordingly, the introduced bias is dependent on the chromatographic separation, the Kr to CH4 mixing ratio in the sample, the mass spectrometer source tuning as well as the detector configuration and can amount to up to several permil in δ13C. Apart from technical solutions to avoid this interference we present correction routines to a posteriori remove the bias.

  17. Determination of site-specific carbon isotope ratios at natural abundance by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caer, V; Trierweiler, M; Martin, G J; Martin, M L

    1991-10-15

    Site-specific natural isotope fractionation of hydrogen studied by deuterium NMR (SNIF-NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful source of information on hydrogen pathways occurring in biosyntheses in natural conditions. The potential of the carbon counterpart of this method has been investigated and compared. Three typical molecular species, ethanol, acetic acid, and vanillin, have been considered. Taking into account the requirements of quantitative 13C NMR, appropriate experimental procedures have been defined and the repeatability and reproducibility of the isotope ratio determinations have been checked in different conditions. It is shown that the carbon version of the SNIF-NMR method is capable of detecting small differences in the carbon-13 content of the ethyl fragment of ethanols from different botanical or synthetic origins. These results are in agreement with mass spectrometry determinations of the overall carbon isotope ratios. Deviations with respect to a statistical distribution of 13C have been detected in the case of acetic acid and vanillin. However, since the method is very sensitive to several kinds of systematic error, only a relative significance can be attached at present to the internal parameters directly accessible. Isotope dilution experiments have also been carried out in order to check the consistency of the results. In the present state of experimental accuracy, the 13C NMR method is of more limited potential than 2H SNIF-NMR spectroscopy. However it may provide complementary information. Moreover it is particularly efficient for detecting and quantifying adulterations that aim to mimic the overall carbon-13 content of a natural compound by adding a selectivity enriched species to a less expensive substrate from a different origin. PMID:1759714

  18. The Titan 14N/ 15N and 12C/ 13C isotopic ratios in HCN from Cassini/CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Nixon, Conor A.

    2007-11-01

    We report the detection of H 13CN and HC 15N in mid-infrared spectra recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini, along with the determination of the 12C/ 13C and 14N/ 15N isotopic ratios. We analyzed two sets of limb spectra recorded near 13-15° S (Tb flyby) and 83° N (T4 flyby) at 0.5 cm -1 resolution. The spectral range 1210-1310 cm -1 was used to retrieve the temperature profile in the range 145-490 km at 13° S and 165-300 km at 83° N. These two temperature profiles were then incorporated in the atmospheric model to retrieve the abundance profile of H 12C 14N, H 13CN and HC 15N from their bands at 713, 706 and 711 cm -1, respectively. The HCN abundance profile was retrieved in the range 90-460 km at 15° S and 165-305 km at 83° N. There is no evidence for vertical variations of the isotopic ratios. Constraining the isotopic abundance profiles to be proportional to the HCN one, we find C12/C13=89-18+22 at 15° S, and 68-12+16 at 83° N, two values that are statistically consistent. A combination of these results yields a 12C/ 13C value equal to 75±12. This global result, as well as the 15° S one, envelop the value in Titan's methane ( 82.3±1) [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779-784] measured at 10° S and is slightly lower than the terrestrial inorganic standard value (89). The 14N/ 15N isotopic ratio is found equal to 56-13+16 at 15° S and 56-9+10 at 83° N. Combining the two values yields 14N/ 15N = 56 ± 8, which corresponds to an enrichment in 15N of about 4.9 compared with the terrestrial ratio. These results agree with the values obtained from previous ground-based millimeter observations [Hidayat, T., Marten, A., Bézard, B., Gautier, D., Owen, T., Matthews, H.E., Paubert, G., 1997. Icarus 126, 170-182; Marten, A., Hidayat, T., Biraud, Y., Moreno, R., 2002. Icarus 158, 532-544]. The 15N/ 14N ratio found in HCN is ˜3 times higher than in N 2 [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779

  19. Uranium separation by solvent extraction and determination of 234U/238U isotopic ratios using liquid scintillation spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid Scintillation Spectrometer (LSS) coupled with Pulse Shape Analysis has proved to be useful tool for determination of alpha emitting radionuclide, providing high counting efficiency, low background but only moderate energy resolution. Application of solvent extraction significantly reduces the extensive chemical separation needed for alpha spectroscopy technique using surface barrier detectors which allows many simple and effective nuclide separations as a part of sample preparation. LSS provides a nearly total rejection of β-γ emissions by means of pulse shape discrimination combined with counting efficiency higher than 99%. Liquid scintillation coupled with solvent extraction is a reliable, specific, very attractive and quick technique for the determination of U. In the present study, radiochemical separation method was used for the analysis of total uranium concentration as well as determination of 234U/238U isotopic ratios in standard U-ores by LSS. Measurements were carried out using Ultra Low Level LKB Wallac Quantulus 1220 LSS which has built-in Pulse Shape Discriminator and external standard 152Eu which allows the measurement of External Quench Parameter (SQP(E)). For determination of Uranium content in the ores, the direct extraction method by extractive cocktail was used. Liquid scintillation technique was successfully tested on the standard ores with total digestion of the samples to assess the possibility of faster analysis. Results was achieved as an effect of total digestion of the ores followed by extraction of Uranium by Toluene scintillator. Peak fitting procedure available in spectroscopy software was utilized for resolving the α peaks due to 4.17 MeV and 4.77MeV of 238U and 234U. It is seen that the 238U and 234U peaks are well resolved, allowing assessment of their ratio. The Uranium activity determined in the reference U ores is exemplified. The activity concentrations and isotopic Uranium activity ratios derived from LSS indicates

  20. Use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in size segregated aerosol particles for the O/I penetration evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Garbariene, Inga; Masalaite, Agne; Ceburnis, Darius; Krugly, Edvinas; Kvietkus, Kestutis; Remeikis, Vidmantas; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio are successfully used in the atmospheric aerosol particle source identification [1, 2], transformation, pollution [3] research. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the penetration of atmospheric aerosol particles from outdoor to indoor using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Six houses in Kaunas (Lithuania) were investigated during February and March 2013. Electrical low pressure impactor was used to measure in real time concentration and size distribution of outdoor aerosol particles. ELPI+ includes 15 channels covering the size range from 0.017 to 10.0 µm. The 25 mm diameter aluminium foils were used to collect aerosol particles. Gravimetric analysis of samples was made using microbalance. In parallel, indoor aerosol samples were collected with a micro-orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI model 110), where the aerosol particles were separated with the nominal D50 cut-off sizes of 0.056, 0.1, 0.18,0.32,0.56, 1.0, 1.8, 3.2, 5.6, 10, 18 μm for impactor stages 1-11, respectively. The impactor was run at a flow rate of 30 L/min. Air quality meters were used to record meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity) during the investigated period. All aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents and their isotopic compositions using elemental analyzer (EA) connected to the stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). TC concentration in indoors ranged from 1.5 to 247.5 µg/m3. During the sampling period outdoors TN levels ranged from 0.1 to 10.9 µg/m3. The obtained outdoor δ13C(PM2.5) values varied from -24.21 to -26.3‰, while the δ15N values varied from 2.4 to 11.1 ‰ (average 7.2±2.5 ‰). Indoors carbonaceous aerosol particles were depleted in 13C compared to outdoors in all sampling sites. This depletion in δ13C varied from 0.1 to 3.2 ‰. We think that this depletion occurs due ongoing chemical reactions (oxidation) when aerosol

  1. Theoretical effect of diffusion on isotopic abundance ratios in rocks and associated fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senftle, F.E.; Bracken, J.T.

    1955-01-01

    Diffusion is considered as a possible process of isotope fractionation taking place throughout geologic time. Both diffusion in solids and diffusion in liquids are taken as possible mechanisms, the latter being more important. Arguments are presented to show that if significant fractionation takes place within a crystal by outward diffusion under solid-state conditions, enrichment will be evident only in elements of minor concentration. Similar conclusions are inferred for solid-state diffusion across a boundary or for diffusion in liquids. No isotopic enrichment can be expected in relatively large bodies of diffusion transported material. Although the necessary data to confirm these conclusions are scanty, it seems worth while to undertake further work in this direction. ?? 1955.

  2. Determination and isotope-ratio analysis of different forms of nitrogen in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modified Kjeldahl method was used to determine total nitrogen in soils. Pretreatment of soils with dilute H2SO4 or water before digestion is recommended. In the presence of clay minerals the soil must be pretreated with HF before Kjeldahl analysis. The Conway diffusion method and the steam-distillation with MgO are suitable to determine ammonium-N in soils. Nitrate-N content can be analysed by the nitrate electrode, by the colorimetric technique, by the u.v. spectrophotometric technique, and by the MgO-Devarda alloy method. The colorimetric method used to determine nitrite was the modified Griess method. Nitrogen-15 determinations were carried out with both mass spectrometers, MI1305 (high isotopic enrichment) and MAT230 (low isotopic enrichment). (author)

  3. A preliminary assessment on the use of biochar as a soil additive for reducing soil-to-plant uptake of cesium isotopes in radioactively contaminated environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of Kd tracer batch experiments were conducted to assess the absorptive-desorption properties of Biochar as a potential agent to selectively sequester labile soil Cs or otherwise help reduce the uptake of Cs isotopes into plants. A parallel experiment was conducted for strontium. Fine-grained fractionated Woodlands tree Biochar was found to have a relatively high affinity for Cs ions (Kd > 100) relative to coral soil (Kd < 10) collected from the Marshall Islands. The Biochar material also contains an abundance of K (and Mg). These findings support a hypothesis that the addition of Biochar as a soil amendment may provide a simple yet effective method for reducing soil-to-plant transfer of Cs isotopes in contaminated environments. (author)

  4. Stable-isotope ratio analysis based on atomic hyperfine structure and optogalvanic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic hyperfine structures were measured for the Cu I transition at 5782 A by optogalvanic spectroscopy at high resolution, with a cw dye laser. Samples were electro-deposited on the demountable cathode of a home-made hollow-cathode lamp. By spectral deconvolution, the relative isotopic abundances of 63Cu and 65Cu could be determined with good accuracy and precision. The technique is applicable to copper concentrations as low as 1.6 ppm. (author)

  5. Investigation of Isotopic Abundance Ratio of Biofield Treated Phenol Derivatives Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Butylatedhydroxytoluene (BHT) and 4-methoxyphenol (4-MP) are phenol derivatives that are generally known for their antioxidant properties and depigmenting activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of BHT and 4-MP using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). BHT and 4-MP samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control group remained untreated while the treated group was subjected to Mr. Trive...

  6. Water budget in the Hakone caldera using hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water budget of the Hakone caldera is estimated by using equations describing the balance of water, of stable isotope content and of dissolved chloride. Six equations with six unknowns are obtained, three for the lake and three for the catchment area. For the lake, computation gives that 58% of water inflow derives from groundwater and 42% from precipitation. Of the outflow, 88% consists of surface drainage and 12% of evaporation. (author)

  7. Climatic and geographical dependence of the H, C and O stable isotope ratios of Italian wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Correlation matrix between (D/H)1, (D/H)2, δ13C and δ18O parameters of wine (4000 samples) and the climatic and geographical characteristics of the areas of origin. - Highlights: • We studied the relationship between wine isotopic data and climate and geography. • We considered (D/H)1, (D/H)2 and δ13C of ethanol and δ18O of water of 4000 wines. • δ18O, followed by (D/H)1, had the strongest relationship with climate and location. • The dominant variables were latitude, δ18O and δ2H of precipitation and temperature. • Relationships and models may be used to predict the isotopic composition of wine. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the relationship between (D/H)1, (D/H)2 and δ13C of ethanol and δ18O of water in wine, and variables describing the climate and the geography of the production area, using exploratory visualisation tools, regression analysis and linear modelling. For the first time, a large amount of data (around 4000 wine samples collected over 11 years in Italy) and all the official isotopic parameters, as well as a large number of significant climatic and geographical descriptors (date of harvest, latitude, longitude, elevation, distance from the sea, amount of precipitation, maximum daily temperature, minimum daily temperature, mean daily temperature, δ18O and δ2H of precipitation) were considered. δ18O, followed by (D/H)1, was shown to have the strongest relationship with climate and location. The dominant variables were latitude, with a negative relationship, δ18O and δ2H of precipitation and temperature, both with positive relationships. The identified correlations and models could be used to predict the isotopic composition of authentic wines, offering increased possibilities for detecting fraud and mislabelling

  8. Preparation system for 13C/12C stable isotope ratio analysis of methane in cuttings gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttings gases are mainly composed of air and water. Sometimes they include small amounts of methane (0.01∼5 %) and smaller amounts of lower-hydrocarbons. To determine stable isotope rations of cuttings gas components, a system was constructed to separate only methane from ten milliliter quantities of cuttings gas by GC in combination with an automatic precutting device and a carbon dioxide preparation device (a vaccum line). A gas chromatograph is equipped with both stainless columns packed with silica gel (5 m x 4mm i.d.) and Molecular Sieve 13X-S (2 m x 4 mm i.d.). Helium is used as the carrier gas. The isotopic measurements are performed with a Finnigan-MAT DELTA E stable-isotope mass spectrometer by an autofreezing method. The determination limit is 0.01 ml of methane with a precision of about 0.5 %. 13C/12C analyses of methane in cuttings gases give an estimation of its origin. (author)

  9. Source characterization using compound composition and stable carbon isotope ratio of PAHs in sediments from lakes, harbor, and shipping waterway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular compositions and compound specific stable carbon isotope ratios of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) isolated from sediments were used to characterize possible sources of contamination at an urban lake, a harbor, a shipping waterway, and a relatively undisturbed remote lake in the northwest United States. Total PAH concentrations in urban lake sediments ranged from 66.0 to 16,500 μg g-1 dry wt. with an average of 2600 μg g-1, which is ∼ 50, 100, and 400 times higher on average than PAH in harbor (48 μg g-1 on average), shipping waterway (26 μg g-1), and remote lake (7 μg g-1) sediments, respectively. The PAH distribution patterns, methyl phenanthrene/phenanthrene ratios, and a pyrogenic index at the sites suggest a pyrogenic origin for PAHs. Source characterization using principal component analysis and various molecular indices including C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes, C3-dibenzothiophenes/C3-phenanthrenes, and C2-chrysenes/C2-phenanthrenes ratios, was able to differentiate PAH deposited in sediments from the four sites. The uniqueness of the source of the sediment PAHs from urban lake was also illustrated by compound specific stable carbon isotope analysis. It was concluded that urban lake sediments are accumulating PAH from sources that are unique from contamination detected at nearby sites in the same watershed

  10. CNO abundances and carbon isotope ratios in evolved stars of the open clusters NGC 2324, NGC 2477, and NGC 3960

    CERN Document Server

    Tautvaisiene, Grazina; Bragaglia, Angela; Randich, Sofia; Zenoviene, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Our main aim is to determine carbon-to-nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios for evolved giants in the open clusters NGC 2324, NGC 2477, and NGC 3960, which have turn-off masses of about 2 Msun, and to compare them with predictions of theoretical models. High-resolution spectra were analysed using a differential synthetic spectrum method. Abundances of carbon were derived using the C2 Swan (0,1) band heads at 5135 and 5635.5 A. The wavelength interval 7940-8130 A with strong CN features was analysed to determine nitrogen abundances and carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen abundances were determined from the [Oi] line at 6300 A. The mean values of the CNO abundances are [C/Fe]=-0.35+-0.06 (s.d.), [N/Fe]=0.28+-0.05, and [O/Fe]=-0.02+-0.10 in seven stars of NGC 2324; [C/Fe]=-0.26+-0.02, [N/Fe]=0.39+-0.04, and [O/Fe]=-0.11+-0.06 in six stars of NGC 2477; and [C/Fe]=-0.39+-0.04, [N/Fe]=0.32+-0.05, and [O/Fe]=-0.19+-0.06 in six stars of NGC 3960. The mean C/N ratio is equal to 0.92+-0.12, 0.91+-0.09, and 0.80+-0.13, resp...

  11. Identifying Sources of Non-fallout Nuclear Contamination in Hudson River Sediments by Plutonium and Neptunium isotope ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Chillrud, S. N.

    2002-12-01

    In an effort to identify and characterize nuclear contaminants released from sources contained within the Hudson River drainage basin, Pu isotopes and 237Np have been measured in a series of sediment cores collected from various locations within the region. During the last several decades, the Hudson River has received input of radioactive contamination from several sources. The first and most significant, has been global fallout, which was a result of atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons primarily by governments of the United States and Former Soviet Union in the 1950s and 1960s. The second, is contamination resulting from reactor releases at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant (IPNPP) located on the Hudson River about 35 miles north of New York City. This facility began operation in 1962. A third source of radioactive contamination to the region is contamination resulting from activities at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) located on the Mohawk River, which began operation in 1946. Our research entails identifying different sources of nuclear contamination by measurement of plutonium and neptunium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The isotopic composition of a nuclear contaminant is a sensitive indicator of its origin. By comparing the isotopic composition measured in fluvial sediments to mean values reported for global fallout (i.e. 240Pu/239Pu = 0.18 ñ 0.014, 237Np/239Pu = 0.48 ñ 0.07, and 241Pu/239Pu = .00194 ñ 00028) it is possible to identify contaminants as non-fallout in origin. To date, we have analyzed selected samples from 3 sediment cores collected from the following locations: 1) the Mohawk River downstream of KAPL, 2) the Hudson River above its confluence with the Mohawk River, and 3) the lower Hudson River at a location in close proximity to IPNPP. Isotopic analysis of sediments from the Mohawk River indicates contamination that is clearly non-fallout in origin (240Pu/239Pu ranges between 0

  12. Lead isotopes and trace metal ratios of aerosols as tracers of Pb pollution sources in Kanpur, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Indra; Bizimis, Michael; Tripathi, Sachchida; Paul, Debajyoti; Tyagi, Swati; Sengupta, Deep

    2015-04-01

    The anthropogenic flux of Pb in the Earth's surface is almost an order of magnitude higher than its corresponding natural flux [1]. Identifying the sources and pathways of anthropogenic Pb in environment is important because Pb toxicity is known to have adverse effects on human health. Pb pollution sources for America, Europe, and China are well documented. However, sources of atmospheric Pb are unknown in India, particularly after leaded gasoline was phased out in 2000. India has a developing economy with a rapidly emerging automobile and high temperature industry, and anthropogenic Pb emission is expected to rise in the next decade. In this study, we report on the Pb- isotope compositions and trace metal ratios of airborne particulates collected in Kanpur, an industrial city in northern India. The Pb concentration in the airborne particulate matter varies between 14-216 ng/m3, while the other heavy metals vary by factor of 10 or less, e.g. Cd=0.3-3 ng/m3, As=0.4-3.5 ng/m3, Zn=36-161 ng/m3, and Cu=3-22 ng/m3. The 206Pb/207Pb, 208Pb/206Pb, and 208Pb/207Pb vary between 1.112 - 1.129, 2.123-2.141, and 2.409-2.424 respectively, and are highly correlated with each other (R2>0.9). Pb isotopes and trace metal data reveals that coal combustion is the major source of anthropogenic Pb in the atmosphere, with limited contribution from mining and smelting processes. We further conclude that combination of Pb isotope ratios and V/Pb ratios are powerful tracers for Pb source apportionment studies, which is otherwise difficult to differentiate based only on Pb systematics [1] Sen and Peucker-Ehrenbrink (2012), Environ. Sci. Technol.(46), 8601-8609

  13. Novel quantum-cascade laser based spectrometer for high precision isotopic ratio measurements of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Continuous and in-situ monitoring of the isotope content of atmospheric carbon dioxide is of prime interest in the biosphere-atmosphere exchange research. We present the design and laboratory results of a compact mid-IR spectrometer developed for such purposes using a pulsed quantum cascade laser (QCL) from Alpes Lasers operating at 4.3 μm. Employing thermoelectrically cooled (TEC) components for both the IR laser light source and detector, the instrument can operate in a complete cryogenic-free mode that greatly facilitates field applications. Furthermore, the carefully selected spectral range in the ν3 ro-vibrational band of CO2 allows for simultaneous concentration measurements of the three main stable carbon dioxide isotopologues (16O12C16O, 16O13C16O and 18O12C16O) in ambient air. The isotopic ratio measurement is performed using differential absorption spectroscopy. A dual multipass-cell arrangement is used to analyze the difference between the sample spectra and the simultaneously acquired reference spectra. This approach significantly improves the spectrometer performance due to the cancellation of correlated noise components specific to this method. The instrument precision has been evaluated using the Allan variance technique. The 13CO2/12CO2 ratio has a 1 s standard deviation of 0.6 o/oo, while the variance minimum at 430 s corresponds to a minimum σAllan of 0.04 o/oo. This clearly demonstrates the feasibility of high precision in-situ isotope ratio measurements by the above mentioned optical technique. Additional efforts for the development of an adequate calibration method and the integration of optimized TEC detectors, which are expected to give even better performance, are currently undertaken. (author)

  14. Determination of cadmium and zinc isotope ratios in sheep's blood and organ tissue by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for the determination of Cd and Zn isotope ratios in sheep's blood and organ tissue. Samples were digested with nitric acid using a microwave oven. Cadmium and Zn were separated from matrix components using adsorption chromatography prior to isotope ratio measurement by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A concentration factor of 35 was achieved. Limits of detection for the determination of Cd and Zn in blood were 0.34 and 0.40 pg g-1, respectively. Cadmium isotope ratios (111Cd: 106Cd; 111Cd: 110Cd) were determined with a precision of 2-3% for both peak height and area count measurements. Zinc isotope ratios (68Zn: 67Zn; 68Zn: 66Zn) were determined with a precision of 2% for peak height measurements and 1% for peak area count measurements. (Author)

  15. A combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new solvent extraction process for the simultaneous extraction of cesium and strontium from acidic nitrate media is described. This process uses a solvent formulation comprised of 0.05 M di-t-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6), 0.1 M Crown 100' (a proprietary, cesium-selective derivative of dibenzo-18-crown-6), 1.2 M tributyl phosphate (TBP), and 5% (v/v) lauryl nitrile in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. Distribution ratios for cesium and strontium from 4 M nitric acid are 4.13 and 3.46, respectively. A benchtop batch countercurrent extraction experiment indicates that >98% of the cesium and strontium initially present in the feed solution can be removed in only four extraction stages. Through proper choice of extraction and strip conditions, extracted cesium and strontium can be recovered either together or individually

  16. Wich Parameter of the Carbonate System Influences the Boron Isotopic Composition and the Boron Calcium Ratio in Foraminiferal Tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, K.; Nehrke, G.; Horn, I.; Langer, G.; Misra, S.; Bijma, J.

    2013-12-01

    We performed culture experiments with the benthic symbiont bearing foraminifer Amphistegina lessonii in order to determine which parameter of the marine carbonate system influences the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) and the boron calcium ratio (B/Ca) in the test. A. lessonii grew for two months in treatments of culture media with decoupled pH-carbonate chemistry. We measured δ11B and B/Ca simultaneously on single tests using a recently new developed mass spectrometric technique. Our results show a clear pH dependence on δ11B. The B/Ca in the shell show a positive correlation with aqueous B(OH)4-/HCO3-.

  17. Isotope ratios of 240Pu/239Pu in soil samples from different areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in soil samples from Japan and other areas in the world (including IAEA standard reference materials) were determined by ICP-MS. The range of 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios observed in 21 Japanese soil samples was 0.155 - 0.194 and the average was 0.180 ± 0.011, which is comparable to the global fallout value. A low ratio of about 0.05, which is derived from Pu-bomb, was found in samples from Nishiyama (Nagasaki) and Mururoa Atoll (IAEA-368), while a high ratio of about 0.31 was found in a sample from Bikini Atoll (Marshall Islands). The ratio for Irish Sea sediment (IAEA-135) was 0.21, which was higher than the global fallout value, suggesting the influence by the contamination from the Sellafield facility. The 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in soils from the Chernobyl area were determined, and the ratio was found to be very high (about 0.4), indicating the high burn-up grade of the reactor fuel. These results show that the 240Pu/239Pu ratio can be used as a finger print to identify the source of the contamination. (author)

  18. Estimates of mantle thorium/uranium ratios from Th, U and Pb isotope abundances in basaltic melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between the abundances of Th, U and Pb isotopes in basalt melts and the [Th/U] ratio of their source is assessed. A simple melting model is used to show that whereas the activity ratio (230Th/232Th) in the initial melt before extraction is equal to the bulk source ratio, that in the extracted melt may be higher. The difference depends upon the rate of melting relative to the half-life of 230Th (73 ka). Only when the rate is fast compared to this half life will (230Th/232Th) in the extracted melt provide a correct estimate of [232Th/238U] in the source and therefore of its [Th/U] ratio. This is normally not the case for MORB, and a better estimate of source [Th/U] ratio is derived from [232Th/238U] ratio in the basalt, which does not depend upon the rate of melting. Available data for MORB glasses give a best estimate for their source [Th/U] = 2.58+ 0.06. This value is less than both that of the bulk Earth of 3.9±0.1, and of the source of plume basalts from Iceland and Hawaii, which are 3.3 and 3.2 respectively. These estimates contrast with the [232Th/238U] ratio required to produce the radiogenic {208Pb/206Pb} atomic ratio of MORB over 4.55 Ga. This averages 3.8 and is little different from the average derived from Pb-isotopes in plume basalts. These observations are most easily reconciled if Th, U and Pb are efficiently stripped from the mantle by melting and have a residence time there of ≤ 1 Ga. The [Th/U] ratio of 2.6 for the upper mantle requires melt fractions of ≤ 1% to be involved in transferrring U and Th from this region into the continents. Such melt fractions are present in subduction zones and in the source regions of continental alkali basalts. (author)

  19. Enhanced sensitivity for Os isotope ratios by magnetic sector ICP-MS with a capacitive decoupling Pt guard electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, A.T. [Central Science Laboratory, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252-74, Hobart, TAS (Australia)

    2000-08-01

    A magnetic sector ICP-MS with enhanced sensitivity was used to measure Os isotope