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Sample records for cervical spine pain

  1. Persisting upper cervical pain as sole symptom by unstable fractures in the cervical spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saksø, Henrik; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Bünger, Cody

    2015-01-01

    Upper cervical spine fractures can be caused by very low-energy traumas, and the clinical presentation can vary from mild neck pain to paraplegia and ultimately to death. The most common cause of these fractures is trauma but degenerative and pathologic aetiology is also seen. Upper cervical spine...

  2. Persisting upper cervical pain as sole symptom by unstable fractures in the cervical spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saksø, Henrik; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Bünger, Cody

    2015-01-01

    Upper cervical spine fractures can be caused by very low-energy traumas, and the clinical presentation can vary from mild neck pain to paraplegia and ultimately to death. The most common cause of these fractures is trauma but degenerative and pathologic aetiology is also seen. Upper cervical spine...... fractures can be difficult to diagnose because of lack of symptoms. Two case stories describe neck pain as the only symptom to severe and unstable cervical fracture and highlight the importance of an accurate history, thorough physical examination and relevant radiological investigation....

  3. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty Relieves Pain in Cervical Spine Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Li; Jia, Pu; Li, Jinjun; Chen, Hao; Dong, Yipeng; Feng, Fei; Yang, He; Chen, Mengmeng

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) has been shown to release spinal pain and stabilize the vertebral body. PVP is suggested as an alternative treatment in spinal metastasis. Although cervical metastases is less prevalent than thoracic and lumbar spine, PVP procedure in cervical vertebrae remains technical challenging. We retrospectively analyzed the data from patients (n = 9) who underwent PVP using anterolateral approach to treat severe neck pain and restricted cervical mobility from metastatic disease. Patients were rated using modified Tokuhashi score and Tomita score before the procedure. Visual analog scale (VAS), neck disability index (NDI), analgesic use, and imaging (X-ray or CT) were evaluated before PVP and 3 days, 3 months, and 6 months after PVP. All patients were in late stage of cancer evaluated using modified Tokuhashi and Tomita score. The cement leakage rate was 63.6% (14 of the 22 vertebrae) with no severe complications. VAS, NDI, and analgesic use were significantly decreased 3 days after the procedure and remained at low level until 6 months of follow-up. Our result suggested PVP effectively released the pain from patients with cervical metastasis. The results warrant further clinical investigation.

  4. Correlation between TMD and Cervical Spine Pain and Mobility: Is the Whole Body Balance TMJ Related?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Walczyńska-Dragon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD is considered to be associated with imbalance of the whole body. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of TMD therapy on cervical spine range of movement (ROM and reduction of spinal pain. The study group consisted of 60 patients with TMD, cervical spine pain, and limited cervical spine range of movements. Subjects were interviewed by a questionnaire about symptoms of TMD and neck pain and had also masticatory motor system physically examined (according to RDC-TMD and analysed by JMA ultrasound device. The cervical spine motion was analysed using an MCS device. Subjects were randomly admitted to two groups, treated and control. Patients from the treated group were treated with an occlusal splint. Patients from control group were ordered to self-control parafunctional habits. Subsequent examinations were planned in both groups 3 weeks and 3 months after treatment was introduced. The results of tests performed 3 months after the beginning of occlusal splint therapy showed a significant improvement in TMJ function (P>0.05, cervical spine ROM, and a reduction of spinal pain. The conclusion is that there is a significant association between TMD treatment and reduction of cervical spine pain, as far as improvement of cervical spine mobility.

  5. Should we abandon cervical spine manipulation for mechanical neck pain? : yes

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spine manipulation (a high velocity, low amplitude, end range thrust manoeuvre) is a common\\ud treatment option for mechanical neck pain yet may carry the potential for serious neurovascular\\ud complications, specifically vertebral artery dissection and subsequent vertebrobasilar stroke. The nonsuperiority\\ud of manipulation to alternative treatments, coupled with concerns regarding safety, renders\\ud cervical spine manipulation unnecessary and inadvisable.

  6. An occult cervical spine fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, R

    1997-12-01

    A 16-year-old athlete developed neck pain after being dropped on his head with his neck flexed while recreationally wrestling. Initial cervical spine radiographs were negative, but he continued to have neck and arm pain, especially after heading a wet soccer ball. Two months after the initial injury, he had a positive Spurling test; cervical spine CT then revealed a parasagittal linear fracture through the body of C-7. The patient avoided contact and collision activities and had no further physical problems. For patients who suffer cervical spine trauma, adequate visualization of the cervical spine can help prevent catastrophic outcomes.

  7. Thoracic spine pain

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    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  8. Simulated Pain and Cervical Motion in Patients with Chronic Disorders of the Cervical Spine

    OpenAIRE

    Zeevi Dvir; Noga Gal-Eshel; Boaz Shamir; Evgeny Pevzner; Chava Peretz; Nachshon Knoller

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to determine how simulated severe cervical pain affects cervical motion in patients suffering from two distinct chronic cervical disorders: whiplash (n=25) and degenerative changes (n=25). The second objective was to derive an index that would allow the differentiation of maximal from submaximal performances of cervical range of motion. Patients first performed maximal movement of the head (maximal effort) in each of the six primary directions an...

  9. The relationship between chronic type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation and cervical spine pain

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    Vestri Anna R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was aimed at evaluating whether or not patients with chronic type III acromioclavicular dislocation develop cervical spine pain and degenerative changes more frequently than normal subjects. Methods The cervical spine of 34 patients with chronic type III AC dislocation was radiographically evaluated. Osteophytosis presence was registered and the narrowing of the intervertebral disc and cervical lordosis were evaluated. Subjective cervical symptoms were investigated using the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ. One-hundred healthy volunteers were recruited as a control group. Results The rate and distribution of osteophytosis and narrowed intervertebral disc were similar in both of the groups. Patients with chronic AC dislocation had a lower value of cervical lordosis. NPQ score was 17.3% in patients with AC separation (100% = the worst result and 2.2% in the control group (p Conclusions Our study shows that chronic type III AC dislocation does not interfere with osteophytes formation or intervertebral disc narrowing, but that it may predispose cervical hypolordosis. The higher average NPQ values were observed in patients with chronic AC dislocation, especially in those that developed cervical hypolordosis.

  10. Range of motion in the upper and lower cervical spine in people with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolfsson, Thomas; Björklund, Martin; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2012-02-01

    Reduced cervical range of motion (ROM) is a common finding in people with neck pain. With few exceptions, only the angle between head and thorax has been measured. Our aim was to use an extended model to compare active cervical flexion and extension, separate for upper and lower cervical levels, between people with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and controls. We also investigated associations between ROM measures, symptoms and self-rated functioning. In this cross-sectional study, 102 subjects with neck pain and 33 healthy controls participated. An electromagnetic tracker system was used to measure the kinematics to construct a three-segment model including the thorax, cervical spine and head. Neutral flexion/extension were defined at subjects' self-selected seated posture. We found that in the neck pain group, extension in the upper cervical levels and predominately flexion for the lower levels were reduced. The ratio between ROM for the upper and lower levels was altered in the neck pain group so that the lower levels contributed to a lesser extent to the total sagittal ROM compared to controls. These findings could not be explained by a greater forward head posture but must have other origins. For the neck pain group, ROM measures were weakly associated to pain and self-rated functioning. Altogether, this implies that using a three-segment model for assessment of ROM can be a valuable improvement for characterisation of patients and treatment evaluation.

  11. Simulated Pain and Cervical Motion in Patients with Chronic Disorders of the Cervical Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeevi Dvir

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of the present study was to determine how simulated severe cervical pain affects cervical motion in patients suffering from two distinct chronic cervical disorders: whiplash (n=25 and degenerative changes (n=25. The second objective was to derive an index that would allow the differentiation of maximal from submaximal performances of cervical range of motion. Patients first performed maximal movement of the head (maximal effort in each of the six primary directions and then repeated the test as if they were suffering from a much more intense level of pain (submaximal effort. All measurements were repeated within four to seven days. In both groups, there was significant compression of cervical motion during the submaximal effort. This compression was also highly stable on a test-retest basis. In both groups, a significantly higher average coefficient of variation was associated with the imagined pain and it was significantly different between the two clinical groups. In the whiplash group, a logistic regression model allowed the derivation of coefficient of variation-based cutoff scores that might, at selected levels of probability and an individual level, identify chronic whiplash patients who intentionally magnify their motion restriction using pain as a cue. However, the relatively small and very stable compression of cervical motion under pain simulation supports the view that the likelihood that chronic whiplash patients are magnifying their restriction of cervical range of motion using pain as a cue is very low.

  12. Upper thoracic-spine disc degeneration in patients with cervical pain

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    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Costa, Salvador [Department of Radiology, Clinica Quiron, Avda Blasco Ibanez 14, 46010, Valencia (Spain); Molla, Enrique [Department of Radiology, Clinica Quiron, Avda Blasco Ibanez 14, 46010, Valencia (Spain); Department of Morphological Sciences, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2004-01-01

    To study the relationship of upper thoracic spine degenerative disc contour changes on MR imaging in patients with neck pain. The relation between upper thoracic and cervical spine degenerative disc disease is not well established. One hundred and fifty-six patients referred with cervical pain were studied. There were 73 women and 77 men with a mean age of 48.6{+-}14.6 years (range, 19 to 83 years). All MR studies were performed with a large 23-cm FOV covering at least from the body of T4 to the clivus. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion/bulge or extrusion. Degenerative thoracic disc contour changes were observed in 13.4% of patients with cervical pain. T2-3 was the most commonly affected level of the upper thoracic spine, with 15 bulge/protrusions and one extrusion. Upper degenerative thoracic disc contour changes presented in older patients than the cervical levels (Student-Newman-Keuls test, P<0.001). Degenerative disc contour changes at the C7-T1, T1-2, T2-3 and T3-4 levels were significantly correlated (P=0.001), but unrelated to any other disc disease, patient's gender or age. Degenerative cervical disc disease was closely related together (P<0.001), but not with any thoracic disc. A statistically significant relation was found within the upper thoracic discs, reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation to cervical segments is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  13. The immediate effects of cervical spine manipulative therapy and mobilization on local skin temperature, in mechanical neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Tech. Purpose: Mechanical neck pain is the most common type of cervical spine pain encountered. It is also referred to as simple or non-specific neck pain, and is common in all groups of people. Often the exact cause of the pain is unknown. Neck pain, although felt in the neck, can be caused by numerous spinal problems. Neck pain may arise due to muscular tightness in both the neck and upper back, or due to entrapment of nerves of the cervical vertebrae. Joint dysfunction in the cervical...

  14. Relationships between sagittal postures of thoracic and cervical spine, presence of neck pain, neck pain severity and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kwok Tung; Cheung, Ka Yuen; Chan, Kwok Bun; Chan, Man Him; Lo, King Yuen; Chiu, Thomas Tai Wing

    2010-10-01

    This was a cross-sectional correlation study to explore the relationships between sagittal postures of thoracic and cervical spine, presence of neck pain, neck pain severity and disability. Moreover, the reliability of the photographic measurement of the sagittal posture of thoracic and cervical spine was investigated. Forty-five subjects without neck pain and forty-seven subjects with neck pain were recruited. Using a photographic method, the sagittal thoracic and cervical postures were measured by the upper thoracic and the craniovertebral (CV) angles respectively. The Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) and Chinese version Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ) were used to assess neck pain severity and disability. The upper thoracic angle was positively correlated (r(s) = 0.63, p angle was negatively correlated (r(s) = -0.56, p upper thoracic angle was negatively correlated with the CV angles (r(s) = -0.62, p angle, the upper thoracic angle was moderately correlated with the neck pain severity (r(s) = 0.43, p = 0.01) and disability (r(s) = 0.44, p = 0.02). The upper thoracic angle (OR = 1.37, p angle (OR = 0.86, p = 0.04).

  15. Immediate effects of active cranio-cervical flexion exercise versus passive mobilisation of the upper cervical spine on pain and performance on the cranio-cervical flexion test.

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    Lluch, Enrique; Schomacher, Jochen; Gizzi, Leonardo; Petzke, Frank; Seegar, Dagmar; Falla, Deborah

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the immediate effects of an assisted plus active cranio-cervical flexion exercise (exercise group) versus a passive mobilisation plus assisted cranio-cervical flexion (mobilisation group) on performance of the cranio-cervical flexion test (CCFT), cervical range of motion (ROM) and pain in patients with chronic neck pain. Eighteen volunteers with chronic idiopathic neck pain participated in the study and were randomised to one of the two intervention groups. Current level of pain, cervical ROM and pain perceived during movement, pressure pain threshold (PPT) and surface electromyography (EMG) during performance of the CCFT were measured before and immediately after the intervention. A significant reduction in resting pain and PPT measured over cervical sites was observed immediately following both interventions, although a greater change was observed for the exercise group. No change in cervical ROM was observed after either intervention. Reduced sternocleidomastoid and anterior scalene EMG amplitude were observed during stages of the CCFT but only for the participants in the active exercise group. Although both active and passive interventions offered pain relief, only the exercise group improved on a task of motor function highlighting the importance of specific active treatment for improved motor control of the cervical spine.

  16. [Combined surgical and physical treatment in traumatic painful syndromes of the cervical spine].

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    Stachowski, B; Kaczmarek, J; Nosek, A; Kocur, L

    1976-01-01

    Clinical observations suggest the need for changing therapeutic management to a more active one in cases of cervical spine injury with damage to the spinal cord and nerve roots or brachial plexus. In 248 patients with these injuries treated initially conservatively the incidence of cervicobrachial pain was analysed. Neuralgic pains were present in 31.5% of cases, causalgic pains in 2.4% and sympathalgic pains in 2%. Conservative treatment conducted in these patients (89 cases) during many months after trauma had no effect on return of mobility. Long-term application of physioterapy prevented only temporarily the development of trophic changes and only partially relieved pains. Only surgical decompression of the spinal cord or spinal nerves with stabilization of damaged vertebrae caused disappearance of painful syndromes and improvement in the motor activity of the extremities. These observations show that early surgical intervention for decompression of the spinal cord, roots or brachial plexus should be advocated in these cases.

  17. Fractures of the cervical spine

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    Raphael Martus Marcon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2 and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7, according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification, which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative.

  18. Cervical spine osteoblastoma presenting as mechanical neck pain: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is a benign bone-forming tumor that represents approximately 1% of all primary bone tumors. It occurs 40% of the time in the spine, most commonly in the posterior elements. The clinical presentation in this case is of chronic neck pain and stiffness. Although most lesions are well visualized on plain films, a bone scan or CT scan may be of better diagnostic value. Treatment is via surgical excision. In this report we present a case of cervical osteoblastoma mistaken for mechanic...

  19. Extension and flexion in the upper cervical spine in neck pain patients.

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    Ernst, Markus J; Crawford, Rebecca J; Schelldorfer, Sarah; Rausch-Osthoff, Anne-Kathrin; Barbero, Marco; Kool, Jan; Bauer, Christoph M

    2015-08-01

    Neck pain is a common problem in the general population with high risk of ongoing complaints or relapses. Range of motion (ROM) assessment is scientifically established in the clinical process of diagnosis, prognosis and outcome evaluation in neck pain. Anatomically, the cervical spine (CS) has been considered in two regions, the upper and lower CS. Disorders like cervicogenic headache have been clinically associated with dysfunctions of the upper CS (UCS), yet ROM tests and measurements are typically conducted on the whole CS. A cross-sectional study assessing 19 subjects with non-specific neck pain was undertaken to examine UCS extension-flexion ROM in relation to self-reported disability and pain (via the Neck Disability Index (NDI)). Two measurement devices (goniometer and electromagnetic tracking) were employed and compared. Correlations between ROM and the NDI were stronger for the UCS compared to the CS, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and the NDI-headache (r = -0.62). Correlations between UCS and CS ROM were fair to moderate, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and CS extension ROM (r = -0.49). UCS flexion restriction is related to headache frequency and intensity. Consistency and agreement between both measurement systems and for all tests was high. The results demonstrate that separate UCS ROM assessments for extension and flexion are useful in patients with neck pain.

  20. Cervical spine CT scan

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    ... defects of the cervical spine Bone problems Fracture Osteoarthritis Disc herniation Risks Risks of CT scans include: ... Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  1. Flexion/extension cervical spine views in blunt cervical

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir Sadaf; Hussain Manzar; Mahmud Roomi

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】Objective: To examine the contribution of flexion and extension radiographs in the evaluation of ligamentous injury in awake adults with acute blunt cervical spine trauma, who show loss of cervical lordosis and neck pain. Methods: All patients who presented to our emer-gency department following blunt trauma were enrolled in this study, except those with schiwora, neurological defi-cits or fracture demonstrated on cross-table cervical spine X-rays, and tho...

  2. Hemangiopericytoma of the cervical spine

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    Raghvendra V Ramdasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old male presented with neck pain and dysesthesias in the right upper limb. On examination, he had a firm, well-defined midline posterior cervical mass discernible on palpation at the mid-cervical level. He had no neurological deficit. Neuroradiology revealed a variegated enhancing cervical mass is arising from C3 lamina. The mass extended into the right extradural space eroding the C3 lamina and posteriorly into the intermuscular plane. The tumor was excised totally. Histopathology of the tumor showed features of hemangiopericytoma (HPC. The patient underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Primary osseous spinal HPC are rare malignant extra-axial tumors that tend to recur and metastasize. Only two cases of primary osseous HPC have been reported earlier to involve the cervical spine. The clinical presentation and management of the present case with a review of the literature is presented.

  3. Acute neck pain: cervical spine range of motion and position sense prior to and after joint mobilization.

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    McNair, Peter J; Portero, Pierre; Chiquet, Christophe; Mawston, Grant; Lavaste, Francois

    2007-11-01

    Despite the relatively high prevalence of cervical spine pain, the efficacy of treatment procedures is limited. In the current study, range of motion and proprioception was assessed prior to and after specific cervical spine mobilisation techniques. A 44-year-old male office worker presented with a history of cervical pain of 1 day duration. He had woken with pain, stiffness and a loss of range of motion. Examination findings indicated pain to be at C5-6 on the left side. Measurement of maximal three-dimensional cervical motion was undertaken using a Zebris system. A position matching task tested the individual's ability to actively reposition their head and neck. The treatment undertaken involved grade III down-slope mobilisations on the left side at C5-6 and C6-7 in supine lying. This technique was then progressed by placing the subject in an upright sitting position, and sustained natural apophyseal glides were performed at C6. Immediately following the treatment, the patient reported a considerable decrease in pain, less difficulty in movement and reduced stiffness. Motion analyses showed the most marked percentage improvements in range of motion after treatment were in flexion (55%), extension (35%), left rotation (56%), and left lateral flexion (22%). Ipsilateral lateral flexion with axial rotation was also notably improved following treatment. No change in proprioceptive ability was found following the treatment. The findings showed that the application of standardised specific mobilisation techniques led to substantial improvements in the range of motion and the restitution of normal coupled motion.

  4. Tophaceous gout in the cervical spine

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    Cabot, Jonathan [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Mosel, Leigh; Kong, Andrew; Hayward, Mike [Flinders Medical Centre, Department of Medical Imaging, Bedford Park, South Australia (Australia)

    2005-12-01

    Gout is a common metabolic disorder typically affecting the distal joints of the appendicular skeleton. Involvement of the axial skeleton, particularly the facet joints and posterior column of the cervical spine, is rare. This case report highlights such a presentation in a 76-year old female who presented with cervical spine pain following a fall. Her radiological findings were suggestive of a destructive metastatic process. Histological diagnosis confirmed tophaceous gout. (orig.)

  5. Flexion/extension cervical spine views in blunt cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Sadaf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To examine the contribution of flexion and extension radiographs in the evaluation of ligamentous injury in awake adults with acute blunt cervical spine trauma, who show loss of cervical lordosis and neck pain. Methods: All patients who presented to our emer-gency department following blunt trauma were enrolled in this study, except those with schiwora, neurological defi-cits or fracture demonstrated on cross-table cervical spine X-rays, and those who were either obtunded or presented after cervical spine surgery. Adequacy of flexion and exten-sion views was checked by the neurosurgery and radiology team members. All these patients underwent cross-table cervical spine view followed by flexion/extension views based on the loss of lordosis on cross-table imaging and the presence of neck pain. Results: A total of 200 cases were reviewed, of whom 90 (45% underwent repeat X-rays because of either inadequate exposure or limited motion. None of the patients with loss of lordosis on cross-table view had positive flexion and extension views of cervical spine for instability. Conclusions: Our results show that in patients who underwent acute radiographic evaluation of blunt cervical spine trauma, flexion and extension views of the cervical spine are unlikely to yield positive results in the presence of axial neck pain and/or loss of cervical lordosis. We can also hypothesize that performing flexion and extension views will be more useful once the acute neck pain has settled. Key words: X-rays; Cervical vertebrae; Lordosis

  6. Flexion/extension cervical spine views in blunt cervical trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sadaf Nasir; Manzar Hussain; Roomi Mahmud

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the contribution of flexion and extension radiographs in the evaluation of ligamentous injury in awake adults with acute blunt cervical spine trauma,who show loss of cervical lordosis and neck pain.Methods: All patients who presented to our emergency department following blunt trauma were enrolled in this study,except those with schiwora,neurological deficits or fracture demonstrated on cross-table cervical spine X-rays,and those who were either obtunded or presented after cervical spine surgery.Adequacy of flexion and extension views was checked by the neurosurgery and radiology team members.All these patients underwent cross-table cervical spine view followed by flexion/extension views based on the loss of lordosis on cross-table imaging and the presence of neck pain.Results: A total of 200 cases were reviewed,of whom 90 (45%) underwent repeat X-rays because of either inadequate exposure or limited motion.None of the patients with loss of lordosis on cross-table view had positive flexion and extension views of cervical spine for instability.Conclusions: Our results show that in patients who underwent acute radiographic evaluation of blunt cervical spine trauma,flexion and extension views of the cervical spine are unlikely to yield positive results in the presence of axial neck pain and/or loss of cervical lordosis.We can also hypothesize that performing flexion and extension views will be more useful once the acute neck pain has settled.

  7. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders.

  8. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

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    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  9. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

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    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine A A A What's ... columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  10. Effect of maitland mobilization in cervical and thoracic spine and therapeutic exercise on functional impairment in individuals with chronic neck pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keun-Su; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated joint mobilization and therapeutic exercise applied to the cervical spine and upper thoracic spine for functional impairment caused by chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen study subjects were randomly assigned to two groups of nine people each. Therapeutic exercise only was applied to the cervical and upper thoracic spine for Group I, while both therapeutic exercise and joint mobilization were applied to Group II. The visual analog scale, neck disability index, active cervical range of motion, static balance capacity, and muscle tone were assessed with a pre-test. The intervention was carried out for 60 minutes a day, three times a week, for two weeks for each group, followed by a post-test using the same protocol as the pre-test. [Results] The visual analog scale, neck disability index, and active cervical range of motion improved significantly in both groups. Group II improved significantly more on right lateral flexion and rightward rotation. Muscle tone improved significantly in the upper trapezius in both groups. [Conclusion] The joint mobilization and therapeutic exercise for functional impairments caused by chronic neck pain had a significant effect on several types of functional impairment. PMID:28356648

  11. Cervical spine movement during intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Swain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been growing concerns following documented instances of neurological deterioration in patients with cervical spine injury as a result of intubation. A significant body of evidence has since evolved with the primary objective of ascertaining the safest way of securing the endotracheal tube in patients with suspected and proven cervical injury. The search for a mode of intubation producing the least movement at the cervical spine is an ongoing process and is limited by logistic and ethical issues. The ensuing review is an attempt to review available evidence on cervical movements during intubation and to comprehensively outline the movement at the cervical spine with a wide plethora of intubation aids. Literature search was sourced from digital libraries including PubMed, Medline and Google Scholar in addition to the standard textbooks of Anaesthesiology. The keywords used in literature search included 'cervical spine motion,' 'neurological deterioration,' 'intubation biomechanics,' 'direct laryngoscopy,' 'flexible fibreoptic intubation,' 'video laryngoscopes' and 'craniocervical motion.' The scientific information in this review is expected to assist neuroanaesthesiologists for planning airway management in patients with neurological injury as well as to direct further research into this topic which has significant clinical and patient safety implications.

  12. Altered alignment of the shoulder girdle and cervical spine in patients with insidious onset neck pain and whiplash-associated disorder.

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    Helgadottir, Harpa; Kristjansson, Eythor; Mottram, Sarah; Karduna, Andrew; Jonsson, Halldor

    2011-08-01

    Clinical theory suggests that altered alignment of the shoulder girdle has the potential to create or sustain symptomatic mechanical dysfunction in the cervical and thoracic spine. The alignment of the shoulder girdle is described by two clavicle rotations, i.e, elevation and retraction, and by three scapular rotations, i.e., upward rotation, internal rotation, and anterior tilt. Elevation and retraction have until now been assessed only in patients with neck pain. The aim of the study was to determine whether there is a pattern of altered alignment of the shoulder girdle and the cervical and thoracic spine in patients with neck pain. A three-dimensional device measured clavicle and scapular orientation, and cervical and thoracic alignment in patients with insidious onset neck pain (IONP) and whiplash-associated disorder (WAD). An asymptomatic control group was selected for baseline measurements. The symptomatic groups revealed a significantly reduced clavicle retraction and scapular upward rotation as well as decreased cranial angle. A difference was found between the symptomatic groups on the left side, whereas the WAD group revealed an increased scapular anterior tilt and the IONP group a decreased clavicle elevation. These changes may be an important mechanism for maintenance and recurrence or exacerbation of symptoms in patients with neck pain.

  13. Cervical spine injuries in American football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihn, Jeffrey A; Anderson, David T; Lamb, Kathleen; Deluca, Peter F; Bata, Ahmed; Marchetto, Paul A; Neves, Nuno; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2009-01-01

    American football is a high-energy contact sport that places players at risk for cervical spine injuries with potential neurological deficits. Advances in tackling and blocking techniques, rules of the game and medical care of the athlete have been made throughout the past few decades to minimize the risk of cervical injury and improve the management of injuries that do occur. Nonetheless, cervical spine injuries remain a serious concern in the game of American football. Injuries have a wide spectrum of severity. The relatively common 'stinger' is a neuropraxia of a cervical nerve root(s) or brachial plexus and represents a reversible peripheral nerve injury. Less common and more serious an injury, cervical cord neuropraxia is the clinical manifestation of neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord due to hyperextension, hyperflexion or axial loading. Recent data on American football suggest that approximately 0.2 per 100,000 participants at the high school level and 2 per 100,000 participants at the collegiate level are diagnosed with cervical cord neuropraxia. Characterized by temporary pain, paraesthesias and/or motor weakness in more than one extremity, there is a rapid and complete resolution of symptoms and a normal physical examination within 10 minutes to 48 hours after the initial injury. Stenosis of the spinal canal, whether congenital or acquired, is thought to predispose the athlete to cervical cord neuropraxia. Although quite rare, catastrophic neurological injury is a devastating entity referring to permanent neurological injury or death. The mechanism is most often a forced hyperflexion injury, as occurs when 'spear tackling'. The mean incidence of catastrophic neurological injury over the past 30 years has been approximately 0.5 per 100,000 participants at high school level and 1.5 per 100,000 at the collegiate level. This incidence has decreased significantly when compared with the incidence in the early 1970s. This decrease in the incidence of

  14. Cervical spine in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Amy Hoi-Ying; Clark, Bruce Eric; David, David John; Anderson, Peter John

    2012-05-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a congenital syndrome with characteristic craniofacial malformations, which are well described in the literature. However, the presence of cervical spine dysmorphology in this syndrome has been minimally described. This study reviews cervical spine radiographs of 40 patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. In this sample, 7 of 40 patients displayed cervical spine anomalies, with 3 of these patients displaying multiple cervical spine anomalies. The patterns of spinal anomalies were variable, suggesting that the underlying genetic mutation has variable expressivity in cervical spine development as it does elsewhere in the craniofacial skeleton.

  15. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  16. Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine after neck injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltsios, Michail; Savvidou, Olga; Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kaspiris, Angelos; Efstathopoulos, Nikolaos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2013-07-01

    The normal sagittal alignment of the cervical spine is lordotic and is affected by the posture of the head and neck. The question of whether loss of cervical lordosis is the result of muscle spasm after injury or a normal variation, and the clinical significance of such changes in sagittal profile of the cervical spine has been an issue of several studies. The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence of normal cervical lordosis and its changes after neck injury compared to the healthy population. We studied the lateral radiographs of the cervical spine of 60 patients with neck injury compared to 100 patients without a neck injury. Lateral radiographs were obtained in the standing or sitting position, and the curvature of the cervical spine was measured using the angle formed between the inferior end plates of the C2 and C7 vertebrae. In the patients without neck injury, lordotic and straight cervical spine sagittal alignment was observed in 36.5% each, double curvature in 17%, and kyphotic in 10%. In the patients with neck injury, lordotic sagittal alignment was observed in 36%, straight in 34%, double curvature in 26% and kyphotic in 4%. No significant difference between the two groups regarding all types of sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was found (p > 0.100). The alterations in normal cervical lordosis in patients with neck injury must be considered coincidental. These alterations should not be associated with muscle spasm caused by neck pain.

  17. Association between neck pain and cervical spine curve%颈部疼痛程度与颈椎曲度相关性的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任龙喜; 何玉宝; 郭函; 韩正锋; 郭保逢

    2011-01-01

    探讨颈部疼痛程度与颈椎曲度的相关性.方法:2009年6月~2011年4月在我院颈椎专家门诊就诊的颈部疼痛患者121例,男性56例,女性65例,年龄17~79岁,平均51.2±17.7岁.对所有患者的颈痛程度进行数字分级法(numeric rating scales,NRS)评分,根据中立位颈椎X线侧位片的颈椎曲度(颈椎角)分为4组,即前凸组、曲度变直组、反屈组和S型组,比较各组之间颈痛程度,并对颈痛程度与颈椎曲度进行相关性分析.结果:121患者中颈椎前凸37例,曲度变直26例,反屈31例,S型27例,其NRS评分分别为4.81±1.90分,5.63±3.64分,5.15±2.47分,6.81±4.65分,颈椎曲度变直组和曲度S型组患者的颈痛程度NRS评分与颈椎前凸组相比差异有显著性(P<0.05),其余各组间两两比较差异无显著性(P>0.05).患者颈痛程度与颈椎角成弱负相关(r=-0.218,P=0.039).结论:颈部疼痛程度与颈椎曲度有关,颈痛程度与颈椎角成弱负相关,在治疗颈椎疾患时应注意对颈椎曲度的矫正.%Objective:To investigate the association between neck pain and cervical spine curve.Method: 121 patients (56 males and 65 females) with neck pain in our out-patients from June 2009 to April 2011 were reviewed retrospectively.All patients had an average age of 51.2±17.7 years (range, 17 to 79 years),and all cases were evaluated by Numeric rating scales (NRS) scores and grouped according to cervical curve under X-rays(lordosis,straight,kyphosis and "S" shape group).The severity of neck pain was recorded,and its relationship with cervical curve type was analyzed.Result:Of 121 cases,37,26,31 and 27 cases were in lordosis, straight,kyphosis and "S" shape group respectively.The NRS scores were 4.81±1.90,5.63±3.64,5.15±2.47 and 6.81 ±4.65 for 4 groups respectively .Compared with lordosis group, patients in straight and "S" shape group had more severe neck pain (P0.05).The severity of neck pain showed weak negative correlation with the cervical

  18. Sport injuries of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargon, G.

    1981-03-01

    The article reports on injuries of the cervical spine occurring during sports activities. An attempt is made to reconstruct the movements which led to the cervical spine injuries in question. In two cases of accidents occuring during bathing, one football accident and a toboggan accident, the injuries concerned point to hyperextension of the cervical spine as cause of the injury. In another football accident and a riding accident, the changes observed allow us to conclude that the movement leading to the injury must have been a hyperflexion. One accident occurring while jumping on the trampolin resulted in an injury of the upper cervical spine pointing to the action of a compressive force on the cervical spine in addition to the force resulting in hyperflexion.

  19. Functional diagnostics of the cervical spine by using computer tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, J.; Hayek, J.; Grob, D.; Penning, L.; Panjabi, M.M.; Zehnder, R.

    1988-04-01

    35 healthy adults and 137 patients after cervical spine injury were examined by functional CT. The range of axial rotation at the level occiput/atlas, atlas/axis and the segment below were measured in all subjects. A rotation occiput/atlas of more than 7/sup 0/, and C1/C2 more than 54/sup 0/ could refer to segmental hypermobility, a rotation at the segment C1/C2 less than 29/sup 0/ to hypomobility. According to the postulated normal values based upon a 98% confidence level, out of 137 patients examined after cervical spine injury and with therapy-resistant neck pain, 45 showed signs of segmental hypermobility of the upper cervical spine, 17 showed hyper- or hypomobility at different levels, 10 patients presented segmental hypomobility at C1/C2 level alone. In all patients, according to the clinical assessment, functional pathology was suspected in the upper cervical spine. Surgical correction of rotatory instability should be considered as a possible therapeutic procedure after successful diagnostic stabilisation of the cervical spine by minerva cast.

  20. Vertigo in patients with cervical spine dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Galm, R.; Rittmeister, M.; Schmitt, E.

    1998-01-01

    To our knowledge, quantitative studies on the significance of disorders of the upper cervical spine as a cause of vertigo or impaired hearing do not exist. We examined the cervical spines of 67 patients who presented with symptoms of dizziness. Prior to the orthopaedic examination, causes of vertigo relating to the field of ENT and neurology had been ruled out. Fifty patients of the above-mentioned group were studied. They followed the outlined treatment protocol with physical therapy and wer...

  1. Tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess without cervical spine TB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChandrakantPatil; RashmiKharatPatil; PrasadDeshmukh; SameerSinghal; BlendaDSouza

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess is a rare presentation. It is present in adults usually due to involvement of cervical spine by tuberculosis. Retropharyngeal space usually gets involved in children due to pyogenic organisms or secondary to trauma. Here is a case of tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess in an adult female, with pulmonary tuberculosis. The patient was not having tuberculous involvement of cervical spine and was managed surgically by aspirating the retropharyngeal abscess transorally and AKT Category I.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging atlas of the cervical spine musculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, John; Perriman, Diana M; Pickering, Mark R; Buirski, Graham; Smith, Paul N; Webb, Alexandra L

    2016-07-01

    The anatomy of the cervical spine musculature visible on magnetic resonance (MR) images is poorly described in the literature. However, the correct identification of individual muscles is clinically important because certain conditions of the cervical spine, for example whiplash associated disorders, idiopathic neck pain, cervical nerve root avulsion and cervical spondylotic myelopathy, are associated with different morphological changes in specific muscles visible on MR images. Knowledge of the precise structure of different cervical spine muscles is crucial when comparisons with the contralateral side or with normal are required for accurate description of imaging pathology, management and assessment of treatment efficacy. However, learning the intricate arrangement of 27 muscles is challenging. A multi-level cross-sectional depiction combined with three-dimensional reconstructions could facilitate the understanding of this anatomically complex area. This paper presents a comprehensive series of labeled axial MR images from one individual and serves as a reference atlas of the cervical spine musculature to guide clinicians, researchers, and anatomists in the accurate identification of these muscles on MR imaging. Clin. Anat. 29:643-659, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cervical Spine Axial Rotation Goniometer Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Ulaş Erdem

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cervical spine rotation movement is quiet harder than other joints. Configuration and arrangement of current goniometers and devices is not always practic in clinics and some methods are quiet expensive. The cervical axial rotation goniometer designed by the authors is consists of five pieces (head apparatus, chair, goniometric platform, eye pads and camera. With this goniometer design a detailed evaluation of cervical spine range of motion can be obtained. Besides, measurement of "joint position sense" which is recently has rising interest in researches can be made practically with this goniometer.

  4. MRI findings in the upper cervical spine of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaida, Hidefumi; Sakou, Takashi; Morizono, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikuni, Nagatoshi; Taketomi, Eiji; Hashiguchi, Masanao

    1989-04-01

    In 55 patients with rheumatoid arthritis associated with upper cervical spine abnormality, the presence or absence of medullary and upper cervical pressures was examined on sagittal MRI scans. Atlanto-dental anterior incomplete dislocation and horizontal dislocation were imaged concurrently with X-rays. For horizontal dislocation, an abnormal Redlund-Johnell value and a Ranawat value of 7 mm or less were always associated with medullary pressure as seen on MRI. For anterior incomplete dislocation, upper cervical pressure was always associated when a space available for the spinal cord was 13 mm or less or frequently associated when the atlanto-dental interval was 8 mm or more. Many of the patients with the upper cervical abnormalities complained of occipital or cervical pain. The pain was always encountered in patients with an abnormal Redlund-Johnell value. Roentgenography of the cervical spine confirmed MRI-proven medullary or upper cervical pressure, suggesting the potential of MRI in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. (Namekawa, K).

  5. Developmental biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuckley, David J; Linders, David R; Ching, Randal P

    2013-04-05

    Head and neck injuries, the leading cause of death for children in the U.S., are difficult to diagnose, treat, and prevent because of a critical void in our understanding of the biomechanical response of the immature cervical spine. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional and failure biomechanics of the cervical spine across multiple axes of loading throughout maturation. A correlational study design was used to examine the relationships governing spinal maturation and biomechanical flexibility curves and tolerance data using a cadaver human in vitro model. Eleven human cadaver cervical spines from across the developmental spectrum (2-28 years) were dissected into segments (C1-C2, C3-C5, and C6-C7) for biomechanical testing. Non-destructive flexibility tests were performed in tension, compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. After measuring their intact biomechanical responses, each segment group was failed in different modes to measure the tissue tolerance in tension (C1-C2), compression (C3-C5), and extension (C5-C6). Classical injury patterns were observed in all of the specimens tested. Both the functional (pcervical spine throughout maturation and elucidated age, spinal level, and mode of loading specificity. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental perspective and facilitate the generation of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects.

  6. Prevalence of cervical facet joint pain in chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Rivera, Jose; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2002-07-01

    Neck pain is considered to be one of the most common chronic pain conditions in modern society. Various structures identified as capable of transmitting pain in the cervical spine include facet joints, intervertebral discs, nerve root dura, ligaments, fascia, and muscles. The prevalence of cervical facet joint pain in patients with chronic pain after whiplash has been determined as 54% to 60%. However, the prevalence of chronic cervical facet joint pain has not yet been determined in a heterogenous population or in patients with cervical spine pain of idiopathic origin in a controlled environment. This study evaluated 160 patients seen in one interventional pain management practice in a non-university setting. Cervical facet joints were investigated with diagnostic blocks using lidocaine 1% preservative free initially, followed by bupivacaine 0.25%, usually 2 to 4 weeks apart. The study population consisted of 76 women and 30 men aged 43 +/- 13 years of age (mean +/- SD). Mode of onset of neck pain was determined as following a traumatic incident in 48% of the patients, whereas it was with gradual onset without an identifiable specific incident in the remaining 55 patients (52%). Eighty-one or 70% of the patients (70%) reported a definite response to lidocaine blocks. Confirmatory blocks with bupivacaine were performed in 81 patients with 64 patients with 60% of the total sample, or 79%, of the lidocaine-positive group reporting definite response with improvement in their pain. Thus, a prevalence rate of facet joint pain in chronic neck pain was determined to be 60% (95% CI, 50%-70%), with a false positive rate of controlled diagnostic blocks of 40% (95% CI, 34%-46%).

  7. Impact of intravenous acetaminophen therapy on the necessity of cervical spine imaging in patients with cervical spine trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koorosh Ahmadi; Amir Masoud Hashemian; Elham Pishbin; Mahdi Sharif-Alhoseini; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2014-01-01

    Objective:We evaluated a new hypothesis of acetaminophen therapy to reduce the necessity of imaging in patients with probable traumatic cervical spine injury.Methods:Patients with acute blunt trauma to the neck and just posterior midline cervical tenderness received acetaminophen (15 mg/kg) intravenously after cervical spine immobilization.Then,all the patients underwent plain radiography and computerized tomography of the cervical spine.The outcome measure was the presence of traumatic cervical spine injury.Sixty minutes after acetaminophen infusion,posterior midline cervical tendemess was reassessed.Results:Of 1 309 patients,41 had traumatic cervical spine injuries based on imaging.Sixty minutes after infusion,posterior midline cervical tenderness was eliminated in 1 041 patients,none of whom had abnormal imaging.Conclusion:Patients with cervical spine trauma do not need imaging if posterior midline cervical tendemess is eliminated after acetaminophen infusion.This analgesia could be considered as a diagnostic and therapeutic intervention.

  8. Cervical spine and crystal-associated diseases: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feydy, Antoine; Chevrot, Alain; Drape, Jean-Luc [Hopital Cochin, Service de Radiologie B, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Liote, Frederic [Hopital Lariboisiere, Federation de Rhumatologie, Paris (France); Carlier, Robert [Hopital Raymond Poincare, Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2006-02-01

    The cervical spine may be specifically involved in crystal-associated arthropathies. In this article, we focus on the three common crystals and diseases: hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposition disease, and monosodium urate crystals (gout). The cervical involvement in crystal-associated diseases may provoke a misleading clinical presentation with acute neck pain, fever, or neurological symptoms. Imaging allows an accurate diagnosis in typical cases with calcific deposits and destructive lesions of the discs and joints. Most of the cases are related to CPPD or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition; gout is much less common. (orig.)

  9. Cervical spine injury in child abuse: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooks, V.J.; Sisler, C.; Burton, B. [Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-03-01

    Pediatric cervical spine injuries have rarely been reported in the setting of child abuse. We report two cases of unsuspected lower cervical spine fracture-dislocation in twin infant girls who had no physical examination findings to suggest cervical spine injury. Classic radio-graphic findings of child abuse were noted at multiple other sites in the axial and appendicular skeleton. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging proved to be valuable in both the initial evaluation of the extent of cervical spine injury and in following postoperative changes. The unexpected yet devastating findings in these two cases further substantiate the importance of routine evaluation of the cervical spine in cases of suspected child abuse. (orig.)

  10. Cervical human spine loads during traumatomechanical investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallieris, D.; Rizzetti, A.; Mattern. R.; Thunnissen, J.G.M.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.

    1996-01-01

    The last decade's improvements in automotive safety resulted into a significant decrease of fatal injuries. However, due to the use of belts and airbags it can be observed that cervical spine injuries, non-severe and severe, have become more important. It seems that inertial loading of the neck by t

  11. AOSpine subaxial cervical spine injury classification system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Koerner, John D.; Radcliff, Kris E.; Oner, F. Cumhur; Reinhold, Maximilian; Schnake, Klaus J.; Kandziora, Frank; Fehlings, Michael G.; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Vialle, Luiz R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This project describes a morphology-based subaxial cervical spine traumatic injury classification system. Using the same approach as the thoracolumbar system, the goal was to develop a comprehensive yet simple classification system with high intra- and interobserver reliability to be used f

  12. Does applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduce cervical spine radiography rates in alert patients with blunt trauma to the neck? A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesupalan Rajam

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cautious outlook towards neck injuries has been the norm to avoid missing cervical spine injuries. Consequently there has been an increased use of cervical spine radiography. The Canadian Cervical Spine rule was proposed to reduce unnecessary use of cervical spine radiography in alert and stable patients. Our aim was to see whether applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduced the need for cervical spine radiography without missing significant cervical spine injuries. Methods This was a retrospective study conducted in 2 hospitals. 114 alert and stable patients who had cervical spine radiographs for suspected neck injuries were included in the study. Data on patient demographics, high risk & low risk factors as per the Canadian Cervical Spine rule and cervical spine radiography results were collected and analysed. Results 28 patients were included in the high risk category according to the Canadian Cervical Spine rule. 86 patients fell into the low risk category. If the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied, there would have been a significant reduction in cervical spine radiographs as 86/114 patients (75.4% would not have needed cervical spine radiograph. 2/114 patients who had significant cervical spine injuries would have been identified when the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied. Conclusion Applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule for neck injuries in alert and stable patients would have reduced the use of cervical spine radiographs without missing out significant cervical spine injuries. This relates to reduction in radiation exposure to patients and health care costs.

  13. Pressure ulcers, indentation marks and pain from cervical spine immobilization with extrication collars and headblocks : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, Wietske H W; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Schuurmans, Marieke J; Leenen, Luke P H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the occurrence and severity of pressure ulcers, indentation marks and pain from the extrication collar combined with headblocks. Furthermore, the influence of time, injury severity and patient characteristics on the development of pressure ulcers, indentation marks and pain w

  14. Cervical biomechanics and neck pain of "head-spinning" breakdancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauther, M D; Piotrowski, M; Hussmann, B; Lendemans, S; Wedemeyer, C; Jaeger, M

    2014-05-01

    The cervical spine of breakdancers is at great risk due to reversed body loading during headspin manoeuvers. This study focused on the cervical biomechanics of breakdancers and a correlation with neck pain. A standardized interview and biomechanical testing of the cervical spine of 25 participants with "headspin" ability ages 16-34 years and an age-matched cohort of 25 participants without any cervical spine problems was conducted. Neck pain history, Neck Disability Index (NDI), cervical range of motion (CROM) and cervical torque were recorded. The "headspin" group reported significantly better subjective fitness, more cervical complaints, higher pain intensity, a longer history of neck pain and a worse NDI compared to the "normal" collective. The "headspin" group showed a 2-2.5 times higher rate of neck pain than the normal population, with increased cervical flexion (pcervical torque in all planes (p<0.001). The CROM showed a negative moderate to strong correlation with NDI, pain intensity and history of neck pain. Sports medicine practitioners should be aware of headspin maneuver accidents that pose the risk of fractures, dislocations and spinal cord injuries of breakdancers.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of upper cervical spine instability tests: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutting, N.; Scholten-Peeters, G.G.M.; Vijverman, V.; Keesenberg, M.D.; Verhagen, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with neck pain, headache, torticollis, or neurological signs should be screened carefully for upper cervical spine instability, as these conditions are "red flags" for applying physical therapy interventions. However, little is known about the diagnostic accuracy of upper cervic

  16. Prevalence of facet joint pain in chronic spinal pain of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pampati Vidyasagar

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facet joints are a clinically important source of chronic cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pain. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the prevalence of facet joint pain by spinal region in patients with chronic spine pain referred to an interventional pain management practice. Methods Five hundred consecutive patients with chronic, non-specific spine pain were evaluated. The prevalence of facet joint pain was determined using controlled comparative local anesthetic blocks (1% lidocaine or 1% lidocaine followed by 0.25% bupivacaine, in accordance with the criteria established by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP. The study was performed in the United States in a non-university based ambulatory interventional pain management setting. Results The prevalence of facet joint pain in patients with chronic cervical spine pain was 55% 5(95% CI, 49% – 61%, with thoracic spine pain was 42% (95% CI, 30% – 53%, and in with lumbar spine pain was 31% (95% CI, 27% – 36%. The false-positive rate with single blocks with lidocaine was 63% (95% CI, 54% – 72% in the cervical spine, 55% (95% CI, 39% – 78% in the thoracic spine, and 27% (95% CI, 22% – 32% in the lumbar spine. Conclusion This study demonstrated that in an interventional pain management setting, facet joints are clinically important spinal pain generators in a significant proportion of patients with chronic spinal pain. Because these patients typically have failed conservative management, including physical therapy, chiropractic treatment and analgesics, they may benefit from specific interventions designed to manage facet joint pain.

  17. Pediatric cervical spine: normal anatomy, variants, and trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustrin, Elizabeth Susan; Karakas, Sabiha Pinar; Ortiz, A Orlando; Cinnamon, Jay; Castillo, Mauricio; Vaheesan, Kirubahara; Brown, James H; Diamond, Alan S; Black, Karen; Singh, Sudha

    2003-01-01

    Emergency radiologic evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine can be challenging because of the confusing appearance of synchondroses, normal anatomic variants, and injuries that are unique to children. Cervical spine injuries in children are usually seen in the upper cervical region owing to the unique biomechanics and anatomy of the pediatric cervical spine. Knowledge of the normal embryologic development and anatomy of the cervical spine is important to avoid mistaking synchondroses for fractures in the setting of trauma. Familiarity with anatomic variants is also important for correct image interpretation. These variants include pseudosubluxation, absence of cervical lordosis, wedging of the C3 vertebra, widening of the predental space, prevertebral soft-tissue widening, intervertebral widening, and "pseudo-Jefferson fracture." In addition, familiarity with mechanisms of injury and appropriate imaging modalities will aid in the correct interpretation of radiologic images of the pediatric cervical spine.

  18. Case series of an intraoral balancing appliance therapy on subjective symptom severity and cervical spine alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Joo Kang; Jung, Soo Chang; Lee, Hwang-Woo; Yin, Chang Shik; Lee, Young Jin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a holistic intraoral appliance (OA) on cervical spine alignment and subjective symptom severity. Design. An observational study on case series with holistic OA therapy. Setting. An outpatient clinic for holistic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) therapy under the supervision of the Pain Center, CHA Biomedical center, CHA University. Subjects. Ambulatory patients presenting with diverse chief complaints in the holistic TMJ clinic. Main Measures. Any immediate change in the curvature of cervical spine and the degree of atlantoaxial rotation was investigated in the images of simple X-ray and computed tomography of cervical spine with or without OA. Changes of subjective symptom severity were also analyzed for the holistic OA therapy cases. Results. A total of 59 cases were reviewed. Alignment of upper cervical spine rotation showed an immediate improvement (P alignment. These results show that further researches may warrant for the holistic TMJ therapy.

  19. Clinical implications of alignment of upper and lower cervical spine

    OpenAIRE

    Sherekar S; Yadav Y; Basoor A; Baghel Arvind; Adam Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The alignment of upper and lower cervical spine is presumed to be closely interrelated and the knowledge of this is mandatory when performing occipito-cervical and upper cervical fusions. The aim of this study was to establish standard values for upper and lower cervical spine alignment in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Five hundred eighteen asymptomatic volunteers (261 males and 257 females) between 12 and 80 years of age underwent lateral radiography w...

  20. Percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty for metastatic lytic lesions of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykomitros, Vasilis; Anagnostidis, Kleovoulos S; Alzeer, Ziad; Kapetanos, George A

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of our report is to describe a new application of kyphoplasty, the percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty that we performed in two cases of metastatic osteolytic lesions in cervical spine. The first patient, aged 48 years, with primary malignancy in lungs had two metastatic lesions in C2 and C6 vertebrae. Patient's complaints were about pain and restriction of movements (due to the pain) in the cervical spine. The second patient, aged 70 years, with primary malignancy in stomach, had multiple metastatic lesions in thoracolumbar spine and C3, C4 and C5 vertebrae without neurological symptoms. The main symptoms were from cervical spine with severe pain even in bed rest and systematic use of opiate-base analgesic. The preoperative status was evaluated with X-rays, CT scan, MRI scan and with Karnofsky score and visual analogue pain (VAS) scale. Both patients underwent percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty via the anterolateral approach in cervical spine under general anaesthesia. No clinical complications occurred during or after the procedure. Both patients experienced pain relief immediately after balloon kyphoplasty and during the following days. The stiffness also resolved rapidly and cervical collars were removed. VAS score significantly improved from 85 and 95 preoperatively to 30 in both patients. Karnofsky score showed also improvement from 40 and 30 preoperatively to 80 and 70, respectively, at the final follow-up (7 months after the procedure). Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty proved to be safe and effective minimally invasive procedure for metastatic osteolytic lesions of the cervical spine, reducing pain and avoiding vertebral collapse. Experience and attention are necessary in order to avoid complications.

  1. Cervical spine alignment, sagittal deformity, and clinical implications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Tang, Jessica A; Smith, Justin S; Acosta, Frank L; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Blondel, Benjamin; Bess, Shay; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Deviren, Vedat; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Ames, Christopher P

    2013-08-01

    This paper is a narrative review of normal cervical alignment, methods for quantifying alignment, and how alignment is associated with cervical deformity, myelopathy, and adjacent-segment disease (ASD), with discussions of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Popular methods currently used to quantify cervical alignment are discussed including cervical lordosis, sagittal vertical axis, and horizontal gaze with the chin-brow to vertical angle. Cervical deformity is examined in detail as deformities localized to the cervical spine affect, and are affected by, other parameters of the spine in preserving global sagittal alignment. An evolving trend is defining cervical sagittal alignment. Evidence from a few recent studies suggests correlations between radiographic parameters in the cervical spine and HRQOL. Analysis of the cervical regional alignment with respect to overall spinal pelvic alignment is critical. The article details mechanisms by which cervical kyphotic deformity potentially leads to ASD and discusses previous studies that suggest how postoperative sagittal malalignment may promote ASD. Further clinical studies are needed to explore the relationship of cervical malalignment and the development of ASD. Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine may play a substantial role in the development of cervical myelopathy as cervical deformity can lead to spinal cord compression and cord tension. Surgical correction of cervical myelopathy should always take into consideration cervical sagittal alignment, as decompression alone may not decrease cord tension induced by kyphosis. Awareness of the development of postlaminectomy kyphosis is critical as it relates to cervical myelopathy. The future direction of cervical deformity correction should include a comprehensive approach in assessing global cervicalpelvic relationships. Just as understanding pelvic incidence as it relates to lumbar lordosis was crucial in building our knowledge of thoracolumbar deformities, T

  2. Misdiagnosing absent pedicle of cervical spine in the acute trauma setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad H. Abduljabbar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms.

  3. High Grade Infective Spondylolisthesis of Cervical Spine Secondary to Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadgaonkar, Shailesh; Shah, Kunal; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2015-12-01

    Spondylolisthesis coexisting with tuberculosis is rarely reported. There is a controversy whether spondylolisthesis coexists or precedes tuberculosis. Few cases of pathological spondylolisthesis secondary to tuberculous spondylodiscitis have been reported in the lumbar and lumbosacral spine. All cases in the literature presented as anterolisthesis, except one which presented as posterolisthesis of lumbar spine. Spondylolisthesis in the cervical spine is mainly degenerative and traumatic. Spondylolisthesis due to tuberculosis is not reported in the lower cervical spine. The exact mechanism of such an occurrence of spondylolisthesis with tuberculosis is sparsely reported in the literature and inadequately understood. We report a rare case of high grade pathological posterolisthesis of the lower cervical spine due to tubercular spondylodiscitis in a 67-year-old woman managed surgically with a three-year follow-up period. This case highlights the varied and complex presentation of tuberculosis of the lower cervical spine and gives insight into its pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

  4. Impact of intravenous acetaminophen therapy on the necessity of cervical spine imaging in patients with cervical spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Koorosh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: We evaluated a new hypothesis of acetaminophen therapy to reduce the necessity of imaging in patients with probable traumatic cervical spine injury. Methods:Patients with acute blunt trauma to the neck and just posterior midline cervical tenderness received acetaminophen (15 mg/kg intravenously after cervical spine immobilization. Then, all the patients underwent plain radiography and computerized tomography of the cervical spine. The outcome measure was the presence of traumatic cervical spine injury. Sixty minutes after acetaminophen infusion, posterior midline cervical tenderness was reassessed. Results:Of 1 309 patients, 41 had traumatic cervical spine injuries based on imaging. Sixty minutes after infusion, posterior midline cervical tenderness was eliminated in 1 041 patients, none of whom had abnormal imaging. Conclusion: Patients with cervical spine trauma do not need imaging if posterior midline cervical tenderness is eliminated after acetaminophen infusion. This analgesia could be considered as a diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Key words: Acetaminophen; Diagnosis; Spinal Injuries; Cervical vertebrae; Radiography

  5. Cervical spine injury in the elderly: imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehara, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Shimamura, Tadashi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    An increase in the elderly population has resulted in an increased incidence of cervical spine injury in this group. No specific type of cervical spine trauma is seen in the elderly, although dens fractures are reported to be common. Hyperextension injuries due to falling and the resultant central cord syndrome in the mid and lower cervical segments due to decreased elasticity as a result of spondylosis may be also characteristic. The imaging features of cervical spine injury are often modified by associated spondylosis deformans, DISH and other systemic disorders. The value of MR imaging in such cases is emphasized. (orig.)

  6. Micromechanics of Minor Cervical Spine Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Peter F.; Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Muser, Markus H.; Walz, Felix H.

    Minor soft tissue injuries of the cervical spine are of increasing significance in public health. They may in particular be associated with long-term impairment. Such injuries are observed primarily in rear-end automobile collisions at low impact speeds and are attributed to a “whiplash”-type event. The question with respect to injury mechanisms of the cervical spine in cases of impacts of a low severity have raised controversial views in the past. Among proposed injury mechanisms, interactions between fluid and solid structures have been postulated: Viscous shear stresses or pressure gradients which arise in the deforming anatomical structures may have an adverse influence, e. g., on cellular membranes. In this communication, mathematical modeling approaches are presented which allow for a quantification of fluid/solid interactions under typical loading conditions of interest here. It is found, that the shear stresses caused by fluids and acting on accelerated surfaces of fluid-filled bodies depend largely on the size of the fluid space under consideration. Accelerations exhibit a stronger influence than their duration. It cannot be excluded that critical levels are reached even in a low speed impact scenario.

  7. From less to maximally invasiveness in cervical spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visocchi, M.; Conforti, G.; Roselli, R.; La Rocca, G.; Spallone, A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multilevel cervical myelopathy without surgical treatment is generally poor in the neurological deficit without surgical decompression. The two main surgical strategies used for the treatment of multilevel cervical myelopathy are anterior decompression via anterior corpectomy or posterior decompression via laminctomy/laminoplasty. Presentation of case We present the case of a 62 year-old lady, harboring rheumatoid artritis (RA) with gait disturbances, pain, and weakness in both arms. A C5 and C6 somatectomy, C4–C7 discectomy and, instrumentation and fusion with telescopic distractor “piston like”, anterior plate and expandable screws were performed. Two days later the patient complained dysfagia, and a cervical X-ray showed hardware dislocation. So a C4 somatectomy, telescopic extension of the construct up to C3 with expandible screws was performed. After one week the patient complained again soft dysfagia. New cervical X-ray showed the pull out of the cranial screws (C3). So the third surgery “one stage combined” an anterior decompression with fusion along with posterior instrumentation, and fusion was performed. Discussion There is a considerable controversy over which surgical approach will receive the best clinical outcome for the minimum cost in the compressive cervical myelopathy. However, the most important factors in patient selection for a particular procedure are the clinical symptoms and the radiographic alignment of the spine. the goals of surgery for cervical multilevel stenosis include the restoration of height, alignment, and stability. Conclusion We stress the importance of a careful patients selection, and invocated still the importance for 360° cervical fixation. PMID:25734320

  8. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z; Overley, Samuel C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of upper cervical spine instability tests: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Hutting (Nathan); G.G.M. Scholten-Peeters (Gwendolijne); V. Vijverman (Veerle); M.D.M. Keesenberg (Martin ); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Patients with neck pain, headache, torticollis, or neurological signs should be screened carefully for upper cervical spine instability, as these conditions are "red flags" for applying physical therapy interventions. However, little is known about the diagnostic accuracy of

  10. Classification and Management of Pediatric Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, Casey J; Johnston, James M

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate management of subaxial spine injury in children requires an appreciation for the differences in anatomy, biomechanics, injury patterns, and treatment options compared with adult patients. Increased flexibility, weak neck muscles, and cranial disproportion predispose younger children to upper cervical injuries and spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality. A majority of subaxial cervical spine injuries can be treated nonoperatively. Surgical instrumentation options for children have significantly increased in recent years. Future studies of outcomes for children with subaxial cervical spine injury should focus on injury classification and standardized outcome measures to ensure continued improvement in quality of care for this patient population.

  11. Combined injuries in the upper cervical spine: clinical and epidemiological data over a 14-year period

    OpenAIRE

    Gleizes, V; Jacquot, F. P.; Signoret, F.; Féron, J.-M. G.

    2000-01-01

    Concomitant traumatic injuries in the upper cervical spine are often encountered and rarely reported. We examined the data concerning 784 patients with cervical spine injuries following trauma, including 116 patients with upper cervical spine injuries. Twenty-six percent of patients with upper cervical spine injuries (31 cases) were found to have combined injuries involving either the upper or the upper and lower cervical spine. The frequent patterns were combined type I bipedicular fracture ...

  12. Clinical implications of alignment of upper and lower cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherekar S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The alignment of upper and lower cervical spine is presumed to be closely interrelated and the knowledge of this is mandatory when performing occipito-cervical and upper cervical fusions. The aim of this study was to establish standard values for upper and lower cervical spine alignment in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Five hundred eighteen asymptomatic volunteers (261 males and 257 females between 12 and 80 years of age underwent lateral radiography with their neck in the neutral position. Angles for occipital to 2nd cervical (Oc-C2, 1st to 2nd cervical (C1-C2 and sagittal alignment of 2nd to 7th cervical vertebrae (C2-C7 were measured. Statistical analyses were performed using a statistical package SPSS 10 for windows and the students ′t′ test. Results: The mean Oc-C2, C1-C2 and C2--C7 angles were 14.66 + 9.5°, 25.6 + 7.9° and 16.8 + 12.7° in male, while same angles in female were 15.59 + 8.26°, 26.9 + 6.8° and 9.11 + 10.4° respectively. Weak statistically significant negative correlation was observed between the measured angles of the upper (Oc-C2 and C1-C2 and lower (C2-C7 cervical spines, which means if the lordosis of the occiput and upper cervical spine increases (if the Oc-C2 angle increases, the alignment of lower cervical spine becomes kyphotic and vice versa. This negative correlation was stronger between the Oc-C2 and C2-C7 angles than between the C1-C2 and C2-C7 angles. Conclusions: Relationship between alignment of the upper and the lower cervical spine should be taken into consideration when performing cervical fusion.

  13. [Assessment of whiplash and cervical spine injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, P

    2011-12-01

    Formulating an expert opinion on whiplash injuries requires that consideration be given to biomechanical, orthopedic, neurological, psychiatric and medicolegal aspects. The greatest difficulties are encountered in cases of mild whiplash where patients complain of constant pain without any physical correlative. Diverse assessments and principles for approving a claim are reflected in the fact that the prevalence of chronic spine pain after whiplash injuries (late whiplash syndrome) varies between 16% and 71% in different countries, and the proportion of whiplash injuries involved in petitions for compensation differs greatly across Europe (UK 75%, Germany 47%, Finland 8.5% and France 3% of all personal injuries).Important biomechanical, orthopedic, neurological, psychiatric and medicolegal aspects of expert testimony on whiplash associated disorders (WAD) are delineated.

  14. Research on the correlation between the physiological curvature of the cervical spine and Northwick Park neck pain scale on the teenagers with cervical vertebra disease relapse stage%颈椎生理曲度在青少年颈椎病复发阶段与Northwick Park颈痛量表的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宇澄; 房纬; 张玮

    2013-01-01

    [目的]探讨颈椎生理曲度在青少年颈椎病的复发阶段与Northwick Park颈痛量表的相关性.[方法]将人选的95例患者分为试验组(整脊疗法组)和对照组(理筋手法组),疗程20 d,治疗后1、2、3个月后进行随访,以Northwick Park颈痛量表(NPQ)及颈椎生理曲度恢复情况为观察指标,观察每组各阶段治疗前后和组间客观指标的变化.[结果]经治疗有效病例纳入复发评价,经统计学分析显示颈椎生理曲度改善情况与NPQ呈较强相关性.[结论]颈椎生理曲度异常可能是导致青少年颈椎病反复发病的关键因素.%[Objective] To investigate the correlation between the physiological curvature of the cervical spine and Northwick Park neck pain scale (NPQ) on the teenagers with cervical vertebra disease relapse stage. [Methods] The 95 patients were randomly divided into two groups, 20 days for a course of treatment and follow-up after treatment for 1, 2, 3 months, NPQ and physiological curvature as the e-valuation index and compared the treatment efficacy of the two groups of patients. [Results] The statistical analysis showed that the physiological curvature of the cervical spine and NPQ showed strong correlation in effective treatment of recurrent cases into evaluation. [Conclusion] The physiological curvature of the cervical spine may be the key factors that lead to recurrent disease of teenagers with cervical vertebra disease.

  15. Calcification of the alar ligament of the cervical spine: imaging findings and clinical course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Mochida, J.; Toh, E. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan); Saito, Ikuo; Matui, Sizuka [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Odawara Hospital, Printing Bureau, Ministry of Finance, Sakawa, Odawara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Ligamentous calcification of the cervical spine has been reported in the yellow ligament, anterior and posterior longitudinal ligaments and interspinous ligament. Calcification in the upper cervical spine is rare, although some cases with calcification of the transverse ligament of the atlas have been reported. Two patients with calcification of the alar ligament with an unusual clinical presentation and course are described. Examination by tomography and computed tomography (CT) showed calcification of the alar ligament and the transverse ligament of the atlas. CT documented decreased calcification as symptoms resolved. There may be a role for CT in the search for calcifications in the upper cervical spine in patients presenting with neck pain and pharyngodynia if radiographs are normal. (orig.)

  16. Dysphagia Due to Anterior Cervical Spine Osteophyte: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mashhadinezhad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Degenerative changes of the cervical spine are more common in elderly, but anterior cervical osteophytes that cause problems in swallowing are rare. The most common cause of this problem is DISH disease (diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Trauma is also suggested as a potential cause in osteophyte formation. Case Report: We report a rare case of anterior cervical osteophyte with problems in swallowing that was caused by cervical spine trauma in a car accident 4 years ago, treated with a cervical collar. Dysphagia was the initial symptom of the disease. Barium swallowing showed a large cervical osteophyte at the C3-C4 level with compression effect on the esophagus. X-ray, CT scan and MRI of the cervical spine confirmed the osteophyte and its correlation with the esophagus. Endoscopic study of esophagus and stomach also ruled out other disorders. Surgical osteophytectomy was performed. Conclusion: Up to now, only two cases of post-traumatic anterior cervical osteophyte have been cited in the literature. In this report, we introduce an unusual case of dysphagia caused by cervical spine trauma.

  17. Pediatric cervical spine trauma imaging: a practical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egloff, Alexia M.; Kadom, Nadja; Vezina, Gilbert; Bulas, Dorothy [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Cervical spine trauma in children is rare and the diagnosis can be challenging due to anatomical and biomechanical differences as compared to adults. A variety of algorithms have been used in adults to accurately diagnose injuries, but have not been fully studied in pediatric patients. In this article we review suggested imaging protocols and the general characteristics, types of injuries, and measurements used to diagnose cervical spine injuries in children. (orig.)

  18. Gout Initially Mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis and Later Cervical Spine Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Araújo Santana Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout is clinically characterized by episodes of monoarthritis, but if not treated properly, it can lead to a chronic polyarthritis, which may eventually mimic rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We present the case of a 59-year-old man, with a history of symmetrical polyarthritis of the large and small joints with later development of subcutaneous nodules, which was initially misdiagnosed as RA, being treated with prednisone and methotrexate for a long period of time. He complained of occipital pain and paresthesia in his left upper limb, and computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed the presence of an expansive formation in the cervical spine with compression of the medulla. He was admitted for spinal decompressive surgery and the biopsy specimen demonstrated a gouty tophus. Chronic gout can mimic RA and rarely involves the axial skeleton, and thus its correct diagnosis and the implementation of adequate therapy can halt the development of such damaging complications.

  19. MRI of cervical spine injuries complicating ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivikko, Mika P.; Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Toeoeloe Hospital, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-09-15

    The objective was to study characteristic MRI findings in cervical spine fractures complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Technical issues related to MRI are also addressed. A review of 6,774 consecutive cervical spine multidetector CT (MDCT) scans obtained during 6.2 years revealed 33 ankylosed spines studied for suspected acute cervical spine injury complicating AS. Of these, 20 patients also underwent MRI. On MRI, of these 20 patients, 19 had a total of 29 cervical and upper thoracic spine fractures. Of 20 transverse fractures traversing both anterior and posterior columns, 7 were transdiskal and exhibited less bone marrow edema than did those traversing vertebral bodies. One Jefferson's, 1 atlas posterior arch (Jefferson's on MDCT), 2 odontoid process, and 5 non-contiguous spinous process fractures were detectable. MRI showed 2 fractures that were undetected by MDCT, and conversely, MDCT detected 6 fractures not seen on MRI; 16 patients had spinal cord findings ranging from impingement and contusion to complete transection. Magnetic resonance imaging can visualize unstable fractures of the cervical and upper thoracic spine. Paravertebral hemorrhages and any ligamentous injuries should alert radiologists to seek transverse fractures. Multiple fractures are common and often complicated by spinal cord injuries. Diagnostic images can be obtained with a flexible multipurpose coil if the use of standard spine array coil is impossible due to a rigid collar or excessive kyphosis. (orig.)

  20. The assessment of the cervical spine. Part 1: Range of motion and proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strimpakos, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    Neck pain and headache of cervical origin are complaints affecting an increasing number of the general population. Mechanical factors such as sustained neck postures or movements and long-term "abnormal" physiologic loads on the neck are believed to affect the cervical structures and compromise neck function. A comprehensive assessment of neck function requires evaluation of its physical parameters such as range of motion, proprioception, strength and endurance/fatigue. The complicated structure of the cervical spine however, makes it difficult for any clinician to obtain reliable and valid results. The aim of the first part of this systematic critical review is to identify the factors influencing the assessment of range of motion and proprioception of the cervical spine.

  1. Emergency department evaluation and treatment of cervical spine injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Rajdeep; Delasobera, Bronson E; Hudson, Korin; Frohna, William

    2015-05-01

    Most spinal cord injuries involve the cervical spine, highlighting the importance of recognition and proper management by emergency physicians. Initial cervical spine injury management should follow the ABCDE (airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure) procedure detailed by Advanced Trauma Life Support. NEXUS (National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study) criteria and Canadian C-spine Rule are clinical decision-making tools providing guidelines of when to obtain imaging. Computed tomography scans are the preferred initial imaging modality. Consider administering intravenous methylprednisolone after discussion with the neurosurgical consultant in patients who present with spinal cord injuries within 8 hours.

  2. Cervical spine involvements in Reiter's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moilanen, A.; Yli-Kerrtula, U.; Vippula, A.

    1984-07-01

    Cervical spine radiographs of 38 patients orginating from 145 consecutive cases with Reiter's syndrome (RS) were reviewed. Five of these 145 patients (3.4%) had cervical spine manifestations: anterior atlanto-axial dislocation 2, craniovertebral lesions typical for rhreumatoid arthritis (RA), spondylitis typical for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and anterior ossification, one each. Four of these patients were males. Cervical lesions in RS turned out to be rare. These lesions are alone indistinguisable from those of other chronic rheumatic inflammatory diseases.

  3. Fatal Vertebral Artery Injury in Penetrating Cervical Spine Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadi Tannoury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. This case illustrates complications to a vertebral artery injury (VAI resulting from penetrating cervical spine trauma. Objectives. To discuss the management of both VAI and cervical spine trauma after penetrating gunshot wound to the neck. Summary of Background Data. Vertebral artery injury following cervical spine trauma is infrequent, and a unilateral VAI often occurs without neurologic sequela. Nevertheless, devastating complications of stroke and death do occur. Methods. A gunshot wound to the neck resulted in a C6 vertebral body fracture and C5–C7 transverse foramina fractures. Neck CT angiogram identified a left vertebral artery occlusion. A cerebral angiography confirmed occlusion of the left extracranial vertebral artery and patency of the remaining cerebrovascular system. Following anterior cervical corpectomy and stabilization, brainstem infarction occurred and resulted in death. Results. A fatal outcome resulted from vertebral artery thrombus propagation with occlusion of the basilar artery triggering basilar ischemia and subsequent brainstem and cerebellar infarction. Conclusions. Vertebral artery injury secondary to cervical spine trauma can lead to potentially devastating neurologic sequela. Early surgical stabilization, along with anticoagulation therapy, contributes towards managing the combination of injuries. Unfortunately, despite efforts, a poor outcome is sometimes inevitable when cervical spine trauma is coupled with a VAI.

  4. Findings in osteosarcoma of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Dayem, H. [Saint Vincents Hospital and Medical Centre, New York (United States)

    1998-12-01

    A 39-year-old male was diagnosed in 1974 with Hodgkin`s disease in the left side of the neck and treated with radiotherapy that same year. In April 1998, he developed weakness and pain in the left shoulder. Further investigation revealed a tumor in the fourth cervical vertebra. A laminectomy and biopsy were performed that confirmed the diagnosis of radiation-induced bone sarcoma, for which further treatment was indicated. A subsequent MRI showed enhanced lesions in the same area, suggestive of either postoperative changes or local recurrence of the tumor. The {sup 18} FDG study carried out prior to surgery, using an ADAC gamma camera with MCD/AC, has demonstrated that the attenuation-corrected (AC) images improve the definition of the borders of the tumor

  5. Dual cervical thoracic coil for spine magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totterman, S.; Foster, T.H.; Plewes, D.B.; Simon, J.H.; Ekholm, S.; Wicks, A. (Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Radiology Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    The need for repositioning of surface coils and patients in MR examinations of the cervical and thoracic spin prolongs examination time. A new receiver design is proposed which overcomes this problem. The device is composed of two actively decoupled receiver coils mounted on the frame of a Philadelphia collar. These coils may be used separately to image either the thoracic or cervical spine or together to produce larger field-of-view images of the combined region. Signal-to-noise ratios of the separate cervical and thoracic spine images are not degraded as a result of mounting the receivers together. The full cervical and thoracic region is shown to be imaged at a signal-to-noise ratio significantly higher than that afforded by the body coil. A retrospective review of our case load suggests that a time saving could be achieved in approximately 1/3 of spine examinations by using this coil. (orig.).

  6. Changes in the cervical spine in chronic polyarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miehle, W.; Schattenkirchner, M.; Lattermann, K.

    1985-02-01

    In 93 patients with classical chronic polyarthritis (rheumatoid arthritis) (at least five ARA-criterias) there were inflammatory lesions of dens epistropheus in 48.4%, ventral atlantoaxial subluxations in 25.8%, lateral atlantoaxial dislocations in 14% and pseudobasilary invagination in 5.4%. Step-ladder-subluxation between C 2/C 7 was found in 31.2%, discitis in 12.5% and spondylarthritis in 38% of cases. Inflammatory signs of the cervical spine were correlated to the Steinbrocker-Grade IV, ANA level 1 : 40 and the degree of Waaler-Rose. The correlation between long standing steroid-therapy and signs of cervical involvement during c.p. - specially in C/sub 1//C/sub 2/ - is found to be proven. There are connections between the duration of c.p. (more than 10 years) and manifestation of cervical spine lesions, further, in a protective sense between longstanding gold therapy and cervical spine lesions.

  7. Case Series of an Intraoral Balancing Appliance Therapy on Subjective Symptom Severity and Cervical Spine Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jun Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a holistic intraoral appliance (OA on cervical spine alignment and subjective symptom severity. Design. An observational study on case series with holistic OA therapy. Setting. An outpatient clinic for holistic temporomandibular joint (TMJ therapy under the supervision of the Pain Center, CHA Biomedical center, CHA University. Subjects. Ambulatory patients presenting with diverse chief complaints in the holistic TMJ clinic. Main Measures. Any immediate change in the curvature of cervical spine and the degree of atlantoaxial rotation was investigated in the images of simple X-ray and computed tomography of cervical spine with or without OA. Changes of subjective symptom severity were also analyzed for the holistic OA therapy cases. Results. A total of 59 cases were reviewed. Alignment of upper cervical spine rotation showed an immediate improvement (. Changes of subjective symptom severity also showed significant improvement (. Conclusion. These cases revealed rudimentary clinical evidence that holistic OA therapy may be related to an alleviated symptom severity and an improved cervical spinal alignment. These results show that further researches may warrant for the holistic TMJ therapy.

  8. Utility of flexion-extension radiography for the detection of ligamentous cervical spine injury and its current role in the clearance of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jason Jaeseong; Asha, Stephen Edward

    2016-04-01

    Detecting the presence of injuries to the cervical spine is an important component of the initial assessment of patients sustaining blunt trauma. A small proportion of cervical spine injuries consists of ligamentous disruption. Accurate detection of ligamentous injury is essential as it may result in sequelae including radiculopathy, quadriplegia and death. Flexion-extension (FE) radiography has traditionally been utilised for the detection of ligamentous injury in patients who have been cleared of bony injury. There are controversies surrounding the use of FE for alert patients with neck pain. There are studies that call into question the diagnostic accuracy of FE, the high proportion of inadequate FE images due to muscle spasm and the adverse effects of prolonged cervical collar immobilisation while awaiting FE. Other literature indicates that FE provides no additional diagnostic information following a multi-detector helical computed tomography. This review evaluates the literature on the utility of FE for the detection of ligamentous injury and explores alternate strategies for clearing the cervical spine of ligamentous injury.

  9. Cervical Spine Involvement in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Michael; Langevin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is a lack of scientific evidence in the literature on the involvement of the cervical spine in mTBI; however, its involvement is clinically accepted. Objective. This paper reviews evidence for the involvement of the cervical spine in mTBI symptoms, the mechanisms of injury, and the efficacy of therapy for cervical spine with concussion-related symptoms. Methods. A keyword search was conducted on PubMed, ICL, SportDiscus, PEDro, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases for articles published since 1990. The reference lists of articles meeting the criteria (original data articles, literature reviews, and clinical guidelines) were also searched in the same databases. Results. 4,854 records were screened and 43 articles were retained. Those articles were used to describe different subjects such as mTBI's signs and symptoms, mechanisms of injury, and treatments of the cervical spine. Conclusions. The hypothesis of cervical spine involvement in post-mTBI symptoms and in PCS (postconcussion syndrome) is supported by increasing evidence and is widely accepted clinically. For the management and treatment of mTBIs, few articles were available in the literature, and relevant studies showed interesting results about manual therapy and exercises as efficient tools for health care practitioners. PMID:27529079

  10. Chronic neck pain: making the connection between capsular ligament laxity and cervical instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steilen, Danielle; Hauser, Ross; Woldin, Barbara; Sawyer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The use of conventional modalities for chronic neck pain remains debatable, primarily because most treatments have had limited success. We conducted a review of the literature published up to December 2013 on the diagnostic and treatment modalities of disorders related to chronic neck pain and concluded that, despite providing temporary relief of symptoms, these treatments do not address the specific problems of healing and are not likely to offer long-term cures. The objectives of this narrative review are to provide an overview of chronic neck pain as it relates to cervical instability, to describe the anatomical features of the cervical spine and the impact of capsular ligament laxity, to discuss the disorders causing chronic neck pain and their current treatments, and lastly, to present prolotherapy as a viable treatment option that heals injured ligaments, restores stability to the spine, and resolves chronic neck pain. The capsular ligaments are the main stabilizing structures of the facet joints in the cervical spine and have been implicated as a major source of chronic neck pain. Chronic neck pain often reflects a state of instability in the cervical spine and is a symptom common to a number of conditions described herein, including disc herniation, cervical spondylosis, whiplash injury and whiplash associated disorder, postconcussion syndrome, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, and Barré-Liéou syndrome. When the capsular ligaments are injured, they become elongated and exhibit laxity, which causes excessive movement of the cervical vertebrae. In the upper cervical spine (C0-C2), this can cause a number of other symptoms including, but not limited to, nerve irritation and vertebrobasilar insufficiency with associated vertigo, tinnitus, dizziness, facial pain, arm pain, and migraine headaches. In the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), this can cause muscle spasms, crepitation, and/or paresthesia in addition to chronic neck pain. In either case, the presence of

  11. 78 FR 65451 - Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...- ] NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire).'' SUPPLEMENTARY...

  12. Primary epidural liposarcoma of the cervical spine: Technical case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Borghei-Razavi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in adults. These tumors have a high incidence of osseous metastases, with a propensity to the spine; however, primary spinal involvement is very rare. A 56-year-old female patient presented with a 4 month history of cervical pain, including radiation to both upper limbs, without radicular distribution. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed an epidural lesion with gadolinium enhancement and bilateral extension into the intervertebral neural foramina (C5–C7, with spreading on the right side of the tumor into paravertebral tissue. The histopathological diagnosis was myxoid liposarcoma. To our knowledge it is the first case of primary myxoid liposarcoma of the cervical spine in the literature. Although rare, our case demonstrates that liposarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cervical tumors.

  13. Anaesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Traumatic Cervical Spine Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Umamaheswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the cervical spine may have devastating consequences. Timely interventions are essential to prevent avoidable neurological deterioration. In the initial stabilization of patients with acute cervical spine injuries, physiological disturbances, especially those involving cardiac and respiratory function require careful attention. Early surgery, which facilitates rapid mobi-lization of the patient, is fraught with important management considerations in the intraopoerative period and the subsequent critical care. Airway management poses a crucial challenge at this stage. Those patients who survive the injury with quadriplegia or quadriparesis may present themselves for incidental surgical procedures. Chronic systemic manifestations in these patients require attention in providing anaesthesia and postoperative care at this stage. The current review provides an insight into the physiological disturbances and the management issues in both acute and chronic phases of traumatic cervical spine injury.

  14. MR manifestations of vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Sik; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Yong Eun; Kang, Byung Chul; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To assess the diagnostic efficacy of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of a vertebral artery injury occurring from major cervical spine trauma. Conventional MR findings of 63 patients and 63 control subjects were compared to detect a possible change in the vertebral arteries resulted from trauma. Plain films, CT and clinical records were also reviewed to correlate the degree of cervical spine injury with vascular change. Nine cases of absent flow signals in vessel lumen were observed in eight patients and one was observed in the control group. Patients more frequently demonstrated other abnormalities such as intraluminal linear signals (n=3) or focal luminal narrowing (n=9) but there was no statistical significance. There was a close relationship between degree of cord damage and occlusion of the vertebral artery. Conventional MR imaging is useful in the detection of vertebral artery occlusion resulting from cervical spine trauma.

  15. Risk factors for vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjundappa S. Harshavardhana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (i.e. involvement of carotid and vertebral arteries are increasingly being recognized in setting of cervical spine trauma/fractures and are associated with high incidence of stroke/morbidity and mortality. The incidence of vertebral artery injuries (VAI is more common than previously thought and regular screening is seldom performed. However there exists no screening criteria and conflicting reports exists between spine and trauma literature. Many clinicians do not routinely screen/evaluate patients presenting with cervical spine trauma for potential VAI. This article provides a brief summary of existing evidence regarding the incidence of VAI in the background of cervical trauma/fractures. The type and fracture pattern that is associated with a high risk of VAI warranting mandatory screening/further work-up is discussed. A brief overview of diagnostic modalities and their respective sensitivity/specificity along with available treatment options is also summarized.

  16. Cervical spine clearance in obtunded patients after severe polytrauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Hong-xing; LI Ming

    2009-01-01

    To provide clinicians with data support-ing three different clearance techniques in the obtunded patients after severe polytrauma, Methods: This study gave an overview of the avail-able and pertinent literature regarding cervical spine clear-ance in obtunded patients after severe polytrauma. Results: Currently, there were three accepted tech-niques for clearance of the cervical spine in obtunded pa-tients after severe polytrauma. Each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages to both of the patients and the clinicians. Condusions: There are continuous improvements in both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that increase their sensitivities. The continued use of plain radiographs is called into ques-tion with respect to cost and time requirements. An algo-rithmic approach to the evaluation of the cervical spine in the obtunded patients will lead to fewer missed injuries.

  17. Examination of Cervical Spine Histological Sections - A Technical Note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Ullerup, Rita; Vesterby, Annie

    2006-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the cervical spine facet joints morphology and anatomy is increasingly important since improved understanding of clinical syndromes, such as whiplash injuries, and therapeutic interventions is based on this knowledge. So far systematic examination of the age-related morphology...... of these joints has not yet been performed, nor has any generally accepted histological classification system for degenerative changes in the cervical spine facet joints been proposed. In the case of whiplash injuries the presented histological method has particular relevance since it allows detailed description...

  18. [Cervical spine instability: point of view of the anesthesiologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda Jaramillo, R; Paredes Sanín, P; Carvajal, H; Carrasquilla, R; Murillo Deluquez, M

    2014-01-01

    The experience in airway management permits the anesthesiologist to participate in cases of cervical spine instability in the operating room when the patient is subjected to surgical procedures, or in cases of difficulty to access or keep the airway open in emergencies. This article reviews the epidemiology, definition, etiology, diagnostic criteria, methods of approach to airway management, and current recommendations on handling cervical instability in different scenarios. There is no approach to the airway that ensures complete immobility of the cervical spine, but there are methods that are better adapted to specific contexts; at the end, the reader will be able to identify the virtues and defects of the various options that the anesthesiologists have to address the airway in cases of cervical instability.

  19. Case Series of an Intraoral Balancing Appliance Therapy on Subjective Symptom Severity and Cervical Spine Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a holistic intraoral appliance (OA) on cervical spine alignment and subjective symptom severity. Design. An observational study on case series with holistic OA therapy. Setting. An outpatient clinic for holistic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) therapy under the supervision of the Pain Center, CHA Biomedical center, CHA University. Subjects. Ambulatory patients presenting with diverse chief complaints in the holistic TMJ cli...

  20. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  1. Significance of prevertebral soft tissue measurement in cervical spine injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Liyang E-mail: lydai@etang.com

    2004-07-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of prevertebral soft tissue swelling in cervical spine injuries. Materials and methods: A group of 107 consecutive patients with suspected injuries of the cervical vertebrae were reviewed retrospectively to identify the presence of prevertebral soft tissue swelling and to investigate the association of prevertebral soft tissue swelling with the types and degrees of cervical spine injuries. Results: Prevertebral soft tissue swelling occurred in 47 (43.9%) patients. Of the 47 patients, 38 were found with bony injury and nine were without. The statistic difference was significant (P<0.05). No correlation was demonstrated between soft tissue swelling and either the injured level of the cervical vertebrae or the degree of the spinal cord injury (P>0.05). Anterior element injuries in the cervical vertebrae had widening of the prevertebral soft tissue more than posterior element injuries (P<0.05). Conclusion: The diagnostic value of prevertebral soft tissue swelling for cervical spine injuries is significant, but the absence of this sign does not mean that further image evaluation can be spared.

  2. Is there a difference in head posture and cervical spine movement in children with and without pediatric headache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budelmann, Kim; von Piekartz, Harry; Hall, Toby

    2013-10-01

    Pediatric headache is an increasingly reported phenomenon. Cervicogenic headache (CGH) is a subgroup of headache, but there is limited information about cervical spine physical examination signs in children with CGH. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was designed to investigate cervical spine physical examination signs including active range of motion (ROM), posture determined by the craniovertebral angle (CVA), and upper cervical ROM determined by the flexion-rotation test (FRT) in children aged between 6 and 12 years. An additional purpose was to determine the degree of pain provoked by the FRT. Thirty children (mean age 120.70 months [SD 15.14]) with features of CGH and 34 (mean age 125.38 months [13.14]) age-matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. When compared to asymptomatic controls, symptomatic children had a significantly smaller CVA (p upper cervical spine in children with CGH and provides evidence of the clinical utility of the FRT when examining children with CGH.

  3. Developmental biomechanics of the cervical spine: Tension and compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuckley, David J; Ching, Randal P

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological data and clinical indicia reveal devastating consequences associated with pediatric neck injuries. Unfortunately, neither injury prevention nor clinical management strategies will be able to effectively reduce these injuries or their effects on children, without an understanding of the cervical spine developmental biomechanics. Thus, we investigated the relationship between spinal development and the functional (stiffness) and failure biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine in a baboon model. A correlation study design was used to define the relationships between spinal tissue maturation and spinal biomechanics in both tension and compression. Eighteen baboon cervical spine specimens distributed across the developmental spectrum (1-26 human equivalent years) were dissected into osteoligamentous functional spinal units. Using a servo-hydraulic MTS, these specimens (Oc-C2, C3-C4, C5-C6, C7-T1) were non-destructively tested in tension and compression and then displaced to failure in tension while measuring the six-axes of loads and displacements. The functions describing the developmental biomechanical response of the cervical spine for stiffness and normalized stiffness exhibited a significant direct relationship in both tension and compression loading. Similarly, the tensile failure load and normalized failure load demonstrated significant maturational increases. Further, differences in biomechanical response were observed between the spinal levels examined and all levels exhibited clinically relevant failure patterns. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental biomechanics perspective and facilitate the development of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects.

  4. Comparison of Three Prehospital Cervical Spine Protocols for Missed Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Hong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We wanted to compare 3 existing emergency medical services (EMS immobilization protocols: the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS, mechanism-based; the Domeier protocol (parallels the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] criteria; and the Hankins’ criteria (immobilization for patients 65 years, those with altered consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, distracting injury, or midline or paraspinal tenderness.To determine the proportion of patients who would require cervical immobilization per protocol and the number of missed cervical spine injuries, had each protocol been followed with 100% compliance. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of patients ≥18 years transported by EMS post-traumatic mechanism to an inner city emergency department. Demographic and clinical/historical data obtained by physicians were recorded prior to radiologic imaging. Medical record review ascertained cervical spine injuries. Both physicians and EMS were blinded to the objective of the study. Results: Of 498 participants, 58% were male and mean age was 48 years. The following participants would have required cervical spine immobilization based on the respective protocol: PHTLS, 95.4% (95% CI: 93.1-96.9%; Domeier, 68.7% (95% CI: 64.5-72.6%; Hankins, 81.5% (95% CI: 77.9-84.7%. There were 18 cervical spine injuries: 12 vertebral fractures, 2 subluxations/dislocations and 4 spinal cord injuries. Compliance with each of the 3 protocols would have led to appropriate cervical spine immobilization of all injured patients. In practice, 2 injuries were missed when the PHTLS criteria were mis-applied. Conclusion: Although physician-determined presence of cervical spine immobilization criteria cannot be generalized to the findings obtained by EMS personnel, our findings suggest that the mechanism-based PHTLS criteria may result in unnecessary cervical spine immobilization without apparent benefit to injured patients. PHTLS

  5. Correlation between signs of temporomandibular (TMD) and cervical spine (CSD) disorders in asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Thaís Cristina; Grossi, Débora Bevilaqua; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Bertolli, Fabiana; Holtz, Amanda; Costa, Dirceu

    2005-01-01

    Neck accessory respiratory muscles and mouth breathing suggest a direct relationship among asthma, Temporomandibular (TMD) and Cervical Spine (CSD) Disorders. This study was performed to evaluate and correlate TMD, CSD in asthmatic and non-asthmatic. Thirty asthmatic children (7.1 +/- 2.6 years old), 30 non-asthmatic predominantly mouth breathing children (Mouth Breathing Group - MBG) (8.80 +/- 1.61 years) and 30 non-asthmatic predominantly nasal breathing children (Nasal breathing Group - NBG) (9.00 +/- 1.64 years) participated in this study and they were submitted to clinical index to evaluate stomatognathic and cervical systems. Spearman correlation test and Chi-square were used. The level of significance was set at p temporomandibular joint (TMJ), TMJ sounds, pain during cervical extension and rotation, palpatory tenderness of sternocleidomastoids and paravertabrae muscles and a severe reduction in cervical range of motion were observed in AG. Both AG and MBG groups demonstrated palpatory tenderness of posterior TMJ, medial and lateral pterygoid, and trapezius muscles when compared to NBG. Results showed a positive correlation between the severity of TMD and CSD signs in asthmatic children (r = 0.48). No child was considered normal to CSD and cervical mobility. The possible shortening of neck accessory muscles of respiration and mouth breathing could explain the relationship observed between TMD, CSD signs in asthmatic children and emphasize the importance of the assessment of temporomandibular and cervical spine regions in asthmatic children.

  6. Dimensional coordinate measurements: application in characterizing cervical spine motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weilong; Li, Linan; Wang, Shibin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Nianke; Xue, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Cervical spine as a complicated part in the human body, the form of its movement is diverse. The movements of the segments of vertebrae are three-dimensional, and it is reflected in the changes of the angle between two joint and the displacement in different directions. Under normal conditions, cervical can flex, extend, lateral flex and rotate. For there is no relative motion between measuring marks fixed on one segment of cervical vertebra, the cervical vertebrae with three marked points can be seen as a body. Body's motion in space can be decomposed into translational movement and rotational movement around a base point .This study concerns the calculation of dimensional coordinate of the marked points pasted to the human body's cervical spine by an optical method. Afterward, these measures will allow the calculation of motion parameters for every spine segment. For this study, we choose a three-dimensional measurement method based on binocular stereo vision. The object with marked points is placed in front of the CCD camera. Through each shot, we will get there two parallax images taken from different cameras. According to the principle of binocular vision we can be realized three-dimensional measurements. Cameras are erected parallelly. This paper describes the layout of experimental system and a mathematical model to get the coordinates.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine in Children: Spinal Incidental Findings in Pediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadorai, Uma E.; Hire, Justin M.; DeVine, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To determine the rate of spinal incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in the pediatric population. Methods We reviewed MRI imaging of the neuraxial spine in patients less than 18 years of age and documented abnormal spinal findings. We then reviewed the charts of these patients to determine the reason for ordering the study. Those who presented with pain were considered symptomatic. Those who had no presenting complaint were considered asymptomatic. The data were analyzed to break down the rate of spinal incidental findings in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, respectively. Results Thirty-one of the 99 MRIs had positive findings, with the most common being disk protrusion (51.6%). Spinal incidental findings were most common in the lumbar spine (9.4%) versus the cervical spine (8%) or thoracic spine (4.7%). In this group, Schmorl nodes and disk protrusion were the two most common findings (37.5% each). Other spinal incidental findings included a vertebral hemangioma and a Tarlov cyst. In the thoracic spine, the only spinal incidental finding was a central disk protrusion without spinal cord or nerve root compression. Conclusion MRI is a useful modality in the pediatric patient with scoliosis or complaints of pain, but the provider should remain cognizant of the potential for spinal incidental findings. PMID:25396102

  8. [The biomechanics of hyperextension injuries of the subaxial cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, G; Meyer, C; Ingenhoff, L; Bredow, J; Müller, L P; Eysel, P; Schiffer, G

    2016-05-24

    Hyperextension injuries of the subaxial cervical spine are potentially hazardous due to relevant destabilization. Depending on the clinical condition, neurologic or vascular damage may occur. Therefore an exact knowledge of the factors leading to destabilization is essential. In a biomechanical investigation, 10 fresh human cadaver cervical spine specimens were tested in a spine simulator. The tested segments were C4 to 7. In the first step, physiologic motion was investigated. Afterwards, the three steps of injury were dissection of the anterior longitudinal ligament, removal of the intervertebral disc/posterior longitudinal ligament, and dissection of the interspinous ligaments/ligamentum flavum. After each step, the mobility was determined. Regarding flexion and extension, an increase in motion of 8.36 % after the first step, 90.45 % after the second step, and 121.67 % after the last step was observed. Testing of lateral bending showed an increase of mobility of 7.88 %/27.48 %/33.23 %; axial rotation increased by 2.87 %/31.16 %/45.80 %. Isolated dissection of the anterior longitudinal ligament led to minor destabilization, whereas the intervertebral disc has to be seen as a major stabilizer of the cervical spine. Few finite-element studies showed comparable results. If a transfer to clinical use is undertaken, an isolated rupture of the anterior longitudinal ligament can be treated without surgical stabilization.

  9. Mobilization and Manipulation of the Cervical Spine in Patients with Cervicogenic Headache: Any Scientific Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jodan D; Arnold, Stephen; Tetley, Kylie; Voight, Kiel; Frank, Rachael Anne

    2016-01-01

    Cervical mobilization and manipulation are frequently used to treat patients diagnosed with cervicogenic headache (CEH); however, there is conflicting evidence on the efficacy of these manual therapy techniques. The purpose of this review is to investigate the effects of cervical mobilization and manipulation on pain intensity and headache frequency, compared to traditional physical therapy interventions in patients diagnosed with CEH. A total of 66 relevant studies were originally identified through a review of the literature, and the 25 most suitable articles were fully evaluated via a careful review of the text. Ultimately, 10 studies met the inclusion criteria: (1) randomized controlled trial (RCT) or open RCT; the study contained at least two separate groups of subjects that were randomly assigned either to a cervical spine mobilization or manipulation or a group that served as a comparison; (2) subjects must have had a diagnosis of CEH; (3) the treatment group received either spinal mobilization or spinal manipulation, while the control group received another physical therapy intervention or placebo control; and (4) the study included headache pain and frequency as outcome measurements. Seven of the 10 studies had statistically significant findings that subjects who received mobilization or manipulation interventions experienced improved outcomes or reported fewer symptoms than control subjects. These results suggest that mobilization or manipulation of the cervical spine may be beneficial for individuals who suffer from CEH, although heterogeneity of the studies makes it difficult to generalize the findings.

  10. Intraoperative radiological visualization of the occipito-cervical transition and upper cervical spine: technical note

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Luis Mudo; Andrea Vieira Amantéa; Sérgio Cavalheiro; Andrei Fernandes Joaquim

    2009-01-01

    Relatamos nota técnica para melhor visualização radiológica intraoperatória em cirurgias da região occipitocervical e coluna cervical superior.Relatamos nota técnica para mejor visualización radiológica intraoperatória en las cirugías de la región occipito-cervical y de la columna cervical alta.We report a technical note to obtain a better intraoperative radiological view in surgeries of the craniocervical junction and upper cervical spine.

  11. The Neandertal vertebral column 1: the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Been, Ella; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Stock, Jay T

    2013-06-01

    This paper provides a metric analysis of the Neandertal cervical spine in relation to modern human variation. All seven cervical vertebrae have been analysed. Metric data from eight Neandertal individuals are compared with a large sample of modern humans. The significance of morphometric differences is tested using both z-scores and two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank tests. The results identify significant metric and morphological differences between Neandertals and modern humans in all seven cervical vertebrae. Neandertal vertebrae are mediolaterally wider and dorsoventrally longer than modern humans, due in part to longer and more horizontally oriented spinous processes. This suggests that Neandertal cervical morphology was more stable in both mid-sagittal and coronal planes. It is hypothesized that the differences in cranial size and shape in the Neandertal and modern human lineages from their Middle Pleistocene ancestors could account for some of the differences in the neck anatomy between these species.

  12. Visuo-proprioceptive interactions in degenerative cervical spine diseases requiring surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freppel, S; Bisdorff, A; Colnat-Coulbois, S; Ceyte, H; Cian, C; Gauchard, G; Auque, J; Perrin, P

    2013-01-01

    Cervical proprioception plays a key role in postural control, but its specific contribution is controversial. Postural impairment was shown in whiplash injuries without demonstrating the sole involvement of the cervical spine. The consequences of degenerative cervical spine diseases are underreported in posture-related scientific literature in spite of their high prevalence. No report has focused on the two different mechanisms underlying cervicobrachial pain: herniated discs and spondylosis. This study aimed to evaluate postural control of two groups of patients with degenerative cervical spine diseases with or without optokinetic stimulation before and after surgical treatment. Seventeen patients with radiculopathy were recruited and divided into two groups according to the spondylotic or discal origin of the nerve compression. All patients and a control population of 31 healthy individuals underwent a static posturographic test with 12 recordings; the first four recordings with the head in 0° position: eyes closed, eyes open without optokinetic stimulation, with clockwise and counter clockwise optokinetic stimulations. These four sensorial situations were repeated with the head rotated 30° to the left and to the right. Patients repeated these 12 recordings 6weeks postoperatively. None of the patients reported vertigo or balance disorders before or after surgery. Prior to surgery, in the eyes closed condition, the herniated disc group was more stable than the spondylosis group. After surgery, the contribution of visual input to postural control in a dynamic visual environment was reduced in both cervical spine diseases whereas in a stable visual environment visual contribution was reduced only in the spondylosis group. The relative importance of visual and proprioceptive inputs to postural control varies according to the type of pathology and surgery tends to reduce visual contribution mostly in the spondylosis group.

  13. Osteoid Osteoma of Cervical Spine in two adjacent Vertebrae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Etemadifar

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid osteoma is a benign bone tumor, mainly seen in 10-30 years male. Spine is a relatively common site and almost always, posterior elements are involved. Plain X-Ray-, CT scan and Isotope scan help to identify and localize spine lesions. We described one 18 years old boy with 3 years low neck pain. Isotope scan, MRI and CT scan showed two lesions in C7 and T1. Gross inspection and histopathology examination confirmed osteoid osteoma in two adjacent vertebrae which has not been reported elsewhere in the literature. Key words: Osteoid Osteoma, Spine, Multifocal

  14. Complications of the anterior approach to the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Lemos Vieira da Cunha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the complications of anterior approach to the cervical spine in patients who underwent cervical arthrodesis with instrumentation. METHODS: Prospective and descriptive study was conducted from January 2009 to April 2010. All patients who underwent arthrodesis of the cervical spine by anterior approach were included, regardless the diagnosis. Access was made by the anterior approach on the right side. We evaluated the number of operated levels (1, 2 or 3 levels and, the type of procedure performed: discectomy and placement of cage and plate (D+C+P, discectomy with placement of a cage (D+C or corpectomy with placement of cage and plate (C+C+P. All complications related to surgical approach were reported. RESULTS: We studied 34 patients, 70% male. The average age was 50 years and mean follow-up was 8 months. Eighteen percent of patients had complications, distributed as follows: dysphasia (33% and dysphonic (67%. Among patients who developed complications, most underwent to D+C+P (83% and no complications were found in patients where no cervical plate was used. Regarding levels, both complications were identified in patients operated to one or two levels. However, in patients operated on three levels, only dysphonia was identified. CONCLUSION: The most frequent complication was dysphonia. Patients who presented more complications were those undergoing discectomy and fusion with cage and anterior cervical plate. All cases of dysphonia were in this group. The number of accessible levels does not seem to have affected the incidence of complications.

  15. Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema Associated with Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Masana; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2014-01-01

    We report a very rare case of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) that occurred immediately after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The patient was a 25-year-old man who sustained a facet fracture-dislocation of C5 during a traffic accident. After ACDF, he developed NPPE and needed mechanical ventilation. Fortunately, he recovered fully within 24 hours. NPPE is a rare postoperative complication that may occur after cervical spine surgery. The aims of this report are to present information regarding the diagnosis and emergent treatment of NPPE, and to review the previous literature regarding this serious complication. PMID:25558327

  16. Analysis of the Functional Independence Measure Value of Cervical Spine Injury Patients with Conservative Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zafrullah Arifin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Functional Independence Measure Value of Cervical Spine Injury Patients with Conservative Management. Cervical spine injury is one of the most common spinal cord injuries in trauma patients. From 100,000 spinal cord injury cases reported in the United States of America (2008, sixty seven percent involve cervical spine injury. American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA impairment score is used as an initial assessment but not enough attention prognostic outcome of these patients was paid to. The objective of this study is to analyze the value of functional independence measure (FIM cervical spine injury patients with conservative management and its correlation with age, sex, type of trauma, onset of trauma, cervical abnormalities, type of cervical spine lesion and ASIA impairment score. A prospective cohort study was performed to all patients with cervical spine injury treated inNeurosurgery Department of Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung that fullfiled the inclusion criteria. The subjects were classified based on age, sex, single/multiple trauma, acute /chronic, cervical abnormalities, complete/incomplete lesion and ASIA impairment score. The FIM examination was performed in Outpatient clinic of Neurosurgery. T-test and chi-square test was done to analyze the data. There were 17 cervical spine injury patients treated in Neurosurgery Department of Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital during April 2009–April 2010. The average FIM value of cervical spine injury in those patients is 4+ 1.63 by cohort prospective study. There were no correlation between FIM value with age, sex, type of trauma, onset of trauma and cervical abnormalities. Significant correlations were found between FIM value with type of cervical spine lesion and ASIA impairment score in cervical spine patients. Type of cervical spine lesion and ASIA impairment score have significant correlation with FIM value of patients in 6 months after cervical injury.

  17. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty for cervical spine metastases: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Benvenutti-Regato, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Vertebroplasty (VP) and kyphoplasty (KP) are two minimally invasive techniques used to relieve pain and restore stability in metastatic spinal disease. However, most of these procedures are performed in the thoracolumbar spine, and there is limited data on outcomes after VP/KP for cervical metastases. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of VP and KP for treating pain in patients with cervical spine metastases. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the PubMed and Medline databases. Only studies that reported five or more patients treated with VP/KP in the cervical spine were included. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendation were established based on the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine guidelines. Data was pooled to perform a meta-analysis for pain relief and complication rates. Results Six studies (all level 4 studies) met the inclusion criteria, representing 120 patients undergoing VP/KP at 135 vertebrae; the most common addressed level was C2 in 83 cases. The average volume of injected cement was 2.5 ± 0.5 milliliters at each vertebra. There were 22 asymptomatic cement leaks (16%; 95% CI, 9.8% - 22.2%) most commonly occurring in the paraspinal soft tissue. There were 5 complications (4%; 95% CI, 0.5% - 7.5%): 3 cases of mild odynophagia, 1 case of occipital neuralgia secondary to leak, and 1 case of stroke secondary to cement embolism. Pain relief was achieved in 89% of cases (range: 80 - 100%). The calculated average pain score decreased significantly from 7.6 ± 0.9 before surgery to 1.9 ± 0.8 at last evaluation (p=0.006). Conclusion Although the calculated complication rate after VP/KP in the cervical spine is low (4%) and the reported pain relief rate is approximately 89%, there is lack of high-quality evidence supporting this. Future randomized controlled trials are needed. PMID:26913227

  18. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

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    Meydam, K.; Sehlen, S.; Schlenkhoff, D.; Kiricuta, J.C.; Beyer, H.K.

    1986-12-01

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed.

  19. The Effect of the Cervical Orthosis on Swallowing Physiology and Cervical Spine Motion During Swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekata, Kojiro; Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Matsubayashi, Jun; Toda, Kazukiyo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Cervical orthosis is used to immobilize the neck in various disorders such as trauma and post-operation. However, it is still uncertain how cervical orthosis restricts the degree of movement of the cervical spine during swallowing and how they affect swallowing physiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these issues using the Philadelphia(®) Collar. We conducted videofluorography of swallowing in 39 healthy subjects (23 men, 16 women; mean age of 34.3 years) with and without cervical orthosis. To compare the two conditions regarding the cervical spine motion, we determined the angular and positional changes of the occipital bone (C0) and each cervical vertebra (C1-C7) from the oral phase to the pharyngeal phase. Similarly, to compare swallowing physiology, we assessed the start and end times and the durations of soft palate elevation, rapid hyoid anterosuperior movement, epiglottis inversion, closure of the laryngeal vestibule, and pharyngoesophageal segment (PES) opening. Finally, we compared the transit times of contrast agent in the two conditions. The respective extensions of C1, C2, and C3 were 0.31°, 0.07°, and 0.05° (mean) with cervical orthosis, and the respective flexions of C1, C2, and C3 were 0.98°, 1.42°, and 0.85° (mean) without. These results suggested that cervical orthosis restricted the flexion of C1-C3. Analysis of swallowing physiology revealed that the average durations of hyoid anterosuperior elevation, epiglottic inversion, and PES opening were prolonged by 0.09, 0.19, and 0.05 s, respectively. In conclusion, the cervical orthosis restricted the movement of the cervical spine during swallowing and changed swallowing physiology.

  20. High cervical spine spondylodiscitis management and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Sebben

    Full Text Available Summary Spondylodiscitis affecting the cervical spine is the most unusual type. Disease progression can be dramatic, even causing quadriplegia and death. We present an unusual case that progressed with osteolytic lesions between C2 and C3, causing cord compression and epidural abscess. The patient was treated surgically by a double approach and improved without neurological deficits and with better inflammatory markers. We reviewed the current literature on the subject.

  1. Dysphagia produced by cervical spine osteophyte. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Silveri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 73-year-old male patient with progressive dysphagia, and hoarseness (irritability in the throat. He was studied with the appropriate imaging techniques, and esophagoscopy led to a diagnosis of extrinsic esophageal dysphagia for osteophyte obstruction of the cervical spine due to the arthrosis. A surgical resection was performed, without complications. Some considerations are given on this theme.

  2. Multidetector Computed Tomography of Cervical Spine Fractures in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivikko, M.P.; Kiuru, M.J.; Koskinen, S.K. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Toeoeloe Trauma Center (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cervical spine findings in trauma patients with advanced ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Material and Methods: Using PACS, 2282 cervical spine MDCT examinations requested by emergency room physicians were found during a period of 3 years. Of these patients, 18 (16 M, aged 41-87, mean 57 years) had advanced AS. Primary imaging included radiography in 12 and MRI in 11 patients. Results: MDCT detected one facet joint subluxation and 31 fractures in 17 patients: 14 transverse fractures, 8 spinous process fractures, 2 Jefferson's fractures, 1 type I and 2 type II odontoid process fractures, and 1 each: atlanto-occipital joint fracture and C2 laminar fracture plus isolated transverse process and facet joint fractures. Radiographs detected 48% and MRI 60% of the fractures. MRI detected all transverse and odontoid fractures, demonstrating spinal cord abnormalities in 72%. Conclusion: MDCT is superior to plain radiographs or MRI, showing significantly more injuries and yielding more information on fracture morphology. MRI is valuable, however, in evaluating the spinal cord and soft-tissue injuries. Fractures in advanced AS often show an abnormal orientation and are frequently associated with spinal cord injuries. In these patients, for any suspected cervical spine injuries, MDCT is therefore the imaging modality of choice.

  3. Occurrence of cervical spine injuries during the rugby scrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzler, M J; Akpata, T; Laughlin, W; Levy, A S

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study of cervical spine injuries that occurred during the rugby scrum in the United States was undertaken. In the U.S., from 1970 to 1996, 36 (58%) of the 62 documented injured players injured their cervical spines during the scrum. Thirty-five men (97%) and one woman (3%) were injured. Twenty-three of the injuries (64%) occurred when the opposing packs came together (engagement), and 13 (36%) occurred when the scrum collapsed. Twenty-eight (78%) hookers, seven (19%) props, and one (3%) second-row player were injured. Twenty (56%) hookers and three (8%) props were hurt during engagement. Eight hookers (22%), four props (11%), and one second-row player (3%) were injured when the scrum collapsed. Significantly more injuries occurred during engagement than during collapse, and hookers were injured significantly more than props. We conclude that in the rugby scrum in the U.S., the hooker suffers most of the cervical spine injuries (78% in this study) and this position is by far the most vulnerable. This study should be used to develop rugby law (rule) changes and educate players, coaches, and referees in United States rugby.

  4. Thyroid cancer after x-ray treatment of benign disorders of the cervical spine in adults

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    Damber, Lena; Johansson, Lennart; Johansson, Robert; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar [Univ. Hospital, Umeaa (Sweden). Oncology Centre

    2002-02-01

    While there is very good epidemiological evidence for induction of thyroid cancer by radiation exposure in children, the risk for adults after exposure is still uncertain, especially when concerning relatively small radiation doses. A cohort of 27415 persons which in 1950 through 1964 had received x-ray treatment for various benign disorders in the locomotor system (such as painful arthrosis and spondylosis) was selected from three hospitals in Northern Sweden. A proportion of this cohort, consisting of 8144 persons (4075 men and 4069 women), had received treatment to the cervical spine and thereby received an estimated average dose in the thyroid gland of about 1 Gy. Standard incidence rates (SIR) were calculated by using the Swedish Cancer Register. In the cervical spine cohort, 22 thyroid cancers were found versus 13.77 expected (SIR 1.60; CI 1.00-2.42). The corresponding figures for women were 16 observed cases versus 9.60 expected cases (SIR 1.67; CI 0.75-2.71). Most thyroid cancers (15 out of 22) were diagnosed >15 years after the exposure. In the remaining part of the total cohort, i.e. those without cervical spine exposure, no increased risk of thyroid cancer was found (SIR 0.98; CI 0.64-1.38). The study strongly suggests that external radiation exposure of adults at relatively small doses increases the risk of thyroid cancer but also that this increase is very much lower than that reported after exposure in children.

  5. Dysphagia Secondary to Anterior Osteophytes of the Cervical Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerter, Alexander C; Kim, Eric S; Lee, Darrin J; Liu, Jonathan J; Cadena, Gilbert; Panchal, Ripul R; Kim, Kee D

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) or Forestier disease involves hyperostosis of the spinal column. Hyperostosis involving the anterior margin of the cervical vertebrae can cause dysphonia, dyspnea, and/or dysphagia. However, the natural history pertaining to the risk factors remain unknown. We present the surgical management of two cases of dysphagia secondary to cervical hyperostosis and discuss the etiology and management of DISH based on the literature review. Methods This is a retrospective review of two patients with DISH and anterior cervical osteophytes. We reviewed the preoperative and postoperative images and clinical history. Results Two patients underwent anterior cervical osteophytectomies due to severe dysphagia. At more than a year follow-up, both patients noted improvement in swallowing as well as their associated pain. Conclusion The surgical removal of cervical osteophytes can be highly successful in treating dysphagia if refractory to prolonged conservative therapy.

  6. Fractured cervical spine and aortic transection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, M J

    2012-02-03

    A 17-year-old victim of a road traffic accident presented. Following investigation diagnoses of fractured first cervical vertebra, aortic transection, diffuse cerebral oedema, fractured right ribs 2-4 and pubic rami were made. Management of this case presented a number of anaesthetic dilemmas: management of the airway, use of cross-clamp vs. shunting or heparinization and bypass, cardiovascular and neurological monitoring, maintenance of cardiovascular stability during and post cross-clamp, minimizing the risk of post-operative renal and neurological dysfunction.

  7. Local and global subaxial cervical spine biomechanics after single-level fusion or cervical arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Michael A; Brodke, Darrel S; Daubs, Michael; Patel, Alpesh; Bachus, Kent N

    2009-10-01

    An experimental in vitro biomechanical study was conducted on human cadaveric spines to evaluate the motion segment (C4-C5) and global subaxial cervical spine motion after placement of a cervical arthroplasty device (Altia TDI,Amedica, Salt Lake City, UT) as compared to both the intact spine and a single-level fusion. Six specimens (C2-C7) were tested in flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation under a +/- 1.5 Nm moment with a 100 N axial follower load. Following the intact spine was tested; the cervical arthroplasty device was implanted at C4-C5 and tested. Then, a fusion using lateral mass fixation and an anterior plate was simulated and tested. Stiffness and range of motion (ROM) data were calculated. The ROM of the C4-C5 motion segment with the arthroplasty device was similar to that of the intact spine in flexion/extension and slightly less in lateral bending and rotation, while the fusion construct allowed significantly less motion in all directions. The fusion construct caused broader effects of increasing motion in the remaining segments of the subaxial cervical spine, whereas the TDI did not alter the adjacent and remote motion segments. The fusion construct was also far stiffer in all motion planes than the intact motion segment and the TDI, while the artificial disc treated level was slightly stiffer than the intact segment. The Altia TDI allows for a magnitude of motion similar to that of the intact spine at the treated and adjacent levels in the in vitro setting.

  8. Cervical Spine Alignment and Motion in the Acute Management of Potential Catastrophic Cervical Spine Injuries in Sport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erik E Swartz

    2008-01-01

    @@ The incidence of spinal cord injury in the United States is estimated to be 11,000 new cases each year[1].Sport participation constitutes the fourth most common cause[1](approximately 8. 7%) of these injuries overall but is the second most common cause for those under the age of 30[2]. The majority of all cervical spine injuries since 2000 have occurred in individuals between the ages of 16 and 30[1].

  9. Head and cervical spine posture in behaving rats: implications for modeling human conditions involving the head and cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C; Choong, W Y; Teh, W; Buxton, A J; Bolton, P S

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the temporal and spatial (postural) characteristics of the head and cervical vertebral column (spine) of behaving rats in order to better understand their suitability as a model to study human conditions involving the head and neck. Time spent in each of four behavioral postures was determined from video tape recordings of rats (n = 10) in the absence and presence of an intruder rat. Plain film radiographic examination of a subset of these rats (n = 5) in each of these postures allowed measurement of head and cervical vertebral column positions adopted by the rats. When single they were quadruped or crouched most (∼80%) of the time and bipedal either supported or free standing for only ∼10% of the time. The introduction of an intruder significantly (P spine was orientated (median, 25-75 percentile) near vertical (18.8°, 4.2°-30.9°) when quadruped, crouched (15.4°, 7.6°-69.3°) and bipedal supported (10.5°, 4.8°-22.6°) but tended to be less vertical oriented when bipedal free standing (25.9°, 7.7°-39.3°). The range of head positions relative to the cervical spine was largest when crouched (73.4°) and smallest when erect free standing (17.7°). This study indicates that, like humans, rats have near vertical orientated cervical vertebral columns but, in contrast to humans, they displace their head in space by movements at both the cervico-thoracic junction and the cranio-cervical regions.

  10. Upper airway obstruction after cervical spine fusion surgery: role of cervical fixation angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Hui; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Huang, Hui-Hsun; Chan, Kuang-Cheng

    2008-09-01

    Upper airway obstruction is one of the life-threatening events in cervical spine surgery. The risk is particularly great during the period immediately after operation. We present the case of a 56-year-old female with breast cancer and metastasis to the cervical spine. The surgical procedure involved C2-C3 laminectomy, posterior fixation (C0-C5), and C2 neurectomy. Tracheal extubation was carried out in the intensive care unit, and upper airway obstruction immediately followed. Emergency cricothyrotomy was performed under well-managed ventilation with a laryngeal mask after several failed intubation attempts. Over-flexion of the cervical spine fixation and severe prevertebral soft tissue swelling were the most probable causes of upper airway obstruction. With a well-adjusted angle for fixation of the cervical spine under fluoroscopic guidance before the procedure, such a surgical mishap could be avoided. Reintubation with a fiberscope might be considered first, and sustaining intubation for 2-3 days postoperatively could be safer in such high risk patients.

  11. Pediatric cervical spine marrow T2 hyperintensity: a systematic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gefen, Ron [Cooper University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Candem, NJ (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E. [The Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa (Canada); Shabshin, Nogah [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-HaShomer (Israel); Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Hyperintense areas of vertebral bone marrow on fluid-sensitive sequences are at times seen on pediatric MRI of the cervical spine in children without suspicious clinical conditions to explain marrow pathology. Although these likely have no clinical significance they may be mistaken for pathology. The purpose of this study is to systematically evaluate the locations and patterns of marrow T2 hyperintensity in the pediatric cervical spine, with respect to age. At 1.5 T, the C2 through T3 vertebrae of 82 children aged 0-17 years without clinically suspicious marrow abnormality were retrospectively reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists, who were blinded to patients' age. The frequency, intensity, and location of the foci of marrow T2 hyperintensity were recorded for each vertebra on a 12-point scoring system and were correlated with the patients' age. Foci of marrow hyperintensity were seen in 46/82 (56.1%) patients and in 241/734 (32.8%) vertebrae. Foci were most common in C4 (42% of patients), C5 (45.7%), and C6 (37.8%). The foci of T2 hyperintensity were more common inferiorly (188 foci) and adjacent to the anterior cortex (123). Analysis revealed no significant correlation between age and marrow score (Spearman = -0.147, P = 0.19), but did find a trend towards increased presence of marrow T2 hyperintensity in the ages of most rapid growth, 8-14 years (81.5% of patients). Vertebral body marrow T2 hyperintensity was most common endosteally and in the mid-cervical spine with a slight peak in adolescence. We therefore believe that these pediatric cervical marrow changes may be related to rapid bone growth at the point of maximal kyphotic stress. (orig.)

  12. Therapeutic strategy for traumatic instability of subaxial cervical spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Peng; LIANG Yu; GONG Yao-cheng; ZHENG Tao; ZHANG Xin-kai; WU Wen-jian

    2008-01-01

    Background A simple, safe and effective therapeutic strategy for traumatic instability of the subaxial cervical spine, as well as its prognostic assessment, is still controversial.Methods The therapeutic options for 83 patients of traumatic instability of the subaxial cervical spine, whose average age was 35 years, were determined, according to the Allen-Ferguson classification, general health and concomitant traumatic conditions, neurological function, position of compression materials, concomitant traumatic disc herniation/damage, concomitant locked-facet dislocation, the involved numbers and position, and the patients' economic conditions. An anterior, posterior or combination approach was used to decompress and reconstruct the cervical spine. No operations with an anterior-posterior-anterior approach were performed.Results The average follow-up was three years and nine months. Distraction-flexion and compression-flexion were the most frequent injury subtypes. There were 46, 28 and 9 cases of anterior, posterior and combination operations, respectively. The average score of the Japanese Orthopaedics Association, visual analog scale and American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA) motor index improved from 11.2, 7.8 and 53.5, respectively, before operation, to 15.3, 2.6 and 67.8, respectively, at final follow-up. For incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), the average ASIA neurological function scale was improved by 1-2 levels. Patients with complete SCI had no neurological recovery, but recovery of nerve root function occurred to different extents. After surgery, radiological parameters improved to different extents. Fusion was achieved in all patients and 12 developed complications.Conclusions The best surgical strategy should be determined by the type of subaxial cervical injury, patients' general health, local pathological anatomy and neurological function.

  13. Helical CT in the primary trauma evaluation of the cervical spine: an evidence-based approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackmore, C.C. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Center for Cost and Outcomes Research, Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Mann, F.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle (United States); Wilson, A.J. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-11-01

    This review provides a summary of the cost-effectiveness, clinical utility, performance, and interpretation of screening helical cervical spine CT for trauma patients. Recent evidence supports the use of helical CT as a cost-effective method for screening the cervical spine in high-risk trauma patients. Screening cervical spine CT can be performed at the time of head CT to lower the cost of the evaluation, and when all short- and long-term costs are considered, CT may actually save money when compared with traditional radiographic screening. In addition to having higher sensitivity and specificity for cervical spine injury, CT screening also allows more rapid radiological clearance of the cervical spine than radiography. Patients who are involved in high-energy trauma, who sustain head injury, or who have neurological deficits are candidates for CT screening. Screening with CT may enhance detection of other potentially important injuries of the cervical region. (orig.)

  14. Surgical Management of Subaxial Cervical Spine Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Emre Aydın

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available These days, as a consequence of the improvement in technology and increase in the use of motor vehicles, spine injuries have become common. Spine traumas, which often occur after motor vehicle accidents, are observed mostly in cervical regions, particularly in the subaxial cervical region, which is also known as the subcervical region, and neurological damage occurs in 70% of the patients. Despite still being controversial, the common ranging for neurological evaluation is the American Spinal Injury Association ranging, which includes the motor and sensory loss and accordingly, the impairment rate. In subaxial cervical traumas, acute neurological deterioration is an indication and therefore requires urgent surgical treatment. The choice of anterior or posterior approach substantially depends on the traumatization mechanism, affected tissues, and neurological deterioration occurring after. The state of patient and instability are the most two important factors affecting the treatment decision. Although the anterior approach is accepted as a routinely available and easily applicable surgical technique, it lacks in the burst fractures involving the three colons, which shows a stabilization disorder. The anterior plate screw technique and posterior lateral mass screw application applied in our clinic are reviewed in literature and are discussed in two cases. Although the best clinical results are achieved in cases where only anterior surgery is performed and in cases where instability is excessive, in unstable compression and blow-out fractures, even if neurological deficit and three colon involvement are not observed in the patient, the requirement of posterior fusion is observed.

  15. [Cervicogenic dysphagia: swallowing difficulties caused by functional and organic disorders of the cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2013-01-01

    Cervical spine disorders which can cause swallowing difficulties (cervicogenic dysphagia; CD) are: chronic multisegmental/MS dysfunction (dysfunction=functional blockade) of the facet joints, changes in physiological curvature of the cervical spine, degenerative changes (anterior osteophytes, anterior disc herniation, osteochondrosis, osteoarthritis), inflammatory rheumatic diseases, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, injuries, conditions after anterior cervical spine surgery, congenital malformations and tumors. According to our clinical observations, degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints and chronic MS dysfunction of the cervical spine facet joints are disorders which can cause swallowing difficulties. However, these disorders have not been recognized enough as the causes of dysphagia and they are not even mentioned in differential diagnosis. Because of the close anatomical relationship of cervical spine with the pharynx and cervical part of esophagus, the consequences of the degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints and chronic MS dysfunction of the cervical spine facet joints such as the changes in the physiological curvature of the cervical spine, changes in elasticity and contractility in the neck muscles and decreased mobility of the cervical spine, adversely affect the dimensions of the pharynx and cervical part of esophagus, that is, swallowing capacity which can result in dysphagia. Degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints are common additional cause of dysphagia in elderly people with disorders of the central control of swallowing (stroke, Parkinson's disease, senile dementia etc). The most important therapeutic options in patients with CD are: medicamentous therapy, physical therapy, manual therapy, kinesiotherapy and surgical treatment. The aim of the conservative therapy in patients with CD is to improve the swallowing capacity (for example, soft tissue techniques, stretching of the

  16. Treatments for primary aneurysmal bone cysts of the cervical spine: experience of 14 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chao; Liu Xiaoguang; Jiang Liang; Yang Shaomin; Wei Feng; Wu Fengliang; Liu Zhongjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign lesion with the potential to be locally aggressive.The optimal treatment of cervical spine lesions remains controversial.This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the different treatments for primary ABCs of the cervical spine.Methods This series included eight men and six women diagnosed between 2002 and 2012.A retrospective review of the hospital charts,operating room reports,office charts,and radiographs was performed.The data collected included patient age,sex,radiological features,pathology,treatment method,outcomes,and complications from biopsies and treatments.The mean age at diagnosis was 17.5 years old with a range of 6-35 years.All patients had experienced local pain for a mean of 7.3 months (range,0.5-18.0 months),and three patients had neurological deficits (one with radiculopathy and two with myelopathy).The Frankel classification before treatment was E in 12 cases,D in one case,and C in one case.Results Four patients received radiotherapy alone.Ten patients underwent surgery,including five total spondyiectomies,two local resections,and three curettages.Three patients received preoperative selective arterial embolization,and four received adjuvant radiotherapy.The mean follow-up time was 44.5 months (range 12-96 months),and no recurrence was identified.Three patients with neurological deficits achieved complete recovery,as noted at the final follow-up examination.One patient received radiotherapy without appropriate immobilization as prescribed and developed C1-C2 subluxation with severe spinal cord compression but without myelopathy.He refused further treatment.Conclusions The results can be achieved by different treatments (surgical resection/curettage,selective arterial embolization,and radiotherapy) for ABC of the cervical spine.Reconstruction of stability is also important for the treatment of cervical ABC.

  17. Evaluation of morbidity, mortality and outcome following cervical spine injuries in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S A; Murphy, M; Connolly, P; O'Byrne, J

    2008-04-01

    time of injury. Outcome of the injury was related to increasing age, co-morbidity and the severity of neurological deficit. Injuries of the cervical spine are not infrequent occurrence in the elderly and occur with relatively minor trauma. Neck pain in the elderly patients should be thoroughly evaluated to exclude C2 injuries. Most patients can be managed in an orthosis but unstable injuries require rigid external immobilization or surgical stabilization.

  18. MRI cervical spine findings in asymptomatic fighter pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrén-Mallmin, M; Linder, J

    1999-12-01

    MRI of the cervical spine for evaluation concerning degenerative lesions was performed on asymptomatic experienced military high performance aircraft pilots (mean age 42 yr with mean accumulated flying time of 2600 h), and for comparison on age-matched controls without military flying experience. Young military high performance aircraft pilots (mean age 23 yr with 220 h of flying per person) were also examined. There were significantly more osteophytes, disk protrusions, compressions of the spinal cord and foraminal stenoses in the experienced pilots than in the age-matched controls. Low frequency of low grade degenerative lesions was found in the young and inexperienced pilots.

  19. A Dynamic Model of the Cervical Spine and Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    Extension in the cervical spine is limited at the upper end by the superior facets of the atlas whose posterior edges lock into the occi- pital condylar ...McKenzie (1971), leaving about 6.2 kg for neck. By distributing the total neck mass to each slice according to the volume of the slice an approximate...divide the volume of the muscle by its length. This figure is called the physiological cross-section. Since the internal arrangement of the fibers was

  20. Hyperextension strain of ``whiplash`` injuries to the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, H.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Olson, P.N. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Everson, L.I. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Winemiller, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    A full cervical spine radiographic series (including flexion and extension views) was reviewed in 40 patients with clinically proven ``whiplash`` injuries and compared to the radiographs in 105 normal controls. The level and degree of kinking or kyphosis, subluxation, and the difference in the amount of fanning between spinous processes on flexion and extension films were measured in each patient. Localized kinking greater than 10 and over 12 mm of fanning, often occurring at the level below the kinking or kyphosis, occurred mainly in the group of whiplash patients (sensitivity 81%, specificity 76%, accuracy 80%). (orig./VHE)

  1. Computed tomography (CT) of traumatic injuries of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robotti, G.C.; Geissmann, A.; Steinsiepe, K.

    1986-02-01

    32 patients with traumatic injuries of the cervical spine were investigated by CT. All patients were initially examined by plain films. CT was definitely superior to conventional radiology in compressive fractures of vertebral bodies. In flexion-extension injuries CT was useful showing fractures of the posterior elements in great detail. Conventional tomography was superior to CT in patients with complex dislocations of vertebral bodies. In the absence of fracture CT failed to detect disruptions of ligaments, which were readily shown by functional examination.

  2. Cervical Spine Motion During Extrication: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafer, Jeffrey S

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal immobilization is one of the most commonly performed pre-hospital procedures. Little research has been done on the movement of the neck during immobilization and extrication. In this study we used a sophisticated infrared six-camera motion-capture system (Motion Analysis Corporation, Santa Rosa, CA, to study the motion of the neck and head during extrication. A mock automobile was constructed to scale, and volunteer patients, with infrared markers on bony prominences, were extricated by experienced paramedics. We found in this pilot study that allowing an individual to exit the car under his own volition with cervical collar in place may result in the least amount of motion of the cervical spine. Further research should be conducted to verify these findings. In addition, this system could be utilized to study a variety of methods of extrication from automobile accidents. [WestJEM. 2009;10:74-78.

  3. The cervical spine in Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P J; Hall, C M; Evans, R D; Hayward, R D; Harkness, W J; Jones, B M

    1997-01-01

    Twenty patients with a diagnosis of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome had their cervical spine radiographs reviewed. Radiologic abnormalities including vertebral fusion were present in 9 of the 20 patients. Fusion of both the vertebral bodies and the posterior elements was noted, although the latter site was more common. C2-3 was the level most commonly involved, although other levels were recorded. Analysis of sequential radiographs in nine patients revealed evidence of progression in seven patients. In those studies in children aged under 2 years, only 1 of 18 films showed evidence of fusion, while in those over 2 years of age, 10 of 12 showed evidence of fusion. These results reveal that the incidence of cervical anomalies in Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is greater than that in the general population. There is both direct and indirect evidence that the vertebral fusions are progressive during childhood.

  4. Clinical value of kinematic MR imaging in the evaluation of patients with exacerbated pain in cervical spine motion; Stellenwert der kinematischen MRT der Halswirbelsaeule bei bewegungsabhaengigen Radikulopathien im Vergleich zur statischen MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Brossmann, J.; Biederer, J.; Grimm, J.; Mohr, A.; Heller, M. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2001-02-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of kinematic MR imaging in patients with cervical radiculopathy and increasing symptoms after provocative maneuvers at flexion, extension, axial rotation and coupled motion of the cervical spine. Methods: Thirty-five patients with cervical disc herniation or cervical spondylosis in whom symptoms were elicited at flexion, extension, axial rotation and coupled motion were studied inside a positioning device using T{sub 2}-weighted TSE, 2D-FLASH, and reformatted 3D DESS and 3D-FISP sequences. The images were evaluated for the size of disc herniations, the foraminal size and cervical cord displacement at provocative position compared with neutral position (0 ). In addition, the value of kinematic MR images were interpretated with regard to changes in the therapeutic procedure and intraoperative patient positioning. Results: Compared with the neutral position (0 ) a change in disc herniations was not found in any (0%) of the provocative positions. In five patients (14%) cervical cord displacement was noted at axial rotation. The foraminal size varied depending on the provocative position, increasing at flexion and decreasing at extension. Conclusion: Kinematic MR imaging in patients with cervical radiculopathy and increasing symptoms at provocative maneuvers provides no additional information for the therapeutic decision-making process. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Bewertung des klinischen Stellenwertes der kinematischen MRT im Vergleich zur statischen MRT Untersuchung in der Abklaerung von Patienten mit bewegungsabhaengigen, zervikalen Radikulopathien. Methode: 35 Patienten mit bewegungsabhaengigen Zervikobrachialgien wurden innerhalb eines Positionsgestells in der Neutralnullstellung (0 ) sowie in der Schmerzprovokationsstellung unter Verwendung einer sagittalen T{sub 2}-gewichteten TSE Sequenz, einer axialen T{sub 2}-gewichteten 2D-FLASH Sequenz sowie einer schraeg-koronar rekonstruierten 3D-FISP- und 3D-DESS Sequenz bei 1,5 Tesla

  5. Improved MR imaging of the cervical spine, 2; Study of disk protrusion in the cervical spine in flexion-versus-extension views

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanno, Munehiko; Kyomasu, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Masafumi (Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)) (and others)

    1990-12-01

    Comparative study of incidence of disk protrusion was performed on the basis of MR imaging in a state of flexion versus extension. The results showed that the incidnece of disk protrusion at each disk level was generally higher on the extension images than on the flexion images at the corresponding levels. The degree of difference in the incidence of the disk protrusion on flexion and extension was the greatest at the mid-cervical level spine. Based on the results with respect to features of the cervical spine in extension and flexion, it appears that the difference in incidence of disk protrusion is probably caused by movement in response to bending of the cervical spine. These results may provide information concerning the dynamic of cervical disks and may partly explain cases in which patients have symptoms of cervical myelopathy and/or radiculopathy but have no disk protrusion on images in the neutral position. (author).

  6. Morphological character of cervical spine for anterior transpedicular screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Ping Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anterior cervical interbody grafts/cages combined with a plate were frequently used in multilevel discectomies/corpectomies. In order to avoid additional posterior stabilization in patients who undergo anterior reconstructive surgery, an anterior cervical transpedicular screw fixation, which offers higher stability is desirable. We investigated in this study the anatomical (morphologic characters for cervical anterior transpedicular screw fixation. Materials and Methods: Left pedicle parameters were measured on computed tomography (CT images based on 36 cervical spine CT scans from healthy subjects. The parameters included outer pedicle width (Distance from lateral to medial pedicle surface in the coronal plane, outer pedicle height (OPH (Distance from upper to lower pedicle surface in the sagittal plane, maximal pedicle axis length (MPAL, distance transverse insertion point (DIP, distance of the insertion point to the upper end plate (DIUP, pedicle sagittal transverse angle (PSTA and pedicle transverse angle (PTA at C3 to C7. Results: The values of outer pedicle width and MPAL in males were larger than in females from C3 to C7. The OPH in males was larger than in females at C3 to C6, but there was no difference at C7. The DIP and PTA were significantly greater in males than in females at C3, but there was no difference in the angle at C4-7. The PSTA was not statistically different between genders at C3, 4, 7, but this value in males was larger than females at C5, 6. The DIUP was significantly greater in males at C3, 4, 6, 7 but was non significant at C5. Conclusions: The placement of cervical anterior transpedicular screws should be individualized for each patient and based on a detailed preoperative planning.

  7. Imaging diagnosis of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To provide the experience in imaging diagnosis of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries in children.Methods: Imaging data of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries in 62 children were retrospectively reviewed.The routine radiography including the lateral,anteroposterior and open-mouth odontoid views were performed in all the patients. Tomography was available for 25 patients, and flexion-extension lateral views for 28patients, CT scanning for 21 patients, MRI for 26 patients.Results: Of these patients, 46 patients were identified with injuries of upper cervical spine (9 with atlantal arch fracture, seven with axial fracture, 21 with odontoid fracture, 1 with atlantal arch fracture combining with odontoid fracture, and 1 with atlantal transverse ligament disruption); 7 patients sustained injuries of lower cervical spine (3 fractures of vertebral body, 2 dislocations and 6fracture-dislocations ); 2 patients had multiple noncontiguous cervical injuries; and 3 had cervical spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormalities (SCIWORA).Conclusions: Imaging assessment is of great importance in the diagnosis of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries in children. Whenever cervical spine and spinal cord injuries are suspected for children patients, and the three-views should be routinely indicated. MRI should be routinely performed in all children with cervical SCIWORA.

  8. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the cervical spine: case report of an unusual location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geusens, E.; Brys, P.; Ghekiere, J.; Baert, A.L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg KU Leuven (Belgium); Samson, I. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Sciot, R. [Department of Pathology II, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Brock, P. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-09-01

    An unusual location for Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the cervical spine is presented. The osteolytic lesion, instead of being located in the vertebral body, was visualised in the left lateral mass of the fifth cervical vertebra, extending into the vertebral body and through the interapophyseal joint into the lateral mass of the fourth cervical vertebra. (orig.) With 3 figs., 7 refs.

  9. Cervical disc herniation presenting with neck pain and contralateral symptoms: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Jacky T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cervical disc herniation often results in neck and arm pain in patients as a result of direct impingement of nerve roots and associated inflammatory processes. The clinical presentation usually corresponds with the side of herniation and ipsilateral symptoms predominate the clinical picture. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian man presented to our facility with neck pain and left-sided upper and lower extremity pain. A magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a right paramedian herniated disc at the C5 to C6 level. All other cervical levels were normal without central canal stenosis or neural foraminal stenosis. Results from magnetic reasonance imaging scans of the brain and lumbar spine were negative. An anterior cervical discectomy was performed at the C5 to C6 level, and an inter-body graft and plate were placed. Our patient had complete resolution of his neck and left arm pain. Conclusions Anterior discectomy and fusion of the cervical spine resulted in complete resolution of our patient’s neck and left arm symptoms and improvement of his contralateral left leg pain. Cervical disc herniation may present with contralateral symptoms that are different from the current perception of this disease.

  10. Assessment of neck pain and cervical mobility among female computer workers at Hail University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Walaa S; Hamza, Hayat H; ElSais, Walaa M

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of neck pain among computer workers at Hail University, Saudi Arabia and to compare the cervical range of motion (ROM) of female computer workers suffering from neck pain to the cervical ROM of healthy female computer workers. One hundred and seventy-six female volunteers between 20 and 46 years of age were investigated. Fifty-six of these volunteers were staff members, 22 were administrators and 98 were students. The Cervical Range of Motion (CROM) instrument was used to measure the ROM of the cervical spine. A questionnaire was used to assess participants for the presence of neck pain. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software, and the level of significant was set at p cervical lateral flexion, rotation to the right side and protraction range between the pain and pain-free groups. Our results demonstrated that cervical ROM measurements, particularly cervical lateral flexion, rotation and protraction, could be useful for predicting changes in head and neck posture after long-term computer work.

  11. ASSESSMENT AND COMPARISION OF CERVICAL JOINT POSITION SENSE IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC NECK PAIN vs NORMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberoi Mugdha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The abundance of mechanoreceptors in the cervical spine and their central and reflex afferent connections to the vestibular, visual and postural control system suggests that the cervical proprioceptive information provides important somatosensory information influencing postural stability, head orientation and eye movement control. Disturbances to the afferent input from the cervical region is thought to underlie symptoms of dizziness, unsteadiness, visual disturbances and signs of altered postural stability, cervical proprioception and head and eye movement control in people with chronic neck pain. This study aimed to assess and compare cervical joint position sense in subjects with chronic neck pain vs normals. Methods: Total 60 subjects, divided into two groups chronic neck pain group (n=30 (12 males and 18 females with mean age of 40.7 years and control group (n=30 with age and gender matched normal individuals were assessed for baseline data and demographic variables. Head repositioning accuracy test was used to assess cervical joint position sense in degrees. Results: The difference in the head repositioning error values were found to be extremely significant (p<0.0001 for all the neck movements for subjects with chronic neck pain as compared to normals. Conclusion: Cervical joint position sense in subjects with chronic neck pain is found to be altered as compared to age and gender matched normals.

  12. Article Volume : 3 Issue :5 Month : October (2016 ASSOCIATION BETWEEN THORACIC KYPHOSIS, HEAD POSTURE AND CERVICAL RANGE OF MOTION IN ADULTS WITH AND WITHOUT CERVICAL SPINE DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhi Shah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive Thoracic Kyphosis (TK and Forward Head Posture(FHP become more apparent in aging adults from the accumulation of remodeling in response to habitual postures. Faulty posture of the shoulders, neck, and particularly the head may contribute to the onset and perpetuation of cervical pain dysfunction syndrome. Current literature suggests that an association exists between the head posture, thoracic kyphosis and cervical range of motion in individuals with cervical spine dysfunction. Since age as well as cervical spine dysfunction may affect the above parameters, the objective of our research was to study the association between these in adults with and without cervical spine dysfunction. Methods: 50 adults with CSD and 50 adults without CSD were assessed for TK, FHP and Cervical range of motion (CROM by flexicurve method Kipnotic Index (KI, measuring cranio-vertebral angle(CVA using a lateral-view photograph(digitized of the subject and using Universal Goniometer respectively. Results: In both groups, there was increased KI (TK, lesser CVA i.e. FHP and reduced CROM when compared to normative values, however there was no statistical difference in KI and CVA between the two groups (p=0.53,0.75. Cervical extension and rotation ranges were significantly reduced in CSD adults (p=0.00,0.00,0.00. Correlation between CVA and CROM, KI and CROM and KI and CVA was not significant in adults with as well as without CSD (p=0.16-0.51,0.05-0.35,p=0.08-0.69,0.19-0.52,p=0.13,0.94 respectively. Conclusion: Correlation between FHP and CROM,TK and CROM, FHP and TK in adults with and without CSD was not significant.

  13. Insufficient pain management after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Dahl, Jørgen Berg;

    2014-01-01

    experienced acceptable pain levels, but instrumented lumbar fusion leads to moderate to severe pain levels and a relatively high opioid consumption. The scheduled standard pain management protocols were sparsely followed. Challenges exist in post-operative pain management as observed in previous surveys...

  14. Idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine II: post-surgical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of severe chronic pain in young people following surgery for the correction of curvatures of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is presented through two case histories. Effective treatment involved release of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) known to refer pain into the spine, and treatment of related fascia and joint dysfunction. The TrPs found to be contributing to spinal area pain were located in muscles at some distance from the spine rather than in the paraspinal muscles. Referred pain from these TrPs apparently accounted for pain throughout the base of the neck and thoracolumbar spine. Exploratory surgery was considered for one patient to address pain following rod placement but the second surgery became unnecessary when the pain was controlled with treatment of the myofascial pain and joint dysfunction. The other individual had both scoliosis and hyperkyphosis, had undergone primary scoliosis surgery, and subsequently underwent a second surgery to remove hardware in an attempt to address her persistent pain following the initial surgery (and because of dislodged screws). The second surgery did not, however, reduce her pain. In both cases these individuals, with severe chronic pain following scoliosis corrective surgery, experienced a marked decrease of pain after myofascial treatment. As will be discussed below, despite the fact that a significant minority of individuals who have scoliosis corrective surgery are thought to require a second surgery, and despite the fact that pain is the most common reason leading to such revision surgery, myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) had apparently not previously been considered as a possible factor in their pain.

  15. Pediatric cervical spine in emergency: radiographic features of normal anatomy, variants and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, Omar; Berthier, Emeline; Loisel, Didier; Aube, Christophe [University Hospital of Angers, Department of Radiology, Angers (France)

    2016-12-15

    Injuries of the cervical spine are uncommon in children. The distribution of injuries, when they do occur, differs according to age. Young children aged less than 8 years usually have upper cervical injuries because of the anatomic and biomechanical properties of their immature spine, whereas older children, whose biomechanics more closely resemble those of adults, are prone to lower cervical injuries. In all cases, the pediatric cervical spine has distinct radiographic features, making the emergency radiological analysis of it difficult. Such features as hypermobility between C2 and C3, pseudospread of the atlas on the axis, pseudosubluxation, the absence of lordosis, anterior wedging of vertebral bodies, pseudowidening of prevertebral soft tissue and incomplete ossification of synchondrosis can be mistaken for traumatic injuries. The interpretation of a plain radiograph of the pediatric cervical spine following trauma must take into account the age of the child, the location of the injury and the mechanism of trauma. Comprehensive knowledge of the specific anatomy and biomechanics of the childhood spine is essential for the diagnosis of suspected cervical spine injury. With it, the physician can, on one hand, differentiate normal physes or synchondroses from pathological fractures or ligamentous disruptions and, on the other, identify any possible congenital anomalies that may also be mistaken for injury. Thus, in the present work, we discuss normal radiological features of the pediatric cervical spine, variants that may be encountered and pitfalls that must be avoided when interpreting plain radiographs taken in an emergency setting following trauma. (orig.)

  16. Rugby union injuries to the cervical spine and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrie, Kenneth L; Cantu, Robert C; Chalmers, David J

    2002-01-01

    Injuries to the cervical spine are among the most serious injuries occurring as a result of participation in rugby. Outcomes of such injuries range from complete recovery to death, depending on the degree of spinal cord damage sustained. Much information has been gained regarding the mechanisms and frequency of such injuries, from case reports and case series studies. The most commonly reported mechanism of injury has been hyperflexion of the cervical spine, resulting in fracture dislocation of C4-C5 or C5-C6. Tracking both the trends of incidence of spinal injuries, and the effectiveness of injury prevention initiatives has proved difficult because of a lack of properly conducted epidemiological studies. Within the constraints of the research published to date, it appears that hookers and props have been at disproportionate risk of cervical spine injury, predominantly because of injuries sustained during scrummaging. While the scrum was the phase of play most commonly associated with spinal injuries throughout the 1980s in most rugby playing countries, there has been a trend through the 1990s of an increasing proportion of spinal injuries occurring in the tackle situation. The majority of injuries have occurred early in the season, when grounds tend to be harder, and players are lacking both practice and physical conditioning for the physical contact phases of the sport. A number of injury prevention measures have been launched, including changes to the laws of the game regarding scrummaging, and education programmes aimed at enforcing safe techniques and eliminating illegal play. Calls for case-registers and effective epidemiological studies have been made by researchers and physicians in most countries where rugby is widespread, but it appears to be only recently that definite steps have been made towards this goal. Well-designed epidemiological studies will be able to provide more accurate information about potential risk factors for injury such as age, grade

  17. Surgeon Reported Outcome Measure for Spine Trauma an International Expert Survey Identifying Parameters Relevant for The Outcome of Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadiqi, Said; Verlaan, Jorrit Jan; Lehr, A. M.; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Kandziora, Frank; Rajasekaran, S.; Schnake, Klaus J.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Oner, F. C.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN.: International web-based survey OBJECTIVE.: To identify clinical and radiological parameters that spine surgeons consider most relevant when evaluating clinical and functional outcomes of subaxial cervical spine trauma patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: While an outcome instrument

  18. Function and structure of the deep cervical extensor muscles in patients with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomacher, Jochen; Falla, Deborah

    2013-10-01

    The deep cervical extensors are anatomically able to control segmental movements of the cervical spine in concert with the deep cervical flexors. Several investigations have confirmed changes in cervical flexor muscle control in patients with neck pain and as a result, effective evidence-based therapeutic exercises have been developed to address such dysfunctions. However, knowledge on how the deep extensor muscles behave in patients with neck pain disorders is scare. Structural changes such as higher concentration of fat within the muscle, variable cross-sectional area and higher proportions of type II fibres have been observed in the deep cervical extensors of patients with neck pain compared to healthy controls. These findings suggest that the behaviour of the deep extensors may be altered in patients with neck pain. Consistent with this hypothesis, a recent series of studies confirm that patients display reduced activation of the deep cervical extensors as well as less defined activation patterns. This article provides an overview of the various different structural and functional changes in the deep neck extensor muscles documented in patients with neck pain. Relevant recommendations for the management of muscle dysfunction in patients with neck pain are presented.

  19. Quantification of C2 cervical spine rotatory fixation by X-ray, MRI and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gradl, Georg [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik der Universitaet Rostock, Abteilung Unfall- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie, Rostock (Germany); Maier-Bosse, Tamara; Staebler, Axel [Institut fuer Radiologische Diagnostik der Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum Grobetahadern, Munich (Germany); Penning, Randolph [Institut fuer Rechtsmedizin der Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Atlanto-axial rotatory displacement is known to be a cause of childhood torticollis and may as well be responsible for chronic neck pain after rear-end automobile collisions. The objective was to determine whether quantification of C2 malrotation is possible by plain radiographs in comparison to CT as the golden standard. MR imaging was evaluated as to whether it was of equal value in the detection of bony landmarks. C2 vertebra of five human cadaveric cervical spine specimens, ligamentously intact, were rotated using a Steinmann pin in steps of 5 up to 15 right and 15 left. Plain radiographs, CT and MRI images were taken in each rotational step. Data were analyzed for quantification of C2 rotation by three independent examiners. A rotation of 5 led to a spinous process deviation (SPD) from the midline of 3 mm as measured on an a.p. plain radiograph. A coefficient of rotation was calculated (1.62 mm{sup -1}). Data analyzed by three examiners revealed a small coefficient of variation (0.03). MRI and CT measurements showed comparable results for the quantification of rotation; however, in both techniques the 15 rotation was underestimated. Quantification of upper cervical spine malrotation was possible on plain radiographs using the SPD and a rotation coefficient. MRI and CT were equally successful in the assessment of C2 malrotation. (orig.)

  20. Three Dimensional Movements Of The Upper Cervical Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, Manohar M.; Dvorak, Jiri; Duranceau, Joanne; Yamamoto, Isao

    1989-04-01

    Ten fresh cadaveric whole cervical spine specimens (occiput to C7) were studied using well established techniques to document the movements in flexion, extension, left and right lateral bending and left and right axial rotation. Pure moments of maximum 1.5 newton meters were applied incrementally and three dimensional movements of the bones were recorded using stereophotogrammetry. Each moment was applied individually and in a three load/unload cycles. The motion measurements were made on the third load cycle. Parameters of neutral zone, elastic zone and range of motion were computed. Neutral zones for flexion/extension, right/left lateral bending and right/left axial rotation were respectively: 1.1, 1.5 and 1.6 (occiput-C1); and 3.2, 1.2 and 29.6 degrees (C1-C2). Ranges of motion for flexion, extension, lateral bending (one side) and axial rotation (one side) were respectively: 3.5, 21.0, 5.5 and 7.2 degrees (occiput-Cl joint) and 11.5, 10.9, 6.7 and 38.9 degrees (CI-CZ joint). The highest intervertebral motion in the spine was the axial rotation at the Cl-C2 joint, neutral zone constituting 75% of this motion.

  1. Parameters that effect spine biomechanics following cervical disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Vijay K; Faizan, Ahmad; Palepu, Vivek; Bhattacharya, Sanghita

    2012-06-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) is expected to provide a more physiologic alternative to fusion. However, long-term clinical data proving the efficacy of the implants is lacking. Limited clinical data suggest somewhat of a disagreement between the in vitro biomechanical studies and in vivo assessments. This conceptual paper presents the potential biomechanical challenges affecting the TDR that should be addressed with a hope to improve the clinical outcomes and our understanding of the devices. Appropriate literature and our own research findings comparing the biomechanics of different disc designs are presented to highlight the need for additional investigations. The biomechanical effects of various surgical procedures are analyzed, reiterating the importance of parameters like preserving uncinate processes, disc placement and its orientation within the cervical spine. Moreover, the need for a 360° dynamic system for disc recipients who may experience whiplash injuries is explored. Probabilistic studies as performed already in the lumbar spine may explore high risk combinations of different parameters and explain the differences between "standard" biomechanical investigations and clinical studies. Development of a patient specific optimized finite element model that takes muscle forces into consideration may help resolve the discrepancies between biomechanics of TDR and the clinical studies. Factors affecting long-term performance such as bone remodeling, subsidence, and wear are elaborated. In vivo assessment of segmental spine motion has been, and continues to be, a challenge. In general, clinical studies while reporting the data have placed lesser emphasis on kinematics following intervertebral disc replacements. Evaluation of in vivo kinematics following TDR to analyze the quality and quantity of motion using stereoradiogrammetric technique may be needed.

  2. Subacromial impingement in patients with whiplash injury to the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giddins Grey E

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impingement syndrome and shoulder pain have been reported to occur in a proportion of patients following whiplash injuries to the neck. In this study we aim to examine these findings to establish the association between subacromial impingement and whiplash injuries to the cervical spine. Methods and results We examined 220 patients who had presented to the senior author for a medico-legal report following a whiplash injury to the neck. All patients were assessed for clinical evidence of subacromial impingement. 56/220 patients (26% had developed shoulder pain following the injury; of these, 11/220 (5% had clinical evidence of impingement syndrome. Only 3/11 patients (27% had the diagnosis made prior to evaluation for their medico-legal report. In the majority, other clinicians had overlooked the diagnosis. The seatbelt shoulder was involved in 83% of cases (p Conclusion After a neck injury a significant proportion of patients present with shoulder pain, some of whom have treatable shoulder pathology such as impingement syndrome. The diagnosis is, however, frequently overlooked and shoulder pain is attributed to pain radiating from the neck resulting in long delays before treatment. It is important that this is appreciated and patients are specifically examined for signs of subacromial impingement after whiplash injuries to the neck. Direct seatbelt trauma to the shoulder is one possible explanation for its aetiology.

  3. Effects of Lateral Mass Screw Rod Fixation to the Stability of Cervical Spine after Laminectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Ruwaida; Kashani, Jamal; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    There are many cases of injury in the cervical spine due to degenerative disorder, trauma or instability. This condition may produce pressure on the spinal cord or on the nerve coming from the spine. The aim of this study was, to analyze the stabilization of the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy via computational simulation. For that purpose, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the multilevel cervical spine segment (C1-C7) was developed using computed tomography (CT) data. There are various decompression techniques that can be applied to overcome the injury. Usually, decompression procedures will create an unstable spine. Therefore, in these situations, the spine is often surgically restabilized by using fusion and instrumentation. In this study, a lateral mass screw-rod fixation was created to stabilize the cervical spine after laminectomy. Material properties of the titanium alloy were assigned on the implants. The requirements moments and boundary conditions were applied on simulated implanted bone. Result showed that the bone without implant has a higher flexion and extension angle in comparison to the bone with implant under applied 1Nm moment. The bone without implant has maximum stress distribution at the vertebrae and ligaments. However, the bone with implant has maximum stress distribution at the screws and rods. Overall, the lateral mass screw-rod fixation provides stability to the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy.

  4. Endonasal access to the upper cervical spine, part one: radiographic morphometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harminder; Grobelny, Bartosz T; Harrop, James; Rosen, Marc; Lober, Robert M; Evans, James

    2013-06-01

    Objectives To determine the anatomical relationships that may influence endonasal access to the upper cervical spine. Setting We retrospectively analyzed computed tomography of 100 patients at a single institution. Participants Participants included adults with imaging of the hard palate, clivus, and cervical spine without evidence of fracture, severe spondylosis, or previous instrumentation. Main Outcome Measures Morphometric analyses of hard palate length and both distance and angle between the hard palate and odontoid process were based on radiographic measurements. Descriptive zones were assigned to cervical spine levels, and endoscopic visualization was simulated with projected lines at 0, 30, and 45 degrees from the hard palate to the cervical spine. Results We found an inverse relationship between hard palate length and the lowest zone of the cervical spine potentially visualized by nasal endoscopy. The distance between the posterior tip of the hard palate and the odontoid tip, and the angle formed between the two, directly influenced the lowest possible cervical exposure. Conclusions Radiographic relationships between hard palate length, distance to the odontoid, and the angle formed between the two predict the limits of endonasal access to the cervical spine. These results are supported by cadaveric data in Part Two of this study.

  5. Biomechanics of the Spine III. The Cranio-Cervical Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, R; Ambrosanio, G; Cigliano, A; Cascone, D; Gallo, G; Muto, M

    2007-04-30

    By virtue of its unique anatomy and functions the cranial-cervical junction was excluded in previous reviews on the general biomechanics of the spine, being a world apart. The special design of the cranial-cervical (CCJ) junction responds to seemingly opposed necessities being at same time loose enough to allow a great variety of movements and strong enough to preserve the spinal cord and vertebral arteries and to resist the head weight and muscular action. The primary goal of the CCJ is to ensure the maximal mobility of the head for visual and auditory exploration of space. Like a cardan joint the CCJ allows simultaneous independent movements about three axes in order to repeat and extend eye movements under the control of vestibular receptors. Several muscular groups and a number of ligaments control the movements of the CCJ and ensure its stability. Although composed of two seemingly distinct joints the CCJ forms a unique functional complex whose stability is ensured by ligaments and bony restraints often operating on both joint components: the occipitoatlantal and atlantoaxial joints.

  6. Deceleration during 'real life' motor vehicle collisions – a sensitive predictor for the risk of sustaining a cervical spine injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartwig Erich

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The predictive value of trauma impact for the severity of whiplash injuries has mainly been investigated in sled- and crash-test studies. However, very little data exist for real-life accidents. Therefore, the predictive value of the trauma impact as assessed by the change in velocity of the car due to the collision (ΔV for the resulting cervical spine injuries were investigated in 57 cases after real-life car accidents. Methods ΔV was determined for every car and clinical findings related to the cervical spine were assessed and classified according to the Quebec Task Force (QTF. Results In our study, 32 (56% subjects did not complain about symptoms and were therefore classified as QTF grade 0; 25 (44% patients complained of neck pain: 8 (14% were classified as QTF grade I, 6 (10% as QTF grade II, and 11 (19% as QTF grade IV. Only a slight correlation (r = 0.55 was found between the reported pain and ΔV. No relevant correlation was found between ΔV and the neck disability index (r = 0.46 and between ΔV and the QTF grade (r = 0.45 for any of the collision types. There was no ΔV threshold associated with acceptable sensitivity and specificity for the prognosis of a cervical spine injury. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that ΔV is not a conclusive predictor for cervical spine injury in real-life motor vehicle accidents. This is of importance for surgeons involved in medicolegal expertise jobs as well as patients who suffer from whiplash-associated disorders (WADs after motor vehicle accidents. Trial registration The study complied with applicable German law and with the principles of the Helsinki Declaration and was approved by the institutional ethics commission.

  7. THE EFFECT OF WEARING HEADSCARVES ON CERVICAL SPINE PROPRIOCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiah F. Alqabbani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proprioception plays an important role in sensorimotor control of posture and movement. Impairments in cervical proprioception have been demonstrated in subjects with whiplash-associated disorder, patients with age-related degeneration, and patients with articular diseases or spondylosis. The joint position error test is widely used to measure head repositioning accuracy. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to compare cervical spine joint position error in females who routinely wear headscarves to females that do not wear headscarves. Methods: Twelve females with mean age 27.5±4.0 years were divided into two groups: females who routinely wear headscarves (n=6, and females who never wear headscarves (n=6. Joint position error was measured using a head-mounted laser while subjects were seated. The tasks involved relocating the head to neutral after flexion, extension, right rotation, and left rotation. A total of six trials were done for each direction. Results: The joint position error was higher in females wearing headscarves compared to females who do not wear them in the cumulative joint position error score (8.2±1.0 vs. 4.4±1.0, p=0.06 as well as during head rotation to the right (9.3±1.6 vs. 3.1±1.6, p=0.06. Conclusion: Wearing headscarves may increase the cervical joint position error and can negatively impact postural control. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  8. Cervical Spine Functional Anatomy and the Biomechanics of Injury Due to Compressive Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Erik E; Floyd, R. T; Cendoma, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To provide a foundation of knowledge concerning the functional anatomy, kinematic response, and mechanisms involved in axial-compression cervical spine injury as they relate to sport injury.

  9. Endotracheal intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilization: a comparison of macintosh and airtraq laryngoscopes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, Chrisen H

    2007-07-01

    The Airtraq laryngoscope (Prodol Ltd., Vizcaya, Spain) is a novel single-use tracheal intubation device. The authors compared ease of intubation with the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients with cervical spine immobilization in a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  10. Tomographic imaging of the cervical spine of horses; Aspectos tomograficos da coluna cervical de equinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, L.P.; Machado, V.M.V.; Santos, R.V.; Evangelista, F.C.; Vulcano, L.C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia

    2012-09-15

    The anatomy of the cervical spine of mature horses based on images obtained with a helical computed tomography examination performed on anatomic specimens was studied. Computed tomography was the diagnostic imaging method of choice and allowed three-dimensional reconstructions of images and other anatomical planes, such as coronal and sagittal. All images were acquired and evaluated in the filter and window to bone tissue. It was possible to demonstrate the anatomical differences and peculiarities of the normal vertebrae, particularly the occipito-atlantoaxial region, which has a higher incidence of changes to assist in the visualization of any change of the bone pattern on CT studies. (author)

  11. When to suspect head injury or cervical spine injury in maxillofacial trauma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad A Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The global status report of the World Health Organization (WHO on road safety suggested that India is leading in road traffic accidents in the world. According to the report on road accidents in India in 2010 by the Transport Research Wing, Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, New Delhi, Kerala ranked third in accidents per lakh population and second in persons injured per lakh population. As the face, brain, and cervical spine are in close proximity with one another, associated injuries can be suspected. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the severity of head, cervical spine, and facial injury and incidence of facial injury in patients with head and/or cervical spine injury. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted over a period of one year. The study population included all patients having computed tomography (CT-demonstrable head injury, radiographic evidence of cervical spine injury, and associated head or cervical spine injury with facial injury. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test using statistical package SPSS. A P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Of 124 patients, 59 (47.6% had facial injuries. As severity of head injury increased, the number of facial injuries decreased. Statistically, no significant association between facial and head injury was seen. A statistically significant association between dentoalveolar involvement and cervical spine injury was seen (P < 0.001. The proportion of injuries in patients with cervical spine injuries alone was significantly lower in the frontal (P = 0.001 and orbital (P = 0.004 regions and higher in the mandibular region (P = 0.010. Conclusion: Midface injuries were more commonly associated with head injuries. Decreased facial involvement leads to increased severity of head injury. Simple injuries of the cervical spine were more commonly associated with facial injuries.

  12. A 12 month clinical audit of cervical spine imaging in multiply injured and intubated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C; Watson, D

    2010-03-01

    Previous work has questioned how plain films should be used when imaging the cervical spine of trauma patients. The authors wanted to identify whether the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines were being followed with respect to the imaging of patients presenting with cervical spine injury over a 1 year period. Data retrieved from the Electronic Digital Information Service (EDIS) computerised database records of all patients presenting with a triage code 1 or 2 between 1 September 2007 and 31 August 2008 were used to conduct a retrospective audit that identified multiply injured and intubated patients who did not undergo CT of the cervical spine and to highlight the use of plain films when the patient was to undergo CT of the head and cervical spine. A clinical record search identified 52 patients with a mean age of 32 years, of whom 73% were males, who had been admitted with multiple traumas and had undergone imaging of the cervical spine. Although no patient was intubated without undergoing CT of the cervical spine or head, seven patients had plain films when it was clear that they were to undergo CT. In conclusion, the audit emphasised the excellent work of emergency department and radiology staff in identifying and imaging multiple trauma patients, as all patients requiring CT of the cervical spine received this investigation. However, careful thought should be given to ordering plain films before CT, as some patients who clearly required CT of the cervical spine underwent unnecessary lateral plain films in the emergency department, delaying their progression to definitive care.

  13. MDCT of acute subaxial cervical spine trauma: a mechanism-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Raniga, Sameer B.; Menon, Venugopal; Al Muzahmi, Khamis S.; Butt, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to the spinal column are common and road traffic accidents are the commonest cause. Subaxial cervical spine (C3–C7) trauma encompasses a wide spectrum of osseous and ligamentous injuries, in addition to being frequently associated with neurological injury. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is routinely performed to evaluate acute cervical spine trauma, very often as first-line imaging. MDCT provides an insight into the injury morphology, which in turn reflects the mechanics of...

  14. Harvesting and preparation of cadaveric osseoligamentous lower cervical spine (C2-C7) for biomechanical testing

    OpenAIRE

    Yeh, J; Jackowski, A

    1998-01-01

    Cadaveric osseoligamentous lower cervical spines (C2-C7) are often used in the investigation of spinal biomechanics in vitro. Surprisingly, however, the techniques of harvesting at postmortem and preparation of cadaveric osseoligamentous lower cervical spine for biomechanical testing have not been described in detail. We describe a simple and effective method that can be readily integrated into the routine autopsy procedure. Points on the avoidance of disfiguring the cadaver and damaging the ...

  15. A case of dialysis-related amyloidosis of the hip and cervical spine: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Ik Won; Min, Seon Jung; Cho, Seong Whi; Kim, Seok Woo; Jang, Woo Young [Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seon Joo [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung Jin [Dankook University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    Dialysis-related amyloidosis is a complication of long-term hemodialysis and it is characterized by the accumulation of {beta} 2-microglobulin in the osteoarticular structures. We describe here the imaging findings of a case of dialysis-related amyloidosis involving the hip and cervical spine in a 62-year-old woman who received long-term dialysis. We focus here on the CT and MR imaging findings of the cervical spine and we include a review of the relevant literatures.

  16. Kinematic analysis of the lower cervical spine in the protracted and retracted neck flexion positions

    OpenAIRE

    Park, So Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze lower cervical spine kinematics in protracted and retracted neck flexion positions in healthy people. [Subjects and Methods] The craniovertebral angle (CVA) and intervertebral body angles of the lower cervical spine of 10 healthy individuals were analyzed using fluoroscopy in a neutral sitting with the head in the neutral (N), protracted (Pro), and retracted (Ret) positions and with the neck in full flexion with the head in the neutral (N-fx), pr...

  17. INTEREXAMINER RELIABILITY OF CHIROPRACTIC EVALUATION FOR CERVICAL SPINE PROBLEMS—A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tuchin, Peter J.; Hart, Christopher J.; Johnson, Catriona; Colman, Robert; Gee, Adam; Edwards, Ian; Plucknett, Mark; Bonello, Rod

    1996-01-01

    Objective: A pilot study was conducted to determine whether untrained examiners could agree on palpatory findings in the cervical spine. Design: Fifty-three university students, (most of whom were chiropractic students), had their cervical spines examined by seven different chiropractors using their own clinical methods, of which motion palpation was a common, but not standard component. Setting: Chiropractic Centre in Macquarie University. Participants: Volunteer university students. Main Ou...

  18. Osseous osteoarthritic-like changes and joint mobility of the temporomandibular joints and upper cervical spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Petersson, Arne; Wiese, Mie

    2017-01-01

    -like changes and with and without reduced UCS mobility. STUDY DESIGN: The study comprised 39 patients without pain from TMJ or UCS and with obstructive sleep apnea, 15 women (age range 26-72 years, mean 56.0) and 24 men (age range 27-71 years, mean 49.8). The range of motion (ROM) of the mandible and UCS......OBJECTIVES: To compare 1) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility between patients with and without reduced upper cervical spine (UCS) mobility and with and without TMJ osseous osteoarthritic-like changes, and 2) UCS osseous changes between patients with and without TMJ osseous osteoarthritic...... was assessed clinically. Osseous changes of the TMJ and UCS were assessed by cone beam computed tomography. Differences were tested and adjusted for age and gender by multiple linear and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The mandibular ROM was within normal range (45-64 mm) but the UCS ROM was reduced...

  19. Impact of morphine use in reducing the need for CT scan in patients with cervical spine trauma: a double blinded randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Mohammad Davood; Doloo, Hamid Zamani Moghadam; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Tourghabe, Javad Tootian; Kakhki, Behrang Rezvani; Teimoori, Sasan Johari; Chokan, Niaz Mohammad Jafari; Noroozi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical spine trauma occurs mostly among young males due to falls and car accidents. The CT scan technology is replacing radiography in many medical clinics as it is very capable in detecting subtle cervical spine injuries. However, the use of CT scan for routine screening in patients with cervical spine trauma remains controversial due to its radiation risks and relatively high cost. Objective The focus of this research was on using morphine in patients with cervical spine trauma. The objective was to determine the ability of morphine to reduce the number of patients in need of CT scans. Methods This double-blinded randomized clinical trial study was conducted from April 2014 to March 2015 in Hasheminejad Hospital in Mashhad, Iran. We enrolled 67 patients with cervical spine trauma and normal radiography in the study. They were divided randomly into two groups (groups A and B), where group A received intravenous morphine, and group B received a placebo. We measured the pain scores in both groups before giving the medication and 10 minutes afterwards using a visual analog scale (VAS). Results As a result of receiving morphine, the patients in group A had significantly lower pain than group B (p-value < 0.001). The average pain score in group A was reduced by 43% versus 23% in group B. However, the most pain reduction was in those in group A with a normal CT scan. The pain score of these patients dropped by 52%. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that patients with a normal radiography may be discharged with a cervical collar without a need for a CT scan if morphine reduces their pain. This is because the pain in these patients stem from the muscles and non-bony structures in the cervical spine area. Clinical trial registration: The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT ID: IRCT2013100214872N1 Funding The authors received no financial support for the research or for the publication

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Cervical Spine: A Review on the Role of Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Gillick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease affecting a significant percentage of the population. The cervical spine is often affected in this disease and can present in the form of atlantoaxial instability (AAI, cranial settling (CS, or subaxial subluxation (SAS. Patients may present with symptoms and disability secondary to these entities but may also be neurologically intact. Cervical spine involvement in RA can pose a challenge to the clinician and the appropriate role of surgical intervention is controversial. The aim of this paper is to describe the pathology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis in the cervical spine in order to provide a better understanding of the indications and options for surgery. Both the medical and surgical treatment options for RA have improved, so has the prognosis of the cervical spine disease. With the advent of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, fewer patients are presenting with cervical spine manifestations of RA; however, those that do, now have improved surgical techniques available to them. We hope that, by reading this paper, the clinician is able to better evaluate patients with RA in the cervical spine and determine in which patients surgery is indicated.

  1. Granuloma eosinofílico de coluna cervical: relato de caso Eosinophilic granuloma of the cervical spine: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Baldoino Leal Filho

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Granuloma eosinofílico (GE é condição benigna de proliferação histiocitária localizada ou multifocal. A ocorrência de lesões na coluna cervical pode variar entre 1,5% e 20% dos casos de GE. Relatamos caso de menina de sete anos de idade e história de cervicalgia há cerca de um mês, torcicolo persistente e postura viciosa do pescoço, com desvio cefálico para esquerda. A tomografia computadorizada revelou lesão expansiva, osteodestrutiva ao nível da hemilâmina esquerda de C2, com invasão do canal raquiano e do plano muscular a este nível. A paciente foi submetida a laminectomia cervical com retirada da lesão com pós-operatório favorável, e melhora da sintomatologia. Foi feita quimioterapia com prednisona, vinblastina e etoposide. Após seis meses, o protocolo foi mantido e associado a metotrexate. A paciente segue sem recidiva há 36 meses.Eosinophilic granuloma (EG is a benign condition of histocytes proliferation localized or multifocal. It is presents in the cervical spine in 1.5%-20% of the cases of EG. We report the case of a seven-year-old girl that presented with a one month history of cervical pain, persistent wryneck and vicious posture of the neck. A computerized tomography was performed and confirmed the presence of spreading lesion, ostheodestructive to the level of the left laminae of C2, with invasion of the spine and the muscular tissue. A laminectomy was underwent for removal of the lesion. The patient had a good post-operative recovery with improvement of the symptoms. Chemotherapy with prednisone, vinblastine and ethoposide was administred. After six months, this protocol was repeated associaded to methotrexate.The patient improved and had no new symptoms in a follow-up of 36 months.

  2. Fibular allograft and anterior plating for dislocations/fractures of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramnarain A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subaxial cervical spine dislocations are common and often present with neurological deficit. Posterior spinal fusion has been the gold standard in the past. Pain and neck stiffness are often the presenting features and may be due to failure of fixation and extension of fusion mass. Anterior spinal fusion which is relatively atraumatic is thus favored using autogenous grafts and cages with anterior plate fixation. We evaluated fresh frozen fibular allografts and anterior plate fixation for anterior fusion in cervical trauma. Materials and Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with single-level dislocations or fracture dislocations of the subaxial cervical spine were recruited in this prospective study following a motor vehicle accident. There were 38 males and 22 females. The mean age at presentation was 34 years (range 19-67 years. The levels involved were C5/6 ( n = 36, C4/5 ( n = 15, C6/7 ( n = 7 and C3/4 ( n = 2. There were 38 unifacet dislocations with nine posterior element fractures and 22 were bifacet dislocations. Twenty-two patients had neurological deficit. Co-morbidities included hypertension ( n = 6, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus ( n = 2 and asthma ( n = 1. All patients were initially managed on skull traction. Following reduction further imaging included Computerized Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Patients underwent anterior surgery (discectomy, fibular allograft and plating. All patients were immobilized in a Philadelphia collar for eight weeks (range 7-12 weeks. Eight patients were lost to follow-up within a year. Follow-up clinical and radiological examinations were performed six-weekly for three months and subsequently at three-monthly intervals for 12 months. Pain was analyzed using the visual analogue scale (VAS. The mean follow-up was 19 months (range 14-39 months. Results: Eight lost to followup, hence 52 patients were considered for final evaluation. The neurological recovery was 1.1 Frankel

  3. Pitfalls and complications in the treatment of cervical spine fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tschoeke Sven K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with ankylosing spondylitis are at significant risk for sustaining cervical spine injuries following trauma predisposed by kyphosis, stiffness and osteoporotic bone quality of the spine. The risk of sustaining neurological deficits in this patient population is higher than average. The present review article provides an outline on the specific injury patterns in the cervical spine, diagnostic algorithms and specific treatment modalities dictated by the underlying disease in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. An emphasis is placed on the risks and complication patterns in the treatment of these rare, but challenging injuries.

  4. Detailed examination of the lower cervical spine facet joints in a road traffic crash fatality - a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Nielsen, Edith; Vesterby, Annie

    2005-01-01

    The lower cervical spine facet joints of a road traffic crash fatality were examined using diagnostic imaging and histological techniques. No injuries to the cervical spine facet joints could be identified with diagnostic imaging including conventional radiology, CT and MRI. Examination of stained...... histological sections visualised the morphology and integrity of the facet joints in detail. Occult injuries to and in close proximity of the cervical spine facet joints were identified only on histological examination....

  5. Effectiveness of Acupuncture Treatment in Cervical Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Ríos García

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A study is performed, longitudinal, prospective, descriptive in patients who attended the consultation of The Health Center With Beds (CSCC of Torbeck, in the Southern Department of Haiti, in order to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment in patients with cervical pain, in the period between January and June 2011. We studied a universe of 73 patients and a sample of 60 patients, from these persons 30 used drug therapy (Group B and 30 patients which used acupuncture (Group A. We note that in both groups, the females were the most affected, with a prevalence between 31 and 60. The main symptom for both groups was pain (100%. Patients who were administered the acupuncture successfully evolved between the second and fourth days of starting treatment and patients in group B between 5 and 6 days. Acupuncture is an effective therapy in the management of neck pain, with few adverse reactions of the patient and drug zero cost.

  6. A 73-Year-Old Male with Cervical Spine Osteomyelitis Presenting as Urosepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarlapudi, H; Speirs, S; Lal, A P; Alaie, D; Petrillo, R; Ashraf, M B; Kolanuvada, B; Bhargava, M

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is a serious debilitating infection if not detected early. Involvement of cervical vertebrae is usually seen in the presence of specific risk factors. Urinary tract infection commonly spreads to the lumbar vertebrae. This is a case presentation of an elderly male who, in the absence of specific risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis, presented with symptoms of urinary tract infection and was found to have cervical spine osteomyelitis.

  7. Do design variations in the artificial disc influence cervical spine biomechanics? A finite element investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Faizan, Ahmad; Goel, Vijay K.; Garfin, Steven R.; Serhan, Hassan; Biyani, Ashok; Elgafy, Hossein; Krishna, Manoj; Friesem, Tai; Bono, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Various ball and socket-type designs of cervical artificial discs are in use or under investigation. Many artificial disc designs claim to restore the normal kinematics of the cervical spine. What differentiates one type of design from another design is currently not well understood. In this study, authors examined various clinically relevant parameters using a finite element model of C3–C7 cervical spine to study the effects of variations of ball and socket disc designs. Four variations of b...

  8. Imaging of acute cervical spine injuries: review and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, B.J. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Victor.Pullicino@rjah.nhs.uk

    2004-10-01

    Advances in imaging technology have been successfully applied in the emergency trauma setting with great benefit providing early, accurate and efficient diagnoses. Gaps in the knowledge of imaging acute spinal injury remain, despite a vast wealth of useful research and publications on the role of CT and MRI. This article reviews in a balanced manner the main questions that still face the attending radiologist by embracing the current and evolving concepts to help define and provide answers to the following; Imaging techniques - strengths and weaknesses; what are the implications of a missed cervical spine injury?; who should be imaged?; how should they be imaged?; spinal immobilisation - help or hazard?; residual open questions; what does all this mean?; and what are the implications for the radiologist? Although there are many helpful guidelines, the residual gaps in the knowledge base result in incomplete answers to the questions posed. The identification of these gaps in knowledge however should act as the initiating stimulus for further research. All too often there is a danger that the performance and productivity of the imaging modalities is the main research focus and not enough attention is given to the two fundamental prerequisites to the assessment of any imaging technology - the clinical selection criteria for imaging and the level of expertise of the appropriate clinician interpreting the images.

  9. National trends in outpatient surgical treatment of degenerative cervical spine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Evan O; Egorova, Natalia N; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Hecht, Andrew C; Cho, Samuel K

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Retrospective population-based observational study. Objective To assess the growth of cervical spine surgery performed in an outpatient setting. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the United States Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases for California, New York, Florida, and Maryland from 2005 to 2009. Current Procedural Terminology, fourth revision (CPT-4) and International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify operations for degenerative cervical spine diseases in adults (age > 20 years). Disposition and complication rates were examined. Results There was an increase in cervical spine surgeries performed in an ambulatory setting during the study period. Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion accounted for 68% of outpatient procedures; posterior decompression made up 21%. Younger patients predominantly underwent anterior fusion procedures, and patients in the eighth and ninth decades of life had more posterior decompressions. Charlson comorbidity index and complication rates were substantially lower for ambulatory cases when compared with inpatients. The majority (>99%) of patients were discharged home following ambulatory surgery. Conclusions Recently, the number of cervical spine surgeries has increased in general, and more of these procedures are being performed in an ambulatory setting. The majority (>99%) of patients are discharged home but the nature of analyzing administrative data limits accurate assessment of postoperative complications and thus patient safety. This increase in outpatient cervical spine surgery necessitates further discussion of its safety.

  10. Cervical spine immobilization during extrication of the awake patient: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Alan; Hague, Ashley; Durge, Neal

    2016-09-29

    Techniques for extricating vehicle occupants after road-traffic collisions have evolved largely through fear of worsening a cervical spine injury, rather than being evidence-based. Recent research has looked at the safety of allowing the alert patient to self-extricate, rather than being assisted with equipment such as long spinal boards and semirigid cervical collars. This review aims to elucidate whether it is safe to allow an alert, ambulant patient to self-extricate from a vehicle with minimal or no cervical spine immobilization. A literature search was conducted looking for papers that discussed cervical spine motion during extrication from a vehicle. Five papers were yielded, and their methodology, results and limitations were assessed. Motion capture studies suggest that a patient who is allowed to self-extricate from a vehicle will move their cervical spine no more than a patient who is extricated by traditional methods, and may move their neck up to four times less. Furthermore, an alert patient with a neck injury will demonstrate a self-protection mechanism, ensuring injuries are not worsened. Evidence is now building that self-extrication in alert patients with minimal or no cervical spine immobilization is safe. Self-extrication should become more commonplace, conferring not only a potential safety benefit but also advantages in time to definitive care and resource use.

  11. Insufficient pain management after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Dahl, Jørgen Berg;

    2014-01-01

    generally experienced VAS ≤ 3. For instrumented lumbar fusion, the total 0-24 h consumption of intravenous morphine equivalents was 39.1 (27.5-62.7) mg. Only eight of 87 patients received the entire scheduled standard post-operative pain treatment. Adverse events were rare. CONCLUSION: Most patients...

  12. Motion analysis study on sensitivity of finite element model of the cervical spine to geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Ozer, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Numerous finite element models of the cervical spine have been proposed, with exact geometry or with symmetric approximation in the geometry. However, few researches have investigated the sensitivity of predicted motion responses to the geometry of the cervical spine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of symmetric assumption on the predicted motion by finite element model of the cervical spine. We developed two finite element models of the cervical spine C2-C7. One model was based on the exact geometry of the cervical spine (asymmetric model), whereas the other was symmetric (symmetric model) about the mid-sagittal plane. The predicted range of motion of both models-main and coupled motions-was compared with published experimental data for all motion planes under a full range of loads. The maximum differences between the asymmetric model and symmetric model predictions for the principal motion were 31%, 78%, and 126% for flexion-extension, right-left lateral bending, and right-left axial rotation, respectively. For flexion-extension and lateral bending, the minimum difference was 0%, whereas it was 2% for axial rotation. The maximum coupled motions predicted by the symmetric model were 1.5° axial rotation and 3.6° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. Those coupled motions predicted by the asymmetric model were 1.6° axial rotation and 4° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. In general, the predicted motion response of the cervical spine by the symmetric model was in the acceptable range and nonlinearity of the moment-rotation curve for the cervical spine was properly predicted.

  13. Flexion and extension structural properties and strengths for male cervical spine segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Roger W; Carol Chancey, V; Ottaviano, Danielle; Luck, Jason F; Tran, Laura; Prange, Michael; Myers, Barry S

    2007-01-01

    New vehicle safety standards are designed to limit the amount of neck tension and extension seen by out-of-position motor vehicle occupants during airbag deployments. The criteria used to assess airbag injury risk are currently based on volunteer data and animal studies due to a lack of bending tolerance data for the adult cervical spine. This study provides quantitative data on the flexion-extension bending properties and strength on the male cervical spine, and tests the hypothesis that the male is stronger than the female in pure bending. An additional objective is to determine if there are significant differences in stiffness and strength between the male upper and lower cervical spine. Pure-moment flexibility and failure testing was conducted on 41 male spinal segments (O-C2, C4-C5, C6-C7) in a pure-moment test frame and the results were compared with a previous study of females. Failures were conducted at approximately 90 N-m/s. In extension, the male upper cervical spine (O-C2) fails at a moment of 49.5 (s.d. 17.6)N-m and at an angle of 42.4 degrees (s.d. 8.0 degrees). In flexion, the mean moment at failure is 39.0 (s.d. 6.3 degrees) N-m and an angle of 58.7 degrees (s.d. 5.1 degrees). The difference in strength between flexion and extension is not statistically significant. The difference in the angles is statistically significant. The upper cervical spine was significantly stronger than the lower cervical spine in both flexion and extension. The male upper cervical spine was significantly stiffer than the female and significantly stronger than the female in flexion. Odontoid fractures were the most common injury produced in extension, suggesting a tensile mechanism due to tensile loads in the odontoid ligamentous complex.

  14. Quantifying cervical-spine curvature using Bézier splines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinich, Kathleen D; Ebert, Sheila M; Reed, Matthew P

    2012-11-01

    Knowledge of the distributions of cervical-spine curvature is needed for computational studies of cervical-spine injury in motor-vehicle crashes. Many methods of specifying spinal curvature have been proposed, but they often involve qualitative assessment or a large number of parameters. The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative method of characterizing cervical-spine curvature using a small number of parameters. 180 sagittal X-rays of subjects seated in automotive posture with their necks in neutral, flexed, and extended postures were collected in the early 1970s. Subjects were selected to represent a range of statures and ages for each gender. X-rays were reanalyzed using advanced technology and statistical methods. Coordinates of the posterior margins of the vertebral bodies and dens were digitized. Bézier splines were fit through the coordinates of these points. The interior control points that define the spline curvature were parameterized as a vector angle and length. By defining the length as a function of the angle, cervical-spine curvature was defined with just two parameters: superior and inferior Bézier angles. A classification scheme was derived to sort each curvature by magnitude and type of curvature (lordosis versus S-shaped versus kyphosis; inferior or superior location). Cervical-spine curvature in an automotive seated posture varies with gender and age but not stature. Average values of superior and inferior Bézier angles for cervical spines in flexion, neutral, and extension automotive postures are presented for each gender and age group. Use of Bézier splines fit through posterior margins offers a quantitative method of characterizing cervical-spine curvature using two parameters: superior and inferior Bézier angles.

  15. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS OF CERVICAL SPINE & SPINAL CORD TRAUMA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R. Bahadorkhan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesMajor differences exist in the anatomy and biomechanics of the growing spine that causes failure patterns different from those in adults. Spinal injury in the pediatric patient is a main concern because timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment can prevent further neurologic damage and deformity and potentiate recovery. We conducted a retrospective clinical study of 137 cases (93 boys, 44 girls of pediatric cervical spine injuries, managed over fifteen years, to present data from a large series of pediatric patients with cervical spine injuries from a single regional trauma center. The aim was to assess and analyze complications, etiology, pathogenesis, site of injuries and age difference of cervical spine and spinal cord injury in a pediatric age group and compare the findings with current literature.Materials & MethodsOne hundred and thirty seven children with cervical spine injuries, seen over twelve years, were divided into two age groups: 54 patients were in group one (0-9 years and 83 patients were in group two (10 - 17 years . We managed them according to status at presentation and type of injury. Forty seven patients were managed surgically and ninety nonsurgically (52 wore a halo brace and 38 wore different hard collars and braces. T-test and Chi squares were used to analyze differences between groupsResultsThe most common cause of injury was motor vehicle accidents(MVA. Our younger patients (Group 1 had sustained more neurological injuries than the older ones (Group 2, 77% vs.48%.; upper cervical spine was the most common site involved in 76%, while 43% suffered head injuries. In group two, 88% of children two sustained fractures or fracture/ subluxations; also in this group, subluxation, and fracture/ subluxation was present in 10 and 25% of children respectively. The most common radiological findings were vertebral fractures (38%. Solid fusions were demonstrated in all patients at late follow-up review (mean 6 years. None

  16. On the creation of a segmentation library for digitized cervical and lumbar spine radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururajan, Arunkumar; Kamalakannan, Sridharan; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Shahriar, Muneem; Long, Rodney; Antani, Sameer

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we address the issue of computer-assisted indexing in one specific case, i.e., for the 17,000 digitized images of the spine acquired during the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The crucial step in this process is to accurately segment the cervical and lumbar spine in the radiographic images. To that end, we have implemented a unique segmentation system that consists of a suite of spine-customized automatic and semi-automatic statistical shape segmentation algorithms. Using the aforementioned system, we have developed experiments to optimally generate a library of spine segmentations, which currently include 2000 cervical and 2000 lumbar spines. This work is expected to contribute toward the creation of a biomedical Content-Based Image Retrieval system that will allow retrieval of vertebral shapes by using query by image example or query by shape example.

  17. [Fracture of the cervical spine in ankylosing spondylitis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Takahisa; Koyanagi, Izumi; Murakami, Tomohiro; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old man with ankylosing spondylitis who showed cervical spine fracture. The patient had fallen down on the floor and presented with severe neck pain. He was treated conservatively with a hard neck collar in an emergency hospital because of C7 body fracture without dislocation. However, the follow-up radiographs demonstrated a progressive C6-7 anterior dislocation. He was referred to our hospital 6 weeks after the trauma. The 3D-CT reconstruction imaging revealed that the fracture extended from the C7 vertebral body to the C6 lamina via the bilateral C6/7 facet joints. The patient underwent C2-Th3 posterior fixation using pedicle and lateral mass screw techniques. The postoperative course was uneventful. He was discharged without any complication at 1 month postoperatively. The radiograph 3 months after surgery showed good bone fusion. Spine fracture with ankylosing spondylitis usually shows significant instability because of the long lever-arm of the fused vertebrae at the fracture level. Solid spinal fusions such as long posterior fusion or anterior-posterior simultaneous fusion are needed in such cases.

  18. Acupoints for cervical spondylosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jihe; Arsovska, Blagica; Vasileva, Dance; Petkovska, Sofija; Kozovska, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a chronic degenerative condition of the cervical spine that affects the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disks of the neck, as well as the contents of the spinal canal. This is one of the most common degenerative disorders of the spine. The disease can be symptomatic and asymptomatic. Symptoms that are distinctive for cervical spondylosis are: tingling, numbness and weakness in the limbs, lack of coordination, stiff neck, shoulder pain, occipital pain, vertigo, poor...

  19. Factors influencing surgical outcome after anterior stabilization of the cervical spine with heterogeneous material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios K. Petridis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral fusion through an anterior approach with polymethylacrylate is a wellestablished neurosurgical technique in the treatment of cervical spine degeneration. However, questions still remain concerning the post-surgical outcome. Factors influencing surgical outcome that could help to predict which patients need further post-surgical treatment and what to expect after surgery are the subject of numerous studies. In the present study, we retrospectively collected data from patients who had undergone intervertebral fusion and defined which pre-operative factors could influence the surgical outcome. Between 1993 and 1997, 379 patients were surgically treated with the ventral fusion technique in our hospital. In 2006, we sent a questionnaire to the patients and 164 responses were received. We identified pre-operative presence of severe pain, hypesthesia, palsy and gait disturbance as negative predictive factors, whereas age, body mass index, pre-operative physical strain and the cervical segment involved did not seem to influence prognosis. In conclusion, identifying preoperative factors which influence prognosis after intervetebral fusion will help predict postoperative outcome.

  20. THE EFFECT OF THE UPPER LIMB TENSION TEST IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ROM LIMITATION AND PAIN IN CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Sarfraznawaz F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objectives: To study the effect of the upper limb tension test in the management of limitation of range of motion and pain in patients with cervical radiculopathy compared with a control group. Intervention and Outcomes: A total of 40 patients were treated with two types of interventions. The Control group received a conservative management protocol and the Experimental group received an experimental protocol that included mobilization using the Upper Limb Tension Test in addition to the conservative protocol .The outcomes measures were flexion, extension, right side flexion and left side flexion ranges of the cervical spine and VAS score for Pain. Results: All data collected was statistically analysed on the Stat Pac 3.0. Pre and Post test values were taken for both cervical range of motion and pain for both the Control and Experimental groups. Paired ‘t’ test was used for within the group comparison. Unpaired ‘t’ test was used for between the group comparison which showed a highly significant difference in favor of the experimental group at 99.9%(P<0.001 between the ROM of Flexion, Extension, right Side Flexion and left Side Flexion of the cervical spine. Conclusion: The results of the study showed that adding neural mobilization using ULLT certainly benefits patients of cervical radiculopathy as far as the cervical range of motion and pain is considered.

  1. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS OF CERVICAL SPINE & SPINAL CORD TRAUMA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R. Bahadorkhan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Major differences exist in the anatomy and biomechanics of the growing spine that causes failure patterns different from those in adults. Spinal injury in the pediatric patient is a main concern because timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment can prevent further neurologic damage and deformity and potentiate recovery. We conducted a retrospective clinical study of 137 cases (93 boys, 44 girls of pediatric cervical spine injuries, managed over fifteen years, to present data from a large series of pediatric patients with cervical spine injuries from a single regional trauma center. The aim was to assess and analyze complications, etiology, pathogenesis, site of injuries and age difference of cervical spine and spinal cord injury in a pediatric age group and compare the findings with current literature.Materials & Methods One hundred and thirty seven children with cervical spine injuries, seen over twelve years, were divided into two age groups: 54 patients were in group one (0-9 years and 83 patients were in group two (10 – 17 years . We managed them according to status at presentation and type of injury. Forty seven patients were managed surgically and ninety nonsurgically (52 wore a halo brace and 38 wore different hard collars and braces. T-test and Chi squares were used to analyze differences between groups ResultsThe most common cause of injury was motor vehicle accidents(MVA. Our younger patients (Group 1 had sustained more neurological injuries than the older ones (Group 2, 77% vs.48%.; upper cervical spine was the most common site involved in 76%, while 43% suffered head injuries. In group two, 88% of children two sustained fractures or fracture/ subluxations; also in this group, subluxation, and fracture/subluxation was present in 10 and 25% of children respectively. The most common radiological findings were vertebral fractures (38%. Solid fusions were demonstrated in all patients at late follow–up review (mean 6 years

  2. Unusual Case of Metastatic Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinoma to the Cervical Spine without a Detectable Primary Source in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E. Kaloostian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of metastatic gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma to the cervical spine in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS being treated with antiretroviral therapy. The source of this tumor could not be identified despite a thorough evaluation. A 49-year-old male being treated for AIDS presents with worsening neck pain and left distal arm weakness. MRI demonstrated an erosive mass within the cervical four vertebral body extending through the pedicle on the left side. Patient underwent needle biopsy followed by combined anterior and posterior fusion procedures. Pathology demonstrated metastatic gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma without known primary origin. He is currently undergoing palliative radiotherapy. This is an unusual case of metastatic gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma to the cervical spine. This should be included on the differential diagnosis of spinal lesions in this patient population and may represent a unique tumor in patients with HIV/AIDS who are on immunosuppressive therapy.

  3. Radiographic distinction of degenerative slippage (spondylolisthesis and retrolisthesis) from traumatic slippage of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.; Woodring, J.H.; Rogers, L.F.; Kim, K.S.

    1986-08-01

    In a review of 42 cases of degenerative arthritis of the cervical spine and 22 cases of cervical spine trauma with an observed anterior slip-page (spondylolisthesis) or posterior slippage (retrolisthesis) of the vertebral bodies of 2 mm or more, characteristic features were observed which allowed distinction between degenerative and traumatic slippage of the cervical spine. In degenerative slippage the shape of the articular facets and width of the facet joint space may remain normal; however, in most cases the articular facets become 'ground-down' with narrowing of the facet joint space and the articular facets themselves becoming thinned or ribbon-like. In traumatic slippage the articular facets will either be normally shaped or fractured and the facet joint space will be abnormally widened. Plain radiographs will usually allow this distinction to be made; however, in difficult cases polytomography may be required.

  4. Functional turbo spin echo magnetic resonance imaging versus tomography for evaluating cervical spine involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostveen, JCM; Roozeboom, AR; van de Laar, MAFJ; Heeres, J; den Boer, JA; Lindeboom, SF

    1998-01-01

    Study Design. Comparison of findings in plain radiography and conventional tomography with findings in plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging of the upper cervical spine in consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis and with known or suspected abnormalities of the cervical spine. Objec

  5. Spine school for patients with low back pain: interdisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Moreno Garcia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze and evaluate an interdisciplinary educational treatment - Spine School.METHODS: This study is a non-controlled clinical trial. Twenty one individuals (19 women aged 27-74 years diagnosed with chronic low back pain were enrolled and followed-up by a rheumatologist and an orthopedist. The evaluations used were SF36, Roland Morris, canadian occupational performance measure (COPM and visual analogue scale (VAS of pain that were performed before and after seven weeks of treatment.RESULTS: We found statistically significant improvements in vitality (mean 48.10 vs. 81.25 p=0.009 and limitations caused by physical aspects (mean 48.81 vs. 81.25 p=0.038 and perception of pain (mean 6.88 vs. 5.38 p=0.005. Although the results were suggestive of improvement, there were no statistical significant differences in the domains social aspects (average 70.82 vs. 92.86 p=0.078, emotional aspects (average 52.38 vs. 88.95 p=0.078, and the performance satisfaction (mean 4.94 vs. 8.24 p=0.074.CONCLUSION: The Interdisciplinary Spine School was useful for improvement in some domains of quality of life of people with low back pain.

  6. Range of motion and cervical myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, J; Niederer, D; Fleckenstein, J; Vogt, L; Banzer, W

    2016-01-01

    Several studies investigating myofascial pain syndrome include assessments of range of motion (ROM) as a diagnostic criterion. However, the value of ROM in this context has not yet been evaluated in controlled clinical studies. We aimed to examine whether patients with myofascial pain syndrome display alterations of ROM when compared to healthy subjects. Twenty-two individuals (13 females, 9 males; aged 33.4 ± 13.9 yrs) afflicted with active myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle as well as 22 age and sex matched healthy controls were included. All subjects underwent an examination of maximal active cervical ROM in flexion/extension assessed by means of a 3D ultrasonic movement analysis system (30 Hz; Zebris CMS 70). In the patients group, pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the trigger points was determined using a pressure algometer. Maximum range of motion in the sagittal plane did not differ between individuals with MTrP (125.9 ± 23.2°, 95% CI: 116.2-135.6°) and asymptomatic subjects (128.2 ± 20.4°, 95% CI: 119.7-136.7°; p > .05). In patients, PPT (1.7 ± .6, 95% CI: 1.5-1.9) was not correlated with cervical mobility (r = -.13; p > .05). Based on these pilot data, range of motion in flexion/extension is not a valid criterion for the detection of myofascial trigger points. Additional research incorporating movement amplitudes in other anatomical planes and additional afflicted muscles should be conducted in order to further delineate the relative impact of MTrP on range of motion.

  7. The cervical spine in rheumatoid arthritis: relationship between neurologic signs and morphology on MR imaging and radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reijnierse, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Leiden (Netherlands); Bloem, J.L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Leiden (Netherlands); Kroon, H.M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Leiden (Netherlands); Holscher, H.C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Leiden (Netherlands); Dijkmans, B.A.C. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Univ. Hospital Leiden (Netherlands); Breedveld, F.C. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Univ. Hospital Leiden (Netherlands); Hansen, B. [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Univ. Hospital Leiden (Netherlands)

    1996-02-01

    Sixty-three consecutive patients with RA and subjective symptoms, especially neck or occipital pain, and/or clinical objective signs consistent with a compromised cervical cord were included in this study. The patients were prospectively assigned to one of three classes on the basis of their neurologic status. Lateral cervical spine radiographs and sagittal Tl-weighted and gradient echo images were performed. The qualitative MR features evaluated were erosion of the dens and atlas, brain stem compression, subarachnoid space encroachment, pannus around the dens, appearance of the fat body caudal to the clivus, and the signal intensity of the pannus. The quantitative imaging parameters were the cervicomedullary angle and the distance of the dens to the line of McRae. Damage documented with radiographs and MR imaging in patients with RA is often severe, even in those without neurologic signs (class 1). None of the abnormalities confined to the atlantoaxial level correlated significantly with neurologic classification. Subarachnoid space encroachment anywhere in the entire cervical spine did correlate significantly with neurologic classification. (orig./MG)

  8. Anatomic Study of Anterior Transdiscal Axial Screw Fixation for Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Minghui; Qu, Dongbin; Zou, Lin; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-08-01

    Anterior transdiscal axial screw (ATAS) fixation is an alternative or supplement to the plate and screw constructs for the upper cervical spine injury. However, no existing literatures clarified the anatomic feasibility of this technique for subaxial cervical spine. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical feasibility and to establish guidelines for the use of the ATAS fixation for the subaxial cervical spine injury.Fifty normal cervical spines had radiographs to determine the proposed screw trajectory (the screw length and insertion angle) and the interbody graft-related parameters (the disc height and depth, and the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw) for all levels of the subaxial cervical spine. Following screw insertion in 8 preserved human cadaver specimens, surgical simulation and dissection verified the feasibility and safety of the ATAS fixation.Radiographic measurements showed the mean axial screw length and cephalic incline angle of all levels were 41.2 mm and 25.2°, respectively. The suitable depth of the interbody graft was >11.7 mm (the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw), but C2-C3, C3-C4, C4-C5, and C5-C6 levels, but impossible at C6-C7 due to the obstacle of the sternum. All screws were placed accurately. None of the screws penetrated into the spinal canal and caused fractures determined by dissecting the specimens.The anterior transdiscal axial screw fixation, as an alternative or supplementary instrumentation for subaxial cervical spine injuries, is feasible and safe with meticulous surgical planning.

  9. Clearing the Cervical Spine in a War Zone: What Other Injuries Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) USAF School of Aerospace Medicine...negative clinical examination of the cervical spine. Coexisting injuries identified in patients with negative physical examination included...injuries in proximity to the neck (head, thoracic spine, chest, or humerus) in 17 (85%) patients. In 3 patients(15%), coexisting injuries were not in

  10. Cervical spine sagittal alignment variations following posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the changes in the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis following posterior spinal fusion. Patients eligible for study inclusion included those with a diagnosis of mainly thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by means of posterior multisegmented hook and screw instrumentation. Pre and post-operative anterior–posterior and lateral radiographs of the entire spine were reviewed to assess the chan...

  11. Congenital spine deformities: a new screening indication for blunt cerebrovascular injuries after cervical trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Christine; Burjonrappa, Sathyaprasad

    2010-12-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) carry significant morbidity if not diagnosed and treated early. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to recognize the injury patterns associated with this condition and to order the requisite imaging studies needed to diagnose it accurately. We report of BCVI associated with a congenital cervical spine malformation after blunt trauma. We recommend inclusion of cervical spine malformations to the current Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma screening criteria for BCVI and explain our rationale for the same.

  12. Cervical spine sagittal alignment variations following posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavese, Federico; Turcot, Katia; De Rosa, Vincenzo; de Coulon, Geraldo; Kaelin, André

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the changes in the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis following posterior spinal fusion. Patients eligible for study inclusion included those with a diagnosis of mainly thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by means of posterior multisegmented hook and screw instrumentation. Pre and post-operative anterior-posterior and lateral radiographs of the entire spine were reviewed to assess the changes of cervical sagittal alignment. Thirty-two patients (3 boys, 29 girls) met the inclusion criteria for the study. The average pre-operative cervical sagittal alignment (CSA) was 4.0° ± 12.3° (range -30° to 40°) of lordosis. Postoperatively, the average CSA was 1.7° ± 11.4° (range -24° to 30°). After surgery, it was less than 20° in 27 patients (84.4%) and between 20° and 40° in 5 patients (15.6%). The results of the present study suggest that even if rod precontouring is performed and postoperative thoracic sagittal alignment is restored, improved or remains unchanged after significant correction of the deformity on the frontal plane, the inherent rigidity of the cervical spine limits changes in the CSA as the cervical spine becomes rigid over time.

  13. Back pain in space and post-flight spine injury: Mechanisms and countermeasure development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayson, Jojo V.; Lotz, Jeffrey; Parazynski, Scott; Hargens, Alan R.

    2013-05-01

    During spaceflight many astronauts experience moderate to severe lumbar pain and deconditioning of paraspinal muscles. There is also a significant incidence of herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in astronauts post-flight being most prevalent in cervical discs. Relief of in-flight lumbar back pain is facilitated by assuming a knee-to-chest position. The pathogenesis of lumbar back pain during spaceflight is most likely discogenic and somatic referred (from the sinuvertebral nerves) due to supra-physiologic swelling of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs) due to removal of gravitational compressive loads in microgravity. The knee-to-chest position may reduce lumbar back pain by redistributing stresses through compressive loading to the IVDs, possibly reducing disc volume by fluid outflow across IVD endplates. IVD stress redistribution may reduce Type IV mechanoreceptor nerve impulse propagation in the annulus fibrosus and vertebral endplate resulting in centrally mediated pain inhibition during spinal flexion. Countermeasures for lumbar back pain may include in-flight use of: (1) an axial compression harness to prevent excessive IVD expansion and spinal column elongation; (2) the use of an adjustable pulley exercise developed to prevent atrophy of spine muscle stabilisers; and (3) other exercises that provide Earth-like annular stress with low-load repetitive active spine rotation movements. The overall objective of these countermeasures is to promote IVD health and to prevent degenerative changes that may lead to HNPs post-flight. In response to "NASA's Critical Path Roadmap Risks and Questions" regarding disc injury and higher incidence of HNPs after space flight (Integrated Research Plan Gap-B4), future studies will incorporate pre- and post-flight imaging of International Space Station long-duration crew members to investigate mechanisms of lumbar back pain as well as degeneration and damage to spinal structures. Quantitative results on morphological, biochemical

  14. Effect of playing basketball on the posture of cervical spine in healthy collegiate students

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the cervical posture of collegiate students and collegiate basketball players.Procedure: Craniovertebral angle and Sagittal head tilt were measured using photogrammetric method in 15 collegiate students and 15 collegiate basketball players.Results: Significant differences were not found between two groups for any of the two angles at p<0.05.Conclusions: Playing basketball does not place any significant impact on the posture of cervical spine of collegiate s...

  15. Local Muscle Fatigue and 3D Kinematics of the Cervical Spine in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Daniel; Vogt, Lutz; Pippig, Torsten; Wall, Rudolf; Banzer, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    The authors aimed to further explore the effects of local muscle fatigue on cervical 3D kinematics and the interrelationship between these kinematic characteristics and local muscle endurance capacity in the unimpaired cervical spine. Twenty healthy subjects (38 ± 10 years; 5 women) performed 2 × 10 maximal cervical flexion-extension movements. Isometric muscle endurance tests (prone/supine lying) were applied between sets to induce local muscle fatigue quantified by Borg scale rates of perceived exertion (RPE) and slope in mean power frequency (MPF; surface electromyography; m. sternocleidomastoideus, m. splenius capitis). Cervical motion characteristics (maximal range of motion [ROM], coefficient of variation of the 10 repetitive movements, mean angular velocity, conjunct movements in transversal and frontal plane) were calculated from raw 3D ultrasonic movement data. Average isometric strength testing duration for flexion and extension correlated to the cervical ROM (r = .49/r = .48; p parameter following local muscle fatigue (p > .05). Although subjects' cervical muscle endurance capacity and motor output seems to be conjugated, no impact of local cervical muscle fatigue on motor function was shown. These findings underline the importance of complementary measures to address muscular performance and kinematic characteristics in outcome assessment and functional rehabilitation of the cervical spine.

  16. Comparison of Upper Cervical Flexion and Cervical Flexion Angle of Computer Workers with Upper Trapezius and Levator Scapular Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we compared upper cervical flexion and cervical flexion angle of computer workers with upper trapezius and levator scapular pain. [Subject] Eight male computer workers with upper trapezius muscle pain and eight others with levator scapular muscle pain participated. [Methods] Each subject was assessed in terms of upper cervical flexion angle and total cervical flexion angles using a cervical range of motion instrument after one hour of computer work. [Results] The uppe...

  17. Male and Female Cervical Spine Biomechanics and Anatomy: Implication for Scaling Injury Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Bass, Cameron R; Voo, Liming; Pintar, Frank A

    2017-05-01

    There is an increased need to develop female-specific injury criteria and anthropomorphic test devices (dummies) for military and automotive environments, especially as women take occupational roles traditionally reserved for men. Although some exhaustive reviews on the biomechanics and injuries of the human spine have appeared in clinical and bioengineering literatures, focus has been largely ignored on the difference between male and female cervical spine responses and characteristics. Current neck injury criteria for automotive dummies for assessing crashworthiness and occupant safety are obtained from animal and human cadaver experiments, computational modeling, and human volunteer studies. They are also used in the military. Since the average human female spines are smaller than average male spines, metrics specific to the female population may be derived using simple geometric scaling, based on the assumption that male and female spines are geometrically scalable. However, as described in this technical brief, studies have shown that the biomechanical responses between males and females do not obey strict geometric similitude. Anatomical differences in terms of the structural component geometry are also different between the two cervical spines. Postural, physiological, and motion responses under automotive scenarios are also different. This technical brief, focused on such nonuniform differences, underscores the need to conduct female spine-specific evaluations/experiments to derive injury criteria for this important group of the population.

  18. An investigation into the validity of cervical spine motion palpation using subjects with congenital block vertebrae as a 'gold standard'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Cynthia K

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the effectiveness of manipulative therapy for treating back and neck pain has been demonstrated, the validity of many of the procedures used to detect joint dysfunction has not been confirmed. Practitioners of manual medicine frequently employ motion palpation as a diagnostic tool, despite conflicting evidence regarding its utility and reliability. The introduction of various spinal models with artificially introduced 'fixations' as an attempt to introduce a 'gold standard' has met with frustration and frequent mechanical failure. Because direct comparison against a 'gold standard' allows the validity, specificity and sensitivity of a test to be calculated, the identification of a realistic 'gold standard' against which motion palpation can be evaluated is essential. The objective of this study was to introduce a new, realistic, 'gold standard', the congenital block vertebra (CBV to assess the validity of motion palpation in detecting a true fixation. Methods Twenty fourth year chiropractic students examined the cervical spines of three subjects with single level congenital block vertebrae, using two commonly employed motion palpation tests. The examiners, who were blinded to the presence of congenital block vertebrae, were asked to identify the most hypomobile segment(s. The congenital block segments included two subjects with fusion at the C2–3 level and one with fusion at C5-6. Exclusion criteria included subjects who were frankly symptomatic, had moderate or severe degenerative changes in their cervical spines, or displayed signs of cervical instability. Spinal levels were marked on the subject's skin overlying the facet joints from C1 to C7 bilaterally and the motion segments were then marked alphabetically with 'A' corresponding to C1-2. Kappa coefficients (K were calculated to determine the validity of motion palpation to detect the congenitally fused segments as the 'most hypomobile' segments. Sensitivity

  19. Comparison of upper cervical flexion and cervical flexion angle of computer workers with upper trapezius and levator scapular pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we compared upper cervical flexion and cervical flexion angle of computer workers with upper trapezius and levator scapular pain. [Subject] Eight male computer workers with upper trapezius muscle pain and eight others with levator scapular muscle pain participated. [Methods] Each subject was assessed in terms of upper cervical flexion angle and total cervical flexion angles using a cervical range of motion instrument after one hour of computer work. [Results] The upper cervical flexion angle of the group with levator scapular pain was significantly lower than that of the group with upper trapezius pain after computer work. The total cervical flexion angle of the group with upper trapezius pain was significantly lower than that of the group with levator scapular pain after computer work. [Conclusion] For selective and effective intervention for neck pain, therapists should evaluate upper and lower cervical motion individually.

  20. Preoperative use of pregabalin for acute pain in spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-liang; Huang, Shuang; Song, Jiang; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Zhong-shu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin for pain management following spine surgery. Methods: In September 2016, a systematic computer-based search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. RCTs of patients prepared for spine surgery that compared pregabalin with placebo were retrieved. The primary endpoint was the VAS score with rest or mobilization at 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours and cumulative morphine consumption at 24 hours and 48 hours. The secondary outcomes were complications of nausea, sedation, dizziness, headache, and visual disturbances. After testing for publication bias and heterogeneity between studies, data were aggregated for random-effects models when necessary. Results: Ten clinical studies with 535 patients (pregabalin group = 294, control group = 241) were included in the meta-analysis. Pregabalin was associated with reduced pain scores at 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours, corresponding to a reduction of 1.91 points (95% CI, –4.07 to 0.24 point) at 12 hours, 2.66 points (95% CI, –4.51 to –0.81 point) at 24 hours, and 4.33 points (95% confidence interval, –6.38 to –2.99 point) at 48 hours on a 100-point numeric rating scale. There was no significant difference between VAS scores with mobilization at 12 hours, 24 hours, or 48 hours. Similarly, pregabalin was associated with a reduction in cumulative morphine consumption at 24 hours (–7.07, 95% CI –9.84, –4.30) and 48 hours (–6.52, 95% CI –7.78, –5.25, P = 0.000). Furthermore, pregabalin can reduce the occurrence of nausea (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.41, 0.79, P = 0.001, number needed to treat = 8.4). There were no significant differences in the occurrence of sedation, dizziness, headache, or visual disturbances. Conclusions: Preoperative use of pregabalin was

  1. Distal Junctional Disease after Occipitothoracic Fusion for Rheumatoid Cervical Disorders: Correlation with Cervical Spine Sagittal Alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanouchi, Tetsu; Shimizu, Takachika; Fueki, Keisuke; Ino, Masatake; Toda, Naofumi; Manabe, Nodoka; Itoh, Kanako

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective radiographic study. Objective We have performed occipitothoracic (OT) fusion for severe rheumatoid cervical disorders since 1991. In our previous study, we reported that the distal junctional disease occurred in patients with fusion of O-T4 or longer due to increased mechanical stress. The present study further evaluated the association between the distal junctional disease and the cervical spine sagittal alignment. Methods Among 60 consecutive OT fusion cases between 1991 and 2010, 24 patients who underwent O-T5 fusion were enrolled in this study. The patients were grouped based on whether they developed postoperative distal junctional disease (group F) or not (group N). We measured pre- and postoperative O-C2, C2-C7, and O-C7 angles and evaluated the association between these values and the occurrence of distal junctional disease. Results Seven (29%) of 24 patients developed adjacent-level vertebral fractures as distal junctional disease. In group F, the mean pre- and postoperative O-C2, C2-C7, and O-C7 angles were 12.1 and 16.8, 7.2 and 11.2, and 19.4 and 27.9 degrees, respectively. In group N, the mean pre- and postoperative O-C2, C2-C7, and O-C7 angles were 15.9 and 15.0, 4.9 and 5.8, and 21.0 and 20.9 degrees, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups. The difference in the O-C7 angle (postoperative angle - preoperative angle) in group F was significantly larger than that in group N (p = 0.04). Conclusion Excessive correction of the O-C7 angle (hyperlordotic alignment) is likely to cause postoperative distal junctional disease following the OT fusion.

  2. Comparative analysis of cervical spine management in a subset of severe traumatic brain injury cases using computer simulation.

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    Kimbroe J Carter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No randomized control trial to date has studied the use of cervical spine management strategies in cases of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI at risk for cervical spine instability solely due to damaged ligaments. A computer algorithm is used to decide between four cervical spine management strategies. A model assumption is that the emergency room evaluation shows no spinal deficit and a computerized tomogram of the cervical spine excludes the possibility of fracture of cervical vertebrae. The study's goal is to determine cervical spine management strategies that maximize brain injury functional survival while minimizing quadriplegia. METHODS/FINDINGS: The severity of TBI is categorized as unstable, high risk and stable based on intracranial hypertension, hypoxemia, hypotension, early ventilator associated pneumonia, admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and age. Complications resulting from cervical spine management are simulated using three decision trees. Each case starts with an amount of primary and secondary brain injury and ends as a functional survivor, severely brain injured, quadriplegic or dead. Cervical spine instability is studied with one-way and two-way sensitivity analyses providing rankings of cervical spine management strategies for probabilities of management complications based on QALYs. Early collar removal received more QALYs than the alternative strategies in most arrangements of these comparisons. A limitation of the model is the absence of testing against an independent data set. CONCLUSIONS: When clinical logic and components of cervical spine management are systematically altered, changes that improve health outcomes are identified. In the absence of controlled clinical studies, the results of this comparative computer assessment show that early collar removal is preferred over a wide range of realistic inputs for this subset of traumatic brain injury. Future research is needed on identifying factors in

  3. Mechanisms of cervical spine injuries for non-fatal motorcycle road crash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, S S; Wong, S V; Radin Umar, R S; Azhar, A A; Yeap, J S; Megat Ahmad, M M H

    2004-06-01

    Cervical spine injuries such as subluxation and fracture dislocation have long been known to result in severe consequences, as well as the trauma management itself. The injury to the region has been identified as one of the major causes of death in Malaysian motorcyclists involved in road crashes, besides head and chest injuries (Pang, 1999). Despite this, cervical spine injury in motorcyclists is not a well-studied injury, unlike the whiplash injury in motorcar accidents. The present study is a retrospective study on the mechanisms of injury in cervical spine sustained by Malaysian motorcyclists, who were involved in road crash using an established mechanistic classification system. This will serve as an initial step to look at the cervical injuries pattern. The information obtained gives engineer ideas to facilitate design and safety features to reduce injuries. All cervical spine injured motorcyclists admitted to Hospital Kuala Lumpur between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2001 were included in the present study. Based on the medical notes and radiological investigations (X-rays, CT and MRI scans), the mechanisms of injuries were formulated using the injury mechanics classification. The result shows that flexion of the cervical vertebrae is the most common vertebral kinematics in causing injury to motorcyclists. This indicates that the cervical vertebrae sustained a high-energy loading at flexion movement in road crash, and exceeded its tolerance level. The high frequency of injury at the C5 vertebra, C6 vertebra and C5-C6 intervertebral space are recorded. Classification based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) is made to give a view on injury severity, 9.1% of the study samples have been classified as AIS code 1, 51.5% with AIS 2 and 21.2% with AIS 3.

  4. Signal intensity loss of the intervertebral discs in the cervical spine of young patients on fluid sensitive sequences

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    Bruin, F. de; Horst, S. ter; Bloem, J.L.; Reijnierse, M. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, C2-S, Albinusdreef 2, PO box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Berg, R. van den; Hooge, M. de; Gaalen, F. van; Heijde, D. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Fagerli, K.M. [Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo (Norway); Landewe, R. [Amsterdam Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oosterhout, M. van [Groene Hartziekenhuis, Department of Rheumatology, Gouda (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the signal intensity (SI) of the intervertebral discs of the cervical spine on magnetic resonance (MR) fluid sensitive sequences, and correlate this to secondary signs of degeneration on MR and radiographs as well as to age. A total of 265 patients aged ≥16 with back pain (≥3-months, <2-year, onset <45-years) from the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early (SPACE) cohort were included. Sagittal 1.5 T MR images and lateral radiographs of the cervical spine were independently evaluated by two readers for: SI of the intervertebral discs using a grading system based of Pfirrmann (grade 1 normal/bright SI; 2 inhomogeneous/bright SI; 3 inhomogeneous/mildly decreased SI; 4 inhomogeneous/markedly decreased SI; 5 signal void), disc herniation and Modic changes (MRI) and disc space narrowing, osteophytes and sclerosis (radiograph). Readers were blinded for clinical information. Descriptive statistics were used for characteristics and prevalence of findings, and regression analysis was used for age and grades. Of 265 patients (36 % male, mean age 30), 221 (83 %) patients had 1 to 6 discs (median 4) with decreased SI. Of 1,590 discs, 737 (46 %) were grade 1; 711 (45 %) grade 2; 133 (8 %) grade 3; 8 (1 %) grade 4 and 1 (0 %) grade 5. Secondary signs of degeneration were rare and seen predominantly in C5-C7 and appear to be related to signal loss grade 3 and 4. Low signal intensity of intervertebral discs in absence of secondary degenerative signs in the cervical spine on fluid sensitive MR images might be pre-existing and part of the natural course. (orig.)

  5. The ability of external immobilizers to restrict movement of the cervical spine: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holla, M.; Huisman, J.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Goosen, J.; Hosman, A.J.; Hannink, G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To review the ability of various types of external immobilizers to restrict cervical spine movement. Methods With a systematical review of original scientific articles, data on range of motion, type of used external immobilization device and risk of bias were extracted. The described extern

  6. The Subaxial Cervical Spine Injury Classification System: an external agreement validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, J.J. van; Audige, L.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Bolger, C.; Deverall, H.; Dhoke, P.; Diekerhof, C.H.; Govaert, G.A.; Guimera, V.; Koller, H.; Morris, S.A.; Setiobudi, T.; Hosman, A.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: In 2007, the Subaxial Cervical Spine Injury Classification (SLIC) system was introduced demonstrating moderate reliability in an internal validation study. PURPOSE: To assess the agreement on the SLIC system using clinical data from a spinal trauma population and whether the SLIC

  7. The Subaxial Cervical Spine Injury Classification System : an external agreement validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Middendorp, Joost J.; Audige, Laurent; Bartels, Ronald H.; Bolger, Ciaran; Deverall, Hamish; Dhoke, Priyesh; Diekerhof, Carel H.; Govaert, Geertje A. M.; Guimera, Vicente; Koller, Heiko; Morris, Stephen A. C.; Setiobudi, Tony; Hosman, Allard J. F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: In 2007, the Subaxial Cervical Spine Injury Classification (SLIC) system was introduced demonstrating moderate reliability in an internal validation study. PURPOSE: To assess the agreement on the SLIC system using clinical data from a spinal trauma population and whether the SLIC

  8. Is radiography justified for the evaluation of patients presenting with cervical spine trauma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Chatzakis, Georgios; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, 71003 Crete (Greece) and Department of Natural Sciences, Technological Education Institute of Crete, P.O. Box 140, Iraklion 71004 Crete (Greece); Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, 71003 Crete (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, 71003 Crete (Greece)

    2009-10-15

    Conventional radiography has been for decades the standard method of evaluation for cervical spine trauma patients. However, currently available helical multidetector CT scanners allow multiplanar reconstruction of images, leading to increased diagnostic accuracy. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative benefit/risk ratio between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography and between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography, followed by CT as an adjunct for positive findings. A decision analysis model for the determination of the optimum imaging technique was developed. The sensitivity and specificity of CT and radiography were obtained by dedicated meta-analysis. Lifetime attributable risk of mortal cancer from CT and radiography was calculated using updated organ-specific risk coefficients and organ-absorbed doses. Patient organ doses from radiography were calculated using Monte Carlo techniques, simulated exposures performed on an anthropomorphic phantom, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. A prospective patient study was performed regarding helical CT scans of the cervical spine. Patient doses were calculated based on the dose-length-product values and Monte Carlo-based CT dosimetry software program. Three groups of patient risk for cervical spine fracture were incorporated in the decision model on the basis of hypothetical trauma mechanism and clinical findings. Radiation effects were assessed separately for males and females for four age groups (20, 40, 60, and 80 yr old). Effective dose from radiography amounts to 0.050 mSv and from a typical CT scan to 3.8 mSv. The use of CT in a hypothetical cohort of 10{sup 6} patients prevents approximately 130 incidents of paralysis in the low risk group (a priori fracture probability of 0.5%), 500 in the moderate risk group (a priori fracture probability of 2%), and 5100 in the high risk group (a priori fracture probability of 20%). The expense of this CT-based prevention is 15-32 additional

  9. Mechanism and patterns of cervical spine fractures-dislocations in vertebral artery injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the fracture patterns and mechanism of injury, based on subaxial cervical spine injury classification system (SLIC, on non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT of cervical spine predictive of vertebral artery injury (VAI. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of 320 patients who were admitted with cervical spine injury in our level I regional trauma center over a period of two years (April 2010 to April 2012. Diagnosis of VAI was based on hyperintensity replacing the flow void on a T2-weighted axial image. NCCT images of the selected 43 patients with MRI diagnosis of VAI were then assessed for the pattern of injury. The cervical spinal injuries were classified into those involving the C1 and C2 and subaxial spine. For the latter, SLIC was used. Results: A total of 47 VAI were analyzed in 43 patients. Only one patient with VAI on MRI had no detectable abnormality on NCCT. C1 and C2 injuries were found in one and six patients respectively. In subaxial injuries, the most common mechanism of injury was distraction (37.5% with facet dislocation with or without fracture representing the most common pattern of injury (55%. C5 was the single most common affected vertebral level. Extension to foramen transversarium was present in 20 (42.5% cases. Conclusion: CT represents a robust screening tool for patients with VAI. VAI should be suspected in patients with facet dislocation with or without fractures, foramina transversarium fractures and C1-C3 fractures, especially type III odontoid fractures and distraction mechanism of injury.

  10. Analysis of patients ≥65 with predominant cervical spine fractures: Issues of disposition and dysphagia

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    Lisa M Poole

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical spine fractures occur in 2.6% to 4.7% of trauma patients aged 65 years or older. Mortality rates in this population ranges from 19% to 24%. A few studies have specifically looked at dysphagia in elderly patients with cervical spine injury. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate dysphagia, disposition, and mortality in elderly patients with cervical spine injury. Settings and Design: Retrospective review at an the American College of Surgeons-verified level 1 trauma center. Methods: Patients 65 years or older with cervical spine fracture, either isolated or in association with other minor injuries were included in the study. Data included demographics, injury details, neurologic deficits, dysphagia evaluation and treatment, hospitalization details, and outcomes. Statistical Analysis: Categorical and continuous data were analyzed using Chi-square analysis and one-way analysis of variance, respectively. Results: Of 136 patients in this study, 2 (1.5% had a sensory deficit alone, 4 (2.9% had a motor deficit alone, and 4 (2.9% had a combined sensory and motor deficit. Nearly one-third of patients (n = 43, 31.6% underwent formal swallow evaluation, and 4 (2.9% had a nasogastric tube or Dobhoff tube placed for enteral nutrition, whereas eight others (5.9% had a gastrostomy tube or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placed. Most patients were discharged to a skilled nursing unit (n = 50, 36.8%, or to home or home with home health (n = 48, 35.3%. Seven patients (5.1% died in the hospital, and eight more (5.9% were transferred to hospice. Conclusion: Cervical spine injury in the elderly patient can lead to significant consequences, including dysphagia and need for skilled nursing care at discharge.

  11. Analysis of patients ≥65 with predominant cervical spine fractures: Issues of disposition and dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Lisa M.; Le, Phong; Drake, Rachel M.; Helmer, Stephen D.; Haan, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cervical spine fractures occur in 2.6% to 4.7% of trauma patients aged 65 years or older. Mortality rates in this population ranges from 19% to 24%. A few studies have specifically looked at dysphagia in elderly patients with cervical spine injury. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate dysphagia, disposition, and mortality in elderly patients with cervical spine injury. Settings and Design: Retrospective review at an the American College of Surgeons-verified level 1 trauma center. Methods: Patients 65 years or older with cervical spine fracture, either isolated or in association with other minor injuries were included in the study. Data included demographics, injury details, neurologic deficits, dysphagia evaluation and treatment, hospitalization details, and outcomes. Statistical Analysis: Categorical and continuous data were analyzed using Chi-square analysis and one-way analysis of variance, respectively. Results: Of 136 patients in this study, 2 (1.5%) had a sensory deficit alone, 4 (2.9%) had a motor deficit alone, and 4 (2.9%) had a combined sensory and motor deficit. Nearly one-third of patients (n = 43, 31.6%) underwent formal swallow evaluation, and 4 (2.9%) had a nasogastric tube or Dobhoff tube placed for enteral nutrition, whereas eight others (5.9%) had a gastrostomy tube or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placed. Most patients were discharged to a skilled nursing unit (n = 50, 36.8%), or to home or home with home health (n = 48, 35.3%). Seven patients (5.1%) died in the hospital, and eight more (5.9%) were transferred to hospice. Conclusion: Cervical spine injury in the elderly patient can lead to significant consequences, including dysphagia and need for skilled nursing care at discharge. PMID:28243007

  12. Dwarf with dual spinal kyphotic deformity at the cervical and dorsal spine unassociated with odontoid hypoplasia: Surgical management

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    Guru Dutta Satyarthee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morquio's syndrome is associated with systemic skeletal hypoplasia leading to generalized skeletal deformation. The hypoplasia of odontoid process is frequent association, which is responsible for atlantoaxial dislocation causing compressive myelopathy. However, development of sub-axial cervical kyphotic deformity unassociated with odontoid hypoplasia is extremely rare, and coexistence of dorsal kyphotic deformity is not reported in the western literature till date and represents first case. Current case is 16-year-old boy, who presented with severe kyphotic deformity of cervical spine with spastic quadriparesis. Interestingly, he also had additional asymptomatic kyphotic deformity of dorsal spine; however, odontoid proves hypoplasia was not observed. He was only symptomatic for cervical compression, accordingly surgery was planned. The patient was planned for correction of cervical kyphotic deformity under general anesthesia, underwent fourth cervical corpectomy with resection of posterior longitudinal ligament and fusion with autologous bone graft derived from right fibula, which was refashioned approximating to the width of the corpectomy size after harvesting and fixed between C3 and C5 vertebral bodies and further secured with anterior cervical plating. He tolerated surgical procedure well with improvement in power with significant reduction in spasticity. Postoperative X-ray, cervical spine revealed complete correction of kyphotic deformity cervical spine. At follow-up 6 months following surgery, he is doing well. Successful surgical correction of symptomatic cervical kyphotic deformity can be achieved utilizing anterior cervical corpectomy, autologous fibular bone graft, and anterior cervical plating.

  13. Neutral lumbar spine sitting posture in pain-free subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Kieran; O'Dea, Patrick; Dankaerts, Wim; O'Sullivan, Peter; Clifford, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2010-12-01

    Sitting is a common aggravating factor in low back pain (LBP), and re-education of sitting posture is a common aspect of LBP management. However, there is debate regarding what is an optimal sitting posture. This pilot study had 2 aims; to investigate whether pain-free subjects can be reliably positioned in a neutral sitting posture (slight lumbar lordosis and relaxed thorax); and to compare perceptions of neutral sitting posture to habitual sitting posture (HSP). The lower lumbar spine HSP of seventeen pain-free subjects was initially recorded. Subjects then assumed their own subjectively perceived ideal posture (SPIP). Finally, 2 testers independently positioned the subjects into a tester perceived neutral posture (TPNP). The inter-tester reliability of positioning in TPNP was very good (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.91, mean difference = 3% of range of motion). A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that HSP was significantly more flexed than both SPIP and TPNP (p 0.05). HSP was more kyphotic than all other postures. This study suggests that pain-free subjects can be reliably positioned in a neutral lumbar sitting posture. Further investigation into the role of neutral sitting posture in LBP subjects is warranted.

  14. Intra-operative computer navigation guided cervical pedicle screw insertion in thirty-three complex cervical spine deformities

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    S Rajasekaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical pedicle screw fixation is challenging due to the small osseous morphometrics and the close proximity of neurovascular elements. Computer navigation has been reported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement. There are very few studies assessing its efficacy in the presence of deformity. Also cervical pedicle screw insertion in children has not been described before. We evaluated the safety and accuracy of Iso-C 3D-navigated pedicle screws in the deformed cervical spine. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients including 15 children formed the study group. One hundred and forty-five cervical pedicle screws were inserted using Iso-C 3D-based computer navigation in patients undergoing cervical spine stabilization for craniovertebral junction anomalies, cervico-thoracic deformities and cervical instabilities due to trauma, post-surgery and degenerative disorders. The accuracy and containment of screw placement was assessed from postoperative computerized tomography scans. Results: One hundred and thirty (89.7% screws were well contained inside the pedicles. Nine (6.1% Type A and six (4.2% Type B pedicle breaches were observed. In 136 levels, the screws were inserted in the classical description of pedicle screw application and in nine deformed vertebra, the screws were inserted in a non-classical fashion, taking purchase of the best bone stock. None of them had a critical breach. No patient had any neurovascular complications. Conclusion: Iso-C navigation improves the safety and accuracy of pedicle screw insertion and is not only successful in achieving secure pedicle fixation but also in identifying the best available bone stock for three-column bone fixation in altered anatomy. The advantages conferred by cervical pedicle screws can be extended to the pediatric population also.

  15. Cervical spine in patients with diastrophic dysplasia - radiographic findings in 122 patients

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    Remes, Ville M.; Helenius, Ilkka J.; Peltonen, Jari I. [Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 281, 00029 HUS (Finland); Marttinen, Eino J. [Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Poussa, Mikko S. [Orton Orthopaedic Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-09-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. In previous studies, typical radiological findings in the cervical spine of patients with diastrophic dysplasia (DD) have been kyphosis, displacement of the vertebrae, spina bifida occulta (SBO), anterior hypoplasia of vertebrae C3-5, and hyperplasia and dysmorphism of the odontoid process.Objectives. To make a radiological analysis of the cervical spine in patients with DD.Materials and methods. The study comprised 122 patients (50 males, 72 females), with an average age of 19 years (range newborn-63 years). Follow-up was available on 62 patients (51%), for an average duration of 11 years. Cervical spine alignment was measured according to Cobb's method. The height (H) and depth (D) of the vertebral body and sagittal diameter (S) of the spinal canal were measured. H/D and S/D ratios were then calculated from the measurements. The shape of the vertebrae was assessed. Displacement and movement of cervical vertebrae in neutral and bending radiographs were measured.Results. The average lordosis in the last radiograph was 17 (range 4 -55 ). Five (4%) patients had a cervical kyphosis with an average of 92 (range 10-165 ) on their last radiograph. The H/D ratio increased slowly during growth and showed significant correlation with age. There was no growth spurt at puberty. The S/D ratio was fairly stable until 7-8 years of age, when it started to decline slowly. The percentage of vertebrae with a flat vertebral body and narrow spinal canal value tended to increase with age. Vertebral hypoplasia and displacement between vertebrae were most common in the mid-cervical region and resolved spontaneously with age. Degenerative changes seemed to increase with age and were already visible during the second decade of life. SBO was noted in 79% of patients.Conclusions. The most common alignment in the cervical spine is lordosis in adulthood. The vertebral bodies are flattened and the spinal canal is narrowed. Vertebral body hypoplasia and

  16. Reliability and safety of a new upper cervical spine injury treatment algorithm

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    Andrei Fernandes Joaquim

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present study, we evaluated the reliability and safety of a new upper cervical spine injury treatment algorithm to help in the selection of the best treatment modality for these injuries. Methods Thirty cases, previously treated according to the new algorithm, were presented to four spine surgeons who were questioned about their personal suggestion for treatment, and the treatment suggested according to the application of the algorithm. After four weeks, the same questions were asked again to evaluate reliability (intra- and inter-observer using the Kappa index. Results The reliability of the treatment suggested by applying the algorithm was superior to the reliability of the surgeons’ personal suggestion for treatment. When applying the upper cervical spine injury treatment algorithm, an agreement with the treatment actually performed was obtained in more than 89% of the cases. Conclusion The system is safe and reliable for treating traumatic upper cervical spine injuries. The algorithm can be used to help surgeons in the decision between conservative versus surgical treatment of these injuries.

  17. Lower cervical spine injury treated with lateral mass plates and pedicle screws through posterior approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xue-ling; ZHAO Hong-bin; WANG Bin; ZHU Xiao-song; LI Lin-zhi; ZHANG Chun-qiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To treat injury of the lower cervical spine C6 to C7 with cervical lateral mass plates and T1 pedicle screws through posterior approach. Methods: The data of 8 patients with lower cervical spine C6 or C7 injury (6 patients with fracture and dislocation in C6 and C7 and 2 with fracture in C7) were analyzed retrospectively in this study. For the preoperative American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) classification, Grade C was found in 3 cases and Grade D in 5 cases. Screws were placed on the lateral masses and the first thoracic pedicle with Margerl technique. Lamina or facet bone allografting was used to achieve a long-term stability. Results: All the 8 patients were followed up for 5-37 months (mean: 15 months). No operative death occurred. There were no examples of aggravation of spinal cord injury or vertebral artery injury, cerebrospinal fluid leak, nerve roots injury, screw malposition or back-out, loose of alignment or implant failure. Clinical symptoms and ASIA classification were improved in all the patients. Postoperative MRI scanning confirmed the satisfactory screw placement in all the cases. Conclusions: Lateral mass plates and pedicle screws through posterior approach are safe and beneficial for patients with lower cervical spine C6 or C7 injury.

  18. Reduced field-of-view DTI segmentation of cervical spine tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lihua; Wen, Ying; Zhou, Zhenyu; von Deneen, Karen M; Huang, Dehui; Ma, Lin

    2013-11-01

    The number of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies regarding the human spine has considerably increased and it is challenging because of the spine's small size and artifacts associated with the most commonly used clinical imaging method. A novel segmentation method based on the reduced field-of-view (rFOV) DTI dataset is presented in cervical spinal canal cerebrospinal fluid, spinal cord grey matter and white matter classification in both healthy volunteers and patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Due to each channel based on high resolution rFOV DTI images providing complementary information on spinal tissue segmentation, we want to choose a different contribution map from multiple channel images. Via principal component analysis (PCA) and a hybrid diffusion filter with a continuous switch applied on fourteen channel features, eigen maps can be obtained and used for tissue segmentation based on the Bayesian discrimination method. Relative to segmentation by a pair of expert readers, all of the automated segmentation results in the experiment fall in the good segmentation area and performed well, giving an average segmentation accuracy of about 0.852 for cervical spinal cord grey matter in terms of volume overlap. Furthermore, this has important applications in defining more accurate human spinal cord tissue maps when fusing structural data with diffusion data. rFOV DTI and the proposed automatic segmentation outperform traditional manual segmentation methods in classifying MR cervical spinal images and might be potentially helpful for detecting cervical spine diseases in NMO and MS.

  19. A systematic review of the need for MRI for the clearance of cervical spine injury in obtunded blunt trauma patients after normal cervical spine CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyore AO James

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clearance of cervical spine injury (CSI in the obtunded or comatose blunt trauma patient remains controversial. In patients with unreliable physical examination and no evidence of CSI on computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine (CS-MRI is the typical follow-up study. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that CS-MRI is unnecessary with negative findings on a multi-detector CT (MDCT scan. This review article systematically analyzes current literature to address the controversies surrounding clearance of CSI in obtunded blunt trauma patients. A literature search through MEDLINE database was conducted using all databases on the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI website (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov for keywords: "cervical spine injury," "obtunded," and "MRI." The search was limited to studies published within the last 10 years and with populations of patients older than 18 years old. Eleven studies were included in the analysis yielding data on 1535 patients. CS-MRI detected abnormalities in 256 patients (16.6%. The abnormalities reported on CS-MRI resulted in prolonged rigid c-collar immobilization in 74 patients (4.9%. Eleven patients (0.7% had unstable injury detected on CS-MRI alone that required surgical intervention. In the obtunded blunt trauma patient with unreliable clinical examination and a normal CT scan, there is still a role for CS-MRI in detecting clinically significant injuries when MRI resources are available. However, when a reliable clinical exam reveals intact gross motor function, CS-MRI may be unnecessary.

  20. Individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in upper cervical spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Dai, Jianhao; Zhang, Junxiang; Ma, Yichuan; Zhu, Guanghui; Shen, Junjie; Niu, Guoqi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine is a difficult and high-risk procedure. The screw is difficult to place rapidly and accurately, and can lead to serious injury of spinal cord or vertebral artery. The aim of this study was to design an individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine. Methods Using CT thin slices data, we employed computer software to design the navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine (atlas and axis). The upper cervical spine models and navigation templates were produced by 3D printer with equal proportion, two sets for each case. In one set (Test group), pedicle screws fixation were guided by the navigation template; in the second set (Control group), the screws were fixed under fluoroscopy. According to the degree of pedicle cortex perforation and whether the screw needed to be refitted, the fixation effects were divided into 3 types: Type I, screw is fully located within the vertebral pedicle; Type II, degree of pedicle cortex perforation is 1 mm or with the poor internal fixation stability and in need of renovation. Type I and Type II were acceptable placements; Type III placements were unacceptable. Results A total of 19 upper cervical spine and 19 navigation templates were printed, and 37 pedicle screws were fixed in each group. Type I screw-placements in the test group totaled 32; Type II totaled 3; and Type III totaled 2; with an acceptable rate of 94.60%. Type I screw placements in the control group totaled 23; Type II totaled 3; and Type III totaled 11, with an acceptable rate of 70.27%. The acceptability rate in test group was higher than the rate in control group. The operation time and fluoroscopic frequency for each screw were decreased, compared with control group. Conclusion The individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation is easy and safe, with a high success rate in the upper cervical spine

  1. Early MRI findings in stab wound of the cervical spine: two case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, A.; Baysal, T.; Sarac, K.; Sigirci, A.; Kutlu, R. [Inonu Universitesi Turgut Ozal Tip Merkezi, Radyoloji Anabilim Dali, Malatya (Turkey)

    2002-01-01

    MR imaging was found to be the most sensitive modality for the detection of spinal cord abnormalities in the acutely injured spine. Although it is reported that traumatic pneumomyelogram indicates a base-of-skull or middle cranial fossa fracture and is almost certainly associated with intracranial subarachnoid air, early MR imaging may demonstrate subarachnoid air in penetrating trauma of the spinal cord without head injury. We report two cervical-spine stab-wound cases, one of which had subarachnoid air on early MR findings. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of the laryngeal view during intubation using Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients with cervical spine immobilization and mouth opening limitation

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Jae-Chul; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Youn-Woo; Chang, Chul Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background For patients suspicious of cervical spine injury, a Philadelphia cervical collar is usually applied. Application of Philadelphia cervical collar may cause difficult airway. The aim of this study was to evaluate the laryngeal view and the success rate at first intubation attempt of the Airtraq and conventional laryngoscopy in patients with simulated cervical spine injury after application of a Philadelphia cervical collar. Methods Anesthesia was induced with propofol, remifentanil, ...

  3. The pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury in patients with cervical spine fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzanah Ismail

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It is not uncommon for vertebral artery injury to occur when there are fractures through the transverse foraminae of the first to the sixth vertebral bodies. Other important risk factors for vertebral artery injury include facet joint dislocations and fractures of the first to the third cervical vertebral bodies. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury on CT angiography (CTA in patients with cervical spine fractures.Method: A retrospective review of patients who had undergone CTA of the vertebral arteries was undertaken. Reports were reviewed to determine which patients met the inclusion criteria of having had both cervical spine fractures and CTA of the vertebral arteries. Images of patients who met the inclusion criteria were analysed by a radiologist.Results: The prevalence of vertebral artery injury was 33%. Four out of the 11 patients who had vertebral artery injury, had post-traumatic spasm of the artery, with associated thrombosis or occlusion of the vessel. In terms of blunt carotid vertebral injury (BCVI grading, most of the patients sustained grade IV injuries. Four patients who had vertebral artery injury had fractures of the upper cervical vertebrae, i.e. C1 to C3. Fifteen transverse process fractures were associated with vertebral artery injury. No vertebral artery injury was detected in patients who had facet joint subluxations.Conclusion: Patients with transverse process fractures of the cervical spine and upper cervical vertebral body fractures should undergo CTA to exclude vertebral artery injury.

  4. The relationship between the type of destructive spondyloarthropathy and its 10 years ago cervical spine alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Koji; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Yanase, Makoto; Sakai, Yoshihito; Katayama, Yoshito; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Wakao, Norimitsu; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro; Kanemura, Tokumi; Sato, Koji; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to analyze the relationship between the type of destructive spondyloarthropathy (DSA) and its 10 years ago cervical spine alignment. DSA was reported as a serious complication of long-term hemodialysis. Although previous reports in regard to risk factor of DSA dealt with the period of hemodialysis and the patient's age upon commencement of hemodialysis, we could not find any reports of the relationship between the type of DSA and its 10 years ago cervical spine alignment. In 96 DSA patients who were the subjects of our study, 8 patients were defined as stage 1, 39 patients as stage 2, 5 patients as stage 3 type A, 11 patients as stage 3 type B, and 33 patients as stage 3 type D. The C2/C7 angle of stage 3 type B was statistically low. The number of the abnormal local cervical alignment was larger in stage 3 types A and B. Multivariate analysis revealed that the risk factors of stage 3 types A and B were the C2/C7 angle and the existence of local abnormal alignment. Fifty-four patients were symptomatic due to DSA and treated at our hospital. Forty-four patients were treated conservatively with medications, physiotherapy, or wearing cervical brace. Ten patients underwent surgical treatment. The loss of physiological lordosis of cervical spine promoted the progression of DSA. Furthermore, the number of the abnormalities of local cervical alignment was statistically larger in stage 3 types A and B; they were the crucial factor promoting the progression of DSA stage 3 types A and B.

  5. Cervical Spine Immobilization in Sports Related Injuries: Review of Current Guidelines and a Case Study of an Injured Athlete

    OpenAIRE

    Bhamra, JS; Morar, Y; Khan, WS; Deep, K.; Hammer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spine immobilization is an essential component of the ATLS® system. Inadequate training in the management of trauma calls and failure of early recognition can have disastrous consequences. Pre-hospital personnel are routinely involved more in the assessment and stabilization of patients in comparison to other health care professionals. This case study and review highlights the importance of early recognition, assessment and correct stabilization of cervical spine injuries both in the...

  6. Columna cervical reumática Artrite reumatoide da coluna cervical Rheumatoid arthritis of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Macchiavello Cornejo

    2009-03-01

    como uma opção terapêutica. A recuperação neurológica pós-cirurgica depende do nível de compromisso neurológico prévio, o que reforça a importância da detecção e derivação rápida do paciente com risco. O tratamento cirúrgico deve fazer-se em centros especializados, por grupos multidisciplinares. Isto, junto com a intervenção rápida, ajudaria a reduzir as complicações peri-operatórias.Rheumatoid arthritis affects millions of people all over the world. Up to 86% of cases involve cervical spine alterations. Cervical spine instability patterns related to rheumatoid arthritis are: atlanto-axial subluxation, basilar invagination and subaxial instability. Once neurological deficit develops, progression can be fast and even lead to death. Rheumatoid arthritis treatment is mainly nonsurgical. Current medication and treatment protocols may prevent or delay the development of atlanto-axial disease. Periodical clinical and radiological examination help diagnose patients who already have neurological symptoms or those who are at risk of developing them, and who should thus be considered for surgical treatment. Preoperative neurological deficit is a predictor of postoperative neurological recovery, thus the importance of early detection and referral of patients at risk. Surgical treatment should be performed in specialized centers, by multidisciplinary groups. Along with early intervention, this should help reduce perioperative complications.

  7. Utility of CT angiography in cervical spine trauma: analysis of radiation and cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas Shuaib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Vertebral artery injuries (VAIs can be seen in cervical injuries. This investigation was conducted to assess the impact of head and neck computed tomography (CT angiography (CTA on planning treatment of vertebral artery injuries, if these tests were ordered appropriately, and to estimate cost and associated exposure to radiation and contrast material. Methods: This retrospective review included all patients who underwent CT of the cervical spine and CTA of the head and neck from March 2011 to October 2012 at a single institution. Patients were divided into two groups, those with and those without cervical spine fracture appreciated on CT of the cervical spine. The frequency of vascular injury on CTA in those with a cervical fracture was assessed. The frequency of vascular injury treatment and modifications owed to a positive CTA of head and neck were also assessed. A study was considered appropriate if it was ordered in accordance with the modified Denver Screening criteria. Effective radiation dose (mSv was calculated by multiplying dose length product (DLP from the scanner with the standard conversion coefficient (k (k = 0.0021 mSv/mGy x cm.Results: In the 387 CTAs of head and neck, a cervical injury was recorded in 128 patients. Twenty CTA scans were correctly ordered for non-spinal indications, and 19 were ordered off protocol. CTA was found positive in 1 patient for whom the imaging was off protocol and 1 for whom the clinical indication was non-cervical. There were 19 positive CTA cases of head and neck, none of which underwent surgical intervention. CTA was positive in 13 of 48 patients who had suffered a C2 fracture; this accounted for 13 of the 19 positive CTA studies (p < 0.01. Estimated fee for CTA was $3783, and radiation exposure was 4 mSv with a standard deviation (±1.3. Conclusion: CTA of head and neck ordered off an institutional imaging protocol has a low probability of being positive. Adherence to protocols for CTA of

  8. HAVE RECENT CHANGES TO THE RUGBY UNION LAWS OF SCRUMMAGE REDUCED SERIOUS CERVICAL SPINE INJURIES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence F. McLoughlin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available All areas of play in rugby union are acknowledged to be potentially dangerous but it is in the scrum where the most frequent and serious spinal injuries occur (McIntosh & McCrory, 2005. This letter addresses the questions: what is it about the scrum which accounts for the alleged increased frequency of scrummage associated spinal cord injury (particular in the cervical region and what has the Rugby Football Union [RFU] done to minimise the chance of cervical cord damage by changes to the Laws? Scrums are used to restart play after infringement of Law 20.1. The team which is successful in winning the ball from the scrum can provide quality possession and space to their attacking backs (IRB, 2005.The three front row players are especially vulnerable to serious cervical spine injury. The majority of neck injuries are caused by heads not being properly aligned when opposing front row players make initial contact as the scrum is being formed. If the scrum collapses then excessive forward flexion/rotation of the cervical spine can occur and by wheeling the scrum this can result in increased abnormal lateral flexion/rotation. Added to these possible abnormal increases in directional movement of the cervical spine is the force generated at engagement. It has been calculated that in the front row a static weight of up to 1600kg is placed on each player's neck. Fracture dislocation (usually between C4/C6 of the spine can be the resulting injury which if the cord is involved can cause tetra paresis.In response to this evidence the IRB amended the law of scrummage which was put into effect 2007 in the hope of reducing the incidence of serious cervical spine injury. This is summarised as a 4 step Law of engagement which is: "crouch, touch, pause, engage". The distance between the front rows must now be less than arms length before making contact. Prior to the introduction of this Law with the stipulated distance apart before engagement, the front row

  9. Cervical spine imaging in trauma: Does the use of grid and filter combination improve visualisation of the cervicothoracic junction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Nimit, E-mail: nimitgoyal@doctors.org.u [University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW (United Kingdom); Rachapalli, Vamsidhar; Burns, Helen; Lloyd, David C.F. [University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of filter and anti-scatter grid combination in demonstrating the cervicothoracic junction in lateral cervical spine radiographs performed for trauma patients. Methods: Following a change in departmental protocol in our hospital, anti-scatter grid and filter are routinely used for lateral cervical spine radiograph in all trauma patients with immobilised cervical spine. A retrospective study was done to compare the efficacy of lateral cervical spine radiographs in demonstrating the cervicothoracic junction for a period of three months before and after the implementation of the change. All images were independently evaluated by two observers. Results: 253 trauma patients had a lateral cervical spine radiograph done in January to March 2003 without using the anti-scatter grid and filter while 309 patients in January to March 2007, using filter and grid. Inter-observer variability between the two observers was calculated using Cohen's Kappa which showed good and very good agreement for 2003 and 2007 respectively. 126 (49.8%) images adequately demonstrated the cervicothoracic junction without using filter and grid while 189 (61.1%) were adequate following their use. This was statistically significant (Fischer exact test, p value = 0.0081). Conclusion: The use of filter and anti-scatter grids improves the visualisation of cervicothoracic junction in lateral cervical spine imaging and reduces the need to repeat exposure.

  10. Diagnosis of instability of the upper cervical spine by functional computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, J.; Hayek, J.

    1986-11-01

    The evaluation by means of functional X-rays, of rotatory instability of the upper cervical spine as a result traumatic or inflammatory destruction of the ligamentous apparatus, is unsatisfactory. Functional CT of the upper cervical spine allows measurement of the segmental rotatory movements. 9 healthy juveniles and 30 patients were examined after neck injury via functional CT's. A rotation between occiput and atlas greater than 9/sup 0/, between atlas and axis over 50/sup 0/, the left-right difference at the level C0/C1 greater than 6/sup 0/ and at the level C1/C2 over 10.5/sup 0/ point to a suspicion of hypermobility or instability.

  11. Fracture and Viscoelastic Characteristics of the Human Cervical Spine,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    flexion moments ranging from -800 N-mm to - 4r 9000 N-mm with no dependence on cervical spinal level. In future testing, the angles of rotation should...loaded in compression while controlling the anterior-posterior shear load at zero and the flexion - extension angle at a constant setting. The final...specimen, tests were performed at fixed flexion -extension angles of 0 degrees, 2 degrees extension and 2 degrees flexion in sequence. The test lasted 1

  12. Surgical treatment of cervical spine trauma: Our experience and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobran, Mauro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Nocchi, Niccolò; Di Rienzo, Alessandro; di Somma, Lucia Giovanna Maria; Nasi, Davide; Colasanti, Roberto; Al-Fay, Mohuammad; Scerrati, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Objective and Background: The objective of this study is to evaluate how the neurological outcome in patients operated for cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is influenced by surgical timing, admission American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grading system, and age. Materials and Methods: From January 2004 to December 2011, we operated 110 patients with cervical SCI. Fifty-seven of them (44 males and 13 females) with preoperative neurological deficit, were included in this study with a complete follow-up. Age, sex, associated comorbidities (evaluated with Charlson comorbidity index [CCI]), mechanism of trauma, preoperative and follow-up ASIA score, time elapsed from injury to surgical treatment, preoperative cervical computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging, type of fractures, and surgical procedure were evaluated for each patient. The patient population was divided into two groups related to the timing of surgery: Ultra-early surgery group (within 12 h from the trauma, 27 patients) and early surgery (within 12–72 h from the trauma, 30 patients). Statistical Analysis Used: The univariate analysis of data was carried out by the Chi-square test for discrete variables, the t-test for the continuous ones. Logistic regression was used for the multivariate analysis. Results: Neurological outcome was statistically better in ultra-early surgery group (<12 h) than in patient underwent surgery within 12–72 h (82.14% vs. 31%, multivariate analysis P = 0.005). The neurological improvement was also correlated with the age and the ASIA grade at admission in the univariate analysis (P = 0.006 and P = 0.017 respectively) and in the multivariate 1 (P = 0.037 and P = 0.006 respectively) while the CCI was correlated with the improvement only in the univariate analysis (P = 0.007). Conclusion: Nowadays, in patients with cervical SCI early surgery could be associated with improved outcome, most in case of young people with mild neurological impairment. PMID:26396608

  13. Cervical Spine Injuries - Numerical Analyses and Statistical Survey

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Injuries to the neck, or cervical region, are very importantsince there is a potential risk of damage to the spinal cord.Any neck injury can have devastating if not life threateningconsequences. High-speed transportation as well as leisure-timeadventures have increased the number of serious neck injuriesand made us increasingly aware of its consequences.Surveillance systems and epidemiological studies are importantprerequisites in defining the scope of the problem. Thedevelopment of mechanica...

  14. Risks associated with magnetic resonance imaging and cervical collar in comatose, blunt trauma patients with negative comprehensive cervical spine computed tomography and no apparent spinal deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Dunham, C Michael; Brocker, Brian P; Collier, B David; Gemmel, David J

    2008-01-01

    Introduction In blunt trauma, comatose patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score 3 to 8) with a negative comprehensive cervical spine (CS) computed tomography assessment and no apparent spinal deficit, CS clearance strategies (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] and prolonged cervical collar use) are controversial. Methods We conducted a literature review to delineate risks for coma, CS instability, prolonged cervical collar use, and CS MRI. Results Based on our search of the literature, the numbers of...

  15. When to suspect head injury or cervical spine injury in maxillofacial trauma?

    OpenAIRE

    Sajjad A Rahman; Soumithran Chandrasala

    2014-01-01

    Background: The global status report of the World Health Organization (WHO) on road safety suggested that India is leading in road traffic accidents in the world. According to the report on road accidents in India in 2010 by the Transport Research Wing, Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, New Delhi, Kerala ranked third in accidents per lakh population and second in persons injured per lakh population. As the face, brain, and cervical spine are in close proximity with one another, associa...

  16. A stiff collar can restrict atlantoaxial instability in rheumatoid cervical spine in selected cases.

    OpenAIRE

    Kauppi, M; Anttila, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the efficiency of a stiff collar in restricting the instability of anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS). METHODS--Twenty two successive patients with an unstable AAS were studied. Lateral view radiographs were taken of the cervical spine in flexion, extension, and neutral positions without a collar, and in full flexion with a custom made stiff collar. RESULTS--The collar restricted more than 30% of the maximal instability of the AAS in 50% of the patients. These patient...

  17. Reconstruction of Low Speed Rear-End collisions - Technical Means of Assessing Cervical Spine Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hitzemann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, an increasing number of cervical spine injuries sustained by vehicle occupants in collisions at comparatively low speeds have been reported to insurance companies and in civil litigation. The reported injuries occur in both rear-end and side impact collisions. The paper describes how a detailed assessment of such cases requires interdisciplinary teamwork involving technical, biomechanical and medical experts.

  18. Cervical Spine Injuries: A Whole-Body Musculoskeletal Model for the Analysis of Spinal Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgrove, Timothy P.; Preatoni, Ezio; Gill, Harinderjit S.; Trewartha, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Cervical spine trauma from sport or traffic collisions can have devastating consequences for individuals and a high societal cost. The precise mechanisms of such injuries are still unknown as investigation is hampered by the difficulty in experimentally replicating the conditions under which these injuries occur. We harness the benefits of computer simulation to report on the creation and validation of i) a generic musculoskeletal model (MASI) for the analyses of cervical spine loading in healthy subjects, and ii) a population-specific version of the model (Rugby Model), for investigating cervical spine injury mechanisms during rugby activities. The musculoskeletal models were created in OpenSim, and validated against in vivo data of a healthy subject and a rugby player performing neck and upper limb movements. The novel aspects of the Rugby Model comprise i) population-specific inertial properties and muscle parameters representing rugby forward players, and ii) a custom scapula-clavicular joint that allows the application of multiple external loads. We confirm the utility of the developed generic and population-specific models via verification steps and validation of kinematics, joint moments and neuromuscular activations during rugby scrummaging and neck functional movements, which achieve results comparable with in vivo and in vitro data. The Rugby Model was validated and used for the first time to provide insight into anatomical loading and cervical spine injury mechanisms related to rugby, whilst the MASI introduces a new computational tool to allow investigation of spinal injuries arising from other sporting activities, transport, and ergonomic applications. The models used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and allow to integrate in silico analyses with experimental approaches in injury prevention. PMID:28052130

  19. Kinematic analysis of the lower cervical spine in the protracted and retracted neck flexion positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze lower cervical spine kinematics in protracted and retracted neck flexion positions in healthy people. [Subjects and Methods] The craniovertebral angle (CVA) and intervertebral body angles of the lower cervical spine of 10 healthy individuals were analyzed using fluoroscopy in a neutral sitting with the head in the neutral (N), protracted (Pro), and retracted (Ret) positions and with the neck in full flexion with the head in the neutral (N-fx), protracted (Pro-fx), and retracted (Ret-fx) positions. [Results] There were significant differences in the CVA and intervertebral body angle at the C3-4 level, and the Ret position showed the highest values followed by the N and Pro positions. Regarding the intervertebral body angle at the C4-5 level, the Pro position showed a higher value than the N and Ret positions. At the C6-7 level, the Pro position showed the lowest value compared with the N and Ret positions. In the CVA, the Ret-fx position showed a higher value than the N-fx and Ret-fx positions. [Conclusion] The results suggest that in the neutral sitting position, protraction is an ineffective posture due to overstress of the C6-7 segment, which is placed in a hyperflexed position at this level. Instead, retraction is the recommend posture for the patient with C6-7 degeneration, which makes for a more flexed position in the upper cervical spine and a less flexed position in the lower cervical spine.

  20. Dermal sinus with dermoid cyst in the upper cervical spine: case note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, W.C. [Department of Radiology, and School of Medicine, China Medical College, China Medical College Hospital, Taiwan (Taiwan); Chiou, T.L. [Department of Neurosurgery, China Medical College Hospital, No. 2 Yuh-Der Road, 407 Taichung, Taiwan (Taiwan); Lin, T.Y. [Department of Pathology, China Medical College Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2000-01-01

    We describe a 5 year-old girl who had a skin dimple of the back of her upper neck. MRI showed a dermal sinus tract in the upper cervical spine, associated with an intramedullary dermoid cyst at C 2-3, and spina bifida. A laminectomy was performed, the dermoid cyst and the sinus tract were completely removed. This congenital complex is very rare. (orig.)

  1. Do design variations in the artificial disc influence cervical spine biomechanics? A finite element investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizan, Ahmad; Goel, Vijay K; Garfin, Steven R; Bono, Christopher M; Serhan, Hassan; Biyani, Ashok; Elgafy, Hossein; Krishna, Manoj; Friesem, Tai

    2012-06-01

    Various ball and socket-type designs of cervical artificial discs are in use or under investigation. Many artificial disc designs claim to restore the normal kinematics of the cervical spine. What differentiates one type of design from another design is currently not well understood. In this study, authors examined various clinically relevant parameters using a finite element model of C3-C7 cervical spine to study the effects of variations of ball and socket disc designs. Four variations of ball and socket-type artificial disc were placed at the C5-C6 level in an experimentally validated finite element model. Biomechanical effects of the shape (oval vs. spherical ball) and location (inferior vs. superior ball) were studied in detail. Range of motion, facet loading, implant stresses and capsule ligament strains were computed to investigate the influence of disc designs on resulting biomechanics. Motions at the implant level tended to increase following disc replacement. No major kinematic differences were observed among the disc designs tested. However, implant stresses were substantially higher in the spherical designs when compared to the oval designs. For both spherical and oval designs, the facet loads were lower for the designs with an inferior ball component. The capsule ligament strains were lower for the oval design with an inferior ball component. Overall, the oval design with an inferior ball component, produced motion, facet loads, implant stresses and capsule ligament strains closest to the intact spine, which may be key to long-term implant survival.

  2. Changes in human cervical and lumbar spine curves while bicycling with different handlebar heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lang; He, Kuo-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Cycling is a daily activity that needs a high demand of human-bicycle fitness. However, studies into the fitness or ergonomic aspects are very little. In this study, the simulated 20 min bicycling test were performed by 26 male participants under 5 handle height conditions. Body joint angles and external cervical/lumbar spine lordosis were measured at the initial and cycling after 20 min. Results show that different handle heights did cause various trunk inclinations. Trunk inclination was negatively and positively correlated with lumbosacral angle (r = -0.620, p < 0.001) and cervical angle (r = 0.510, p < 0.001), respectively. In this study, regression models were also developed to predict the internal cervical and lumbar spine movements by external trunk inclination and head extension, respectively. The explanatory abilities for the variance of the models were 67.2% for LSA and 82.8% for CE prediction. This can be used to understand the cyclist's spine movements while field study of bicycling.

  3. Functional MR imaging of the cervical spine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allmann, K.H.; Uhl, M.; Uhrmeister, P.; Neumann, K.; Langer, M. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Universitaetsklinik; Kempis, J. von [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Rheumatologie und Klinische Immunologie

    1998-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate functional MR imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involving the cervical spine. Material and Methods: We used a device that allows MR examination to be made of the cervical spine in infinitely variable degrees of flexion and extension. Dynamic functional MR imaging was performed on 25 patients with RA. Results: Functional MR imaging was able to show the degree of vertebral instability of the occipito-atlantal or atlanto-axial level as well as the subaxial level. By performing functional MR imaging, we were able to demonstrate the extent of synovial tissue around the dens, and the impingement and displacement of the spinal cord during flexion and extension. The basilar impression, the cord impingement into the foramen magnum, the cord compression, the slipping of vertebrae, and the angulation of the cord were all much more evident in functional than in static MR imaging. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging provided additional information in patients with RA, and is valuable in patients who have a normal MR study in the neutral position and yet have signs of a neurological deficit. Functional MR imaging is important in the planning of stabilizing operations of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  4. Rugby injuries to the cervical spine and spinal cord: a 10-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, A T

    1998-01-01

    A 10-year review (1987-1996) of injuries sustained to the spine and spinal cord in rugby players with resultant paralysis has been undertaken. This article reviews that the incidence of serious rugby spine and spinal cord injuries in South Africa has increased over the 10-year period reviewed, despite stringent new rules instituted in an attempt to decrease the incidence of these injuries. The mechanisms of injury, as previously reported, remain the same as well as the phases of game responsible for injury of the tight scrum, tackle, rucks, and mauls. Two new observations are reported: the first is related to the occurrence of spinal cord concussion with transient paralysis, and the second is related to the increased incidence of osteoarthritis of the cervical spine in rugby players.

  5. Connective tissue, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s), and head and cervical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an umbrella term for a growing group of hereditary disorders of the connective tissue mainly manifesting with generalized joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and vascular and internal organ fragility. In contrast with other well known heritable connective tissue disorders with severe cardiovascular involvement (e.g., Marfan syndrome), most EDS patients share a nearly normal life span, but are severely limited by disabling features, such as pain, fatigue and headache. In this work, pertinent literature is reviewed with focus on prevalence, features and possible pathogenic mechanisms of headache in EDSs. Gathered data are fragmented and generally have a low level of evidence. Headache is reported in no less than 1/3 of the patients. Migraine results the most common type in the hypermobility type of EDS. Other possibly related headache disorders include tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache, headache attributed to spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leakage, headache secondary to Chiari malformation, cervicogenic headache and neck-tongue syndrome, whose association still lacks of reliable prevalence studies. The underlying pathogenesis seems complex and variably associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia, cervical spine and temporomandibular joint instability/dysfunction, meningeal fragility, poor sleep quality, pain-killer drugs overuse and central sensitization. Particular attention is posed on a presumed subclinical cervical spine dysfunction. Standard treatment is always symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. Assessment and management procedures are discussed in order to put some basis for ameliorating the actual patients' needs and nurturing future research.

  6. EMS Adherence to a Pre-hospital Cervical Spine Clearance Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson, David

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the degree of adherence to a cervical spine (c-spine clearance protocol by pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS personnel by both self-assessment and receiving hospital assessment, to describe deviations from the protocol, and to determine if the rate of compliance by paramedic self-assessment differed from receiving hospital assessment. Methods: A retrospective sample of pre-hospital (consecutive series and receiving hospital (convenience sample assessments of the compliance with and appropriateness of c-spine immobilization. The c-spine clearance protocol was implemented for Orange County EMS just prior to the April-November 1999 data collection period. Results: We collected 396 pre-hospital and 162 receiving hospital data forms. From the pre-hospital data sheet. the percentage deviation from the protocol was 4.096 (16/396. Only one out of 16 cases that did not comply with the protocol was due to over immobilization (0.2%. The remaining 15 cases were under immobilized, according to protocol. Nine of the under immobilized cases (66% that should have been placed in c-spine precautions met physical assessment criteria in the protocol, while the other five cases met mechanism of injury criteria. The rate of deviations from protocol did not differ over time. The receiving hospital identified 8.0% (13/162; 6/16 over immobilized, 7/16 under immobilized of patients with deviations from the protocol; none was determined to have actual c-spine injury. Conclusion: The implementation of a pre-hospital c-spine clearance protocol in Orange County was associated with a moderate overall adherence rate (96% from the pre-hospital perspective, and 92% from the hospital perspective, p=.08 for the two evaluation methods. Most patients who deviated from protocol were under immobilized, but no c-spine injuries were missed. The rate of over immobilization was better than previously reported, implying a saving of resources.

  7. Development of Ultrasound to Measure In-vivo Dynamic Cervical Spine Intervertebral Disc Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Neck pain is pervasive problems in military population...especially in those working in vibrating environments. Previous studies show neck pain is strongly associated with degeneration of Intervertebral Disc (IVD...The capability of dual US to measure C-spine properties in-vivo in simulation environment is currently being tested. Biomechanics finite element(FE

  8. Effect of pillow height on the biomechanics of the head-neck complex: investigation of the cranio-cervical pressure and cervical spine alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicong Ren

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background While appropriate pillow height is crucial to maintaining the quality of sleep and overall health, there are no universal, evidence-based guidelines for pillow design or selection. We aimed to evaluate the effect of pillow height on cranio-cervical pressure and cervical spine alignment. Methods Ten healthy subjects (five males aged 26 ± 3.6 years were recruited. The average height, weight, and neck length were 167 ± 9.3 cm, 59.6 ± 11.9 kg, and 12.9 ± 1.2 cm respectively. The subjects lay on pillows of four different heights (H0, 110 mm; H1, 130 mm; H2, 150 mm; and H3, 170 mm. The cranio-cervical pressure distribution over the pillow was recorded; the peak and average pressures for each pillow height were compared by one-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Cervical spine alignment was studied using a finite element model constructed based on data from the Visible Human Project. The coordinate of the center of each cervical vertebra were predicted for each pillow height. Three spine alignment parameters (cervical angle, lordosis distance and kyphosis distance were identified. Results The average cranial pressure at pillow height H3 was approximately 30% higher than that at H0, and significantly different from those at H1 and H2 (p < 0.05. The average cervical pressure at pillow height H0 was 65% lower than that at H3, and significantly different from those at H1 and H2 (p < 0.05. The peak cervical pressures at pillow heights H2 and H3 were significantly different from that at H0 (p < 0.05. With respect to cervical spine alignment, raising pillow height from H0 to H3 caused an increase of 66.4% and 25.1% in cervical angle and lordosis distance, respectively, and a reduction of 43.4% in kyphosis distance. Discussion Pillow height elevation significantly increased the average and peak pressures of the cranial and cervical regions, and increased the extension and lordosis of the cervical spine. The cranio-cervical pressures and cervical

  9. OUR EXPERIENCE WITH MAGERL’S MODIFIED TECHNIQUE FOR STABILIZATION OF SUBAXIAL CERVICAL SPINE

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    Haritonov Dimitar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: There are different surgical techniques for massa lateralis screw instrumentation of subaxial cervical spine--those of Roy-Camille, Magerl, Anderson, and An. Each has different starting point and trajectorys of screw implantation.For each technique there is a potential risk to affect vascular and neural structures.In this paper we share our experience in using a modified Magerl's technique for stabilization of subaxial cervical spine. Method:We present a retrospective study and clinical follow-up of 27 patients operated on the occasion of cervical injury that we have used the modified technique of Magerl. In 8 patients was carried and an anterior decompression and stabilization. Results: In these patients was carried posterior or combined -- posterior and anterior stabilization. The posterior fixation was massa lateralis with this modified technique of Magerl with multiaxial screws. With this technique were inserted 160 multiaxial screws and the most common length of the implants were 108 mm (108 from 160 or 67.5%. Conclusion: Based on world literature, experience and analysis of clinical cases, we believe that this modified technique for subaxial cervical fixation is effective (the pull-out strength approach to the strength of pedicle screw instrumentation and is much safer.

  10. Airway management in a patient of ankylosing spondylitis with traumatic cervical spine injury

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    Nilesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic cervical lesions compressing the spinal cord pose a significant risk of exacerbating the existing neurological condition during tracheal intubation and subsequent positioning. Preexisting ankylosing spondylitis with spinal column involvement renders the spinal column more rigid and introduces difficulty in airway management of the patient with traumatic cervical spinal cord. To improve ease and success, and reduce cervical spine movement, awake fibreoptic intubation (FOI is considered the gold standard technique for airway management in such cases. Attaining appropriate position for intubation was challenge in this case due to rigid curvature of the ankylosed spinal column. To prevent neurological injury to the spinal cord and preserve spinal cord function, minimizing movement during intubation and attaining appropriate position was of prime concern. Optimal sedation with self-positioning by the patient in a comfortable posture is quite imperative and assures both airway as well as neurological protection in such expected difficult situations. We report the use of dexmedetomidine for self-positioning and awake FOI in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis having traumatic cervical spine who was otherwise neither able to co-operative nor able to give appropriate position for FOI.

  11. Correlation between Modic changes in cervical spine and cervical degenerative disease%颈椎Modic改变与颈椎退行性疾病的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许耀丰; 马智佳; 姜宏; 俞鹏飞; 俞振翰; 陈梦菲

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between Modic changes in cervical spine and cervical degenera-tive disease. Methods 78 outpatients with both Modic changes in cervical spine and cervical degenerative disease were calculated. The correlation between Modic changes in cervical spine and cervical degenerative disease were ana-lyzed. Results 30 patients (38. 5%) were diagnosed with mild cervical degenerative disease;26 (33. 3%) were diagnosed with moderate cervical degenerative disease, 22 (28. 2%) were diagnosed with severe cervical degenera-tive disease. Conclusions Modic changes in cervical spine often occurs in old patients, mostly type Ⅱ, in C5~6 , C6~7 segments. There is no obvious correlation between Modic changes and the severity of cervical degenerative dis-ease.%目的:探讨颈椎Modic改变与颈椎退行性疾病之间的关系。方法对78例Modic改变患者的颈椎退行性疾病进行统计,分析其与Modic改变之间的关系。结果78例患者中30例(38.5%)诊断为轻度颈椎退行性疾病,26例(33.3%)诊断为中度颈椎退行性疾病,22例(28.2%)诊断为重度颈椎退行性疾病。结论颈椎Modic改变好发于老年患者,以Ⅱ型改变居多,多发生于C5~6、C6~7节段,与颈椎退行性疾病的程度无明显关系。

  12. Does the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine have an impact on disk degeneration? Minimum 10-year follow-up of asymptomatic volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    There have been few studies that investigated and clarified the relationships between progression of degenerative changes and sagittal alignment of the cervical spine. The objective of the study was to longitudinally evaluate the relationships among progression of degenerative changes of the cervical spine with age, the development of clinical symptoms and sagittal alignment of the cervical spine in healthy subjects. Out of 497 symptom-free volunteers who underwent MRI and plain radiography o...

  13. Airway management in cervical spine ankylosing spondylitis: Between a rock and a hard place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Eipe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the perioperative course of a patient with long standing ankylosing spondylitis with severe dysphagia due to large anterior cervical syndesmophytes at the level of the epiglottis. He was scheduled to undergo anterior cervical decompression and the surgical approach possibly precluded an elective pre-operative tracheostomy. We performed a modified awake fibreoptic nasal intubation through a split nasopharyngeal airway while adequate oxygenation was ensured through a modified nasal trumpet inserted in the other nares. We discuss the role of nasal intubations and the use of both the modified nasopharyngeal airways we used to facilitate tracheal intubation. This modified nasal fibreoptic intubation technique could find the application in other patients with cervical spine abnormalities and in other anticipated difficult airways.

  14. Positive Outcome After a Small-Caliber Gunshot Fracture of the Upper Cervical Spine without Neurovascular Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Thula; Schwabe, Philipp; Schaser, Klaus-Dieter; Maurer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Gunshot wounds to the cervical spine most frequently concur with serious injuries to the spinal cord and cervical vessels and often have a fatal outcome. Case Report We describe the case of a 35-year-old male with a complex fracture of the C2 vertebra body and a mandibular fracture after a penetration gunshot to the cervical spine. Computed tomography (CT) at admission revealed the exact extent of the fractures and the small caliber bullet lodged next to the C2 vertebra. In...

  15. Short communication: Traits unique to genus Homo within primates at the cervical spine (C2-C7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Luis; Muñoz, Alexandra; Cardoso, Hugo; Pastor, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    From a comparative study of 222 human and 261 nonhuman primates complete cervical spines, two bony variants associated to the course of the vertebral artery are proposed as unique to genus Homo within primates. First, the opening of the foramen transversarium at C2, a trait present at low frequency in humans (3 to 5.6%). Second, the presence of a bipartite foramen transversarium in the cervical segment C3-C6, a trait that can be observed fully formed in human fetal skeletons, with a clear frequency pattern along the cervical spine (C3>C4>C5>C6spines studied, practically absent in Strepsirrhini, at low frequency in Platyrrhini, and generalized in Catarrhini. These findings, together with previous data regarding absence and presence of foramina at C1, indicate a pattern of gain and loss of foramina in the transverse process of the cervical vertebrae for genus Homo. The test of a possible explanation of these differences as associated to anatomical changes of the cervical spine due to erect posture and bipedal locomotion needs further research in the morphology and function of the primate cervical spine.

  16. The effect of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization on pain and disability in cervical radiculopathy. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Christos; Giakas, Giannis

    2013-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is the result of cervical nerve root pathology that may lead to chronic pain and disability. Although manual therapy interventions including cervical traction and neural mobilization have been advocated to decrease pain and disability caused by cervical radiculopathy, their analgesic effect has been questioned due to the low quality of research evidence. The purpose of this paper is to present the effect of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization on pain and disability in a patient experiencing cervical radiculopathy. A 52-year-old woman presented with a 2 month history of neurological cervico-brachial pain and whose presentation was consistent with cervical radiculopathy. Cervical traction and a slider neural mobilization of the medial nerve were applied simultaneously to reduce the patient's pain and disability measured at baseline and at 2 and 4 weeks using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale, the Neck Disability Index and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. Improvements in all outcome measures were noted over a period of four weeks. Scores in all outcome measures revealed that the patient's pain had almost disappeared and that she was able to perform her household chores and job tasks without difficulties and limitations. In conclusion, the findings of this study support that the application of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization can produce significant improvements in terms of pain and disability in cervical radiculopathy.

  17. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery.......In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery....

  18. Result of the arc of movement of lower cervical spine after seven years of arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Claudio de Velleca e Lima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the mobility of the lower cervical spine after seven years of total cervical disc replacement at two levels. METHOD: This clinical study was designed randomly and prospectively at the spine surgery center at the Hospital Nossa Senhora das Graças, in Canoas, RS-Brazil and at the Hospital Don João Becker, in Gravataí, RS-Brazil. Seventeen patients were included in the study that was designed to compare the data obtained from annual and sequential manner until the end of seven years. A comparison was made with the prior range of motion (ROM of each patient. All patients were diagnosed with not tractable symptomatic cervical degenerative disc disease with two adjacent levels between C-3 and C-7. RESULTS: A total of patients underwent TDR in two levels and at the end of seven years, only one patient was lost to follow-up. The pre and postoperative ROM was the same in the first three years however after the fourth year there was a gradual decline with a loss of 12% of preoperative ROM in flexion, 21% in extension and 23% in the right and left lateral bending at the end of seven years. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical outcome of this study is evidence level IV in evaluating the ROM for Moby-C(r for TDR in two adjacent levels at the lower cervical spine. These results show that the ROM is maintained during the first three years, gradually declining after that.

  19. EXPERIENCE OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF INJURIES OF MIDDLE AND LOWER CERVICAL SPINE WHILE DIVING

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    I. P. Ardashev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective - to analyze the long-term results of surgical treatment of patients with injuries of middle- and lower cervical spine in diving. Materials and methods. An analysis of surgical treatment of 27 patients and assessment of the long-term results of 20 patients in a period of 6 months to 6 years were performed with analysis of clinical, neurological, radiographic data and mortality. Results. Mostly the C5 vertebra was damaged - in 17 patients (63%. Compression fractures of vertebral bodies met in 6 (22%, compression-comminuted fractures - in 16 (59% patients, dislocations - in 5 (19%. All patients had neurological disorders. All observations noted rigid stabilization of the spine with an implant made of porous nickel-titanium, the presence of bone-metal block at the level of the damaged vertebral body Mortality in the postoperative period was 26%. In the long-term period the initial neurological symptoms were observed in 7 (30% patients, 13 (48% patients had marked regression of neurological symptoms. Full functional maladjustment was observed in 6 patients with no motor function below the damaged segment, originally belonging to groups A and B on the classification of H.L. Frankel. Moderate and mild degree of functional adaptation disorders were present in 5 and 4 patients respectively. In the remaining patients we did not reveal a functional maladjustment. Range of motion in the cervical spine in all patients was considered as good. Conclusions. Anterior decompressive-stabilizing surgeries on the spine with an implant made of porous nickel-titanium and metal plate CSLP allows reliably stabilization of the injured spine and the rehabilitation of this severe category of patients.

  20. Pain assessment in time to get pain treatment on time – patients’ perspective of time during pain assessment after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptain, Kirsten; Bregnballe, Vibeke; Dreyer, Pia

    Background: Despite advances in medicine, pharmaceutical and technical knowledge, patients still have postop-erative pain after spine surgery. Studies show that patient participation has positive effect on treatment outcomes and patients require quick individual and efficient pain treatment. Obje...... an efficient and individual pain treatment on time. Knowl-edge about how time affect patients pain assessment is important for nurses in order to make patients participate in pain assessment.......Background: Despite advances in medicine, pharmaceutical and technical knowledge, patients still have postop-erative pain after spine surgery. Studies show that patient participation has positive effect on treatment outcomes and patients require quick individual and efficient pain treatment...... was difficult to use for the patients during activity as intensity of pain changed within seconds in the postoperative phase. The patients elucidated how anaesthesia affected their ability to assess pain and they described how pain medicine and severe pain over time caused variation in ability to communicate...

  1. Image Segmentation and Analysis of Flexion-Extension Radiographs of Cervical Spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eniko T. Enikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new analysis tool for cervical flexion-extension radiographs based on machine vision and computerized image processing. The method is based on semiautomatic image segmentation leading to detection of common landmarks such as the spinolaminar (SL line or contour lines of the implanted anterior cervical plates. The technique allows for visualization of the local curvature of these landmarks during flexion-extension experiments. In addition to changes in the curvature of the SL line, it has been found that the cervical plates also deform during flexion-extension examination. While extension radiographs reveal larger curvature changes in the SL line, flexion radiographs on the other hand tend to generate larger curvature changes in the implanted cervical plates. Furthermore, while some lordosis is always present in the cervical plates by design, it actually decreases during extension and increases during flexion. Possible causes of this unexpected finding are also discussed. The described analysis may lead to a more precise interpretation of flexion-extension radiographs, allowing diagnosis of spinal instability and/or pseudoarthrosis in already seemingly fused spines.

  2. Biomechanical evaluation of Caspar and Cervical Spine Locking Plate systems in a cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J D; Ryken, T C; Traynelis, V C; Sawin, P D; Dexter, F; Goel, V K

    1996-06-01

    There exist two markedly different instrumentation systems for the anterior cervical spine: the Cervical Spine Locking Plate (CSLP) system, which uses unicortical screws with a locking hub mechanism for attachment, and the Caspar Trapezial Plate System, which is secured with unlocked bicortical screws. The biomechanical stability of these two systems was evaluated in a cadaveric model of complete C5-6 instability. The immediate stability was determined in six loading modalities: flexion, extension, right and left lateral bending, and right and left axial rotation. Biomechanical stability was reassessed following fatigue with 5000 cycles of flexion-extension, and finally, the spines were loaded in flexion until the instrumentation failed. The Caspar system stabilized significantly in flexion before (p < 0.05) but not after fatigue, and it stabilized significantly in extension before (p < 0.01) and after fatigue (p < 0.01). The CSLP system stabilized significantly in flexion before (p < 0.01) but not after fatigue, and it did not stabilize in extension before or after fatigue. The moment needed to produce failure in flexion did not differ substantially between the two plating systems. The discrepancy in the biomechanical stability of these two systems may be due to differences in bone screw fixation.

  3. C5 Nerve root palsies following cervical spine surgery: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Epstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical C5 nerve root palsies may occur in between 0% and 30% of routine anterior or posterior cervical spine operations. They are largely attributed to traction injuries/increased cord migration following anterior/posterior decompressions. Of interest, almost all studies cite spontaneous resolution of these deficits without surgery with 3-24 postoperative months. Methods: Different studies cite various frequencies for C5 root palsies following anterior or posterior cervical spine surgery. In their combined anterior/posterior series involving C4-C5 level  decompressions, Libelski et al. cited up to a 12% incidence of C5 palsies. In Gu et al. series, C5 root palsies occurred in 3.1% of double-door laminoplasty, 4.5% of open-door laminoplasty, and 11.3% of laminectomy. Miller et al. observed an intermediate 6.9% frequency of C5 palsies followed by posterior cervical decompressions and fusions (PCDF. Results: Gu et al. also identified multiple risk factors for developing C5 palsies following posterior surgery; male gender, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL, narrower foramina, laminectomy, and marked dorsal spinal cord drift. Miller et al. also identified an average $1918 increased cost for physical/occupational therapy for patients with C5 palsies. Conclusions: The incidence of C5 root deficits for anterior/posterior cervical surgery at C4-C5 was 12% in one series, and ranged up to 11.3% for laminectomies, while others cited 0-30%. Although identification of preoperative risk factors for C5 root deficits may help educate patients regarding these risks, there is no clear method for their avoidance at this time.

  4. Evaluation in the use of bismuth shielding on cervical spine CT scan using a male phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleme, C.; Mourao, A. P. [Centro Federal de Educacion Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Biomedical Engineering Center, Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil); Lyra, M. A., E-mail: carolinaaleme@gmail.com [Universidad Federal de Minas Gerais, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Av. Pdte. Antonio Carlos 6627, Pampulha, 31270-91 Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The cervical spine is the region of the column that articulates the head and chest. The tests of computed tomography (CT) performed in this region have as main objectives to diagnose fractures, dislocations and tumors. In CT scans the cervical spine volume is limited by the foramen Magnum and the first thoracic vertebra. In this region is the thyroid that is directly irradiated by X-ray beam during cervical scan. Based on this information, it was studied the dose variation deposited in thyroid and in nearby organs, such as: lenses, spinal cord in the foramen Magnum region and breasts, with and without the use of bismuth protector. In this study was used a male anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent s dosimeters (TLD-100) were required to register the individual doses in the organs of interest. CT scans were performed on a GE Bright Speed scanner of 32 channels. With the data obtained, it was found the organ dose variation. The largest recorded dose was in the thyroid. Comparing two scans it was possible to note that the use of the bismuth protector promoted a 26% reduction in the thyroid dose and an increase in the lens dose. (Author)

  5. Injuries of the upper cervical spine: A series of 28 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basu Saumyajit

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are very few published reports of upper cervical spine injuries from our country and there is a heavy bias towards operative treatment of these injuries. We present below our experience of upper cervical injuries over the last four years. Materials and Methods: Twenty eight patients (20 males, 8 females with upper cervical spine injury (including Occiput, Atlas and Axis were treated and were followed-up for an average of 11.2 months. The data was analyzed retrospectively with regards to the location and type of injury, the treatment offered (conservative or operative as well as the final clinical and radiological outcome. Results: The clinico-radiological outcome of treatment of these injuries is mostly very good with few complications. Other than a single case of mortality due to associated head injury there were no major complications. Conclusion: Management of these patients needs a proper evaluation to arrive at the type of injury and prompt conservative or operative treatment. Treatment is usually safe and effective with good clinical and radiological outcome.

  6. Management of neglected cervical spine dislocation: a study of six cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goni Vijay

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To report a case series of six neglected cervical spine dislocations without neurological deficit, which were managed operatively. Methods: The study was conducted from August 2010 to December 2011 and cases were selected from the out-patient department of Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, India. The patients were in the age group of 30 to 50 years. All patients were operated via both anterior and posterior approaches. Results: During the immediate postoperative period, five (83.33% patients had normal neurological status. One (16.67% patient who had C 5 -C 6 subluxation developed neu-rological deficit with sensory loss below C 6 level and motor power of 2/5 in the lower limb and 3/5 in the upper limb below C 6 level. Conclusion: There is no role of skull traction in ne-glected distractive flexion injuries to cervical spine delayed for more than 3 weeks. Posterior followed by anterior ap-proach saves much time. If both approaches are to be done in the same sitting, there is no need for instrumentation posteriorly. But if staged procedure is planed, posterior sta-bilization is recommended, as there is a risk of deterioration in neurological status. Key words: Cervical vertebrae; Neck; Postoperative complications

  7. MR imaging of the neural foramina of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Univ. of Kiel, (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Ahn, J.M. [Univ. of Kiel, (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Biederer, J.; Schaefer, F.K.W.; Frahm, C.H.; Mohr, A.; Brossmann, J. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Resnick, D. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether a single three-dimensional double-echo steady state (3D-DESS) sequence can produce equivalent results when compared to a 3D free induction with steady precession (3D-FISP) sequence for the evaluation of the neural foraminal diameter and structures. Material and Methods: Five phantoms were imaged on CT with 3-mm axial slices followed by reformatted axial 3D-DESS and 3D-FISP sequences. In addition, 3D-DESS and 3D-FISP sequences of 20 healthy subjects were compared with regard to image quality, differentiation between vertebrae and discs, differentiation between discs and neural foramina, and differentiation between vertebrae and neural foramina. Results: Compared with CT, 3D-DESS and 3D-FISP sequences consistently underestimated the diameters of the neural foramina. The mean difference values for the 3D-DESS was 12.8%, compared to 9.5% for the 3D-FISP sequence. Concerning the in vivo studies, the 3D-DESS sequence was superior but not statistical significant to the 3D-FISP sequence with regard to image quality, differentiation between vertebrae and discs, differentiation between discs and neural foramina, and identification of the nerve roots. Conclusion: The 3D-DESS sequence is moderately accurate in the evaluation of the neural foraminal size. Compared to the 3D-FISP sequence, the 3D-DESS sequence is compatible concerning the image quality, differentiation between the cervical vertebrae and discs, and between the discs and neural foramina.

  8. Cervical spine trauma radiographs: Swimmers and supine obliques; an exploration of current practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fell, Michael, E-mail: michael.fell@mkgeneral.nhs.u [Milton Keynes General Hospital, Radiology Standing Way, Eaglestone, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire MK6 5LD (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    The study objectives were: to investigate current cervical spine radiographic imaging practices in conscious adult patients with suspected neck injury; reasons behind variation and consideration of dose estimates were explored. Comparison with a previous survey has been made. Questionnaires were sent to superintendent radiographers responsible for accident and emergency X-ray departments in English trusts with over 8500 emergency admissions per year, with a response rate of 97% (n = 181/186). Departmental cervical spine imaging protocols were reported by 82% of respondents. None use fewer than the three standard projections; if the cervicothoracic junction (C7/T1), is not adequately demonstrated 87% use swimmers projections, 9% supine obliques, 3% CT alone. Following projectional radiography, 97% perform CT. A significant (p = 0.018) increase was found since 1999 in CT use once the swimmers projection fails; fewer now use obliques at this point, continuing with CT instead. No significant difference (p = 0.644) was found in choice of first supplementary radiographs; despite British Trauma Society's recommendation to undertake supine obliques, swimmers remain the most widespread technique. An 85% response rate (n = 103/121) completed a second questionnaire, exploring reasons behind the various practices. Several reported a perceived difficulty in interpreting oblique radiographs, some a concern over high dose of the swimmers. Numerous issues affect the acquisition of cervical spine radiographs. Patient radiation dose should be a major consideration in selection of technique. A potential need for training in interpretation of obliques is highlighted. Specific guidelines for optimum projections should be researched, and protocols issued to ensure best practice.

  9. Three-dimensional intervertebral kinematics in the healthy young adult cervical spine during dynamic functional loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderst, William J; Donaldson, William F; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the intervertebral kinematics of the young, healthy cervical spine during dynamic, three-dimensional, functional loading. Intervertebral motion was characterized by the range of motion (ROM) and the helical axis of motion (HAM). Biplane radiographs of the cervical spine were collected at 30 images/s as 29 participants (20-35 yr) performed dynamic flexion\\extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. Vertebral motion (C1-T1 in flexion\\extension, C3-T1 in lateral bending and axial rotation) was tracked with sub-millimeter accuracy using a validated volumetric model-based tracking process that matched subject-specific CT-based bone models to the radiographs. Flexion\\extension ROM was smallest at the C2-C3 motion segment (12.7±2.6°) and largest at the C5-C6 motion segment (19.7±3.7°). During head lateral bending and axial rotation, the intervertebral bending ROM was greater than the rotation ROM at every motion segment. The HAM demonstrated differences among motion segments and among movements. During flexion\\extension, the helical axis of motion was directed nearly perpendicular to the sagittal plane for the C2-C3 through C7-T1 motion segments. During lateral bending, the angle between the HAM and the transverse plane progressively increased from the C6-C7 motion segment (approximately ±22°) to the C3-C4 motion segment (approximately ±40°). During axial rotation, the angle between the transverse plane and the HAM was approximately ±42° at the C3-C4 through C5-C6 motion segments, and approximately ±32° at the C6-C7 motion segment. This study provides valuable reference data for evaluating the effects of age, degeneration, and surgical procedures on cervical spine kinematics during three-dimensional dynamic functional loading.

  10. Osteoradionecrosis of the upper cervical spine: MR imaging following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Ann D. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: king2015@cuhk.edu.hk; Griffith, James F.; Abrigo, Jill M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Leung Singfai [Department of Clinical Oncology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Yau Fungkwai [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Tse, Gary M.K. [Department of Anatomical and Cellular Pathology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Ahuja, Anil T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To document the MRI appearances of radiation-induced abnormalities in the cervical spine following treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Patients with radiation-induced abnormalities in the upper cervical spine were identified from a retrospective analysis of reports from patients undergoing MRI follow-up. Imaging and clinical records of these patients were reviewed. Symmetrical distribution of abnormalities at C1 (anterior arch {+-} adjacent aspect of the lateral masses) and C2 (dens {+-} body especially with a characteristic horizontal rim of marrow preservation above the inferior endplate) were considered typical for osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Results: Abnormalities of C1/2 were identified in 9/884 (1%) patients. The MRI distribution of abnormalities was typical for ORN in four and atypical in five patients. Abnormal soft tissue was present in the atlantoaxial joint in eight patients, forming a florid mass in six. This soft tissue was in direct continuity with the posterior nasopharyngeal wall ulceration via the retropharyngeal region. The final clinical diagnosis was ORN in eight, five of whom had clinical factors which suggested infection could have played a contributory role, and osteomyelitis in one patient. All patients had undergone additional radiotherapy treatment comprising of brachytherapy (7), stereotactic radiotherapy (1) or radiotherapy boost (2) and three had undergone nasopharyngectomy. Conclusion: ORN of the upper cervical spine following radiotherapy for NPC is more common than previously suspected and is seen in patients with additional treatment, especially brachytherapy. MRI features are often atypical and a contributory role of infection in the development of some cases of ORN is postulated.

  11. Morphometric analysis of the cervical spine of Indian population by using computerized tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Sarathi Banerjee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to measure the surgically important morphological parameters of cervical spine region of a representative sample of Indian population from the images obtained through computerized tomography (CT. Another purpose has been to compare the computed statistical mean, standard deviation and range of variation of these data with those of other Asian population and also European/American populations. With that aim, ninety five (95 CT scan data of Indian people (73 for male patients and 22 for female patients pertaining to undeformed normal cervical spine has been collected from an Indian hospital. From these, 15 important morphological parameters have been measured. These values have been tabulated and their mean, standard deviation and range of variation have been computed. It has been found that pedicle dimensions of Indian people are smaller at almost all vertebra levels as compared to Caucasian people. Pedicle axis length for Indian people are found to be smaller at C3, C4 and C5 levels than those for other Asian people including Chinese people, but it is bigger at C6 and C7 levels. Indian people have longer measurements of pedicle length + lateral mass on an average than their other Asian counterparts at C5, C6 and C7 levels, but shorter measurements at C3 and C4 levels. The results of the present work may help in better understanding of morphological parameters of cervical spine region of Indian population. It may be further useful in designing spinal implants which would be biomechanically compatible to the anatomy of Indian people.

  12. Pharyngeal function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the cervical spine and temporomandibular joint

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    Ekberg, O.; Redlund-Johnell, I.; Sjoeblom, K.G.

    Pharyngeal function was studied in 31 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Eighteen of these patients had dysphagia. Cervical spine abnormalities were present in 14. Destruction of the capitulum and/or ramus of the mandible was registered in 9. Pharyngeal dysfunction was revealed in 20. Patients with a vertical dislocation of the C1-C2 in relation to the occipital bone and patients with destruction of the capitulum and/or ramus of the mandible had an increased frequency of pharyngeal dysfunction. Pharyngeal dysfunction is thought to be due to mechanical factors and caused by derangements of muscular attachments and turning points.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute trauma of the cervical spine: spectrum of findings

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    Forster, B.B.; Koopmans, R.A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrum of acute injury to the cervical spine was illustrated in this pictorial essay. The appearance of the traumatized cord was discussed, including intramedullary hemorrhage, and the causes of spinal cord compression, such as disk herniation, epidural hematoma, fracture, dislocation and underlying spinal stenosis. The ability of MRI to directly reveal the severity of cord injury and simultaneously indicate the cause of cord compression proved particularly useful in the management of incomplete injury, for which surgical intervention may prevent further deterioration. The protocol for MRI of cervical spinal trauma included sagittal T1-weighted and T2-weighted conventional spin-echo sequences. In addition, transverse T2-weighted gradient-echo images were obtained. MRI`s ability to directly reveal the extent of cord injury was said to be a powerful tool in the management of incomplete injuries where further deterioration could be prevented by timely surgical intervention. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Outcomes of C1 and C2 posterior screw fixation for upper cervical spine fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Iure, F; Donthineni, R; Boriani, S

    2009-06-01

    To achieve stable fixation of the upper cervical spine in posterior fusions, the occiput is often included. With the newer techniques, excluding fixation to the occiput will retain the occiput-cervical motion, while still allowing a stable fixation. Harms's technique has been adapted at our institution and its effectiveness for indications such as C2 complex fractures and tumors using C1 or C2 as endpoints of a posterior fixation are reviewed. Fourteen cases were identified, consisting of one os odontoideum; four acute fractures and four non-unions of the odontoid; three tumors and two complex fractures of C2 vertebral body, and one C2-C3 post-traumatic instability. One misplaced screw without clinical consequences was the only complication recorded. Screw loosening or migration was not observed at follow-up, showing a stable fixation.

  15. True oblique axis fracture associated with congenital anomalies of the upper cervical spine: Case report of an unusual fracture pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Luis A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute traumatic axis fractures are common cervical spine injuries often caused by road accidents or falls. They are usually classified into three different types, namely, odontoid fractures, Hangman's fractures, and miscellaneous fractures. Congenital malformations of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ), although typically asymptomatic, may result in neural compression or instability, especially following trauma. Here, the authors present an unusual oblique axis fracture occurring in conjunction with several malformations of the upper cervical spine. Case Description: Following a motor vehicle accident, a 25-year-old female's radiographic studies showed an oblique axis fracture involving both the anterior and posterior elements along with an anterior and posterior Klippel–Feil syndrome (KFS) anomaly. Following treatment in a halo vest, the patient maintained alignment, and ultimately the fracture was fused. Conclusions: True oblique fractures of the axis are rare, as in the case presented, and may occasionally occur in conjunction with KFS of the upper cervical spine. PMID:28217386

  16. Neurophysiological evaluation of patients with degenerative diseases of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Tihomir V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Diagnostic protocol for patients with degenerative diseases of the cervical spine demands, in parallel with neuroimaging methods, functional evaluation through neurophysiological methods (somatosensitive and motor evoked potentials and electromyoneurography aiming to evaluate possible subclinical affection of spinal medula resulting in neurological signs of long tract abnormalities. Considering diversities of clinical outcomes for these patients, complex diagnostic evaluation provides a prognosis of the disease progression. Methods. The study included 21 patients (48.24 ± 11.01 years of age with clinical presentation of cervical spondylarthropathy, without neuroradiological signs of myelopathy. For each patient, in addition to conventional neurophysiological tests (somatisensory evoked potentials - SSEP, motor evoked potentials - MEP, electromyoneurography - EMG, nerve conduction studies, we calculated central motor conduction time (CMCTF, as well the same parameter in relation to a different position of the head (maximal anteflexion and retroflexion, so-called dynamic tests. Results. Abnormalities of the peripheral motor neurone by conventional EMNeG was established in 2/3 of the patients, correponding to the findings of root condution time. Prolonged conventional CVMPF were found in 29% of the patients, comparing to 43% CVMPF abnormalities found with the dynamic tests. In addition, the SSEP findings were abnormal in 38% of the patients with degenerative diseases of the cervical spine. Conclusion. An extended neurophysiological protocol of testing corticospinal functions, including dynamic tests of central and periheral motor neurons are relevant for detection of subclinical forms of cervical spondylothic myelopathy, even at early stages. In addition to the conventional neurophysiological tests, we found usefull to include the dynamic motor tests and root conduction time measurement in diagnostic evaluation.

  17. Epidemiology and risk factors of cervical spine injury during heating season in the patients with cervical trauma: a cross-sectional study.

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    Sidong Yang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of cervical spine injury in the patients with cervical trauma and analyze its associated risk factors during the special heating season in North China. METHODS: This cross-sectional study investigated predictors for cervical spine injury in cervical trauma patients using retrospectively collected data of Hebei Provincial Orthopaedic Hospital from 11/2011 to 02/2012, and 11/2012 to 02/2013. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors for cervical fractures/dislocations or cord injury. RESULTS: A total of 106 patients were admitted into this study. Of all, 34 patients (32.1% were treated from 11/2011 to 02/2012 and 72 patients (67.9% from 11/2012 to 02/2013. The mean age was 41.9±13.3 years old; 85 patients (80.2% were male and 82 (77.4% from rural areas. Eighty patients (75.5% were caused by fall including 45 (42.5% by severe fall (>2 m. Sixty-five patients (61.3% of all suffered injuries to other body regions and 32 (30.2% got head injury. Thirty-one patients (29.2% sustained cervical cord injury with cervical fractures/dislocations. Twenty-six (83.9% of cervical cord injury patients were from rural areas and 24 (77.4% of those resulted from fall including 15 (48.4% from severe fall (>2 m. Logistic regression displayed that age (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.05-2.07, head injury (OR, 5.63; 95% CI, 2.23-14.26, were risk factors for cervical cord injury and snowing (OR, 8.25; 95% CI, 2.26-30.15 was a risk factor for cervical spine injury due to severe fall (>2 m. CONCLUSIONS: The elder male patients and patients with head trauma are high-risk population for cervical cord injury. As a seasonal factor, snowing during heating season is of note a risk factor for cervical spine injury resulting from severe fall (>2 m in the patients with cervical trauma in North China.

  18. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy: effect and prognostic factors

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    Kwon, Jong Won; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Choi, Ja-Young; Moon, Sung Gyu; Jun, Woo Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yeom, Jin-Sup [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-05-15

    To verify the usefulness of a fluoroscopy guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) in patients with neck pain and cervical radiculopathy and to evaluate outcome predictors. We retrospectively analyzed 91 patients from July 2004 to June 2005 in whom CIESI was initially performed for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy. Therapeutic effects were evaluated 2 weeks after the administration of CIESI, and CIESI effectiveness was graded using a five-point scale, namely, whether the pain had disappeared, was much improved, slightly improved, the same, or aggravated. We also used a visual analog scale (VAS) for the clinical evaluation. According to documentation and follow-up charts, we categorized treatments as effective or ineffective. Possible outcome predictors, namely, diagnosis (spinal stenosis vs herniated disc), primary symptoms (neck pain vs radiculopathy vs both), age, gender, and duration of pain (more or less than 6 months) were also analyzed. Fisher's exact test, the chi-square test, and multiple logistic regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. After their medical records had been reviewed, 76 patients were included in this study. Inclusion criteria were: the availability of a cross-sectional image, such as a CT scan or an MR image, and a follow-up record after injection. The medical records of 76 patients (male:female = 41: 35) of mean age 53.1 years (range 32 years to 82 years) were reviewed. Two weeks after injection, 55 patients (72.4%) had experienced effective pain relief. Patients with herniated discs had significantly better results than patients with spinal stenosis (86.1% vs 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Other non-significant predictors of an improved outcome included: a symptom duration of <6 months, a young age, and the presence of cervical radiculopathy. Multiple regression analysis showed that the only factor that was significantly associated with outcome was the cause of the pain, i.e., herniated disc or

  19. Tracheal intubation in patients with rigid collar immobilisation of the cervical spine: a comparison of Airtraq and LMA CTrach devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Z I; Yildiz, T; Baykara, Z N; Solak, M; Toker, K

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Airtraq and CTrach in lean patients with simulated cervical spine injury after application of a rigid cervical collar. Eighty-six consenting adult patients of ASA physical status 1 or 2, who required elective tracheal intubation were included in this study in a randomised manner. Anaesthesia was induced using 1 microg kg(-1) fentanyl, 3 mg kg(-1) propofol and 0.6 mg kg(-1) rocuronium, following which a rigid cervical collar was applied. Comparison was then made between tracheal intubation techniques using either the AirTraq or CTrach device. The mean (SD) time to see the glottis was shorter with the Airtraq than the CTrach (11.9 (6.8) vs 37.6 (16.7)s, respectively; p cervical spine immobilisation.

  20. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  1. Neuromodulation of the cervical spinal cord in the treatment of chronic intractable neck and upper extremity pain: a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Ricardo; Kramer, Jeffery; Benyamin, Ramsin

    2007-03-01

    Electrical spinal neuromodulation in the form of spinal cord stimulation is currently used for treating chronic painful conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, peripheral ischemia, low back pain, and other conditions refractory to more conservative treatments. To date, there are very few published reports documenting the use of spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of head/neck and upper limb pain. This paper reports a case series of 5 consecutive patients outlining the use of spinal cord stimulation to treat upper extremity pain. All subjects had previously undergone cervical fusion surgery to treat chronic neck and upper limb pain. Patients were referred following failure of the surgery to manage their painful conditions. Spinal cord stimulators were placed in the cervical epidural space through a thoracic needle placement. Stimulation parameters were adjusted to capture as much of the painful area(s) as possible. In total, 4 out of 5 patients moved to implantation. In all cases, patients reported significant (70-90%) reductions in pain, including axial neck pain and upper extremity pain. Interestingly, 2 patients with associated headache and lower extremity pain obtained relief after paresthesia-steering reportedly covered those areas. Moreover, 2 patients reported that cervical spinal cord stimulation significantly improved axial low back pain. Patients continue to report excellent pain relief up to 9 months following implantation. This case series documents the successful treatment of neck and upper extremity pain following unsuccessful cervical spine fusion surgery. Given this initial success, prospective, controlled studies are warranted to more adequately assess the long term utility and cost effectiveness of electrical neuromodulation treatment of chronic neck and upper extremity pain.

  2. Comparison of tracheal intubation using the Airtraq® and Mc Coy laryngoscope in the presence of rigid cervical collar simulating cervical immobilisation for traumatic cervical spine injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Durga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is difficult to visualise the larynx using conventional laryngoscopy in the presence of cervical spine immobilisation. Airtraq® provides for easy and successful intubation in the neutral neck position. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Airtraq in comparison with the Mc Coy laryngoscope, when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilisation using hard cervical collar and manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilisation. Methods: A randomised, cross-over, open-labelled study was undertaken in 60 ASA I and II patients aged between 20 and 50 years, belonging to either gender, scheduled to undergo elective surgical procedures. Following induction and adequate muscle relaxation, they were intubated using either of the techniques first, followed by the other. Intubation time and Intubation Difficulty Score (IDS were noted using Mc Coy laryngoscope and Airtraq. The anaesthesiologist was asked to grade the ease of intubation on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS of 1-10. Chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between the groups and paired sample t-test for comparison of continuous data. IDS score and VAS were compared using Wilcoxon Signed ranked test. Results: The mean intubation time was 33.27 sec (13.25 for laryngoscopy and 28.95 sec (18.53 for Airtraq (P=0.32. The median IDS values were 4 (interquartile range (IQR 1-6 and 0 (IQR 0-1 for laryngoscopy and Airtraq, respectively (P=0.007. The median Cormack Lehane glottic view grade was 3 (IQR 2-4 and 1 (IQR 1-1 for laryngoscopy and Airtraq, respectively (P=0.003. The ease of intubation on VAS was graded as 4 (IQR 3-5 for laryngoscopy and 2 (IQR 2-2 for Airtraq (P=0.033. There were two failures to intubate with the Airtraq. Conclusion: Airtraq improves the ease of intubation significantly when compared to Mc Coy blade in patients immobilised with cervical collar and manual in-line stabilisation simulating cervical spine injury.

  3. [Pain associated with craniofacial and cervical herpes zoster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, B; Lory, C

    2007-10-01

    Ophthalmological and cervical involvement of herpes zoster virus ranks second and third, respectively, in terms of localization frequency. Involvement of the cranial nerves is a particular sign of complications, notably ocular complications, possibly compromising the visual or facial prognosis through involvement of the VIIth nerve, which is responsible for facial paralysis. These types of involvement should be rapidly diagnosed and treated so as to limit these complications. The pain associated with herpes zoster remains frequent and difficult to treat, even if today the criteria for defining postzoster pain is increasingly refined. Antalgic and antiviral treatment should be initiated early, from the very first signs, to attempt to reduce the incidence of this postzoster pain. The risk factors, associated with the development of postzoster pain are age over 50 years, the severity of the skin rash and the intensity of the acute pain, and the existence of a prodromic pain phase before onset. The European Federation of Neurological Societies has recently published guidelines on the pharmacological treatments for postzoster pain. Nerve block treatments remain at a limited evidence level. Patients with postzoster pain should be managed by teams specializing in pain management as soon as conventional treatments fail.

  4. Trauma related changes in cervical spine and spinal cord in myelography and MRI; Zmiany pourazowe kregoslupa i rdzenia w odcinku szyjnym, w mielografii i w obrazie NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozniak, E.; Bronarski, J.; Kiwerski, J.; Krasuski, M. [Akademia Medyczna, Warsaw (Poland)]|[Stoleczny Zespol Rehabilitacji, Konstancin (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Myelographic and MRI results in 14 patients treated in 1992 because of cervical spine injury with neurological complications have been presented. Myelography proves to be useful in posttraumatic spine diagnostics but in some cases does not render sufficient information, especially if the trauma superimposes previously existing pathological changes. MRI is exceptionally valuable diagnostic modality in cervical spine injuries offering an advantage of both early and late evaluation of the post-traumatic spinal cord changes. (author). 12 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs.

  5. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE IN THE PLACEMENT OF TRANSPEDICULAR SCREWS IN SUBAXIAL CERVICAL SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Herrera Palacios

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The high-energy trauma mainly involves vertebral lesions and 6% occur in the cervical region. This poses a challenge to spine surgeons in surgical decision-making, both in terms of approach as the instrumentation. International recommendations establish that the procedures performed are reproducible, safe, and effective. The techniques for placement of pedicle screws are complicated and have been based on intraoperative navigation (limited by cost and fluoroscopy (greater exposure of health care professionals and patients to radiation. Therefore, the freehand technique is an option. The goal was to identify the level of evidence and grade of recommendation in the medical literature regarding the safety and efficacy of pedicle screw instrumentation with freehand technique in subaxial cervical spine. To this end, we carried out a systematic review with the following MeSH terms: safety, efficacy, vertebral artery. Articles were evaluated twice in a standardized and blind way by two observers skilled in systematic analysis, after CLEIS 3401 authorization in November 2014. Due to the nature of the study and the variables, articles with a high level of evidence and grade of recommendation were not found. Level of Evidence obtained on safety and efficacy in the placement of pedicle screws in subaxial column with freehand technique: 2b. Degree of Recommendation obtained on safety and efficacy in the placement of pedicle screws in subaxial column with freehand technique: B, favorable recommendation.

  6. Fast spin echo vs conventional spin echo in cervical spine imaging

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    Gillams, A.R.; Soto, J.A.; Carter, A.P. [Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical School and Boston City Hospital Imaging Foundation, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The major attraction of fast-spin-echo (FSE) imaging is reduced acquisition time; however, careful review of the literature reveals many weaknesses: phase-encoded blurring, truncation artefact, bright fat signal, reduced magnetic susceptibility and increased motion artefact. Our aim was a prospective, blinded comparison of FSE and conventional spin echo (CSE) in the cervical spine. Both sequences were performed in 43 patients (19 males and 24 females; mean age 45 years, range 15-66 years). Twenty-eight patients were studied at 1.5 T and 15 at 0.5 T. Typical sequence parameters were: at 1.5 T, TR/TE 2000/90 CSE and 3000/120 FSE, and at 0.5 T, 2200/80 CSE and 2800/120 FSE. Time saved on the FSE was used to increase the matrix and the number of acquisitions. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the images for pathology, artefacts, disc signal intensity, thecal sac compression and image quality. Ten patients had cord lesions; 2 (20%) were missed on CSE. In 4 of 10 patients with moderate/severe thecal sac compression, the degree of stenosis was apparently exaggerated on CSE. The mean degree of confidence for the CSE sequences was 1.8 and for the FSE 1.1, where 1 is optimal. For cervical spine imaging, FSE should be preferred to CSE. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  7. Cervical spine injury. Diagnosis, prognosis and management; Trauma der Halswirbelsaeule. Diagnose, Prognose und Management

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    Schueller-Weidekamm, C. [AKH, Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie und Muskuloskelettale Radiologie

    2008-05-15

    Cervical spine injuries are a common occurrence in multi-trauma patients and should be taken into account when planning further clinical management. This review describes in detail upper and lower cervical spine injuries and introduces the sub-axial injury classification (SLIC) that is based on three components: injury morphology, integrity of the discoligamentous complex and the neurologic status of the patient. If the total SLIC score is <3, non-surgical treatment is recommended. If the total is {>=}5, operative treatment is indicated as such a score is associated with instability and probably neurologic deficits. The precise diagnosis of the radiologist, which would include the SLIC classification, should facilitate clinical decision-making about further management. (orig.) [German] Halswirbelsaeulenverletzungen sind bei polytraumatisierten Patienten haeufig und sollten beim klinischen Management des Patienten beruecksichtigt werden. Verletzungen der oberen Halswirbelsaeule werden als Sonderformen eingeteilt. Die subaxialen Verletzungen koennen nach der SLIC-Klassifikation ('sub-axial injury classification') gescort werden, die auf der Morphologie der Verletzung, dem diskoligamentaeren Komplex und dem neurologischen Status basiert. Bei einem Score <3 wird ein konservatives Management empfohlen. Bei einem Score {>=}5 sollte eine operative Versorgung der Halswirbelsaeule vorgenommen werden, da die Verletzung eine Instabilitaet und moeglicherweise auch ein neurologisches Defizit verursacht. Anhand einer praezisen Diagnose des Radiologen unter Beruecksichtigung der SLIC-Klassifikation sollte dem Kliniker die Entscheidung fuer das weitere Management erleichtert werden. (orig.)

  8. 颈椎损伤的现场救治%First aid of cervical spine injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张进军

    2013-01-01

    Spinal injury is a common disease in pre-hospital emergency .Timely and correct rescue is im-portant to save lives and improve prognosis for cervical spine injury patients .In this paper ,the author makes a brief introduction on the first aid of cervical spine injury based on the clinical and teaching experience and the related lit -erature analysis in recent years ,so as to provide a reference for the relevant clinical workers .%颈椎损伤是院前急救工作中的常见病、多发病。及时正确的现场救治对于挽救颈椎损伤患者的生命和改善预后具有极为重要的意义。本文结合笔者近年来的临床、教学经验和相关文献分析,就颈椎损伤的现场急救做一简要介绍,可为相关临床工作者提供参考。

  9. Systematic review of flexion/extension radiography of the cervical spine in trauma patients

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    Sierink, J.C., E-mail: j.c.sierink@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lieshout, W.A.M. van, E-mail: w.a.vanlieshout@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M., E-mail: l.f.beenen@amc.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schep, N.W.L., E-mail: n.w.schep@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vandertop, W.P., E-mail: w.p.vandertop@amc.nl [Neurosurgical Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goslings, J.C., E-mail: j.c.goslings@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    Introduction: The aim of this review was to investigate whether Flexion/Extension (F/E) radiography adds diagnostic value to CT or MRI in the detection of cervical spine ligamentous injury and/or clinically significant cervical spine instability of blunt trauma patients. Methods: A systematic search of literature was done in Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. Primary outcome was sensitivity and specificity of F/E radiography. Secondary outcomes were the positive predicting value (PPV) and negative predicting value (NPV) (with CT or MRI as reference tests due to the heterogeneity of the included studies) of each modality and the quality of F/E radiography. Results: F/E radiography was overall regarded to be inferior to CT or MRI in the detection of ligamentous injury. This was reflected by the high specificity and NPV for CT with F/E as reference test (ranging from 97 to 100% and 99 to 100% respectively) and the ambiguous results for F/E radiography with MRI as its reference test (0–98% and 0–83% for specificity and NPV respectively). Image quality of F/E radiography was reported to have 31 to 70% adequacy, except in two studies which reported an adequacy of respectively 4 and 97%. Conclusion: This systematic review of the literature shows that F/E radiography adds little diagnostic value to the evaluation of blunt trauma patients compared to CT and MRI, especially in those cases where CT or MRI show no indication of ligamentous injury.

  10. Management of neglected cervical spine dislocation: a study of six cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vijay Goni; Nirmal Raj Gopinathan; Vibhu Krishnan; Rajesh Kumar; Avinash Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To report a case series of six neglected cervical spine dislocations without neurological deficit,which were managed operatively.Methods:The study was conducted fromAugust 2010 to December 2011 and cases were selected from the out-patient department of Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research,India.The patients were in the age group of 30 to 50 years.All patients were operated via both anterior and posterior approaches.Results:During the immediate postoperative period,five (83.33%) patients had normal neurological status.One (16.67%) patient who had C5-C6 subluxation developed neurological deficit with sensory loss below C6 level and motor power of 2/5 in the lower limb and 3/5 in the upper limb below C6 level.Conclusion:There is no role of skull traction in neglected distractive flexion injuries to cervical spine delayed for more than 3 weeks.Posterior followed by anterior approach saves much time.If both approaches are to be done in the same sitting,there is no need for instrumentation posteriorly.But if staged procedure is planed,posterior stabilization is recommended,as there is a risk of deterioration in neurological status.

  11. Evaluation of the SLICS use in the treatment of subaxial cervical spine injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halisson Y. F. da Cruz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The SLICS (Sub-axial Cervical Spine Injury Classification System was proposed to help in the decision-making of sub-axial cervical spine trauma (SCST, even though the literature assessing its safety and efficacy is scarce. Method We compared a cohort series of patients surgically treated based on surgeon’s preference with patients treated based on the SLICS. Results From 2009-10, 12 patients were included. The SLICS score ranged from 2 to 9 points (mean of 5.5. Two patients had the SLICS < 4 points. From 2011-13, 28 patients were included. The SLICS score ranged from 4 to 9 points (mean of 6. There was no neurological deterioration in any group. Conclusion After using the SLICS there was a decrease in the number of patients with less severe injuries that were treated surgically. This suggests that the SLICS can be helpful in differentiating mild from severe injuries, potentially improving the results of treatment.

  12. The Occupancy of the Components in the Cervical Spine and Their Changes with Extension and Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayıt, Emrah; Aghdasi, Bayan; Daubs, Michael D; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objectives The kinematics of the cervical spine has been investigated by many researchers. However, the occupancy of the disk bulges, spinal cord, ligamentum flavum, and the rest of the canal as well as the changes of these structures with motion have not yet been investigated. The goal of this study is to investigate these dynamic changes. Methods The kinetic magnetic resonance images of 248 patients (124 men and 124 women) were evaluated, and the occupancy of each structure for each cervical level at neutral, flexion, and extension were calculated. Results Whole canal anteroposterior (AP) diameters showed significant differences between neutral-extension and flexion-extension at the C4-C5 and C5-C6 levels (p flexion and flexion-extension at the C4-C5, C5-C6, C6-C7, and C7-T1 levels (p flexion-extension and neutral-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p flexion at the C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p flexion-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p flexion at the C5-C6 and C6-C7 levels (p flexion at the C2-C3 and C3-C4 levels (p flexion-extension at the C3-C4 and C4-C5 levels (p flexion-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p flexion at the C5-C6 and C6-C7 levels (p cervical spine for each level was revealed by this study. In addition, the dynamic changes in the cervical spine with flexion and extension were seen to have different characteristics for each level.

  13. [Cervical myofascial pain syndrome. Narrative review of physiotherapeutic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capó-Juan, M A

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a complex and multifactorial phenomenon that depends on the interaction of biopsychosocial factors. Between 15-25% of adults suffer from chronic pain at some point in their lives. Cervical chronic pain is considered a public health problem affecting 9.6% men and 21.9% women, according to the latest National Health Survey 2011-12. A high percentage of medical consultations due to muscle pain turn out to be myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Its existence implies the presence of myofascial trigger points which can be latent or active throughout the whole population. The aim of this review is to update knowledge in the various therapies applied by the physiotherapist in the treatment of this syndrome at cervical level. From the review it appears that some of the most used techniques that may be useful in the short or medium term are: ischemic compression and/or trigger point pressure release and dry needling. Furthermore, various combinations of treatment modalities are used to treat this syndrome, taking other aspects into account, such as education.

  14. SpineData – a Danish clinical registry of people with chronic back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Peter Kent,1 Alice Kongsted,1,2 Tue Secher Jensen,2,3 Hanne B Albert,4 Berit Schiøttz-Christensen,3 Claus Manniche3 1Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; 2Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark; 3Research Department, Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Hospital Lillebaelt, Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Middelfart, Denmark; 4The Modic Clinic, Odense, Denmark Background: Large-scale clinical registries are increasingly recognized as important resources for quality assurance and research to inform clinical decision-making and health policy. We established a clinical registry (SpineData in a conservative care setting where more than 10,000 new cases of spinal pain are assessed each year. This paper describes the SpineData registry, summarizes the characteristics of its clinical population and data, and signals the availability of these data as a resource for collaborative research projects. Methods: The SpineData registry is an Internet-based system that captures patient data electronically at the point of clinical contact. The setting is the government-funded Medical Department of the Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Hospital Lillebaelt, where patients receive a multidisciplinary assessment of their chronic spinal pain. Results: Started in 2011, the database by early 2015 contained information on more than 36,300 baseline episodes of patient care, plus the available 6-month and 12-month follow-up data for these episodes. The baseline questionnaire completion rate has been 93%; 79% of people were presenting with low back pain as their main complaint, 6% with mid-back pain, and 15% with neck pain. Collectively, across the body regions and measurement time points, there are approximately 1,980 patient-related variables in the database across a broad range of biopsychosocial factors. To date, 36 research

  15. The accuracy of the Oculus Rift virtual reality head-mounted display during cervical spine mobility measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Chen, Karen B; Lin, Jia-Hua; Radwin, Robert G

    2015-02-26

    An inertial sensor-embedded virtual reality (VR) head-mounted display, the Oculus Rift (the Rift), monitors head movement so the content displayed can be updated accordingly. While the Rift may have potential use in cervical spine biomechanics studies, its accuracy in terms of cervical spine mobility measurement has not yet been validated. In the current study, a VR environment was designed to guide participants to perform prescribed neck movements. The cervical spine kinematics was measured by both the Rift and a reference motion tracking system. Comparison of the kinematics data between the Rift and the tracking system indicated that the Rift can provide good estimates on full range of motion (from one side to the other side) during the performed task. Because of inertial sensor drifting, the unilateral range of motion (from one side to neutral posture) derived from the Rift is more erroneous. The root-mean-square errors over a 1-min task were within 10° for each rotation axis. The error analysis further indicated that the inertial sensor drifted approximately 6° at the beginning of a trial during the initialization. This needs to be addressed when using the Rift in order to more accurately measure cervical spine kinematics. It is suggested that the front cover of the Rift should be aligned against a vertical plane during its initialization.

  16. Narrative review of the in vivo mechanics of the cervical spine after anterior arthrodesis as revealed by dynamic biplane radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderst, William

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis is the standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine and is performed over 150,000 times annually in the United States. The primary long-term concern after this surgery is adjacent segment disease (ASD), defined as new clinical symptoms adjacent to a previous fusion. The incidence of adjacent segment disease is approximately 3% per year, meaning that within 10 years of the initial surgery, approximately 25% of cervical arthrodesis patients require a second procedure to address symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration. Despite the high incidence of ASD, until recently, there was little data available to characterize in vivo adjacent segment mechanics during dynamic motion. This manuscript reviews recent advances in our knowledge of adjacent segment mechanics after cervical arthrodesis that have been facilitated by the use of dynamic biplane radiography. The primary observations from these studies are that current in vitro test paradigms often fail to replicate in vivo spine mechanics before and after arthrodesis, that intervertebral mechanics vary among cervical motion segments, and that joint arthrokinematics (i.e., the interactions between adjacent vertebrae) are superior to traditional kinematics measurements for identifying altered adjacent segment mechanics after arthrodesis. Future research challenges are identified, including improving the biofidelity of in vitro tests, determining the natural history of in vivo spine mechanics, conducting prospective longitudinal studies on adjacent segment kinematics and arthrokinematics after single and multiple-level arthrodesis, and creating subject-specific computational models to accurately estimate muscle forces and tissue loading in the spine during dynamic activities.

  17. Comparison of Macintosh, Truview EVO2, Glidescope, and Airwayscope laryngoscope use in patients with cervical spine immobilization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M A

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Pentax AWS, Glidescope, and the Truview EVO2, in comparison with the Macintosh laryngoscope, when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilization using manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilization.

  18. No trauma of the cervical spine. Automatic headrest adjustment; Kein HWS-Trauma. Kopfstuetze automatisch naeher am Kopf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmuck, M.; Gaebelein, J. [Proma GmbH, Lichtenfels (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    A new headrest system developed by Proma considerably reduces the risk of injuries of the cervical spine. The idea behind it is simple and innovative: Apart from the automatic height adjustment, the headrest also has an automatic adjustment function to keep it in a position close to the head. (orig.)

  19. Tracheal intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilization: a comparison of the Airwayscope, LMA CTrach, and the Macintosh laryngoscopes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M A

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Pentax AWS, and the LMA CTrach, in comparison with the Macintosh laryngoscope, when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilization using manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilization.

  20. The effects of weightbath traction hydrotherapy as a component of complex physical therapy in disorders of the cervical and lumbar spine: a controlled pilot study with follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Mihály; Molnár, Levente; Dobai, József; Oláh, Csaba; Fehér, Judit; Bender, Tamás

    2008-06-01

    The therapeutic modalities available for the conservative management of chronic cervical and lumbar pain include underwater traction, the usefulness of which is not universally acknowledged. No reports have been published on clinical trials evaluating underwater traction. This study was intended to ascertain any beneficial impact of weightbath therapy on the clinical parameters and quality of life of patients with cervical/lumbar discopathy. The study population comprised 72 subjects. Two groups of 18 patients each received underwater traction therapy of the cervical or lumbar spine with add-on McKenzie exercises and iontophoresis. The remaining two groups, treated with exercises and iontophoresis, served as controls. VAS and SF36 scores, range of motion were monitored to appraise therapeutic efficacy in cervical discopathy, whereas these parameters were supplemented by the Oswestry index in lumbar discopathy. A MRI scan was done at baseline and after 3 months of follow-up. Underwater cervical or lumbar traction therapy for discopathy achieved significant improvement of all study parameters, which was still evident 3 months later. Among the controls, significant improvement of just a single parameter was seen in patients with lumbar, and of two parameters in those with cervical discopathy. Underwater traction therapy effectively mitigates pain, enhances joint flexibility, and improves the quality of life of patients with cervical or lumbar discopathy. The equipment required to administer weightbath therapy is simple to install and treatment technique is straightforward.

  1. Direction-Specific Impairments in Cervical Range of Motion in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: Influence of Head Posture and Gravitationally Induced Torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Martin; Svedmark, Åsa; Srinivasan, Divya; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical range of motion (ROM) is commonly assessed in clinical practice and research. In a previous study we decomposed active cervical sagittal ROM into contributions from lower and upper levels of the cervical spine and found level- and direction-specific impairments in women with chronic non-specific neck pain. The present study aimed to validate these results and investigate if the specific impairments can be explained by the neutral posture (defining zero flexion/extension) or a movement strategy to avoid large gravitationally induced torques on the cervical spine. Methods Kinematics of the head and thorax was assessed in sitting during maximal sagittal cervical flexion/extension (high torque condition) and maximal protraction (low torque condition) in 120 women with chronic non-specific neck pain and 40 controls. We derived the lower and upper cervical angles, and the head centre of mass (HCM), from a 3-segment kinematic model. Neutral head posture was assessed using a standardized procedure. Findings Previous findings of level- and direction-specific impairments in neck pain were confirmed. Neutral head posture was equal between groups and did not explain the direction-specific impairments. The relative magnitude of group difference in HCM migration did not differ between high and low torques conditions, lending no support for our hypothesis that impairments in sagittal ROM are due to torque avoidance behaviour. Interpretation The direction- and level-specific impairments in cervical sagittal ROM can be generalised to the population of women with non-specific neck pain. Further research is necessary to clarify if torque avoidance behaviour can explain the impairments. PMID:28099504

  2. Pain, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Cervical Miyofascial Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Dundar

    2014-03-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of depression, pain and disability in patients with chronic cervical miyofascial pain syndrome (MPS and to determine their association with quality of life. Material and Method: Forty patients with Cervical MPS and 40 age and sex-matched healthy controls enrolled in this study. The social and demographic characteristics of the patients and controls were examined. All patients and controls were evaluated with respect to pain (at night, rest and movement and assessed by visual analog scale (VAS. Neck disability index (NDI was used to calculate functional disability. Quality of life was evaluated with the the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36. Also all of the patients and controls underwent Beck depression inventory (BDI. Results: There was no statistical difference between the patients and control cases according to demographical data. The SF-36 scores of the study patients were lower than controls. NDI, BDI and VAS scores were higher in the patients with chronic cervical MPS compared to controls. BDI scores of the patients with chronic cervical MPS  were negatively and closely associated with subparameters of the SF-36 (physical function (r:-0,599, p<0.001, role limitations due to physical functioning (r:-0,558, p<0.001, bodily pain (r:-0.540, p<0.001, general health (r:- 0,708 p<0.001, vitality (r:-0,692, p<0.001, social functioning (r:-0,559, p<0.001, role limitations due to emotional problems (r:-0,537, p<0.001 and mental health (r: -0,787, p<0.001. Discussion: BDI scores are higher in patients with chronic cervical MPS than healthy controls and negatively affect their quality of life. Psychiatric evaluation of the patients with chronic cervical MPS may improve their quality of life and treatments outcome.

  3. The effect of the PostureJac on deep cervical flexor endurance: implications in the management of cervicogenic headache and mechanical neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makofsky, Howard W; Douris, Peter; Goldstein, Leonard B; Discepolo, Adam; Grion, Kelly; Kushnir, Garry; Malner, Stacie; Singh, Jessica; Urgolites, Lisa; Zic, Frank; Oricchio, Jacqueline

    2011-07-01

    The convergence of cervical and trigeminal afferents on second-order neurons in the trigeminocervical nucleus may refer pain from the upper cervical spine into the head and face. Furthermore, "bi-directional interactions" between trigeminal and upper cervical afferents may also explain neck symptoms of trigeminal origin (e.g., migraine). It is known that cervicogenic headache sufferers present with several musculoskeletal changes including poor endurance of the deep cervical flexor muscles. These intrinsic muscles of the neck contribute to stabilization and protection of the cervical spine and are critical for the control of both intervertebral motion and the cervical lordosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of the PostureJac (SomatoCentric Systems, Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada), a posture support and exercise jacket, was effective in enhancing deep cervical muscle endurance. Forty-five (45) female subjects, between the ages of 18 and 40 years, were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of the no-treatment control, the treatment-control (table stabilization), and the experimental (PostureJac) group. The outcome measure of deep cervical flexor muscle endurance was based on the Flexor Endurance Test and was recorded in seconds. The results indicated that the PostureJac group was superior to the no-treatment control (p=.001) and the treatment-control (p=.004) groups in terms of increasing endurance of the deep cervical flexors. Consequently, the PostureJac may be a useful therapeutic tool in the management of cervicogenic headache and mechanical neck pain.

  4. Usefulness of MRI detection of cervical spine and brain injuries in the evaluation of abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadom, Nadja [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Khademian, Zarir; Vezina, Gilbert; Shalaby-Rana, Eglal [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Rice, Amy [Independent Consultant (Biostatistics), Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Hinds, Tanya [Children' s National Medical Center, Child and Adolescent Protection Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-07-15

    In the evaluation of children younger than 3 years with intracranial hemorrhage it can be difficult to determine whether the cause of hemorrhage was traumatic, and if so, whether abusive head trauma (AHT) is a possibility. Cervical spine MRI is not a routine part of the nationally recommended imaging workup for children with suspected abusive head trauma. There is increasing evidence that spinal injuries are found at autopsy or MRI in abused children. However the prevalence of cervical spine injuries in children evaluated for abusive head trauma is unknown. We sought to determine both the incidence and the spectrum of cervical spine and brain injuries in children being evaluated for possible abusive head trauma. We also examined the relationship between cervical and brain MRI findings and selected study outcome categories. This study is a 3-year retrospective review of children evaluated for abusive head trauma. Inclusion criteria were: children with head trauma seen at our institution between 2008 and 2010, age younger than 36 months, availability of diagnostic-quality brain and cervical spine MRI, and child abuse team involvement because abusive head trauma was a possibility. A child abuse pediatrician and pediatric radiologists, all with board certification, were involved in data collection, image interpretation and data analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata v12.1. The study included 74 children (43 boys, 31 girls) with a mean age of 164 days (range, 20-679 days). Study outcomes were categorized as: n = 26 children with accidental head trauma, n = 38 with abusive head trauma (n = 18 presumptive AHT, n = 20 suspicious for AHT), and n = 10 with undefined head trauma. We found cervical spine injuries in 27/74 (36%) children. Most cervical spine injuries were ligamentous injuries. One child had intrathecal spinal blood and two had spinal cord edema; all three of these children had ligamentous injury. MRI signs of cervical injury did not show a

  5. Effect of cryotherapy on the lumbar spine in elderly men with back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giemza, Czesław; Matczak-Giemza, Magdalena; Ostrowska, Bożena; Bieć, Ewa; Doliński, Mirosław

    2014-09-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) is a procedure which is more and more often successfully applied in medicine. Used in physiotherapy programs improves the efficiency of physiotherapeutic exercises applied in different aliments. The aim of the research was to determine the influence of WBC treatment on the improvement of spine activity in elderly men. The evaluation was based on subjects suffering from chronic lower back pain. The research was conducted on 96 male in the age of 65-75 years suffering from chronic pain in the lumbar spine, lasting >3 months. All the subjects performed physical exercises at a gym. Half of the examined patients performed only physical exercises while the second half of the group participated in WBC before performing the same exercises. The research evaluated the mobility of lumbar spine at all movement planes and examined the values of active potentials of erector spinae in the lumbar part of the spine. The group of men who participated in WBC showed significantly lower values of active potentials of erector spinae muscles in the lumbar part of the spine and a significant increase in the range of the lumbar spine mobility, in comparison to the group which did not use WBC.

  6. Cervical spine segmental vertebral motion in healthy volunteers feigning restriction of neck flexion and extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Filadelfio; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Papathanasiou, Matthildi; Kapreli, Eleni; Bonelli, Aurelio; Sgambetterra, Sergio; Ferrari, Robert

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain comparative data concerning the percentage contribution of segmental cervical vertebral motion to the cervical range of motion (ROM) in healthy volunteers under two conditions: (1) normal, voluntary neck flexion and extension and (2) feigned restriction of neck flexion and extension. Each healthy subject's angular motion over forward cervical flexion and extension was measured first by X-ray analysis during normal, voluntary motion. Then the subjects were asked to pretend that they had a 50% restricted neck range due to pain or stiffness and thus to move in both flexion and extension only as far as about 50% of their normal range. A total of 26 healthy subjects (ten males and sixteen females, age 28.7+/-7.7 years) participated. The total angular motion from C2 to C7 was normal in the unrestricted condition and was significantly reduced in the feigned restriction condition (prange. A greater percentage contribution was made by C2-C3 and C3-C4 than under normal conditions (Prange (pcervical segments and less contribution to the angular rotation by the lowest cervical segment. Feigners of restricted neck range thus produce a pattern different from nonfeigning subjects.

  7. Degenerative diseases of the cervical spine: comparison of a multiecho data image combination sequence with a magnetisation transfer saturation pulse and cervical myelography and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorenbeck, U. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of the Saarland, 66421, Homburg (Germany); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss Allee 11, 93042, Regensburg (Germany); Schreyer, A.G.; Held, P.; Feuerbach, S.; Seitz, J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss Allee 11, 93042, Regensburg (Germany); Schlaier, J. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss Allee 11, 93042, Regensburg (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Assessing degenerative disease in the cervical spine remains a challenge. There is much controversy about imaging the cervical spine using MRI. Our aim in this prospective study was to compare a T2*-weighted 2D spoiled gradient-echo multiecho sequence (MEDIC) with a magnetisation transfer saturation pulse with cervical myelography and postmyelographic CT. Using an assessment scale we looked at the vertebral bodies, intervertebral discs, neural foramina, anterior and posterior nerve roots, grey matter, ligamenta flava, oedema in the spinal cord and stenosis of the spinal canal. We also evaluated postmyelography CT and the MEDIC sequence for assessing narrowing of the neural foramina in a cadaver cervical spine. We examined 67 disc levels in 18 patients, showing 18 disc prolapses and 21 osteophytes narrowing the spinal canal or the neural foramina. All MRI studies showed these abnormalities findings equally well. Postmyelography CT was significantly better for showing the bony structures and the anterior and posterior nerve roots. The MEDIC sequence provided excellent demonstration of soft-tissue structures such as the intervertebral disc and ligamentum flavum. No statistical differences between the imaging modalities were found in the assessment of narrowing of the neural foramina or the extent of spinal stenosis. The cadaver measurements showed no overestimation of abnormalities using the MEDIC sequence. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of ultrasound as a diagnostic modality for detecting potentially unstable cervical spine fractures in pediatric severe traumatic brain injury: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early cervical spine clearance is extremely important in unconscious trauma patients and may be difficult to achieve in emergency setting. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of standard portable ultrasound in detecting potentially unstable cervical spine injuries in severe traumatic brain injured (TBI patients during initial resuscitation. Materials and Methods: This retro-prospective pilot study carried out over 1-month period (June-July 2013 after approval from the institutional ethics committee. Initially, the technique of cervical ultrasound was standardized by the authors and tested on ten admitted patients of cervical spine injury. To assess feasibility in the emergency setting, three hemodynamically stable pediatric patients (≦18 years with isolated severe head injury (Glasgow coma scale ≤8 coming to emergency department underwent an ultrasound examination. Results: The best window for the cervical spine was through the anterior triangle using the linear array probe (6-13 MHz. In the ten patients with documented cervical spine injury, bilateral facet dislocation at C5-C6 was seen in 4 patients and at C6-C7 was seen in 3 patients. C5 burst fracture was present in one and cervical vertebra (C2 anterolisthesis was seen in one patient. Cervical ultrasound could easily detect fracture lines, canal compromise and ligamental injury in all cases. Ultrasound examination of the cervical spine was possible in the emergency setting, even in unstable patients and could be done without moving the neck. Conclusions: Cervical ultrasound may be a useful tool for detecting potentially unstable cervical spine injury in TBI patients, especially those who are hemodynamically unstable.

  9. Pediatric cervical spine fracture caused by an adult 3-point seatbelt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Robert Jay; Badawy, Mohamed K

    2008-02-01

    The development and use of seatbelts has saved numerous lives and prevented serious injuries in the setting of automobile crashes. However, restraints designed for adults are not necessarily effective in preventing injury to small children and may actually be harmful. Here, we present a case of upper cervical spine fracture in a 5-year-old female patient caused by neck flexion over an inappropriately applied adult 3-point seatbelt during a motor vehicle collision. The American Academy of Pediatrics currently advises against the use of vehicle safety belts until the shoulder belt can be positioned across the chest with the lap belt snug across the thighs. As clinicians who care for children, it is imperative that we continue to educate parents about proper use of age-appropriate child safety restraints.

  10. Course of atlanto-axial involvement and disc narrowing of the cervical spine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Carvalho, A.; Graudal, H.

    1981-07-01

    In 188 patients with rheumatoid arthritis 585 radiological examinations of the cervical spine were performed. Subluxation of C1-2 was found more often than expected; it was often the only radiological change in that segment, and its degree was not related to the duration of the disease. Lateral radiographs taken in full flexion were important for the diagnosis. Age over 40 years at the onset of RA, increased ESR at least on one occasion and seropositivity were related to more severe degrees of involvement. The presence of subcutaneous nodules, high titres of the Rose-Waaler reaction and the presence of antinuclear antibodies had no definite relation to the degree of involvement.

  11. Vertebral pain in helicopter pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, R.; Delahaye, R. P.; Metges, P. J.; VICENS

    1980-01-01

    Pathological forms of spinal pain engendered by piloting helicopters were clinically studied. Lumbalgia and pathology of the dorsal and cervical spine are discussed along with their clinical and radiological signs and origins.

  12. Are magnetic resonance flexion views useful in evaluating the cervical spine of patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reijnierse, M.; Kroon, H.M.; Bloem, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Breedveld, F.C. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Hansen, B. [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Pope, T.L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem (United States)

    2000-02-01

    Objective. To determine whether MR imaging in flexion adds value relative to imaging in the neutral position with respect to displaying involvement of the subarachnoid space, brainstem and spinal cord. Design and patients. T1-weighted MR images of the cervical spine in 42 rheumatoid arthritis patients with cervical spine involvement were obtained and analyzed prospectively. We assessed changes between images obtained in the neutral position and following active flexion, especially horizontal atlantoaxial and subaxial motion, presence or absence of brainstem compression, subarachnoid space involvement at the atlantoaxial and subaxial level and the cervicomedullary angle. Vertical atlantoaxial subluxation and the amount of pannus were correlated with motion and change in subarachnoid space. Results. The flexion images showed horizontal atlantoaxial motion in 21 patients and subaxial motion in one patient. The flexion view displayed brainstem compression in only one patient. Involvement of the subarachnoid space increased at the atlantoaxial level in eight (19%) patients (P=0.004) and at the level below C2 in five (12%) patients (P=0.03). There were no patients with a normal subarachnoid space in neutral position and compression in the flexed position. The cervicomedullary angle changed significantly with flexion. Vertical atlantoaxial subluxation and the amount of pannus did not show a significant correlation with motion or subarachnoid space involvement. Conclusion. MR imaging in the flexed position shows a statistically significant narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the atlantoaxial level and below C2. Cord compression is only observed on flexion views if the subarachnoid space in neutral position is already decreased. MR imaging in the flexed position might be useful, since subarachnoid space involvement may be an indicator for the development of neurologic dysfunction. (orig.)

  13. The role of B-mode ultrasonography in the musculoskeletal anatomical evaluation of the cervical region of the dog spine

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    Cibely G. Sarto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study characterized the normal musculoskeletal anatomy of the cervical segment of the spine of dogs by means of B-mode ultrasonography. The objective was to establish the role of B-mode ultrasonography for the anatomical evaluation of the cervical spine segment in dogs, by comparing the ultrasonographic findings with images by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The ultrasound examination, in transverse and median sagittal sections, allowed to identify a part of the epaxial cervical musculature, the bone surface of the cervical vertebrae and parts of the spinal cord through restricted areas with natural acoustic windows, such as between the atlanto-occipital joint, axis and atlas, and axis and the third cervical vertebra. The images, on transverse and sagittal planes, by low-field magnetic resonance imaging, were superior for the anatomical identification of the structures, due to higher contrast between the different tissues in this modality. Computed tomography showed superiority for bone detailing when compared with ultrasonography. As for magnetic resonance imaging, in addition to the muscles and cervical vertebrae, it is possible to identify the cerebrospinal fluid and differentiate between the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral discs. Although not the scope of this study, with knowledge of the ultrasonographic anatomy of this region, it is believed that some lesions can be identified, yet in a limited manner, when compared with the information obtained mainly with magnetic resonance imaging. The ultrasound examination presented lower morphology diagnostic value compared with the other modalities.

  14. A comprehensive multimodal pain treatment reduces opioid consumption after multilevel spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Benny; Thomsen, Berit A

    2013-01-01

    and dizziness on POD 1-6. CONCLUSIONS: In this study of patients scheduled for multilevel spine surgery, it was demonstrated that compared to a historic group of patients receiving usual care, a comprehensive and standardized multimodal pain and PONV protocol significantly reduced opioid consumption, improved...... postoperative mobilization and presented concomitant low levels of nausea, sedation and dizziness....

  15. Return-to-Play Recommendations After Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Philip; Anissipour, Alireza; McGee, William; Lemak, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Context: Currently, there is a national focus on establishing and disseminating standardized guidelines for return to play for athletes at all levels of competition. As more data become available, protocols and guidelines are being refined and implemented to assist physicians, coaches, trainers, players, and parents in making decisions about return to play. To date, no standardized criteria for returning to play exist for injuries to the spine. Evidence Acquisition: Electronic databases including PubMed and MEDLINE and professional orthopaedic, neurosurgical, and spine organizational websites were reviewed between 1980 and 2015. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Although clinical guidelines have been published for return to play after spine injury, they are almost exclusively derived from expert opinion and clinical experience rather than from well-designed studies. Furthermore, recommendations differ and vary depending on anatomic location, type of sport, and surgery performed. Conclusion: Despite a lack of consensus and specific recommendations, there is universal agreement that athletes should be pain free, completely neurologically intact, and have full strength and range of motion before returning to play after spinal injury. PMID:26502187

  16. Primary leptomeningeal melanoma of the cervical spine mimicking a meningioma-a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Sascha; Fleck, Steffen K; Manwaring, Jotham; Vogelgesang, Silke; Langner, Soenke; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2014-08-01

    Background and Importance Primary leptomeningeal melanoma (PLM) is highly malignant and exceedingly rare. Due to its rarity, diagnostic and treatment paradigms have been slow to evolve. We report the first case of a PLM that mimics a cervical spine meningioma and then discuss the current clinical, radiologic, and pathologic diagnostic methodologies as well as expected outcomes related to this disease. Clinical Presentation A 54-year-old woman presented a dural-based extramedullary solid mass ventral to the C2-C3 spinal cord causing spinal cord compression without cord signal changes, characteristic of meningioma. Intraoperative microscopic inspection revealed numerous black spots littering the surface of the dura; the tumor itself was yellow in appearance and had a soft consistency. Pathologic analysis of the specimen revealed a malignant melanin-containing tumor. No primary site was found, so a diagnosis of primary leptomeningeal melanoma was made, and the patient subsequently received interferon therapy. To date (2 years postoperatively), no local or systemic recurrence of the tumor has been identified. Conclusion As with most rare tumors, case reports constitute the vast majority of references to PLM. Only an increased awareness and an extensive report of each individual case can help diagnose and clarify the nature of PLM. Clinicians need to be aware of such malignant conditions when diagnosing benign tumoral lesions of the spine such as meningiomas.

  17. Delayed Esophageal Pseudodiverticulum after Anterior Cervical Spine Fixation: Report of 2 Cases

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    Ali Sadrizadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although perforation of the esophagus, in the anterior cervical spine fixation, is well established, cases with delayed onset, especially cases that present pseudodiverticulum, are not common. In addition, management of the perforation in this situation is debated.  Case Report:   Delayed esophageal pseudodiverticulum was managed in two patients with a history of anterior spine fixation. Patients were operated on, the loose plate and screws were extracted, the wall of the diverticulum was excised, the perforation on the nasogastric tube was suboptimally repaired, and a closed suction drain was placed there. The NGT was removed on the 7th day and barium swallow demonstrated no leakage at the operation site; therefore, oral feeding was started without any problem.  Conclusion:  In cases with delayed perforation, fistula, or diverticulum removal of anterior fixation instruments, gentle repair of the esophageal wall without persistence on definitive and optimal perforation closure, wide local drainage, early enteral nutrition via NGT, and antibiotic prescription is suggested.

  18. Conversion paralysis after cervical spine arthroplasty: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudissa, M; Castelain, J E; Boissière, L; Mariey, R; Pointillart, V; Vital, J M

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of conversion paralysis after cervical spine arthroplasty performed in a 45-year-old woman to treat cervico-brachial neuralgia due to a left-sided C6-C7 disc herniation. Upon awakening from the anaesthesia, she had left hemiplegia sparing the face, with normal sensory function. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain ruled out a stroke. MRI of the spinal cord showed artefacts from the cobalt-chrome prosthesis that precluded confident elimination of mechanical spinal cord compression. Surgery performed on the same day to substitute a cage for the prosthesis ruled out spinal cord compression, while eliminating the source of MRI artefacts. Findings were normal from follow-up MRI scans 1 and 15days later, as well as from neurophysiological testing (electromyogram and motor evoked potentials). The deficit resolved fully within the next 4days. A psychological assessment revealed emotional distress related to an ongoing divorce. The most likely diagnosis was conversion paralysis. Surgeons should be aware that conversion disorder might develop after a procedure on the spine, although the risk of litigation requires re-operation. Familiarity with specific MRI sequences that minimise artefacts can be valuable. A preoperative psychological assessment might improve the detection of patients at high risk for conversion disorder.

  19. Prospective Validation of Modified NEXUS Cervical Spine Injury Criteria in Low-risk Elderly Fall Patients

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    John Tran

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The National Emergency X-radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS criteria are used extensively in emergency departments to rule out C-spine injuries (CSI in the general population. Although the NEXUS validation set included 2,943 elderly patients, multiple case reports and the Canadian C-Spine Rules question the validity of applying NEXUS to geriatric populations. The objective of this study was to validate a modified NEXUS criteria in a low-risk elderly fall population with two changes: a modified definition for distracting injury and the definition of normal mentation. Methods: This is a prospective, observational cohort study of geriatric fall patients who presented to a Level I trauma center and were not triaged to the trauma bay. Providers enrolled non-intoxicated patients at baseline mental status with no lateralizing neurologic deficits. They recorded midline neck tenderness, signs of trauma, and presence of other distracting injury. Results: We enrolled 800 patients. One patient fall event was excluded due to duplicate enrollment, and four were lost to follow up, leaving 795 for analysis. Average age was 83.6 (range 65-101. The numbers in parenthesis after the negative predictive value represent confidence interval. There were 11 (1.4% cervical spine injuries. One hundred seventeen patients had midline tenderness and seven of these had CSI; 366 patients had signs of trauma to the face/neck, and 10 of these patients had CSI. Using signs of trauma to the head/neck as the only distracting injury and baseline mental status as normal alertness, the modified NEXUS criteria was 100% sensitive (CI [67.9-100] with a negative predictive value of 100 (98.7-100. Conclusion: Our study suggests that a modified NEXUS criteria can be safely applied to low-risk elderly falls.

  20. Comparison of intubation success and glottic visualization using King Vision and C-MAC videolaryngoscopes in patients with cervical spine injuries with cervical immobilization: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shravanalakshmi, Dhanyasi; Bidkar, Prasanna U.; Narmadalakshmi, K.; Lata, Suman; Mishra, Sandeep K.; Adinarayanan, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Glottic visualization can be difficult with cervical immobilization in patients with cervical spine injury. Indirect laryngoscopes may provide better glottic visualization in these groups of patients. Hence, we compared King Vision videolaryngoscope, C-MAC videolaryngoscope for endotracheal intubation in patients with proven/suspected cervical spine injury. Methods: After standard induction of anesthesia, 135 patients were randomized into three groups: group C (conventional C-MAC videolaryngoscope), group K (King Vision videolaryngoscope), and group D (D blade C-MAC videolaryngoscope). Cervical immobilization was maintained with Manual in line stabilization with anterior part of cervical collar removed. First pass intubation success, time for intubation, and glottic visualization (Cormack – Lehane grade and percentage of glottic opening) were noted. Intubation difficulty score (IDS) was used for grading difficulty of intubation. Five-point Likert scale was used for ease of insertion of laryngoscope. Results: First attempt success rate were 100% (45/45), 93.3% (42/45), and 95.6% (43/45) in patients using conventional C-MAC, King Vision, and D blade C-MAC videolaryngoscopes, respectively. Time for intubation in seconds was significantly faster with conventional C-MAC videolaryngoscope (23.3 ± 4.7) compared to D blade C-MAC videolaryngoscope (26.7 ± 7.1), whereas conventional C-MAC and King Vision were comparable (24.9 ± 7.2). Good grade glottic visualization was obtained with all the three videolaryngoscopes. Conclusion: All the videolaryngoscopes provided good glottic visualization and first attempt success rate. Conventional C-MAC insertion was significantly easier. We conclude that all the three videolaryngoscopes can be used effectively in patients with cervical spine injury. PMID:28217398

  1. Role of Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging in Degenerative Cervical Spine Disease: a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszek, A; Bladowska, J; Podgórski, P; Sąsiadek, M J

    2016-09-01

    In the article we review the current role of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a modern magnetic resonance (MR) technique, in the diagnosis and the management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the most serious complication of degenerative cervical spine disease (DCSD). The pathogenesis of DCSD is presented first with an emphasis placed on the pathological processes leading to myelopathy development. An understanding of the pathophysiological background of DCSD is necessary for appropriate interpretation of MR images, both plain and DTI. Conventional MRI is currently the imaging modality of choice in DCSD and provides useful information concerning the extent of spondylotic changes and degree of central spinal canal stenosis; however its capability in myelopathy detection is limited. DTI is a state of the art imaging method which recently has emerged in spinal cord investigations and has the potential to detect microscopic alterations which are beyond the capability of plain MRI. In the article we present the physical principles underlying DTI which determine its sensitivity, followed by an overview of technical aspects of DTI acquisition with a special consideration of spinal cord imaging. Finally, the scientific reports concerning DTI utility in DSCD are also reviewed. DTI detects spinal cord injury in the course of DCSD earlier than any other method and could be useful in predicting surgical outcomes in CMS patients, however technical and methodology improvement as well as standardization of acquisition protocols and postprocessing methods among the imaging centers are needed before its implementation in clinical practice.

  2. Inertial sensor real-time feedback enhances the learning of cervical spine manipulation: a prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical Spinal Manipulation (CSM) is considered a high-level skill of the central nervous system because it requires bimanual coordinated rhythmical movements therefore necessitating training to achieve proficiency. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of real-time feedback on the performance of CSM. Methods Six postgraduate physiotherapy students attending a training workshop on Cervical Spine Manipulation Technique (CSMT) using inertial sensor derived real-time feedback participated in this study. The key variables were pre-manipulative position, angular displacement of the thrust and angular velocity of the thrust. Differences between variables before and after training were investigated using t-tests. Results There were no significant differences after training for the pre-manipulative position (rotation p = 0.549; side bending p = 0.312) or for thrust displacement (rotation p = 0.247; side bending p = 0.314). Thrust angular velocity demonstrated a significant difference following training for rotation (pre-training mean (sd) 48.9°/s (35.1); post-training mean (sd) 96.9°/s (53.9); p = 0.027) but not for side bending (p = 0.521). Conclusion Real-time feedback using an inertial sensor may be valuable in the development of specific manipulative skill. Future studies investigating manipulation could consider a randomized controlled trial using inertial sensor real time feedback compared to traditional training. PMID:24942483

  3. Methodological quality and outcomes of studies addressing manual cervical spine examinations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerwöger, Dieter

    2006-05-01

    The aims of this review were, first to rate the methodological quality of studies which investigate the reliability of manual tests for cervical spine dysfunctions by applying a new quality assessment tool; secondly to compare the outcomes of these studies. The literature search included databases of CINAHL, MEDLINE, AMED, AMI, and SPORT DISCUS, the Cochrane Library, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), the National Library of Medicine (PubMed), Factiva, the EBSCOT HOST Research Database, online journal databases of ELSEVIER Science periodicals, LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, ELSEVIER Science @ Direct, THIEME ONLINE, and BLACKWELL SYNERGY. The application of the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool (QUADAS) to the 15 studies which met the inclusion criteria showed methodological weaknesses such as not considering an independent reference standard, or a representative study population. The studies demonstrated methodological strength in describing selection criteria and in interpreting results. The studies' outcomes make the claim to be able to detect segmental cervical dysfunction based on a manual assessment only questionable. Further improvements in quality, uniform study designs, and a valid reference standard would be necessary in order to obtain more reliable data in the future.

  4. Imaging suspected cervical spine injury: Plain radiography or computed tomography? Systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, Gavin [Diagnostic Radiographer, Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust, Colchester General Hospital, Turner Road, Colchester, CO4 5JL Essex (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gavincain8@hotmail.com; Shepherdson, Jane; Elliott, Vicki; Svensson, Jon [Faculty of Health and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 9PT Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom); Brennan, Patrick [UCD School of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Health Science Building, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2010-02-15

    Aim: (1) to establish which modality offers the greatest accuracy in the detection of cervical spine injury (CSI) Following trauma: plain radiography or computed tomography (CT), and (2) make an evidence-based recommendation for the initial imaging modality of choice. Method: A systematic literature review was performed to identify primary research studies which compare the diagnostic accuracy of plain radiography and CT with the results of a reference standard in the detection of CSI. A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Science Direct and Pubmed Central databases was conducted. Results: Ten studies were identified. Critical appraisal identified limitations among all studies. There was heterogeneity in the sensitivity estimates for plain radiography, whereas estimates for CT were consistently high. Examination of the reported sensitivities shows that CT outperforms plain radiography in the detection of CSI. Conclusion: CT is superior to plain radiography in the detection of CSI. However, the optimal imaging strategy depends on the patients' relative risk of injury. If at high-risk cervical CT is indicated. If at low-risk the increased cost and radiation exposure mean that screening CT may not be warranted, good-quality plain radiographs are sufficient.

  5. Association between cervical spine and skull-base fractures and blunt cerebrovascular injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buch, Karen; Nguyen, Thanh; Norbash, Alex; Mian, Asim [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Mahoney, Eric; Burke, Peter [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Libby, Brandon; Calner, Paul [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) are associated with high morbidity and mortality and can lead to neurological deficits. The established criteria for patients undergoing CT angiography (CTA) for BCVI are broad, and can expose patients to radiation unnecessarily. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of BCVI in patients on CTA and determine presentations associated with the highest rates of BCVI. With IRB approval, patients were selected for CTA screening for BCVI according to a predefined set of criteria at our hospital between 2007 and 2010. Patients were identified from our institution's trauma database. CTAs were retrospectively reviewed for BCVI including vasospasm and dissection. Electronic medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and hospital course. Of 432 patients, vasospasm (n = 10) and/or dissection (n = 36) were found in 46 patients (10.6 %). BCVI was associated with cervical spine and/or skull-base fracture in 40/46 patients (87 %, P < 0.0001). Significant correlations were seen between dissection and fracture in 31/36 patients (86.2 %, p < 0.0001) and between BCVI and both neurological deficits and fractures (27/44, P < 0.0001). BCVI was significantly associated with cervical and/or skullbase fractures and neurological deficits with coexistent fractures. Patients with these injuries should be prioritized for rapid CTA evaluation for BCVI. (orig.)

  6. Facet joint injuries in acute cervical spine trauma : evaluation with CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jeon Ju; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Lee, Keon; Kwon, Hyeok Po; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Yun, Seong Mun [Dongkang General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate injury patterns of facet joints and associated soft tissue injuries in patients with acute traumatic cervical facet joint injuries. From among patients with cervical spine trauma, 27 with facet joint injuries, as seen on CT and MRI, were chosen for this study. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the location of facet joint injury, the presence or absence of facet dislocation or fracture, and other associated fractures. MR images were analyzed with regard to ligament injury, intervertebral disc injury, intervertebral disc herniation, and spinal cord injury. The most common location of facet joint injury was C6-7 level(n=10), followed by C5-6(n=8). Among these 27 patients with facet joint injuries, 12(44%) had bilateral injuries and 15(56%) unilateral injuries. Facet fractures were present in 17 cases(63%) and the fracture of inferior facet was more frequent than superior. Patterns of fracture were vertical, transverse, or comminuted, but vertical fracture was the most common. Various degrees of dislocation were observed in patients with facet fractures. Fractures other than facet included pillar(n=11), lamina(n=6), transverse process(n=14), body(n=13), and spinous process(n=3). On MR images, anterior longitudinal ligament injury was found in 8 patients(30%), posterior longitudinal ligament injury in 4(15%), and interspinous ligament injury in 20(74%). Twelve patients(44%) had spinal cord injuries including edema(n=8) and hemorrhage(n=4). Among patients with disc abnormalities, 11(41%) had intervertebral disc injuries, and traumatic disc herniations were found in nine. Traumatic cervical facet joint injuries were manifested as various patterns and frequently associated with other fractures or soft tissue injuries. Analysis of CT and MR findings of these injury patterns helped formulate a therapeutic plan and determine of prognosis.

  7. SELECTION OF SURGICAL APPROACH TO TREAT TRAUMATIC INSTABILITY OF SUBAXIAL CERVICAL SPINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Peng; LIANG Yu; GONG Yao-cheng; ZHENG Tao; ZHANG Xing-kai; WU Wen-jian

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcomes of surgical therapy in treating traumatic instability of subaxial cervical spine through either anterior or posterior approach. Methods according to the allen-Fergurson's classification, we retrospectively studied 42 cases of traumatic instability of subaxial cervical spine through either anterior or posterior surgical reconstruction. Patients requiring approach for either reduction or decompression were not included.Results The average follow-up interval was 3 years and 2 months. The anterior and posterior reconstructions were 24 and 18 cases, respectively. Before operation, the average scores of JOA and VAS were: 12.1 and 6.9 for anterior group, and 12.3 and 7.2 for posterior group. At the final assement, the scores of JOA and VAS improved to 16.0 and 2.2 for anterior group, and 15.7 and 2.6 for posterior group. The average ASIA motor scores of anterior and posterior group improved to 68.2 and 65.5 at the final follow-up from 58.4 and 59.7 before operation, respectively. The ASIA grade (A-E) was converted to a numeric score. The average scores before operation in the anterior and posterior group were 3.3 and 3.4, and increased to 3.8 and 3.7 at the final follow-up. After operation, there were different extent improvements of average radiological parameter, such as Cobb angle, vertebral body translation and disc height ratio. The average operation time and blood losing were 122 min and 125 mL for anterior group, and 153 min and 287 mL for posterior group. Fusion was achieved in all patients and 4 and 2 complications occurred at the anterior or posterior group.Conclusion The results showed that there were no obvious difference in parameters, such as neurological assements, functional grades, fusion rate, operation time and blood losing, between anterior and posterior group, except the virtues of anterior group in reconstruction and maintaining physiologic cervical lordosis and intervertrbal disc height occurred.

  8. MRI morphometric characterisation of the paediatric cervical spine and spinal cord in children with MPS IVA (Morquio-Brailsford syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Guirish A; Lo, William B; Hendriksz, Christian J

    2013-03-01

    Nearly all children with MPS IVA develop skeletal deformities affecting the spine. At the atlanto-axial spine, odontoid hypoplasia occurs. GAG deposition around the dens, leads to peri-odontoid infiltration. Transverse/alar ligament incompetence causes instability. Atlanto-axial instability is associated with cord compression and myelopathy, leading to major morbidity and mortality. Intervention is often required. Does the presence of widened bullet shaped vertebra in platyspondily encroach on the spinal canal and cause spinal stenosis in MPS IVA? So far, there have been no standardised morphometric measurements of the paediatric MPS IVA cervical spine to evaluate whether there is pre-existing spinal stenosis predisposing to compressive myelopathy or whether this is purely an acquired process secondary to instability and compression. This study provides the first radiological quantitative analysis of the cervical spine and spinal cord in a series of affected children. MRI morphometry indicates that the MPS IVA spine is narrower at C1-2 level giving an inverted funnel shape. There is no evidence of a reduction in the Torg ratio (canal-body ratio) in the cervical spine. The spinal canal does not exceed 11 mm at any level, significantly smaller than normal historical cohorts (14 mm). The sagittal diameter and axial surface area of both spinal canal and cord are reduced. C1-2 level cord compression was evident in the canal-cord ratio but the Torg ratio was not predictive of cord compression. In MPS IVA the reduction in the space available for the cord (SAC) is multifactorial rather than due to congenital spinal stenosis.

  9. Evidence against the use of lumbar spine radiography for low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, M.A.A.J. van den E-mail: m.a.vandenbosch@azu.nl; Hollingworth, W.; Kinmonth, A.L.; Dixon, A.K

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To review abnormalities reported on plain radiographic examination of the lumbar spine in patients referred with low back pain by general practitioners. Additionally, we evaluated and stratified the prevalence of these abnormalities by age. Finally, the diagnostic impact of lumbar spine radiography for the diagnosis of degenerative change, fracture, infection and possible tumour, was modelled. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of 2007 radiographic reports of patients referred with low back pain for lumbar spine radiography to a large radiology department was performed. The reports were classified into different diagnostic groups and subsequently stratified according to age. The potential diagnostic impact of lumbar spine radiography was modelled by using the prevalence of conditions studied as pre-test probabilities of disease. RESULTS: The prevalence of reported lumbar spine degeneration increased with age to 71% in patients aged 65-74 years. The overall prevalence of fracture, possible infection, possible tumour was low in our study population: 4, 0.8 and 0.7%, respectively. Fracture and possible infection showed no association with age. Possible tumour was only reported in patients older than 55 years of age. CONCLUSION: Although the prevalence of degenerative changes was high in older patients, the therapeutic consequences of diagnosing this abnormality are minor. The prevalence of possible serious conditions was very low in all age categories, which implies radiation exposure in many patients with no significant lesions.

  10. Case studies in cervicothoracic spine function evaluation and treatment of two dancers with mechanical neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandow, Emily

    2011-03-01

    It has been reported that manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine followed by exercise may improve outcomes in patients with mechanical neck pain. At this point, there is little available data on dancers with neck pain, and it is unclear whether this type of treatment is appropriate for restoring the rigorous level of activity required of the dancer. The purpose of this study was to review the evaluation, clinical decision-making process, and treatment of two dancers-one with acute and the other with chronic neck pain-who fell into the classification of patients who might benefit from an intervention to the thoracic spine. The two participants were a musical theater dancer with an acute onset of neck pain and a retired dancer who was an active dance company director with an 11-year history of chronic neck pain. Both participants went through a standard examination and were treated with mobilizations to the upper thoracic spine followed by therapeutic exercises. In both cases, successful outcomes were achieved immediately after treatment and up to six months after discharge from physical therapy.

  11. COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS OF ISOMETRIC EXERCISES WITH AND WITHOUT STRETCHING EXERCISES IN NON SPECIFIC CERVICAL PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warda Hassan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical pain is a common condition and almost two thirds of population suffers with this condition. Cervical region is the commonest region for non-traumatic neck pain. Neck pain generates many muscular disturbances in the neck region and may result in tightness of muscles of cervical region. Stretching is considered as an effective mean of treating cervical pain. Isometric exercise is used to enhance the performance of muscles because it provides strength required to perform dynamic exercise. Both of the regimens either separately or combined are used in clinical settings to treat nonspecific cervical pain. This study aims to compare the results of cervical isometrics with and without stretching exercises in reducing non-specific cervical pain Methods: A randomized controlled trial research was performed at physiotherapy department of Mayo Hospital Lahore, Pakistan. A convenience sample of 40 participants was divided into two groups. The cervical isometric exercise was applied to group A and stretching plus isometric exercise to group B for 3 weeks. Nonspecific neck pain was analyzed by using visual analogue scale and goniometry for pre and post treatment assessment. Results: Isometric exercises play an effective role in relieving pain (p value is 0.03 and minimizing inability of the body to perform functional activities (p value is 0.004 in contrast to the patients of group A. Isometric exercises were applied to the patients of group A (Level of pain: pain value is 0.172 and (physical inability to perform functional activities has P value 0.201. Conclusion: The result showed that the patients with the complain of non-specific neck discomfort who were treated by cervical isometric alone, showed less improvement in pain relief in contrast to the patients who were treated by the cervical isometric long with stretching.

  12. Development of the Young Spine Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Hestbæk, Lise

    Title Development of the Young Spine Questionnaire Authors & Affiliations Henrik Hein Lauridsen1, Lise Hestbæk1,2 1. Research Unit for Clinical Biomechanics, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Clinical Locomotion Network, Campusvej 55, DK-5230...... Odense M, Denmark 2. Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Clinical Locomotion Network, Forskerparken 10A, 5230 Odense M, Denmark Background Back pain in children is common and early onset of back pain has been shown to increase the risk of back pain significantly in adulthood...... Agreement between the questionnaire prevalence estimates and the interviews ranged between 83.7% (cervical pain today) and 97.9% (thoracic pain today). Correlations between the rFPS and the interview NRS score ranged between 0.71 (cervical spine) and 0.84 (thoracic spine). Agreement between...

  13. Best evidence in multimodal pain management in spine surgery and means of assessing postoperative pain and functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devin, Clinton J; McGirt, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Multimodal approaches to pain management have arisen with the goal of improving postoperative pain and reducing opioid analgesic use. We performed a comprehensive literature review to determine grades of recommendation for commonly used agents in multimodal pain management and provide a best practice guideline. To evaluate common drugs used in multimodal treatment of pain, a search was performed on English language publications on Medline (PubMed; National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA). Manuscripts were rated as Level I-V according to the North American Spine Society's (NASS) standardized levels of evidence tables. Grades of recommendation were assigned for each drug based on the NASS Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care. There is good (Grade A) evidence gabapentinoids, acetaminophen, neuraxial blockade and extended-release local anesthetics reduce postoperative pain and narcotic requirements. There is fair (Grade B) evidence that preemptive analgesia and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) result in reduced postoperative pain. There is insufficient and/or conflicting (Grade I) evidence that muscle relaxants and ketamine provide a significant reduction in postoperative pain or narcotic usage. There is fair (Grade B) evidence that short-term use of NSAID result in no long-term reduction in bone healing or fusion rates. Comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of perioperative pain control can be accomplished through the use of validated measures. Multimodal pain management protocols have consistently been demonstrated to allow for improved pain control with less reliance on opioids. There is good quality evidence that supports many of the common agents utilized in multimodal therapy, however, there is a lack of evidence regarding optimal postoperative protocols or pathways.

  14. 颈椎有限元模型的应用进展%Application progress of finite element model in cervical spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周毅强; 张建新; 林蔚莘

    2014-01-01

    有限元分析法(FEA)是一种在生物力学领域广泛应用的研究方法.近年来,颈椎有限元模型已被广泛应用于研究颈椎损伤、颈椎退变及模拟各种颈椎手术,已日趋完善.回顾了颈椎有限元模型的发展,介绍了颈椎有限元建模与分析在颈椎损伤、人工椎间盘置换、椎间植骨融合、颈椎退变及颈椎失稳等方面的应用进展,展望了未来的发展趋势.%Finite element analysis (FEA) is broadly used in biomechanics.Being widely used in clinical studies on cervical spine injury,cervical degeneration and stimulating a variety of cervical spine surgeries,cervical finite element model is becoming more and more accurate in recent years.This paper aims to review the development of cervical finite element model,to introduce the application progress of the modeling and analysis in cervical spine injury,cervical disc arthroplasty,cervical interbody fusion,cervical degeneration and cervical instability,and to prospect the foreground of cervical finite element model in future.

  15. Evaluation of low-cost computer monitors for the detection of cervical spine injuries in the emergency room: an observer confidence-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Brem, H. M.; Böhner, C; A. Brenning; Gelse, K; Radkow, T.; Blanke, M.; Schlechtweg, P. M.; Neumann, G.; Wu, I Y; Bautz, W; Hennig, F. F.; Richter, H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: To compare the diagnostic value of low-cost computer monitors and a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) workstation for the evaluation of cervical spine fractures in the emergency room. Methods: Two groups of readers blinded to the diagnoses (2 radiologists and 3 orthopaedic surgeons) independently assessed–digital radiographs of the cervical spine (anterior–posterior, oblique and trans-oral-dens views). The radiographs of 57 patients who arrived consecutively to ...

  16. Anterior decompression, structural bone grafting, and Caspar plate stabilization for unstable cervical spine fractures and/or dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, T A; Eismont, F J; Roberti, L J

    1992-10-01

    Fourteen patients who sustained acute cervical spine fractures and/or dislocations with associated posterior ligamentous disruption had anterior decompressions, structural bone grafting, and anterior Caspar plate stabilization. With an average 30-month follow-up, no patient has had loss of fixation. Despite criticism raised from biomechanical testing, the Caspar anterior plate system (Aesculape, Tuttlingen, Germany) may be added to structural bone grafting of unstable cervical fractures and/or dislocations, yielding an in vivo solid construct, which obviates the need for simultaneous posterior stabilization.

  17. Minimally invasive spine surgery in chronic low back pain patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoor, A. B.; Oner, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 85%. The pathophysiology of LBP can be various depending on the underlying problem. Only in about 10% of the patients specific underlying disease processes can be identified. Patients with scoliosis, spondylolisthesis, herniated

  18. Cementoplasty for managing painful bone metastases outside the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Gang; Jin, Peng; Liu, Xun-wei; Li, Min; Li, Li [Jinan Military General Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan, Shandong Province (China)

    2014-03-15

    To illustrate the effect of treatment with cementoplasty in patients with painful bone metastases in the extraspinal region. A retrospective study was conducted to review 51 consecutive patients who underwent cementoplasty under CT or fluoroscopic guidance, a total of 65 lesions involving the ilium, ischium, pubis, acetabulum, humeral, femur and tibia. In 5 patients with a high risk of impending fracture in long bones based on Mirels' scoring system, an innovative technique using a cement-filled catheter was applied. The clinical effects were evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS) preoperatively and postoperatively. All patients were treated successfully with a satisfying resolution of painful symptoms at 3 months' follow-up. Cement leakage was found in 8 lesions without any symptoms. VAS scores decreased from 8.19 ± 1.1 preoperatively to 4.94 ± 1.6 at 3 days, 3.41 ± 2.1 at 1 month and 3.02 ± 1.9 at 3 months postoperatively. There was a significant difference between the mean preoperative baseline score and the mean score at all of the postoperative follow-up points (P < 0.01). Cementoplasty is an effective technique for treating painful bone metastases in extraspinal regions, which is a valuable, minimally invasive, method that allows reduction of pain and improvement of patients' quality of life. (orig.)

  19. [The trigemino-cervical complex. Integration of peripheral and central pain mechanisms in primary headache syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, V; Frese, A; Bartsch, T

    2004-10-01

    The activation of the trigeminal nociceptive system is the neural substrate of pain in primary headache syndromes such as migraine and cluster headache. The nociceptive inflow from the meninges to the spinal cord is relayed in brainstem neurones of the trigemino-cervical complex (TCC). Two important mechanisms of pain transmission are reviewed: convergence of nociceptive trigeminal and cervical afferents and sensitization of trigemino-cervical neurones. These mechanisms have clinical correlates such as hyperalgesia, allodynia, spread and referral of pain to trigeminal or cervical dermatomes. Neurones in the TCC are subject to a modulation of pain-modulatory circuits in the brainstem such as the periaqueductal grey (PAG). Recent experimental and clinical findings of a modulation of these pain processes are discussed. The review focuses on TCC neurones as integrative relay neurones between peripheral and central pain mechanisms. The understanding of these mechanisms has implications for the understanding of the clinical phenomenology in primary headache syndromes and the development of therapeutical options.

  20. Growing heterotopic calcification in the prevertebral space of a cervical spine as a late complication of irradiation: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jina; Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Heterotopic calcification following head and neck irradiation has rarely been reported. It usually develops as a late complication of radiotherapy in patients with malignancies, including breast cancer, lymphoma, and genitourinary malignancies. The occurrence of heterotopic calcification in the prevertebral space of the cervical spine has not been described as a late complication of irradiation. Here, we report a case of prevertebral heterotopic calcification in a patient with history of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for tonsil cancer 21 years ago.

  1. Study of the influence of degenerative intervertebral disc changes on the deformation behavior of the cervical spine segment in flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakova, Tatyana V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the model of the cervical spine segment (C3-C4) and the calculation results of the deformation behavior of the segment under degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc. The segment model was built based on the experimental literature data taking into account the presence of the cortical and cancellous bone tissue of vertebral bodies. The calculation results show that degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc cause the immobility of the C3 vertebra at flexion.

  2. CAN A SPECIFIC NECK STRENGTHENING PROGRAM DECREASE CERVICAL SPINE INJURIES IN A MEN'S PROFESSIONAL RUGBY UNION TEAM? A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Naish

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spine injuries in Rugby Union are a concerning issue at all levels of the game. The primary aim of this retrospective analysis conducted in a professional Rugby Union squad was to determine whether a 26-week isometric neck strengthening intervention program (13-week strengthening phase and 13-week maintenance phase was effective in reducing the number and severity of cervical spine injuries. The secondary aim was to determine whether at week five, where the program had been the similar for all players, there was increased isometric neck strength. All 27 players who were common to both the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons were included in this analysis and data was extracted from a Sports Medicine/Sports Science database which included the squad's injury records. Primary outcome variables included; the number of cervical spine injuries and the severity of these injuries as determined by the total number of days lost from training and competition. Secondary outcome variables included isometric neck strength in flexion, extension and left and right lateral flexion. Using non-parametric statistical methods, no significant differences were evident for the total number of cervical spine injuries (n = 8 in 2007-2008, n = 6 in 2008-2009 or time loss due to these injuries (100 days in 2007-2008, 40 days in 2008-2009. However, a significant (p = 0.03 reduction in the number of match injuries was evident from 2007-2008 (n = 11 to 2008-09 (n = 2. Non-significant increases in isometric neck strength were found in all directions examined. A significant reduction in the number of match injuries was evident in this study. However, no other significant changes to primary outcome variables were achieved. Further, no significant increases in isometric neck strength were found in this well-trained group of professional athletes

  3. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrara, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture ...

  4. Discover人工颈椎间盘置换治疗颈椎间盘退变性疾病的临床疗效%Outcome of discover cervical artificial disc replacement for degenerativedisc disease of the cervical spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何智勇; 李开南; 聂海; 母建松; 兰海

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the clinical effects on Discover cervical artificial disc replacement for degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine. Methods A total of 20 patients with cervical disc degeneration, whose pain is not relieved adequately with six weeks of conservative care and daily activities become difficult, were chosed in this study between January 2007 and August 2011. The clinical outcomes were assessed using neck disable index (NDI) and visual analogue scale ( VAS) and Odora scale before surgery and 1、6、12、24 months after surgery. Imageological examination included X ray, cervical CT scanning and MR imaging. Results There are 26 levels in 20 patients performing cervical disc replacement and the follow-up period was 24 months. The NDI, VAS of neck pain, VAS of arm pain were from (23. 82 ±2. 87)、(5.90 ±0. 35)、(5. 91 ±1.63) before sugery to (5. 21 ± 1. 12)、(1. 62 ±0. 87)、(0. 97 ±0. 65) 2 years after sugery. Odom scale were excellent or good in all palienls. The operation time was 60-210 minutes and the estimated blood loss was 70 - 350 milliliter. The motion function of cervical artificial disc implanted was very good with imageology evaluation. The prosthesis moved forward 3 mm in one patient, and another patient had heterotopic ossification 12 months after surgery. Conclusion Discover cervical artificial disc replacement for degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine is safe and effective, however, further study should be conducted to determine the long term outcome.%目的 评价Discover人工颈椎间盘置换治疗颈椎间盘退变性疾病的临床疗效.方法 2007年1月~2011年8月,20例颈椎间盘退变突出经保守治疗无效的患者行人工颈椎间盘置换术.患者术前、术后1、6、12、24个月时使用颈椎功能障碍指数(neck disable index,NDI)、疼痛视觉模拟疼痛量表(visual analogue scale,VAS)进行疗效评估,手术效果采用Odom法评价.影像学检查包括颈椎动力位X

  5. Cervical spine injuries resulting from diving accidents in swimming pools: outcome of 34 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borius, Pierre-Yves; Gouader, Ismail; Bousquet, Philippe; Draper, Louisa; Roux, Franck-Emmanuel

    2010-04-01

    Cervical spine injuries after diving into private swimming pools can lead to dramatic consequences. We reviewed 34 patients hospitalized in our center between 1996 and 2006. Data was collected from their initial admission and from follow-up appointments. The injuries were sustained by young men in 97% (mean age 27) and the majority happened during the summer (88%). Fractures were at C5-C7 in 70%. American Spinal Injury Association class (ASIA) on admission was A for 8 patients, B for 4, C for 4, D for 1, and E for 17. There were 23 surgical spine stabilizations. Final ASIA class was A for 6 patients, B for 1, C for 3, D for 5, and E for 18. The mean duration of hospitalization was 21.3 days in our neurosurgical center (mean overall cost: 36,000 Euros/patient) plus 10.6 months in rehabilitation center for the 15 patients admitted who had an ASIA class A to C. Mean overall direct cost for a patient with class A is almost 300,000 Euros, compared to around 10,000 Euros for patients with class D and E. In addition, a profound impact on personal and professional life was seen in many cases including 11 divorces and 7 job losses. Dangerous diving into swimming pools can result in spinal injuries with drastic consequences, including permanent physical disability and a profound impact on socio-professional status. Moreover, there are significant financial costs to society. Better prevention strategies should be implemented to reduce the impact of this public health problem.

  6. A method to characterize average cervical spine ligament response based on raw data sets for implementation into injury biomechanics models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattucci, Stephen F E; Cronin, Duane S

    2015-01-01

    Experimental testing on cervical spine ligaments provides important data for advanced numerical modeling and injury prediction; however, accurate characterization of individual ligament response and determination of average mechanical properties for specific ligaments has not been adequately addressed in the literature. Existing methods are limited by a number of arbitrary choices made during the curve fits that often misrepresent the characteristic shape response of the ligaments, which is important for incorporation into numerical models to produce a biofidelic response. A method was developed to represent the mechanical properties of individual ligaments using a piece-wise curve fit with first derivative continuity between adjacent regions. The method was applied to published data for cervical spine ligaments and preserved the shape response (toe, linear, and traumatic regions) up to failure, for strain rates of 0.5s(-1), 20s(-1), and 150-250s(-1), to determine the average force-displacement curves. Individual ligament coefficients of determination were 0.989 to 1.000 demonstrating excellent fit. This study produced a novel method in which a set of experimental ligament material property data exhibiting scatter was fit using a characteristic curve approach with a toe, linear, and traumatic region, as often observed in ligaments and tendons, and could be applied to other biological material data with a similar characteristic shape. The resultant average cervical spine ligament curves provide an accurate representation of the raw test data and the expected material property effects corresponding to varying deformation rates.

  7. [Vertical development of the face and cervical spine. Diagnostic and therapeutic significance in orthodontics and maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagnac, J M; Delaire, J; Mercier, J

    1999-04-01

    Vertical growth of the cervical spine, of the mandibula and the upper maxilla are normally anatomically and physiologically correlated. At a very early age the relationships are established between the cervical spine and the angle of the mandibula which is normally level with C2's antero-inferior angle. A parallelism can be noticed between the rhythms of the vertical growth of the cervical spine and the changes of the maxillary in relation to the skull. So relationships are gradually established between the palate level, the top of the odontoid, and the foramen magnum. These relationships are well objectivized on a lateral teleradiography by Delaire' analysis. Lateral teleradiography of the situation of the angle of the mandibula, in relation to the basis of the C2 body should be systematic. It provides much information concerning the growth potential of the condylar unit, and makes possible a differential diagnosis between true or false posterior vertical insufficiency (PVI) and true or false posterior vertical excess (PVE) and to recognize clinical types of skeletal class II and class III of vertical origin.

  8. Destructive spondyloarthropathy of the cervical spine in long-term hemodialyzed patients: a five-year clinical radiological prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, A.; Marano, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Cattolica, Rome (Italy); Sundaram, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Cerase, A. [Unit of Neuroradiology, Policlinico ' ' Le Scotte' ' , Siena (Italy); Magnavita, N. [Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Univ. Cattolica, Rome (Italy); Tazza, L. [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Cattolica, Rome (Italy)

    2001-08-01

    To describe the radiographic features and progression of cervical spine destructive spondyloarthropathy (DSA) in hemodialyzed patients, and to evaluate the relationship between this disease and patient characteristics, biochemical values, and hemodialysis duration. Design and patients: Standard radiographs, and lateral flexion and extension views of the cervical spine, were performed annually for 5 years in 31 hemodialyzed patients who were divided into three groups at the commencement of the study: those showing (I) DSA, (II) vertebral rim erosions (VRE) without DSA, and (III) absence of DSA and VRE. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) were performed in seven and two patients respectively. The imaging features were evaluated for the presence and progression of spondyloarthropathy and correlated with clinical and biochemical variables. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance. The duration of hemodialysis appeared to be the main predictive factor (P=0.0003) for DSA, which was found in six patients (19%). DSA was found to correlate with higher levels of beta2-microglobulin (P<0.00001), parathyroid hormone (P<0.05), and alkaline phosphatase (P<0.05). Clinical symptoms were minimal. In two patients, MR imaging revealed changes mimicking spondylodiscitis. In another patient, CT of the craniocervical junction showed bone resorption due to a pseudotumor, and basilar invagination. DSA of the cervical spine is often clinically silent. Pathogenesis of DSA may be multifactorial but its progression is most influenced by the duration of hemodialysis. On MR imaging, DSA may mimic spondylodiscitis. (orig.)

  9. Three-dimensional intervertebral range of motion in the cervical spine: Does the method of calculation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderst, William J; Aucie, Yashar

    2017-03-01

    Intervertebral range of motion (ROM) is commonly calculated using ordered rotations or projection angles. Ordered rotations are sequence-dependent, and projection angles are dependent upon on which orientation vectors are projected. This study assessed the effect of calculation method on intervertebral ROM in the subaxial cervical spine (C3-C7) during in vivo dynamic, three-dimensional, functional movement. Biplane radiographs were collected at 30 images per second while 29 participants performed full ROM flexion/extension, axial rotation and lateral bending movements of their cervical spine. In vivo bone motion was tracked with sub-millimeter accuracy using a validated volumetric model-based tracking technique. Intervertebral rotations were calculated using six Cardan angle sequences and two projection angle combinations. Within-subject comparisons revealed significant differences in intervertebral ROM among calculation methods (all p<0.002). Group mean ROM differences were small, but significantly different among calculation methods (p<0.001). A resampling technique demonstrated that as group size increases, the differences between calculation methods decreases substantially. It is concluded that the method used to calculate intervertebral rotations of the sub-axial cervical spine can significantly affect within-subject and between group comparisons of intervertebral ROM.

  10. LMA C Trach aided endotracheal intubation in simulated cases of cervical spine injury: A series of 30 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepshikha C Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laryngeal mask airway (LMA C Trach is a novel device designed to intubate trachea without conventional laryngoscopy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of C trach in the simulated scenario of cervical spine injury where conventional laryngoscopy is not desirable. Methods: This prospective pilot study was carried out in 30 consenting adults of either gender, ASAPS I or II, scheduled for surgery requiring endotracheal intubation. An appropriate sized rigid cervical collar was positioned around the patient′s neck to restrict the neck movements and simulate the scenario of cervical spine injury. After induction of anesthesia, various technical aspects of C Trach facilitated endotracheal intubation, changes in hemodynamic variables, and complications were recorded. Results: Mask ventilation was easy in all the patients. Successful insertion of C Trach was achieved in 27 patients at first attempt, while 3 patients required second attempt. Majority of patients required one of the adjusting maneuvers to obtain acceptable view of glottis (POGO score >50%. Intubation success rate was 100% with 26 patients intubated at first attempt and the rest required second attempt. Mean intubation time was 69.8±27.40 sec. With experience, significant decrease in mean intubation time was observed in last 10 patients as compared to first 10 (46±15.77 sec vs. 101.3±22.91 sec. Minor mucosal injury was noted in four patients. Conclusion: LMA C Trach facilitates endotracheal intubation under direct vision and can be a useful technique in patients with cervical spine injury with cervical collar in situ.

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF CRANIO-CERVICAL TRAINING OVER MYOFACIAL PAIN SYNDROME: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyanthi. S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS is a syndrome presenting with acute or chronic regional pain originating from trigger points (TPs localized in the muscles or the fascia. TPs are local points showing high irritability, sensitivity to finger pressure and causing characteristic referred pain. The aim of this case study is to assess the effectiveness of cranio-cervical training on neck disability, endurance of deep cervical muscles and pressure pain threshold in a patient with cervical myofascial pain syndrome. Case description: A 36 year old female who was diagnosed with myofascial pain syndrome. She received cranio cervical training, a low load endurance exercises in order to train and/or to regain muscle control of the cervicoscapular and craniocervical regions. The patient received the treatment program for 10 to 15 minutes. The frequency of treatment is five days in a week for a period of 3 weeks. Outcome: The outcome measures were neck disability index, pressure pain threshold and deep cervical endurance test, which were measured prior to treatment and at the end of third week. Conclusion: The craniocervical training programme for a patient with myofascial pain syndrome found to be effective in reducing neck disability, improving the pressure pain threshold and deep cervical flexor muscle endurance.

  12. Development of a clinical prediction rule to identify patients with neck pain who are likely to benefit from home-based mechanical cervical traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Congcong; Ming, Guan; Ng, Lih Yen

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify the population of patients with neck pain who improved with home-based mechanical cervical traction (HMCT). A prospective cohort study was conducted in a physical therapy clinic at a local hospital. Patients with neck pain referred to the clinic for physical therapy were included in the study. A HMCT program was given to participants for 2 weeks. The patient's demographic data, Numerical Pain Scale (NPS) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire score were collected, and standard physical examination of the cervical spine was conducted before intervention. The NPS score, NDI and a global rating of perceived improvement were collected after the intervention was completed. A total of 103 patients participated in the study and 47 had a positive response to HMCT. A clinical prediction rule with four variables (Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Work Subscale score pain intensity ≥ 7/10, positive cervical distraction test and pain below shoulder) was identified. With satisfaction of at least three out of four variables (positive likelihood ratio = 4.77), the intervention's success rate increased from 45.6% to over 80%. It appears that patients with neck pain who are likely to respond to HMCT may be identified.

  13. Anterior cervical fusion and osteosynthetic stabilization according to Caspar: a prospective study of 41 patients with fractures and/or dislocations of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, J; Plets, C; Van den Bergh, R

    1989-12-01

    Between June 1984 and April 1988, 41 patients with severe posttraumatic lesions of the cervical spine between the C2-C3 and the C7-T1 level seen consecutively were treated by an anterior cervical fusion and osteosynthetic stabilization according to Caspar. These patients were prospectively studied. Seven patients had a bilateral facet dislocation, 5 a unilateral facet dislocation, 9 an anterior subluxation, 9 an anterior compression fracture, 5 a hangman's fracture, and 6 a hyperextension injury at a lower cervical level. From a neurological point of view, there were 12 patients with an initial complete transverse lesion and 14 with an incomplete transverse lesion, and the remaining 15 patients did not have any deficit initially. Four patients died during the first 3 months after the operation. In 38 patients good anatomical position was obtained, generally by the intraoperative use of the vertebral distractor of Caspar. In all patients excellent immediate postoperative stability of the spine was obtained, although in 2 patients a second operation was necessary a few days after the first one. Postoperatively all patients were "immobilized" by a soft collar for 3 months. Four patients with an initial complete transverse lesion showed some neurological recovery in the postoperative period, and all patients with an incomplete transverse lesion improved. There were no postoperative neurological disturbances in the group of patients who were neurologically normal from the beginning. The mean postoperative hospitalization time was 13.6 days. These results were compared to the results from the literature, concerning other conservative and operative treatments for posttraumatic lesions of the cervical spine.

  14. 下颈椎单侧小关节脱位的研究进展%Current research on unilateral cervical facet dislocation of the lower cervical spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江晨; 宋文慧

    2016-01-01

    单侧小关节脱位是较为常见的颈椎损伤,且以C5-6最常发生,这与其解剖及形态学特征密切相关.该损伤由屈曲和旋转暴力协同作用所致,但主要因素尚不明确.治疗分为非手术治疗和手术治疗,但仍未确定最佳的治疗方案.现在被普遍接受的方案是首先行闭合复位,再根据闭合复位成功与否及有无出现创伤性椎间盘突出决定下一步治疗.%Unilateral facet dislocation of the lower cervical spine is an important subgroup of cervical spine injuries,accounting for from 12% to 16% of all cervical spine injuries.Unilateral facet dislocation occurs the most commonly at the C5-6 level,and is closely related to the anatomic and morphometric features of the cervical facet.This injury has been attributed to combined flexion and rotation,but it remains unclear whether flexion or rotation is the component of greater importance.Its treatment includes nonoperative and operative measures but optimal treatment has not been established.It is generally accepted that a recommendable treatment protocol begins with closed reduction and proceeds depending on whether the closed reduction succeeds and traumatic disc herniation is present or not.

  15. Psychopathology predicts the outcome of medial branch blocks with corticosteroid for chronic axial low back or cervical pain: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tipirneni Naveen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comorbid psychopathology is an important predictor of poor outcome for many types of treatments for back or neck pain. But it is unknown if this applies to the results of medial branch blocks (MBBs for chronic low back or neck pain, which involves injecting the medial branch of the dorsal ramus nerves that innervate the facet joints. The objective of this study was to determine whether high levels of psychopathology are predictive of pain relief after MBB injections in the lumbar or cervical spine. Methods This was a prospective cohort study. Consecutive patients in a pain medicine practice undergoing MBBs of the lumbar or cervical facets with corticosteroids were recruited to participate. Subjects were selected for a MBB based on operationalized selection criteria and the procedure was performed in a standardized manner. Subjects completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS just prior to the procedure and at one-month follow up. Scores on the HADS classified the subjects into three groups based on psychiatric symptoms, which formed the primary predictor variable: Low, Moderate, or High levels of psychopathology. The primary outcome measure was the percent improvement in average daily pain rating one-month following an injection. Analysis of variance and chi-square were used to analyze the analgesia and functional rating differences between groups, and to perform a responder analysis. Results Eighty six (86 subjects completed the study. The Low psychopathology group (n = 37 reported a mean of 23% improvement in pain at one-month while the High psychopathology group (n = 29 reported a mean worsening of -5.8% in pain (p Low group had at least 30% improvement in pain versus 10% in the High group (p Conclusion Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with diminished pain relief after a MBB injection performed with steroid at one-month follow-up. These findings illustrate the importance

  16. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervical spine. Clinical, neuroradiological and neurophysiological study on 9 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Conte, L; Tassinari, T; Trucco, M; Serrato, O; Badino, R

    1992-12-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervical spine is considered to be uncommon in western countries, although widely known and studied in Japan. We report on 9 cases of OPLL cervical myelopathy investigated by x-ray films and cervical CT and by somatosensory evoked potentials. The patients reported spastic tetraparesis, sensory disorders of the limbs and, in one case, sphincter incontinence. Neuroradiological examinations showed that the posterior columns of the spinal cord were more affected than the roots. Our data suggest that OPLL is more frequent in the West than has so far been reported and that combined radiological and neurophysiological investigation ensures correct diagnosis and accurate assessment of the cord impairment.

  17. Office evaluation of spine and limb pain: spondylotic radiculopathy and other nonstructural mimickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James

    2011-02-01

    Low back and neck pain, with or without radiculopathy, are one of the most common reasons for referral to an outpatient neurology practice. Determining appropriate treatment relies on establishing an accurate diagnosis of the etiology of the spine or limb pain. The author reviews structural radiculopathies as a result of diskogenic and spondylotic etiologies with an emphasis on the clinical approach and evaluation of these patients (including imaging and electrodiagnostics), identifying management altering neurogenic mimickers of structural radiculopathies (such as infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic myeloradiculitis and radiculoplexopathies), and stratifying patients for treatment.

  18. Cervical spine degeneration in fighter pilots and controls: a 5-yr follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrén-Mallmin, M; Linder, J

    2001-05-01

    At 5 yr after MRI of the cervical spine, for evaluation concerning degenerative lesions, follow-up MRI was performed on asymptomatic experienced military high performance aircraft pilots (mean age 47 yr; mean accumulated flying time 3,100 h) and on age-matched controls without military flying experience. Young military high performance aircraft pilots (mean age 28 yr, mean accumulated flying time 915 h) were also re-examined. Compared with baseline MRI 5 yr earlier, there was significant increase in disk protrusions in all groups, in osteophytes in controls, and in foraminal stenoses in experienced pilots, and a significant reduction in disk signal intensity in young pilots. The difference between experienced pilots and controls was markedly reduced compared with that at baseline MRI. Thus, military high performance aircraft pilots seem to be at increased risk of premature development of degenerative lesions of the same type as are seen in an aging population. With increasing age the difference between pilots and controls diminishes.

  19. Acceleration-caused injury of the cervical spine. Whiplash injury; Beschleunigungsverletzung der Halswirbelsaeule. HWS-Schleudertrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedig, Hans-Dieter (eds.) [Kanzlei Dr. W.G. Schmidt, Sonthofen (Germany); Graf, Michael; Grill, Christian

    2009-07-01

    Acceleration injuries of the cervical spine are mostly caused by car accidents. Due to the high traffic density and the increasing number of car accidents with personal injuries the number of concerned persons is also increasing. A large percentage of injured persons suffer ongoing troubles following ineffective therapy trials up to occupational disability. Therefore the whiplash injury is a significant medical and legal problem. The book includes contributions of international experts on the latest state of research and the actual knowledge on the controversial discussed field. An interdisciplinary forum discusses medical, injury-mechanical, consultant-related and legal questions and therapeutic approaches that might be successful. [German] Beschleunigungsverletzungen der Halswirbelsaeule treten ueberwiegend nach Autounfaellen auf. Aufgrund der hohen Verkehrsdichte und der steigenden Anzahl an Verkehrsunfaellen mit Personenschaeden steigt auch die Zahl der Betroffenen stetig an. Einer grossen Zahl von Unfallgeschaedigten, die nach kurzer Zeit beschwerdefrei leben koennen, steht leider eine wachsende Zahl von Betroffenen mit anhaltenden Beschwerden, erfolglosen Therapieversuchen bis hin zur Berufsunfaehigkeit gegenueber. Das 'HWS-Schleudertrauma' stellt nach wie vor ein erhebliches medizinisches und rechtliches Problem dar. In diesem Buch beschreiben international ausgewiesene Experten den neuesten Forschungsstand, das aktuelle Wissen und die Lehrmeinungen auf diesem kontrovers diskutierten und komplexen Gebiet. In einem interdisziplinaeren Ansatz werden medizinische, verletzungsmechanische, gutachterliche und gerichtliche Fragestellungen diskutiert und Erfolg versprechende Therapieansaetze eroertert. Aerzte, Juristen, Versicherungen und Betroffene werden in einen gemeinsamen Dialog gebracht, mit dem Ziel, konstruktive Loesungen zu erarbeiten. Eine praktische Arbeitshilfe - das Buch fuer alle, die mit dieser Problematik befasst sind. (orig.)

  20. Does posture of the cervical spine influence dorsal neck muscle activity when lifting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peolsson, Anneli; Marstein, Eivind; McNamara, Timothy; Nolan, Damien; Sjaaberg, Espen; Peolsson, Michael; Jull, Gwendolen; O'Leary, Shaun

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that postural orientations of the neck, such as flexed or forward head postures, are associated with heightened activity of the dorsal neck muscles. While these studies describe the impact of variations in neck posture alone, there is scant literature regarding the effect of neck posture on muscle activity when combined with upper limb activities such as lifting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different neck postures on the activity of the different layers of the dorsal neck muscles during a lifting task. Ultrasound measurements of dorsal neck muscle deformation were compared over two time points (rest, during lift) during a lifting task performed in three different neck postural conditions (neutral, flexed and forward head posture) in 21 healthy subjects. Data were analysed by post-process speckle tracking analysis. Results demonstrated significantly greater muscle deformation induced by flexed and forward head postures, compared to the neutral posture, for all dorsal neck muscles at rest (pposture of the cervical spine influenced the level of muscle deformation not only at rest, but also when lifting. The findings of the study suggest that neck posture should be considered during the evaluation or design of lifting activities as it may contribute to excessive demands on dorsal neck muscles with potential detrimental consequences.

  1. Functional MRI of the cervical spine after distortion injury; MR-Funktionsdiagnostik der Halswirbelsaeule nach Schleudertrauma

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    Schnarkowski, P. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Weidenmaier, W. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Heuck, A. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Reiser, M.F. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1995-04-01

    50 patients with a history of distortion injury of the cervical spine were examined with static and functional MRI. Functional MRI consisted of different patient`s positions from maximal extension to maximal flexion (30 , 0 , 25 , 40 , 50 ). T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient echo sequences were performed in a sagittal view for the different positions. Ligamentous instabilities and disc protrusions were seen only in functional MRI in 17 patients. These findings correlated with the neurological symptoms. Two patients were treated by operative fusion because of these findings. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei 50 Patienten mit einem Schleudertrauma der Halswirbelsaeule wurden zu den statischen Magnetresonanztomogrammen der Halswirbelsaeule MR-Funktionsaufnahmen durchgefuehrt. Diese Funktionsaufnahmen erfolgten in 5 verschiedenen Flexionsgraden von maximaler Reklination bis zur maximalen Inklination (30 , 0 , 25 , 40 , 50 ). T{sub 2}*-gewichtete Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen in sagittaler Schnittfuehrung wurden fuer jeden Flexionsgrad angefertigt. Bandinstabilitaeten und Bandscheibenvorwoelbungen konnten bei 17 Patienten nur in bestimmten Flexionsgraden erfasst werden. Diese 17 Patienten zeigten eine umschriebene neurologische Symptomatik, die von ihrer Lokalisation mit den in der MR-Funktionsdiagnostik erhobenen Befunden korrelierten. Zwei Patienten wurden aufgrund diese Befunde mit einer operativen Fusion therapiert. (orig.)

  2. Static and dynamic CT imaging of the cervical spine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederman, Tomas; Shalabi, Adel; Sundin, Anders [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Olerud, Claes; Alavi, Kamran [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-09-18

    To compare CR with CT (static and dynamic) to evaluate upper spine instability and to determine if CT in flexion adds value compared to MR imaging in neutral position to assess compression of the subarachnoid space and of the spinal cord. Twenty-one consecutive patients with atlantoaxial subluxation due to rheumatoid arthritis planned for atlantoaxial fusion were included. CT and MRI were performed with the neck in the neutral position and CT also in flexion. CR in neutral position and flexion were obtained in all patients except for one subject who underwent examination in flexion and extension. CR and CT measurements of atlantoaxial subluxation correlated but were larger by CR than CT in flexion, however, the degree of vertical dislocation was similar with both techniques irrespective of the position of the neck. Cervical motion was larger at CR than at CT. The spinal cord compression was significantly worse at CT obtained in the flexed position as compared to MR imaging in the neutral position. Functional CR remains the primary imaging method but CT in the flexed position might be useful in the preoperative imaging work-up, as subarachnoid space involvement may be an indicator for the development of neurologic dysfunction. (orig.)

  3. ANALYSIS OF 111 PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL SPINE FRACTURES IN A TERTIARY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Vilchis Sámano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the epidemiology of 111 patients to determine the age group affected, the level of fracture, fracture classification, and type of treatment. Methods: Descriptive study of 111 cases of cervical spine fracture treated at the Hospital of Traumatology and Orthopedics Lomas Verdes - IMSS from March 2009 to October 2014. Results: The condition appeared in 88% of men. The age range was 16-81 years, with an average of 40 years. The most common fracture according to the AO classification was type A (57%. The segments most affected were C5-C6, C6-C7, C6 and C4-C5 (24.32%, 17.1%, 9.9% and 8.1%. Neurological involvement occurred in 46.8%. The most common mechanism of injury was high energy. Surgical treatment was performed in 78.4% of patients, being one-level corpectomy with placement of mesh and plate, and posterior fixation with facet screws the most appropriate procedures (31.5% and 27.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Males were the most affected, the highest incidence was in C5-C6 and C6-C7 levels and the surgical procedure was the most used.

  4. Efficacy of coblation technology in treating cervical discogenic upper back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liangliang; Tang, Yuanzhang; Li, Xiuliang; Li, Na; Ni, Jiaxiang; He, Liangliang

    2015-05-01

    Upper back pain originating from the cervical disk itself is defined as cervical discogenic upper back pain. Coblation procedures can provide therapeutic effects for neck and radicular pain related to contained cervical disk herniation. However, no studies have reported the performance of coblation procedures, particularly for treating cervical discogenic upper back pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of coblation procedures in treating cervical discogenic upper back pain.In a prospective, clinical, observational study, 28 consecutive patients with discogenic upper back pain underwent coblation procedures on the cervical disk with a percutaneous anterior approach. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, patient responses stating significant (≥50%) pain relief, significant (≥50%) reduction in pain medicine intake and Modified MacNab criteria were adopted to evaluate the pain intensity, degree of pain relief, and functional status after 12 months of follow-up.The preoperative pain VAS score was 6.5 ± 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.085-6.915), and the pain VAS score significantly decreased to 2.4 ± 1.3 (95% CI 1.929-2.928), 2.5 ± 1.5 (95% CI 1.963-3.109), 2.7 ± 1.4 (95% CI 2.157-3.271), 3.1 ± 1.6 (95% CI 2.457-3.686), and 3.1 ± 1.6 (95% CI 2.471-3.743) at 1 week and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, respectively (P coblation is an effective, safe, minimally invasive, and less uncomfortable procedure for the treatment of discogenic upper back pain.

  5. Aberrant cervical vasculature anastomosis as cause of neck pain and successful treatment with embolization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lucy; Ladner, Travis R; Cobb, Mark; Mocco, J

    2016-01-27

    We report a patient with non-dermatomal radiating neck pain without focal neurologic deficit. Traditional workup could not identify an anatomic or biomechanical cause. Imaging showed a deep cervical vessel centered in the region of pain. Angiography later identified an aberrant anastomosis of this vessel with the occipital artery. Subsequent endovascular embolization of this arterial trunk resulted in complete pain relief.

  6. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Muñoz-García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neck pain (NP is strongly associated with cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP. The primary aim of the present study was to compare the neck pain-related disability, pain catastrophizing, and cervical and mandibular ROM between patients with chronic mechanical NP and patients with CCFP, as well as asymptomatic subjects. Methods. A total of 64 participants formed three groups. All participants underwent a clinical examination evaluating the cervical range of motion and maximum mouth opening, neck disability index (NDI, and psychological factor of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS. Results. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with NP and CCFP for NDI and PCS (P>0.05. One- way ANOVA revealed significant differences for all ROM measurements. The post hoc analysis showed no statistically significant differences in cervical extension and rotation between the two patient groups (P>0.05. The Pearson correlation analysis shows a moderate positive association between NDI and the PCS for the group of patients with NP and CCFP. Conclusion. The CCFP and NP patient groups have similar neck disability levels and limitation in cervical ROM in extension and rotation. Both groups had positively correlated the NDI with the PCS.

  7. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-López, Almudena; Lopez-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neck pain (NP) is strongly associated with cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP). The primary aim of the present study was to compare the neck pain-related disability, pain catastrophizing, and cervical and mandibular ROM between patients with chronic mechanical NP and patients with CCFP, as well as asymptomatic subjects. Methods. A total of 64 participants formed three groups. All participants underwent a clinical examination evaluating the cervical range of motion and maximum mouth opening, neck disability index (NDI), and psychological factor of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Results. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with NP and CCFP for NDI and PCS (P > 0.05). One- way ANOVA revealed significant differences for all ROM measurements. The post hoc analysis showed no statistically significant differences in cervical extension and rotation between the two patient groups (P > 0.05). The Pearson correlation analysis shows a moderate positive association between NDI and the PCS for the group of patients with NP and CCFP. Conclusion. The CCFP and NP patient groups have similar neck disability levels and limitation in cervical ROM in extension and rotation. Both groups had positively correlated the NDI with the PCS.

  8. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-López, Almudena; Lopez-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neck pain (NP) is strongly associated with cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP). The primary aim of the present study was to compare the neck pain-related disability, pain catastrophizing, and cervical and mandibular ROM between patients with chronic mechanical NP and patients with CCFP, as well as asymptomatic subjects. Methods. A total of 64 participants formed three groups. All participants underwent a clinical examination evaluating the cervical range of motion and maximum mouth opening, neck disability index (NDI), and psychological factor of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Results. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with NP and CCFP for NDI and PCS (P > 0.05). One- way ANOVA revealed significant differences for all ROM measurements. The post hoc analysis showed no statistically significant differences in cervical extension and rotation between the two patient groups (P > 0.05). The Pearson correlation analysis shows a moderate positive association between NDI and the PCS for the group of patients with NP and CCFP. Conclusion. The CCFP and NP patient groups have similar neck disability levels and limitation in cervical ROM in extension and rotation. Both groups had positively correlated the NDI with the PCS. PMID:27119020

  9. The validity of using an electrocutaneous device for pain assessment in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Allan; Ghasemi-Kafash, Elaheh; Dedering, Åsa

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and preference for assessing pain magnitude with electrocutaneous testing (ECT) compared to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Borg CR10 scale in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. An additional purpose was to investigate ECT sensory and pain thresholds in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. This is a cross-sectional study of 34 patients with cervical radiculopathy. Scatterplots and linear regression were used to investigate bivariate relationships between ECT, VAS and Borg CR10 methods of pain magnitude measurement as well as ECT sensory and pain thresholds. The use of the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm for patients with cervical radiculopathy with normal sensory phenotype shows good linear association with arm pain VAS (R(2) = 0.39), neck pain VAS (R(2) = 0.38), arm pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.50) and neck pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.49) suggesting acceptable validity of the procedure. For patients with hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia sensory phenotypes, the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm does not show adequate linear association with rating scale methods rendering the validity of the procedure as doubtful. ECT for sensory and pain threshold investigation, however, provides a method to objectively assess global sensory function in conjunction with sensory receptor specific bedside examination measures.

  10. Dystrophic calcinosis with both a huge calcified mass in the cervical spine and calcification in the chest wall in a patient with rheumatoid overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kei; Takaoka, Hirokazu; Iyama, Ken-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis in soft tissue occurs in damaged or devitalized tissues in the presence of normal calcium and phosphorous metabolism. It is often noted in subcutaneous tissues in patients with collagen vascular diseases and may involve a relatively localized area or be widespread. A 74-year-old Japanese woman with an overlap of rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic sclerosis developed a huge tumor-like mass at the atlanto-axial vertebral joint region that caused severe cervical pain and difficulty in activities of daily living. She also had subcutaneous dystrophic calcification in the soft tissue of the chest wall. Calcinosis associated with systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized phenomenon, but a destructive paraspinal tumor in the cervical spine associated with overlap syndrome is extremely unique. Because calcinosis in spinal locations can be complicated by neurological involvement, patients with progressive symptoms may require surgical intervention. Surgical resection and biological therapy improved this patient's life and activities of daily living. Calcinosis is common in the conditions reviewed here, and different agents have been used for treatment. However, calcinosis management is poorly organized and lacks an accepted classification, systematic studies, and clinical therapeutic trials. The association of calcinosis and collagen vascular diseases is clinically and etiologically important. Although a combination of calcinosis and rheumatoid overlap syndrome is rare, various collagen vascular diseases may occur simultaneously. A perceptive diagnostic approach toward these diseases is critical, and early diagnosis and treatment are needed to prevent dystrophic calcinosis.

  11. Follow-up radiographs of the cervical spine after anterior fusion with titanium intervertebral disc; Roentgen-Verlaufsuntersuchung der Halswirbelsaeule nach anteriorer Fusion mit Titaninterponaten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biederer, J.; Hutzelmann, A.; Heller, M. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Rama, B. [Paracelsus Klinik, Osnabrueck (Germany). Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie

    1999-08-01

    Purpose: We examined the postoperative changes of the cervical spine after treatment of cervical nerve root compression with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with a new titanium intervertebral disc. Patients and Methods: 37 patients were examined prior to, as well as 4 days, 6 weeks, and 7 months after surgery. Lateral view X-rays and functional imaging were used to evaluate posture and mobility of the cervical spine, the position of the implants, and the reactions of adjacent bone structures. Results: Implantation of the titanium disc led to post-operative distraction of the intervertebral space and slight lordosis. Within the first 6 months a slight loss of distraction and re-kyphosis due to impression of the implants into the vertebral end-plates were found in all patients. We noted partial infractions into the vertebral end-plates in 10/42 segments and slight mobility of the implants in 14/42 segments. Both groups of patients showed reactive spondylosis and local symptoms due to loosening of the implants. The pain subsided after onset of bone bridging and stable fixation of the loosened discs. Conclusions: The titanium intervertebral disc provides initial distraction of the fusioned segments with partial recurrence of kyphosis during the subsequent course. Loosening of the implants with local symptoms can be evaluated with follow-up X-rays and functional imaging. (orig.) [German] Ziel: An Patienten mit zervikalen Kompressionssyndromen wurden Stellung und Funktion der Halswirbelsaeule nach Diskektomie und Fusion mit einem neuartigen Titaninterponat untersucht. Patienten und Methoden: Bei 37 Patienten (42 Segmente) wurden praeoperativ sowie 4 Tage, 6 Wochen und 7 Monate postoperativ mit seitlichen Uebersichts- und Funktionsaufnahmen Stellung und Mobilitaet der HWS beurteilt. Erfasst wurden Lageveraenderungen des Titaninterponates und die Reaktion der angrenzenden Wirbelkoerperabschlussplatten. Ergebnisse: Das Titaninterponat bewirkte postoperativ eine

  12. MR imaging of the cervical spine: assessment of image quality with parallel imaging compared to non-accelerated MR measurements

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    Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Imhof, Herwig [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Glaser, Christian; Dietrich, Olaf; Wallner, C.P.; Klinger, Wolfgang; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    To compare the quality of cervical spine MR images obtained by parallel imaging [generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA)] with those of non-accelerated imaging, we conducted both phantom studies and examinations of ten volunteers at 1.5Tesla with a dedicated 12-element coil system and a head-spine-neck coil combination. Acquisitions included axial T2-weighted (T2w) images with both methods, and sagittal T2w and T1w images in vivo with the latter coil combination. Non-accelerated MRI with two averages and GRAPPA (acceleration factor 2) with two averages (GRAPPA/2AV, time reduction of approximately 50%) and four averages (GRAPPA/4AV) were compared. In the phantom, the signal-to-noise ratio of the GRAPPA/2AV was lower than that of the other two settings. In vivo, the image inhomogeneity (non-uniformity, NU) was significantly higher in T2w GRAPPA/2AV than in both other settings, and in T1w GRAPPA/2AV compared to GRAPPA/4AV. Subjectively, the delineation of anatomical structures was sufficient in all sequences. Only the spinal cord was considered to be better delineable on the non-accelerated T1w sequence compared to GRAPPA/2AV. In part, GRAPPA/4AV performed better than the other settings. The subjective image noise was lowest with GRAPPA/4AV. In cervical spine MRI, the examination time can be reduced by nearly 42% with GRAPPA, while preserving sufficient image quality. (orig.)

  13. Does the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine have an impact on disk degeneration? Minimum 10-year follow-up of asymptomatic volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Eijiro; Matsumoto, Morio; Ichihara, Daisuke; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Momoshima, Suketaka; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Ogawa, Jun; Watanabe, Masahiko; Takahata, Takeshi

    2009-11-01

    There have been few studies that investigated and clarified the relationships between progression of degenerative changes and sagittal alignment of the cervical spine. The objective of the study was to longitudinally evaluate the relationships among progression of degenerative changes of the cervical spine with age, the development of clinical symptoms and sagittal alignment of the cervical spine in healthy subjects. Out of 497 symptom-free volunteers who underwent MRI and plain radiography of the cervical spine between 1994 and 1996, 113 subjects (45 males and 68 females) who responded to our contacts were enrolled. All subjects underwent another MRI at an average of 11.3 years after the initial study. Their mean age at the time of the initial imaging was 36.6 +/- 14.5 years (11-65 years). The items evaluated on MRI were (1) decrease in signal intensity of the intervertebral disks, (2) posterior disk protrusion, and (3) disk space narrowing. Each item was evaluated using a numerical grading system. The subjects were divided into four groups according to the age and sagittal alignment of the cervical spine, i.e., subjects under or over the age of 40 years, and subjects with the lordosis or non-lordosis type of sagittal alignment of the cervical spine. During the 10-year period, progression of decrease in signal intensity of the disk, posterior disk protrusion, and disk space narrowing were recognized in 64.6, 65.5, and 28.3% of the subjects, respectively. Progression of posterior disk protrusion was significantly more frequent in subjects over 40 years of age with non-lordosis type of sagittal alignment. Logistic regression analysis revealed that stiff shoulder was closely correlated with females (P = 0.001), and that numbness of the upper extremity was closely correlated with age (P = 0.030) and male (P = 0.038). However, no significant correlation between the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine and clinical symptoms was detected. Sagittal alignment of the

  14. When should a cervical collar be used to treat neck pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzin, Stefan; Isaac, Zacharia; Walker, Joseph; Abd, Omar El; Baima, Jennifer

    2008-06-01

    Neck pain is one of the most prevalent and costly health problems in the United States. It remains a complex, subjective experience with a variety of musculoskeletal causes. Although, cervical collars are a seemingly benign intervention, they can have adverse effects, especially when used for longer periods of time. It is feared that a long period of immobilization, can result in atrophy-related secondary damage. Many physicians cite anecdotal evidence of their clinical utility and soft cervical collars are often prescribed by convention for patients complaining of neck pain. The use of cervical collars to treat neck pain is an area of controversy. This review article examines the current evidence and studies related to recommending cervical collars for neck pain of a variety of etiologies.

  15. Comorbidity of fibromyalgia and cervical myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakit, Burcu Duyur; Taskin, Suhan; Nacir, Baris; Unlu, Irem; Genc, Hakan; Erdem, Hatice Rana

    2010-04-01

    The aims of this study are to determine the frequency of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) in patients with chronic cervical myofascial pain (CMP) and to investigate the FMS characteristics in CMP patients. Ninty-three patients with CMP and 30 age-matched healthy women were included in this study. Main outcome measures included visual analog scale (VAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and pain pressure thresholds. CMP patients were evaluated for the existence of FMS. The severity of FMS was assessed with total myalgic score (TMS) and control point score (CPS). Most common clinical characteristics of FMS were noted. Of the 93 CMP subjects, 22 (23.6%) patients fulfilled the classification criteria for FMS. Number of tender points were higher (p=0.0), while TMS (p=0.0) and CPS (p=0.0) values were lower in comorbid CMP and FMS patients than regional CMP group. There were statistically significant differences between regional CMP patients and comorbid CMP and FMS patients regarding presence of fatigue (p=0.0) and irritable bowel syndrome (p=0.022). There was no statistically significant difference between patient groups regarding VAS values (p>0.05). BDI values of the regional CMP were significantly lower than comorbid CMP and FMS patients (p=0.011). In conclusion, we found that nearly a quarter of CMP patients were comorbid with FMS, and psychological and comorbid symptoms were more prominent in comorbid patients. We thought that, these two syndromes might be overlapping conditions and as a peripheral pain generator or inducer of central sensitisation, MPS might lead to FMS or precipitate and worsen the FMS symptoms.

  16. Inclusion of thoracic spine thrust manipulation into an electro-therapy/thermal program for the management of patients with acute mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Iglesias, Javier; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Cesar; Cleland, Joshua A; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Palomeque-del-Cerro, Luis; Méndez-Sánchez, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the effects of a seated thoracic spine distraction thrust manipulation included in an electrotherapy/thermal program on pain, disability, and cervical range of motion in patients with acute neck pain. This randomized controlled trial included 45 patients (20 males, 25 females) between 23 and 44 years of age presenting with acute neck pain. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: an experimental group which received a thoracic manipulation, and a control group which did not receive the manipulative procedure. Both groups received an electrotherapy program consisting of 6 sessions of TENS (frequency 100Hz; 20min), superficial thermo-therapy (15min) and soft tissue massage. The experimental group also received a thoracic manipulation once a week for 3 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures included neck pain (numerical pain rate scale; NPRS), level of disability (Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire; NPQ) and neck mobility. These outcomes were assessed at baseline and 1 week after discharge. A 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA with group as between-subject variable and time as within-subject variable was used. Patients receiving thoracic manipulation experienced greater reductions in both neck pain, with between-group difference of 2.3 (95% CI 2-2.7) points on a 11-NPRS, and perceived disability with between-group differences 8.5 (95% CI 7.2-9.8) points. Further, patients receiving thoracic manipulation experienced greater increases in all cervical motions with between-group differences of 10.6 degrees (95% CI 8.8-12.5 degrees) for flexion; 9.9 degrees (95% CI 8.1-11.7 degrees) for extension; 9.5 degrees (95% CI 7.6-11.4 degrees) for right lateral-flexion; 8 degrees (95% CI 6.2-9.8 degrees) for left lateral-flexion; 9.6 degrees (95% CI 7.7-11.6 degrees) for right rotation; and 8.4 degrees (95% CI 6.5-10.3 degrees) for left rotation. We found that the inclusion of a thoracic manipulation into an electrotherapy/thermal program was effective in

  17. The epidemiology of traumatic cervical spine fractures: a prospective population study from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredø Hege Linnerud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of traumatic cervical spine fractures (CS-fx in a general population. Background The incidence of CS-fx in the general population is largely unknown. Methods All CS-fx (C0/C1 to C7/Th1 patients diagnosed with cervical-CT in Southeast Norway (2.7 million inhabitants during the time period from April 27, 2010-April 26, 2011 were prospectively registered in this observational cohort study. Results Over a one-year period, 319 patients with CS-fx at one or more levels were registered, constituting an estimated incidence of 11.8/100,000/year. The median age of the patients was 56 years (range 4–101 years, and 68% were males. The relative incidence of CS-fx increased significantly with age. The trauma mechanisms were falls in 60%, motorized vehicle accidents in 21%, bicycling in 8%, diving in 4% and others in 7% of patients. Neurological status was normal in 79%, 5% had a radiculopathy, 8% had an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI, 2% had a complete SCI, and neurological function could not be determined in 6%. The mortality rates after 1 and 3 months were 7 and 9%, respectively. Among 319 patients, 26.6% were treated with open surgery, 68.7% were treated with external immobilization with a stiff collar and 4.7% were considered stable and not in need of any specific treatment. The estimated incidence of surgically treated CS-fx in our population was 3.1/100,000/year. Conclusions This study estimates the incidence of traumatic CS-fx in a general Norwegian population to be 11.8/100,000/year. A male predominance was observed and the incidence increased with increasing age. Falls were the most common trauma mechanism, and SCI was observed in 10%. The 1- and 3-month mortality rates were 7 and 9%, respectively. The incidence of open surgery for the fixation of CS-fx in this population was 3.1/100,000/year. Level of evidence This is a prospective observational cohort study and level II-2

  18. Multidetector-row helical computed tomography in the evaluation of cervical spine disorders; Tomografia computadorizada multislice no diagnostico das afeccoes da coluna cervical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Almeida, Milena Oliveira; Rios, Adriana Martins; Garbaccio, Viviane Ladeira; Kim, Nelson Ji Tae; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem]. E-mail: laercio@einstein.br

    2003-07-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MRCT) has advantages in comparison to conventional helical computed tomography, such as reduction of study time, lower radiation doses, fewer metallic artifacts and high quality multiplanar reformatting and three dimensional reconstructions. We reviewed 150 cervical spine examinations and selected the most illustrative cases including congenital anomalies, degenerative lesions, spinal infections, neoplasms, traumatic injuries and postoperative abnormalities. The quality of multiplanar reformatting and volume reconstructions of the MRCT made the detection and evaluation of most of cases with complex anatomy easier and more precise. (author)

  19. The effect of multi-level laminoplasty and laminectomy on the biomechanics of the cervical spine: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kode, Swathi; Kallemeyn, Nicole A; Smucker, Joseph D; Fredericks, Douglas C; Grosland, Nicole M

    2014-01-01

    Laminectomy has been regarded as a standard treatment for multi-level cervical stenosis. Concern for complications such as kyphosis has limited the indication of multi-level laminectomy; hence it is often augmented with an instrumented fusion. Laminoplasty has emerged as a motion preserving alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the multidirectional flexibility of the cervical spine in response to a plate-only open door laminoplasty, double door laminoplasty, and laminectomy using a computational model. A validated three-dimensional finite element model of a specimen-specific intact cervical spine (C2-T1) was modified to simulate each surgical procedure at levels C3-C6. An additional goal of this work was to compare the instrumented computational model to our multi-specimen experimental findings to ensure similar trends in response to the surgical procedures. Model predictions indicate that mobility was retained following open and double door laminoplasty with a 5.4% and 20% increase in flexion, respectively, compared to the intact state. Laminectomy resulted in 57% increase in flexion as compared to the intact state, creating a concern for eventual kyphosis--a known risk/complication of multi-level laminectomy in the absence of fusion. Increased disc stresses were observed at the altered and adjacent segments post-laminectomy in flexion.

  20. Influence of neck pain on cervical movement in the sagittal plane during smartphone use

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Smartphone use reportedly changes posture. However, how neck posture is altered in smartphone users with neck pain is unknown. This study examined changes in the posture of young adults with and without mild neck pain (MNP) when using a smartphone. [Subjects] Thirteen control subjects and 14 subjects with MNP who used smartphones were recruited. [Methods] The upper cervical (UC) and lower cervical (LC) angles in the sagittal plane were measured using an ultrasound-based motion analy...

  1. Estimated Probability of a Cervical Spine Injury During an ISS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, John E.; Weaver, Aaron S.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) utilizes historical data, cohort data, and external simulations as input factors to provide estimates of crew health, resource utilization and mission outcomes. The Cervical Spine Injury Module (CSIM) is an external simulation designed to provide the IMM with parameter estimates for 1) a probability distribution function (PDF) of the incidence rate, 2) the mean incidence rate, and 3) the standard deviation associated with the mean resulting from injury/trauma of the neck. Methods: An injury mechanism based on an idealized low-velocity blunt impact to the superior posterior thorax of an ISS crewmember was used as the simulated mission environment. As a result of this impact, the cervical spine is inertially loaded from the mass of the head producing an extension-flexion motion deforming the soft tissues of the neck. A multibody biomechanical model was developed to estimate the kinematic and dynamic response of the head-neck system from a prescribed acceleration profile. Logistic regression was performed on a dataset containing AIS1 soft tissue neck injuries from rear-end automobile collisions with published Neck Injury Criterion values producing an injury transfer function (ITF). An injury event scenario (IES) was constructed such that crew 1 is moving through a primary or standard translation path transferring large volume equipment impacting stationary crew 2. The incidence rate for this IES was estimated from in-flight data and used to calculate the probability of occurrence. The uncertainty in the model input factors were estimated from representative datasets and expressed in terms of probability distributions. A Monte Carlo Method utilizing simple random sampling was employed to propagate both aleatory and epistemic uncertain factors. Scatterplots and partial correlation coefficients (PCC) were generated to determine input factor sensitivity. CSIM was developed in the SimMechanics/Simulink environment with a

  2. Influence of cervical spine stabilization via Stiff Neck on the postural system in healthy patients: compensation or decompensation of the postural system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, N; Eysel-Gosepath, Katrin; Klünter, H; Delank, S; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2010-10-01

    Functional and structural disorders of the cervical spine are often regarded as the cause of non-specific vertigo. Pathogenetically, disorders of proprioceptive connections between neck muscles and vestibular cores as well as the proprioceptors in the cervical facette joints are presumed. According to a study by Hülse and Hölzl (HNO 48:295-301, 1), after manual therapeutic intervention in patients with functional disorders of the cervical spine 50% of the probands stated a significant reduction of their vertigo. This was backed up in posturography, which documented an improvement in vestibulospinal reactions. To date, the effects of artificial as well as surgical stabilization of the cervical spine on the balance system have not been explored yet. In a first pilot study, we examined the influence of artificial stabilization of the cervical spine via cervical collar Stiff Neck, manufactured by Ambu/Perfit ACE] on the balance system of 20 healthy probands. For this purpose, a posturography (Balance Master Systems, NeuroCom, Clackamas, OR, USA) was applied to 20 healthy probands (10 males, 10 females) with a mean age of 35 years who had no prior spine pathology. Posturography was analyzed under static and dynamic test situations with and without Stiff Neck cervical collar. The results were compared statistically to the Wilcoxon test. In the static test situation of the modified clinical test of sensory interaction on balance, a significantly improved standing stability occurred. In none of the dynamic tests did fixation of the cervical spine by Stiff Neck cuff lead to a measurable impairment of the movement coordination. All probands felt subjectively more stable when wearing the Stiff Neck. In healthy probands, a fixation of the cervical spine leads to a stabilization of the postural balance situation. This fixation seems to be helpful in compensating the malfunction of other components of balance information. In a next step, this same model of analysis is applied

  3. Changes in muscle activity determine progression of clinical symptoms in patients with chronic spine-related muscle pain. A complex clinical and neurophysiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wytrazek, Marcin; Huber, Juliusz; Lisinski, Przemyslaw

    2011-01-01

    Spine-related muscle pain can affect muscle strength and motor unit activity. This study was undertaken to investigate whether surface electromyographic (sEMG) recordings performed during relaxation and maximal contraction reveal differences in the activity of muscles with or without trigger points (TRPs). We also analyzed the possible coexistence of characteristic spontaneous activity in needle electromyographic (eEMG) recordings with the presence of TRPs. Thirty patients with non-specific cervical and back pain were evaluated using clinical, neuroimaging and electroneurographic examinations. Muscle pain was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), and strength using Lovett's scale; trigger points were detected by palpation. EMG was used to examine motor unit activity. Trigger points were found mainly in the trapezius muscles in thirteen patients. Their presence was accompanied by increased pain intensity, decreased muscle strength, increased resting sEMG amplitude, and decreased sEMG amplitude during muscle contraction. eEMG revealed characteristic asynchronous discharges in TRPs. The results of EMG examinations point to a complexity of muscle pain that depends on progression of the myofascial syndrome.

  4. Scalene myofascial pain syndrome mimicking cervical disc prolapse: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Jalil, Nizar; Awang, Mohammad Saufi; Omar, Mahamarowi

    2010-01-01

    Scalene myofascial pain syndrome is a regional pain syndrome wherein pain originates over the neck area and radiates down to the arm. This condition may present as primary or secondary to underlying cervical pathology. Although scalene myofascial pain syndrome is a well known medical entity, it is often misdiagnosed as being some other neck pain associated with radiculopathy, such as cervical disc prolapse, cervical spinal stenosis and thoracic outlet syndrome. Because scalene myofascial pain syndrome mimics cervical radiculopathy, this condition often leads to mismanagement, which can, in turn, result in persistent pain and suffering. In the worst-case scenarios, patients may be subjected to unjustifiable surgical intervention. Because the clinical findings in scalene myofascial pain syndrome are "pathognomonic", clinicians should be aware of ways to recognize this disorder and be able to differentiate it from other conditions that present with neck pain and rediculopathy. We present two cases of unilateral scalene myofascial pain syndrome that significantly impaired the patients' functioning and quality of life. This case report serves to create awareness about the existence of the syndrome and to highlight the potential morbidity due to clinical misdiagnosis.

  5. An Investigation of Dimensional Scaling Using Cervical Spine Motion Segment Finite Element Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dilaver; Cronin, Duane S

    2017-02-15

    The paucity of experimental data for validating computational models of different statures underscores the need for appropriate scaling methods so that models can be verified and validated using experimental data. Scaling was investigated using 50(th) percentile male (M50) and 5(th) percentile female (F05) cervical spine motion segment (C4-C5) finite element models subject to tension, flexion and extension loading. Two approaches were undertaken: geometric scaling of the models to investigate size effects (volumetric scaling) and scaling of the force-displacement or moment-angle model results (data scaling). Three sets of scale factors were considered: global (body mass), regional (neck dimensions) and local (segment tissue dimensions). Volumetric scaling of the segment models from M50 to F05, and vice-versa, produced correlations that were good or excellent in both tension and flexion (0.825-0.991); however, less agreement was found in extension (0.550-0.569). The reduced correlation in extension was attributed to variations in shape between the models leading to nonlinear effects such as different time to contact for the facet joints and posterior processes. Data scaling of the responses between the M50 and F05 models produced similar trends to volumetric scaling, with marginally greater correlations. Overall, the local tissue level and neck region level scale factors produced better correlations than the traditional global scaling. The scaling methods work well for a given subject, but are limited in applicability between subjects with different morphology, where nonlinear effects may dominate the response.

  6. Validity of surface markers placement on the cervical spine for craniocervical posture assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadotti, I C; Magee, D

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a physical therapist to place surface markers on the skin over spinous process of C2, C4, C6, and C7 by evaluating the markers positioning using radiographs. A total of 39 healthy female subjects participated. From 39 subjects, 22 had 2 radiographs taken and 17 had 1 radiograph taken. This study presents the results from the 22 subjects and from all 39 subjects together. The markers used were visible on the radiographs. The surface markers placement was tested by using percentage agreement. The criteria used were based on the direction of palpation. Only the markers placed that presented the center of the markers tip aligned to the tip of the spinous process was considered an acceptable placement. Only one level of agreement was considered. A misplaced marker was measured by its relation with the vertebra above or below. From the 22 subjects, the total percentage of agreement was 87.5%. Of the 12.5% error, 1.7% (3) occurred attempting to find C2; 4.5% (8) for C4; 3.4% (6) for C6; and 2.8% (5) for C7. From the total of 39 subjects, the total percentage of agreement was 87.8%. Of the 12.2% error 1.3% (2) occurred attempting to find C2; 2.6% (4) for C4; 3.2% (5) for C6; and 5.2% (8) for C7. Based on the results from this study, clinicians and researchers should take into account possible errors on surface markers placement on the cervical spine when measuring craniocervical posture using photographs.

  7. Kinematic MRI of the cervical spine in patients with degenerative disease; Kinematische MRT bei degenerativen Halswirbelsaeulenveraenderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Wiskirchen, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Brinkmann, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Falliner, A. [Klinik fuer Orthopaedie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Weinert, D. [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Reuter, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany)

    1995-08-01

    Kinematic MRI of the cervical spine was done from 50 of inclination to 30 of reclination. Depending on the maximum inclination and reclination the range of motion was divided into 9 equal angle positions. At each angle position sagittal T{sub 2}{sup `} weighted gradient echo sequences were performed. In relation to the neutral position a physiological narrowing of the ventral epidural space was seen in healthy volunteers at inclination (50 ) in up to 50% and respectively widening at reclination (30 ) in up to 10%. An increase of spinal canal stenosis or even spinal cord compression was seen at inclination in 5 patients (22%) and in 15 patients (65%) at reclination. No change of spinal canal stenosis was found in three patients (13%). (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Bei 23 Probanden und 23 Patienten mit degenerativen Veraenderungen der Halswirbelsaeule erfolgte nach Abschluss der statischen MRT-Untersuchung die Funktionsuntersuchung der Halswirbelsaeule von maximal 50 Anteflexion bis maximal 30 Retroflexion in bis zu 9 unterschiedlichen Flexionsstellungen. In jeder Flexionsstellung wurden sagittale Aufnahmen in T{sub 2}{sup `}-gewichteten Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen angefertigt. In der Probandengruppe konnten bei max. Anteflexion (50 ) eine physiologische Verschmaelerung des ventralen Subarachnoidalraumes von ca. 50% gegenueber der horizontalen Ausgangstellung (0 ) und eine Erweiterung des ventralen Subarachnoidalraumes von ca. 10% waehrend max. Retroflexion (30 ) festgestellt werden. Die Funktionsuntersuchungen zeigten bei 5 Patienten (22%) in Anteflexion und bei 15 Patienten (65%) in Retroflexion eine zunehmende Spinalkanalstenose bzw. Myelonkompression durch dorsale osteophytaere Randanbauten. Gegenueber der Ausgangsstellung war bei nur 3 Patienten (13%) eine Befundkonstanz zu beobachten. (orig./MG)

  8. The effect of thoracic spine manipulation on pain and disability in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, P.A.; Speksnijder, C.M.; Wijer, A. de

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of thoracic spine manipulation (TSM) in reducing pain and disability in patients diagnosed with non-specific neck pain. Methods: An extensive literature search of PubMed, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL and EMBASE was con

  9. Pediatric Cervical Spine and Spinal Cord Injuries%小儿颈椎及颈脊髓损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴力扬; 倪斌; 袁文; 贾连顺

    1999-01-01

    Objective This study is designed to provide the experience in diagnosis and treatment of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries in children.Methods Forty seven children with cervical spine and spinal cord injuries were retrospectively reviewed.There were 31 males and 16 females,with their age ranging 6 to 14 years(mean,11.6 years).Nineteen children had fresh injuries,whereas the remaining 28 sustained old iniuries.Of these patients,thirty one patients were identified with injuries of upper cervical spine.10 were with injuries of lower cervical spine,1 was with multiple noncontiguous injuries of cervical spine,and 3 were with spinal cord injuries without radiographic abnormalities.All these patients underwent nonoperative(27 cases)or operative(19 cases)treatment except one who refuse treatment.Results A follow-up for 1 to 12 years showed that 34 patients had complete or significant improvement,six had moderate improvement and 5 remained unchanged.Conclusions Imaging assessment is of great importance to diagnosis and treatment of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries in children.Most injuries do not require surgical intervention,but decompression and/or fusion should be indicated in those patients with unstable injuries that cannot he reduced and stablilized by conservative therapy or progressive neurological deficit.%目的 总结小儿颈椎及颈脊髓损伤的诊断治疗经验.方法 回顾分析47例小儿颈椎及颈脊髓损伤,男31例,女16例,年龄6~14岁,平均11.6岁.新鲜损伤19例,陈旧性损伤28例.其中上颈椎损伤33例,下颈椎损伤10例,多节段间隔性颈椎损伤1例,无X线异常的脊髓损伤3例.非手术治疗27例,手术治疗19例,未治1例.结果 早期死亡1例.45例获1~12年随访,恢复正常或接近正常者34例,明显改善者6例,5例无改善.结论 影像学检查对于小儿颈椎及颈脊髓损伤的诊断具有重要价值,小儿颈椎损伤多数不需手术治疗,不稳定性损伤非手术治疗无

  10. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in Adult Degenerative Scoliosis for Spine Support: Study for Pain Evaluation and Mobility Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios K. Filippiadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the efficacy-safety of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV as primary treatment in adult degenerative scoliosis. During the last 4 years, PV was performed in 18 adult patients (68 vertebral bodies with back pain due to degenerative scoliotic spine. Under anaesthesia and fluoroscopy, direct access to most deformed vertebral bodies was obtained by 13G needles, and PMMA for vertebroplasty was injected. Scoliosis’ inner arch was supported. Clinical evaluation included immediate and delayed studies of patient’s general condition and neurological status. An NVS scale helped assessing pain relief, life quality, and mobility improvement. Comparing patients’ scores prior to (mean value 8.06±1.3 NVS units, the morning after (mean value 3.11±1.2 NVS units, at 12 (mean value 1.67±1.5 NVS units, and 24 months after vertebroplasty (mean value 1.67±1.5 NVS units treatment, patients presented a mean decrease of 6.39±1.6 NVS units on terms of life quality improvement and pain relief (P=0.000. Overall mobility improved in 18/18 (100% patients. No complications were observed. During follow-up period (mean value 17.66 months, all patients underwent a mean of 1.3 sessions for facet joint and nerve root infiltrations. Percutaneous vertebroplasty in the inner arch seems to be an effective technique for supporting adult degenerative scoliotic spine.

  11. SPECT/CT imaging of the lumbar spine in chronic low back pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carstensen Michael H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mechanical low back pain is a common indication for Nuclear Medicine imaging. Whole-body bone scan is a very sensitive but poorly specific study for the detection of metabolic bone abnormalities. The accurate localisation of metabolically active bone disease is often difficult in 2D imaging but single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT allows accurate diagnosis and anatomic localisation of osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions in 3D imaging. We present a clinical case of a patient referred for evaluation of chronic lower back pain with no history of trauma, spinal surgery, or cancer. Planar whole-body scan showed heterogeneous tracer uptake in the lumbar spine with intense localisation to the right lateral aspect of L3. Integrated SPECT/CT of the lumbar spine detected active bone metabolism in the right L3/L4 facet joint in the presence of minimal signs of degenerative osteoarthrosis on CT images, while a segment demonstrating more gross degenerative changes was more quiescent with only mild tracer uptake. The usefulness of integrated SPECT/CT for anatomical and functional assessment of back pain opens promising opportunities both for multi-disciplinary clinical assessment and treatment for manual therapists and for research into the effectiveness of manual therapies.

  12. An unusual presentation of autonomic dysreflexia in a patient with cold abscess of cervical spine for anterolateral decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Susmita; Taneja, Dipali; Saxena, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    A young female having complaints of quadriparesis along with bladder and bowel involvement, diagnosed to have osseous destruction of C4, C6, C7, T2 vertebral bodies with pre- and para-vertebral abscess, was taken up for anterolateral decompression and fusion of cervical spine. She presented with anxiety, agitation, sweating and headache and was in hypertensive crisis which was refractory to antihypertensives, anxiolytics and analgesics but showed a reasonable response to intravenous dexmedetomidine and finally responded dramatically to rectal evacuation. Autonomic dysreflexia was suspected with stimulus arising from distended rectum as all other causes of hypertension were ruled out. PMID:28003699

  13. An unusual presentation of autonomic dysreflexia in a patient with cold abscess of cervical spine for anterolateral decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Sarangi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A young female having complaints of quadriparesis along with bladder and bowel involvement, diagnosed to have osseous destruction of C 4 , C 6 , C 7 , T 2 vertebral bodies with pre- and para-vertebral abscess, was taken up for anterolateral decompression and fusion of cervical spine. She presented with anxiety, agitation, sweating and headache and was in hypertensive crisis which was refractory to antihypertensives, anxiolytics and analgesics but showed a reasonable response to intravenous dexmedetomidine and finally responded dramatically to rectal evacuation. Autonomic dysreflexia was suspected with stimulus arising from distended rectum as all other causes of hypertension were ruled out.

  14. Lumbar spine MRI in the elite-level female gymnast with low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, D. Lee [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, Colleges of Human Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine, East Lansing, MI (United States); Nassar, Lawrence [Department of Sports Medicine and Kinesiology, Michigan State University, College of Osteopathic Medicine, East Lansing, MI (United States); DeLano, Mark C. [Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, Colleges of Human Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Previous studies have shown increased degenerative disk changes and spine injuries in the competitive female gymnast. However, it has also been shown that many of these findings are found in asymptomatic athletic people of the same age. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies evaluating the gymnastic spine have not made a distinction between symptomatic and asymptomatic athletes. Our hypothesis is that MRI will demonstrate the same types of abnormalities in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic gymnasts. Olympic-level female gymnasts received prospectively an MRI exam of the lumbar spine. Each of the gymnasts underwent a physical exam by a sports medicine physician just prior to the MRI for documentation of low back pain. Each MRI exam was evaluated for anterior apophyseal ring avulsion injury, compression deformity of the vertebral body, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, degenerative disease, focal disk protrusion/extrusion, muscle strain, epidural mass, and bone-marrow edema. Nineteen Olympic-level female gymnasts (age 12-20 years) were evaluated prospectively in this study. All of these gymnasts were evaluated while attending a specific training camp. Anterior ring apophyseal injuries (9/19) and degenerative disk disease (12/19) were common. Spondylolysis (3/19) and spondylolisthesis (3/19) were found. Focal bone-marrow edema was found in both L3 pedicles in one gymnast. History and physical exam revealed four gymnasts with current low back pain at the time of imaging. There were findings confined to those athletes with current low back pain: spondylolisthesis, spondylolysis, bilateral pedicle bone-marrow edema, and muscle strain. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: Frequency of degenerative changes in the intervertebral disc with relation to age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulkarim, J.A.; Dhingsa, R.; Finlay, D.B.L

    2003-12-01

    AIM: To ascertain the level at which intervertebral disc degeneration of the cervical spine most commonly occurs in each decade from 20-79 years. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using computer analysis, we retrospectively assessed the mean signal intensity from each cervical disc from T2-weighted spin-echo images in 60 symptomatic patients (10 per decade from the third to eighth inclusive). RESULTS: Age, disc level and interaction between age and level were highly significant predictors for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) mean signal intensity from intervertebral discs (p<0.0001 for all three terms). The MRI signals were generally lower as age increased and also for the higher discs (C2-C3, etc). CONCLUSION: In our study we have shown that in younger patients the higher discs are more frequently affected by degeneration than the lower ones. As age increases, the process of degeneration becomes more generalized with less variability between discs.

  16. Importance of contouring the cervical spine levels in initial intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiation for head and neck cancers: Implications for re-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parashar Bhupesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the maximum differential cervical spinal (C-spine cord dose in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans of patients undergoing radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: The C-spine of ten head and neck cancer patients that were planned using IMRT and each cervical vertebral body and the right and left sides was contoured by splitting the cord in the center. Dose-volume histograms (DVH and maximum point doses were obtained for each contour and compared. Results: The dose to the cord varied with the location of the primary tumor but such variation was not consistently seen. This report provides information that is critical for planning reirradiation treatments. We recommend that contouring of the C-spine cord with IMRT should include outlining of each cervical cord level and identification of the right and the left sides of the cord on each plan.

  17. Cervical helical axis characteristics and its center of rotation during active head and upper arm movements-comparisons of whiplash-associated disorders, non-specific neck pain and asymptomatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grip, Helena; Sundelin, Gunnevi; Gerdle, Björn; Stefan Karlsson, J

    2008-09-18

    The helical axis model can be used to describe translation and rotation of spine segments. The aim of this study was to investigate the cervical helical axis and its center of rotation during fast head movements (side rotation and flexion/extension) and ball catching in patients with non-specific neck pain or pain due to whiplash injury as compared with matched controls. The aim was also to investigate correlations with neck pain intensity. A finite helical axis model with a time-varying window was used. The intersection point of the axis during different movement conditions was calculated. A repeated-measures ANOVA model was used to investigate the cervical helical axis and its rotation center for consecutive levels of 15 degrees during head movement. Irregularities in axis movement were derived using a zero-crossing approach. In addition, head, arm and upper body range of motion and velocity were observed. A general increase of axis irregularity that correlated to pain intensity was observed in the whiplash group. The rotation center was superiorly displaced in the non-specific neck pain group during side rotation, with the same tendency for the whiplash group. During ball catching, an anterior displacement (and a tendency to an inferior displacement) of the center of rotation and slower and more restricted upper body movements implied a changed movement strategy in neck pain patients, possibly as an attempt to stabilize the cervical spine during head movement.

  18. Methodological systematic review: mortality in elderly patients with cervical spine injury: a critical appraisal of the reporting of baseline characteristics, follow-up, cause of death, and analysis of risk factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, J.J. van; Albert, T.J.; Veth, R.P.H.; Hosman, A.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Methodologic systematic review. OBJECTIVE: To determine the validity of reported risk factors for mortality in elderly patients with cervical spine injury. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In elderly patients with cervical spine injury, mortality has frequently been associated with the type

  19. Quality of systematic reviews: an example of studies comparing artificial disc replacement with fusion in the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashani, Osama A; El-Tumi, Hanan; Aneiba, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) is now an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Many studies have evaluated the efficacy of C-ADR compared with ACDF. This led to a series of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to evaluate the evidence of the superiority of one intervention against the other. The aim of the study presented here was to evaluate the quality of these reviews and meta-analyses. Medline via Ovid, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched using the keywords: (total disk replacement, prosthesis, implantation, discectomy, and arthroplasty) AND (cervical vertebrae, cervical spine, and spine) AND (systematic reviews, reviews, and meta-analysis). Screening and data extraction were conducted by two reviewers independently. Two reviewers then assessed the quality of the selected reviews and meta-analysis using 11-item AMSTAR score which is a validated measurement tool to assess the methodological quality of systematic reviews. Screening of full reports of 46 relevant abstracts resulted in the selection of 15 systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses as eligible for this study. The two reviewers' inter-rater agreement level was high as indicated by kappa of >0.72. The AMSTAR score of the reviews ranged from 3 to 11. Only one study (a Cochrane review) scored 100% (AMSTAR 11). Five studies scored below (AMSTAR 5) indicating low-quality reviews. The most significant drawbacks of reviews of a score below 5 were not using an extensive search strategy, failure to use the scientific quality of the included studies appropriately in formulating a conclusion, not assessing publication bias, and not reporting the excluded studies. With a significant exception of a Cochrane review, the methodological quality of systematic reviews evaluating the evidence of C-ADR versus ACDF has to be improved.

  20. 颈前路蝶型钢板系统的生物力学评价%Cervical spine butterfly plate for unstable cervical spine: A biomechanical evaluation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王柏川; 朱青安; 樊仕才; 张美超; 金大地

    2001-01-01

    目的:对颈前路蝶型钢板(CSBP)进行生物力学评价。方法:14具颈椎标本随机分为A、B两组,测量两组正常颈椎在2.0Nm载荷下的运动范围(ROM);将两组颈椎制作成三柱不稳定模型,分别以CSBP和Orion钢板固定,测量两组颈椎的ROM。将CSBP固定于椎体模型上,施加100N循环压缩载荷(1Hz),观察CSBP松动、断裂情况。对疲劳测试条件下钢板的受力情况进行有限元分析。结果:CSBP和Orion钢板均能显著降低颈椎各方向上的ROM(P<0.05),在前屈、后伸方向最大。应用CSBP钢板,前屈、后伸ROM较正常颈椎分别降低66%、60%;应用Orion钢板分别降低72%、71%;两种钢板在重建颈椎稳定程度上无明显差异(P>0.05)。CSBP抵抗载荷次数达105次,于钢板钉孔外侧缘出现裂缝并断裂。有限元分析提示钢板钉孔周围是应力集中处。结论:CSBP的生物力学稳定作用较好,钉孔外侧缘是钢板应力集中部位。%Objective:To evaluate the biomechanical stability of a cervical spine butterfly plate(CSBP) for unstable cervical spine.Method:Fourteen cervical spine specimens (C3~T1) were divided into two groups:A and B. All intact specimens were subjected to nondestructive testing in 6 loading modalities on a universal testing machine.A cadaveric model of complete C5~C6 instability was produced in both groups.Specimens in group A were stabilized with CSBPs,and group B with Orion plates.The nondestructive testing was repeated to determine structural stability.The 2 models were fatigued with 106 cycles(1Hz) of compression bending(100N) testing at a rate of loading 10.The location of fissure or rupture was observed.Stress in plate was analyzed by finite element method (FEM).Result:The injured spines stabilized with implants in both groups were significantly more stable than the intact specimens in all modes of testing(P<0.05).Stability of injured spines was increased

  1. Is pressure pain sensitivity over the cervical musculature associated with neck disability in individuals with migraine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Maria Claudia; Chaves, Thaís Cristina; Florencio, Lidiane Lima; Carvalho, Gabriela Ferreira; Dach, Fabíola; Fernández-De-Las-Penãs, Cesar; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to determine if disability due to neck pain is correlated with pressure pain sensitivity in the cervical muscles in patients with migraine. Thirty-two volunteers with migraine completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius and suboccipital muscles were also assessed. Data were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (rs) and linear regression models (α cervical muscles correlated moderately and was inversely proportional in patients with migraine, but the association was not linear, so both outcomes should be considered in the assessment of this population.

  2. Ossificação do ligamento longitudinal posterior na coluna cervical: relato de caso Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSANA HERMINIA SCOLA

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available A ossificação do ligamento longitudinal posterior (OLLP é causa incomum de mielopatia compressiva na população caucasiana. É relatado o caso de um paciente do sexo masculino com um quadro de paraparesia espástica, cuja investigação radiológica mostrou OLLP. O raio-X de coluna cervical mostrou imagem laminar, vertical, com densidade óssea, posterior aos corpos vertebrais, que se estendia de C2 a T1. A tomografia computadorizada (TC e a mielotomografia mostravam OLLP causando compressão medular ântero-posterior no segmento descrito. Na ressonância magnética, observou-se área de hiperintensidade em T2 no segmento C7-T1, compatível com mielomalácia. O paciente foi submetido a laminoplastia tipo "open-door", com melhora do quadro parético dos membros inferiores. A OLLP deve entrar no diagnóstico diferencial das mielopatias cervicais, sendo facilmente diagnosticada através de radiografias e TC da coluna cervical. São revisados os aspectos clínicos e radiológicos e o tratamento da OLLP.Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL is an uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy in the Caucasian population. A case of spastic paraparesis in a Caucasian man whose radiological investigation showed OPLL is presented. The radiographs of the cervical spine showed a strip of bony density posterior to the vertebral bodies, extending from C2 to T1. Computerized tomography (CT and CT myelography showed OPLL at the same level. Magnetic resonance showed an area of increased signal on T2-weighted sequences at C7-T1 level suggestive of myelomalacia. The patient underwent an open-door laminoplasty (C2 to C7 with improvement of the paraparesis. OPLL should be included in the differential diagnosis of cervical myelopathy. It can be easily detected by plain radiographs and CT of the cervical spine. A review of the clinical and radiological features and the treatment of OPLL is presented.

  3. Correction of immune disorders in patients with malignant tumors at level of craniovertebral junction and upper cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazhanov S.P.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the cellular and humoral immunity in patients with malignant tumors of the upper cervical spine. Material and methods: The study included 22 patients with malignant tumors of the craniovertebral junction and upper cervical spine. To assess the function of the immune system the methods of population and subpopulation immuno-phenotyping of peripheral blood lymphocytes have been applied. Cytokine parameters and functional status (cytotoxic activity of NK-cells have been studied using immunofermental methods. The indices have been presented in absolute and relative terms. All the patients have been subjected to the adjuvant therapy. Results: Correction of cellular immunity has led to significant increase in CD3 + (T-lymphocytes and CD3 + CD8 + (T-killers. Cytokine levels in the groups studied in the dynamics have not been significantly altered. The changes of cytotoxic (functional activity of NK-cells in the first group after the combined treatment have been considered to be higher than before the treatment. Cytotoxic index of (functional activity of NK-cells in the second group under the study after the combined treatment has been determined to be lower than before the treatment. Conclusion: It has been found out that the application of complex treatment accompanied by immunotropic therapy may positively influence the immune status.

  4. Artrodese na coluna cervical utilizando SICAP como substituto de enxerto ósseo Artrodesis en la columna cervical utilizando SICAP como sustituto de injerto óseo Cervical spine fusion utilizing silicated calcium phosphate bone graft substitute (SICAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fratezi

    2011-01-01

    resembling natural bone. METHODS: 19 patients who underwent cervical spine fusion were retrospectively reviewed. Radiographic evaluation and clinical evaluation were performed using Neck Disability Index questionnaire and Visual Analog Scale (VAS pre- and post-operatively. RESULTS: The mean post-operative follow-up was 14 ± 5 months, range 7-30 months. Eleven patients had an anterior approach, five patients had a posterior approach, and 3 had combined anterior-posterior approaches. Radiographic review showed 19/19 (100% patients were considered fused, with no subsidence, hardware breakage, or hardware loosening. No instances of heterotopic bone formation or intracanal boney ingrowths were observed. Clinically, average Neck Disability scores decreased 13.3 points (pre-op 34.5, post-op 21.2, a 39% improvement; average VAS neck pain scores decreased 2.2 points (4.9 pre-op to 1.9 post-op; a 44.9% improvement; average VAS arm pain decreased 2.0 points (2.7 pre-op to 0.7 post-op, a 74.1% improvement. There were no complications such as infection, osteolysis, or abnormal swelling of soft tissues. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary results from this series with the use of SiCaP bone graft substitute were encouraging, with solid fusion occurring in all subjects, and no heterotopic bone formation or intracanal bone ingrowths. SiCaP seems to be a reliable alternative to autograft on cervical spine fusion achieving solid fusion with no complications.

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF MANUAL TRACTION AND OTHER PHYSIOTHERAPY TREATMENT IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PAINFUL CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwal Khan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical radiculopathy, generally entitle as pinching of the nerves which causes severe shooting pain which mostly pass through the shoulder. Along with it causes muscle weakness and numbness into the arm and hand. In majority of the cases, cervical radiculopathy responds well to conservative mode of treatments which incorporate physical therapy with medical management. The aim of this study is to uncover the effective and evidence based conservative treatment of cervical radiculopathy. Method: Randomized controlled trial study conducted from January 2014 to December 2014. Participants were recruited from physiotherapy OPDs of tertiary care hospitals. A total number of, 100 subjects with a ratio of 50 men and 50 women were recruited between the ages of 25 and 55 years with unilateral cervical radiculopathy. Control group received combination of conventional AROM exercises and modalities including TENS and superficial thermotherapy as a treatment while experimental group received manual cervical traction and combination of conventional AROM exercises, modalities including TENS and superficial thermotherapy. For both groups, treatment was designed for two weeks (6 sessions/ week. Improvement in symptoms was assessed by evaluation of both groups on the basis of visual analogue scale (VAS. Results: After 2 weeks of treatment, patients with neck pain showed marked decreased in pain as compared with the control group (P<.001.For pre and post level a paired sample t-test was used and the results with p-value less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Mean difference of 0.94 (VAS with a significant p-value (P<0.01 was obtained shows the respective improvements in the numeric pain scale scores. Conclusion: Manual cervical traction when used with conventional AROM exercises and modalities were effective methods for decreasing pain in cervical radiculopathy. Recent literature supports such protocols involving multiple interventions. Results

  6. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per ...

  7. Laryngoscope and a new tracheal tube assist lightwand intubation in difficult airways due to unstable cervical spine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-neng Wu

    Full Text Available The WEI Jet Endotracheal Tube (WEI JET is a new tracheal tube that facilitates both oxygenation and ventilation during the process of intubation and assists tracheal intubation in patients with difficult airway. We evaluated the effectiveness and usefulness of the WEI JET in combination with lightwand under direct laryngoscopy in difficult tracheal intubation due to unstable cervical spine.Ninety patients with unstable cervical spine disorders (ASA I-III with general anaesthesia were included and randomly assigned to three groups, based on the device used for intubation: lightwand only, lightwand under direct laryngoscopy, lightwand with WEI JET under direct laryngoscopy.No statistically significant differences were detected among three groups with respect to demographic characteristics and C/L grade. There were statistically significant differences between three groups for overall intubation success rate (p = 0.015 and first attempt success rate (p = 0.000. The intubation time was significantly longer in the WEI group (110.8±18.3 s than in the LW group (63.3±27.5 s, p = 0.000 and DL group (66.7±29.4 s, p = 0.000, but the lowest SpO2 in WEI group was significantly higher than other two groups (p<0.01. The WEI JET significantly reduced successful tracheal intubation attempts compared to the LW group (p = 0.043. The severity of sore throat was similar in three groups (p = 0.185.The combined use of WEI JET under direct laryngoscopy helps to assist tracheal intubation and improves oxygenation during intubation in patients with difficult airway secondary to unstable spine disorders.Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-14005141.

  8. Fatal outcome after brain stem infarction related to bilateral vertebral artery occlusion - case report of a detrimental complication of cervical spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beauchamp Kathryn M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebral artery injury (VAI after blunt cervical trauma occurs more frequently than historically believed. The symptoms due to vertebral artery (VA occlusion usually manifest within the first 24 hours after trauma. Misdiagnosed VAI or delay in diagnosis has been reported to cause acute deterioration of previously conscious and neurologically intact patients. Case presentation A 67 year-old male was involved in a motor vehicle crash (MVC sustaining multiple injuries. Initial evaluation by the emergency medical response team revealed that he was alert, oriented, and neurologically intact. He was transferred to the local hospital where cervical spine computed tomography (CT revealed several abnormalities. Distraction and subluxation was present at C5-C6 and a comminuted fracture of the left lateral mass of C6 with violation of the transverse foramen was noted. Unavailability of a spine specialist prompted the patient's transfer to an area medical center equipped with spine care capabilities. After arrival, the patient became unresponsive and neurological deficits were noted. His continued deterioration prompted yet another transfer to our Level 1 regional trauma center. A repeat cervical spine CT at our institution revealed significantly worsened subluxation at C5-C6. CT angiogram also revealed complete occlusion of bilateral VA. The following day, a repeat CT of the head revealed brain stem infarction due to bilateral VA occlusion. Shortly following, the patient was diagnosed with brain death and care was withdrawn. Conclusion Brain stem infarction secondary to bilateral VA occlusion following cervical spine trauma resulted in fatal outcome. Prompt imaging evaluation is necessary to assess for VAI in cervical trauma cases with facet joint subluxation/dislocation or transverse foramen fracture so that treatment is not delayed. Additionally, multiple transportation events are risk factors for worsening when unstable cervical

  9. Motor Cortex Stimulation for the Treatment of Chronic Facial, Upper Extremity, and Throat Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    Trigeminal Neuralgia (Burchiel Type I); Trigeminal Neuralgia (Burchiel Type II); Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain; Trigeminal Deafferentation Pain; Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (Types I and II, Involving the Upper Extremity); Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia; Upper Extremity Pain Due to Deafferentation of the Cervical Spine; Central Pain Syndromes

  10. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

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    Lisa A. Ferrara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression.

  11. The biomechanics of cervical spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression.

  12. Isolated transverse process fractures of the subaxial cervical spine: a clinically insignificant injury or not?: a prospective, longitudinal analysis in a consecutive high-energy blunt trauma population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotanus, M.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Hosman, A.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective single cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the incidence, associated injuries, treatment outcomes and associated adverse events of isolated transverse process fractures (TPFs) of the subaxial cervical spine in a high-energy blunt trauma population. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DAT

  13. Image quality in the anteroposterior cervical spine radiograph: Comparison between moving, stationary and non-grid techniques in a lamb neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Michelle [School of Health and Social Care, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 1DD (United Kingdom); Grange, Stuart, E-mail: Stuart2.Grange@uwe.ac.u [School of Health and Social Care, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 1DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Background: Cervical spine radiography is a commonly employed examination for degenerative disease and trauma in the cervical spine. Traditionally, the anteroposterior projection is undertaken with the use of an anti-scatter grid. Some practitioners appear to have rejected this practice in favour of a non-grid technique, possibly because of the dose saving it affords. It is necessary to determine if image quality in the cervical spine is significantly degraded and whether the omission of the grid is justified. Method: Using a slaughtered lamb neck as a model of the human neck triplicate radiographs were obtained using a non-grid, a stationary grid and a moving grid technique. Entrance surface dose and dose area product was measured for these techniques. Image quality in terms of contrast, sharpness and overall acceptability was evaluated by 9 independent and blinded observers. Results: A significant reduction in measured dose was observed when the non-grid technique was compared to stationary or moving grid techniques. A statistically significant reduction in image contrast, sharpness and acceptability was also seen in the non-grid compared to grid techniques. Conclusion: These results show evidence of significantly greater image quality in the presence of either a moving or stationary grid in the lamb model. As such they support the continued use of scatter rejection methods such as the anti-scatter grid in AP radiography of the human cervical spine, to optimise radiographic image quality in this critical structure.

  14. 颈椎在体运动学研究方法的进展%The research processes of in vivo kinematics of the cervical spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺金亮; 夏群

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The research of in vivo kinematics of the cervical spine can obtain the characteristics of cervical motion inphysiological load by invasive or non-invasive method, whichwill provide the guidelines and reference for the diagnose andtreatment of patients with cervical degeneration diseases.OBJECTIVE: To summarize the current research methods and their respective characteristics of in vivo kinematics of the cervicalspine.METHODS: The computer-based search was done in PubMed database(http:/www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) and W anfangdatabase (http://www.wanf a ngdata.com. Cn) for articles published with the English keywords of "Spine, cervical, in wo motion"and the Chinese key words of "Spine, cervical, measurement, rang of motion". Ultimately a total of 238 literatures were searchedand 30 literatures were included for review according to inclusion and exclusion criteria.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The research of in vivo kinematics of the cervical spine can obtain the quantitative data of eachjoint6DOF of the cervical vertebra. It has an important role in improving the level of awareness of cervical movement inphysiological load, knowing more about the kinematic characteristics of cervical spine degeneration and optimizing the clinicaldiagnosis and treatment programme of cervical diseases. At the same time, it can provide indispensable data for the developmentof artificially vertebral articulatory and internal fixation, especially the fusion of internal fixation. The research of in wio kinematicsof the cervical spine has been investigated by using X-ray. CT, MRI. Ultrasound, electromagnetis mand so on. However, thepresent data cannot provide a reference standard for understanding normal conditions. The future research of in vivo kinematics ofthe cervical spine needs to be advanced gradually.%背景:颈椎在体运动学研究能够通过侵袭性或非侵袭性方法获取生理载荷下活体颈椎的活动特性,可为颈椎疾病的诊断和治疗提供指

  15. Cervical Laminoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spine showing extension of the spine following a cervical laminoplasty. B) Post-operative lateral x-rays of the same patient showing flexion. Note that the range of motion is maintained after the laminoplasty and that no ...

  16. 上颈椎融合对颈椎活动度的影响%The impact of the upper cervical spine fusion on cervical range of motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁伟; 朱悦; 崔璀

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨上颈椎融合对颈椎活动功能的影响,并评估颈椎活动度测量仪(cervical range of motion device,CROM)的可靠性.方法 我科于2010年7月至2011年10月对收治的14例上颈椎疾病患者使用CROM仪测量,其中5例为颈枕融合,2例寰枢椎融合,7例采用Halo架非融合治疗后2个月及6个月左右颈椎前屈、后伸、左右侧弯、左右旋转主动活动度,并与15例健康志愿者颈椎活动度进行比较,分析术后颈椎活动度丢失情况;使用CROM仪重复测量健康志愿者颈椎活动度并采用组间相关系数(intraclass correlation coefficients,ICC)来评价CROM仪的测量者内可靠性.结果 术后6个月随访时颈椎活动度六个方向中的三个方向:颈椎前屈、左旋转及右旋转,融合组与非融合组相比有显著降低(P<0.05),与正常组相比则在六个方向均有显著性差异(P<0.05).融合组中颈枕融合较寰枢椎融合在颈椎前屈、左右旋转活动上有显著性降低(P<0.05),术后第6个月随访各组颈椎活动度较3个月随访时均有一定程度的增加.CROM仪测量颈椎六个方向的活动度测量者内ICC均在0.91以上,有较高的可靠性.结论 上颈椎融合使颈椎活动范围显著性减小,对颈椎前屈、旋转功能影响最大.此外,CROM仪是一种可靠的颈椎活动度测量工具.%Objective To investigate the impact of the upper cervical spine fusion on cervical range of motion (CROM) and to evaluate the reliability of the CROM device. Methods From July 2010 to October 2011, 14 patients with upper cervical disease were adopted by our department and treated with cervical spine fusion or non-fusion, among whom there were 5 cases of cervicooccipital fusion, 2 cases of atlantoaxial fusion and 7 cases of Halo-vest treatment. The cervical flexion, backward extension, left and right lateral bending and rotation of all patients were measured by the CROM device about 2 months and 6 months after surgery

  17. Undiagnosed osteoid osteoma of the spine presenting as painful scoliosis from adolescence to adulthood: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathopoulos Nicolas E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presented here is a case of a young woman, with an undiagnosed osteoid osteoma of the spine, which presented with painful scoliosis in adolescence and was treated by bracing until her accession to adulthood. A more thorough investigation, years after the initial one, revealed the tumor. Surgical excision and stabilization offered the long-awaited cure. Misdiagnosis resulted in intractable pain for years, deformity, the discomfort of brace therapy, and the frustration of a prolonged yet ineffective treatment.

  18. EFFECT OF THE CERVICAL ENDURANCE TRAINING PROGRAMME IN MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Gogoi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical neck pain commonly arises insidiously and is generally multifactorial in origin. Regardless of the primary source of pain, the prognosis for individual experiencing chronic neck pain is poor. Exercise interventions are important for effective management of patients with neck pain.the objective of the study is to compare the efficacy of cervical endurance training programme with cervical isometric exercise in alleviating symptoms of mechanical neck pain. Methods: 40 subjects were assessed and identified with Mechanical Neck Pain and recruited for the study and were randomly divided into two groups. In one group endurance training for cervical muscles and in another group resisted isometric had been given for 3 weeks. The post treatment scores regarding endurance, pain intensity, disability, Range of motion and muscle power were compared with the pre treatment scores. Results: Paired‘t’ test was done to compare the pretreatment scores with the post treatment scores .Unpaired ‘t’ test was done to compare the post treatment scores of both the groups. The pain intensity, disability were found to be significantly decreased in experimental group than the control group (p<0.001. While the endurance was found to be significantly increased in experimental group than the control group (p < 0.001. The muscle power was found to be slightly increased in the control group than the experimental group .The post treatment cervical range of motion does not have significant difference in between the groups (Flexion- p=0.35 and Extension-p=0.40. Conclusion: This study showed that the progressive endurance exercise is beneficial in alleviating mechanical neck pain and should be incorporated along with the conventional physiotherapy treatment for mechanical neck pain.

  19. Music Therapy Increases Comfort and Reduces Pain in Patients Recovering From Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondanaro, John F; Homel, Peter; Lonner, Baron; Shepp, Jennifer; Lichtensztein, Marcela; Loewy, Joanne V

    The treatment of pain continues to gain in saliency as a component of defining best practice in medical care. Music therapy is an integrative treatment modality that impacts patient outcomes in the treatment of spinal pain. At Mount Sinai Beth Israel, we conducted a mixed-methods study addressing the effects of music therapy interventions on the recovery of patients after spine surgery. The study combined standard medical approaches and integrative music therapy. Sixty patients (35 female, 25 male) ranging in age from 40 to 55 years underwent anterior, posterior, or anterior-posterior spinal fusion and were randomly assigned to either music therapy plus standard care (medical and nursing care with scheduled pharmacologic pain intervention) or standard care only. Measurements for both groups were completed before and after the intervention. Music therapy involved the use of patient-preferred live music that supported tension release/relaxation through incentive-based clinical improvisation, singing, and/or rhythmic drumming or through active visualization supported by live music that encompasses tension resolution. The control and music groups showed significant differences in degree and direction of change in the visual analog scale (VAS) pain ratings from before to after intervention (P = .01). VAS pain levels increased slightly in the control group (to 5.87 from 5.20) but decreased by more than 1 point in the music group (to 5.09 from 6.20). The control and music therapy groups did not differ in the rate of change in scores on Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) Anxiety (P = .62), HADS Depression (P = .85), or Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (P = .93). Both groups had slight increases in HADS Anxiety, comparable decreases in HADS Depression, and minimal changes in fear-related movement (Tampa scale).

  20. Psychopathology predicts the outcome of medial branch blocks with corticosteroid for chronic axial low back or cervical pain: a prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasan, Ajay D; Jamison, Robert N; Pham, Loc; Tipirneni, Naveen; Nedeljkovic, Srdjan S; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2009-01-01

    Background Comorbid psychopathology is an important predictor of poor outcome for many types of treatments for back or neck pain. But it is unknown if this applies to the results of medial branch blocks (MBBs) for chronic low back or neck pain, which involves injecting the medial branch of the dorsal ramus nerves that innervate the facet joints. The objective of this study was to determine whether high levels of psychopathology are predictive of pain relief after MBB injections in the lumbar or cervical spine. Methods This was a prospective cohort study. Consecutive patients in a pain medicine practice undergoing MBBs of the lumbar or cervical facets with corticosteroids were recruited to participate. Subjects were selected for a MBB based on operationalized selection criteria and the procedure was performed in a standardized manner. Subjects completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) just prior to the procedure and at one-month follow up. Scores on the HADS classified the subjects into three groups based on psychiatric symptoms, which formed the primary predictor variable: Low, Moderate, or High levels of psychopathology. The primary outcome measure was the percent improvement in average daily pain rating one-month following an injection. Analysis of variance and chi-square were used to analyze the analgesia and functional rating differences between groups, and to perform a responder analysis. Results Eighty six (86) subjects completed the study. The Low psychopathology group (n = 37) reported a mean of 23% improvement in pain at one-month while the High psychopathology group (n = 29) reported a mean worsening of -5.8% in pain (p < .001). Forty five percent (45%) of the Low group had at least 30% improvement in pain versus 10% in the High group (p < .001). Using an analysis of covariance, no baseline demographic, social, or medical variables were significant predictors of pain improvement, nor did they mitigate

  1. A comparison of McCoy, TruView, and Macintosh laryngoscopes for tracheal intubation in patients with immobilized cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Bharti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical spine immobilization results in a poor laryngeal view on direct laryngoscopy leading to difficulty in intubation. This randomized prospective study was designed to compare the laryngeal view and ease of intubation with the Macintosh, McCoy, and TruView laryngoscopes in patients with immobilized cervical spine. Materials and Methods: 60 adult patients of ASA grade I-II with immobilized cervical spine undergoing elective cervical spine surgery were enrolled. Anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl, and vecuronium and maintained with isoflurane and nitrous oxide in oxygen. The patients were randomly allocated into three groups to achieve tracheal intubation with Macintosh, McCoy, or TruView laryngoscopes. When the best possible view of the glottis was obtained, the Cormack-Lehane laryngoscopy grade and the percentage of glottic opening (POGO score were assessed. Other measurements included the intubation time, the intubation difficulty score, and the intubation success rate. Hemodynamic parameters and any airway complications were also recorded. Results: TruView reduced the intubation difficulty score, improved the Cormack and Lehane glottic view, and the POGO score compared with the McCoy and Macintosh laryngoscopes. The first attempt intubation success rate was also high in the TruView laryngoscope group. However, there were no differences in the time required for successful intubation and the overall success rates between the devices tested. No dental injury or hypoxia occurred with either device. Conclusion: The use of a TruView laryngoscope resulted in better glottis visualization, easier tracheal intubation, and higher first attempt success rate as compared to Macintosh and McCoy laryngoscopes in immobilized cervical spine patients.

  2. EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF CERVICAL SPINE INJURY: APPLICATION OF CT AND MRI%颈椎损伤的早期诊断:CT与MRI的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管英

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To study the application value of CT and MRI in early diagnosis of cervical spine injury. [Methods] Collected 30 patients with cervical spine injury from January 2009 to January 2011 in our hospital in 2009, analyzed their cervical spine X-ray, CT and MRI data, focusing on the vertebral arch fracture and spinal cord injury. [Results] CT and MRI in cervical spine injuries had their advantages. Compared with ordinary X-ray, CT in display of vertebral arch fracture had obvious advantages, there was a significant difference between the two; and in display of spinal cord injury, MRI was better than CT. [Conclusion] The applications of CT and MRI can obviously improve the accuracy rate of early diagnosis of cervical spine injury, which provides more information for the treatment.%[目的]探讨CT与MRI在颈椎损伤早期诊断中的应用价值.[方法]收集某院2009年1月~2011年1月颈椎损伤患者病例共30例,对其颈椎X线平片、CT及MRI资料进行回顾性分析,重点观察椎弓骨折及脊髓损伤.[结果] CT与MRI在颈椎损伤中各有优势,与普通X线片相比,CT在椎弓骨折的显示方面有明显优势,二者间有统计学差异;而在脊髓损伤的显示中,MRI则比CT更有优势.[结论]CT与MRI的应用,可以明显提高颈椎损伤的早期诊断的准确率,为治疗提供更多的信息.

  3. Anterior subaxial cervical spine fixation using a plate with single screw per vertebral body: A simple and efficient construct - Clinical series and a cadaver study

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    Vannemreddy Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report our experience with a novel construct for traumatic and nontraumatic cervical spine lesions that was validated by biomechanical studies of cadaver cervical spine. Study Design: Consecutive cases of anterior cervical spine fixation performed over six years reviewed for stability offered by a construct comprising of a plate fixed by a single screw to each vertebral body. Setting: A university hospital and a biomechanical lab. Materials and Methods: Data were coded and entered into a statistical worksheet for multivariate analysis. Cadaver spine models applied for biomechanical study of stability. Results: Total of 103 cases reviewed; 86 with single-level disease; traumatic in 66 (64% cases and degenerative in 33 (32% cases, including hard disks, OPLL, and spondylitis (4% with other causes. Fixation was with diskectomy in 59 and with corpectomy in 40. A bone graft was utilized for fusion in 87 and a bone-filled titanium spacer in 13. A single screw was placed in each vertebral body with a locking plate (having linear arrangement of holes. This construct remained strong in 95% of cases at the end of 6-24 months. Five cases failed requiring reoperation. Five patients with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI died. On statistical analysis, construct was stronger with diskectomy compared with corpectomy. Construct used on cadavers confirmed the biomechanical stability in short segment fixation (C5-6. Conclusion: A conservative construct utilizing a single screw per vertebral body and a one-holed plate system appears to be strong enough to afford stability in both traumatic and nontraumatic lesions of subaxial cervical spine, comparable to others.

  4. Comparison of the use of McCoy and TruView EVO2 laryngoscopes in patients with cervical spine immobilization

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    Jiju Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The cervical spine has to be stabilized in patients with suspected cervical spine injury during laryngoscopy and intubation by manual in-line axial stabilization. This has the propensity to increase the difficulty of intubation. An attempt has been made to compare TruView EVO2 and McCoy with cervical spine immobilization, which will aid the clinician in choosing an appropriate device for securing the airway with an endotracheal tube (ETT in the clinical scenario of trauma. Aims: To compare the effectiveness of TruView EVO2 and McCoy laryngoscopes when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilization using manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilization. Settings and design: K. M. C. Hospital, Mangalore, This was a randomized control clinical trial. Methods: Sixty adult patients of either sex of ASA physical status 1 and 2 who were scheduled to undergo general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation were studied. Comparison of intubation difficulty score (IDS, hemodynamic response, Cormack and Lehane grade, duration of the tracheal intubation and rate of successful placement of the ETT in the trachea between TruView EVO2 and McCoy laryngoscopes was performed. Results: The results demonstrated that TruView has a statistically significant less IDS of 0.33 compared with an IDS of 1.2 for McCoy. TruView also had a better Cormack and Lehane glottic view (CL 1 of 77% versus 40% and less hemodynamic response. Conclusions: The TruView blade is a useful option for tracheal intubation in patients with suspected cervical spine injury.

  5. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence...

  6. [Five-component visual analogue scale for assessement of pain status retrospective analysis of outcomes after surgical treatment of degenerative spine disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmullin, V N; Klitsenko, O A; Shulev, Iu A; Rychkov, V L; Tsyruleva, O A

    2011-01-01

    The study was performed for development of more precise criteria for assessment of pain using five-component visual analogue scale. Pain status was studied in 493 patients who underwent lumbar spinal nerve root decompression. Pain scale included the following parameters: pain at the moment, usual pain, maximal pain, minimal pain and overall pain score which was calculated as an average quantity of the previous four parameters. Overall pain score is a more precise criterion for evaluation of postoperative pain status in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease.

  7. Image Segmentation and Analysis of Flexion-Extension Radiographs of Cervical Spines

    OpenAIRE

    Eniko T. Enikov; Rein Anton

    2014-01-01

    We present a new analysis tool for cervical flexion-extension radiographs based on machine vision and computerized image processing. The method is based on semiautomatic image segmentation leading to detection of common landmarks such as the spinolaminar (SL) line or contour lines of the implanted anterior cervical plates. The technique allows for visualization of the local curvature of these landmarks during flexion-extension experiments. In addition to changes in the curvature of the SL lin...

  8. Effects of spinal manipulation in patients with mechanical neck pain

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    Diana Gregoletto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse changes in the range of motion (ROM and pain after spinal manipulation of the cervical spine and thoracic spine in subjects with mechanical neck pain. Methods : Spinal manipulations were performed in the cervical and thoracic spine with the Gonstead and Diversified DTV techniques. To assess cervical ROM an inclinometer was used. Cervical pain was assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. The participation of 73 patients was obtained. Ages ranged from 18 to 63 years, with an average of 42.27 years. The subjects of this study were characterized by having mechanical neck pain and restricted cervical ROM. Results: We observed a reduction in the intensity of pain perceived by patients and increased cervical ROM. There were significant differences between pre-treatment values (first visit and the fifth and tenth visits (p<0.01, and between the fifth and tenth visits (p<0.01 in all parameters except in the cervical extension of 70º. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that spinal manipulation of the cervical and thoracic regions with the Gonstead and Diversified DTV techniques could subjectively reduce pain and produce considerable increase in cervical ROM in adults with mechanical neck pain.

  9. Distal bimelic amyotrophy (DBMA): Phenotypically distinct but identical on cervical spine MR imaging with brachial monomelic amyotrophy/Hirayama disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preethish-Kumar, Veeramani; Nalini, Atchayaram; Singh, Ravinder-Jeet; Saini, Jitender; Prasad, Chandrajit; Polavarapu, Kiran; Thennarasu, Kandavel

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to characterize the MR imaging features in a large and distinct series of distal bimelic amyotrophy (DBMA) from India. We utilized a retrospective and prospective study on 26 cases. Results demonstrated that upper limb distal muscle wasting and weakness was predominantly symmetrical in onset. Mean age at onset was 20.9 ± 7.0 years, mean duration 83.0 ± 102.6 months. MRI carried out in 22 patients with flexion studies showed forward displacement of posterior dura in 19 (86.4%). Crescent shaped epidural enhancement on contrast was seen in 20/24 cases (83.3%), and bilateral T2W hyperintensities of cord in17 (65.4%) - symmetrical in15 cases. Maximum hyperintensity was noted at C5-C6, C6-C7 levels. Cord atrophy was noted in 24 (92.3%) cases (most affected: C5-C6, C6-C7) - symmetrical atrophy in 21cases. Cervical spine straightening occurred in six (23.1%) cases and reversal of lordosis in 15 (57.7%). In conclusion, this study confirms that DBMA is phenotypically distinct but pathophysiologically the same as brachial monomelic amyotrophy (BMMA) on MR imaging. Typical MRI features were seen in all. It is important to differentiate this disorder from ALS, which could present at a younger age as often seen among Indians. The clinical and MR imaging features are highly suggestive that DBMA, as with BMMA/Hirayama disease, occurs due to dynamic alterations at the cervical spine level.

  10. Imaging skeletal anatomy of injured cervical spine specimens: comparison of single-slice vs multi-slice helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obenauer, S.; Alamo, L.; Herold, T.; Funke, M.; Kopka, L.; Grabbe, E. [Department of Radiology, Georg August-University Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Our objective was to compare a single-slice CT (SS-CT) scanner with a multi-slice CT (MS-CT) scanner in the depiction of osseous anatomic structures and fractures of the upper cervical spine. Two cervical spine specimens with artificial trauma were scanned with a SS-CT scanner (HighSpeed, CT/i, GE, Milwaukee, Wis.) by using various collimations (1, 3, 5 mm) and pitch factors (1, 1.5, 2, 3) and a four-slice helical CT scanner (LightSpeed, QX/i, GE, Milwaukee, Wis.) by using various table speeds ranging from 3.75 to 15 mm/rotation for a pitch of 0.75 and from 7.5 to 30 mm/rotation for a pitch of 1.5. Images were reconstructed with an interval of 1 mm. Sagittal and coronal multiplanar reconstructions of the primary and reconstructed data set were performed. For MS-CT a tube current resulting in equivalent image noise as with SS-CT was used. All images were judged by two observers using a 4-point scale. The best image quality for SS-CT was achieved with the smallest slice thickness (1 mm) and a pitch smaller than 2 resulting in a table speed of up to 2 mm per gantry rotation (4 points). A reduction of the slice thickness rather than of the table speed proved to be beneficial at MS-CT. Therefore, the optimal scan protocol in MS-CT included a slice thickness of 1.25 mm with a table speed of 7.5 mm/360 using a pitch of 1.5 (4 points), resulting in a faster scan time than when a pitch of 0.75 (4 points) was used. This study indicates that MS-CT could provide equivalent image quality at approximately four times the volume coverage speed of SS-CT. (orig.)

  11. The effect of balance training on cervical sensorimotor function and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinert, Konstantin; Taube, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The authors' aim was to evaluate the effect of balance training on cervical joint position sense in people with subclinical neck pain. Thirty-four participants were randomly assigned to balance training or to stay active. Sensorimotor function was determined before and after 5 weeks of training by assessing the ability to reproduce the neutral head position and a predefined rotated head position. After balance training, the intervention group showed improved joint repositioning accuracy and decreased pain whereas no effects were observed in the control group. A weak correlation was identified between reduced neck pain intensity and improved joint repositioning. The present data demonstrate that balance training can effectively improve cervical sensorimotor function and decrease neck pain intensity.

  12. Minimally Invasive Posterior Stabilization Improved Ambulation and Pain Scores in Patients with Plasmacytomas and/or Metastases of the Spine

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    Joseph H. Schwab

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of spine metastasis is expected to increase as the population ages, and so is the number of palliative spinal procedures. Minimally invasive procedures are attractive options in that they offer the theoretical advantage of less morbidity. Purpose. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation provided significant pain relief and improved function. Study Design. We compared pre- and postoperative pain scores as well as ambulatory status in a population of patients suffering from oncologic conditions in the spine. Patient Sample. A consecutive series of patients with spine tumors treated minimally invasively with stabilization were reviewed. Outcome Measures. Visual analog pain scale as well as pre- and postoperative ambulatory status were used as outcome measures. Methods. Twenty-four patients who underwent minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation for metastasis were retrospectively reviewed. Results. Seven (29% patients were unable to ambulate secondary to pain and instability prior to surgery. All patients were ambulating within 2 to 3 days after having surgery (=0.01. The mean visual analog scale value for the preoperative patients was 2.8, and the mean postoperative value was 1.0 (=0.001. Conclusion. Minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation significantly improved pain and ambulatory status in this series.

  13. [Arthrodesis of the sub-occipital spine by screwed occipito-cervical plate. Clinical case and technical notes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, C; Privat, J M; Frerebeau, P; Bonnel, F; Bazin, M; Benezech, J

    1975-01-01

    The authors report a new technique in arthrodesis of the sub-occipital spine which has been experienced since 1973 in case of metastases at CI-C2 level. An occipitovertebral metal plate, inverted Y shaped has been realised after anatomical and biomecanical studies. It is adapted to the occipito-vertebral curvature and screwed in the articular processes of C3 and C4 (14 mm screw), and in the pedicles of C2 (32 mm screw). At the upper part, the occiptal ridge offers fixation by 12 and 14 mm Muller's screw. In addition CI is attached to the plate, by a nylon thread. After the report of the first clinical case with a nine month period of follow up technical features of the material as well as practical problems are exposed. Tomograms of the cervical spine as well as bilateral brachial angiography are of paramount value. The latter investigation may reveal anomalies of the vertebral artery that can hinder of forbid the pedicular fixation. Finally the authors discuss the extension of this technique to complexe trauma of the suboccipital column.

  14. A Novel Patient-Specific Drill Guide Template for Pedicle Screw Insertion into the Subaxial Cervical Spine Utilizing Stereolithographic Modelling: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Giorgio De Guzman; Grozman, Samuel Arsenio Munoz

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Cadaveric study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and feasibility of cervical pedicle screw (CPS) insertion into the subaxial cervical spine placed using a patient-specific drill guide template constructed from a stereolithographic model. Overview of Literature CPS fixation is an invaluable tool for posterior cervical fixation because of its biomechanical advantages. The major drawback is its narrow corridor that allows very little clearance for neural and vascular injuries. Methods Fifty subaxial pedicles of the cervical vertebrae from five cadavers were scanned into thin slices using computed tomography (CT). Digital imaging and communications in medicine images of the cadaver spine were digitally processed and printed to scale as a three-dimensional (3D) model. Drill guide templates were manually moulded over the 3D-printed models incorporating pins inserted in the pedicles. The drill guide templates were used for precise placement of the drill holes in the pedicles of cadaveric specimens for pedicle screw fixation. Results The instrumented cadaveric spines were subjected to CT to assess the accuracy of our pedicle placement by an external observer. Our patient-specific drill guide template had an accuracy of 94%. Conclusions The use of a patient-specific drill guide constructed using stereolithography improved the accuracy of CPS placement in a cadaveric model.

  15. Semi-automatic delineation of the spino-laminar junction curve on lateral x-ray radiographs of the cervical spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Benjamin; Phillips, Michael; Knapp, Karen; Appelboam, Andy; Reuben, Adam; Slabaugh, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of the cervical spine using x-ray radiography is an important task when providing emergency room care to trauma patients suspected of a cervical spine injury. In routine clinical practice, a physician will inspect the alignment of the cervical spine vertebrae by mentally tracing three alignment curves along the anterior and posterior sides of the cervical vertebral bodies, as well as one along the spinolaminar junction. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to semi-automatically delineate the spinolaminar junction curve, given a single reference point and the corners of each vertebral body. From the reference point, our method extracts a region of interest, and performs template matching using normalized cross-correlation to find matching regions along the spinolaminar junction. Matching points are then fit to a third order spline, producing an interpolating curve. Experimental results demonstrate promising results, on average producing a modified Hausdorff distance of 1.8 mm, validated on a dataset consisting of 29 patients including those with degenerative change, retrolisthesis, and fracture.

  16. Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Upper Cervical Spine Injury%上颈椎损伤的诊治进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李柳炳; 顾俊; 董启榕; 沈光思; 陆政峰; 秦建忠; 陈礼(综述); 沈忆新(审校)

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord in upper cervical canal is an essential and vulnerable component of the cen-tral nervous system.The integrity of the upper cervical spine is essential for the survival and function ,because of the neurovascular structures contained in it.Due to its specific anatomical location,large range of rotation, upper cervical spine easily suffers from violence of different directions.The upper cervical spine injuries mainly refer to the fractures,torn ligaments,dislocation of atlantoaxial vertebrae and its accessory structures caused by violence.Here is to make a review of various common types of upper cervical spine injuries,as well as their treatment principles,surgical approaches and research progress,in order to provide reference for clini-cal treatment.%位于上颈椎管内的脊髓是中枢神经系统中重要及脆弱的部分。由于其包含神经、血管结构,上颈椎骨性结构的完整性对生存和功能至关重要。由于上颈椎特殊的解剖位置及较大的活动范围,其易遭受不同方向的暴力。上颈椎损伤主要是指寰枢椎及其附属结构由于受到暴力导致骨折、韧带撕裂、脱位等。该文将介绍上颈椎各种常见的损伤类型、治疗原则、手术方式以及研究进展,为临床处理各型上颈椎损伤提供参考。

  17. A comprehensive subaxial cervical spine injury severity assessment model using numeric scores and its predictive value for surgical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Paul M; Daffner, Scott D; Holly, Langston T; Shamie, A Nick; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2012-02-10

    Multiple factors contribute to the determination for surgical intervention in the setting of cervical spinal injury, yet to date no unified classification system exists that predicts this need. The goals of this study were twofold: to create a comprehensive subaxial cervical spine injury severity numeric scoring model, and to determine the predictive value of this model for the probability of surgical intervention. In a retrospective cohort study of 333 patients, neural impairment, patho-morphology, and available spinal canal sagittal diameter post-injury were selected as injury severity determinants. A common numeric scoring trend was created; smaller values indicated less favorable clinical conditions. Neural impairment was graded from 2-10, patho-morphology scoring ranged from 2-15, and post-injury available canal sagittal diameter (SD) was measured in millimeters at the narrowest point of injury. Logistic regression analysis was performed using the numeric scores to predict the probability for surgical intervention. Complete neurologic deficit was found in 39 patients, partial deficits in 108, root injuries in 19, and 167 were neurologically intact. The pre-injury mean canal SD was 14.6 mm; the post-injury measurement mean was 12.3 mm. The mean patho-morphology score for all patients was 10.9 and the mean neurologic function score was 7.6. There was a statistically significant difference in mean scores for neural impairment, canal SD, and patho-morphology for surgical compared to nonsurgical patients. At the lowest clinical score for each determinant, the probability for surgery was 0.949 for neural impairment, 0.989 for post-injury available canal SD, and 0.971 for patho-morphology. The unit odds ratio for each determinant was 1.73, 1.61, and 1.45, for neural impairment, patho-morphology, and canal SD scores, respectively. The subaxial cervical spine injury severity determinants of neural impairment, patho-morphology, and post-injury available canal SD have

  18. Improvement in pain intensity, spine stiffness, and mobility during a controlled individualized physiotherapy program in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurcsik, Zsuzsanna Némethné; András, Anita; Bodnár, Nóra; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Szántó, Sándor

    2012-12-01

    Physical therapy in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is important for maintaining or improving mobility, fitness, functioning, and global health. It also plays a role in the prevention and management of structural deformities. In this study we assessed the functional status of AS patients in relation to disease duration and activity. Furthermore, in volunteering patients we analyzed the efficacy of a controlled, individualized physiotherapeutic program. Altogether, clinical data of 75 AS patients were retrospectively analyzed. Anthropometrical data, duration since diagnosis and disease activity, pain intensity, tender points, sacroiliac joint involvement determined by X-ray, functional condition, and physical activity level were recorded. Subjective, functional, and physical tests were performed. Out of the 75 patients, 10 volunteered to undergo a complex physical exercise program twice a week for 3 months. The program included 1.5 h of general posture reeducation, manual mobilization of the spine, and pelvic-, upper-, and lower-extremity exercises, stretching with joint prevention strategies and functional exercises. In AS, pain intensity recorded on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), BASFI, BASDAI, modified Schober index, chest expansion and occiput-to-wall distance values showed significant correlation with disease activity. The 3-month physical therapy improved several subjective and functional parameters, and markedly reduced pain intensity and spine stiffness. A complex, individualized physical therapy program may be useful and should be introduced to AS patients in order to maintain and increase spine mobility, preserve functional capacity, decrease the pain and stiffness.

  19. Visualização radiológica intraoperatória da região occipitocervical e coluna cervical superior: nota técnica Visualización radiológica intraoperatoria de la región occipito-cervical y columna cervical alta: nota técnica Intraoperative radiological visualization of the occipito-cervical transition and upper cervical spine: technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luis Mudo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos nota técnica para melhor visualização radiológica intraoperatória em cirurgias da região occipitocervical e coluna cervical superior.Relatamos nota técnica para mejor visualización radiológica intraoperatória en las cirugías de la región occipito-cervical y de la columna cervical alta.We report a technical note to obtain a better intraoperative radiological view in surgeries of the craniocervical junction and upper cervical spine.

  20. Rheumatologists and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, H A

    2000-01-01

    Many authors have suggested that chronic pain syndromes are psychosocial in origin; maladaptive behaviours favoured by psychosocial and political factors. Sometimes this may be true, but neither the individual patients nor the accumulated scientific evidence deserve such a routine dismissal. In this editorial