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Sample records for cervical spinal epidural

  1. Evaluation of optimal electrode configurations for epidural spinal cord stimulation in cervical spinal cord injured rats.

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    Alam, Monzurul; Garcia-Alias, Guillermo; Shah, Prithvi K; Gerasimenko, Yury; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2015-05-30

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation is a promising technique for modulating the level of excitability and reactivation of dormant spinal neuronal circuits after spinal cord injury (SCI). We examined the ability of chronically implanted epidural stimulation electrodes within the cervical spinal cord to (1) directly elicit spinal motor evoked potentials (sMEPs) in forelimb muscles and (2) determine whether these sMEPs can serve as a biomarker of forelimb motor function after SCI. We implanted EMG electrodes in forelimb muscles and epidural stimulation electrodes at C6 and C8 in adult rats. After recovering from a dorsal funiculi crush (C4), rats were tested with different stimulation configurations and current intensities to elicit sMEPs and determined forelimb grip strength. sMEPs were evoked in all muscles tested and their characteristics were dependent on electrode configurations and current intensities. C6(-) stimulation elicited more robust sMEPs than stimulation at C8(-). Stimulating C6 and C8 simultaneously produced better muscle recruitment and higher grip strengths than stimulation at one site. Classical method to select the most optimal stimulation configuration is to empirically test each combination individually for every subject and relate to functional improvements. This approach is impractical, requiring extensively long experimental time to determine the more effective stimulation parameters. Our proposed method is fast and physiologically sound. Results suggest that sMEPs from forelimb muscles can be useful biomarkers for identifying optimal parameters for epidural stimulation of the cervical spinal cord after SCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hemiparesis Caused by Cervical Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma: A Report of 3 Cases

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    Kinya Nakanishi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH with hemiparesis. The first patient was a 73-year-old woman who presented with left hemiparesis, neck pain, and left shoulder pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a left posterolateral epidural hematoma at the C3–C6 level. The condition of the patient improved after laminectomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. The second patient was a 62-year-old man who presented with right hemiparesis and neck pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a right posterolateral dominant epidural hematoma at the C6-T1 level. The condition of the patient improved after laminectomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. The third patient was a 60-year-old woman who presented with left hemiparesis and neck pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a left posterolateral epidural hematoma at the C2–C4 level. The condition of the patient improved with conservative treatment. The classical clinical presentation of SSEH is acute onset of severe irradiating back pain followed by progression to paralysis, whereas SSEH with hemiparesis is less common. Our cases suggest that acute cervical spinal epidural hematoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with clinical symptoms of sudden neck pain and radicular pain with progression to hemiparesis.

  3. Cervical spinal epidural abscess following acupuncture and wet-cupping therapy: A case report.

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    Yao, Yindan; Hong, Wenke; Chen, Huimin; Guan, Qiongfeng; Yu, Hu; Chang, Xianchao; Yu, Yaoping; Xu, Shanhu; Fan, Weinv

    2016-02-01

    Report of an uncommon complication of acupuncture and wet cupping. A 54-year-old man presented with neck pain and fever. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed an epidural abscess at C4 to T2. The symptoms related to epidural abscess resolved partially after treatment with antibiotics. Acupuncture and wet-cupping therapy should be taken into consideration as a cause of spinal epidural abscesses in patients who present with neck pain and fever. Furthermore, acupuncture and wet-cupping practitioners should pay attention to hygienic measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

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    Sharpe, Abigail N.; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach. Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results. Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2-5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance. We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function.

  5. Spinal cord injury produced by direct damage during cervical transforaminal epidural injection.

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    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Kil; Seo, Bo-Ra; Moon, Sung-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hyoo; Kim, Soo-Han

    2008-01-01

    Cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) has become a common treatment for cervical radiculopathy. We describe a case of spinal cord injury caused by direct injection of iohexol into the cervical spinal cord during cervical TFESI. A 55-year-old male suffered from intractable pain in the neck, radiating to his left arm. After undergoing C6-7 TFESI under fluoroscopic guidance, the patient reported a shooting pain during needle insertion, and developed quadriparesis shortly after contrast injection. The radiological findings of the contrast medium and air bubble within the cord indicated needle penetration and intracord contrast injection. The paresis of his right arm and both legs recovered within 4 hours after the procedure. At 1-month follow-up, his left arm paresis had continued to improve. One year after the event, the motor paresis improved except for grasping with the left hand, resulting in a claw hand deformity. This case report draws attention to this very serious complication of cervical TFESI. It is essential to confirm final needle position using both anteroposterior and lateral fluoroscopy before any injection through the needle.

  6. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  7. [Cervical epidural anesthesia].

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    Baylot, D; Mahul, P; Navez, M L; Hajjar, J; Prades, J M; Auboyer, C

    1993-01-01

    Cervical epidural anaesthesia (CEA) results in an effective sensory blockade of the superficial cervical (C1/C4) and brachial plexus (C5/T1-T2). It is used both intraoperatively and in the treatment of postoperative or chronic pain. The approach to the epidural space at the C7-T1 interspace is not technically difficult. Patients are placed in the sitting position, increasing the negative pressure in the epidural space, with the head flexed on the thorax, in order to open the lowest cervical interspace. A 18-gauge Tuohy needle is inserted by a midline approach into the C6-C7 or C7-T1 interspace. A catheter may be inserted and left in place for postoperative analgesia. Local anaesthetics are administered either alone, or in combination with opiates. The CEA blocks the cardiac sympathetic fibers and consequently decreases heart rate, cardiac output and contractility. The mean blood pressure is unchanged or decreased, depending on peripheral systemic vascular resistance changes. The baroreflex activity is also partly impaired. Sympathetic blockade also decreases myocardial ischaemia. The cardiovascular changes induced by CEA are also partly due to the systemic effect of the local anaesthetic. The respiratory effects are minimal and depend on the extent of the blockade and the concentration of the local anaesthetic. A moderate restrictive syndrome occurs. Since the phrenic nerves originate from C3 to C5, ventilation may be impaired by CEA. Extension of the block may also impair intercostal muscle function, with a risk of respiratory failure when a CEA is used in patients with compromised respiratory function. The potential specific complications, mainly cardiovascular and respiratory, are the exacerbation of the effects of CEA. Side effects such as bradycardia, hypotension and acute ventilatory failure in relation to respiratory muscle paralysis, may be observed. Close monitoring of haemodynamics, respiratory rate and level blockade is required. Cervical epidural

  8. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

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    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Paired motor cortex and cervical epidural electrical stimulation timed to converge in the spinal cord promotes lasting increases in motor responses.

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    Mishra, Asht M; Pal, Ajay; Gupta, Disha; Carmel, Jason B

    2017-11-15

    Pairing motor cortex stimulation and spinal cord epidural stimulation produced large augmentation in motor cortex evoked potentials if they were timed to converge in the spinal cord. The modulation of cortical evoked potentials by spinal cord stimulation was largest when the spinal electrodes were placed over the dorsal root entry zone. Repeated pairing of motor cortex and spinal cord stimulation caused lasting increases in evoked potentials from both sites, but only if the time between the stimuli was optimal. Both immediate and lasting effects of paired stimulation are likely mediated by convergence of descending motor circuits and large diameter afferents onto common interneurons in the cervical spinal cord. Convergent activity in neural circuits can generate changes at their intersection. The rules of paired electrical stimulation are best understood for protocols that stimulate input circuits and their targets. We took a different approach by targeting the interaction of descending motor pathways and large diameter afferents in the spinal cord. We hypothesized that pairing stimulation of motor cortex and cervical spinal cord would strengthen motor responses through their convergence. We placed epidural electrodes over motor cortex and the dorsal cervical spinal cord in rats; motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured from biceps. MEPs evoked from motor cortex were robustly augmented with spinal epidural stimulation delivered at an intensity below the threshold for provoking an MEP. Augmentation was critically dependent on the timing and position of spinal stimulation. When the spinal stimulation was timed to coincide with the descending volley from motor cortex stimulation, MEPs were more than doubled. We then tested the effect of repeated pairing of motor cortex and spinal stimulation. Repetitive pairing caused strong augmentation of cortical MEPs and spinal excitability that lasted up to an hour after just 5 min of pairing. Additional physiology

  10. MR findings of spinal epidural mass

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    Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Woo Suk; Shin, In Soo; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Yoon, Yup [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    We analyzed the MR findings of spinal epidural mass in 23 patients retrospectively. MR images were performed at 1.5 T unit. The lesion were confirmed as metastasis(12 cases), lymphoma(2 cases), leukemia(1 cases), multiple myeloma(2 cases), meningioma(3 case), neurofibroma(1 case), dysraphism with lipomal(1 caes) and lipomatosis(4 cases). Most MRI examinations consisted of T1, proton density and T2 weighted sagittal imaging of the spine, with additional pulse sequences or image planes as needed for clarification. The level of the spinal epidural mass was cervical spine level in 2 cases, thoracic in 15 cases, lumbar in 7 cases, and sacral in 2 cases. The location of epidural mass within the spinal canal was eccentric in 20 case, multiple in 2 cases, and encirdled in 4 case. Paraspinal mass was seen in 11 cases. Signal intensity of epidural mass was variable. The marrow of spine revealed low signal intensity(SI) on T1WI and high SI on T2WI in 14 cases. In conclusion, MRI is a useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of spinal epidural mass.

  11. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

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    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth [Department of Psychology, Sigmund Freud Private University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore [Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dimopoulos, Johannes C. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  12. High-frequency epidural stimulation across the respiratory cycle evokes phrenic short-term potentiation after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Streeter, Kristi A; Hanna, Marie H; Stamas, Anna C; Reier, Paul J; Baekey, David M; Fuller, David D

    2017-10-01

    C2 spinal hemilesion (C2Hx) paralyzes the ipsilateral diaphragm, but recovery is possible through activation of "crossed spinal" synaptic inputs to ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons. We tested the hypothesis that high-frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) would potentiate ipsilateral phrenic output after subacute and chronic C2Hx. HF-ES (300 Hz) was applied to the ventrolateral C4 or T2 spinal cord ipsilateral to C2Hx in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats. Stimulus duration was 60 s, and currents ranged from 100 to 1,000 µA. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity and ipsilateral hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity were recorded before and after HF-ES. Higher T2 stimulus currents potentiated ipsilateral phasic inspiratory activity at both 2 and 12 wk post-C2Hx, whereas higher stimulus currents delivered at C4 potentiated ipsilateral phasic phrenic activity only at 12 wk ( P = 0.028). Meanwhile, tonic output in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve reached 500% of baseline values at the high currents with no difference between 2 and 12 wk. HF-ES did not trigger inspiratory burst-frequency changes. Similar responses occurred following T2 HF-ES. Increases in contralateral phrenic and XII nerve output were induced by C4 and T2 HF-ES at higher currents, but the relative magnitude of these changes was small compared with the ipsilateral phrenic response. We conclude that following incomplete cervical spinal cord injury, HF-ES of the ventrolateral midcervical or thoracic spinal cord can potentiate efferent phrenic motor output with little impact on inspiratory burst frequency. However, the substantial increases in tonic output indicate that the uninterrupted 60-s stimulation paradigm used is unlikely to be useful for respiratory muscle activation after spinal injury. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Previous studies reported that high-frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) activates the diaphragm following acute spinal transection. This study examined HF-ES and phrenic motor output

  13. Cervical epidural abscess after cupping and acupuncture.

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    Lee, Jun-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Heung; Jo, Dae-Jean

    2012-08-01

    Retrospective case report. Report of an uncommon complication of cupping and acupuncture. Epidural abscess after cupping and acupuncture therapies is quite rare. Only a few cases of epidural abscess after acupuncture have been reported. The present report describes a case of cervical epidural abscess that developed after cupping and acupuncture. A 47-year-old woman presented with swelling and pain in the posterior nuchal region. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed a well-enhanced epidural mass at the C1-C3 level that was determined to be an epidural abscess. The symptoms related to epidural abscess resolved after treatment with antibiotics. Although a rare complication, epidural abscess is a possibility when applying cupping and acupuncture. Therapists need to be aware of human anatomy in the vicinity of the puncture and must give continuous attention to hygiene throughout the procedure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

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    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  15. Acute cervical epidural hematoma: case report

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    BORGES GUILHERME

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 74 year-old patient with a nocturnal onset of neck and chest pain was brought to an emergency clinic. Physical examination and cardiac assessment were normal. Three hours after the addmittance, a flaccid paralysis of the four limbs supervened. Suspecting of an unusual onset of central nervous system infection, a lumbar puncture was performed, yielding 20 ml of normal cerebrospinal fluid. Thirty oinutes after the puncture, the patient completely regained neurological funcion. He was then referred to a General Hospital where a computed tomography (CT scan was done showing a large cervical epidural bleeding in the posterolateral region of C4/C5 extending to C7/Th1, along with a C6 vertebral body hemangioma. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed the same CT findings. A normal selective angiography of vertebral arteries, carotid arteries and thyreocervical trunk was carried out. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (ASSEH is a rare but dramatic cause of neurological impairment. In this article we report a fortunate case of complete recovery after an unusual spine cord decompression. We also review the current literature concerning diagnosis and treatment of ASSEH.

  16. Primary thoracic epidural lymphoma: A rare cause of spinal cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary thoracic epidural lymphoma: A rare cause of spinal cord compression. AS Yusuf, KO Omokanye, T Buhari. Abstract. Spinal epidural lymphoma is a rare entity that is not often considered in the differential diagnosis of an epidural mass in a previously healthy individual. Pfatients with Primary Spinal Epidural ...

  17. Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma: a case report and review of the literature; Hematoma epidural cervical espontaneo: a proposito de un caso y revision de la bibligrafia

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    Aparici, F.; Mas, F.; Solera, M. C.; Moro, G. [Hospital Universitario La Fe. Valencia (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    We present the case of a 78-year-old woman with a spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma that presented with sudden interscapular pain accompanied by left hemiparesis and a significant improvement 15 minutes later. Initially diagnosed as angina, the persistence of pain in dorsal cervical spine suggested the need to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The images demonstrated a lesion in the epidural spinal canal at level C3-D2 that presented a heterogeneous signal intensity, with hyperintense areas in T1-weighted sequences and hypointense areas in gradient-echo sequences, with no sign of compression myelopathy. A diagnosis of epidural hematoma was established and, given the favorable clinical course, conservative treatment was indicated. The second MRI study showed the complete resorption of the epidural hematoma. (Author) 12 refs.

  18. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Gastric Cancer

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    Taisei Sako

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary epidural space metastasis of a malignant tumor is rare. We encountered a 79-year-old male patient with solitary metastatic epidural tumor who developed paraplegia and dysuria. The patient had undergone total gastrectomy for gastric cancer followed by chemotherapy 8 months priorly. The whole body was examined for suspected metastatic spinal tumor, but no metastases of the spine or important organs were observed, and a solitary mass was present in the thoracic spinal epidural space. The mass was excised for diagnosis and treatment and was histopathologically diagnosed as metastasis from gastric cancer. No solitary metastatic epidural tumor from gastric cancer has been reported in English. Among the Japanese, 3 cases have been reported, in which the outcome was poor in all cases and no definite diagnosis could be made before surgery in any case. Our patient developed concomitant pneumonia after surgery and died shortly after the surgery. When a patient has a past medical history of malignant tumor, the possibility of a solitary metastatic tumor in the epidural space should be considered.

  19. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as paraplegia after cardiac surgery.

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    Kin, Hajime; Mukaida, Masayuki; Koizumi, Junichi; Kamada, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Yoshino; Iwase, Tomoyuki; Ikai, Akio; Okabayashi, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    An 86-year-old woman was scheduled to undergo aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft. On postoperative day 3, she developed sudden-onset neck pain followed by weakness in the right arm. Her symptoms worsened with time, and she developed paraplegia. At 60 h after the first complaint, spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) from C2 to C6 with spinal cord compression was diagnosed from a magnetic resonance image of the cervical region. We decided on conservative therapy because operative recovery was impossible. Delayed diagnosis led to grievous results in the present case. When neurological abnormalities follow neck or back pain after open heart surgery, SSEH must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Further, if it is suspected, early cervical computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and surgery should be considered.

  20. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

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    ... one of many methods doctors use to relieve pain, along with physical therapy, oral medications and surgery if a patient is not responding to conservative treatments. An epidural injection may be performed to alleviate pain caused by: A herniated or bulging disk that ...

  1. Cervical Epidural and Retropharyngeal Abscess Induced by a Chicken Bone

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    Wei-Ting Hsu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Retropharyngeal abscess is occasionally seen in children, but is less common in adults where it usually occurs secondary to iatrogenic oropharynx trauma or a perforated foreign body in the oropharynx. Spinal epidural abscess in combination with a retropharyngeal abscess, which may cause rapid and irreversible neurological deterioration, is not often found, as indicated by the very few reports in the literature. Here we report a 52-year-old male with a clinical history of seizure and mental retardation since childhood who presented at our emergency room with severe sore throat of 1 day’s duration. A chicken bone was removed successfully. However, he complained of progressive dysphagia, sore throat and posterior neck pain during the following 5 days. Flexible fiber-laryngoscopy showed bulging of the retropharyngeal wall and a small ulcer at the right posterior pharyngeal wall. A neck computed tomography (CT scan showed a retropharyngeal abscess at the oropharynx and hypopharynx level. His symptoms showed partial improvement after the administration of intravenous antibiotics. However, 2 weeks later he developed high fever, posterior neck pain and flaccid tetra-paresia. Emergent neck CT scan revealed a mild retropharyngeal abscess and epidural abscess formation between the second and third cervical vertebrae. The patient’s family refused drainage of the pre-vertebral and epidural pus. After receiving 2 months of antibiotics, the patient regained the mobility of his limbs

  2. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay

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    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication. PMID:27857455

  3. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay

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    Foram B Gala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication.

  4. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication.

  5. Cervical Epidural Depth: Correlation Between Cervical MRI Measurements of the Skin-to-Cervical Epidural Space and the Actual Needle Depth During Interlaminar Cervical Epidural Injections.

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    Algrain, Haitham; Liu, Alison; Singh, Sarabdeep; Vu, To-Nhu; Cohen, Steven P

    2017-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between skin-to-epidural space depth, as measured on cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and actual needle depth, as measured by Tuohy needle markings during cervical epidural steroid injections. We conducted a retrospective review of cervical MRI images to determine estimated depth from skin to epidural space. Of the 121 reviewed patients who underwent cervical epidural steroid injections, 81 met inclusion criteria and were retained for data analysis. At the C6-C7 level, the estimated needle depth according to MRI images was 6.03 ± 1.15 cm (mean ± SD) and the actual needle depth was 5.62 ± 0.77 cm. At the C7-T1 level, the estimated needle depth based on MRI images was 5.90 ± 1.05 cm and the actual needle depth was 5.73 ± 0.98 cm. At both C6-C7 and C7-T1, MRI depth ( P  <   0.009, P  <   0.001) and body mass index ( P  <   0.001, P  <   0.002) were significantly associated with actual depth. Estimates of needle depth made with MRI were consistently slightly deeper than the actual loss-of-resistance needle depth, indicating that the provider should employ caution when using MRI predictive depths. Information garnered from preprocedure MRIs can be used to improve the safety of cervical epidural steroid injection procedures.

  6. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain.

  7. Primary spinal epidural hydatid cyst with intrathoracic extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzagmout, Mohammed; Kamaoui, Imane; Chakour, Khalid; Chaoui, Mohamed E

    2009-01-01

    Spinal epidural localization of hydatid cyst is quite rare. We report a case of a 33-year-old patient who experienced paraparesis over 2 years, with an umbilical sensitive level. A CT scan and MRI showed an intrathoracic multilobar lesion, probably of intra-spinal origin. An anterolateral transpleural surgical approach confirmed the hydatic character of the observed lesion and enabled total spinal cord decompression. No osseous involvement was noted. We report a case of spinal epidural hydatid cyst successfully managed by an anterior approach, and we discuss epidemiological, diagnosis, and therapeutical features of this rare localization of hydatid cyst.

  8. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Harrer, J. [Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Cesak, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Herman, A. [1. Dept. of Internal Medicine, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  9. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-08-20

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy: effect and prognostic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Choi, Ja-Young; Moon, Sung Gyu; Jun, Woo Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yeom, Jin-Sup [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-05-15

    To verify the usefulness of a fluoroscopy guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) in patients with neck pain and cervical radiculopathy and to evaluate outcome predictors. We retrospectively analyzed 91 patients from July 2004 to June 2005 in whom CIESI was initially performed for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy. Therapeutic effects were evaluated 2 weeks after the administration of CIESI, and CIESI effectiveness was graded using a five-point scale, namely, whether the pain had disappeared, was much improved, slightly improved, the same, or aggravated. We also used a visual analog scale (VAS) for the clinical evaluation. According to documentation and follow-up charts, we categorized treatments as effective or ineffective. Possible outcome predictors, namely, diagnosis (spinal stenosis vs herniated disc), primary symptoms (neck pain vs radiculopathy vs both), age, gender, and duration of pain (more or less than 6 months) were also analyzed. Fisher's exact test, the chi-square test, and multiple logistic regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. After their medical records had been reviewed, 76 patients were included in this study. Inclusion criteria were: the availability of a cross-sectional image, such as a CT scan or an MR image, and a follow-up record after injection. The medical records of 76 patients (male:female = 41: 35) of mean age 53.1 years (range 32 years to 82 years) were reviewed. Two weeks after injection, 55 patients (72.4%) had experienced effective pain relief. Patients with herniated discs had significantly better results than patients with spinal stenosis (86.1% vs 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Other non-significant predictors of an improved outcome included: a symptom duration of <6 months, a young age, and the presence of cervical radiculopathy. Multiple regression analysis showed that the only factor that was significantly associated with outcome was the cause of the pain, i.e., herniated disc or

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging features of an epidural spinal haemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta Sanjay; Sunil Kumar; Gujral Ratni [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Depts. of Radiology, Neurosurgery and Pathology

    1996-08-01

    Isolated spinal epidural haemangioma without vertebral involvement is rare. A case is reported, of an epidural capillary haemangioma in the thoracic region and present the magnetic resonance (MRI) findings, including contrast-enhanced features. MRI, performed on 1.5 T -Magnetrom, using T1, proton density (PD) and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences, revealed a well defined bilobed mass in the left half of the spinal canal, extending from D8 to D10 vertebral bodies. It showed and intense homogenous enhancement following intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA at dose of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Spinal cord compression due to epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydingoez, Ue.; Oto, A.; Cila, A. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-12-01

    Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis is very rare in thalassaemia. A 27-year-old man with thalassaemia intermedia presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. MRI showed a thoracic spinal epidural mass, representing extramedullary haematopoietic tissue, compressing the spinal cord. Following radiotherapy, serial MRI revealed regression of the epidural mass and gradual resolution of spinal cord oedema. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 refs.

  13. Angioma cavernoso espinhal epidural: relato de caso Epidural spinal cavernous angioma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Félix

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A ocorrência de um angioma cavernoso epidural primário é incomum, constituindo aproximadamente 4% de todos os tumores epidurais espinhais, entretanto o número de relatos desta entidade tem aumentado nos últimos anos, provavelmente devido aos melhores recursos diagnósticos. Relatamos o caso de um paciente com um angioma cavernoso epidural puro em nível espinhal de L1-L2 , que apresentava quadro clínico de compressão medular lenta e progressiva, com piora importante recente. A ressonância magnética de coluna lombosacra demonstrou lesão hipo e isointensa em T1 e hiperintensa em T2. O paciente foi submetido a tratamento cirúrgico com boa recuperação neurológica. Os achados clínicos, de imagem, anátomo-patológicos e de tratamento desta patologia são analisados e discutidos.Epidural spinal cavernous angiomas account for approximately 4% of all spinal epidural tumors. More recently the diagnosis has become more frequent due to refinement of imaging modalities. We describe a 50-year-old woman with a spinal epidural cavernous angioma at L1-L2, which was successfully surgical treated. Clinical picture, imaginology and treatment of this entity is reviewed.

  14. MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Beom [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2000-01-01

    To describe the MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. The MR and clinical findings in six patients (M:F=3D4:2;adult:child=3D3:3) with spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma were reviewed. Five patients without any predisposing factor which might cause the condition and one with acute myelogenous leukemia were included. Emergency surgery was performed in two patients, and the other four were managed conservatively. The epidural lesion involved between three and seven vertebrae (mean:4.5), and relative to the spinal cord was located in the posterior-lateral (n=3D4), anterior (n=3D1), or right lateral (n=3D1) area. The hematoma was isointense (n=3D1) or hyperintense (n=3D5) with spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and hypointense (n=3D2) or hyperintense (n=3D4) on T2-weighted images. It was completely absorbed in four of five patients who underwent follow-up MR imaging, but not changed in one. The clinical outcome of these patients was complete recovery (n=3D4), spastic cerebral palsy (n=3D1), or unknown (n=3D1). Because of the lesion's characteristic signal intensity; MR imaging is very useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. (author)

  15. Intramedullary Cervical Spinal Cord Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Kim, Paul E; Attenello, Frank J

    2017-10-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rarely encountered in modern neurosurgical practice. Select patients are at high risk for developing an intramedullary spinal cord abscess, which can result in acute neurologic deficits. Patients with failed conservative management may benefit from early surgical intervention; however, the evidence is limited by level 3 studies. In this case presentation, the patient failed conservative management for a cervical intramedullary spinal cord abscess and developed acute neurologic deficits. The decision was made to perform an urgent cervical laminectomy and drainage to avoid any further decline that may have occurred with continued conservative management. Increased awareness of intramedullary spinal cord abscess is warranted for its clinical suspicion and emergent treatment in select circumstances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia for an elective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-02

    Feb 2, 2012 ... electrocardiography, pulse oximetry and the heart rate using the Classic-120 Multiparameter® monitor (Hamburg,. Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia for an elective. Caesarean section in a patient with achondroplasia. Rukewe A, Consultant Anaesthetist. Department of Anaesthesia, University ...

  17. Primary epidural liposarcoma of the cervical spine: Technical case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Borghei-Razavi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in adults. These tumors have a high incidence of osseous metastases, with a propensity to the spine; however, primary spinal involvement is very rare. A 56-year-old female patient presented with a 4 month history of cervical pain, including radiation to both upper limbs, without radicular distribution. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed an epidural lesion with gadolinium enhancement and bilateral extension into the intervertebral neural foramina (C5–C7, with spreading on the right side of the tumor into paravertebral tissue. The histopathological diagnosis was myxoid liposarcoma. To our knowledge it is the first case of primary myxoid liposarcoma of the cervical spine in the literature. Although rare, our case demonstrates that liposarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cervical tumors.

  18. Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma: Report of a case managed conservatively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Tariq

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is a rare cause of acute spinal cord compression. A 25-year-old male presented with a history of sudden onset of complete quadriplegia with sensory loss below the neck along with loss of bowel and bladder control. He had no history of any constitutional symptoms. He reported 10 days later. He was managed conservatively and after two weeks of intensive rehabilitation he had complete neural recovery. The spontaneous recovery of neurological impairment is attributed to the spreading of the hematoma throughout the epidural space, thus decreasing the pressure with partial neural recovery. Conservative treatment is a fair option in young patients who present late and show neurological improvement. The neurological status on presentation will guide the further approach to management.

  19. Giant cervical lipoma excision under cervical epidural anesthesia: A viable alternative to general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Pal; Shukla, Aparna; Verma, Satyajeet

    2011-01-01

    The technique of Cervical Epidural Anesthesia (CEA) was first described by Dogliotti in 1933 for upper thoracic procedures. Administration of local anesthetic into cervical epidural space results in anesthesia of the neck, upper extremity, and upper thoracic region. CEA provides high-quality analgesia and anesthesia of above dermatomes and, at the same time, it has favorable effect on hemodynamic variable by blocking sympathetic innervation of the heart. CEA is not practiced routinely because of its potential complications. We selected this technique of CEA for excision of giant cervical lipoma on the back of the neck in an adult patient, as the patient was unwilling for general anesthesia. CEA was induced with 10 ml of 1% lignocaine-adrenaline mixture administered into C7-T1 space through 18G Tuohy needle. Our patient maintained vital parameters throught the procedure. The added advantage of epidural anesthesia was that the patient was awake and comfortable throughout the procedure.

  20. Ewing Sarcoma of the Cervical Epidural Space Presenting with Tetraplegia: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutty, Raja K; Peethambaran, Anilkumar; Sunilkumar, Balakrishnan S; Balachandran Nair, Krishna G; Korde, Paresh; Jain, Sourabh Kumar

    2017-11-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is among the most frequented extremity osseous tumor in childhood. It was first described by James Ewing as diffuse endotheliomas in 1921. The name Ewing sarcoma was coined by Oberling in 1928 as a tribute to the legend who described this disease. ES exists in osseous and extraosseous forms. It shares much of its molecular typing with primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET); hence, they are regarded as different ends of the same molecular spectrum. ES, extraosseous ES, PNET, and Askins tumor are the other members of this family termed the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors. Extraosseous ES has been described in various locations of the spine, but its occurrence in the cervical epidural region is uncommon. A 12-year-old child presented to us with neck pain and progressive weakness of all 4 limbs. She was investigated and found to have a highly vascular lesion in the cervical epidural region extending from C2 to the C4 region. Embolization therapy was unsuccessful. She deteriorated and eventually had to undergo emergency surgery to decompress the spinal cord. The lesion was biopsied and diagnosed as extraosseous ES. After radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the patient regained most of the power in her limbs. Extraosseous ES is a rare tumor of the cervical cord in this age group. We report this case to highlight the difficulties encountered in the management of this variant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Spinal epidural abscess: a rare complication of olecranon bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Rhys D R; Thaya, Moe; Chew, Ne Siang; Gibbons, Charles E R

    2009-06-30

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal condition if left untreated. We report the case of a 67-year old man who presented to the Accident and Emergency department complaining of acute onset of inter-scapular back pain, left leg weakness and loss of sensation in the left foot. On examination he was found to be pyrexial with long tract signs in the left lower leg. In addition he had a left sided olecranon bursitis of three weeks duration. Blood tests revealed raised inflammatory markers and a staphylococcal bacteremia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and he subsequently underwent a three level laminectomy with good resolution of his back pain and neurological symptoms. He has made a complete recovery with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics.

  2. cervical spinal tuberculosis with tuberculous otitis media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    CERVICAL SPINAL TUBERCULOSIS WITH TUBERCULOUS OTITIS MEDIA MASQUERADING AS OTITIS EXTERNA MALIGNANS IN AN ELDERLY. DIABETIC PATIENT: CASE REPORT. A. Aderibigbe, MBBS .... extrapulmonary tuberculosis, but in children it may occur in isolation(3,7). In Nigeria, cervical tuberculosis.

  3. Symptomatic epidural lipomatosis of the spinal cord in a child: MR demonstration of spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 505 Parnassus Av, L-371, University of California-San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Seccion de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barkovich, James A. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 505 Parnassus Av, L-371, University of California-San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Mateos, Fernando; Simon, Rogelio [Seccion de Neurpediatria, Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , 28041 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of symptomatic epidural lipomatosis in an 8-year-old girl with Cushing's syndrome secondary to longstanding high-dose steroid therapy for Crohn's disease. MR imaging of the spine revealed massive diffuse epidural fat compressing the entire spinal cord with T2 prolongation in the central gray matter of the cord suggesting ischemic myelopathy. This finding has not been previously demonstrated on imaging. A proposed mechanism underlying these findings is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: Comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Seok [School of Business Administration, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  5. Idiopathic Spinal Epidural Fat Accumulation is Associated With Hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Shinichi; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Yagi, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Takashi; Michikawa, Takehiro; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Fukui, Yasuyuki; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota

    2017-08-29

    Single-center retrospective analysis of consecutively collected data. To determine the clinical characteristics of idiopathic spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL). SEL is associated with the overt accumulation of nonencapsulated adipose tissue in the epidural space, leading to spinal cord or nerve root compression. The etiology of this condition is currently not completely understood. Data of 166 male patients who underwent primary surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS) from May 2013 to February 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Participants were divided into 3 groups based on the degree of epidural lipomatous lesion. Patient data of age at surgery, body mass index, prevalence of common noncommunicable diseases, blood tests, arteriosclerotic index, and preoperative clinical scores (assessed using the Japanese Orthopedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire) were evaluated. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the potential associated factors for idiopathic SEL. LSS patients with severe SEL had a significantly higher body mass index and elevated serum levels of total cholesterol and triglyceride compared with those without SEL. Analysis of preoperative clinical scores revealed that patients with SEL experienced pain more frequently and showed less walking ability than did those without SEL. Multivariate analysis revealed that hyperlipidemia was significantly associated with idiopathic SEL (odds ratio = 3.74, 95% confidence interval = 1.31-10.64). Our data suggest that aberrant lipid metabolism is related to the pathogenesis of idiopathic SEL and that LSS patients with idiopathic SEL have more severe pain than do those without SEL. 3.

  6. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia in achondroplastic dwarf for femur surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochana Girish Bakhshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia is the commonest form of short-limbed dwarfism and occurs in 1:26,000- 40,000 live births. This is an autosomal dominant disorder with abnormal endochondral ossification whereas periosteal and intramembranous ossification are normal. The basic abnormality is a disturbance of cartilage formation mainly at the epiphyseal growth plates and at the base of the skull. The anesthetic management of achondroplastic dwarfs is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Both regional as well as general anesthesia have their individual risks and consequences. We report a case of an achondroplastic dwarf in whom combined spinal epidural anesthesia was used for fixation of a fractured femur. The patient had undergone previous femur surgery under general anesthesia since he had been informed that spinal anesthesia could be very problematic. There was no technical difficulty encountered during the procedure and an adequate level was achieved with low-dose local anesthetics without any problem. Postoperative pain relief was offered for three consecutive postoperative days using epidural tramadol. We discuss the anesthetic issues and highlight the role of combined spinal epidural anesthesia with low-dose local anesthetics in this patient. This approach also helped in early ambulation and postoperative pain relief.

  7. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  8. Late onset cervical myelopathy secondary to fibrous scar tissue formation around the spinal cord stimulation electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, E; Kawai, H

    2010-08-01

    Case report. To report the late onset of cervical myelopathy secondary to fibrous scar tissue formation around an epidural electrode implanted for spinal cord stimulation (SCS). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hoshigaoka Koseinenkin Hospital, Osaka, Japan. A 49-year-old man who had an electrode implanted for SCS 5 years ago was referred to our department on 2 March 2005, complaining of difficulty using chopsticks and walking. A computed tomography scan with myelography revealed severe spinal cord compression around the epidural electrode. Surgical removal of the electrode was not effective. Removal of fibrous scar tissue during a second surgery significantly improved his neurological symptoms. Late onset cervical myelopathy secondary to fibrous scar tissue formation around the epidural electrode should be considered a possible event associated with SCS therapy.

  9. MRI findings in spinal subdural and epidural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Petra [Department of Radiology, Hospital La Plana, Ctra. De Vila-real a Borriana km. 0.5, 12540 Vila-real (Castello) (Spain)], E-mail: PetraBraun@gmx.de; Kazmi, Khuram [Department of Radiology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Nogues-Melendez, Pablo; Mas-Estelles, Fernando; Aparici-Robles, Fernando [Department of Radiology, La Fe Hospital, Avenida Campanar, 21, 46009 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    Background: Spinal hematomas are rare entities that can be the cause of an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Therefore, an early diagnosis is of great importance. Patients and Methods: From 2001 to 2005 seven patients with intense back pain and/or acute progressive neurological deficit were studied via 1.5 T MRI (in axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted sequences). Follow-up MRI was obtained in six patients. Results: Four patients showed the MRI features of a hyperacute spinal hematoma (two spinal subdural hematoma [SSH] and two spinal epidural hematoma [SEH]), isointense to the spinal cord on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences. One patient had an early subacute SEH manifest as heterogeneous signal intensity with areas of high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. Another patient had a late subacute SSH with high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The final patient had a SEH in the late chronic phase being hypointense on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Discussion: MRI is valuable in diagnosing the presence, location and extent of spinal hematomas. Hyperacute spinal hematoma and the differentiation between SSH and SEH are particular diagnostic challenges. In addition, MRI is an important tool in the follow-up in patients with conservative treatment.

  10. Targeting Lumbar Spinal Neural Circuitry by Epidural Stimulation to Restore Motor Function After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minassian, Karen; McKay, W Barry; Binder, Heinrich; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation has a long history of application for improving motor control in spinal cord injury. This review focuses on its resurgence following the progress made in understanding the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and on recent reports of its augmentative effects upon otherwise subfunctional volitional motor control. Early work revealed that the spinal circuitry involved in lower-limb motor control can be accessed by stimulating through electrodes placed epidurally over the posterior aspect of the lumbar spinal cord below a paralyzing injury. Current understanding is that such stimulation activates large-to-medium-diameter sensory fibers within the posterior roots. Those fibers then trans-synaptically activate various spinal reflex circuits and plurisegmentally organized interneuronal networks that control more complex contraction and relaxation patterns involving multiple muscles. The induced change in responsiveness of this spinal motor circuitry to any residual supraspinal input via clinically silent translesional neural connections that have survived the injury may be a likely explanation for rudimentary volitional control enabled by epidural stimulation in otherwise paralyzed muscles. Technological developments that allow dynamic control of stimulation parameters and the potential for activity-dependent beneficial plasticity may further unveil the remarkable capacity of spinal motor processing that remains even after severe spinal cord injuries.

  11. Acute presentation of solitary spinal epidural cavernous angioma in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Hamidi, Mehrdokht; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2013-05-01

    Solitary spinal epidural cavernous angiomas are rare lesions, especially in paediatric age group. They are infrequently considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural masses in children. We report a case of solitary epidural cavernous angioma of the thoracic spine in a child presenting with acute onset of back pain and myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine demonstrated a posterior epidural mass at T6-T8 levels with compression of the spinal cord. Using microsurgical technique and bipolar coagulation, total excision of the lesion was achieved. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous angioma. At the five-year follow-up, there was no recurrence of the tumour.

  12. Success of spinal and epidural labor analgesia: comparison of loss of resistance technique using air versus saline in combined spinal-epidural labor analgesia technique.

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    Grondin, Lydia S; Nelson, Kenneth; Ross, Vernon; Aponte, Orlando; Lee, Sherman; Pan, Peter H

    2009-07-01

    Comparison of air versus saline for loss of resistance technique (LORT) in combined spinal epidural labor analgesia (CSE) has not been evaluated, and neither has the relation between CSE characteristics (the presence/absence of initial spontaneous clear fluid return or upon aspiration) and spinal/epidural analgesia outcomes. The authors hypothesized that there is no difference in the spinal analgesia success or epidural catheter efficacy between using air versus saline LORT for CSE. A total of 360 patients were randomized to air or saline LORT for CSE. Primary outcome was spinal analgesia success as defined by verbal pain score of no more than 3 at 15 min after spinal dose administration. Secondary outcomes were CSE characteristics, catheter replacement, and average hourly epidural drug consumption. Results from 345 patients were analyzed. Spinal analgesia success, epidural catheter replacement, and drug consumption were not different between using air or saline LORT and were also independent of the presence/absence of fluid return on aspiration if initial spontaneous fluid returned to the spinal needle. However, epidural catheters inserted in absence of initial fluid return had a significantly higher catheter replacement rate (28.6%) than the 4.1% among those with initial fluid return (P air or saline is used for LORT during CSE. Practice of aspiration for fluid after observing initial fluid return may be unnecessary because this practice does not alter spinal/epidural analgesia outcomes. However, epidural catheters inserted with the absence of initial fluid returned to spinal needle may pose a high failure risk.

  13. Single dose spinal analgesia: Is it a good alternative to epidural analgesia in controlling labour pain?

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    Tarek AbdElBarr

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Based on the results of our study we concluded that single dose spinal analgesia is a good alternative to epidural analgesia in controlling labour pain i.e. spinal compared to epidural is more easy performed, faster, less expensive, and provide effective analgesia.

  14. A rare case of cervical epidural extramedullary plasmacytoma presenting with monoparesis

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    Turk Okan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders are characterized by production of a large number of plasma cells in the bone marrow. On the other hand, plasmacytoma results from proliferation of abnormal plasma cells in the soft tissue or skeletal system. Neurological complications are frequently observed in these diseases. The most commonly known complications among those complications are spine fractures, spinal cord compressions, and peripheral neuropathies. Although neurological involvements are common in plasmacytomas, extramedullary spinal epidural localizations have been reported very rarely. In this case report, we aimed to present a plasmacytoma case that presented with acute onset of upper extremity monoparesis. A 40-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with complaints of sudden weakness and numbness in her left arm following neck and left arm pain. Emergency cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed an epidural mass and the patient underwent emergency surgery. The patient showed improvement post-operatively and the pathology was reported as plasmacytoma. Following hematology consultation, systemic chemotherapy was initiated and radiotherapy was planned after wound healing.

  15. Primary vertebral and spinal epidural non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma with spinal cord compression

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    Boukobza, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital La Pitie, F-75012 Paris (France); Mazel, C. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Hopital La Pitie, F-75012 Paris (France); Touboul, E. [Department of Cancerology and Radiotherapy B, Hopital Tenon, F-75020 Paris (France)

    1996-05-01

    We examined eight patients with primary spinal epidural non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma presenting with spinal cord compression and proven histologically after laminectomy (7 cases) or biopsy (1 case) by MRI. The most common findings were an isointense or low signal relative to the spinal cord on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and high signal on T2-weighted images (T2WI). Spinal cord compression, vertebral bone marrow and paravertebral extension were assessed. Contrast enhancement was intense in seven of the eight cases and homogeneous in all of them. T2WI (performed in 2 cases) may be useful to distinguish metastatic carcinomas and sarcomas. T1WI demonstrated the full extent of the epidural lesion, which was well-delineated in all cases. When the paravertebral extension is not well-defined, a study with contrast medium should be performed. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Occult cervical (C1-2) dural tear causing bilateral recurrent subdural hematomas and repaired with cervical epidural blood patch.

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    Buvanendran, Asokumar; Byrne, Richard W; Kari, Maruti; Kroin, Jeffrey S

    2008-11-01

    The authors report the case of a 56-year-old previously healthy man who presented with a 4-month history of postural headache accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The results of initial imaging studies of the brain were normal. Repeated MR imaging demonstrated bilateral subdural hematomas which were drained and reaccumulated over a period of time. Spinal myelography revealed a cerebrospinal fluid leak at the C1-2 level. A cervical epidural blood patch, with repeated injections of 10 ml autologous blood at the site of the leak, dramatically improved the headache within 24 hours and eliminated the recurrent subdural hematomas. The results of follow-up computed tomography of the brain at 1, 4, 8, and 16 weeks were normal, and at 1-year follow-up the patient was completely free of symptoms and working.

  17. Cervical spondylodiscitis with epidural abscess after knife stab wounds to the neck: A case report.

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    Voelker, Anna; von der Hoeh, Nicolas H; Gulow, Jens; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2015-08-01

    Cervical spondylodiscitis is usually caused by pyogenic infections, associated with retropharyngeal abscesses, or due to the swallowing of foreign bodies. No cases of cervical spondylodiscitis caused by a penetrating neck injury have been published in the literature. We describe a case of cervical spondylodiscitis after multiple knife stab wounds to the lateral soft tissue of the neck. Case report and review of the literature. A 54-year-old patient was brought to our clinic with destructive spondylodiscitis C3/4 with paravertebral and epidural abscesses. He had been involved in a fight and had suffered multiple stab wounds to his neck with a knife 1 month prior. The initial CT scan had revealed one deeper wound canal behind the sternocleidomastoid muscle on the left side without any injury to the vessels. The wound was cleaned and an antibiotic therapy with cefuroxime was given for 1 week. After an uneventful and complete healing of the wound the patient developed severe neck pain. Inflammatory laboratory parameters were elevated, and a MRI of the neck revealed a distinct spondylodiscitis C3/4 with paravertebral and epidural abscess formations. Surgery was performed and included debridement, abscess drainage, decompression of the spinal canal, fusion of the C3/4 segment using an autologous iliac crest bone graft and a plate osteosynthesis. A course of calculated antibiotic therapy was administered for 8 weeks. Normal laboratory parameters and no radiological signs of an ongoing inflammatory process were observed during follow-up examinations. The C3/4 segment was consolidated. Stab wound injuries to the neck not only bear the risk of injuries to the nerves, vessels and organs of the neck but also increase the risk of developing secondary spondylodiscitis. Specifically, cervical spondylodiscitis can result in distinct neurological symptoms, and surgical intervention should be performed in a timely manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Paramedian epidural with midline spinal in the same intervertebral space: An alternative technique for combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia

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    Deepti Saigal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although different techniques have been developed for administering combined spinal epidural (CSE anaesthesia, none can be described as an ideal one. Objectives: We performed a study to compare two popular CSE techniques: Double segment technique (DST and single segment (needle through needle technique (SST with another alternative technique: Paramedian epidural and midline spinal in the same intervertebral space (single space dual needle technique: SDT. Methods: After institutional ethical clearance, 90 consenting patients undergoing elective lower limb orthopaedic surgery were allocated to receive CSE into one of the three groups (n=30 each: Group I: SST, Group II: SDT, Group III: DST using computerized randomization. The time for technique performance, surgical readiness, technical aspects of epidural and subarachnoid block (SAB and morbidity were compared. Results: SDT is comparable with SST and DST in time for technique performance (13.42±2.848 min, 12.18±6.092 min, 11.63±3.243 min respectively; P=0.268, time to surgical readiness (18.28±3.624 min, 17.64±5.877 min, 16.87±3.137 min respectively; P=0.42 and incidence of technically perfect block (70%, 66.66%, 76.66%; respectively P=0.757. Use of paramedian route for epidural catheterization in SDT group decreases complications and facilitates catheter insertion. There was a significant number of cases with lack of dural puncture appreciation (SST=ten, none in SDT and DST; P=0.001 and delayed cerebrospinal fluid reflux (SST=five, none in SDT and DST; P=0.005 while performance of SAB in SST group. The incidence of nausea, vomiting, post-operative backache and headache was comparable between the three groups. Conclusion: SDT is an acceptable alternative to DST and SST.

  19. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

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    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  20. Epidural and spinal anesthesia use during labor: 27-state reporting area, 2008.

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    Osterman, Michelle J K; Martin, Joyce A

    2011-04-06

    This report presents 2008 data on receipt of epidural and spinal anesthesia as collected on the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth. The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics of women giving birth and the circumstances of births in which epidural or spinal anesthesia is used to relieve the pain of labor for vaginal deliveries. Descriptive statistics are presented on births occurring in 2008 to residents of 27 states that had implemented the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth as of January 1, 2008. Analyses are limited to singleton births in vaginal deliveries that occurred in the 27-state reporting area only and are not generalizable to the United States as a whole. Overall, 61 percent of women who had a singleton birth in a vaginal delivery in the 27 states in 2008 received epidural or spinal anesthesia; non-Hispanic white women received epidural or spinal anesthesia more often (69 percent) than other racial groups. Among Hispanic origin groups, Puerto Rican women were most likely to receive epidural or spinal anesthesia (68 percent). Levels of treatment with epidural or spinal anesthesia decreased by advancing age of mother. Levels increased with increasing maternal educational attainment. Early initiation of prenatal care increased the likelihood of epidural or spinal anesthesia receipt, as did attendance at birth by a physician. Use of epidural or spinal anesthesia was more common in vaginal deliveries assisted by forceps (84 percent) or vacuum extraction (77 percent) than in spontaneous vaginal deliveries (60 percent). Use of epidural or spinal anesthesia was less likely when infants were born prior to 34 weeks of gestation or weighed less than 1,500 grams. Women with chronic and gestational diabetes were more likely to receive an epidural or spinal anesthesia than women with no pregnancy risk factors. Precipitous labor (less than 3 hours) was associated with decreased epidural or spinal anesthesia receipt. longer second

  1. [YouTube as an information source of spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia].

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    Tulgar, Serkan; Selvi, Onur; Serifsoy, Talat Ercan; Senturk, Ozgur; Ozer, Zeliha

    Social media as YouTube have become a part of daily life and many studies evaluated health-related YouTube videos. Our aim was to evaluate videos available on YouTube for the conformity to textbook information and their sufficiency as a source for patient information. A search of the YouTube website was performed using the keywords "spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia". Firstly, 180 videos were evaluated and the characteristics of the video were noted, and the features of the video too were noted if the video was regarding neuraxial anesthesia. Questionnaire 1 (Q1) evaluating the video quality relating to neuraxial anesthesia was designed using a textbook as reference and questionnaire 2 (Q2) was designed for evaluating patient information. After exclusions, 40 videos were included in the study. There was no difference in Q1 or Q2 scores when videos were grouped into 4 quarters according to their appearance order, time since upload or views to length rate (p>0.05). There was no statistical difference between Q1 or Q2 scores for spinal, epidural or combined videos (p>0.05). Videos prepared by a healthcare institute have a higher score in both Questionnaires 1 and 2 (10.87±4.28 vs. 5.84±2.90, p=0.044 and 3.89±5.43 vs. 1.19±3.35, p=0.01 respectively). Videos prepared by institutes, societies, etc. were of higher educational value, but were still very lacking. Videos should be prepared in adherence to available and up-to-date guidelines taking into consideration appropriate step by step explanation of each procedure, patient safety and frequently asked questions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. YouTube as an information source of spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia

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    Serkan Tulgar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Social media as YouTube have become a part of daily life and many studies evaluated health-related YouTube videos. Our aim was to evaluate videos available on YouTube for the conformity to textbook information and their sufficiency as a source for patient information. Material and method A search of the YouTube website was performed using the keywords "spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia". Firstly, 180 videos were evaluated and the characteristics of the video were noted, and the features of the video too were noted if the video was regarding neuraxial anesthesia. Questionnaire 1 (Q1 evaluating the video quality relating to neuraxial anesthesia was designed using a textbook as reference and questionnaire 2 (Q2 was designed for evaluating patient information. Results After exclusions, 40 videos were included in the study. There was no difference in Q1 or Q2 scores when videos were grouped into 4 quarters according to their appearance order, time since upload or views to length rate (p > 0.05. There was no statistical difference between Q1 or Q2 scores for spinal, epidural or combined videos (p > 0.05. Videos prepared by a healthcare institute have a higher score in both Questionnaires 1 and 2 (10.87 ± 4.28 vs. 5.84 ± 2.90, p = 0.044 and 3.89 ± 5.43 vs. 1.19 ± 3.35, p = 0.01 respectively. Conclusion Videos prepared by institutes, societies, etc. were of higher educational value, but were still very lacking. Videos should be prepared in adherence to available and up-to-date guidelines taking into consideration appropriate step by step explanation of each procedure, patient safety and frequently asked questions.

  3. Primary spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma: clinical features and surgical outcome in 14 cases.

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    Li, Teng-Yu; Xu, Yu-Lun; Yang, Jun; Wang, James; Wang, Gui-Huai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics, imaging features, differential diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis for primary spinal epidural cavernous hemangiomas. Fourteen patients with pathologically diagnosed non-vertebral origin cavernous hemangiomas who had undergone surgery at Beijing Tiantan Hospital between 2003 and 2012 were identified in the hospital's database. The patients' clinical data, imaging characteristics, surgical treatment, and postoperative follow-up were analyzed retrospectively. There were 9 males and 5 females with an average age of 51.64 years. The primary epidural cavernous hemangiomas were located in the cervical spine (2 cases), cervicothoracic junction (2 cases), thoracic spine (8 cases), thoracolumbar junction (1 case), and lumbar spine (1 case). Hemorrhage was confirmed in 4 cases during surgery. Preoperatively 5 lesions were misdiagnosed as schwannoma, 1 was misdiagnosed as a meningioma, and 1 was misdiagnosed as an arachnoid cyst. Preoperative hemorrhages were identified in 2 cases. Three patients had recurrent cavernous hemangiomas. The initial presenting symptoms were local pain in 5 cases, radiculopathy in 6 cases, and myelopathy in 3 cases. Upon admission, 1 patient had radicular symptoms and 13 had myelopathic symptoms. The average symptom duration was 18 months. All patients underwent surgery; complete resection was achieved in 8 cases, subtotal resection in 4 cases, and partial resection in 2 cases. Postoperative follow-up was completed in 10 cases (average follow-up 34 months); 1 patient died, 5 patients showed clinical improvement, and 4 patients remained neurologically unchanged. Total surgical removal of spine epidural cavernous hemangiomas with a chronic course is the optimum treatment and carries a good prognosis. Secondary surgery for recurrent epidural cavernous hemangioma is technically more challenging. In patients with profound myelopathy from acute hemorrhage, even prompt surgical

  4. Knotting of a Cervical Epidural Catheter in the Patient with Post-Herpetic Neuralgia: A Rare Complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Taek; Cho, Dong Woo; Lee, Young Bok

    2017-01-01

    Epidural block is achieved either by single injection of local anesthetic through an epidural needle or as a continuous block by infusion pump through an epidural catheter. Complications associated with epidural catheters include breakage, entrapment, and knotting. Knotting of epidural catheters is very rare, but knotting in lumbar epidural catheters has been reported in a number of studies, and most of these cases involved removal difficulty. We report a case in which we inserted a cervical epidural catheter in a patient who was experiencing severe post-herpetic neuralgia and then removed the knotted catheter without complications.

  5. Neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord following cervical spinal cord trauma: a report of five patients.

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    Bernsen, H J; Koetsveld, A; Frenken, C W; van Norel, G J

    2000-06-01

    Neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord is a rare condition which is almost exclusively reported in American football players following cervical hyperextension or hyperflexion trauma. In this entity-neurological symptoms of both arms and legs for a period of up to 15 minutes are observed with complete recovery. We report the characteristics of five patients not involved in contact sport activities with a neuropraxia of the spinal cord following cervical trauma. In four of the five patients, this syndrome was associated with a cervical canal stenosis. Surgical decompression was performed in two patients with progressive neurological symptoms after an initial period of recovery. The cases illustrates that although neuropraxia of the spinal cord is usually seen in athletes, also other persons may be at risk for developing this condition, especially when a preexisting spinal stenosis is present. Patients who experienced neuropraxia of the spinal cord should thus be evaluated carefully for the presence of cervical spinal cord abnormalities.

  6. [Combined spinal epidural and general anesthesia in abdominal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorić, Sava; Stamenković, Dusica; Stevanović, Slobodan; Malenković, Vesna; Dikić, Svetlana Dragojević; Randelović, Tomislav; Bilanović, Dragoljub

    2003-01-01

    Almost ten years has past since Eldor described combined spinal-epidural-general anaesthesia (CSEOGA) as a new concept in anaesthesia in which all of these components can be used, with sub-anaesthetic doses of drugs, due to its sinergist effect. The clinics studies has not demonstrated crucial advantages CSEGA comparing with combined epidural-general anaesthesia (CEDGA), in sense of analgesia, pulmonary function and neuro-hormomal inhibition. However we have been routinely practising our technique CSEGA in big abdominal and thoraco-abdominal surgery, since 1997. This study is a retrospective analysis of our technique and clinic observations, during 4.5 years, which include 293 patients. Their demographic characteristics can be seen in table 2. We perform combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia (CSE) in one or two interspinal spaces, depending on the type of surgery, but always before induction in general anaesthesia (GA). For preemptive and intraoperative analgesia we use 0.25% plain bupivacaine (B), both for spinal (SA) and epidural (ED) blockade. The most important detail in our technique, despite precise order to administrate drugs, is analgesic solution (AS) which contain B 4.5 mg, fentanyl (Fe) 50 mcg and morphine hydrochloride (Mo) 0.2 mg, in total volume of 3 ml, in SA. After the ED test dose with 2% lidocaine 60 mg (3 ml), before the induction in GA, we inject more 10 ml B, but intraoperative analgesia is almost performed with B 3 to 5 ml in intermittent bolus doses. This ED bolus dosis is particularly important, partly to sufficiently cephalic migration of the SA somatosensorieblock, as well as for intraoperative analgesia. For very light GA only artificial ventilation with 66% N2O in O2 and muscle relaxation with paneuronium is needed. Co analgesia with intravenous (i.v.) Fe, was exceptionally seldom needed, except for induction. Intraoperative drugs consumption was very small as we see in table 5. With adequate liquid compensation, this technique achieve

  7. Clinical presentation and treatment outcomes of spinal epidural arteriovenous fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Deena M; Brinjikji, Waleed; Clarke, Michelle J; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal epidural arteriovenous fistulas (SEDAVFs) constitute a rare but treatable cause of vascular myelopathy and are a different subtype from the more common Type I spinal dural AVFs. The purpose of this study was to review a consecutive series of SEDAVFs from a single institution and report on the clinical presentations, functional status, and treatment outcomes. METHODS The authors identified all SEDAVFs treated at their institution from 2005 to 2015. SEDAVFs were defined as spinal AVFs in which the fistulous connection occurred in the epidural venous plexus. The clinical presentation, functional status, immediate treatment outcomes, and long-term neurological outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS Twenty-four patients with SEDAVFs were included in this study. The patients' mean age at presentation was 66.9 years. The most common presenting symptoms were pain and numbness (22 patients, 91.7%), followed by lower-extremity weakness (21 patients, 87.5%). The mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 11.8 months. Eighteen patients (75.0%) were treated with endovascular therapy alone, 4 (16.7) with surgery, and 2 (8.3%) with a combination of techniques. There was 1 major treatment-related complication (4.2%). Fifteen patients (62.5%) had improvement in disability, and 12 patients (54.5%) had improvement in sensory symptoms. CONCLUSIONS SEDAVFs often present with lower-extremity motor dysfunction and sensory symptoms. With the availability of newer liquid embolic agents, these lesions can be effectively treated with endovascular techniques. Surgery is also effective at treating these lesions, especially in situations where endovascular embolization fails or is not safe and in patients presenting with mass effect from compressive varices.

  8. An acute cervical epidural hematoma as a complication of dry needling.

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    Lee, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Hyangsook; Jo, Dae-Jean

    2011-06-01

    A retrospective case report. The objective of this article is to report an unusual complication of dry needling. Epidural hematomas after dry needling are quite unusual and only a few cases of epidural hematoma after acupuncture have been reported in the literature. We are presenting the first report of acute cervical epidural hematoma after dry needling. A 58-year-old woman presented with quadriparesis and neck pain. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a hyperintense mass in the T2-weighted magnetic resonance image at the C2-T2 level, which proved to be an epidural hematoma. Symptoms related to the epidural hematoma resolved after decompression. Though rare, epidural hematomas are a possible complication when applying needling therapies. Therapists need to have precise knowledge of human anatomy, especially in the region where he or she will puncture. Continuous attention must be paid throughout the whole procedure.

  9. Cervical brucellar spondylodiscitis mimicking a cervical disc herniation with epidural abscess: a case report

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    Ahmet Aslan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis can show many clinical manifestations according to the affected sites of the body, and is usually diagnosed with osteoarticular symptoms. We present a patient with cervical brucellar spondylodiscitis and epidural abscess who presented with severe neck and left upper extremity pain and was referred to our hospital for surgery because of cervical disc herniation. The patient didn’t undergo surgery and was cured with 6 months of medical therapy. Duration of the medical therapy was assessed by magnetic resonans imaging (MRI studies. In endemic regions, brucellar spondylodiscitis should be included in differential diagnoses for patients who have cervical pain with or without neurological deficits. Patients should be attentively questioned concerning occupation, settlement place, subfebril fever, consumption of raw milk or dairy products, travel to endemic regions or past brucellosis history in the family. MRI is an important imaging modality in the diagnosis and response to medical treatment in brucellar spondylodiscitis.

  10. The morphology and clinical significance of the dorsal meningovertebra ligaments in the cervical epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Benchao; Zheng, Xuefeng; Min, Shaoxiong; Zhou, Zhilai; Ding, Zihai; Jin, Anmin

    2014-11-01

    The dural sac is anchored within the vertebral canal by connective tissue called meningovertebral ligaments in the epidural space. During flavectomy and laminectomy, inadvertent disruption of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments may lead to dura laceration and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. All the described dorsal meningovertebral ligaments were located in the lumbar region. A rare study is available about dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the cervical spinal dura to the adjacent vertebrae. To identify and describe the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments at each cervical level and discuss their clinical significance. A dissection-based study of 22 embalmed cadavers. The anatomy was studied in 22 whole cervical cadavers (11 females, 11 males), prepared with formaldehyde, whose ages at the time of death ranged from 55 to 78 years. The vertebral canal was divided to expose the dural sac and the spinal nerve roots. At all levels of the cervical vertebra, the morphology, quantity, origin, insertion, and spatial orientation of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments were determined and the length, width or diameter, and thickness of the ligaments were measured with vernier calipers. The dorsal meningovertebral ligaments in the cervical region anchored the posterior dural sac to the ligamentum flavum or laminae. The number of attachment points on the ligamentum flavum was relatively larger than that on the lamina, and the occurrence rate of dorsal meningovertebral ligaments was 100% at C1-C2 and C4--C5. The thickest ligaments were observed at the C1 and C2 vertebrae. The length of the ligaments varied from 1.50 to 35.22 mm, and the orientation of the ligaments mostly was craniocaudal. The morphology of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments was divided into four types: strip type, cord type, grid type, and thin slice type. In the cervical spine, the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments exist between the posterior dural sac and the ligamentum flavum or lamina. The dorsal

  11. Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma: A case series of seven cases

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    Ignatius Ngene Esene

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: PSECH although rare is increasing reported and ought to be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. Early surgical treatment with total resection is recommended as would result in a good prognosis.

  12. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Orioli, Andrea; Brigo, Francesco; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-05-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI) reorganization of spinal cord circuits occur both above and below the spinal lesion. These functional changes can be determined by assessing electrophysiological recording. We aimed at investigating the trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR) and trigemino-spinal reflex (TSR) responses after traumatic SCI. TCR and TSR were registered after stimulation of the infraorbital nerve from the sternocleidomastoid, splenius, deltoid, biceps and first dorsal interosseous muscles in 10 healthy subjects and 10 subjects with incomplete cervical SCI. In the control subjects reflex responses were registered from the sternocleidomastoid, and splenium muscles, while no responses were obtained from upper limb muscles. In contrast, smaller but clear short latency EMG potentials were recorded from deltoid and biceps muscles in about half of the SCI patients. Moreover, the amplitudes of the EMG responses in the neck muscles were significantly higher in patients than in control subjects. The reflex responses are likely to propagate up the brainstem and down the spinal cord along the reticulospinal tracts and the propriospinal system. Despite the loss of corticospinal axons, synaptic plasticity in pre-existing pathways and/or formation of new circuits through sprouting processes above the injury site may contribute to the findings of this preliminary study and may be involved in the functional recovery. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes can be used to demonstrate and quantify plastic changes at brainstem and cervical level following SCI. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy: diagnosis and management concerns.

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    Henry, J B; Messerer, M; Thomas, V; Diabira, S; Morandi, X; Hamlat, A

    2012-09-01

    Nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) during pregnancy is rare. Therefore, appropriate management of this occurrence is not well defined. The aim of this study was to extensively review the literature on this subject, to propose some novel treatment guidelines. Electronic databases, manual reviews and conference proceedings up to December 2011 were systematically reviewed. Articles were deemed eligible for inclusion in this study if they dealt with nontraumatic SEH during pregnancy. Search protocols and data were independently assessed by two authors. In all, 23 case reports were found to be appropriate for review. The mean patient age was 28 years and gestational age was 33.2 weeks. Thirteen cases presented with acute interscapular pain. The clinical picture consisted of paraplegia, which occurred approximately 63 h after pain onset. Spinal cord decompression was performed within an average time of 20 h after neurological deficit onset. Fifteen patients had cesarean deliveries, even when the gestational age was less than 36 weeks. This review failed to identify articles, other than case reports, which could assist in the formation of new guidelines to treat SEH in pregnancy. However, we believe that SEH may be managed neurosurgically, without requiring prior, premature, cesarean section.

  14. Study Protocol- Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injections for Spinal Stenosis (LESS: a double-blind randomized controlled trial of epidural steroid injections for lumbar spinal stenosis among older adults

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    Friedly Janna L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common causes of low back pain among older adults and can cause significant disability. Despite its prevalence, treatment of spinal stenosis symptoms remains controversial. Epidural steroid injections are used with increasing frequency as a less invasive, potentially safer, and more cost-effective treatment than surgery. However, there is a lack of data to judge the effectiveness and safety of epidural steroid injections for spinal stenosis. We describe our prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that tests the hypothesis that epidural injections with steroids plus local anesthetic are more effective than epidural injections of local anesthetic alone in improving pain and function among older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods We will recruit up to 400 patients with lumbar central canal spinal stenosis from at least 9 clinical sites over 2 years. Patients with spinal instability who require surgical fusion, a history of prior lumbar surgery, or prior epidural steroid injection within the past 6 months are excluded. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either ESI with local anesthetic or the control intervention (epidural injections with local anesthetic alone. Subjects receive up to 2 injections prior to the primary endpoint at 6 weeks, at which time they may choose to crossover to the other intervention. Participants complete validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health-related quality of life at baseline and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcomes are Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and a numerical rating scale measure of pain intensity at 6 weeks. In order to better understand their safety, we also measure cortisol, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, weight, and blood pressure at baseline, and at 3 and 6 weeks post-injection. We also obtain data on resource utilization

  15. Epidural lipomatosis and congenital small spinal canal in spinal anaesthesia: a case report and review of the literature

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    Flisberg Per

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Complications after lumbar anaesthesia and epidural blood patch have been described in patients with congenital small spinal canal and increased epidural fat or epidural lipomatosis. These conditions, whether occurring separately or in combination, require magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis and grading, but their clinical significance is still unclear. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian woman who was undergoing a Caesarean section developed a longstanding L4-L5 unilateral neuropathy after the administration of spinal anaesthesia. There were several attempts to correctly position the needle, one of which resulted in paraesthesia. A magnetic resonance image revealed that the patient's bony spinal canal was congenitally small and had excess epidural fat. The cross-sectional area of the dural sac was then reduced, which left practically no free cerebrospinal fluid space. Conclusion The combination of epidural lipomatosis of varying degrees and congenital small spinal canal has not been previously discussed with spinal anaesthesia. Due to the low cerebrospinal fluid content of the small dural sac, the cauda equina becomes a firm system with a very limited possibility for the nerve roots to move away from the puncture needle when it is inserted into the dural sac. This constitutes risks of technical difficulties and neuropathies with spinal anaesthesia.

  16. Surgical Strategies for Cervical Spinal Neurinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Aoyama, Tatsuro; Miyaoka, Yoshinari; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cervical spinal neurinomas are benign tumors that arise from nerve roots. Based on their location, these tumors can also take the form of a dumbbell-shaped mass. Treatment strategies for these tumors have raised several controversial issues such as appropriate surgical indications and selection of surgical approaches for cervical dumbbell-shaped spinal neurinomas. In this report, we review previous literature and retrospectively analyze cervical spinal neurinoma cases that have been treated at our hospital. Surgical indications and approaches based on tumor location and severity are discussed in detail. Thus, with advances in neuroimaging and neurophysiological monitoring, we conclude that appropriate surgical approaches and intraoperative surgical manipulations should be chosen on a case-by-case basis.

  17. The prevalence of spinal epidural lipomatosis on magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Theyskens, Nina C; Paulino Pereira, Nuno Rui; Janssen, Stein J; Bono, Christopher M; Schwab, Joseph H; Cha, Thomas D

    2017-07-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) refers to an excessive accumulation of fat within the epidural space. It can be idiopathic or secondary, resulting in significant morbidity. The prevalence of SEL, including idiopathic and secondary SEL, and its respective risk factors are poorly defined. We sought to: (1) assess the prevalence of SEL among patients who underwent a dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the spine-including incidental SEL (ie, SEL without any spine-related symptoms), SEL with spine-related symptoms, and symptomatic SEL (ie, with symptoms specific for SEL); and (2) assess factors associated with overall SEL and subgroups. In addition, we assessed differences between SEL subgroups. We reviewed the records of 28,902 patients, aged 18 years and older with a spine MRI (2004 to 2015) at two tertiary care centers. We identified SEL cases by searching radiology reports for SEL, including synonyms and misspellings. Prevalence numbers were calculated as a percentage of the total number of patients. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify factors associated with overall SEL and subgroups. The prevalence of overall SEL was 2.5% (731 of 28,902): incidental SEL, 0.6% (168 of 28,902); SEL with symptoms, 1.8% (526 of 28,902); and symptomatic SEL, 0.1% (37 of 28,902). Factors associated with overall SEL in multivariate analysis were the following: older age (odds ratio [OR]: 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.02, p30 (OR: 2.59, 95% CI: 1.97-3.41, pSEL; 23% of whom with no symptoms, 72% with spine-related symptoms, and 5% with symptoms specific for SEL. Our data help identify patients who might warrant an increased index of suspicion for SEL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Spinal Cord Compression Secondary to Epidural Fibrosis Associated with Percutaneously Placed Spinal Cord Stimulation Electrodes: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Tamimi, Mazin; Aoun, Salah G; Gluf, Wayne

    2017-08-01

    Spinal cord stimulation is a safe method for treating chronic pain syndromes. Spinal cord stimulators can be placed either surgically by creating a laminectomy defect for paddle leads or percutaneously by inserting electrodes. They are usually not associated with major complications. There have been several reports of epidural fibrosis formation after paddle lead placement but only 1 case of excessive fibrosis following percutaneous lead placement. We describe the unique case of excessive cervical fibrosis formation with creation of tolerance phenomenon, clinically significant stenosis, cord compression, and myelopathy after percutaneous lead placement, which improved after surgical removal of the implant. We also reviewed the PubMed and Medline databases for all cases of significant epidural fibrosis related to spinal cord stimulator lead placement, including both surgically implanted paddles and percutaneously implanted leads. This is an uncommon complication after placement of spinal cord stimulators, but it can carry a clinically significant impact and be the source of severe morbidity. It should especially be suspected if the successful placement of the device is followed by development of a "tolerance" phenomenon, with progressive loss of satisfactory pain control and development of new myelopathic symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Review of Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation for Augmenting Cough after Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachmann, Jan T; Calvert, Jonathan S; Grahn, Peter J; Drubach, Dina I; Lee, Kendall H; Lavrov, Igor A

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains a debilitating condition for which there is no cure. In addition to loss of somatic sensorimotor functions, SCI is also commonly associated with impairment of autonomic function. Importantly, cough dysfunction due to paralysis of expiratory muscles in combination with respiratory insufficiency can render affected individuals vulnerable to respiratory morbidity. Failure to clear sputum can aggravate both risk for and severity of respiratory infections, accounting for frequent hospitalizations and even mortality. Recently, epidural stimulation of the lower thoracic spinal cord has been investigated as novel means for restoring cough by evoking expiratory muscle contraction to generate large positive airway pressures and expulsive air flow. This review article discusses available preclinical and clinical evidence, current challenges and clinical potential of lower thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for restoring cough in individuals with SCI.

  20. [Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma with uncommon clinical presentation: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelec, H; Krzyślak, K

    2001-01-01

    Spinal epidural haematoma (SEH)--posttraumatic or spontaneous (SSEH) is a rare entity, usually associated with severe neurological deficit. Urgent surgical decompression of the spinal cord is mandatory procedure. A case of SSEH with unusual transient clinical symptomatology and subsequent spontaneous resolution during conservative management is reported.

  1. Neuromodulation of evoked muscle potentials induced by epidural spinal-cord stimulation in paralyzed individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayenko, Dimitry G; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan J; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P

    2014-03-01

    Epidural stimulation (ES) of the lumbosacral spinal cord has been used to facilitate standing and voluntary movement after clinically motor-complete spinal-cord injury. It seems of importance to examine how the epidurally evoked potentials are modulated in the spinal circuitry and projected to various motor pools. We hypothesized that chronically implanted electrode arrays over the lumbosacral spinal cord can be used to assess functionally spinal circuitry linked to specific motor pools. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functional and topographic organization of compound evoked potentials induced by the stimulation. Three individuals with complete motor paralysis of the lower limbs participated in the study. The evoked potentials to epidural spinal stimulation were investigated after surgery in a supine position and in one participant, during both supine and standing, with body weight load of 60%. The stimulation was delivered with intensity from 0.5 to 10 V at a frequency of 2 Hz. Recruitment curves of evoked potentials in knee and ankle muscles were collected at three localized and two wide-field stimulation configurations. Epidural electrical stimulation of rostral and caudal areas of lumbar spinal cord resulted in a selective topographical recruitment of proximal and distal leg muscles, as revealed by both magnitude and thresholds of the evoked potentials. ES activated both afferent and efferent pathways. The components of neural pathways that can mediate motor-evoked potentials were highly dependent on the stimulation parameters and sensory conditions, suggesting a weight-bearing-induced reorganization of the spinal circuitries.

  2. [A rare cause of spinal cord compression: spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (about 3 cases)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Saqui, Abderrazzak; Aggouri, Mohamed; Benzagmout, Mohamed; Chakour, Khalid; Chaoui, Mohamed El Faiz

    2017-01-01

    Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a benign condition whose pathophysiology is still uncertain. It is most commonly asymptomatic but it can cause severe neurological sequelae especially when treatment is not received in time. We conducted a retrospective study of three patients treated for SEAC conducted in the Neurosurgery Department, Hassan II University Hospital, Fez. We report the case of two male patients and a woman, with an average age of 35 years (range: 16-56 years), admitted with slow progressive spinal cord compression. All patients underwent spinal cord MRI showing epidural fluid collection, having the same signal as that of cerebrospinal fluid, compressing the opposite marrow. The collection was located in the chest in all cases. All patients underwent surgery via posterior approach for cyst resection and cyst neck ligation in two cases and dural plasty in a single case. Anatomo-pathologic examination showed arachnoid cysts. Postoperative outcome was simple in all cases. This study aims to update the current understanding of this pathology while insisting on the need for early management given its tendency toward gradual worsening in the absence of adapt therapy. It also aims to review the clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic features of this condition.

  3. Spinal epidural cavernous angioma: two case reports and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayri, Yaşar; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Yalçınkaya Koç, Demet; Konya, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous angiomas are vascular malformations that occur most frequently in the supratentorial area of the central nervous system (CNS). Spinal epidural occurrence is rare. This article describes 2 cases of spinal epidural cavernous angioma. The lesions were hypo- to isointense on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Both were enhanced homogenously with intravenous contrast. Total resection was achieved in both cases, and the lesions were histopathologically diagnosed as cavernous angiomas. The patients' symptoms regressed postsurgery. Although the MRI features of cavernous angiomas are well known, spinal epidural occurrence is rare and many differential diagnoses have similar clinical and imaging findings. It is important to definitively diagnose these lesions prior to surgery in order to prevent possible intraoperative complications such as massive bleeding and to maximize chances for complete resection. In addition to case descriptions, this article includes a thorough literature review to raise clinical awareness about this well-known but rare spinal entity.

  4. The use of combined spinal-epidural technique to compare intrathecal ziconotide and epidural opioids for trialing intrathecal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Amitabh; Loh, Jeffrey; Puttanniah, Vinay; Malhotra, Vivek

    2013-03-01

    SUMMARY Choosing the initial medications for intrathecal delivery is often confusing and not standardized. We describe a novel way for using a combined spinal-epidural technique to compare two first-line medications for intrathecal delivery; ziconotide and morphine (or hydromorphone). Five patients with intractable chronic or cancer pain were elected to have an intrathecal drug delivery system implanted for pain management. Each patient was given a 3-day inpatient trial with the combined spinal-epidural technique. The Visual Analog Scale, Numerical Rating Scale, short-term McGill questionnaire and opioid consumption were monitored daily. The results were used to develop a paradigm to describe how ziconotide can be used in practice.

  5. Cervical spinal canal narrowing in idiopathic syringomyelia

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    Struck, Aaron F. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA (United States); Carr, Carrie M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shah, Vinil [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hesselink, John R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Haughton, Victor M. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The cervical spine in Chiari I patient with syringomyelia has significantly different anteroposterior diameters than it does in Chiari I patients without syringomyelia. We tested the hypothesis that patients with idiopathic syringomyelia (IS) also have abnormal cervical spinal canal diameters. The finding in both groups may relate to the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. Local institutional review boards approved this retrospective study. Patients with IS were compared to age-matched controls with normal sagittal spine MR. All subjects had T1-weighted spin-echo (500/20) and T2-weighted fast spin-echo (2000/90) sagittal cervical spine images at 1.5 T. Readers blinded to demographic data and study hypothesis measured anteroposterior diameters at each cervical level. The spinal canal diameters were compared with a Mann-Whitney U test. The overall difference was assessed with a Friedman test. Seventeen subjects were read by two reviewers to assess inter-rater reliability. Fifty IS patients with 50 age-matched controls were studied. IS subjects had one or more syrinxes varying from 1 to 19 spinal segments. Spinal canal diameters narrowed from C1 to C3 and then enlarged from C5 to C7 in both groups. Diameters from C2 to C4 were narrower in the IS group (p < 0.005) than in controls. The ratio of the C3 to the C7 diameters was also smaller (p = 0.004) in IS than controls. Collectively, the spinal canal diameters in the IS were significantly different from controls (Friedman test p < 0.0001). Patients with IS have abnormally narrow upper and mid cervical spinal canal diameters and greater positive tapering between C3 and C7. (orig.)

  6. Cervical spinal canal narrowing in idiopathic syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Aaron F; Carr, Carrie M; Shah, Vinil; Hesselink, John R; Haughton, Victor M

    2016-08-01

    The cervical spine in Chiari I patient with syringomyelia has significantly different anteroposterior diameters than it does in Chiari I patients without syringomyelia. We tested the hypothesis that patients with idiopathic syringomyelia (IS) also have abnormal cervical spinal canal diameters. The finding in both groups may relate to the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. Local institutional review boards approved this retrospective study. Patients with IS were compared to age-matched controls with normal sagittal spine MR. All subjects had T1-weighted spin-echo (500/20) and T2-weighted fast spin-echo (2000/90) sagittal cervical spine images at 1.5 T. Readers blinded to demographic data and study hypothesis measured anteroposterior diameters at each cervical level. The spinal canal diameters were compared with a Mann-Whitney U test. The overall difference was assessed with a Friedman test. Seventeen subjects were read by two reviewers to assess inter-rater reliability. Fifty IS patients with 50 age-matched controls were studied. IS subjects had one or more syrinxes varying from 1 to 19 spinal segments. Spinal canal diameters narrowed from C1 to C3 and then enlarged from C5 to C7 in both groups. Diameters from C2 to C4 were narrower in the IS group (p < 0.005) than in controls. The ratio of the C3 to the C7 diameters was also smaller (p = 0.004) in IS than controls. Collectively, the spinal canal diameters in the IS were significantly different from controls (Friedman test p < 0.0001). Patients with IS have abnormally narrow upper and mid cervical spinal canal diameters and greater positive tapering between C3 and C7.

  7. Effectiveness of a multimodal pain management concept for patients with cervical radiculopathy with focus on cervical epidural injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditz, Achim; Brunner, Melanie; Zeman, Florian; Greimel, Felix; Florian, Völlner; Boluki, Daniel; Grifka, Joachim; Weber, Markus; Renkawitz, Tobias

    2017-08-11

    Cervical radiculopathy has become an increasing problem worldwide. Conservative treatment options have been recommended in many reviews on cervical radiculopathy, ranging from different types of physiotherapy to waiting for remission by natural history. No multimodal pain management concept (MPM) on an inpatient basis has been evaluated. This study aimed at showing the positive short-term effects of an inpatient multimodal pain management concept with focus on cervical translaminar epidural steroid injection for patients with cervical radiculopathy. 54 patients who had undergone inpatient MPM for 10 days were evaluated before and after 10-days treatment. The NRS (0-10) value for arm pain could be reduced from 6.0 (IQR 5.7-6.8) to 2.25 (IQR 2.0-3.1) and from 5.9 (IQR 4.8-6.0) to 2.0 (IQR 1.7-2.6) for neck pain. Neck pain was reduced by 57.4% and arm pain by 62.5%. 2 days after epidural steroid injection, pain was reduced by 40.1% in the neck and by 43.4% in the arms. MPM seems to be an efficient short-term approach to treating cervical radiculopathy. Cervical translaminar epidural steroid injection is an important part of this concept. In the absence of a clear indication for surgery, MPM represents a treatment option.

  8. Cervical spinal cord infarction after cervical spine decompressive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Samuel; Fakhran, Saeed; Dean, Bruce; Ross, Jeffrey; Porter, Randall W; Kakarla, Udaya K; Ruggieri, Paul; Theodore, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    To report five patients who underwent cervical decompressive surgeries and developed persistent postoperative neurologic deficits compatible with spinal cord infarctions and evaluate causes for these rare complications. The clinical courses and imaging studies of five patients were retrospectively analyzed. Imaging findings, types of surgeries, vascular compromise or risk factors, hypotensive episodes, intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials, concomitant brain infarctions, and clinical degree and radiographic extent of spinal cord infarction were studied. The presence of spinal cord infarction was determined by clinical course and imaging evaluation. All five patients had antecedent cervical cord region vascular compromise or generalized vascular risk factors. Four patients developed hypotensive episodes, two intraoperatively and two postoperatively. None of the four patients with hypotensive episodes had imaging or clinical evidence of concomitant brain infarctions. Neuroimaging evaluation of spinal cord infarction after decompressive surgery is done to exclude spinal cord compression, to ensure adequate surgical decompression, and to confirm infarction by imaging. Antecedent, unrecognized preoperative vascular compromise may be a significant contributor to spinal cord infarction by itself or in combination with hypotension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute cervical fracture or congenital spinal deformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, James S; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Sharan, Ashwini; Ratliff, John; Flanders, Adam; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Falowski, Stephen; Vaccaro, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    There are few reports of developmental or congenital cervical spinal deformities. Such cases may be mistaken for traumatically induced fractures, and additional treatment may ensue. A retrospective analysis was performed to identify patients with congenital cervical spine deformities. These patients were matched with a confirmed traumatic spinal fracture population with similar demographic features. Patients were analyzed for age, gender, imaging findings (plain roentgenograms including dynamic flexion and extension views, computed tomography scan, and MRI), neurologic status, and subjective complaints of pain. Thirty-six individuals were included in the final analysis, 7 with congenital abnormalities and 29 with radiographically confirmed traumatic injuries. Patients with congenital abnormalities had significantly less soft-tissue swelling compared with the population with traumatic fractures (P spinal deformity (congenital vs traumatic).

  10. Acute Cervical Fracture or Congenital Spinal Deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, James S; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Sharan, Ashwini; Ratliff, John; Flanders, Adam; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Falowski, Stephen; Vaccaro, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: There are few reports of developmental or congenital cervical spinal deformities. Such cases may be mistaken for traumatically induced fractures, and additional treatment may ensue. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to identify patients with congenital cervical spine deformities. These patients were matched with a confirmed traumatic spinal fracture population with similar demographic features. Patients were analyzed for age, gender, imaging findings (plain roentgenograms including dynamic flexion and extension views, computed tomography scan, and MRI), neurologic status, and subjective complaints of pain. Results: Thirty-six individuals were included in the final analysis, 7 with congenital abnormalities and 29 with radiographically confirmed traumatic injuries. Patients with congenital abnormalities had significantly less soft-tissue swelling compared with the population with traumatic fractures (P spinal deformity (congenital vs traumatic). PMID:18533417

  11. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Paraplegia: Two Different Etiologies and Treatment Approaches

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    Cetin Kursad Akpinar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and non-spontaneous epidural hematomas are among rarely seen emergency diseases which can cause permanent neurological deficits in the event of delays in diagnosis and treatment. They are findings of spinal cord compression that generally develop following a clinical, severe backache. While surgical treatment can be delayed in case of recovery of sudden neurological findings within hours, surgical treatment should be conducted as soon as possible in case of advancement of the findings within hours. Spinal epidural hematoma developed when Case 1 was receiving anticoagulant therapy while it developed in Case 2 when the case was not receiving any therapy. Case 1 recovered with conservative treatment and Case 2 recovered with surgical treatment. In this article, we presented spinal epidural hematoma cases with 2 different etiological causes in which we followed 2 different treatment approaches.

  12. Worsening Cervical Epidural Hematoma After Tissue Plasminogen Activator Administration for Stroke Like Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Tadatsugu; Yoshihara, Tomohito; Yakushiji, Yusuke; Eriguchi, Makoto; Hara, Hideo; Sonohata, Motoki; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    Case report. To report an extremely rare case of stroke-mimicking, cervical spontaneous epidural hematoma (SEH) treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for hemiparesis followed by emergency cervical decompression. Although hemiparesis caused by cervical SEH is a relatively uncommon symptom compared with tetraparesis, such cases were often misdiagnosed as cerebral infarction and worsened by antithrombic therapy. A case report and literature review are presented. A 71-year-old male presented with sudden neck pain followed by left-sided hemiparesis, and was believed to have had a stroke. He was administered tPA as intracranial computed tomography showed no signs of hemorrhage. However, his neurological condition continued to decline, and MRI of the cervical spine revealed a large spontaneous epidural hematoma. He subsequently underwent evacuation of the epidural hematoma and C3-6 laminoplasty, and his clinical status improved after the surgery. To our knowledge, only three cases of cervical SEH with hemiparesis erroneously treated with tPA resulting in neurological decline because of the enlargement of an existing hematoma, including the current case, have been reported in the English literature. It is important for physicians, especially those who administer tPA treatment, to include cervical SEH in the differential diagnosis of stroke in patients presenting with sudden back pain followed by the onset of neurological deficits including hemiparesis. 5.

  13. Spinal ultrasound versus palpation for epidural catheter insertion in labour: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzola, Cristian; Mikhael, Rafeek; Margarido, Clarita; Carvalho, Jose C A

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the spine is thought to reduce failed and traumatic neuraxial procedures. Most of the evidence supporting this assumption has been produced in the context of an expert sonographer performing the ultrasound assessment, and it remains unknown whether this technique is useful when used by multiple individual operators. To invesstigate the impact of preprocedural spinal ultrasound on the ease of insertion of labour epidurals by a group of trainees. We hypothesised that the ultrasound-assisted technique would improve the ease of insertion when compared with the conventional palpation technique. A randomised controlled trial. Academic hospital in Toronto, Canada. A group of 17 second-year anaesthesia residents and five anaesthesia fellows underwent a training programme in ultrasound assessment of the spine. Parturients with easily palpable lumbar spines were randomised to either ultrasound or palpation group. Residents and fellows performed both the assessment (ultrasound or palpation) and the epidural procedure. ease of insertion of epidural catheter composed of the time taken to insert the epidural catheter, number of interspace levels attempted and number of needle passes. total procedural time (assessment and insertion); first pass success rate; number of attempts required to thread the epidural catheter; failure of epidural analgesia; and patient satisfaction. We analysed 128 epidural catheter insertions (residents 84, fellows 44). There was no difference in median (interquartile range, IQR) epidural insertion time between the ultrasound and palpation groups [174 (120 to 241) versus 180 (130 to 322.5) s, respectively; P = 0.14]. The number of interspace levels attempted and needle passes were also similar in both groups. The total procedural time was longer in the ultrasound group. The use of preprocedural spinal ultrasound by a cohort of anaesthesia trainees did not improve the ease of insertion of labour epidural catheters in patients

  14. Delayed onset of a spinal epidural hematoma after facet joint injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Velickovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic back pain is a challenging problem. Facet joint infiltration is an established treatment for chronic low back pain caused by arthrosis of the lumbar facet joints. Due to the increasing number of patients with chronic low back pain, this therapy has become more frequent. We treated a 51-year-old male patient, who developed an epidural hematoma 2 months after infiltration therapy. Our case shows that even a delayed onset of spinal epidural hematoma is possible and should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute myelopathy after spinal intervention.

  15. The Effects of Epidural Top-Up Technique with Serum Physiological On Unilateral Spinal Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    İlkay Cömert; Koray Erbüyün; Gülay Ok; İdil Tekin; Demet Tok

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of saline injections as epidural top-up on the sensory block duration, quality and hemodynamic effects of unilateral spinal anesthesia. The cases from ASA I-Il containing of 18-65 age group were randomly separated into three groups. For the purpose of unilateral spinal anesthesia, 6 mg 0.5% ‘heavy’ bupivacaine and for the purpose of epidural top-up, 10 mL saline were applied to the each patients of the groups. The study protocol was desi...

  16. Contralateral oblique view is superior to lateral view for interlaminar cervical and cervicothoracic epidural access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Jatinder S; Aner, Moris; Nagda, Jyotsna V; Jyotsna, Nagda; Keel, John C; Simopoulos, Thomas T

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the reliability of the lateral fluoroscopic view and several contralateral oblique (CLO) views at different angles in visualizing and accurately predicting the position of the needle tip at the point of access in the posterior cervical and cervicothoracic epidural space. After the epidural space was accessed but before confirmation with contrast fluoroscopy, we prospectively obtained fluoroscopic images at eight different angles. Subsequent contrast injection confirmed epidural spread. Needle tip visualization and location of needle relative to bony landmarks were analyzed. The needle tip was clearly visualized in all CLO projections in all 24 subjects. CLO view at 50 degrees and at obliquity measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images provided the most consistent needle tip location. In these views, the epidural space was accessed at or just beyond the ventral laminar margin at the ventral interlaminar line or within the proximal half of the predefined CLO area in all patients. The needle tip was poorly visualized in the lateral view and the location of the needle tip was less well defined and independent of the needle location in the anteroposterior (AP) view. This study provides evidence that during cervical and cervicothoracic epidural access, the CLO view at 50 degrees and at MRI-measured obliquity is superior to the lateral view for the purpose of needle tip visualization and in providing a consistent landmark for accessing the epidural space. This article also introduces the concept of zones to describe needle position in the cervical and cervicothoracic spine in AP, lateral, and oblique views. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Hematome Extra Dural (HED) cervical post traumatique revelateur d ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mots clés: Hématome extra dural, traumatisme, trouble de l'hémostase, rachis cervical. English Title: Post traumatic cervical epidural hematoma revelating hemostasis disorder. Englsh Abstract. Extra dural hematoma or epidural post traumatic hematoma of the cervical rachis is a rare affection witch causes a severe spinal ...

  18. Epidural spinal cord stimulation for recovery from spinal cord injury: its place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques L

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Line Jacques, Michael Safaee Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA Abstract: This paper is a review of some of the current research focused on using existing epidural spinal cord stimulation technologies in establishing the effectiveness in the recovery of independent standing, ambulation, or intentional movement of spinal cord injury patients. From a clinician’s perspective, the results have been intriguing, from a restorative perspective they are promising, and from a patient’s perspective they are hopeful. The outcomes, although still in the experimental phase, show some proof of theory and support further research. From a high volume university based clinician’s perspective, the resources needed to integrate this type of restorative care into a busy clinical practice are highly challenging without a well-structured and resource rich institutional restorative program. Patient selection is profoundly critical due to the extraordinary resources needed, and the level of motivation required to participate in such an intense and arduous rehabilitation process. Establishing an algorithmic approach to patient selection and treatment will be paramount to effectively utilize scarce resources and optimize outcomes. Further research is warranted, and the development of dedicated technological hardware and software for this therapeutic treatment versus using traditional spinal cord stimulation devices may yield more robust and efficacious outcomes. Keywords: independent standing, ambulation, intentional movement, recovery, rehabilitation, locomotion

  19. Treat high cervical spinal arteriovenous malformation with Cyberknife radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of CyberKnife radiosurgery in the treatment of accidentally found cervical spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM. We present the case of a patient with cervical spinal AVM, who developed progressive neck pain, gait disturbance, urine and stool incontinence 2 weeks after the fell down accident. The patient underwent CyberKnife radiosurgery. After CyberKnife radiosurgery for 2 years, the patient′s neck pain diminished and was able to keep the walk without any assistance. The management of cervical spinal AVM varies. This patient demonstrated a successful treatment of cervical spinal AVM with CyberKnife radiosurgery.

  20. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cervical spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hsien Huang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH is an unpredictable and rare complication of spinal surgery. We report five cases of RCH following cervical spinal surgery, and summarize another seven similar cases from the literature. Dural opening with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF hypovolemia seems to be an important factor contributing to RCH following cervical spinal surgery. As other authors have proposed, surgical positioning may be another factor contributing to RCH. RCH is thought to be hemorrhagic venous infarction, resulting from the stretching occlusion of the superior cerebellar vein by the cerebellar sag effect. Either intraoperative CSF loss or a postoperative CSF leak from drainage may cause cerebellar sag, further resulting in RCH. RCH is usually self-limiting, and most patients with RCH have an optimal outcome after conservative treatment. Severe cases that involved surgical intervention because of evidence of brainstem compression or hydrocephalus also had acceptable outcomes, compared to spontaneous CH. It has been suggested that one way to prevent RCH is to avoid extensive perioperative loss of CSF, by paying attention to surgical positioning during spinal surgery. We also underline the importance of early diagnosis and CSF expansion in the early treatment of RCH.

  1. Non-traumatic acute epidural spinal hematomas diagnosed by magnetic resonance; Hematomas espinales epidurales agudos no traumaticos: diagnostico por resonancia magnetica

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    Rovira, A.; Grive, E.; Pedraza, S.; Capellades, J.; Nos, C.; Alarcon, M.; Rovira, A. [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron. Barcelona (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The non-traumatic spinal epidural hematoma (NTSEH) is a rare entity that can be the cause of an acute spinal compression syndrome. the objective of this review is to identify the characteristics by MRI and NTSEH and to analyze the factors that influence in its prognosis. In the years 1994 and 1999, 12 patients with NTSEH have been diagnosed in our hospital, and a MRI was performed during the acute phase. the characteristics of the lesions have been analyzed by MRI, with special emphasis on the topographic data and resonance signal and the factors that can influence in the clinical prognosis of the patients. Initially, all of the patients presented pain in the cervical dorsal or interscapular site, followed by a sensitive-motor deficit picture. The MRI showed a lesion of expansive character and posterior epidural location in every case that would produce varying degrees of compression on the spinal cord. The NTSEH should be considered as one of the causes of acute spinal cord compression. The clinical association of intense cervical, dorsal or interscapular pain followed by a sensomotor deficit picture should lead to the suspicion of this entity, that would require an immediate examination with MRI to verify its diagnosis. Both the clinical manifestations as well as the characteristics observed by MRI of the NTSEH have a prognostic value and determine the therapeutic decision. (Author) 34 refs.

  2. [Rare medico-surgical emergency: spinal epidural abscess (about 3 cases)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqui, Abderrazzak El; Aggouri, Mohamed; Benzagmout, Mohamed; Chakour, Khalid; Chaoui, Mohamed El Faiz

    2017-01-01

    The awareness about infections in the epidural space is increasing thanks to the development of neurosurgery, including MRI. Spinal epidural abscess is a rare pathology but extremely serious from a functional point of view and potentially life threatening. We report three cases of male patients (the first one aged 52 years, the second 57 years and the third 63 years) with diagnosed spinal epidural abscess. Two patients were admitted to the Neurosurgical Emergencies with slow progressive spinal cord compression evolving in the context of infection. The last patient complained of S1 sciatica pain in his right leg resistant to treatment associated with urinary incontinence. Entrance door of the infection wasn't identified during the initial assessment. All patients underwent spinal cord/radicular decompression surgery and evacuation of the epidural abscess via posterior approach. Bacteriological examination showed pyogenic germ justifying adequate prescription of antibiotic therapy in the three cases. The evolution was favorable in two cases. However one patient died three days after surgery due to severe sepsis.

  3. Cervical Epidural Anaesthesia for Radical Mastectomy and Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome of Upper Limb - A Case Report

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    Ashok Jadon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 47-yrs-female patient presented with carcinoma right breast, swelling and allodynia of right upper limb. radical mastectomy with axillary clearance and skin grafting was done under cervical epidural anaesthesia through 18G epidural catheter placed at C6/C7 level. Postoperative analgesia and rehabilitation of affected right upper limb was managed by continuous epidural infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine and 2.5 µg/ml -1 clonidine solution through epidu-ral catheter for 5 days and physiotherapy. This case report highlights the usefulness of cervical epidural analgesia in managing a complex situation of carcinoma breast with associated periarthitis of shoulder joint and chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS of right upper limb.

  4. Controversies in the differential diagnosis of Brown-Sequard syndrome due to cervical spinal disease from stroke: A case series

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    Vaner Koksal, M.D.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is generally considered to be the first preliminary diagnosis in patients presenting with acute hemiparesia in the emergency department. But rarely in unexpected spontaneous neurological pathologies that may lead to hemiparesis. The data from 8 non-traumatic patients who underwent surgical treatment for brown-sequard syndrome (BSS were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were initially misdiagnosed with strokes. Two of the patients had spinal canal stenosis, two had spinal epidural hematomas, one had an ossified herniated disc and three had soft herniated discs. None of the patients complained of significant pain at the initial presentation. All of the patients had a mild sensory deficit that was initially unrecognized. The pain of the patients began to become evident after hospitalization and, patients transferred to neurosurgery department. Cervical spinal pathologies compressing the corticospinal tract in one-half of the cervical spinal canal may present with only hemiparesis, without neck and radicular pain. If it's too late, permanent neurological damage may become inevitable while it is a correctable pathology. Keywords: Brown-Sequard syndrome, Cervical cord, Herniated disc, Spinal epidural hematoma, Stroke

  5. The Role of Functional Neuroanatomy of the Lumbar Spinal Cord in Effect of Epidural Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Carlos A; Mendez, Aldo A; Islam, Riazul; Calvert, Jonathan S; Grahn, Peter J; Knudsen, Bruce; Pham, Tuan; Lee, Kendall H; Lavrov, Igor A

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the neuroanatomy of the swine lumbar spinal cord, particularly the spatial orientation of dorsal roots was correlated to the anatomical landmarks of the lumbar spine and to the magnitude of motor evoked potentials during epidural electrical stimulation (EES). We found that the proximity of the stimulating electrode to the dorsal roots entry zone across spinal segments was a critical factor to evoke higher peak-to-peak motor responses. Positioning the electrode close to the dorsal roots produced a significantly higher impact on motor evoked responses than rostro-caudal shift of electrode from segment to segment. Based on anatomical measurements of the lumbar spine and spinal cord, significant differences were found between L1-L4 to L5-L6 segments in terms of spinal cord gross anatomy, dorsal roots and spine landmarks. Linear regression analysis between intersegmental landmarks was performed and L2 intervertebral spinous process length was selected as the anatomical reference in order to correlate vertebral landmarks and the spinal cord structures. These findings present for the first time, the influence of spinal cord anatomy on the effects of epidural stimulation and the role of specific orientation of electrodes on the dorsal surface of the dura mater in relation to the dorsal roots. These results are critical to consider as spinal cord neuromodulation strategies continue to evolve and novel spinal interfaces translate into clinical practice.

  6. The Role of Functional Neuroanatomy of the Lumbar Spinal Cord in Effect of Epidural Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Cuellar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the neuroanatomy of the swine lumbar spinal cord, particularly the spatial orientation of dorsal roots was correlated to the anatomical landmarks of the lumbar spine and to the magnitude of motor evoked potentials during epidural electrical stimulation (EES. We found that the proximity of the stimulating electrode to the dorsal roots entry zone across spinal segments was a critical factor to evoke higher peak-to-peak motor responses. Positioning the electrode close to the dorsal roots produced a significantly higher impact on motor evoked responses than rostro-caudal shift of electrode from segment to segment. Based on anatomical measurements of the lumbar spine and spinal cord, significant differences were found between L1-L4 to L5-L6 segments in terms of spinal cord gross anatomy, dorsal roots and spine landmarks. Linear regression analysis between intersegmental landmarks was performed and L2 intervertebral spinous process length was selected as the anatomical reference in order to correlate vertebral landmarks and the spinal cord structures. These findings present for the first time, the influence of spinal cord anatomy on the effects of epidural stimulation and the role of specific orientation of electrodes on the dorsal surface of the dura mater in relation to the dorsal roots. These results are critical to consider as spinal cord neuromodulation strategies continue to evolve and novel spinal interfaces translate into clinical practice.

  7. The Role of Functional Neuroanatomy of the Lumbar Spinal Cord in Effect of Epidural Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Carlos A.; Mendez, Aldo A.; Islam, Riazul; Calvert, Jonathan S.; Grahn, Peter J.; Knudsen, Bruce; Pham, Tuan; Lee, Kendall H.; Lavrov, Igor A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the neuroanatomy of the swine lumbar spinal cord, particularly the spatial orientation of dorsal roots was correlated to the anatomical landmarks of the lumbar spine and to the magnitude of motor evoked potentials during epidural electrical stimulation (EES). We found that the proximity of the stimulating electrode to the dorsal roots entry zone across spinal segments was a critical factor to evoke higher peak-to-peak motor responses. Positioning the electrode close to the dorsal roots produced a significantly higher impact on motor evoked responses than rostro-caudal shift of electrode from segment to segment. Based on anatomical measurements of the lumbar spine and spinal cord, significant differences were found between L1-L4 to L5-L6 segments in terms of spinal cord gross anatomy, dorsal roots and spine landmarks. Linear regression analysis between intersegmental landmarks was performed and L2 intervertebral spinous process length was selected as the anatomical reference in order to correlate vertebral landmarks and the spinal cord structures. These findings present for the first time, the influence of spinal cord anatomy on the effects of epidural stimulation and the role of specific orientation of electrodes on the dorsal surface of the dura mater in relation to the dorsal roots. These results are critical to consider as spinal cord neuromodulation strategies continue to evolve and novel spinal interfaces translate into clinical practice. PMID:29075183

  8. Chronic nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine: MRI diagnosis

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    Vazquez-Barquero, A.; Pinto, J.I. [Univ. Hospital ' ' Marques de Valdecilla' ' , Santander (Spain). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Abascal, F.; Garcia-Valtuille, R.; Cerezal, L. [Hospital Mompia, Cantabria, (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Figols, F.J. [Univ. Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, Santander (Spain). Dept. of Pathology

    2000-10-01

    An uncommon case of chronic nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine in a 75-year-old woman is reported. The patient presented with a 7-month history of low back pain and bilateral sciatica. Magnetic resonance imaging enabled a correct preoperative diagnosis revealing a nodular, well-circumscribed epidural mass with peripheral enhancement and signal intensities consistent with chronic hematoma, which extended from L2 to L3. Laminectomy of L2-L3 was performed and the hematoma was totally resected. Histological examination of the surgical specimen demonstrated a chronic encapsulated hematoma. No evidence of vascular malformation was found. The patient recovered fully after surgical treatment. (orig.)

  9. Epidural Injections for Lumbar Radiculopathy and Spinal Stenosis: A Comparative Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick; Boswell, Mark V; Kaye, Alan D; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of chronic low back pain and related disability is rapidly increasing as are the myriad treatments, including epidural injections. Even though epidural injections are one of the most commonly performed procedures in managing low back and lower extremity pain, starting in 1901 with local anesthetic alone, conflicting recommendations have been provided, despite the extensive literature. Recently Chou et al performed a technology assessment review for Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) part of which was published in Annals of Internal Medicine showing lack of effectiveness of epidural steroid injections in managing lumbar radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. In contrast, multiple other publications have supported the efficacy and use of epidural injections. To assess the efficacy of 3 categories of epidural injections for lumbar and spinal stenosis: performed with saline with steroids, local anesthetic alone, or steroids with local anesthetic and separate facts from opinions. PubMed, Cochrane Library, US National Guideline Clearinghouse, prior systematic reviews, and reference lists. The literature search was performed through August 2015. Randomized trials, either placebo or active control, of epidural injections for lumbar radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. Data extraction and methodological quality assessment were performed utilizing Cochrane review methodologic quality assessment and Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment (IPM-QRB). Evidence was summarized utilizing principles of best evidence synthesis. Thirty-nine randomized controlled trials met inclusion criteria. There were 9 placebo-controlled trials evaluating epidural corticosteroid injections, either with sodium chloride solution or bupivacaine, compared to placebo injections. There were 12 studies comparing local anesthetic alone to local anesthetic with steroid. A meta-analysis of 5 studies utilizing sodium

  10. Efficacy of epidural administration of anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody onto spinal nerve for treatment of sciatica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ohtori, Seiji; Miyagi, Masayuki; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Nakamura, Junichi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Arai, Gen; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Takaso, Masashi; Furuya, Takeo; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    ... clarified. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of the anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody, tocilizumab, on radicular pain by its epidural administration onto spinal nerves in patients...

  11. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing’s Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Mark Bustoros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Extraosseous Ewing’s sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing’s sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing’s sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing’s sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes.

  12. [Locomotion induced by epidural stimulation in decerebrate cat after spinal cord injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musienko, P E; Pavlova, N V; Selionov, V A; Gerasimenko, Iu P

    2009-01-01

    The effect of partial and complete spinal cord injury (Th7-Th8) on locomotor activity evoked by epidural electrical stimulation (L5 segment, stimulation frequency 5 Hz, current strength 80-100 microA) in decerebrate cats has been investigated. It was established that the cutting of dorsal columns did not influence substantially the locomotion. The destruction of the ventral spinal quadrant resulted in the deterioration and instability of the locomotor rhythm. The injury of lateral or medial descending motor systems led to a redistribution of the tone in antagonist muscles. It was found that locomotion can be evoked by epidural stimulation within 20 h after the complete transaction of the spinal cord. The restoration of polysynaptic components in EMG responses correlated with the restoration of the stepping function. The data obtained confirm that the initiation of locomotion under epidural stimulation is caused by direct action on intraspinal systems responsible for locomotion regulation. In the case of intact or partially injured spinal cord, this effect is under the influence of supraspinal motor systems correcting and stabilizing the evoked locomotor pattern.

  13. Does Pain Reduction with Oral Steroids Predict Pain Reduction after a First-Time Cervical Epidural Steroid Injection in Patients with Cervical Radicular Pain? A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovo, Dana G; Craig, Wendy Y; Curry, Craig S; Richard, Janelle M; Pisini, James V

    2017-10-01

    Oral and injected steroids are used commonly in the treatment of cervical radicular pain despite a paucity of data demonstrating their efficacy. The purpose of this study is to assess whether the response to orally administered steroids among patients with acute cervical radicular pain who develop recurrent pain is associated with their subsequent response to cervical epidural steroid injections. Patients referred to our center were evaluated and then referred for cervical epidural steroid injections at the clinical discretion of the provider; those who met inclusion criteria were offered participation in the study. After the injection was administered, patients were contacted by telephone and asked to complete the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form at one week, one month, three months, and six months postinjection. Pain reduction after cervical steroid injection was not significantly different between 49 patients who reported pain reduction with a prior course of oral steroids and 22 patients who reported no pain reduction. Average pain scores decreased over six months (P steroid injection for cervical radicular pain. Of the 55 who provided baseline and six-month data, 14 (25.5%) reported complete relief at six months and 20 (36.4%) reported decreased pain. Patients can be reassured that they may experience pain reduction after a cervical epidural steroid injection even if oral steroid therapy was not effective. The majority of patients treated for cervical radicular pain with epidural steroid injection have reduced or absent pain for at least six months after treatment.

  14. Increased intraoperative epidural pressure in lumbar spinal stenosis patients with a positive nerve root sedimentation sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Thomas; Melloh, Markus; Staub, Lukas P; Lord, Sarah J; Lange, Jörn; Merk, Harry R

    2014-05-01

    The sedimentation sign (SedSign) has been shown to discriminate well between selected patients with and without lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The purpose of this study was to compare the pressure values associated with LSS versus non-LSS and discuss whether a positive SedSign may be related to increased epidural pressure at the level of the stenosis. We measured the intraoperative epidural pressure in five patients without LSS and a negative SedSign, and in five patients with LSS and a positive SedSign using a Codman(™) catheter in prone position under radioscopy. Patients with a negative SedSign had a median epidural pressure of 9 mmHg independent of the measurement location. Breath and pulse-synchronous waves accounted for 1-3 mmHg. In patients with monosegmental LSS and a positive SedSign, the epidural pressure above and below the stenosis was similar (median 8-9 mmHg). At the level of the stenosis the median epidural pressure was 22 mmHg. A breath and pulse-synchronous wave was present cranial to the stenosis, but absent below. These findings were independent of the cross-sectional area of the spinal canal at the level of the stenosis. Patients with LSS have an increased epidural pressure at the level of the stenosis and altered pressure wave characteristics below. We argue that the absence of sedimentation of lumbar nerve roots to the dorsal part of the dural sac in supine position may be due to tethering of affected nerve roots at the level of the stenosis.

  15. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in the evaluation of epidural spinal lesions

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    Plank, Christina; Mueller-Mang, Christina [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Koller, Anke [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Bammer, Roland [Stanford University, Lucas MRI/S Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford (United States); Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Neuroradiology Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-12-15

    Epidural spinal cord compression is one of the most critical emergency conditions requiring medical attention and requires prompt and adequate treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis and differentiation of epidural spinal lesions. Three patients with epidural lymphoma, two with sarcoma and three with epidural metastatic disease were imaged on a 1.5T MRI unit. DWI was performed using navigated, interleaved, multi-shot echo planar imaging (IEPI). Three region of interest (ROI)-measurements were obtained on corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and the mean ADC value was used for further analysis. The cellularity of tumors was determined as the N/C ratio (nucleus/cytoplasma ratio) from histological samples. The ADC values and N/C ratios of lesions were compared using a Kruskal-Wallis test. The mean ADC of the lymphomas was 0.66 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, that of the sarcomas was 0.85 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s and the ADC of the metastatic lesions was 1.05 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; however, the differences were not statistically significant. Mean N/C ratios in the lymphoma, sarcomas and metastases were 4:1, 2:1, and 2.6:1, respectively, with a statistically significant difference between the groups (p < 0.025). Although not statistically significant due to the small patient sample, our results clearly show a tendency toward decreased diffusivity in neoplastic lesions with higher cellularity. The data from our study suggest that DWI is a feasible and potentially useful technique for the evaluation of epidural lesions that cause spinal cord compression on a per-patient basis. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of low doses of intrathecal bupivacaine in combined spinal epidural anaesthesia with epidural volume extension for caesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Gaurav; Singh, Dinesh K; Bansal, Pranav; Ahmed, Bashir; Dhama, Satyavir S

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to compare relative efficacy of three different doses of intrathecal bupivacaine in combined spinal epidural anaesthesia (CSEA) for caesarean delivery. In a double blinded manner, 204 cases were randomized into three groups: I, II, and III to receive a dose of 4, 5.5, and 7 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine with a fixed dose of 25 μg fentanyl intrathecally, and Dextran 40 w/v 10 mL given for epidural volume extension (EVE), in CSEA. Our primary outcome was the number of effective doses. The block characteristics and side effects were also monitored. Out of 198 patients completing the study, 53, 63, and 65 in group I, II and III had effective doses. Mean Pi (probability of an effective dose) in group I, II, and III, was 0.81, 0.95, and 0.97, respectively. The Pb (superiority of one group over the other) of group II and III was higher than group I. The maximal sensory block height in group II and III (T2) was higher than group I (T3), with a shorter time required to achieve the same. Group I and II exhibited lesser motor blockade, lesser hypotension with early recovery as compared to group III. No significant adverse effects were observed between the groups. The intermediate dose of bupivacaine (5.5 mg) provided safe and effective anaesthesia for caesarean delivery with an additional advantage of lesser episodes of hypotension and partial motor blockade in CSEA.

  17. Formation of locomotor patterns in decerebrate cats in conditions of epidural stimulation of the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimenko, Yu P; Lavrov, I A; Bogacheva, I N; Shcherbakova, N A; Kucher, V I; Musienko, P E

    2005-03-01

    Acute experiments on decerebrate cats were performed to study the mechanism of formation of the locomotor pattern in conditions of epidural stimulation of the spinal cord. These studies showed that only segments L3-L5 contributed to generating the stepping pattern in the hindlimbs. At the optimum frequency (5-10 Hz) of stimulation of these segments, formation of electromyographic burst activity in the flexor muscles was mainly due to polysynaptic reflex responses with latencies of 80-110 msec. In the extensor muscles, this process involved the interaction of a monosynaptic reflex and polysynaptic activity. In epidural stimulation, the stepping pattern was specified by spinal structures, while peripheral feedback had modulatory influences.

  18. Continuous spinal anesthesia versus combined spinal epidural block for major orthopedic surgery: prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: In major orthopedic surgery of the lower limbs, continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA and combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSE are safe and reliable anesthesia methods. In this prospective randomized clinical study, the blockading properties and side effects of CSA were compared with single interspace CSE, among patients scheduled for major hip or knee surgery. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective clinical study conducted at the Institute for Regional Anesthesia, Hospital de Base, São José do Rio Preto. METHODS: 240 patients scheduled for hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty or femoral fracture treatment were randomly assigned to receive either CSA or CSE. Blockades were performed in the lateral position at the L3-L4 interspace. Puncture success, technical difficulties, paresthesia, highest level of sensory and motor blockade, need for complementary doses of local anesthetic, degree of technical difficulties, cardiocirculatory changes and postdural puncture headache (PDPH were recorded. At the end of the surgery, the catheter was removed and cerebrospinal fluid leakage was evaluated. RESULTS: Seven patients were excluded (three CSA and four CSE. There was significantly lower incidence of paresthesia in the CSE group. The resultant sensory blockade level was significantly higher with CSE. Complete motor blockade occurred in 110 CSA patients and in 109 CSE patients. Arterial hypotension was observed significantly more often in the CSE group. PDPH was observed in two patients of each group. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that both CSA and CSE provided good surgical conditions with low incidence of complications. The sensory blockade level and hemodynamic changes were lower with CSA.

  19. The Relationship Between Cervical Degeneration and Global Spinal Alignment in Patients With Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Takahito; Le, Hai; Schairer, William; Inoue, Shinichi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Oda, Takenori; Hu, Serena S

    2017-05-01

    To examine the relationship between cervical degeneration and spinal alignment by comparing patients with adult spinal deformity versus the control cohort. The effect of degeneration on cervical alignment has been controversial. Cervical and full-length spine radiographs of 57 patients with adult spinal deformity and 78 patients in the control group were reviewed. Adult spinal deformity was classified into 3 types based on the primary characteristics of the deformity: "Degenerative flatback" group, "Positive sagittal imbalance" group, and "Hyperthoracic kyphosis" group. Cervical degeneration was assessed using the cervical degeneration index scoring system. The "Degenerative flatback" group had significantly higher total cervical degeneration index score (25±7) than the control group (16±8), the "Positive sagittal imbalance" group (18±8), and the "Hyperthoracic kyphosis" group (12±7) (P<0.01). The "Degenerative flatback" group had significantly less cervical lordosis than the other groups. This reduced amount of cervical lordosis was thought to be induced by a compensatory decrease in thoracic kyphosis. In this group, increased cervical degeneration was significantly associated with a decrease in cervical lordosis. Significantly greater compensatory increase in cervical lordosis was noted in the "Positive sagittal imbalance" group (20±15 degrees) and the "Hyperthoracic kyphosis" group (26±9 degrees) compared with the control group (11±12 degrees) (P<0.02). Flat cervical spine coexisted with cervical degeneration when compensatory hypothoracic kyphosis was induced by degenerative flatback. In other situations, cervical lordosis could increase as a compensatory reaction against sagittal imbalance or hyperthoracic kyphosis.

  20. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic appendectomy in adults: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh S Mane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopy is one of the most common surgical procedures and is the procedure of choice for most of the elective abdominal surgeries performed preferably under endotracheal general anesthesia. Technical advances in the field of laparoscopy have helped to reduce surgical trauma and discomfort, reduce anesthetic requirement resulting in shortened hospital stay. Recently, regional anaesthetic techniques have been found beneficial, especially in patients at a high risk to receive general anesthesia. Herewith we present a case series of laparoscopic appendectomy in eight American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA I and II patients performed under spinal-epidural anaesthesia. Methods: Eight ASA Grade I and II adult patients undergoing elective Laparoscopic appendectomy received Combined Spinal Epidural Anaesthesia. Spinal Anaesthesia was performed at L 2 -L 3 interspace using 2 ml of 0.5% (10 mg hyperbaric Bupivacaine mixed with 0.5ml (25 micrograms of Fentanyl. Epidural catheter was inserted at T 10 -T 11 interspace for inadequate spinal anaesthesia and postoperative pain relief. Perioperative events and operative difficulty were studied. Systemic drugs were administered if patients complained of shoulder pain, abdominal discomfort, nausea or hypotension. Results: Spinal anaesthesia was adequate for surgery with no operative difficulty in all the patients. Intraoperatively, two patients experienced right shoulder pain and received Fentanyl, one patient was given Midazolam for anxiety and two were given Ephedrine for hypotension. The postoperative period was uneventful. Conclusion: Spinal anaesthesia with Hyperbaric Bupivacaine and Fentanyl is adequate and safe for elective laparoscopic appendectomy in healthy patients but careful evaluation of the method is needed particularly in compromised cardio respiratory conditions.

  1. Kambin's Triangle Approach of Lumbar Transforaminal Epidural Injection with Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Woong; Nam, Hee Seung; Cho, Soo Kyoung; Jung, Hee Jin; Lee, Byeong Ju; Park, Yongbum

    2011-12-01

    To compare the short-term effect and advantage of transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) performed using the Kambin's triangle and subpedicular approaches. Forty-two patients with radicular pain from lumbar spinal stenosis were enrolled. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups. All procedures were performed using C-arm KMC 950. The frequency of complications during the procedure and the effect of TFESI at 2 and 4 weeks after the procedure between the two groups were compared. Short-term outcomes were measured using a visual numeric scale (VNS) and a five-grade scale. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between possible outcome predictors (Kambin's triangle or subpedicular approach, age, duration of symptoms and sex) and the therapeutic effect. VNS was improved 2 weeks after the injection and continued to improve until 4 weeks in both groups. There were no statistical differences in changes of VNS, effectiveness and contrast spread pattern between these two groups. No correlation was found between the other variables tested and therapeutic effect. Spinal nerve pricking occurred in five cases of the subpedicular and in none of the cases of the Kambin's triangle approach (ptriangle approach is as efficacious as the subpedicular approach for short-term effect and offers considerable advantages (i.e., less spinal nerve pricking during procedure). The Kambin's triangle approach maybe an alternative method for transforaminal epidural steroid injection in cases where needle tip positioning in the anterior epidural space is difficult.

  2. Assessing the Agreement Between Radiologic and Clinical Measurements of Lumbar and Cervical Epidural Depths in Patients Undergoing Prone Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James Harvey; Singh, Naileshni; Nidecker, Anna; Li, Chin-Shang; Fishman, Scott

    2017-05-01

    Fluoroscopy-guided epidural steroid injection (ESI) commonly is performed to treat radicular pain yet can lead to adverse events if the needle is not advanced with precision. Accurate preoperative assessment of the distance from the skin to the epidural space holds the potential for reducing the risks of adverse effects from ESI. It was hypothesized that the distance from the skin to the epidural space as measured on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) would agree with the distance traveled by a Tuohy needle to reach the epidural space during midline, interlaminar ESI. This study compared the final needle depth measurement at the point of loss of resistance (LOR) from cervical or lumbar ESI to the distance from the skin to the anterior and posterior borders of the epidural space on the associated cervical and lumbar preoperative MRI. This retrospective chart review analyzed the procedure notes, MRI, and demographic data of patients who received a prone, interlaminar ESI at an outpatient chronic pain clinic between June 1, 2013, and June 1, 2015. The following data were collected: body mass index (BMI), age, sex, intervertebral level of the ESI, and LOR depth. We then measured the distance from the skin surface to the anterior border of the ligamentum flavum (ligamentum flavum depth [LFD]) and dura (dura depth [DD]) on MRI. A total of 335 patients were categorized into the following patient subgroups: age ≥65 years, age measurements were 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85-0.91) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.64-0.79), respectively. Estimated ICC values for the agreement between LOR depth and DD for all lumbar and cervical measurements were 0.86 (95% CI, 0.82-0.89) and 0.69 (95% CI, 0.60-0.77), respectively. This study assessed the agreement between MRI-derived measurements of epidural depth and those determined clinically. MRI-derived measurements from the skin to the anterior border of the ligamentum flavum, which represents the most posterior aspect of the

  3. Dorsal Cervical Spinal Cord Herniation Precipitated by Kyphosis Deformity Correction for Spinal Cord Tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Robert S; Hwang, Steven W; Riesenburger, Ron I

    2017-04-01

    Cervical spinal cord herniation is a rare clinical entity. Reported after previous intradural surgery or surgery complicated by durotomy, patients return several months to years later with symptoms of worsening myelopathy. Herein is presented a case of a 51-year-old female patient with spinal cord herniation in the cervical spine after kyphosis deformity correction. A 51-year old female patient presented to the neurosurgery clinic with worsening cervical myelopathy due to cervical spinal cord tethering and adhesions from previous intradural surgery for Chiari malformation. Conservative treatment initially was recommended but ultimately unsuccessful, as her neurologic function continued to deteriorate. Follow-up imaging demonstrated progressive cervical kyphotic deformity with stability of the tethered spinal cord. The patient underwent cervical deformity correction to reduce tension on the spinal cord, after which her neurologic symptoms stabilized and began to improve with physical therapy. Four months after surgery, she returned to clinic with recurrence of cervical myelopathy. Repeat imaging demonstrated herniation of the cervical spinal cord through a dorsal defect, and the patient was treated successfully with a wide cervical duraplasty to recreate an intact thecal sac. The inability of the spinal cord to compensate for changes in spinal alignment in cases of tethering makes it susceptible to increased pressure and tension at the point of tethering. Caution is urged when attempting deformity correction in the presence of spinal cord tethering, which may limit the capacity of the spinal cord and surrounding tissue to compensate for alterations in spinal alignment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cervical spinal intradural arachnoid cysts in related, young pugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohdin, C; Nyman, H T; Wohlsein, P; Hultin Jäderlund, K

    2014-04-01

    Seven related young pugs were diagnosed with cervical spinal intradural arachnoid cysts by magnetic resonance imaging (n = 6) and myelography (n = 1). All dogs were presented with skin abrasions on their thoracic limbs and non-painful neurological deficits, indicating a C1-T2 myelopathy. In all six dogs examined by magnetic resonance imaging not only the spinal arachnoid cyst but also a concomitant, most likely secondary, syringohydromyelia was confirmed. Pedigree analysis suggested a genetic predisposition for spinal arachnoid cysts in this family of pugs. Generalised proprioceptive deficits more pronounced in the thoracic limbs suggesting a focal cervical spinal cord lesion, with concomitant skin abrasions on the dorsal aspect of the thoracic limbs in a young pug, should alert veterinarians to the possibility of cervical spinal arachnoid cysts. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  5. A rat model of chronic syringomyelia induced by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Shin Won; Kim, Saet Pyoul; Kim, Hyeonjin; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Paek, Sun Ha; Pang, Dachling; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There has been no established animal model of syringomyelia associated with lumbosacral spinal lipoma. The research on the pathophysiology of syringomyelia has been focused on Chiari malformation, trauma, and inflammation. To understand the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with occult spinal dysraphism, a novel animal model of syringomyelia induced by chronic mechanical compression of the lumbar spinal cord was created. METHODS The model was made by epidural injection of highly concentrated paste-like kaolin solution through windows created by partial laminectomy of L-1 and L-5 vertebrae. Behavioral outcome in terms of motor (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score) and urinary function was assessed serially for 12 weeks. Magnetic resonance images were obtained in some animals to confirm the formation of a syrinx and to monitor changes in its size. Immunohistochemical studies, including analysis for glial fibrillary acidic protein, NeuN, CC1, ED-1, and caspase-3, were done. RESULTS By 12 weeks after the epidural compression procedure, syringomyelia formation was confirmed in 85% of the rats (34 of 40) on histology and/or MRI. The syrinx cavities were found rostral to the epidural compression. Motor deficit of varying degrees was seen immediately after the procedure in 28% of the rats (11 of 40). In 13 rats (33%), lower urinary tract dysfunction was seen. Motor deficit improved by 5 weeks after the procedure, whereas urinary dysfunction mostly improved by 2 weeks. Five rats (13%, 5 of 40) died 1 month postoperatively or later, and 3 of the 5 had developed urinary tract infection. At 12 weeks after the operation, IHC showed no inflammatory process, demyelination, or accelerated apoptosis in the spinal cords surrounding the syrinx cavities, similar to sham-operated animals. CONCLUSIONS A novel experimental model for syringomyelia by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord has been created. The authors hope that it will serve as an important research

  6. Cervical myelopathy from traditional bonesetters' treatment of spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Approximately 55% of the entire rotation of the cervical spine takes place at this joint2. This joint is kept stable only by its capsule and ligaments, hence the possibility of dislocation. Any injury in this region is associated with potentially catastrophic neurological complications. We report a case of severe upper cervical spinal ...

  7. Epidural anaesthesia in a child with possible spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, A; Molenbuur, B; Richardson, FJ

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rare lower motor neurone disease in which anaesthetic management is often difficult as a result of muscle weakness and hypersensitivity to neuromuscular blocking agents. Neuraxial anaesthesia is controversial in these patients; however, some cases have been

  8. Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia for an elective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    old parturient with achondroplasia who presented for an elective Caesarean section. A low-dose spinal block, using 5 mg 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine with 10 μg fentanyl, was inadequate (sensory loss up to T10). Sensory loss was extended ...

  9. Acute transient spinal paralysis and cardiac symptoms following an accidental epidural potassium infusion – a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kreutzträger, Martin; Kopp, Marcel A; Liebscher, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background To describe a case of an accidental epidural potassium infusion leading to an acute transient spinal paralysis and cardiac symptoms and review the literature on that topic. Case presentation We report the case of an accidental infusion of 900 mg potassium chloride 7.45% (KCl) into the epidural space, which occurred during epidural analgesia in a 74-year-old patient suffering from immobilization due to lumbar back pain as well as from a paralytic Ileus. The event was resulting in ve...

  10. [Paraplegia associated with intramedullary spinal cord and epidural abcesses, meningitis and spondylodiscitis (Staphylococcus aureus)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroir, J-P; Lescure, F-X; Giannesini, C; Elghozi, D; Marro, B

    2012-11-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rare, frequently associated with meningitis, sometimes with epidural abscesses. They are frequently responsible for paraplegia. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant organism. MRI shows an intramedullary collection giving a low-intensity signal on T1-weighted images with peripheral contrast uptake on enhanced TI-weighted studies and a high-intensity signal on T2-weighted images with generally extended adjacent medullary edema. They may be multiple. We report the case of a man who presented meningitis with intramedullary and epidural abscesses. The number of the lesions did not allow chirurgical drainage. The paraplegia did not resolve despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. Appropriate antibiotic therapy and early surgical drainage, if feasible, are key factors for better outcome and prognosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. CASE REPORT Endovascular embolisation of a cervical spinal AVF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imaging findings. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a right-sided occipital plexiform neurofibroma in keeping with NF1 (Fig. 1). MRI of the cervical spine demonstrated a large signal void in keeping with an extradural spinal AVF. There was a significant intra-spinal component causing a compressive ...

  12. Adhesive arachnoiditis with extensive syringomyelia and giant arachnoid cyst after spinal and epidural anesthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Takashi; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kawabata, Shigenori; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Tomizawa, Shoji; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Sakaki, Kyohei; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Okawa, Atsushi

    2012-02-01

    A case report of a patient with adhesive arachnoiditis after combined spinal and epidural anesthesia. To report an extremely rare case of paraplegia due to adhesive arachnoiditis with extensive syringomyelia (ES) and a giant anterior arachnoid spinal cyst (AASC) after spinal and epidural anesthesia for obstetric surgery. Progressive inflammation of the arachnoid mater due to trauma, infection, or hydrocortisone was reported as early as the 1970s. However, coexistence of ES and a giant AASC after spinal and epidural anesthesia is extremely rare. A 29-year-old woman suffered from sudden anuresis 5 months after spinal and epidural anesthesia for a cesarean section and subsequently experienced paraplegia and numbness below the chest. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an AASC compressing the spinal cord at T1-T6 and an adhesive lesion at T7. Posterior laminectomy at T6-T7 and adhesiolysis for arachnoid adhesion at T7 were performed. Although there was slight recovery of locomotive function postoperatively, it gradually worsened until 3 years after surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging at that time demonstrated a giant AASC and ES at the lower-thoracic cord. The cord compressed by the AASC became thinner sagittally. Secondary surgery involving posterior laminectomy at T5-T6 and insertion of a cyst-peritoneal shunt into the AASC was performed. The patient could walk without a cane 3 years after the shunt operation, although numbness and motor weakness of the lower extremities remained. Magnetic resonance imaging 3 years after the shunt operation showed a reduction of the AASC and decompression of the cord despite no improvement in ES. This is the first report of a patient with a giant AASC and ES caused by spinal and epidural anesthesia. Although the optimal surgical treatment for these conditions remains unclear, shunting of the cyst effectively prevented the progression of symptoms.

  13. A case of spinal epidural venous malformation with mediastinal extension: management with combined surgery and percutaneous sclerotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Yilmaz, Sabri; Grunwaldt, Lorelei; Hamilton, Ronald L; Salvetti, David J; Greene, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    While spinal epidural arteriovenous malformations, fistulas, and shunts are well reported, the presence of a venous malformation in the spinal epidural space is a rare phenomenon. Herein, the authors report the clinical presentation, imaging findings, pathological features, and the outcome of surgical and percutaneous interventional management of a mediastinal and spinal epidural venous malformation in a young woman who presented clinically with neurogenic claudication from presumed venous hypertension precipitating the formation of a syrinx. The patient underwent a C6-T5 osteoplastic laminectomy for decompression of the spinal canal and subtotal resection of the epidural venous malformation, followed by percutaneous sclerotherapy of the mediastinal and residual anterior spinal venous malformation. She developed transient loss of dorsal column sensation, which returned to baseline within 3 weeks of the surgery. A 6-month postoperative MRI study revealed complete resolution of the syrinx and the mediastinal venous malformation. Twelve months after the surgery, the patient has had resolution of all neurological symptoms with the exception of her premorbid migraine headaches. A multidisciplinary approach with partial resection and the use of percutaneous sclerotherapy for the residual malformation can be used to successfully treat a complex venous malformation.

  14. Comparison of Spinal Block Levels between Laboring and Nonlaboring Parturients Using Combined Spinal Epidural Technique with Intrathecal Plain Bupivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ying Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It was suggested that labor may influence the spread of intrathecal bupivacaine using combined spinal epidural (CSE technique. However, no previous studies investigated this proposition. We designed this study to investigate the spinal block characteristics of plain bupivacaine between nonlaboring and laboring parturients using CSE technique. Methods. Twenty-five nonlaboring (Group NL and twenty-five laboring parturients (Group L undergoing cesarean delivery were enrolled. Following identification of the epidural space at the L3-4 interspace, plain bupivacaine 10 mg was administered intrathecally using CSE technique. The level of sensory block, degree of motor block, and hemodynamic changes were assessed. Results. The baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP and the maximal decrease of SBP in Group L were significantly higher than those in Group NL (=0.002 and =0.03, resp.. The median sensory level tested by cold stimulation was T6 for Group NL and T5 for Group L (=0.46. The median sensory level tested by pinprick was T7 for both groups (=0.35. The degree of motor block was comparable between the two groups (=0.85. Conclusion. We did not detect significant differences in the sensory block levels between laboring and nonlaboring parturients using CSE technique with intrathecal plain bupivacaine.

  15. Screw driver: an unusual cause of cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Taopheeq Bamidele; Aremu, Abayomi Adeniran; Amao, Olusegun Adetunji; Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa

    2011-01-01

    Non-missile penetrating spinal injuries are rare. Screw driver injury, more especially to the cervical spine, represents an even rarer subset. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case from West Africa of cervical spinal cord injury from a screw driver. A middle-aged man was stabbed from the back with a screw driver. He presented with right-sided C4 Brown-Sequard syndrome with the impaling object in situ. Cervical spine x-rays showed the screw driver to have gone into the spine between the spinous processes of C4 and C5, traversing the spinal canal and lodged in the anterior part of the C4/5 intervertebral disc space. C4 and C5 laminectomies were performed and the screw driver removed under vision. The object was found to have traversed the right side of the cervical spinal cord. The dural tear was repaired. He had some neurologic improvement initially, but later declined. He died from severe pulmonary complications 2 weeks postinjury. Screw driver represents an unusual cause of non-missile penetrating cervical spinal injury. Its neurological effects and complications of the cord injury lead to significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:22679187

  16. Effects of Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Epidural Stimulation for Standing after Chronic Complete Paralysis in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejc, Enrico; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Sensory and motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI) has been considered functionally complete resulting in permanent paralysis with no recovery of voluntary movement, standing or walking. Previous findings demonstrated that lumbosacral spinal cord epidural stimulation can activate the spinal neural networks in one individual with motor complete, but sensory incomplete SCI, who achieved full body weight-bearing standing with independent knee extension, minimal self-assistance for balance and minimal external assistance for facilitating hip extension. In this study, we showed that two clinically sensory and motor complete participants were able to stand over-ground bearing full body-weight without any external assistance, using their hands to assist balance. The two clinically motor complete, but sensory incomplete participants also used minimal external assistance for hip extension. Standing with the least amount of assistance was achieved with individual-specific stimulation parameters, which promoted overall continuous EMG patterns in the lower limbs’ muscles. Stimulation parameters optimized for one individual resulted in poor standing and additional need of external assistance for hip and knee extension in the other participants. During sitting, little or negligible EMG activity of lower limb muscles was induced by epidural stimulation, showing that the weight-bearing related sensory information was needed to generate sufficient EMG patterns to effectively support full weight-bearing standing. In general, electrode configurations with cathodes selected in the caudal region of the array at relatively higher frequencies (25–60 Hz) resulted in the more effective EMG patterns for standing. These results show that human spinal circuitry can generate motor patterns effective for standing in the absence of functional supraspinal connections; however the appropriate selection of stimulation parameters is critical. PMID:26207623

  17. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Due To Tyre-Blast Injury: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyaci, Mehmet G; Aslan, Adem; Tünay, Kamil; Karademir, Mustafa; Aydoğmuş, Arda

    2017-01-15

    A retrospective case report. The objective of this article is to report a spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) due to shock wave. SEH is an infrequent condition. Most of SEH's are spontaneous. We have reported an SEH traumatic case without bone lesions due to exploding truck tire. A different category of blast injuries is the one related with exploding tyres. Shock waves are the main mechanism that is responsible for blast injuries. We are presenting the first report of acute SEH due to shock wave. A 33-year-old man was brought to the emergency department with complaints of weakness and numbness of the upper extremities. There was an epidural high-signal density without osseous lesion in computerized tomography from the level of C2 to C5, and there was a T2-weighted hyperintense lesion in magnetic resonance imaging from the level of C2 to C5 with compression of the spinal cord the anterior and posterior which proved to be an SEH. The patient was discharged from the hospital with complete neurologic recovery. SEH should be considered possible in the blast injury. SEH condition carries a significant risk of morbidity and mortality without early recognition and rapid management. 5.

  18. Motor cortex and spinal cord neuromodulation promote corticospinal tract axonal outgrowth and motor recovery after cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareen, N; Shinozaki, M; Ryan, D; Alexander, H; Amer, A; Truong, D Q; Khadka, N; Sarkar, A; Naeem, S; Bikson, M; Martin, J H

    2017-11-01

    Cervical injuries are the most common form of SCI. In this study, we used a neuromodulatory approach to promote skilled movement recovery and repair of the corticospinal tract (CST) after a moderately severe C4 midline contusion in adult rats. We used bilateral epidural intermittent theta burst (iTBS) electrical stimulation of motor cortex to promote CST axonal sprouting and cathodal trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) to enhance spinal cord activation to motor cortex stimulation after injury. We used Finite Element Method (FEM) modeling to direct tsDCS to the cervical enlargement. Combined iTBS-tsDCS was delivered for 30min daily for 10days. We compared the effect of stimulation on performance in the horizontal ladder and the Irvine Beattie and Bresnahan forepaw manipulation tasks and CST axonal sprouting in injury-only and injury+stimulation animals. The contusion eliminated the dorsal CST in all animals. tsDCS significantly enhanced motor cortex evoked responses after C4 injury. Using this combined spinal-M1 neuromodulatory approach, we found significant recovery of skilled locomotion and forepaw manipulation skills compared with injury-only controls. The spared CST axons caudal to the lesion in both animal groups derived mostly from lateral CST axons that populated the contralateral intermediate zone. Stimulation enhanced injury-dependent CST axonal outgrowth below and above the level of the injury. This dual neuromodulatory approach produced partial recovery of skilled motor behaviors that normally require integration of posture, upper limb sensory information, and intent for performance. We propose that the motor systems use these new CST projections to control movements better after injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Common neural structures activated by epidural and transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation: Elicitation of posterior root-muscle reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Minassian, Karen

    2018-01-01

    Epidural electrical stimulation of the lumbar spinal cord is currently regaining momentum as a neuromodulation intervention in spinal cord injury (SCI) to modify dysregulated sensorimotor functions and augment residual motor capacity. There is ample evidence that it engages spinal circuits through the electrical stimulation of large-to-medium diameter afferent fibers within lumbar and upper sacral posterior roots. Recent pilot studies suggested that the surface electrode-based method of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may produce similar neuromodulatory effects as caused by epidural SCS. Neurophysiological and computer modeling studies proposed that this noninvasive technique stimulates posterior-root fibers as well, likely activating similar input structures to the spinal cord as epidural stimulation. Here, we add a yet missing piece of evidence substantiating this assumption. We conducted in-depth analyses and direct comparisons of the electromyographic (EMG) characteristics of short-latency responses in multiple leg muscles to both stimulation techniques derived from ten individuals with SCI each. Post-activation depression of responses evoked by paired pulses applied either epidurally or transcutaneously confirmed the reflex nature of the responses. The muscle responses to both techniques had the same latencies, EMG peak-to-peak amplitudes, and waveforms, except for smaller responses with shorter onset latencies in the triceps surae muscle group and shorter offsets of the responses in the biceps femoris muscle during epidural stimulation. Responses obtained in three subjects tested with both methods at different time points had near-identical waveforms per muscle group as well as same onset latencies. The present results strongly corroborate the activation of common neural input structures to the lumbar spinal cord-predominantly primary afferent fibers within multiple posterior roots-by both techniques and add to unraveling the basic mechanisms

  20. Spontaneous idiopathic spinal epidural hematoma: two different presentations of the same disease Hematoma epidural espinal espontáneo: dos diferentes presentaciones clínicas de la misma enfermedad Hematoma epidural espinhal espontâneo: duas diferentes apresentações da mesma doença

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrúbal Falavigna

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma with different clinical presentations without precipitating factors and a brief review of the literature. Our case first developed acute and had progressive cervical spinal cord signs that determined emergency decompressive laminectomy. On the other hand, the second patient, who was chronic, was operated almost five months after the initial symptoms and the radiological diagnosis was a large facet cyst. Early surgical intervention is the chosen treatment for spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas. Spinal surgeons should bear in mind that spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas may have different clinical presentations according to their location in order to perform a differential diagnosis.Fueron relatados dos casos de hematoma epidural espinal espontáneo con diferentes presentaciones clínicas sin factores precipitantes, y fue hecha una breve revisión de la literatura. Nuestro caso 1 tuvo un desarrollo agudo y mostró señales progresivas en la columna cervical que determinaron una laminectomía descompresiva de emergencia. Por otro lado, el segundo paciente, crónico, fue operado casi cinco meses después de los síntomas iniciales y el diagnóstico radiológico fue de un gran quiste sinovial. La intervención quirúrgica temprana es el tratamiento de elección para hematomas espontáneos epidurales espinales. El tratamiento quirúrgico representa la forma más común de terapia para todos los tipos de presentaciones clínicas. Debemos considerar que el tratamiento conservador (o no sea más común en casos de presentación leve, principalmente en pacientes con hematoma espinal crónico. Para realizar un diagnóstico diferencial, los cirujanos deben recordar que los hematomas epidurales espinales espontáneos pueden tener distintas presentaciones clínicas según su ubicación.Os autores relatam dois casos de hematoma epidural espinhal espontâneo com diferentes apresentações cl

  1. COMBINED SPINAL EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOUR: COMPARISON OF BUPIVACAINE 1.25 MG WITH FENTANYL AND ROPIVACAINE 2.5 MG WITH FENTANYL INTRATHECAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash T. S. N

    2016-10-01

    with ASA I and ASA II in established labour with cervical dilatation less than 5 cm was selected and randomly allocated into two groups using closed envelope method. Informed written consent was taken from all participants. They were divided into 2 groups of 20 each. Group I received intrathecal Inj. Bupivacaine 1.25 mg and Inj. Fentanyl 20 µg. Group II received intrathecal Inj. Ropivacaine 2.5 mg and Inj. Fentanyl 20 µg for combined spinal epidural. IV line was secured with 18G cannula. Patient was preloaded with 500 mL of Hartmann’s solution. Basal vital parameter like pulse rate, blood pressure, respiration, O2 saturation were recorded. The patient was positioned in a sitting position with the help of an assistant. Under aseptic conditions, the back was prepared with 5% povidone-iodine solution, spirit and area was draped. L3-L4 interspace was identified. Skin was infiltrated with 2 mL of 1% Xylocaine. After infiltration of local anaesthetic by using needle through needle technique 18-gauge Tuohy needle, epidural space was identified with loss of resistance to air technique. Then, a 15 mm (27 G long ‘Whitacre’ spinal needle was introduced through the epidural needle and the correct position of the tip in the intrathecal space was confirmed by observation of free flow of CSF. Patients were allocated randomly to receive intrathecal injection of bupivacaine 1.25 mg (0.5% bupivacaine 0.25 mL with fentanyl 20 µg (Group I n=30 or ropivacaine 2.5 mg/0.2% ropivacaine 1.25 mL with fentanyl 20 µg (Group II, n=30 both made up to total volume of 2 mL with saline. Injection of intrathecal drug was completed in 10 secs., then 20G epidural catheter was threaded through the epidural needle into the epidural space in cephalad direction. The epidural needle was slowly pulled out without disturbing the catheter. About 3 to 5 cm of catheter was left in epidural space. The catheter was well secured with plaster. Patients vitals was recorded every 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90

  2. Cervical Spinal Cord Compression: A Rare Presentation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvanalingam Ayyadurai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most common primary malignancy of liver. Distant metastasis to various organs is well known. Skeletal metastasis is also reported to various locations. Vertebral metastasis has been reported mostly to thoracic spine. However, cervical spinal cord involvement leading to cord compression has been reported very rarely in literature. We present a case of 58-year-old male with liver cirrhosis presenting as neck pain. Further work-up revealed metastatic HCC to cervical spinal cord resulting in acute cord compression. Patient has been treated with neurosurgical intervention.

  3. Activation of Central Pattern Generator for Respiration Following Complete High Cervical Spinal Cord Interruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    electrical (epidural stimulation) modulation of spinal circuits at the level of phrenic nucleus in complete spinal cord injury animal model. These results...epidural electric stimulation for improving respiratory recovery follow C1Tx (15-36 months). For the 2nd year of project Major Task 1.2 (13-14 months) and...Has there been a change in the active other support of the PD/PI(s) or senior/ key personnel since the last reporting

  4. A comparative study-efficacy and safety of combined spinal epidural anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in high-risk geriatric patients for surgeries around the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Vengamamba; Rao, Lella Nageswara; Vallury, Manoj Kumar; Sanapala, Anitha

    2015-01-01

    Combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) has a significant advantage by enabling the use of low dose intrathecal local anesthetic, with knowledge that the epidural catheter may be used to extend the block as necessary. CSEA is useful in high-risk geriatric patients by providing greater hemodynamic stability. This study is designed to compare the clinical effects of CSEA versus spinal anesthesia in high-risk geriatric patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint. Sixty patients aged >65 years, American Society of Anaesthesiology III and IV were randomly allocated into two equal groups. Group A (n = 30) received CSEA with 1 ml (5 mg) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl through spinal route, and the expected incompleteness of spinal block was managed with small incremental dose of 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine through epidural catheter, 1-1.5 ml for every unblocked segment to achieve T10 sensory level. Group B (n = 30) received spinal anesthesia with 2.5 ml (12.5 mg) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and 25 μg fentanyl. Both the groups showed rapid onset, excellent analgesia and good quality motor block. Group A showed a significantly less incidence of hypotension (P < 0.01) along with the provision of prolonging analgesia as compared to Group B. CSEA is a safe, effective, reliable technique with better hemodynamic stability along with the provision of prolonging analgesia compared to spinal anesthesia for high-risk geriatric patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint.

  5. Epidural Steroid Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Epidural Steroid Injections Ray Baker MD Ray Baker MD Updated ... out of the spine. Why Get an Epidural Steroid Injection? Narrowing of the spinal passages can occur ...

  6. Paraplegia caused by giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk after combined spinal-epidural anesthesia in total hip arthroplasty.

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    Sawai, Toshiyuki; Nakahira, Junko; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    Total paraplegia after epidural or spinal anesthesia is extremely rare. We herein report a case of total paraplegia caused by a giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk at the L3-L4 level after total hip arthroplasty for coxarthrosis. The patient had no preoperative neurologic abnormalities. Intraoperative anesthetic management involved combined spinal-epidural anesthesia at the L3-L4 level with continuous intravenous propofol administration. Postoperatively, the patient complained of numbness and total paraplegia of the lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a giant herniation of a lumbar disk compressing the spinal cord at the L3-L4 level. The intradural herniation was surgically treated, and the patient's symptoms completely resolved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Myelopathy and spinal deformity: relevance of spinal alignment in planning surgical intervention for degenerative cervical myelopathy.

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    Shamji, Mohammed F; Ames, Christopher P; Smith, Justin S; Rhee, John M; Chapman, Jens R; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-10-15

    Surgical management of degenerative cervical myelopathy requires careful pathoanatomic consideration to select between various surgical options from both anterior and posterior approach. Hitherto, unexplored is the relevance of cervical deformity to the pathophysiology of such neurological disability, and whether correction of that deformity should be a surgical objective when planning for reconstruction after spinal cord decompression. Such correction could address both the static cord compression and the dynamic repetitive cord injury, while also restoring more normal biomechanics to the cervical spine. The articles in this focus issue's section on cervical spinal deformity reveal that cervical sagittal alignment is geometrically related to thoracolumbar spinal pelvic alignment and to T1 slope, and that it is further clinically correlated to regional disability and general health scores and to myelopathy severity. These conclusions are based on narrative reviews and a selection of primary research data, reflecting the nascency of this field. They further recommend for preoperative assessment of spinal alignment when significant deformity is suspected, and that correction of cervical kyphosis should be an objective when surgery is planned.

  8. Persistent cauda equina syndrome after caudal epidural injection under severe spinal stenosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo YT

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Young Tak Seo,1 Hyun Ho Kong,1 Goo Joo Lee,1 Heui Je Bang1,2 1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea Abstract: Caudal epidural injection (CEI is one of the most common treatments for low-back pain with sciatica. CEI rarely leads to neurologic complications. We report a case of persistent cauda equina syndrome after CEI. A 44-year-old male patient with severe L4 and L5 spinal stenosis underwent CEI for low-back pain and sciatica. The CEI solution consisted of bupivacaine, hyaluronidase, triamcinolone acetonide, and normal saline. He experienced motor weakness and sensory loss in both lower extremities and neurogenic bladder for more than 1 year after the procedure. His ankle dorsiflexors, big-toe extensors, and ankle plantar flexors on both sides were checked and categorized as motor-power Medical Research Council grade 0. His bilateral ankle-jerk reflection was absent. An electrophysiological study showed lumbosacral polyradiculopathy affecting both sides of the L5 and S1 nerve roots. A urodynamic study revealed hypoactive neurogenic bladder affecting both sacral roots. Keywords: epidural injection, cauda equina syndrome, complications

  9. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labour: its effects on delivery outcome

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    Suneet Kaur Sra Charanjit Singh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Combined spinal-epidural (CSE has become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional labour epidural due to its rapid onset and reliable analgesia provided. This was a prospective, convenient sampling study to determine the effects of CSE analgesia on labour outcome. METHODS: One hundred and ten healthy primigravida parturients with a singleton pregnancy of ≥37 weeks gestation and in the active phase of labour were studied. They were enrolled to the CSE (n = 55 or Non-CSE (n = 55 group based on whether they consented to CSE analgesia. Non-CSE parturients were offered other methods of labour analgesia. The duration of the first and second stage of labour, rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and emergency cesarean section, and Apgar scores were compared. RESULTS: The mean duration of the first and second stage of labour was not significantly different between both groups. Instrumental delivery rates between the groups were not significantly different (CSE group, 11% versus Non-CSE group, 16%. The slightly higher incidence of cesarean section in the CSE group (16% versus 15% in the Non-CSE group was not statistically significant. Neonatal outcome in terms of Apgar score of less than 7 at 1 and 5 min was similar in both groups. CONCLUSION: There were no significant differences in the duration of labour, rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and emergency cesarean section, and neonatal outcome in parturients who received compared to those who did not receive CSE for labour analgesia.

  10. Cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection for the management of cervical radiculopathy: a comparative study of particulate versus non-particulate steroids

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    Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S. [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Chung, Sang-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Gyeonggi-do (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    To determine if a particulate steroid which has a risk for embolic infarct would be more effective than a non-particulate steroid for transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI). The purpose of this study was (1) to compare the effect of cervical TFESI using particulate (e.g., triamcinolone) and non-particulate (e.g., dexamethasone) steroids and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of cervical TFESI in general. From January 2006 to August 2008, 159 consecutive patients [male:female (M:F) 89:70; mean age 53 years, range 33-75 years] who underwent cervical TFESI were included in this non-randomized study. For cervical TFESI, triamcinolone was injected into 97 patients and dexamethasone into 62 patients. Short-term follow-up was conducted within 1 month. The outcome was classified as effective or ineffective. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the difference of outcome according to the injected steroid (triamcinolone vs dexamethasone). Other possible outcome predictors, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, predominant symptom, attack of radiculopathy, cause of radiculopathy, number of nerve root compression levels, previous operation, and failure of previous interlaminar epidural injection, were also analyzed. Cervical TFESI using triamcinolone (78/97, 80.4%) was slightly more effective than that using dexamethasone (43/62, 69.4%), which was not significant (P = 0.129). In general, cervical TFESIs were effective in 121 of 159 patients (76.1%) at short-term follow-up. The only significant outcome predictor was whether the patient had had a previous operation (6/13, 46/2%) or not (115/146, 78.8%) (P = 0.015). There was no significant difference between particulate or non-particulate steroid for the effect of cervical TFESI. Cervical TFESI was effective in managing cervical radiculopathy in general. (orig.)

  11. Epidural application of spinal instrumentation particulate wear debris: a comprehensive evaluation of neurotoxicity using an in vivo animal model.

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    Cunningham, Bryan W; Hallab, Nadim J; Hu, Nianbin; McAfee, Paul C

    2013-09-01

    The introduction and utilization of motion-preserving implant systems for spinal reconstruction served as the impetus for this basic scientific investigation. The effect of unintended wear particulate debris resulting from micromotion at spinal implant interconnections and bearing surfaces remains a clinical concern. Using an in vivo rabbit model, the current study quantified the neural and systemic histopathological responses following epidural application of 11 different types of medical-grade particulate wear debris produced from spinal instrumentation. A total of 120 New Zealand White rabbits were equally randomized into 12 groups based on implant treatment: 1) sham (control), 2) stainless steel, 3) titanium alloy, 4) cobalt chromium alloy, 5) ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPe), 6) ceramic, 7) polytetrafluoroethylene, 8) polycarbonate urethane, 9) silicone, 10) polyethylene terephthalate, 11) polyester, and 12) polyetheretherketone. The surgical procedure consisted of a midline posterior approach followed by resection of the L-6 spinous process and L5-6 ligamentum flavum, permitting interlaminar exposure of the dural sac. Four milligrams of the appropriate treatment material (Groups 2-12) was then implanted onto the dura in a dry, sterile format. All particles (average size range 0.1-50 μm in diameter) were verified to be endotoxin free prior to implantation. Five animals from each treatment group were sacrificed at 3 months and 5 were sacrificed at 6 months postoperatively. Postmortem analysis included epidural cultures and histopathological assessment of local and systemic tissue samples. Immunocytochemical analysis of the spinal cord and overlying epidural fibrosis quantified the extent of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, tumor necrosis factor-β, interleukin [IL]-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and activated macrophages. Epidural cultures were negative for nearly all cases, and there was no evidence of particulate debris or

  12. Detection of epithelial cell transfer in spinal areas by light microscopy and determining any tissue coring via cell culture during combined spinal-epidural interventions.

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    Tunali, Yusuf; Kaya, Guner; Tunali, Gulden; Solakoglu, Seyhun; Yenice, Sedef; Bahar, Mois

    2006-01-01

    Epithelial tissue coring by spinal needles during subarachnoid injections may cause intraspinal epidermal tumors. Previous studies have investigated tissue transfer with different needle types during subarachnoid or epidural injection. This study deals with the transfer of epithelial tissue during combined spinal-epidural (CSE) anesthesia. We studied 68 American Society of Anesthesiologists I to III adult patients. CSE anesthesia was induced under aseptic conditions at the L2-3 or L3-4 interspace with patients in the lateral decubitus position. Cerebral spinal fluid, spinal needle stylet, fluid used to flush the interior of the spinal needle, fluid used to wash the exterior of the spinal needle, fluid used to flush the interior of the epidural needle, and fluid used to wash the exterior tip of the epidural needle were examined under light microscopy (n = 30 patients) or incubated in a cell-culture medium (n = 38 patients). Samples were incubated in cell-culture medium alone (n = 13) or in a cell-culture medium for 3 weeks and then in a medium with epidermal growth factor (n = 25). As a positive control, skin tissue samples were taken by punch biopsy from 10 randomly chosen patients who underwent CSE interventions. These samples were incubated in an enriched medium serum. Light microscopy revealed that there was cell transfer in all phases in various rates: samples 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 contained epithelial cells and debris in ratios of 6.9%, 20.7%, 6.9%, 20.7%, 26.7%, and 33.3%, respectively. Epithelial cell colonization was detected in the cell-culture samples taken from the control group but not in the samples taken from the CSE group. We could not reproduce the cells or cell debris obtained during the CSE interventions in vivo, which can be explained by a possible structural deformation of cells or the inadequacy of the amount of cells that were transferred.

  13. Controversies in the differential diagnosis of Brown-Sequard syndrome due to cervical spinal disease from stroke: A case series.

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    Koksal, Vaner; Yavasi, Ozcan

    2017-09-01

    Stroke is generally considered to be the first preliminary diagnosis in patients presenting with acute hemiparesia in the emergency department. But rarely in unexpected spontaneous neurological pathologies that may lead to hemiparesis. The data from 8 non-traumatic patients who underwent surgical treatment for brown-sequard syndrome (BSS) were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were initially misdiagnosed with strokes. Two of the patients had spinal canal stenosis, two had spinal epidural hematomas, one had an ossified herniated disc and three had soft herniated discs. None of the patients complained of significant pain at the initial presentation. All of the patients had a mild sensory deficit that was initially unrecognized. The pain of the patients began to become evident after hospitalization and, patients transferred to neurosurgery department. Cervical spinal pathologies compressing the corticospinal tract in one-half of the cervical spinal canal may present with only hemiparesis, without neck and radicular pain. If it's too late, permanent neurological damage may become inevitable while it is a correctable pathology.

  14. Thermal Stimulation Alters Cervical Spinal Cord Functional Connectivity in Humans.

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    Weber, Kenneth A; Sentis, Amy I; Bernadel-Huey, Olivia N; Chen, Yufen; Wang, Xue; Parrish, Todd B; Mackey, Sean

    2018-01-15

    The spinal cord has an active role in the modulation and transmission of the neural signals traveling between the body and the brain. Recent advancements in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have made the in vivo examination of spinal cord function in humans now possible. This technology has been recently extended to the investigation of resting state functional networks in the spinal cord, leading to the identification of distinct patterns of spinal cord functional connectivity. In this study, we expand on the previous work and further investigate resting state cervical spinal cord functional connectivity in healthy participants (n = 15) using high resolution imaging coupled with both seed-based functional connectivity analyses and graph theory-based metrics. Within spinal cord segment functional connectivity was present between the left and right ventral horns (bilateral motor network), left and right dorsal horns (bilateral sensory network), and the ipsilateral ventral and dorsal horns (unilateral sensory-motor network). Functional connectivity between the spinal cord segments was less apparent with the connectivity centered at the region of interest and spanning spinal cord functional network was demonstrated to be state-dependent as thermal stimulation of the right ventrolateral forearm resulted in significant disruption of the bilateral sensory network, increased network global efficiency, and decreased network modularity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analgesic efficacy using loss of resistance to air vs. saline in combined spinal epidural technique for labour analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, S; Lim, Y; Sia, A T H

    2008-09-01

    Identification of the epidural space is often performed using the loss of resistance technique to either air or saline. We sought to investigate if the medium used affected the quality of analgesia obtained by parturients who received labour epidurals. We conducted a retrospective audit of labour epidurals performed on nulliparous parturients in our institution from May 2003 to March 2005. All epidural catheters were inserted by senior obstetric anaesthetists using a combined spinal epidural technique. The following information was recorded: parturients' demographic data, loss of resistance technique used, type and amount of local anaesthetic solution administered, complications encountered during procedure, pre-block and post-block pain scores, incidence of breakthrough pain requiring supplemental medication and post-block side-effects. Data from 2848 patients were collected and analysed; 56% of patients made up the saline group and 44% the air group. Patients in both groups had similar demographic profiles and similar incidences of complications and post-block side-effects. However patients in the air group had a higher incidence of recurrent breakthrough pain P = 0.023). We also identified three other factors that were associated with an increased incidence of recurrent breakthrough pain; administration of pre-block oxytocin, sitting position of the parturient during the procedure and the use of intrathecal bupivacaine for induction of analgesia. Our findings suggest that a loss of resistance to air is associated with a higher incidence of recurrent breakthrough pain among parturients who received combined spinal epidural analgesia for labour than a loss of resistance to saline.

  16. Spinal meningocele due to iatrogenic dural puncture during epidural analgesia for childbirth: 5-year history of headache with a spinal etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurboja, Besnik; Rezajooi, Kia; Newton, Mary C; Casey, Adrian T H

    2009-12-01

    Patients undergoing epidural injection for labor pains occasionally sustain iatrogenic inadvertent puncture of the dura with or without damage to the underlying neurological structures. This may be associated with CSF leakage, headache, neurological deficit, and infection. Rarely, the headache persists for years. To the authors' knowledge, chronic headache due to acquired spinal meningocele featuring as a duplicated dural sac, as a sequela of traumatic inadvertent dural puncture, has not been previously reported. The authors report a case of a 20-year-old woman with persistent headaches following an epidural injection. Five years later, the persistent headache was found to be due to a large acquired spinal meningocele. The operative removal of the meningocele led to resolution of headaches. This report highlights the importance of considering a spinal condition as a culprit for chronic headache and postulates a mechanism for the formation of the acquired spinal meningocele appearing as a duplicated dural sac. The authors recommend early MR imaging of the spine for any persisting headache that has a history of attempted spinal access. If an acquired spinal meningocele collection is found, exploration with a view to complete removal of the sac should be considered. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report depicting a rare, treatable cause of chronic spinal hypotension resulting in headaches.

  17. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

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    Takahashi, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Yamada, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Ishii, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Saito, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Tanji, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Kobayashi, T. (Inst. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Miyagi (Japan)); Soma, Y. (Div. of Neurology, Takeda Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu (Japan)); Sakamoto, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)

  18. Cervical spinal functional magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord injured patient during electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Ye-Xi; Li, Zhi-Yang; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Kong, Kang-Mei; Wu, Ren-Hua

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the spatial distribution and signal intensity changes following spinal cord activation in patients with spinal cord injury. This study used spinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on signal enhancement by extra-vascular water protons (SEEP) to assess elicited responses during subcutaneous electrical stimulation at the right elbow and right thumb in the cervical spinal cord. Seven healthy volunteers and seven patients with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) were included in this study. Significant functional activation was observed mainly in the right side of the spinal cord at the level of the C5-C6 cervical vertebra in both the axial and sagittal planes. A higher percentage of signal changes (4.66 ± 2.08 % in injured subjects vs. 2.78 ± 1.66 % in normal) and more average activation voxels (4.69 ± 2.59 in injured subjects vs. 2.56 ± 1.13 in normal subject) in axial plane at the C5-C6 cervical vertebra with a statistically significant difference. The same trends were observed in the sagittal plane with higher percentage of signal changes and more average activation voxels, though no statistically significant difference compared with the control group. Spinal SEEP fMRI is a powerful noninvasive method for the study of local neuronal activation in the human spinal cord, which may be of clinical value for evaluating the effectiveness of interventions aimed at promoting recovery of function using electrical stimulation.

  19. Low-dose spinal-epidural anesthesia for Cesarean section in a parturient with uncontrolled hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhimin; Xiong, Yaqin; Luo, Linli

    2016-08-01

    A 29-year-old woman at 34 weeks' gestation with uncontrolled hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxic heart disease was admitted to urgency Cesarean section. After preoperative sedation and good communication, low-dose spinal anesthesia (7.5 mg 0.5 % bupivacaine) combined with epidural anesthesia (6 ml 2 % lidocaine) was performed through L3-4 inter-vertebral. Opioids were given intravenously to the mother for sedation after delivery of the baby. Satisfactory anesthesia and sedation was provided during surgery. The mother and the neonate were safe and no special complication was found after surgery. Our case demonstrated that low-dose spinal anesthesia combined with epidural anesthesia with intravenous opioids can provide satisfactory anesthesia and sedation, and reduce the risk of heart failure and thyroid storm.

  20. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies for Patients with Malignant Epidural Spinal Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilan A; Campian, Jian L

    2017-08-10

    Malignant epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) is an oncologic emergency with the potential for devastating consequences for patients if not promptly diagnosed and treated. MESCC is diagnosed by imaging. MRI is by far the most sensitive test, preferably with gadolinium. Once the diagnosis of MESCC is suspected, patients with neurologic deficits should receive prompt administration of dexamethasone with a 10-mg IV loading dose followed by 4 mg every 6 h. Quick taper is recommended once the definitive treatment is established. Consultation with medical oncology, radiation oncology, and neurosurgery is imperative in order to facilitate a multidisciplinary approach. Although spine surgery is the most effective method for relief of cord compression and is necessary if there is spinal instability, surgery is only used in selected patients because most patients have a poor overall condition and short life expectancy. Radiation therapy, therefore, is the most commonly used therapy for patients with MESCC after surgical decompression or in patients who are not surgical candidates. Conventional fractionated radiation alone can achieve modest neurologic outcomes in selected radiosensitive tumors. Radiosurgery techniques which deliver intense focal irradiation to a delimited area with imaging guidance and contoured radiation delivery to the shape of the tumor have recently emerged as increasing effective treatments in MESCC, especially in radioresistant tumors. Stereotactic radiosurgery and different radiation technologies have been studied in recent clinical trials.

  1. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under spinal-epidural anesthesia vs. general anaesthesia: a prospective randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donmez, Turgut; Erdem, Vuslat Muslu; Uzman, Sinan; Yildirim, Dogan; Avaroglu, Huseyin; Ferahman, Sina; Sunamak, Oguzhan

    2017-03-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is usually performed under the general anesthesia (GA). Aim of the study is to investigate the availability, safety and side effects of combined spinal/epidural anesthesia (CSEA) and comparison it with GA for LC. Forty-nine patients who have a LC plan were included into the study. The patients were randomly divided into GA (n = 25) and CSEA (n = 24) groups. Intraoperative and postoperative adverse events, postoperative pain levels were compared between groups. Anesthesia procedures and surgeries for all patients were successfully completed. After the organization of pneumoperitoneum in CSEA group, 3 patients suffered from shoulder pain (12.5%) and 4 patients suffered from abdominal discomfort (16.6%). All these complaints were recovered with IV fentanyl administration. Only 1 patient developed hypotension which is recovered with fluid replacement and no need to use vasopressor treatment. Postoperative shoulder pain was significantly less observed in CSEA group (25% vs. 60%). Incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) was less observed in CSEA group but not statistically significant (4.2% vs. 20%). In the group of CSEA, 3 patients suffered from urinary retention (12.5%) and 2 patients suffered from spinal headache (8.3%). All postoperative pain parameters except 6th hour, were less observed in CSEA group, less VAS scores and less need to analgesic treatment in CSEA group comparing with GA group. CSEA can be used safely for laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Less postoperative surgical field pain, shoulder pain and PONV are the advantages of CSEA compared to GA.

  2. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling for lumbar spinal stenosis using a specially designed needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background This report describes the methodological approach and clinical application of a minimally invasive intervention to treat lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Methods Thirty-four patients with LSS underwent fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling using a specially designed flexed Round Needle. The needle was inserted 8-12 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the stenosis and advanced to a position between the anterior side of the facet joint and pedicle up to the outer-third of the pedicle. The needle was advanced medially and backed laterally within a few millimetres along the canal side of the inferior articular process between the facet joint and pedicle. The procedure was completed when a marked reduction in resistance was felt at the tip of the needle. The procedure was performed bilaterally at the level of the stenosis. Results The average follow-up period was 12.9 ± 1.1 months. The visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score was reduced from 7.3 ± 2.0 to 4.6 ± 2.5 points, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score decreased from 41.4 ± 17.2 to 25.5 ± 12.6% and the average self-rated improvement was 52.6 ± 33.1%. The VAS scores indicated that 14 (41.2%) patients reported a "good" to "excellent" treatment response, while 11 (32.4%) had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the ODI and 22 (64.7%) had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the self-rated improvement scale. Conclusions These results suggest that fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling is effective for managing LSS. PMID:20698999

  3. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling for lumbar spinal stenosis using a specially designed needle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Kang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report describes the methodological approach and clinical application of a minimally invasive intervention to treat lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS. Methods Thirty-four patients with LSS underwent fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling using a specially designed flexed Round Needle. The needle was inserted 8-12 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the stenosis and advanced to a position between the anterior side of the facet joint and pedicle up to the outer-third of the pedicle. The needle was advanced medially and backed laterally within a few millimetres along the canal side of the inferior articular process between the facet joint and pedicle. The procedure was completed when a marked reduction in resistance was felt at the tip of the needle. The procedure was performed bilaterally at the level of the stenosis. Results The average follow-up period was 12.9 ± 1.1 months. The visual analogue scale (VAS pain score was reduced from 7.3 ± 2.0 to 4.6 ± 2.5 points, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score decreased from 41.4 ± 17.2 to 25.5 ± 12.6% and the average self-rated improvement was 52.6 ± 33.1%. The VAS scores indicated that 14 (41.2% patients reported a "good" to "excellent" treatment response, while 11 (32.4% had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the ODI and 22 (64.7% had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the self-rated improvement scale. Conclusions These results suggest that fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling is effective for managing LSS.

  4. Spinal epidural abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a patient with AIDS: case report and review of the literature

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    Humberto Metta

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural abscess (SEA is a rare infectious disorder that often has delayed diagnosis and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates. We present a case of an AIDS patient with a SEA due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This type of SEA in AIDS patients is characterized by localized spinal pain and prolonged fever. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice in the diagnostic process. Early diagnosis, followed by specific therapy (surgical decompression combined with antituberculous drugs, is necessary to improve the prognosis of these kinds of patients.

  5. Cervical Spinal Motion During Orotacheal Intubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    the trauma victim with an unstable cervical spine. Ann Emerg Med 17: 25- 29, 1988 4. Cormack RS, Lehane J: Difficult tracheal intubation in...optimal airway view was scored according to Cormack .4 The Malampati Grade, ease or difficulty of intubation, and Cormack scores for each patient are...Malampati and Cormack scores for individual patients and specific events. 13 Median Distraction at each stage of intubation for different methods of

  6. Randomized trial of epidural injections for spinal stenosis published in the New England Journal of Medicine: further confusion without clarification.

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    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Kaye, Alan D; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Gharibo, Christopher G; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials are considered the hallmark of evidence-based medicine. This conveys the idea that up-to-date evidence applied consistently in clinical practice, in combination with clinicians' individual expertise and patients own preference/expectations are enjoined to achieve the best possible outcome. Since its inception in 1990s, evidence-based medicine has evolved in conjunction with numerous changes in the healthcare environment. However, the benefits of evidence-based medicine have not materialized for spinal pain including surgical interventions. Consequently, the debate continues on the efficacy and medical necessity of multiple interventions provided in managing spinal pain. Friedly et al published a randomized controlled trial of epidural glucocorticoid injections for spinal stenosis in the July 2014 edition of the highly prestigious New England Journal of Medicine. This was accompanied by an editorial from Andersson. This manuscript provided significant sensationalism for the media and confusion for the spine community. This randomized trial of epidural glucocorticoid injections for spinal stenosis and accompanying editorial concluded that epidural injections of glucocorticoids plus lidocaine offered minimal or no short-term benefit as compared with epidural injections of lidocaine alone, with the editorial emphasizing proceeding directly to surgical intervention. In addition media statements by the authors also emphasized the idea that exercise or surgery might be better options for patients suffereing from narrowing of the spinal canal. The interventional pain management community believes that there are severe limitations to this study, manuscript, and accompanying editorial. The design, inclusion criteria, outcomes assessment, analysis of data and interpretation, and conclusions of this trial point to the fact that this highly sophisticated and much publicized randomized trial may not be appropriate and lead to misinformation. The

  7. Headache and seizures after cervical epidural injection in a patient undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheeraj Arora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidural analgesia is widely used in cardiothoracic surgery. Most of the complications associated with epidural analgesia are related to the insertion techniques of epidural catheter. A 68-year-old obese patient posted for coronary artery bypass grafting surgery developed headache followed by seizures after insertion of the thoracic epidural catheter. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed air in the basal cisterns and in the left frontal region. The patient was managed conservatively and the symptoms subsided after 24 h. Later, the patient underwent coronary angioplasty.

  8. [The influence factors and meanings of tracheotomy after cervical spinal cord injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pu; Zhang, Xun

    2015-06-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury is a common and serious disease in clinic, and tracheotomy combined with mechanical ventilation is an effective way to prevent respiratory complications. Although tracheotomy is used widely, there are not unified indications of tracheotomy after cervical spinal cord injury in the practical application. At the same time, the advantages and disadvantages of the application of tracheotomy in patients with cervical spinal cord injury are still on dispute. Based on the recent literature, we summarize the influence factors and meanings of tracheotomy after cervical spinal cord injury.

  9. Patient-reported outcome of surgical treatment for lumbar spinal epidural lipomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlic, Peter W; Mannion, Anne F; Jeszenszky, Deszö; Porchet, François; Fekete, Tamás F; Kleinstück, Frank; Haschtmann, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is a rare condition characterized by an excessive accumulation of fat tissue in the spinal canal that can have a compressive effect, leading to clinical symptoms. This condition has a distinct pathology from spinal stenosis associated with degeneration of the intervertebral discs, ligaments, and facet joints. Several different conservative and surgical treatment strategies have been proposed for SEL, but its treatment remains controversial. There is a lack of evidence documenting the success of surgical decompression in SEL, and no previous studies have reported the postoperative outcome from the patient's perspective. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patient-rated outcome after surgical decompression in SEL. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was carried out. A total of 22 patients (19 males; age: 68.2±9.9 years) who had undergone spine surgery for SEL were identified from our local Spine Surgery Outcomes Database, which includes a total of 10,028 spine surgeries recorded between 2005 and 2012. Inclusion criteria were epidural lipomatosis confirmed by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and subsequent decompression surgery without spinal fusion. The Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) was used to assess patient-rated outcome. The COMI includes the domains pain (separate 0-10 scales for back and leg pain), back-specific function, symptom-specific well-being, general quality of life (QOL), work disability, and social disability. The questionnaires were completed preoperatively and at 3, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Surgical data were retrieved from the patient charts and from our local Spine Surgery Outcomes Database, which we operate in connection with the International Spine Tango Registry. Differences between pre- and postoperative scores were analyzed using paired t tests and repeated measures analysis of variance. At 3-months follow-up, the COMI score and scores for leg

  10. CT-guided radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteomas with concomitant perineural and epidural irrigation for neuroprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klass, Darren [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom); Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Radiology Academy, Cotman Centre, Norwich (United Kingdom); Marshall, Tom; Toms, Andoni [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Here we report our experience of a neuroprotective adaptation of the technique of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of spinal osteoid osteomas. Over 9 years seven patients underwent eight CT-guided RF treatments for osteoid osteoma. CT-guided RF ablation was performed with general anaesthesia. The lesion was heated to 90 C for 2 min for two cycles by using a Cosman SMK TC-10 RF electrode. This was preceded by a bolus of room temperature sterile water (10 ml) injected through a 26G curved spinal needle into the exit foramen and adjacent epidural space for neuroprotection. The age of the patient, sex, lesion location, biopsy results and complications were recorded. All the biopsies (n = 7) demonstrated histological features of osteoid osteoma. All the procedures were technically successful. Clinical success was assessed up to 3 years post procedure. There was an 85% clinical success rate (6 of the 7 patients), with recurrence of a lesion at 6 months, necessitating a repeat procedure (successful). CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma preceded by bolus of sterile water, injected through a spinal needle into the exit foramen and adjacent epidural space for neuroprotection, is a safe and effective procedure. (orig.)

  11. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoki Minato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case.

  12. Morphological analysis of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals using CT myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, H. [Department of Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgery, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, 2-9 Myoken-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 (Japan); Ohmori, K. [Department of Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgery, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, 2-9 Myoken-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 (Japan); Takatsu, T. [Department of Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgery, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, 2-9 Myoken-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 (Japan); Teramoto, T. [Department of Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgery, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, 2-9 Myoken-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 (Japan); Ishida, Y. [Department of Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgery, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, 2-9 Myoken-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 (Japan); Suzuki, K. [Department of Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgery, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, 2-9 Myoken-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    To verify the conventional concept of ``developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal``, we performed a morphological analysis of the relations of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals. The sagittal diameter, area and circularity of the three structures, and the dispersion of each parameter, were examined on axial sections of CT myelograms of 36 normal subjects. The spinal canal was narrowest at C4, followed by C5, while the spinal cord was largest at C4/5. The area and circularity of the cervical spinal cord were not significantly correlated with any parameter of the spinal canal nor with the sagittal diameter and area of the dural tube at any level examined, and the spinal cord showed less individual variation than the bony canal. Compression of the spinal cord might be expected whenever the sagittal diameter of the spinal canal is below the lower limit of normal, that is about 12 mm on plain radiographs. Thus, we concluded that the concept of ``developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal`` was reasonable and acceptable. (orig.). With 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Global Spinal Alignment in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Go; Alzakri, Abdulmajeed; Pointillart, Vincent; Boissiere, Louis; Obeid, Ibrahim; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Vital, Jean Marc; Gille, Olivier

    2017-05-24

    Prospective radiographic analysis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) OBJECTIVE.: To clarify the pathophysiology of CSM, and use the characteristic of global spinal alignment for determining the surgical strategy. Radiographic evaluation of CSM, in general, comprises cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and regional cervical radiography, which cannot distinguish between cervical hyperlodorsis with spinopelvic compensation and cervical lordorsis with normal global alignment. Our inclusion criteria were preoperative whole spine radiography and cervical MRI and health-related quality of life scores. Global spinal alignment was characterized by cervical lordosis (CL), C7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA), T1 slope (T1S), thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), and knee flexion angle (KFA). Cervical alignment was characterized by O-C2, C2-4, C5-7, and C2-7 angles; cranial center of gravity (CCG) C7SVA; and C2-7 SVA. Responsible lesion determined using MRI was divided from C2/3 to C7/T1. Eighty-eight surgically treated CSM patients with EOS full spine imaging were prospectively analyzed. There were 72 normal (Type 1; SVA SVA ≥ 50 mm) global balance patients. There were significant differences in age, T1S, KFA, T1S-CL, SVA, CCG-SVA, and C2-7 SVA between Type 1 and Type 2. C3/4 lesion was more common in Type 2 than in Type 1. There was a positive correlation between global sagittal, but not regional, balance and responsible lesion. C3/4 lesion was more frequent in older, male, high SVA, large T1S-CL, large KFA, and large cranial lordosis (C2-4/C5-7 angle) patients. This study indicates the necessity for global alignment evaluation, particularly in older CSM patients because of their compensation mechanism for global malalignment. Surgical strategy for cranial type CSM should be carefully selected considering global balance. 4.

  14. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulames, Vanessa M; Plant, Giles W

    2016-04-09

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient's own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI-even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury.

  15. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Plant, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  16. Traumatic cervical spinal cord injury with "negative" cervical spine CT scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, Sreedhar; Schreiber, Adam; Harrop, James; Jallo, Jack

    2010-01-01

    A 46-year-old man fell four steps, striking his neck and having associated neck pain and discomfort. He was evaluated at a local emergency department and reported no neurological deficit but focal mid cervical tenderness. Radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scan were "negative" for cervical spine fracture, dislocation or pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling. He was discharged home in a cervical collar with a scheduled outpatient follow-up. Over the proceeding hours neurologic deterioration occurred, including hand and lower limb weakness with the inability to urinate. The patient returned to the local emergency room and was transferred to a tertiary care hospital where examination revealed C5ASIAB deficits. Repeat high resolution CT scan of the cervical spine with reformatted images was unremarkable for osseous fractures except some loss of definition in the posterior cervical musculature. Emergency magnetic resonance imaging MRI revealed a subluxation of C5/6 right facet (not evident on CT) with disruption of the posterior longitudinal ligament, ligamentum flavum, and disc space with abnormal T2 weighted spinal cord hyperintense signal at C5/6. He underwent emergency C5-C6 anterior and posterior decompression and fusion. One week later an examination showed improved C5ASIAD. This case reveals the difficulty of assessing the cervical spine for instability and potential limitations of current management schemes.

  17. Dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord after proton irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, HP; van Luijk, P; Coppes, RP; Schippers, JM; Konings, AWT; van der Kogel, AJ

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord with protons. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with a single fraction of unmodulated protons (150-190 MeV) using the shoot through method, which employs the plateau of the

  18. Acquired cervical spinal arachnoid diverticulum in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, R J; Garosi, L; Matiasek, K; Lowrie, M

    2015-04-01

    A one-year-old, female entire, domestic, shorthair cat presented with acute onset non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging was consistent with a C3-C4 acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion and the cat was treated conservatively. The cat was able to walk after 10 days and was normal 2 months after presentation. The cat was referred five and a half years later for investigation of an insidious onset 3-month history of ataxia and tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine was repeated, demonstrating a spinal arachnoid diverticulum at C3 causing marked focal compression of the spinal cord. This was treated surgically with hemilaminectomy and durectomy. The cat improved uneventfully and was discharged 12 days later. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  19. The role of cutaneous afferents in controlling locomotion evoked by epidural stimulation of the spinal cord in decerebrate cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofeev, I Yu; Avelev, V D; Shcherbakova, N A; Gerasimenko, Yu P

    2008-09-01

    The effects of the cutaneous input on the formation of the locomotor pattern in conditions of epidural stimulation of the spinal cord in decerebrate cats were studied. Locomotor activity was induced by rhythmic stimulation of the dorsal surface of spinal cord segments L4-L5 at a frequency of 3-5 Hz. Electromyograms (EMG) recorded from the antagonist muscles quadriceps, semitendinosus, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius lateralis were recorded, along with the kinematics of stepping movements during locomotion on a moving treadmill and reflex responses to single stimuli. Changes in the pattern of reactions observed before and after exclusion of cutaneous receptors (infiltration of lidocaine solution at the base of the paw or irrigation of the paw pads with chlorothane solution) were assessed. This treatment led to impairment of the locomotor cycle: the paw was placed with the rear surface downward and was dragged along in the swing phase, and the duration of the stance phase decreased. Exclusion of cutaneous afferents suppressed the polysynaptic activity of the extensor muscles and the distal flexor muscle of the ipsilateral hindlimb during locomotion evoked by epidural stimulation of the spinal cord. The effects of exclusion of cutaneous afferents on the monosynaptic component of the EMG response were insignificant.

  20. Angiographic suppression of the artery of Adamkiewicz by venous hypertension resolving after embolization in a case of spinal epidural arteriovenous fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart Sorte, Danielle; Pardo, Carlos A; Gailloud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A case of complete angiographic suppression of the artery of Adamkiewicz and anterior spinal artery in a patient with a spinal epidural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is reported. Slow flow AVFs typically present with progressive myelopathy secondary to spinal venous hypertension (SVH). The lack of a normal venous phase during angiography and its restoration after treatment is commonly observed with these lesions, yet a similar phenomenon seems exceptional at the arterial level. Right T11 intercostal artery angiograms obtained before and after treatment of a left L4 epidural AVF documented the initial suppression of the artery of Adamkiewicz and anterior spinal artery, and their normal appearance immediately after correction of the SVH by embolization. This report confirms that SVH can angiographically suppress prominent and functionally important spinal arteries, re-emphasizing the potential role played by secondary arterial changes in SVH induced myelopathy. This hemodynamic phenomenon also represents a potential pitfall during diagnostic and therapeutic endovascular procedures. PMID:25028420

  1. Immunoglobulin G4-related epidural inflammatory pseudotumor presenting with pulmonary complications and spinal cord compression: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumalla, Kavelin; Smith, Kyle A; Arnold, Paul M

    2017-06-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently defined condition characterized by inflammatory tumefactive lesions in various organ systems. IgG4-RD is a clinical and radiological diagnosis of exclusion and requires the presence of specific histopathological criteria for diagnosis. A 50-year-old man presented to an outside hospital with a 3-month history of progressively worsening back pain and symptoms of pleurisy, nasal crusting, and hematochezia. Radiological workup revealed an epidural-paraspinal mass with displacement of the spinal cord, destruction of the T5-6 vertebrae, and extension into the right lung. Biopsy sampling and subsequent histopathological analysis revealed dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with an increased number of IgG4-positive plasma cells and a storiform pattern of fibrosis. With strong histopathological evidence of IgG4-RD, the patient was started on a regimen of prednisone. Further testing ruled out malignant neoplasm, infectious etiologies, and other autoimmune diseases. Two weeks later, the patient presented with acute-onset paraplegia due to spinal cord compression. The patient underwent decompression laminectomy of T5-6, posterior instrumented fusion of T2-8, and debulking of the epidural-paraspinal mass. After the continued administration of glucocorticosteroids, the patient improved remarkably to near-normal strength in the lower extremities and sensory function 6 months after surgery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of IgG4-related epidural inflammatory pseudotumor and spinal cord compression in the United States. This case highlights the importance of early administration of glucocorticosteroids, which were essential to preventing further progression and preventing relapse. IgG4-RD evaluation is important after other diseases in the differential diagnosis are ruled out.

  2. Intralesional hemorrhage and thrombosis without rupture in a pure spinal epidural cavernous angioma: a rare cause of acute lumbal radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floeth, Frank; Riemenschneider, Markus; Herdmann, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    Pure spinal epidural cavernous angiomas are extremely rare lesions, and their normal shape is that of a fusiform mass in the dorsal aspects of the spinal canal. We report a case of a lumbo-sacral epidural cavernous vascular malformation presenting with acute onset of right-sided S1 radiculopathy. Clinical aspects, imaging, intraoperative findings, and histology are demonstrated. The patient, a 27-year-old man presented with acute onset of pain, paraesthesia, and numbness within the right leg corresponding to the S1 segment. An acute lumbosacral disc herniation was suspected, but MRI revealed a cystic lesion with the shape of a balloon, a fluid level and a thickened contrast-enhancing wall. Intraoperatively, a purple-blue tumor with fibrous adhesions was located between the right S1 and S2 nerve roots. Macroscopically, no signs of epidural bleedings could be denoted. After coagulation of a reticular venous feeder network and dissection of the adhesions the rubber ball-like lesion was resected in total. Histology revealed a prominent venous vessel with a pathologically thickened, amuscular wall surrounded by smaller, hyalinized, venous vessels arranged in a back-to-back position typical for the diagnosis of a cavernous angioma. Lumina were partially occluded by thrombi. The surrounding fibrotic tissue showed signs of recurrent bleedings. There was no obvious mass hemorrhage into the surrounding tissue. In this unique case, the pathologic mechanism was not the usual rupture of the cavernous angioma with subsequent intraspinal hemorrhage, but acute mass effect by intralesional bleedings and thrombosis with subsequent increase of volume leading to nerve root compression. Thus, even without a sudden intraspinal hemorrhage a spinal cavernous malformation can cause acute symptoms identical to the clinical features of a soft disc herniation.

  3. The increased prevalence of cervical spondylosis in patients with adult thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, William W; Carrer, Alexandra; Lu, Michael; Hu, Serena S

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the concomitance of cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity. Patients with degenerative cervical spine disease have higher rates of degeneration in the lumbar spine. In addition, degenerative cervical spine changes have been observed in adult patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformities. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies quantifying the association between cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity in adult patients. Patients seen by a spine surgeon or spine specialist at a single institution were assessed for cervical spondylosis and/or thoracolumbar spinal deformity using an administrative claims database. Spinal radiographic utilization and surgical intervention were used to infer severity of spinal disease. The relative prevalence of each spinal diagnosis was assessed in patients with and without the other diagnosis. A total of 47,560 patients were included in this study. Cervical spondylosis occurred in 13.1% overall, but was found in 31.0% of patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformity (OR=3.27, Pdeformity was found in 10.7% of patients overall, but was increased at 23.5% in patients with cervical spondylosis (OR=3.26, Pspine fusion. Patients with cervical spondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity had significantly higher rates of the other spinal diagnosis. This correlation was increased with increased severity of disease. Patients with both diagnoses were significantly more likely to have received a spine fusion. Further research is warranted to establish the cause of this correlation. Clinicians should use this information to both screen and counsel patients who present for cervical spondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

  4. Multilevel Spinal Segmental Fixation for Kyphotic Cervical Spinal Deformity in Pediatric Age Group-Report of Management in 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Atul; Kaswa, Amol; Shah, Abhidha; Dhar, Arjun

    2017-10-01

    We discuss the role of instability of multiple spinal segments including the atlantoaxial joint in the pathogenesis of cervical kyphotic deformity. Two male patients (5 and 17 years old) had severe cervical kyphosis and presented with symptoms related to myelopathy. The patients underwent multisegmental spinal distraction and fixation that included atlantoaxial joint. No bone decompression was done. At a follow-up of >30 months, both patients had significant neurologic recovery. Investigations at follow-up showed successful arthrodesis of treated spinal segments. Although incomplete, there was recovery in kyphosis. Multisegmental spinal distraction and fixation can lead to reduction in kyphosis and relief from symptoms related to myelopathy. Role of spinal instability in general and atlantoaxial joint instability in particular in pathogenesis of cervical kyphosis need to be assessed on the basis of studies with a larger number of patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Clinical observation on cervical type cervical spondylosis treated with sword-like needle and chiropractic spinal manipulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhong; Diao, Jing-Wen; Ma, Zi-Yuan

    2014-02-01

    To compare the difference in the efficacy on cervical type of cervical spondylosis (CS) between the combined treatment of sword-like needle and chiropractic spinal manipulation (the combined therapy) and the simple chiropractic spinal manipulation. One hundred and thirty-eight cases of cervical type of CS were randomized into a combined therapy group (76 cases) and a simple chiropractic spinal manipulation group (62 cases). In the combined therapy group, the sword-like needle therapy was applied at Fengchi (GB 20), Tianzhu (BL 10) and Jiaji (EX-B 2) C3-C5. The chiropractic spinal manipulation was used in combination. In the chiropractic spinal manipulation group, the simple chiropractic spinal manipulation was adopted. The treatment was given once every other day in the two groups, 10 days made one session. One session of treatment was required. Visual analog scale (VAS) score was observed before and after treatment in the two groups and the efficacies were compared between the two groups. VAS score after treatment was reduced obviously as compared with that before treatment in the patients of the two groups (both P sword-like needle therapy combined with chiropractic spinal manipulation relieve effectively pain in cervical type of CS and the efficacy is superior to the simple chiropractic spinal manipulation.

  6. The indications and timing for operative management of spinal epidural abscess: literature review and treatment algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchman, Alexander; Pham, Martin; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2014-08-01

    Delayed or inappropriate treatment of spinal epidural abscess (SEA) can lead to serious morbidity or death. It is a rare event with significant variation in its causes, anatomical locations, and rate of progression. Traditionally the treatment of choice has involved emergency surgical evacuation and a prolonged course of antibiotics tailored to the offending pathogen. Recent publications have advocated antibiotic treatment without surgical decompression in select patient populations. Clearly defining those patients who can be safely treated in this manner remains in evolution. The authors review the current literature concerning the treatment and outcome of SEA to make recommendations concerning what population can be safely triaged to nonoperative management and the optimal timing of surgery. A PubMed database search was performed using a combination of search terms and Medical Subject Headings, to identify clinical studies reporting on the treatment and outcome of SEA. The literature review revealed 28 original case series containing at least 30 patients and reporting on treatment and outcome. All cohorts were deemed Class III evidence, and in all but two the data were obtained retrospectively. Based on the conclusions of these studies along with selected smaller studies and review articles, the authors present an evidence-based algorithm for selecting patients who may be safe candidates for nonoperative management. Patients who are unable to undergo an operation, have a complete spinal cord injury more than 48 hours with low clinical or radiographic concern for an ascending lesion, or who are neurologically stable and lack risk factors for failure of medical management may be initially treated with antibiotics alone and close clinical monitoring. If initial medical management is to be undertaken the patient should be made aware that delayed neurological deterioration may not fully resolve even after prompt surgical treatment. Patients deemed good surgical

  7. [A Case of Postoperative Paraplegia Caused by Idiopathic Spinal Cord Infarction following Hepatectomy under Both General and Epidural Anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Yukari; Hiraki, Teruyuki; Ushijima, Kazuo

    2015-04-01

    A 73-year-old woman (height : 155 cm, weight : 55 kg) was scheduled to undergo a laparotomic hepatectomy and radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Her medical history did not include any relevant conditions such as cardiovascular or neurological disorders. A thoracic epidural catheter was introduced at T8-9 before the induction of anesthesia with intravenous propofol. General anesthesia was maintained with the inhalation of oxygen, air, and desflurane, and the continuous infusion of remifentanil. Several intraoperative episodes of mild hypotension occurred, each of which was successfully treated with intravenous ephedrine, but otherwise her anesthetic course was uneventful, and she recovered from the anesthesia smoothly. Her postoperative pain was well controlled with continuous epidural infusion of levobupivacaine and fentanyl, and she could walk by herself on postoperative day (POD) 1. However, she suffered weakness in her lower extremities on POD2 and subsequently fell into complete paraplegia with sensory loss below the T4 level on POD3. A magnetic resonance imaging scan taken on POD4 showed an idiopathic spinal cord infarction (SCI) involving levels T1 through T4, although no epidural abnormalities, e.g., hematomas, were detected. Immediate treatment with methylprednisolone, ozagrel, and edaravone failed to resolve her symptoms. We suggest that it is of great importance to consider SCI as a differential diagnosis as soon as possible in cases of unanticipated postoperative paraplegia.

  8. Anesthetic considerations for patients with acute cervical spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-ping Bao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesiologists work to prevent or minimize secondary injury of the nervous system and improve the outcome of medical procedures. To this end, anesthesiologists must have a thorough understanding of pathophysiology and optimize their skills and equipment to make an anesthesia plan. Anesthesiologists should conduct careful physical examinations of patients and consider neuroprotection at preoperative interviews, consider cervical spinal cord movement and compression during airway management, and suggest awake fiberoptic bronchoscope intubation for stable patients and direct laryngoscopy with manual in-line immobilization in emergency situations. During induction, anesthesiologists should avoid hypotension and depolarizing muscle relaxants. Mean artery pressure should be maintained within 85–90 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa; vasoactive drug selection and fluid management. Normal arterial carbon dioxide pressure and normal blood glucose levels should be maintained. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is a useful option. Anesthesiologists should be attentive to postoperative respiratory insufficiency (carefully considering postoperative extubation, thrombus, and infection. In conclusion, anesthesiologists should carefully plan the treatment of patients with acute cervical spinal cord injuries to protect the nervous system and improve patient outcome.

  9. Regional (spinal, epidural, caudal) versus general anaesthesia in preterm infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy in early infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa J; Craven, Paul D; Lakkundi, Anil; Foster, Jann P; Badawi, Nadia

    2015-06-09

    With improvements in neonatal intensive care, more preterm infants are surviving the neonatal period and presenting for surgery in early infancy. Inguinal hernia is the most common condition requiring early surgery, appearing in 38% of infants whose birth weight is between 751 grams and 1000 grams. Approximately 20% to 30% of otherwise healthy preterm infants having general anaesthesia for inguinal hernia surgery at a postmature age have at least one apnoeic episode within the postoperative period. Research studies have failed to adequately distinguish the effects of apnoeic episodes from other complications of extreme preterm gestation on the risk of brain injury, or to investigate the potential impact of postoperative apnoea upon longer term neurodevelopment. In addition to episodes of apnoea, there are concerns that anaesthetic and sedative agents may have a direct toxic effect on the developing brain of preterm infants even after reaching postmature age. It is proposed that regional anaesthesia may reduce the risk of postoperative apnoea, avoid the risk of anaesthetic-related neurotoxicity and improve neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants requiring surgery for inguinal hernia at a postmature age. To determine if regional anaesthesia reduces postoperative apnoea, bradycardia, the use of assisted ventilation, and neurological impairment, in comparison to general anaesthesia, in preterm infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy at a postmature age. The following databases and resources were searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 2), MEDLINE (December 2002 to 25 February 2015), EMBASE (December 2002 to 25 February 2015), controlled-trials.com and clinicaltrials.gov, reference lists of published trials and abstracts published in Pediatric Research and Pediatric Anesthesia. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of regional (spinal, epidural, caudal) versus general anaesthesia, or

  10. Safety assessment of epidural wire electrodes for cough production in a chronic pig model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Krzysztof E; Kowalski, Tomasz; DiMarco, Anthony F

    2016-08-01

    It is our hypothesis that high intensity spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to restore an effective cough mechanism using wire leads, will result in significant activation of target neurons without tissue injury or electrode corrosion. Adult mini-pigs underwent chronic spinal cord compression, followed by implantation of parallel wire leads on the dorsal epidural surface of the spinal cord, with stimulation contacts at the T9 and T12, and control electrode contacts at the T2 and T5 levels. After 3 months of daily SCS, airway pressure generation (P), tissue in the area of the stimulating and control electrodes and electrode leads were examined. P was also assessed in acute animals, which served as controls. Mean P at FRC was 54±5cmH2O and 109±11cmH2O in the control and chronically stimulated animals, respectively (pstimulating and control electrodes. All sets of leads revealed no evidence of electrode corrosion. Previous porcine models of chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) were developed to study neurological and regenerative outcomes. Our method of chronic SCI porcine model was developed to evaluate the safety of electrical SCS to restore expiratory muscle function. Chronic SCS with wire lead electrodes results in significant increases in P without evidence of significant adverse tissue reaction, nor evidence of electrode corrosion. This method may be a safe and useful technique to restore a functional cough in spinal cord injured subjects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Avulsión del plexo braquial traumático no controlado con remifentalino: Papel de la analgesia epidural cervical Traumatic brachial plexus root avulsion unresponsive to remifentanyl role cervical epidural analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    M. Cortiñas; G. Moreno-Pardo; S. Uña; M. Arcasa; M.R. Calero; Parra, R.; R. Gálvez

    2007-01-01

    Presentamos el caso de una paciente que sufrió accidente de tráfico con avulsión del plexo braquial izquierdo, y que presentaba dolor muy intenso (escala visual analógica 8) de características neuropáticas en la fase aguda postraumática. Dosis altas de remifentanilo fueron inefectivas para control del cuadro álgico, el cual se trato con éxito con una infusión de ropivacaína a través de catéter epidural cervical (C5-6). El dolor es controlado en fase crónica (escala visual analógica 2) con age...

  12. Symptomatic spinal epidural lipomatosis without exogenous steroid intake; report of case with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gero, B.T.; Chynn, K.Y.

    1989-05-01

    We present a case of epidural lipomatosis, in which there is no association with exogenous steroids and describe a previously unreported plain film finding. To our knowledge these are the first published MR images of this condition.

  13. Spinal Epidural Varices, a great Mimic of Intervertebral Disc Prolapse - A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Raghavendra; Haridas, Papanaik; Kumar, Anand; K, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Epidural venous plexus enlargement, presenting with low back pain and radiculopathy, is an uncommon cause of nerve roots impingement. This condition commonly mimics a herniated nucleus pulposus radiologically. The radiological diagnosis is often missed and the diagnosis is made during the surgery. We are hereby presenting 2 such cases of epidural varices mimicking intervertebral disc prolapse with lumbar radiculopathy. Case 1: 43 yr old female presented with acute exacerbation of low back ache and significant right L5-S1 radiculopathy without neurological deficit. MRI reported as L5-S1 disc prolapse. Intra-operatively engorged dilated epidural vein seen compressing S1 nerve root. Associated Disc bulge removed and Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed Case 2: 45 year old male manual labourer presented with backache with left sided sciatica since 8 months, increased in severity since past 1month associated with sensory blunting in L5 and S1 dermatomes. Neurologic examination revealed normal muscle power in his lower extremities. Sensations was blunted in L5 and S1 dermatomes. MRI was reported as L5-S1 disc prolapsed compressing left S1 nerve root. Decompression of the L5-S1 intervertebral space was performed through a left -sidelaminotomy. Large, engorged serpentine epidural veins was found in the axilla of S1 nerve root, compressing it. Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed. Retrospectively, features of epidural varices were noted in the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans. Both patients had significant improvement in radiculopathy immediate postoperatively, and sensory symptoms resolved over the next 6 weeks in second case. At recent follow up, both patients had significant relief of symptoms and no recurrent radicular symptoms. An abnormal dilated epidural venous plexus that mimics a herniated lumbar disc is a rare entity. This pathology should be always kept in mind during lumbar disc surgery

  14. HOMICIDE BY CERVICAL SPINAL CORD GUNSHOT INJURY WITH SHOTGUN FIRE PELLETS: CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Turliuc, Serban Turliuc, Iustin Mihailov, Andrei Cucu, Gabriel Dumitrescu,Claudia Costea

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This case present a rare forensic case of cervical spinal gunshot injury of a female by her husband, a professional hunter, during a family fight with a shotgun fire pellets. The gunshot destroyed completely the cervical spinal cord, without injury to the neck vessels and organs and with the patient survival for seven days. We discuss notions of judicial ballistics, assessment of the patient with spinal cord gunshot injury and therapeutic strategies. Even if cervical spine gunshot injuries are most of the times lethal for majority of patients, the surviving patients need the coordination of a multidisciplinary surgical team to ensure the optimal functional prognostic.

  15. Imaging of spinal stenosis: neurogenic intermittent claudication and cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Timothy P

    2012-07-01

    Spinal stenosis in either the cervical or lumbar spinal segments is one of the most common indications for spine imaging and intervention, particularly among the elderly. This article examines the pathophysiology and imaging of the corresponding clinical syndromes, cervical spondylotic myelopathy or neurogenic intermittent claudication. The specificity fault of spine imaging is readily evident in evaluation of spinal stenosis, as many patients with anatomic cervical or lumbar central canal narrowing are asymptomatic. Imaging also may be insensitive to dynamic lesions. Those imaging features that identify symptomatic patients, or predict response to interventions, are emphasized. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Advantageous usage combined spinal, epidural and general anesthesia versus general anesthesia in abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malenković Vesna

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Type and technique of anesthesia have an important effect on per operative surgical course. The aim of the study was prospective analyses of advantages of combined spinal, epidural and general anesthesia (CSEGA versus general anesthesia (GA in abdominal surgery according to: 1. operative course (haemodynamic stability of patients, quality of analgesia, undesirables effects, 2. postoperative course (quality of analgesia, unfavorable effects, temporary abode of patients in intensive care. Using prospective randomized double blind controlled study, we evaluated two groups of patients whom the same type of abdominal surgical intervention was planed and the only difference was the type of technique of anesthesia. First group of patients (n=34, was treated with CSEGA and second group of patients (n=33, was treated only with standard (GA. Both groups had intraoperative and 24-hour-long postoperative continued monitoring of blood pressure central venous pressure, and dieresis. In the 24 hours postoperative period the following parameters were analyzed: vigilance conditions, motor block level, pain intensity in rest and movement, necessity for a complementary analgesia, side effects and final subjective effect of analgesia. There was important difference in waking up the patients after a general anesthesia in the first group this period was shorter. In the first 24 hours, patients from the first group didn't get any systemic analgesic, while the patients from the second group needed fractionary application of parenteral analgesics in the period of 4-6 hours. Patients from the first group were also physically faster and easier recovered and they had less respiratory complications and there was not any example of thromboembolysm and the intestine motility was faster re-established. First group of patients spent less time in intensive care (three days than second group (six days. Final subjective effect of analgesia, according to verbal descriptive scale

  17. Effects of different doses of epidural midazolam on spinal somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciçek, S; Attar, A; Tuna, H; Keçik, Y; Egemen, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the effects of different doses of midazolam, when used epidurally, on somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) by delaying neuronal conduction. Thirty two New Zeland albino male rabbits were divided into four groups. All rabbits were anesthetised with ketamine and xylasine combination and atracurium was used as muscle relaxant. 10 mg/kg/hr ketamine infusion was used for maintenance of anesthesia. After insertion of the epidural catheter surgically; Group 1 received 1.5 ml isotonic saline (Control), Group 2 received 150 microg/kg, Group 3 received 250 microg/kg, and Group 4 received 500 microg/kg midazolam epidurally. With the stimulation of sciatic nerve. SEP records were recorded from the epidural space. Records were received before the injection of the drug, and 20, 40, 60 minutes after injection of the drug. "Latency" results were increased according to control in all groups (including isotonic saline-control-group). Increase in latency in the control group was interpreted as due to the effect of temperature mismatch of the saline and the rabbits. While in the first and second group amplitudes showed no differences, group 3 and 4 showed decreases of up to 50%. Epidurally administered midazolam up to 150 microg/kg caused no change in SEP records, but 250 and 500 microg/kg doses caused decreases in SEP records which can lead to misinterpretation as neurological damage.

  18. A Novel Cervical Spinal Cord Window Preparation Allows for Two-Photon Imaging of T-Cell Interactions with the Cervical Spinal Cord Microvasculature during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghayegh Jahromi, Neda; Tardent, Heidi; Enzmann, Gaby; Deutsch, Urban; Kawakami, Naoto; Bittner, Stefan; Vestweber, Dietmar; Zipp, Frauke; Stein, Jens V.; Engelhardt, Britta

    2017-01-01

    T-cell migration across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a crucial step in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Two-photon intravital microscopy (2P-IVM) has been established as a powerful tool to study cell–cell interactions in inflammatory EAE lesions in living animals. In EAE, central nervous system inflammation is strongly pronounced in the spinal cord, an organ in which 2P-IVM imaging is technically very challenging and has been limited to the lumbar spinal cord. Here, we describe a novel spinal cord window preparation allowing to use 2P-IVM to image immune cell interactions with the cervical spinal cord microvascular endothelium during EAE. We describe differences in the angioarchitecture of the cervical spinal cord versus the lumbar spinal cord, which will entail different hemodynamic parameters in these different vascular beds. Using T cells as an example, we demonstrate the suitability of this novel methodology in imaging the post-arrest multistep T-cell extravasation across the cervical spinal cord microvessels. The novel methodology includes an outlook to the analysis of the cellular pathway of T-cell diapedesis across the BBB by establishing visualization of endothelial junctions in this vascular bed. PMID:28443093

  19. Comparative evaluation of surgical alternatives in the treatment of acute cervical myelopathy and in the decompression of cervical spinal canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Czigléczki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of cervical myelopathy are caused by the compression of the cervical spinal cord in the narrowed spinal canal. Several techniques including less invasive and minimally invasive methods have been developed with the aim of decompressing the cervical spinal canal, preserving posterior motion segments and paraspinal muscles as much as possible, reducing iatrogenic consequences and promoting faster recoveries of patients. The purpose of this article is to summarize these procedures and evaluate their efficacy with comparing them to each other. The applicable methods are presented shortly but the differences between them are discussed in details. Comprehensive examination did not reveal the proven superiority of any techniques and in most cases the less invasive or minimally invasive treatment choices should be individually determined, considering the location and extension of pathology and the familiarity of surgeon with techniques.

  20. 'Crashing' the rugby scrum -- an avoidable cause of cervical spinal injury. Case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, A T

    1982-06-12

    Deliberate crashing of the opposing packs prior to a rugby scrum is an illegal but commonly practised manoeuvre which can lead to abnormal flexion forces being applied to players in the front row, with resultant cervical spine and spinal cord injury. Two cases of cervical spinal cord injury sustained in this manner are presented. The mechanism of injury, the forces involved and preventive measures are discussed.

  1. Combined Spinal-Epidural Analgesia for Laboring Parturient with Arnold-Chiari Type I Malformation: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark K. Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic management of laboring parturients with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation poses a difficult challenge for the anesthesiologist. The increase in intracranial pressure during uterine contractions, coughing, valsalva maneuvers, and expulsion of the fetus can be detrimental to the mother during the process of labor and delivery. No concrete evidence has implicated high cerebral spinal fluid pressure on maternal and fetal complications. The literature on the use of neuraxial techniques for managing parturients with Arnold-Chiari is extremely scarce. While most anesthesiologists advocate epidural analgesia for management of labor pain and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section, we are the first to report the use of combined spinal-epidural analgesia for managing labor pain in a pregnant woman with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation. Also, we have reviewed the literature and presented information from case reports and case series to support the safe usage of neuraxial techniques in these patients.

  2. Radium-223 outcomes after multiple lines of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer therapy in clinical practice: implication of pre-treatment spinal epidural disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, D E; Osborne, J R; Zumsteg, Z S; Rebeiz, K; Leeman, J; Rivera, A; Morris, M J; Zelefsky, M J

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not routinely performed before initiating radium-223 to document spinal epidural disease. However, radium-223 decays to form α-particles with very short path lengths that may not reach the epidural space. Herein, we investigate the impact of baseline spinal epidural disease on metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated with radium-223. Between October 2013 to December 2014, 41 consecutive mCRPC patients at a large tertiary cancer center were prescribed radium-223 as part of standard of care. 29% of patients had pre-treatment epidural disease (posMRI), 27% had no epidural disease (negMRI), and 44% did not have a baseline MRI (noMRI). All patients had post-treatment spinal imaging. Actuarial survival times were calculated for overall survival (OS), spinal axis radiographic progression-free survival (spinePFS) and epidural progression-free survival (epiPFS) from time of first radium-223 treatment. For patients with posMRI (n=12), noMRI (n=18) and negMRI (n=11) cumulative rates of development or worsening of epidural disease and/or high-grade cord compression at time of last follow-up were 83%, 44% and 9%, respectively (P=0.001). For the posMRI, noMRI and negMRI groups the median OS was 6.3 months, 12.6 months and not reached (P=0.01), the median spinePFS was 3.2 months, 4.8 months and not reached (P=0.01), and the median epiPFS was 3.2 months, 10.4 months and not reached (P=0.001). Completing less than six cycles of radium-223 was significantly associated with worse OS (Pradium-223 therapy. Studies are needed to determine the optimal timing of radium-223 with other mCRPC therapies given the predilection for epidural disease and treatment failure after multiple prior lines of mCRPC therapy.

  3. Unusual stab wound of the spinal cervical cord caused by a screw driver

    OpenAIRE

    Mashlehaty, Homajoun; Petridis, Athanasios K; Nabavi, Arya; Mehdorn, Hubertus Maximilian

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of dorsal cervical spinal cord injury in a 16-year-old boy caused by a screwdriver. Neurological deficits were hypaesthesia of the right body and neurovegetative functional deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging showed significant myelopathy and a subdural haematoma of the cervical spine. Surgical treatment was not necessary. Rheological infusions, lumbar puncture and rehabilitation resulted in full neurological recovery.

  4. Improving Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This application proposes to help improve survival, decrease early dependence on mechanical ventilation, and restore breathing after cervical spinal...complications. This application proposes to help improve survival, decrease early dependence on mechanical ventilation, and restore breathing after...training as cervical SCI is a complicated and difficult surgery and much practice is needed in order to produce consistent injury outcomes

  5. How Effective Is a Virtual Consultation Process in Facilitating Multidisciplinary Decision-Making for Malignant Epidural Spinal Cord Compression?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, David [Palliative Radiation Oncology Program and Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); St Luke' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Grabarz, Daniel [Palliative Radiation Oncology Program and Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Centro Oncologia Mendel and Associados, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Wang, Lisa [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea [Palliative Radiation Oncology Program and Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Fehlings, Michael G. [Division of Neurosurgery, Krembil Neuroscience Center, Spinal Program, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Fosker, Christopher [Palliative Radiation Oncology Program and Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Rampersaud, Raja [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Krembil Neuroscience Center, Spinal Program, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Wong, Rebecca K.S., E-mail: rebecca.wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Palliative Radiation Oncology Program and Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of a virtual consultation (VC) process in determining treatment strategy for patients with malignant epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC). Methods and Materials: A prospective clinical database was maintained for patients with MESCC. A virtual consultation process (involving exchange of key predetermined clinical information and diagnostic imaging) facilitated rapid decision-making between oncologists and spinal surgeons. Diagnostic imaging was reviewed retrospectively (by R.R.) for surgical opinions in all patients. The primary outcome was the accuracy of virtual consultation opinion in predicting the final treatment recommendation. Results: After excluding 20 patients who were referred directly to the spinal surgeon, 125 patients were eligible for virtual consultation. Of the 46 patients who had a VC, surgery was recommended in 28 patients and actually given to 23. A retrospective review revealed that 5/79 patients who did not have a VC would have been considered surgical candidates. The overall accuracy of the virtual consultation process was estimated at 92%. Conclusion: The VC process for MESCC patients provides a reliable means of arriving at a multidisciplinary opinion while minimizing patient transfer. This can potentially shorten treatment decision time and enhance clinical outcomes.

  6. Spinal epidural lipomatosis associated with Paget's disease of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koziarz, P. [Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON K1H 8M5 (Canada); Avruch, L. [Department of Radiology, The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa ON K1H 8L6 (Canada)

    2002-10-01

    We present a case of epidural lipomatosis in a non-obese patient with no history of steroid use. On MRI, the lipomatous mass had an unusual appearance and was centered over thoracic vertebrae with Paget's disease. Decompressive laminectomy was effective in promoting resolution of the neurological deficits. (orig.)

  7. A prospective randomized study comparing percutaneous nephrolithotomy under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia with percutaneous nephrolithotomy under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishwajeet; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Sankhwar, S N; Malik, Anita

    2011-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was executed to compare the surgical parameters and stone clearance in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA) versus those who underwent PNL under general anesthesia (GA). Between January 2008 to December 2009, 64 patients with renal calculi were randomized into 2 groups and evaluated for the purpose of this study. Group 1 consisted of patients who underwent PNL under CSEA and Group 2 consisted of patients who underwent PNL under GA. The operative time, stone clearance rate, visual pain analog score, mean analgesic dose and mean hospital stay were compared amongst other parameters. The difference between visual pain analog score after the operation and the dose of analgesic requirement was significant on statistical analysis between both groups. PNL under CSEA is as effective and safe as PNL under GA. Patients who undergo PNL under CESA require lesser analgesic dose and have a shorter hospital stay. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. A Cadaveric Study of the Morphometry of the Cervical Spinal Canal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphometry of the cervical spinal canal is of clinical importance in traumatic, degenerative and inflammatory conditions. A small canal diameter has been associated with an increase of injury mainly in athletes who participate in contact or collision sports. Before abnormal spinal morphometry can be determined, it is first ...

  9. Cervicothoracic syringomyelia caused by cervical spinal stenosis: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Mohamed; Gader, Ghassen; Bahri, Kamel; Zammel, Ihsen

    2017-01-01

    Syringomyelia is commonly associated with Chiari malformations, spinal trauma, arachnoiditis, or tumors. However, rarely, cervical canal stenosis is implicated in intramedullary cavitations. Here, we report the case of a 60-year-old male patient who presented with loss of pain and temperature sensation in upper extremities associated with a spastic tetraparesis. On magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was found to have syringomyelia extending from C1 to Th3. Following posterior decompressive surgery, the syrinx resolved along with the patient's neurological complaints. Here, the authors presented a case and reviewed the literature regarding how cervical spinal stenosis may contribute to cervical or thoracic syringomyelia.

  10. [Maternal hypotension with low doses of spinal bupivacaine or levobupivacaine and epidural volume expansion with saline for cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch, E; Gilsanz, F; Díez, J; Alsina, E

    2010-05-01

    Epidural volume extension (EVE) with saline solution can contribute to greater cephalad spread of drugs injected into the subarachnoid space during cesarean section. We studied the incidence of material hypotension with spinal bupivacaine or levobupivacaine (L-bupivacaine) and the spread after epidural saline injection. After ethics committee approval, we randomized women scheduled for cesarean section to 4 groups to receive 5 mg of 0.25% bupivacaine with (n=51) or without (n=6) saline EVE; 5 mg of 025% L-bupivacaine (n=50); or 6 mg of 03% L-bupivacaine (n=50). All patients also received 25 microg of fentanyl per 2 mL of local hyperbaric spinal anesthetic. In all except the non-EVE group, 10 mL of saline was infused through an epidural catheter 5 minutes after anesthetic infusion. We recorded patient demographic data, procedural and anesthetic times, incision-clamping times, occurrence of hypotension, ephedrine dose required, motor and sensory blockade, requirement for rescue analgesics, and neonatal outcome. After 6 patients had been randomized to the non-EVE group, no further patients were assigned because all the women required rescue analgesics. Demographic data, duration of procedure, time between. incision and delivery, and Apgar scores were similar in all the groups. The incidence of hypotension was lower in the group receiving 5 mg of L-bupivacaine (26% vs. 52.9% in the bupivacaine 5-mg group, and 56% in the 6-mg L-bupivacaine group, P = .04). More women given 5 mg of L-bupivacaine required rescue analgesia (46%) than did those receiving 5 mg of bupivacaine (235%) or 6 mg of L-bupivacaine (28%) (P = .039). Hypotension was associated with a lower umbilical cord pH (P = .001). Ephedrine doses over 20 mg were also associated with a lower umbilical cord pH (P = .031). The incidence of hypotension was lowest in the group anesthetized with 5 mg of L-bupivacaine, but the need for rescue analgesia was greater in this group. Doses of 5 mg and 6 mg may be sufficient

  11. A Latent Propriospinal Network Can Restore Diaphragm Function after High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared M. Cregg

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI above cervical level 4 disrupts descending axons from the medulla that innervate phrenic motor neurons, causing permanent paralysis of the diaphragm. Using an ex vivo preparation in neonatal mice, we have identified an excitatory spinal network that can direct phrenic motor bursting in the absence of medullary input. After complete cervical SCI, blockade of fast inhibitory synaptic transmission caused spontaneous, bilaterally coordinated phrenic bursting. Here, spinal cord glutamatergic neurons were both sufficient and necessary for the induction of phrenic bursts. Direct stimulation of phrenic motor neurons was insufficient to evoke burst activity. Transection and pharmacological manipulations showed that this spinal network acts independently of medullary circuits that normally generate inspiration, suggesting a distinct non-respiratory function. We further show that this “latent” network can be harnessed to restore diaphragm function after high cervical SCI in adult mice and rats.

  12. [Appraise operative outcome for acute central cervical spinal cord injuries without fracture and dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-yuan; Ma, Xin; Lü, Fei-zhou; Xu, Zheng-feng

    2007-03-15

    To evaluate the surgical outcome for acute central cervical spinal cord injuries without fracture and dislocation. A retrospective study was performed on 52 patients with acute central cervical cord injuries without fracture and dislocation from 2000 to 2005. All of patients underwent cervical anterior or posterior decompression, fusion and inter fixation. Spinal function was evaluated by ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) guidelines. Pre- and post-operation ASIA scores were analyzed using liner correlation and regression. The neurological function was recorded during followed-up. The average follow-up was 29 months (range, 12 to 42). After operation, the ASIA scores increased significantly (P<0.01). Finally, ASIA motor, pin pricking and light touching scores of the 41 patients were 91 +/- 7, 107 +/- 6 and 107 +/- 6 respectively. Decompression and inter fixation for injured segment can make a stable and broad space for spinal cord, promoting early neurological recovery and long-term improvement.

  13. Transforaminal epidural steroid injection in lumbar spinal stenosis: an observational study with two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Niel; Hourigan, Patrick; Clarke, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) is recognised as a treatment for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation, whilst surgical decompression is generally thought to be the most effective treatment option for lumbar spinal stenosis. There is little available literature examining the effect of TFESI on symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. To evaluate the use of TFESI as an alternative to surgery in patients with symptomatic stenosis. An observational study which took place between May 2010 and July 2013. All patients were seen by the Extended Scope Physiotherapist (ESP) injection service. A total of 68 consecutive patients were included. Thirty-one were male and 37 were female. The average age was 75 years. The primary outcome measure was the avoidance of decompressive surgery. Patients with radicular leg pain were seen by an ESP in an Outpatient setting. Concordant clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging were required for diagnosis. Peri-radicular bupivacaine hydrochloride 0.25% (3 ml) and triamcinolone (40 mg) were then injected. Outcome measures were recorded at 6 weeks, 1 year and 2 years. Of 68 patients with spinal stenosis, 22 (32%) had opted for surgery at two year follow-up. Thirty (44%) patients were satisfied with non-surgical management at 2 years, required no further treatment, and were discharged. Of the remaining 24%, nine patients were referred for further injection, four declined surgery but were referred to the Pain Relief Clinic, two still had a similar level of pain but declined surgery and one had died. Our study reports a considerably lower percentage patients opting for surgery than previously demonstrated by the available literature. TFESI is a reasonable treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis and can result in long-term relief from symptoms in a high proportion of patients.

  14. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (pspinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (pinjury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors that synergistically work together producing a negative impact on weaning outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Multimodal Treatment Approach using Spinal Decompression via SpineMED, Flexion-Distraction Mobilization of the Cervical Spine, and Cervical Stabilization Exercises for the Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ma, Sang-Yeol; Je, Hyun Dong; Kim, Hyeong-Dong

    2011-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether a multimodal treatment approach using spinal decompression via SpineMED and spinal mobilization as well as cervical stabilization exercises would...

  16. Cervical Alignment Changes in Patients Developing Proximal Junctional Kyphosis Following Surgical Correction of Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passias, Peter G; Horn, Samantha R; Jalai, Cyrus M; Ramchandran, Subaraman; Poorman, Gregory W; Kim, Han Jo; Smith, Justin S; Sciubba, Daniel; Soroceanu, Alexandra; Ames, Christopher P; Hamilton, D Kojo; Eastlack, Robert; Burton, Douglas; Gupta, Munish; Bess, Shay; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank

    2017-10-12

    Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) following adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery is a well-documented complication, but associations between radiographic PJK and cervical malalignment onset remain unexplored. To study cervical malalignment in ASD surgical patients that develop PJK. Retrospective review of prospective multicenter database. Inclusion: primary ASD patients (≥5 levels fused, upper instrumented vertebra [UIV] at T2 or above, and 1-yr minimum follow-up) without baseline cervical deformity (CD), defined as ≥2 of the following criteria: T1 slope minus cervical lordosis .05). Increased PJK magnitude was associated with increasing T1 slope and C2-T3 SVA (P deformity.

  17. Comments on a systematic review and meta-analysis of steroids for epidural injections in spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchikanti L

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Joshua A Hirsch3,41Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, KY, USA; 2Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA; 3Interventional Care, Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery, Interventional Radiology, NeuroInterventional Services and Neuroendovascular Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 4Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAWe read with interest the manuscript by Liu et al a systematic review and meta-analysis of steroids for epidural injection in spinal stenosis. The results showed there was fair short- and long-term benefit for treating spinal stenosis with local anesthetic and steroids; however, the authors concluded that the meta-analysis suggested that epidural steroid injections provided limited improvement in short- and long-term benefits in lumbar spinal stenosis patients. This may be confusing to the readership. Fair evidence essentially provides moderate benefits, but the conclusion shows limited improvement.Further, the authors included a wide variety of studies which are not applicable to the meta-analysis. Issues include studies performed with or without fluoroscopy, with short-term and long-term follow-up, with local anesthetic or without local anesthetic, inter-laminar, caudal, and transforaminal approaches, and some very small studies. Multiple studies with variable bias were also included in the meta-analysis. Further, the risk of bias assessment appears to be inappropriate. For example, both studies by Manchikanti et al, even though identical, were rated differently showing variable bias. Further, multiple items were rated inaccurately which differed for each study even though they were identical. These two trials have been assessed in the past in multiple systematic reviews and were rated as high quality, meeting at least 8 of 12 criteria of Cochrane review criteria which have been compressed to 7 in this

  18. Epidural and transcutaneous spinal electrical stimulation for restoration of movement after incomplete and complete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Winfried; Krenn, Matthias; Dimitrijevic, Milan R

    2016-12-01

    The Purpose of this review is to outline and explain the therapeutic use of electrical spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for modification of spinal motor output. Central functional stimulation provides afferent input to posterior root neurons and is applied to improve volitional movements, posture and their endurance, control spasticity, and improve bladder function or perfusion in the lower limbs. Clinical accomplishments strongly depend on each individual's physiological state and specific methodical adaptation to that physiological state. Effectiveness of this neuromodulory technique for changing motor control after spinal cord injury (SCI) continues to be explored along with the underlying mechanisms of its effect in people with complete and incomplete spinal cord injuries. There are extensive studies of tonic and rhythmical activity elicited from the lumbar cord as well as data demonstrating augmentation of residual volitional activity. Recent studies have focused on verifying if and how SCS can modify features of neurocontrol in ambulatory spinal cord patients. In this review, we emphasize recent publications of research revealing that SCS can substitute for the reduced brain drive for control of excitability in people with SCI. Artificially replacing diminished or lost brain control over the spinal cord has limitations. A fundamental requirement for successful SCS application is analysis of each individual's residual postinjury neural function. This will allow a better understanding of the physiological interactions between SCS and spinal cord motor control below injury and provide criteria for its application. Finally, the publication of both successful and failed applications of SCS will be crucial for gaining future progress.

  19. Radiation Dose Reduction in CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Cervical Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection by Modifying Scout and Planning Steps

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    Paik, Nam Chull, E-mail: pncspine@gmail.com [Arumdaun Wooldul Spine Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Background and PurposeIn CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI), the majority of radiation dose is contributed by the planning CT scan rather than the CTF procedure itself. We replaced the planning helical CT with a spot CTF and accordingly changed the patient posture during scout and planning scans. The aim of this study was to test whether radiation dose reduction would be achieved by this protocol modification while still maintaining technical performance.MethodsOverall, 338 consecutive procedures before (control group: n = 163) and after (study group: n = 175) instituting the above-mentioned protocol modification were analyzed retrospectively, comparing patient characteristics (age, sex, neck diameter, and level injected) and technical performance [technical success rate, dose-length product (DLP), inadvertent contrast flow incidence, number of CTF acquisitions, and procedural time] between the two groups.ResultsAll injections were technically successful at every level from C3–C4 to C7–T1 without serious complications in both groups. The median DLP of the study group (7.92 mGy·cm) was significantly reduced compared to that of the control group (39.05 mGy·cm, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the incidence of inadvertent contrast flow (20.6 vs. 17.2 %, P = 0.426), number of CTF acquisitions (median 5 vs. 4, P = 0.123), and the procedural time (median 6.62 vs. 6.90 min, P = 0.100).ConclusionsWhen conducting CTF-guided cervical TFESIs, a significant radiation dose reduction (median 79.7 % in DLP) can be achieved by modifying scout and planning steps, without compromising the technical performance.

  20. Development of Cervical Spinal Cord Evoked Magnetic Field Measurement System Using SQUID Magnetometers

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    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Masakazu; Kawai, Jun; Uehara, Gen; Kawabata, Shigenori; Sato, Tomoya

    We are investigating an application of the biomagnetic measurement to non-invasive diagnosis of spinal cord function. Multichannel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) biomagnetometer systems for the measurement of the evoked magnetic field from spinal cords were developed as hospital-use apparatuses. The specific pattern transition of the spinal cord evoked field distribution was clearly observed. The conduction velocity of the cervical spinal cord, which is a significant information for the diagnosis of the dysfunction, was non-invasively estimated from the magnetic measurement.

  1. Cervical Spinal Cord Injury at the Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service: Epidemiology of the Last Decade

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    Simon C.P. Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI is a significant medical and socioeconomic problem. In Victoria, Australia, there has been limited research into the incidence of CSCI. The Austin Hospital's Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service (VSCIS is a tertiary referral hospital that accepts referrals for surgical management and ongoing neurological rehabilitation for south eastern Australia. The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of CSCI managed operatively at the VSCIS over the last decade, in order to help fashion public health campaigns. Methods This was a retrospective review of medical records from January 2000 to December 2009 of all patients who underwent surgical management of acute CSCI in the VSCIS catchment region. Patients treated non-operatively were excluded. Outcome measures included: demographics, mechanism of injury and associated factors (like alcohol and patient neurological status. Results Men were much more likely to have CSCI than women, with a 4:1 ratio, and the highest incidence of CSCI for men was in their 20s (39%. The most common cause of CSCI was transport related (52%, followed by falls (23% and water-related incidents (16%. Falls were more prevalent among those >50 years. Alcohol was associated in 22% of all CSCIs, including 42% of water-related injuries. Discussion Our retrospective epidemiological study identified at-risk groups presenting to our spinal injury service. Young males in their 20s were associated with an increased risk of transport-related accidents, water-related incidents in the summer months and accidents associated with alcohol. Another high risk group were men >50 years who suffer falls, both from standing and from greater heights. Public awareness campaigns should target these groups to lower incidence of CSCI.

  2. Epidural Spinal Stimulation to Improve Bladder, Bowel, and Sexual Function in Individuals With Spinal Cord Injuries: A Framework for Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Roderic I; Heetderks, William J; Kelley, Christine A; Peng, Grace C Y; Krosnick, Steven H; Jakeman, Lyn B; Egan, Katharine D; Marge, Michael

    2017-02-01

    While some recent studies that apply epidural spinal cord stimulation (SCS) have demonstrated a breakthrough in improvement of the health and quality of the life of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), the numbers of people who have received SCS are small. This is in sharp contrast to the thousands of persons worldwide living with SCI who have no practical recourse or hope of recovery of lost functions. Thus, the vision is to understand the full potential of this new intervention and to determine if it is safe and effective in a larger cohort, and if it is scalable so that it can be made available to all those who might benefit. To achieve this vision, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering called for and organized a consortium of multiple stakeholder groups: foundations addressing paralysis, federal and public agencies, industrial partners, academicians, and researchers, all interested in the same goal. Based on input from consortium participants, we have reasoned that a first step is to define a scalable SCS approach that is effective in restoring lost autonomic physiology, specifically bladder, bowel, and sexual function. These functions are most critical for improving the quality of life of persons living with SCI. This report outlines a framework for conducting the research needed to define such an effective SCS procedure that might seek Food and Drug Administration approval and be implemented at the population level.

  3. Clinical therapeutic effect of surgery on 
upper cervical spinal cord tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Zou, Mingxiang; Liu, Congcong; Deng, Youwen

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the long-term clinical therapeutic effect of polyaxial screw-rod system for posterior cervical arthrodesis on patients with upper cervical spinal cord tumors.
 From March 2007 to May 2013, 22 patients with upper cervical spinal cord tumors underwent tumor resection and posterior cervical arthrodesis in our institution. The medical records of these patients were reviewed respectively. There were 10 males and 12 females with ages ranging from 16 to 60 years old. Posterior cervical arthrodesis by polyaxial screw-rod was performed at the upper cervical spine (C1-3). All patients were followed-up clinically and radiographically.
 The average follow-up was 65.5 months. Twenty-two patients were enrolled and a total of 114 screws were placed in this study. Histopathology revealed neurinoma, meningioma, ganglioneuroma and ganglioglioma in 16, 3, 1 and 1 case (s), respectively. The mixed tumor with component of ganglioneuroma and neurinoma was observed in 1 case. All patients received tumor resection and posterior athrodesis by polyaxial screw-rod system. Cervical kyphosis was encountered in one patient and this patient suffered the recurrence of tumor. Solid fusion was achieved in all patients. The average postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was 13.9 and the average recovery rate was 51.4%. Neurologic deterioration was found in 2 patients. No complications, such as spinal cord or vertebral artery injury, postoperative radiculopathy or instrumentation failure, were observed.
 The long-term clinical therapeutic effects of posterior cervical arthrodesis using polyaxial screw-rod system on upper cervical spinal cord tumors are satisfactory, with no severe complication.

  4. Patterns of Phrenic Nerve Discharge after Complete High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in the Decerebrate Rat.

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    Ghali, Michael George Zaki; Marchenko, Vitaliy

    2016-06-15

    Studies conducted since the second half of the 19th century have revealed spontaneous as well as pharmacologically induced phasic/rhythmic discharge in spinal respiratory motor outputs of cats, dogs, rabbits, and neonatal rats following high cervical transection (Tx). The extent to which these various studies validate the existence of a true spinal respiratory rhythm generator remains debated. In this set of studies, we seek to characterize patterns of spontaneous phasic/rhythmic, asphyxia-induced, and pharmacologically induced activity occurring in phrenic nerve (PhN) discharge after complete high cervical (C1-C2) spinal cord transection. Experiments were performed on 20 unanesthetized decerebrate Sprague-Dawley adult male rats. Patterns of spontaneous activity after spinalization included tonic, phasic, slow oscillatory, and long-lasting tonic discharges. Topical application of antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors to C1- and C2- spinal segments induced left-right synchronized phasic decrementing activity in PhN discharge that was abolished by an additional C2Tx. Asphyxia elicited increases in tonic activity and left-right synchronized gasp-like bursts in PhN discharge, demonstrating the presence of spinal circuits that may underlie a spinal gasping-like mechanism. We conclude that intrinsic slow oscillators and a phasic burst/rhythm generator exist in the spinal cord of the adult rat. If present in humans, this mechanism may be exploited to recover respiratory function in patients sustaining severe spinal cord injury.

  5. Acute cervical cord infarction in anterior spinal artery territory with acute swelling mimicking myelitis.

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    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; AbouAl-Shaar, Iyad; Al-Kawi, Mohammed Z

    2015-10-01

    Acute infarction of the cervical segment of the spinal cord is extremely uncommon. Patients may present with signs and symptoms mimicking that of acute myelitis. On imaging, both conditions may present as a hyperintense area on T-2 weighted MRI. History of sudden onset is essential in establishing the diagnosis. We report a case of cervical spinal cord infarction in a 40-year-old man who was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, and was treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroids followed by 5 sessions of plasma exchange. An MRI of the spine revealed abnormal high T2 signal intensity extending from the C2 to C7 level involving the anterior two-thirds of the cord with more central involvement. The findings were consistent with anterior spinal artery territory cervical cord infarction.

  6. Novel use of epidural catheter: Air injection for neuroprotection during radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma

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    J R Doctor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid osteoma (OO is a benign bone tumor, with a male-female ratio of approximately 2:1 and mainly affecting long bones. Ten percent of the lesions occur in the spine, mostly within the posterior elements. Treatment options for OO include surgical excision and percutaneous imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA. Lesions within the spine have an inherent risk of thermal damage to the vital structure because of proximity to the neural elements. We report a novel use of the epidural catheter for air injection for the neuroprotection of nerves close to the OO of the spine. A 12-year-old and 30 kg male child with an OO of the L3 vertebra was taken up for RFA. His preoperative examinations were within normal limits. The OO was very close to the L3 nerve root. Under general anesthesia, lumbar epidural catheter was placed in the L3-L4 space under imaging guidance. Ten ml of aliquots of air was injected under imaging guidance to avoid injury to the neural structures due to RFA. The air created a gap between neural elements and the tumor and served as an insulating material thereby protecting the neural elements from damage due to the RFA. Postoperatively, the patient did not develop any neurological deficit.

  7. A Case of Infective Endocarditis and Spinal Epidural Abscess Caused by Streptococcus mitis Bacteremia

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    Victoria S. Byrd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old man presented with abdominal pain, hematemesis, and melena. He reported taking high-dose ibuprofen for back pain and drinking several 24-ounce beers daily. Examination was remarkable for icteric sclera, poor dentition, tachycardia, and crescendo-decrescendo murmur at right upper sternal border, radiating to the carotids. Labs revealed leukocytosis, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver function tests and INR. Endoscopy demonstrated antral ulcers, duodenitis, and esophagitis. Blood cultures were obtained and broad-spectrum antibiotics started; cultures later grew Streptococcus mitis, and antibiotic coverage was narrowed. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE demonstrated aortic stenosis and regurgitation, but no vegetation. Repeat blood cultures were negative; however, the patient developed neurological symptoms concerning for cauda equina syndrome, and MRI revealed epidural abscess. Emergent decompression could not be performed as the patient developed hematemesis and required intubation. Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE, initially deferred due to friable esophageal mucosa, was performed and revealed small aortic valve vegetation. Poor oral hygiene was felt to be the probable source of the patient’s S. mitis bacteremia, epidural abscess, and infective endocarditis. The patient’s neurological symptoms resolved without intervention and remaining teeth were extracted. This case demonstrates that Streptococcus mitis can result in clinically significant bacteremia, particularly in immunocompromised patients, including chronic heavy alcohol users.

  8. Comparison of contrast flow and clinical effectiveness between a modified paramedian interlaminar approach and transforaminal approach in cervical epidural steroid injection.

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    Choi, E; Nahm, F S; Lee, P-B

    2015-11-01

    The different methods of cervical epidural injection include the median or paramedian interlaminar (PI) approach and the transforaminal (TF) approach. We hypothesized that the modified PI (mPI) approach could deliver drugs suitably and safely into the anterior epidural space compared with the TF approach. A total of 62 patients were randomized into either the mPI group (n=31) or the TF group (n=31). Contrast to the anterior epidural space (primary outcome, grade 1-3), vascular uptake and discomfort were assessed. Furthermore, pain intensity in the arm and neck [numeric rating scale (NRS)] and the degree of symptoms (5-point Likert scale) before the procedure and 2 weeks, 1 and 3 months following the procedure were compared between two groups. Effectiveness (a secondary outcome) was defined as a ≥50% reduction on the NRS for arm and neck pain and a result of 3 or 4 on the Likert scale at 3 months following the procedure. Contrast to the anterior epidural space in the mPI group was significantly greater than that in the TF group (P=0.036). Vascular uptake and discomfort in the mPI group were significantly lower than those in the TF group (Papproach allows for suitable and safe delivery of drugs into the anterior epidural space. Institutional Review Board of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (B-1206/159-004) and Clinical Research Information Service (KCT0000626). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Upper cervical myelopathy due to arachnoiditis and spinal cord tethering from adjacent C-2 osteomyelitis. Case report and review of the literature.

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    Rajpal, Sharad; Chanbusarakum, Krisada; Deshmukh, Praveen R

    2007-01-01

    Myelopathy caused by a spinal cord infection is typically related to an adjacent compressive lesion such as an epidural abscess. The authors report a case of progressive high cervical myelopathy from spinal cord tethering caused by arachnoiditis related to an adjacent C-2 osteomyelitis. This 70-year-old woman initially presented with a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis involving the C-2 odontoid process. She was treated with appropriate antibiotic therapy but, over the course of 4 weeks, she developed progressive quadriparesis. A magnetic resonance image revealed near-complete resolution of the C-2 osteomyelitis, but new ventral tethering of the cord was observed at the level of the odontoid tip. She subsequently underwent open surgical decompression and cord detethering. Postoperatively she experienced improvement in her symptoms and deficits, which continued to improve 1 year after her surgery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of progressive upper cervical myelopathy due to arachnoiditis and cord tethering from an adjacent methicillin-sensitive S. aureus C-2 osteomyelitis.

  10. A Good Short-term Outcome in Delayed Decompression of Cauda Equina Syndrome in Klebsiella pneumoniae Spinal Epidural Abscess: A Case Report

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    Hanifah J

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural abscess is a severe, generally pyogenic, infection of the epidural space of spinal cord or cauda equina. The swelling caused by the abscess leads to compression or vascular disruption of neurological structures that requires urgent surgical decompression to avoid significant permanent disability. We share a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae spinal epidural abscess secondary to haematogenous spread of previous lung infection that presented late at our centre with cauda equina syndrome that showed good short-term outcome in delayed decompression. A 50-year old female presented with one-week history of persistent low back pain with progressively worsening bilateral lower limb weakness for seven days and urinary retention associated with saddle anesthesia of 2-day duration. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast of the lumbo-sacral region showed an intramuscular collection of abscess at left gluteus maximus and left multifidus muscle with a L3-L5 posteriorly placed extradural lesion enhancing peripherally on contrast, suggestive of epidural abscess that compressed the cauda equina. The pus was drained using the posterior lumbar approach. Tissue and pus culture revealed Klebsiella pneumoniae, suggestive of bacterial infection. The patient made immediate improvement of muscle power over bilateral lower limbs postoperative followed by ability to control micturition and defecation in the 4th post-operative day. A good short-term outcome in delayed decompression of cauda equine syndrome is extremely rare. Aggressive surgical decompression combined with antibiotic therapy led to good short-term outcome in this patient despite delayed decompression of more than 48 hours.

  11. SSFSE sequence functional MRI of the human cervical spinal cord with complex finger tapping

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    Xie Chuhai [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: xiechuhai@hotmail.com; Kong Kangmei [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: kongkm@vip.sina.com; Guan Jitian [Department of Medical Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: jtguan@126.com; Chen Yexi [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: yexichen@21cn.com; He Jiankang [Department of Medical Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: colin3727@sina.com; Qi Weili [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: qiwl@sina.com; Wang Xinjia [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: xj.wang2000@163.com; Shen Zhiwei [Department of Medical Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: zwshen@stu.edu.cn; Wu Renhua [Department of Medical Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: rhwu@stu.edu.cn

    2009-04-15

    Purpose: Functional MR imaging of the human cervical spinal cord was carried out on volunteers during alternated rest and a complex finger tapping task, in order to detect image intensity changes arising from neuronal activity. Methods: Functional MR imaging data using single-shot fast spin-echo sequence (SSFSE) with echo time 42.4 ms on a 1.5 T GE Clinical System were acquired in eight subjects performing a complex finger tapping task. Cervical spinal cord activation was measured both in the sagittal and transverse imaging planes. Postprocessing was performed by AFNI (Analysis of Functional Neuroimages) software system. Results: Intensity changes (5.5-7.6%) were correlated with the time course of stimulation and were consistently detected in both sagittal and transverse imaging planes of the cervical spinal cord. The activated regions localized to the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord in agreement with the neural anatomy. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging signals can be reliably detected with finger tapping activity in the human cervical spinal cord using a SSFSE sequence with 42.4 ms echo time. The anatomic location of neural activity correlates with the muscles used in the finger tapping task.

  12. Epidural injections with or without steroids in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials

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    Meng H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hai Meng, Qi Fei, Bingqiang Wang, Yong Yang, Dong Li, Jinjun Li, Nan Su Department of Orthopedics, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Epidural injections of anesthetic with or without steroids are widely used for treating lumbar spinal stenosis, a common cause of chronic low back pain, but there is a lack of rigorous data comparing the effectiveness of epidural injections of anesthetic with and without steroids. This meta-analysis presents a current, comprehensive picture of how epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids compare with those using local anesthetic alone.Methods: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from their inception through February 5, 2015. Weight mean difference, risk ratio, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A random effects model or fixed effects model was used to pool the estimates, according to the heterogeneity between the included studies.Results: We included 13 randomized controlled trials, involving 1,465 patients. Significant pain relief (≥50% was demonstrated in 53.7% of patients administered with epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids (group 1 and in 56.4% of those administered with local anesthetic alone (group 2. Patients showed a reduction in numeric rating scale pain score of 3.7 and 3.6 in the two groups, respectively. Significant functional improvement was achieved in 65.2% of patients in group 1 and 63.1% of patients in group 2, with Oswestry Disability Index reductions of 13.8 and 14.5 points, respectively. The overall number of injections per year was 3.2±1.3 and 3.4±1.2 with average total relief per year of 29.3±19.7 and 33.8±19.3 weeks, respectively. The opioid intakes decreased from baseline by 12.4 and 7.8 mg, respectively. Among the outcomes listed, only total relief time differed significantly between the two groups.Conclusion: Both epidural injections with

  13. Outcomes of Spinal Fusion for Cervical Kyphosis in Children with Neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Ilkka J; Sponseller, Paul D; Mackenzie, William; Odent, Thierry; Dormans, John P; Asghar, Jahangir; Rathjen, Karl; Pahys, Joshua M; Miyanji, Firoz; Hedequist, Daniel; Phillips, Jonathan H

    2016-11-02

    Cervical kyphosis may occur with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) and is often associated with vertebral dysplasia. Outcomes of cervical spinal fusion in patients with NF1 are not well described because of the rarity of the condition. We aimed to (1) characterize the clinical presentation of cervical kyphosis and (2) report the outcomes of posterior and anteroposterior cervical fusion for the condition in these children. The medical records and imaging studies of 22 children with NF1 who had undergone spinal fusion for cervical kyphosis (mean, 67°) at a mean age of 11 years and who had been followed for a minimum of 2 years were reviewed. Thirteen children presented with neck pain; 10, with head tilt; 9, with a previous cervical laminectomy or fusion; and 5, with a neurologic deficit. Two patients had spontaneous dislocation of the mid-cervical spine without a neurologic deficit. Eleven had scoliosis, with the major curve measuring a mean of 61°. Nine patients underwent posterior and 13 underwent anteroposterior surgery. Twenty-one received spinal instrumentation, and 1 was not treated with instrumentation. Preoperative halo traction was used for 9 patients, and it reduced the mean preoperative kyphosis by 34% (p = 0.0059). At the time of final follow-up, all spinal fusion sites had healed and the cervical kyphosis averaged 21° (mean correction, 69%; p < 0.001). The cervical kyphosis correction was significantly better after the anteroposterior procedures (83%) than after the posterior-only procedures (58%) (p = 0.031). Vertebral dysplasia and erosion continued in all 17 patients who had presented with dysplasia preoperatively. Thirteen patients had complications, including 5 new neurologic deficits and 8 cases of junctional kyphosis. Nine patients required revision surgery. Junctional kyphosis was more common in children in whom ≤5 levels had been fused (p = 0.054). Anteroposterior surgery provided better correction of cervical kyphosis than posterior spinal

  14. Pneumothorax complicating pulmonary embolism after combined spinal epidural anesthesia in a chronic smoker with open femur fracture

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    Shivendu Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism during or after regional anaesthesia is although very rare, it has been reported in cases undergoing lower limb orthopedic procedures. We presenting a 48 years old male, a known smoker since 25 years, with history of road traffic accident and open fracture right femur for external fixation. Combined spinal epidural anaesthesia was given. After 35 minutes patient complained dyspnea and chest pain. SpO2 decreased to 82% from 100%. Continuous positive airway pressure with 100% oxygen was given. SpO2 increased from 82% to 96%. Suddenly he had bouts of cough and SpO2 became 79-80% with unstable haemodynamics. On chest auscultation there was decreased breath sounds on right side with limited expansion. Trachea was intubated after inducing anaesthesia with fentanyl 70 μg and thiopental 300 mg. Chest radiograph showed right sided pneumothorax. Intercostal drain with a water seal was put. After 5 minutes HR was 80/min, BP was 110/69 mmHg and SpO2 was 97%. Pulmonary thromboembolism secondary to deep vein thrombosis was suspected and was confirmed by D-dimer Elisa and color Doppler of lower limbs. Patient was shifted to intensive care unit after completion of surgery. Anticoagulant therapy was started. He was weaned from the ventilator on 3rd day and trachea was extubated. Chest drain was removed after 9 days and he was discharged from hospital on 15th post operative day

  15. Thoracic combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease and renal insufficiency

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    Mehta N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nandita Mehta, Sunana Gupta, Atul Sharma, Mohd Reidwan Dar Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Acharya Shri Chander College of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India Abstract: Older people undergoing any surgery have a higher incidence of morbidity and mortality, resulting from a decline in physiological reserves, associated comorbidities, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and frailty. Most of the clinical trials comparing regional versus general anesthesia in elderly have failed to establish superiority of any single technique. However, the ideal approach in elderly is to be least invasive, thus minimizing alterations in homeostasis. The goal of anesthetic management in laparoscopic procedures includes management of pneumoperitoneum, achieving an adequate level of sensory blockade without any respiratory compromise, management of shoulder tip pain, provision of adequate postoperative pain relief, and early ambulation. Regional anesthesia fulfills all the aforementioned criteria and aids in quick recovery and thus has been suggested to be a suitable alternative to general anesthesia for laparoscopic surgeries, particularly in patients who are at high risk while under general anesthesia or for patients unwilling to undergo general anesthesia. In conclusion, we report results of successful management with thoracic combined spinal epidural for laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal insufficiency. Keywords: geriatric anesthesia, bupivacaine, segmental anesthesia, laparoscopic surgery

  16. The Outcomes of Anterior Spinal Fusion for Cervical Compressive Myelopathy—A Retrospective Review

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    Tsz-King Suen

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Anterior cervical decompression with bone fusion is a viable surgical option for patients with one level of anterior cervical cord compression, especially for patients with kyphosis or straight canal spine. For patients with two- to three-level involvement, anterior cervical decompression with bone fusion provides good functional result in proper selection of cases. We also identified some prognostic factors (male sex, symptoms less than 1 year, and age less than 70 years in predicting a favourable outcome of anterior spinal fusion for CCM.

  17. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, Paavel G. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Inserm U894, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Sanchez, Katherine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, APHP, CHU Cochin, Paris (France); INSERM U1153 Epidemiologie Clinique des Maladies Osteo-Articulaires, Paris (France); Ozcan, Fidan [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Feydy, Antoine [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Maier, Marc A. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. (orig.)

  18. ANTERIOR CERVICAL INTRADURAL ARACHNOID CYST - A RARE CAUSE OF SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollam Chandra Sekhar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Arachnoid cysts of spinal cord are relatively uncommon lesions. Most of them arise dorsal to the cord, and anteriorly placed intradural arachnoid cyst is a rare cause of cervical cord compression. To the best of our knowledge, only 30 cases were reported in the literature. We present a case of anterior cervical intradural arachnoid cyst with review of literature. METHODS We performed a literature search for anteriorly placed intradural arachnoid cysts in the cervical spinal cord through http://pubmed.com, a well-known worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, only 30 cases were reported in the literature. We reviewed the literature with illustration of our case. We present a case of a 40-year-old male patient who presented with insidious onset of radicular pain. MRI cervical spine demonstrated cervical intradural cystic lesion extending from C2 to upper border of C4, lying anteriorly with compression over the cord. Cervical laminectomy followed by wide cyst fenestration and subtotal excision of cyst was done. Histopathological diagnosis was arachnoid cyst. RESULTS Patient totally recovered from his pain and sensory symptoms within a week and motor symptoms improved gradually over a period of six to eight weeks. With two years followup, patient had no further complaints. CONCLUSION Anterior cervical intradural arachnoid cysts are rare. These are amenable to resection through posterior approach safely with good postoperative recovery.

  19. Infections following epidural catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, MS; Andersen, SS; Andersen, Ove

    1995-01-01

    patients with only local symptoms of infection. The microorganisms isolated from the tips of the epidural catheters were coagulase-negative staphylococci (41%), Staphylococcus aureus (35%), Gram-negative bacilli (14%) and others (10%). The Gram-negative bacilli and S. aureus caused serious infections more...... frequently than the others. We discuss the symptoms and diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and suggest a proposal for prophylactic and diagnostic guidelines for epidural catheter-related infections. Comment in: J Hosp Infect. 1997 Mar;35(3):245....

  20. Preliminary report: biomechanics of vertebral artery segments C1-C6 during cervical spinal manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Sarah; Symons, Bruce; Leonard, Timothy; Herzog, Walter

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure strains in the human vertebral artery (VA) within the cervical transverse foramina and report the first results on the mechanical loading of segments of the VA during spinal manipulation of the cervical spine. Eight piezoelectric ultrasound crystals of 0.5-mm diameter were sutured into the lumen of the left and right VA of one cadaver. Four hundred-nanosecond ultrasound pulses were sent between the crystals to measure the instantaneous lengths of the VA segments (total segments n = 14) at a frequency of 200 Hz. Vertebral artery engineering strains were then calculated from the instantaneous lengths during cervical spinal range of motion testing, chiropractic cervical spinal manipulation adjustments, and vertebrobasilar insufficiency testing. The results of this study suggest complex and nonintuitive strain patterns of the VA within the cervical transverse foramina. Consistent (for 2 chiropractors) and repeatable (for 3 repeat measurements for each chiropractor) elongation and shortening of adjacent VA segments were observed simultaneously and could not be explained with a simple model of neck movement. We hypothesized that they were caused by variations in the location and stiffness of the VA fascial attachments to the vertebral foramina and by coupled movements of the cervical vertebrae. However, in agreement with previous work on VA strains proximal and distal to the cervical transverse foramina, strains for cervical spinal manipulations were consistently lower than those obtained for cervical rotation. Although general conclusions should not be drawn from these preliminary results, the findings of this study suggest that textbook mechanics of the VA may not hold, that VA strains may not be predictable from neck movements alone, and that fascial connections within the transverse foramina and coupled vertebra movements may play a crucial role in VA mechanics during neck manipulation. Furthermore, the engineering strains

  1. Cost Utility Analysis of Lumbar Interlaminar Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation, Central Spinal Stenosis, and Axial or Discogenic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-05-01

    Cost utility or cost effective analysis continues to take center stage in the United States for defining and measuring the value of treatments in interventional pain management. Appropriate cost utility analysis has been performed for caudal epidural injections, percutaneous adhesiolysis, and spinal cord stimulation. However, the literature pertaining to lumbar interlaminar epidural injections is lacking, specifically in reference to cost utility analysis derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with a pragmatic approach in a practical setting. To assess the cost utility of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain secondary to lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and axial or discogenic low back pain. Analysis based on 3 previously published randomized trials of effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections assessing their role in disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and axial or discogenic pain. A contemporary, private, specialty referral interventional pain management center in the United States. Cost utility of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections with or without steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation, central spinal stenosis, and discogenic or axial low back pain was conducted with data derived from 3 RCTs that included a 2-year follow-up, with inclusion of 360 patients. The primary outcome was significant improvement defined as at least a 50% in pain reduction and disability status. Direct payment data from 2016 was utilized for assessment of procedural costs. Overall costs, including drug costs, were determined by multiplication of direct procedural payment data by a factor of 1.6 to accommodate for indirect payments respectively for disc herniation, spinal stenosis, discogenic pain. The results of 3 RCTs showed direct cost utility for one year of quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of $2,050.87 for disc herniation, $2,112.25 for axial or discogenic pain without disc herniation

  2. Epidural steroid injections in the management of a patient with spinal stenosis and urinary urgency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Raj; Huang, Lawrence; Payne, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    A 79-year-old woman with a history of chronic back pain and urinary urgency presented to a spine center for treatment and evaluation for axial low back pain. The patient described the back pain as severe with intermittent radiation into the right leg; her pain intensity was 7 out of 10 on a visual analog scale. She described her sense of urgency as severe, and could delay urination for 10 min or less. She described her bladder control as 6 out of 10 on the urgency perception score (with 0 being perfect control). Physical examination, including manual muscle testing, test for sensation to fine touch, reflex assessment and assessment of gait pattern, and MRI of the lumbar spine. Overactive bladder associated with severe central-canal stenosis at L4-5, in the setting of anterolisthesis. Fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injection; 60 mg of triamcinolone, 3 ml of 1% lidocaine hydrochloride and 3 ml of normal saline, injected in increments.

  3. Rate of perioperative neurological complications after surgery for cervical spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew K; Winkler, Ethan A; Jacques, Line

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical spinal cord stimulation (cSCS) is used to treat pain of the cervical region and upper extremities. Case reports and small series have shown a relatively low risk of complication after cSCS, with only a single reported case of perioperative spinal cord injury in the literature. Catastrophic cSCS-associated spinal cord injury remains a concern as a result of underreporting. To aid in preoperative counseling, it is necessary to establish a minimum rate of spinal cord injury and surgical complication following cSCS. METHODS The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) is a stratified sample of 20% of all patient discharges from nonfederal hospitals in the United States. The authors identified discharges with a primary procedure code for spinal cord stimulation (ICD-9 03.93) associated with a primary diagnosis of cervical pathology from 2002 to 2011. They then analyzed short-term safety outcomes including the presence of spinal cord injury and neurological, medical, and general perioperative complications and compared outcomes using univariate analysis. RESULTS Between 2002 and 2011, there were 2053 discharges for cSCS. The spinal cord injury rate was 0.5%. The rates of any neurological, medical, and general perioperative complications were 1.1%, 1.4%, and 11.7%, respectively. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS In the largest series of cSCS, the risk of spinal cord injury was higher than previously reported (0.5%). Nonetheless, this procedure remains relatively safe, and physicians may use these data to corroborate the safety of cSCS in an appropriately selected patient population. This may become a key treatment option in an increasingly opioid-dependent, aging population.

  4. 121 Rate of Perioperative Neurological Complications After Surgery for Cervical Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai-Hong Chan, Andrew; Winkler, Ethan A; Jacques, Line

    2016-08-01

    Cervical spinal cord stimulation (cSCS) is used to treat pain of the cervical region and upper extremities. Case reports and small series have shown a relatively low risk of complication after cSCS, with only 2 reported cases of perioperative spinal cord injury in the literature. Catastrophic cSCS-associated spinal cord injury remains a concern as a result of underreporting. To aid in preoperative counseling, it is necessary to establish a minimum rate of spinal cord injury and surgical complication following cSCS. The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) is a stratified sample of 20% of all patient discharges from nonfederal hospitals in the United States. We identified discharges with a primary procedure code for spinal cord stimulation (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision 03.93) associated with a primary diagnosis of cervical pathology from 2002 to 2011. We analyzed short-term safety outcomes including the presence of spinal cord injury and neurological, medical, and general perioperative complications and compared outcomes using univariate analysis. Between 2002 and 2011, there were 2053 discharges for cSCS. The spinal cord injury rate was 0.5%. The rate of any neurological, medical, and any general perioperative complication was 1.1%, 1.4%, and 11.7%, respectively. There were no deaths. In the largest series of cSCS, the risk of spinal cord injury was higher than previously reported (0.5%). Nonetheless, this procedure remains relatively safe, and physicians may utilize these data to support the safety of cSCS in an appropriately selected patient population. This may become a key treatment option in an increasingly opioid-dependent, aging population.

  5. Extraforaminal ligaments of the cervical spinal nerves in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, Gerald A.; Smit, Theo H.; Hoogland, Piet V. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last 120 years, several mechanisms to protect the spinal nerve against traction have been described. All the described structures were located inside the spinal canal proximal to the intervertebral foramen. Ligaments with a comparable function just outside the intervertebral foramen are

  6. Conservative Management Of Third Trimester Cervical Spinal Cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal cord injury, though an important cause of morbidity appears to be uncommon in pregnant women or perhaps, has not been accurately documented among them. Superimposed on the many impairments resulting from spinal cord injury is the presence of the foetus in the womb, which in itself normally brings about ...

  7. The Cervical Spinal Canal Tapers Differently in Patients with Chiari I with and without Syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A; Madan, N; Hesselink, J R; Weinstein, G; Munoz del Rio, A; Haughton, V

    2016-04-01

    The cause of syringomyelia in patients with Chiari I remains uncertain. Cervical spine anatomy modifies CSF velocities, flow patterns, and pressure gradients, which may affect the spinal cord. We tested the hypothesis that cervical spinal anatomy differs between Chiari I patients with and without syringomyelia. We identified consecutive patients with Chiari I at 3 institutions and divided them into groups with and without syringomyelia. Five readers measured anteroposterior cervical spinal diameters, tonsillar herniation, and syrinx dimensions on cervical MR images. Taper ratios for C1-C7, C1-C4, and C4-C7 spinal segments were calculated by linear least squares fitting to the appropriate spinal canal diameters. Mean taper ratios and tonsillar herniation for groups were compared and tested for statistical significance with a Kruskal-Wallis test. Inter- and intrareader agreement and correlations in the data were measured. One hundred fifty patients were included, of which 49 had syringomyelia. C1-C7 taper ratios were smaller and C4-C7 taper ratios greater for patients with syringomyelia than for those without it. C1-C4 taper ratios did not differ significantly between groups. Patients with syringomyelia had, on average, greater tonsillar herniation than those without a syrinx. However, C4-C7 taper ratios were steeper, for all degrees of tonsil herniation, in patients with syringomyelia. Differences among readers did not exceed differences among patient groups. The tapering of the lower cervical spine may contribute to the development of syringomyelia in patients with Chiari I. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  8. 7 Tesla 22-channel wrap-around coil array for cervical spinal cord and brainstem imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; Seifert, Alan C; Kim, Joo-Won; Borrello, Joseph; Xu, Junqian

    2017-10-01

    Increased signal-to-noise ratio and blood oxygenation level-dependent sensitivity at 7 Tesla (T) have the potential to enable high-resolution imaging of the human cervical spinal cord and brainstem. We propose a new two-panel radiofrequency coil design for these regions to fully exploit the advantages of ultra-high field. A two-panel array, containing four transmit/receive and 18 receive-only elements fully encircling the head and neck, was constructed following simulations demonstrating the B1+ and specific absorption rate (SAR) benefits of two-panel over one-panel arrays. This array was compared with a previously reported posterior-only array and tested for safety using a phantom. Its anatomical, functional, and diffusion MRI performance was demonstrated in vivo. The two-panel array produced more uniform B1+ across the brainstem and cervical spinal cord without compromising SAR, and achieved 70% greater receive sensitivity than the posterior-only array. The two-panel design enabled acceleration of R = 2 × 2 in two dimensions or R = 3 in a single dimension. High quality in vivo anatomical, functional, and diffusion images of the human cervical spinal cord and brainstem were acquired. We have designed and constructed a wrap-around coil array with excellent performance for cervical spinal cord and brainstem MRI at 7T, which enables simultaneous human cervical spinal cord and brainstem functional MRI. Magn Reson Med 78:1623-1634, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Gradual Recovery from Nonambulatory Quadriparesis Caused by Metastatic Epidural Cervical Cord Compression in an Octogenarian Gallbladder Carcinoma Patient Treated with Image-Guided Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Alone Using a Field-in-Field Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ohtakara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy for acute metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC involves conventional techniques and dose fractionation schemes, as it needs to be initiated quickly. However, even with rapid intervention, few paraplegic patients regain ambulation. Here, we describe the case of a mid-octogenarian who presented with severe pain and nonambulatory quadriparesis attributable to MESCC at the fifth cervical vertebra, which developed 10 months after the diagnosis of undifferentiated carcinoma of the gallbladder. Image-guided three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (IG-3DCRT was started with 25 Gy in 5 fractions followed by a boost of 12 Gy in 3 fractions, for which a field-in-field (FIF technique was used to optimize the dose distribution. Despite the fact that steroids were not administered, the patient reported significant pain reduction and showed improved motor function 3 and 4 weeks after the IG-3DCRT, respectively. Over the following 4 months, her neurological function gradually improved, and she was consequently able to eat and change clothes without assistance and to walk slowly for 10–20 m using a walker. She succumbed to progression of abdominal disease 8.5 months after the IG-3DCRT. This case demonstrates that image-guided FIF radiotherapy with a dose-escalated hypofractionated regimen can potentially improve functional outcome and local control.

  10. A novel approach for automatic visualization and activation detection of evoked potentials induced by epidural spinal cord stimulation in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Samineh; Angeli, Claudia A; Keynton, Robert S; El-Baz, Ayman; Harkema, Susan J

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary movements and the standing of spinal cord injured patients have been facilitated using lumbosacral spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES). Identifying the appropriate stimulation parameters (intensity, frequency and anode/cathode assignment) is an arduous task and requires extensive mapping of the spinal cord using evoked potentials. Effective visualization and detection of muscle evoked potentials induced by scES from the recorded electromyography (EMG) signals is critical to identify the optimal configurations and the effects of specific scES parameters on muscle activation. The purpose of this work was to develop a novel approach to automatically detect the occurrence of evoked potentials, quantify the attributes of the signal and visualize the effects across a high number of scES parameters. This new method is designed to automate the current process for performing this task, which has been accomplished manually by data analysts through observation of raw EMG signals, a process that is laborious and time-consuming as well as prone to human errors. The proposed method provides a fast and accurate five-step algorithms framework for activation detection and visualization of the results including: conversion of the EMG signal into its 2-D representation by overlaying the located signal building blocks; de-noising the 2-D image by applying the Generalized Gaussian Markov Random Field technique; detection of the occurrence of evoked potentials using a statistically optimal decision method through the comparison of the probability density functions of each segment to the background noise utilizing log-likelihood ratio; feature extraction of detected motor units such as peak-to-peak amplitude, latency, integrated EMG and Min-max time intervals; and finally visualization of the outputs as Colormap images. In comparing the automatic method vs. manual detection on 700 EMG signals from five individuals, the new approach decreased the processing time from several

  11. Quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the entire human cervical spinal cord and beyond at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Anke; Schär, Michael; Kollias, Spyros S; Boesiger, Peter; Dydak, Ulrike

    2008-06-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) amends differential diagnostics of neurological pathology. However, due to technical challenges, it has rarely been applied to the spinal cord and has mainly been restricted to the very upper part of the cervical spine. In this work, an improved acquisition protocol is proposed that takes technical problems as strong magnetic field inhomogeneities, pulsatile flow of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and small voxel size into account. For that purpose, inner-volume saturated point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) localization, ECG triggering, and localized higher-order shimming and F0 determination, based on high-resolution cardiac-triggered static magnetic field B0 mapping, are combined. For inner-volume saturation a highly selective T1- and B1-insensitive outer-volume suppression (OVS) sequence based on broadband RF pulses with polynomial-phase response (PPR) is used. Validation is performed in healthy volunteers and patients with multiple sclerosis and intramedullary tumors. The applicability of spinal cord MRS is extended to the entire cervical spine. Spectral quality and its consistency are improved. In addition, high quality MRS patient data from a lesion that occluded the spinal canal in the thoracic spinal cord could be acquired. A quantitative analysis of patient spectra and spectra from healthy volunteers at different positions along the spinal cord underlines the diagnostic value of spinal cord MRS. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Early Versus Delayed Surgical Decompression of Spinal Cord after Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Cost-Utility Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Julio C; Craven, B Catharine; Massicotte, Eric M; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    This cost-utility analysis was undertaken to compare early (≤24 hours since trauma) versus delayed surgical decompression of spinal cord to determine which approach is more cost effective in the management of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). This study includes the patients enrolled into the Surgical Timing in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (STASCIS) and admitted at Toronto Western Hospital. Cases were grouped into patients with motor complete SCI and individuals with motor incomplete SCI. A cost-utility analysis was performed for each group of patients by the use of data for the first 6 months after SCI. The perspective of a public health care insurer was adopted. Costs were estimated in 2014 U.S. dollars. Utilities were estimated from the STASCIS. The baseline analysis indicates early spinal decompression is more cost-effective approach compared with the delayed spinal decompression. When we considered the delayed spinal decompression as the baseline strategy, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio analysis revealed a saving of US$ 58,368,024.12 per quality-adjusted life years gained for patients with complete SCI and a saving of US$ 536,217.33 per quality-adjusted life years gained in patients with incomplete SCI for the early spinal decompression. The probabilistic analysis confirmed the early-decompression strategy as more cost effective than the delayed-decompression approach, even though there is no clearly dominant strategy. The results of this economic analysis suggests that early decompression of spinal cord was more cost effective than delayed surgical decompression in the management of patients with motor complete and incomplete SCI, even though no strategy was clearly dominant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cervical spondylosis with spinal cord encroachment: should preventive surgery be recommended?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Donald R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been stated that individuals who have spondylotic encroachment on the cervical spinal cord without myelopathy are at increased risk of spinal cord injury if they experience minor trauma. Preventive decompression surgery has been recommended for these individuals. The purpose of this paper is to provide the non-surgical spine specialist with information upon which to base advice to patients. The evidence behind claims of increased risk is investigated as well as the evidence regarding the risk of decompression surgery. Methods A literature search was conducted on the risk of spinal cord injury in individuals with asymptomatic cord encroachment and the risk and benefit of preventive decompression surgery. Results Three studies on the risk of spinal cord injury in this population met the inclusion criteria. All reported increased risk. However, none were prospective cohort studies or case-control studies, so the designs did not allow firm conclusions to be drawn. A number of studies and reviews of the risks and benefits of decompression surgery in patients with cervical myelopathy were found, but no studies were found that addressed surgery in asymptomatic individuals thought to be at risk. The complications of decompression surgery range from transient hoarseness to spinal cord injury, with rates ranging from 0.3% to 60%. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence that individuals with spondylotic spinal cord encroachment are at increased risk of spinal cord injury from minor trauma. Prospective cohort or case-control studies are needed to assess this risk. There is no evidence that prophylactic decompression surgery is helpful in this patient population. Decompression surgery appears to be helpful in patients with cervical myelopathy, but the significant risks may outweigh the unknown benefit in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, broad recommendations for decompression surgery in suspected at-risk individuals cannot be made

  14. Reducing kyphotic deformity by posterior vertebral column resection with 360° osteosynthesis in metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreimann, Marc; Hoffmann, Michael; Viezens, Lennart; Weiser, Lukas; Czorlich, Patrick; Eicker, Sven Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) often requires anterior-posterior decompression and stabilization. To reduce approach-related complications, single-stage posterolateral vertebrectomy and 360° fusion is often performed. However, a sufficient reduction of kyphotic deformity through this approach has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of kyphotic deformity reduction by this approach in MESCC. A retrospective analysis and chart review was performed for 14 consecutive patients who underwent a vertebrectomy and decompression from a posterolateral approach. Anterior mesh stabilization of the ventral column is used as hypomochlion for the posterior compression manoeuvre, which leads to reduction of the kyphotic deformity. Pre-operative back pain was 7.2 on a visual analogue scale. Back pain was reduced to 4.4 at discharge and 2.0 at the latest follow-up with a mean follow-up of 12 months (p < 0.001). The Frankel score remains constant or improved from D to E. Radiological segmental kyphosis was corrected from a mean of 16° to 4° (p < 0.001) post-operatively with a loss of 3° at the final follow-up, but still with significant corrections compared with the pre-operative measurements (p < 0.003). Single-stage posterolateral vertebrectomy and reconstruction is a safe and less invasive approach that allows a sufficient reduction of hyperkyphosis and preservation of neurological function in patients with MESCC. This approach is an efficient alternative to anterior-posterior fusion with good pain reduction and improved sagittal profile.

  15. Myelin water fraction in human cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yijing; Alexander, Andrew L; Fleming, John O; Duncan, Ian D; Field, Aaron S

    2006-01-01

    The noninvasive discrimination of myelin disease from axonal loss and other pathologic confounds remains an unsolved problem in multiple sclerosis but may be possible through magnetic resonance quantitation of the intramyelinic water compartment. Technical challenges have limited the study of this approach in the spinal cord, a common site of involvement in multiple sclerosis. This technical note reports the test-retest reproducibility of a short T2-based estimate of myelin content in human spinal cord in vivo.

  16. Traumatic cervical spinal cord injury with “negative” cervical spine CT scan

    OpenAIRE

    Kolli, Sreedhar; Schreiber, Adam; Harrop, James; Jallo, Jack

    2010-01-01

    A 46-year-old man fell four steps, striking his neck and having associated neck pain and discomfort. He was evaluated at a local emergency department and reported no neurological deficit but focal mid cervical tenderness. Radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scan were “negative” for cervical spine fracture, dislocation or pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling. He was discharged home in a cervical collar with a scheduled outpatient follow-up. Over the proceeding hours neurologic deterioration...

  17. Thoracic sensory level as a false localizing sign in cervical spinal cord and brain lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Mark A; Djaldetti, Ruth; Luckman, Judith; Dabby, Ron

    2013-01-01

    In rare cases of cervical myelopathy, there may be a discrepancy between the sensory level and the site of cord lesion. This phenomenon is not well recognized. This study sought to investigate the characteristics of patients presenting with a false localizing thoracic sensory level. The databases of the neurology clinics of two major tertiary medical centers were reviewed for all patients who presented in 2000-2010 with a main complaint of paraparesis and a thoracic sensory level. Those whose initial thoracic magnetic resonance scan showed no spinal cord pathology were included in the study. Twelve patients (mean age, 52 ± 31 years) met the study criteria. In all cases, the pathological lesion was visualized on magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine or brain. Eight patients had a compressive lesion of the spinal cord and 4 had demyelinating lesions. The difference between the false localizing sensory level and the level of the cervical lesion ranged from 6 to 11 segments. Patients with a sensory thoracic level and normal findings on thoracic magnetic resonance imaging should be further evaluated with cervical spinal cord and, sometimes, brain imaging to search for potentially treatable lesions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Osteological features in pure-bred dogs predisposing to cervical spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, S; Künzel, W

    2001-11-01

    Relative to body size, midsagittal and interpedicular diameters of the cranial and caudal aspects of cervical vertebral foramina (C3-C7) were found to be significantly (P dogs, and this is also exacerbated by the typical shape of the vertebral foramina (i.e. dorsoventrally flattened cranially and bilaterally narrowed caudally). Within large dogs those breeds highly predisposed to cervical spinal cord compression were Great Danes (the breed with the smallest midsagittal vertebral foramen diameters from cranial C6 to cranial T1) and Doberman Pinschers, because of the most strikingly cranially dorsoventrally narrowed cone-shaped vertebral foramina at C6 and C7. The existence of a small midsagittal diameter in the cranial cervical spine was a high risk factor predisposing to spinal cord compression in small breeds and Dachshunds. Remarkable consistency was noted between the spinal level of the maximum enlargement of the spinal cord which previously was reported to be at C6, and the site of maximum enlargement of the vertebral canal currently stated in Dachshunds and small breeds. In large breeds the maximum enlargement of the vertebral canal tended to be located more caudally at the caudal limit of C7. The average age at which large dogs were most susceptible to noxious factors causing abnormal growth of the pedicles was determined to be 16 wk.

  19. Targeted, activity-dependent spinal stimulation produces long-lasting motor recovery in chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Jacob G; Miller, Robert R; Perlmutter, Steve I

    2015-09-29

    Use-dependent movement therapies can lead to partial recovery of motor function after neurological injury. We attempted to improve recovery by developing a neuroprosthetic intervention that enhances movement therapy by directing spike timing-dependent plasticity in spared motor pathways. Using a recurrent neural-computer interface in rats with a cervical contusion of the spinal cord, we synchronized intraspinal microstimulation below the injury with the arrival of functionally related volitional motor commands signaled by muscle activity in the impaired forelimb. Stimulation was delivered during physical retraining of a forelimb behavior and throughout the day for 3 mo. Rats receiving this targeted, activity-dependent spinal stimulation (TADSS) exhibited markedly enhanced recovery compared with animals receiving targeted but open-loop spinal stimulation and rats receiving physical retraining alone. On a forelimb reach and grasp task, TADSS animals recovered 63% of their preinjury ability, more than two times the performance level achieved by the other therapy groups. Therapeutic gains were maintained for 3 additional wk without stimulation. The results suggest that activity-dependent spinal stimulation can induce neural plasticity that improves behavioral recovery after spinal cord injury.

  20. Phrenic motor outputs in response to bronchopulmonary C‐fibre activation following chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Kun‐Ze

    2016-01-01

    .... Supersensitivity of phrenic motor outputs to the inhibitory effect of bronchopulmonary C‐fibre activation is due to a shift of phrenic motoneuron types and slow recovery of phrenic motoneuron discharge in cervical spinal cord‐injured animals...

  1. Should suspected cervical spinal cord injury be immobilised?: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteir, Ala'a O; Smith, Karen; Stoelwinder, Johannes U; Middleton, James; Jennings, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    Spinal cord injuries occur worldwide; often being life-threatening with devastating long term impacts on functioning, independence, health, and quality of life. Systematic review of the literature to determine the efficacy of cervical spinal immobilisation (vs no immobilisation) in patients with suspected cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI); and to provide recommendations for prehospital spinal immobilisation. Searches were conducted of the Cochrane library, CINAHL, EMBASE, Pubmed, Scopus, Web of science, Google scholar, and OvidSP (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and DARE) databases. Studies were included if they were relevant to the research question, published in English, based in the prehospital setting, and included adult patients with traumatic injury. The search identified 1471 citations, of which eight observational studies of variable quality were included. Four studies were retrospective cohorts, three were case series and one a case report. Cervical collar application was reported in penetrating trauma to be associated with unadjusted increased risk of mortality in two studies [(OR, 8.82; 95% CI, 1.09-194; p=0.038) & (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.35-3.13)], concealment of neck injuries in one study and increased scene time in another study. While, in blunt trauma, one study indicated that immobilisation might be associated with worsened neurological outcome (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.03-3.99; p=0.04, unadjusted). We did not attempt to combine study results due to significant heterogeneity of study design and outcome measures. There is a lack of high-level evidence on the effect of prehospital cervical spine immobilisation on patient outcomes. There is a clear need for large prospective studies to determine the clinical benefit of prehospital spinal immobilisation as well as to identify the subgroup of patients most likely to benefit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cervical total disc replacement exhibits similar stiffness to intact cervical functional spinal units tested on a dynamic pendulum testing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmende, Sean M; Daniels, Alan H; Paller, David J; Koruprolu, Sarath; Palumbo, Mark A; Crisco, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    The pendulum testing system is capable of applying physiologic compressive loads without constraining the motion of functional spinal units (FSUs). The number of cycles to equilibrium observed under pendulum testing is a measure of the energy absorbed by the FSU. To examine the dynamic bending stiffness and energy absorption of the cervical spine, with and without implanted cervical total disc replacement (TDR) under simulated physiologic motion. A biomechanical cadaver investigation. Nine unembalmed, frozen human cervical FSUs from levels C3-C4 and C5-C6 were tested on the pendulum system with axial compressive loads of 25, 50, and 100 N before and after TDR implantation. Testing in flexion, extension, and lateral bending began by rotating the pendulum to 5°, resulting in unconstrained oscillatory motion. The number of rotations to equilibrium was recorded and the bending stiffness (Newton-meter/°) was calculated and compared for each testing mode. In flexion/extension, with increasing compressive loading from 25 to 100 N, the average number of cycles to equilibrium for the intact FSUs increased from 6.6 to 19.1, compared with 4.1 to 12.7 after TDR implantation (ppendulum system. These results provide further insight into the biomechanical behavior of cervical TDR under approximated physiologic loading conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MR imaging in neuroborreliosis of the cervical spinal cord

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    Hattingen, Elke; Weidauer, Stefan; Zanella, Friedhelm E. [University of Frankfurt, Institute of Neuroradiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Kieslich, Matthias; Boda, Volker [University of Frankfurt, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    The central nervous system is involved in 10-20% of cases in Lyme disease. The neurological symptoms, time course of the disease and imaging findings are multifaceted. We report two patients with cervical radiculitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed strong enhancement of the cervical nerve roots on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. These imaging patterns of borrelia-associated radiculitis have not been reported before. Knowledge of these imaging features may help to diagnose neuroborreliosis, which presents with non-specific symptoms. (orig.)

  4. Motor levels in high cervical spinal cord injuries: Implications for the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Steffen; Kirshblum, Steven C; Weidner, Norbert; Rupp, Rüdiger; Schuld, Christian

    2016-09-01

    To verify the hypothesis that motor levels (ML) inferred from sensory levels in the upper cervical segments C2-C4 according to the current version of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) are counterintuitive in cases where the most rostral myotomes C5 and C6 are graded as intact. Prospective cohort study of ISNCSCI instructional course participants completing a post-test after the workshop to determine the MLs in two variants of a complete, high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) case scenario. Both variants were based on the same ISNCSCI sensory and MLs of C2. In the first variant myotomes C5 and C6 were bilaterally graded as intact, while in variant 2 only active movements against gravity were possible (grade 3). Eight ISNCSCI instructional courses conducted during the study period from November 2012 until March 2015 in the framework of the European Multicenter Study on Human Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI- http//emsci.org ). Ninety-two clinicians from twenty-two SCI centers. Most of the attendees were physicians (58.7%) or physical therapists (33.7%) and had less than one year (44.6%) experience in SCI medicine. Not applicable. The classification performance described as percentage of correctly determined MLs by the clinicians. Variant 2 (89.13%) was significantly (P definition in ISNCSCI may be needed.

  5. Protocol for evaluation of the comparative effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis and caudal epidural steroid injections in low back and/or lower extremity pain without post surgery syndrome or spinal stenosis.

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    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Cash, Kimberly A

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of chronic low back pain with or without lower extremity pain continues to be a challenge. Epidural steroids are commonly utilized in patients after the failure of conservative treatment. The results of epidural steroid injections have been variable based on the pathophysiology, the route of administration, injected drugs, and utilization of fluoroscopy. In patients resistant to fluoroscopically directed epidural injections, percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis and percutaneous targeted delivery of injections with or without adhesiolysis has been recommended. Percutaneous adhesiolysis has been studied in chronic pain syndromes related to post laminectomy syndrome and spinal stenosis with encouraging results. There is a paucity of literature regarding the effectiveness of the targeted delivery of medications with or without epidural adhesiolysis in patients recalcitrant to epidural steroid injections without a history of surgery and spinal stenosis. A randomized, equivalence trial of percutaneous lumbar adhesiolysis and caudal epidural steroid injections in patients with low back and/or lower extremity pain without post surgery syndrome or spinal stenosis. An interventional pain management practice setting in the United States. The study is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in managing chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain in patients without post lumbar surgery syndrome or spinal stenosis and compare it with fluoroscopically directed caudal epidural steroid injections The study design includes 120 patients randomly assigned into 2 groups. Group I (60 patients), the control group, will receive caudal epidural injections with catheterization up to S3 with local anesthetic, steroids, and 0.9% sodium chloride solution; Group II (60 patients), the intervention group, will receive percutaneous adhesiolysis with target delivery of lidocaine, 10% hypertonic sodium chloride solution, and non-participate betamethasone

  6. Cost utility analysis of caudal epidural injections in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation, axial or discogenic low back pain, central spinal stenosis, and post lumbar surgery syndrome.

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    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Falco, Frank J E; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Cash, Kimberly A; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2013-01-01

    In this era of escalating health care costs and the questionable effectiveness of multiple interventions, cost effectiveness or cost utility analysis has become the cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, and has an influence coverage decisions. Even though multiple cost effectiveness analysis studies have been performed over the years, extensive literature is lacking for interventional techniques. Cost utility analysis studies of epidural injections for managing chronic low back pain demonstrated highly variable results including a lack of cost utility in randomized trials and contrasting results in observational studies. There has not been any cost utility analysis studies of epidural injections in large randomized trials performed in interventional pain management settings. To assess the cost utility of caudal epidural injections in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar disc herniation, axial or discogenic low back pain, lumbar central spinal stenosis, and lumbar post surgery syndrome. This analysis is based on 4 previously published randomized trials. A private, specialty referral interventional pain management center in the United States. Four randomized trials were conducted assessing the clinical effectiveness of caudal epidural injections with or without steroids for lumbar disc herniation, lumbar discogenic or axial low back pain, lumbar central spinal stenosis, and post surgery syndrome. A cost utility analysis was performed with direct payment data for a total of 480 patients over a period of 2 years from these 4 trials. Outcome included various measures with significant improvement defined as at least a 50% improvement in pain reduction and disability status. The results of 4 randomized controlled trials of low back pain with 480 patients with a 2 year follow-up with the actual reimbursement data showed cost utility for one year of quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of $2,206 for disc herniation, $2,136 for axial or discogenic pain without

  7. Comparing the effects of epidural methylprednisolone acetate injected in patients with pain due to lumbar spinal stenosis or herniated disks: a prospective study

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    Gharibi F

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jafar Mobaleghi1, Faramarz Allahdini2, Karim Nasseri3, Behzad Ahsan3, Shoaleh Shami4, Mansour Faizi5, Fardin Gharibi51Department of Surgery, 2Department of Neurosurgery, 3Department of Anesthesia, 4Faculty of Nursing, 5Faculty of Medicine, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Kurdistan, IranObjective: Satisfactory results have been seen with epidural steroid injections (ESI in patients with herniated disks (HD, but the role in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS has been less investigated. We compared long-term effects of ESI in HD and LSS patients.Methods: In a prospective, single-blind uncontrolled study, 60 patients with radicular pain due to HD (n = 32 or LSS (n = 28 were enrolled over a 9-month period. Methylprednisolone acetate 80 mg plus 0.5% bupivacaine 10 mg were diluted in normal saline up to a total volume of 10 mL, and injected into the epidural space. The amount of pain based on numeric pain score, level of activity, and subjective improvement were reported by patients after 2 and 6 months by telephone. Demographic data were analyzed with the chi-square test. The differences in numeric pain scale scores between the two groups at different times were analyzed with the t-test.Results: There were no differences between HD and LSS patients regarding age, sex, and average duration of pain prior to ESI. The degree of pain was significantly higher in LSS patients in comparison with HD patients in the pre-injection period. The amount of pain was significantly reduced in both groups 2 months after injection. This pain reduction period lasted for 6 months in the HD group, but to a lesser extent in LSS patients (P < 0.05.Discussion: Epidural methylprednisolone injection has less analgesic effect in LSS, with less permanent effect in comparison with HD.Keywords: methylprednisolone acetate, lumbar spinal stenosis, herniated disk

  8. Corticosteroid-induced spinal epidural lipomatosis in the pediatric age group: report of a new case and updated analysis of the literature

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    Kukita Akiko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare complication of chronic corticosteroid treatment. We report a new pediatric case and an analysis of this and 19 pediatric cases identified in the international literature. The youngest of these combined 20 patients was 5 years old when lipomatosis was diagnosed. Lipomatosis manifested after a mean of 1.3 (+/- 1.5 years (SD (median, 0.8 years; range, 3 weeks - 6.5 years of corticosteroid treatment. The corticosteroid dose at the time of presentation of the lipomatosis ranged widely, between 5 and 80 mg of prednisone/day. Back pain was the most common presenting symptom. Imaging revealed that lipomatosis almost always involved the thoracic spine, extending into the lumbosacral region in a subset of patients. Predominantly lumbosacral involvement was documented in only two cases. Although a neurological deficit at presentation was documented in about half of the cases, surgical decompression was not performed in the cases reported after 1996. Instead, reducing the corticosteroid dose (sometimes combined with dietary restriction to mobilize fat sufficed to induce remission. In summary, pediatric spinal epidural lipomatosis remains a potentially serious untoward effect of corticosteroid treatment, which, if recognized in a timely manner, can have a good outcome with conservative treatment.

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human cervical spinal cord with stimulation of different sensory dermatomes.

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    Stroman, P W; Krause, V; Malisza, K L; Frankenstein, U N; Tomanek, B

    2002-01-01

    Functional MR imaging (fMRI) of the cervical spinal cord was carried out in 13 healthy volunteers. A cold stimulus was applied, at different times, to three different sensory dermatome regions overlying the right hand and forearm: the thumb side of the palm, the little finger side of the palm, and the forearm below the elbow. Stimulation of these areas is expected to involve the 6(th), 8(th), and 5(th) cervical spinal cord segments respectively. Whereas true activations are expected to correspond to the region being stimulated, false activations such as arising from noise and motion, are not. The results demonstrate that clustering of active pixels into groups based on their intensity time courses discriminates false activations from true activations. Following clustering, the distribution of activity observed with fMRI matched the expected regions of neuronal activation with the different areas of stimulation on the hand and forearm.

  10. Cervical laminectomy width and spinal cord drift are risk factors for postoperative C5 palsy.

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    Radcliff, Kris E; Limthongkul, Worawat; Kepler, Chris K; Sidhu, Gursukhman D S; Anderson, D Greg; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Albert, Todd J

    2014-04-01

    Cervical laminectomy and fusion (CLF) is a treatment option for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Postoperative C5 nerve palsy is a possible complication of CLF. It has been suggested that C5 nerve palsy may be due to posterior drift of the spinal cord related to a wide laminectomy trough. To test the hypothesis that excessive spinal cord drift into a wide laminectomy trough is associated with C5 palsy. Retrospective case-control study. Seventeen patients with C5 palsy, 8 patients as control group. Spinal cord positional measurements on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All patients who underwent elective CLF for cervical spondylotic myelopathy or ossified posterior longitudinal ligament using posterior instrumentation between 2004 and 2008 were included. Patients who underwent CLF for trauma, infection, or tumors were excluded. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed by chart review (minimum of 1 y follow-up). Patients who developed a new postoperative C5 nerve palsy underwent repeat MRI. The control group also underwent CLF, did not develop a neurological deficit, and received a postoperative MRI for evaluation of possible infection. MRI measurements included the width of the laminectomy trough, the distance from the posterior vertebral body or disk to the anterior spinal cord, the width of the spinal cord herniated into the laminectomy defect, and C2-7 sagittal alignment. Preoperative radiographic measurements included preoperative vertebral body diameter, spinal canal diameter, and sagittal vertical offset. There were seventeen patients with C5 nerve root palsy and 8 patients without C5 nerve root palsy. There were no baseline differences in fusion levels, instrumentation used, patient age, or sex. MRI measurements revealed an increase in mean postoperative cord drift in patients with C5 palsy at C3 (4.2 vs. 2.2 mm, P=0.002), C4 (4.6 vs. 2.8 mm, P=0.056), C5 (5.1 vs. 2.4 mm, P=0.011), and C6 (5.2 vs. 2.4 mm, P=0.003). There was a significant

  11. Increased intracranial pressure in a case of spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme: analysis of these two rare conditions

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    C.M. de Castro-Costa

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a rare case of increased intracranial hypertension consequent to a spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme in a young patient. They analyse the physiopathology of intracranial hypertension in spinal tumors and the rarity of such kind of tumor in this location, and its clinico-pathological aspects.

  12. Case report: Cervical spinal cord signal changes in a case of adult-onset subacute sclerosing panenchephalitis

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    Sharma Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we report a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE in which there were central cervical cord signal changes on MRI. The spinal cord is uncommonly involved in SSPE. However, demonstration of spinal cord signal change in a patient of SSPE has significant implications for the differential diagnosis and management

  13. Effects on mother and fetus of epidural and combined spinal-epidural techniques for labor analgesia Efeitos maternos e fetais da analgesia de parto pelas técnicas peridural e duplo bloqueio

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    Giane Nakamura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Epidural (EA and combined spinal-epidural (CSE techniques have both been utilized for labor analgesia. This study compared the effects on the mother and newborn of these techniques in labor analgesia and anesthesia. METHODS: Forty pregnant women received epidural analgesia with 15 mL of 0.125% ropivacaine (EA group and 5 µg of sufentanil plus 2.5mg bupivacaine in the subarachnoid space (CSE group. Pain intensity, sensory blockade level, latency time, motor block intensity, labor analgesia duration, epidural analgesia duration, maternal hypotension, and pruritus were evaluated. The newborns were evaluated by Apgar and the neurological and adaptive capacity score (NACS developed by Amiel-Tison. RESULTS: There were no significant statistical differences between groups for pain scores, latency time, sensory blockade level, and Apgar score. Motor block, labor analgesia duration, and epidural analgesia duration were greater in the CSE group, whose seven mothers had mild pruritus. The NACS were greater in the EA group after half, two, and 24 hours. Ninety five percent of EA group newborns and 60% of CSE group newborns were found to be neurologically healthy at the 24 hour examination. CONCLUSION: EA and CSE analgesia relieved maternal pain during obstetric analgesia, but CSE mothers had pruritus and a longer labor. Newborns of mothers who received epidural analgesia showed the best NACS.OBJETIVO: A peridural (AP e a técnica de duplo bloqueio (DB são utilizadas em analgesia para o trabalho de parto. Este estudo comparou os efeitos na mãe e no feto de ambas as técnicas em analgesia e anestesia para o parto. MÉTODOS: Quarenta parturientes ASA I e II receberam por via peridural 15 ml de ropivacaína a 0,125% (grupo AP e 5 µg de sufentanil com 2,5 mg bupivacaína por via subaracnóidea (grupo DB. Foram avaliados: intensidade de dor, altura do bloqueio sensitivo, tempo de latência, bloqueio motor, duração da analgesia de parto, tempo

  14. Temporary occipital fixation in young children with severe cervical-thoracic spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brian J; Minkara, Anas A; Angevine, Peter D; Vitale, Michael G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Anderson, Richard C E

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects of instrumentation and fusion of the occipital-cervical-thoracic spine on spinal growth in young children are poorly understood. To mitigate the effects of this surgery on the growing pediatric spine, the authors report a novel technique used in 4 children with severe cervical-thoracic instability. These patients underwent instrumentation from the occiput to the upper thoracic region for stabilization, but without bone graft at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). Subsequent surgery was then performed to remove the occipital instrumentation, thereby allowing further growth and increased motion across the CVJ. METHODS Three very young children (15, 30, and 30 months old) underwent occipital to thoracic posterior segmental instrumentation due to cervical or upper thoracic dislocation, progressive kyphosis, and myelopathy. The fourth child (10 years old) underwent similar instrumentation for progressive cervical-thoracic scoliosis. Bone graft was placed at and distal to C-2 only. After follow-up CT scans demonstrated posterior arthrodesis without unintended fusion from the occiput to C-2, 3 patients underwent removal of the occipital instrumentation. RESULTS Follow-up cervical spine flexion/extension radiographs demonstrated partial restoration of motion at the CVJ. One patient has not had the occipital instrumentation removed yet, because only 4 months have elapsed since her operation. CONCLUSIONS Temporary fixation to the occiput provides increased biomechanical stability for spinal stabilization in young children, without permanently eliminating motion and growth at the CVJ. This technique can be considered in children who require longer instrumentation constructs for temporary stabilization, but who only need fusion in more limited areas where spinal instability exists.

  15. Cervical Spinal Injury from Repeated Exposures to Sustained Acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    load (51). Also, with arm movements the upper trapezius and the levator scapulae become involved and resist neck movement, thus directly and...proper diet and weight control; 2. Regular strength and aerobic training with stretching and functional respiration training; 3. Massage, sauna and...physical warm-up including stretching neck muscles immediately before taking off while the pilot is in the cockpit. 39 CHAPTER 10 CERVICAL INJURY AND

  16. [Diaphragmatic pacemaker as an alternative to mechanical ventilation in patients with cervical spinal injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Ganuza, F J; Gambarrutta-Malfatti, C; Diez de la Lastra-Buigues, E; Marín-Ruiz, M Á; Merlo-González, V E; Sánchez-Aranzueque Pantoja, A M; García-Moreno, F J; Mazaira-Álvarez, J

    2011-01-01

    To verify that the diaphragmatic pacemaker is a form of respiratory support that can be used to replace a volumetric respirator in cervical spinal injury patients with cervical spinal lesion and diaphragmatic paralysis by means of its comparison with the traditional volumetric respirator. Retrospective study of a prospective database and age-matched case-control study. Intensive Care Unit and Intermediate Care Respiratory Unit, Paraplegics National Hospital, Toledo (Spain). We collected data on all patients discharged from the Hospital with permanent respiratory support by volumetric respirator or diaphragmatic pacemaker during a follow-up period of 25 years. Personal interviews were conducted to evaluate health-related quality of life. Comparison and survival tests were used for statistical comparisons. Quality of life questionnaire. The main variables collected were demographic data, hospital stay, mortality, family reintegration and health-related quality of life. We evaluated the clinical records of 101 patients, 37 in the pacemaker-group and 64 in the volumetric respirator-group. Our results show that ICU admission duration and hospitalization as well as family reintegration, without significant differences, with a tendency to greater survival in pacemaker patients (18.18 versus 9.67 years by the Kaplan-Meier method, pventilation is an effective alternative to mechanical ventilation with similar efficacy that improve quality of life in patients with severe respiratory failure due to cervical spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits in the cervical spinal cord of wobbler mice

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    Corsi Massimiliano M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The localisation of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits was studied in a model of degeneration of cervical spinal motoneurons, the wobbler mouse. Cervical regions from early or late symptomatic wobbler mice (4 or 12 weeks of age were compared to lumbar tracts (unaffected and to those of healthy mice. Results No differences were found in the distribution of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits at both ages. Western blots analysis showed a trend of reduction in AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits, mainly GluR1 and NR2A, exclusively in the cervical region of late symptomatic mice in the triton-insoluble post-synaptic fraction but not whole homogenates. Colocalisation experiments evidenced the expression of GluR1 and NR2A receptors in activated astrocytes from the cervical spinal cord of wobbler mice, GluR2 did not colocalise with GFAP positive cells. No differences were found in the expression of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits in the lumbar tract of wobbler mice, where neither motoneuron loss nor reactive gliosis occurs. Conclusion In late symptomatic wobbler mice altered levels of GluR1 and NR2A receptor subunits may be a consequence of motoneuron loss rather than an early feature of motoneuron vulnerability.

  18. Somatostatinergic nerves in the cervical spinal cord of the monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnweit, C; Forssmann, W G

    1979-08-03

    Somatostatinergic nerves in the spinal cord of the monkey were investigated utilizing immunohistochemistry with various antibodies against synthetic somatostatin. In contrast to earlier investigations, it is shown that somatostatinergic nerve endings occur in most of the areas of the grey matter of the spinal cord. The somatostatinergic axons are, however, characteristically distributed in three main regions: (1) Densely-packed endings are seen in lamina II of the substantia gelatinosa, forming a crescent-shaped pattern in the columna dorsalis. Somatostatin immunoreactivity is also seen in lamina I and in the Lissauer tract. (2) A fine network of fibers is observed around the central canal; the endings are concentrated on special cell bodies. Some single perikarya are also stained in this region. (3) A loose network of single fibers is found ending on perikarya of the columna lateralis or ventralis. The perikarya of the nerve axons, with the exception of those terminating in the columna dorsalis, have as yet not been identified. In order to better understand the somatostatinergic system of the spinal cord, these newly-detected somatostatinergic nerves must be studied and their exact pathways analyzed.

  19. Impaired crossed facilitation of the corticospinal pathway after cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunday, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    In uninjured humans, it is well established that voluntary contraction of muscles on one side of the body can facilitate transmission in the contralateral corticospinal pathway. This crossed facilitatory effect may favor interlimb coordination and motor performance. Whether this aspect of corticospinal function is preserved after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) is unknown. Here, using transcranial magnetic stimulation, we show in patients with chronic cervical SCI (C5–C8) that the size of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in a resting intrinsic hand muscle remained unchanged during increasing levels of voluntary contraction with a contralateral distal or proximal arm muscle. In contrast, MEP size in a resting hand muscle was increased during the same motor tasks in healthy control subjects. The magnitude of voluntary electromyography was negatively correlated with MEP size after chronic cervical SCI and positively correlated in healthy control subjects. To examine the mechanisms contributing to MEP crossed facilitation we examined short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), interhemispheric inhibition (IHI), and motoneuronal behavior by testing F waves and cervicomedullary MEPs (CMEPs). During strong voluntary contractions SICI was unchanged after cervical SCI and decreased in healthy control subjects compared with rest. F-wave amplitude and persistence and CMEP size remained unchanged after cervical SCI and increased in healthy control subjects compared with rest. In addition, during strong voluntary contractions IHI was unchanged in cervical SCI compared with rest. Our results indicate that GABAergic intracortical circuits, interhemispheric glutamatergic projections between motor cortices, and excitability of index finger motoneurons are neural mechanisms underlying, at least in part, the lack of crossed corticospinal facilitation observed after SCI. Our data point to the spinal motoneurons as a critical site for modulating corticospinal transmission after

  20. Human cervical spinal cord funiculi: investigation with magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, Mihaela; Gervai, Patricia; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Lawrence, Jane; Kornelsen, Jennifer; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta Nicola

    2010-04-01

    To use spinal cord diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for investigating human cervical funiculi, acquire axial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data with an in-plane resolution sufficient to delineate subquadrants within the spinal cord, obtain corresponding DTI metrics, and assess potential regional differences. Healthy volunteers were studied with a 3 T Siemens Trio MRI scanner. DTI data were acquired using a single-shot spin echo EPI sequence. The spatial resolution allowed for the delineation of regions of interest (ROIs) in the ventral, dorsal, and lateral spinal cord funiculi. ROI-based and tractography-based analyses were performed. Significant fractional anisotropy (FA) differences were found between ROIs in the dorsal and ventral funiculi (P = 0.0001), dorsal and lateral funiculi (P = 0.015), and lateral and ventral funiculi (P = 0.0002). Transverse diffusivity was significantly different between ROIs in the ventral and dorsal funiculi (P = 0.003) and the ventral and lateral funiculi (P = 0.004). Tractography-based quantifications revealed DTI parameter regional differences that were generally consistent with the ROI-based analysis. Original contributions are: 1) the use of a tractography-based method to quantify DTI metrics in the human cervical spinal cord, and 2) reported DTI values in various funiculi at 3 T. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Microstructure of the Midbrain and Cervical Spinal Cord in Idiopathic Restless Legs Syndrome: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study.

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    Lindemann, Klaas; Müller, Hans-Peter; Ludolph, Albert C; Hornyak, Magdolna; Kassubek, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows the study of white matter microstructure in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to examine the DTI metrics of the cervical spinal cord and the brainstem up to the midbrain in patients with idiopathic restless legs (RLS) compared to matched healthy controls. DTI analysis of the cervical spinal cord and the brainstem up into the midbrain was performed in 25 patients with idiopathic RLS and 25 matched healthy controls. Data analysis in the brain was performed by voxelwise comparison of fractional anisotropy (FA) maps at group level. Cervical spinal cord data analysis was performed by slicewise analysis of averaged FA values in axial slices along the spinal cord. Voxelwise comparison of FA maps in the brainstem showed significant microstructural alterations in two clusters in the midbrain bilaterally. Slicewise comparison of the FA maps in the cervical spinal cord showed a trend for lower FA values at the level of the second and third vertebra area in the patient sample. The imaging data suggest that significant alterations in the midbrain in RLS can be visualized by DTI and might correlate to a macroscopically subtle process with changes of the tissue microstructure in the corresponding tracts. An additional area of interest is regionally clustered in the upper cervical spinal cord with a tendency toward altered diffusion metrics. These results might be addressed by further studies, e.g., at higher magnetic field strengths. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  2. Global Spinal Alignment in Cervical Kyphotic Deformity: The Importance of Head Position and Thoracolumbar Alignment in the Compensatory Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Jun; Verma, Kushagra; Endo, Kenji; Ishii, Ken; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Yagi, Mitsuru; Hosogane, Naobumi; Yang, Jeffrey; Tay, Bobby; Deviren, Vedat; Ames, Christopher

    2017-06-07

    Previous studies have evaluated cervical kyphosis (C-kypho) using cervical curvature or chin-brow vertical angle, but the relationship between C-kypho and global spinal alignment is currently unknown. To elucidate global spinal alignment and compensatory mechanisms in primary symptomatic C-kypho using full-spine radiography. In this retrospective multicenter study, symptomatic primary C-kypho patients (Cerv group; n = 103) and adult thoracolumbar deformity patients (TL group; n = 119) were compared. We subanalyzed Cerv subgroups according to sagittal vertical axis (SVA) values of C7 (SVA positive or negative [C7P or C7N]). Various Cobb angles (°) and SVAs (mm) were evaluated. SVA values were -20.2 and 63.6 mm in the Cerv group and TL group, respectively ( P spinal alignment. Thus, global spinal alignment with cervical kyphosis is characterized as head balanced or trunk balanced.

  3. Klippel-Feil syndrome – the risk of cervical spinal cord injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurpreet

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klippel-Feil syndrome is defined as congenital fusion of two or more cervical vertebrae and is believed to result from faulty segmentation along the embryo's developing axis during weeks 3–8 of gestation. Persons with Klippel-Feil syndrome and cervical stenosis may be at increased risk for spinal cord injury after minor trauma as a result of hypermobility of the various cervical segments. Persons with Klippel-Feil Syndrome often have congenital anomalies of the urinary tract as well. Case presentation A 51-year male developed incomplete tetraplegia in 1997 when he slipped and fell backwards hitting his head on the floor. X-rays of cervical spine showed fusion at two levels: C2 and C3 vertebrae, and C4 and C5 vertebrae. Intravenous urography (IVU revealed no kidneys in the renal fossa on both sides, but the presence of crossed, fused renal ectopia in the left ilio-lumbar region. This patient had a similar cervical spinal cord injury about 15 years ago, when he developed transient numbness and paresis of the lower limbs following a fall. Discussion and Conclusion 1 Persons with Klippel-Feil syndrome should be made aware of the increased risk of sustaining transient neurologic deterioration after minor trauma if there is associated radiographic evidence of spinal stenosis. 2 Patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome often have congenital anomalies of the urinary tract. Our patient had crossed, fused, ectopia of kidney. 3 When patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome sustain tetraplegia they have increased chances of developing urinary tract calculi. Treatment of kidney stones may pose a challenge because of associated renal anomalies. 4 Health professionals caring for cervical spinal cord injury patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome and renal anomalies should place emphasis on prevention of kidney stones. A large fluid intake is recommended for these patients, as a high intake of fluids is still the most powerful and certainly the most

  4. Interneuronal systems of the cervical spinal cord assessed with BOLD imaging at 1.5 T

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    Stracke, C.P.; Schoth, F.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Krings, T. [University Hospital of the University of Technology, Departments of Neuroradiology and Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Pettersson, L.G. [University of Goeteborg, Department of Physiology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if functional activity with spinal cord somatosensory stimulation can be visualized using BOLD fMRI. We investigated nine healthy volunteers using a somatosensory stimulus generator. The stimuli were applied in three different runs at the first, third, and fifth finger tip of the right hand, respectively, corresponding to dermatomes c6, c7, and c8. The stimuli gave an increase of BOLD signal (activation) in three different locations of the spinal cord and brain stem. First, activations could be seen in the spinal segment corresponding to the stimulated dermatome in seven out of nine volunteers for c6 stimulation, two out of eight for c7, and three out of eight for c8. These activations were located close to the posterior margin of the spinal cord, presumably reflecting synaptic transmission to dorsal horn interneurons. Second, activation in the medulla oblongata was evident in four subjects, most likely corresponding to the location of the nucleus cuneatus. The third location of activation, which was the strongest and most reliable observed was inside the spinal cord in the c3 and c4 segments. Activation at these spinal levels was almost invariably observed independently of the dermatome stimulated (9/9 for c6, 8/8 for c7, and 7/8 for c8 stimulation). These activations may pertain to an interneuronal system at this spinal level. The results are discussed in relation to neurophysiological studies on cervical spinal interneuronal pathways in animals and humans. (orig.)

  5. Epidural Naloxone to Prevent Buprenorphine Induced PONV

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    Ashok Jadon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidural infusion of local analgesic and opioid are commonly used for postoperative pain relief. This combina-tion gives excellent anlgesia but nausea and vomiting remains a major concern. Low dose epidural naloxone prevents PONV induced by spinal opioids like morphine, fentanyl and sufentanil. However, it is not known that epidural naloxone administration prevents PONV induced by epidural buprenorphine. We have reported three cases of major abdominal operation in which lowdose epidural infusion of naloxone releived the symptom of buprenorphine induced severe PONV and improved the quality of analgesia.

  6. Modulation of thermal somatosensory thresholds within local and remote spinal dermatomes following cervical repetitive magnetic stimulation.

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    Albu, Sergiu; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Palazon, Ramiro; Kumru, Hatice; Avila-Martin, Gerardo; Galán-Arriero, Iriana; Taylor, Julian

    2013-10-25

    Repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) modulates thermal somatosensory function at both low (0.2-1.0Hz) and high (5.0-20.0Hz) frequencies within the conditioned dermatome. However the effects of 1Hz and 20Hz cervical (C6-C7) rMS on thermosensory thresholds and contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs) tested within local and remote spinal dermatomes are not known. Thirty healthy subjects participated in the study. Warm and cold detection threshold, heat and cold pain thresholds, and Cz/Fz CHEPs were evaluated within the C6, T10 and extrasegmental V3 control dermatome, before and after random assignment of subjects to sham, 1 or 20Hz C6-C7 rMS. Following both 1 and 20Hz cervical rMS, warm detection threshold increased within the local C6 dermatome. Furthermore 1Hz cervical rMS increased warm detection threshold within the remote T10 dermatome, but not within the V3-trigeminal control area. Cervical rMS failed to modulate cold detection threshold, heat and cold pain threshold or Cz/Fz CHEP amplitude from the dermatomal test sites. Both 1 and 20Hz cervical rMS modulated warm detection threshold within the locally conditioned C6 dermatome. The concomitant increase in warm detection threshold within the T10 dermatome following 1Hz rMS provides evidence for remote neuromodulation of thermosensory function via intraspinal control mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Value of preventive tracheotomy in patients with acute cervical spinal cord injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao-tian; Zhao, Chang-ping; Li, Zhi; Yan, Jin-cheng; Hao, Jian-dong; Li, Zeng-yan

    2013-12-17

    To evaluate the value of preventive tracheotomy in patients with acute cervical spinal cord injury. A retrospective analysis was performed on 54 cases of severe C4-C8 cervical spinal cord injury patients undergoing anterior fixation. They were classified as A and B according to the criteria of American Spinal Injury Association. And no tracheotomy was performed preoperatively. The patients with a high risk of dyspnea and with an indication for preventive tracheotomy received a preventive tracheotomy right after anterior fixation. 11 cases were classified into tracheotomy group and 43 cases were in non-tracheotomy group. The preoperative and hospital stays, incidence of hypoxemia and pulmonary infection, incidence of surgical incision site infection and mortality were analyzed between two groups. The preoperative and hospital stays of tracheotomy group were shorter than those of non-tracheotomy group (2.9 ± 1.2 vs 5.7 ± 4.4 days, 10.3 ± 4.0 vs 16.5 ± 9.2 days). The incidence of hypoxemia was lower in tracheotomy group (9.1% vs 44.2%). There was difference existed between two groups. 44.2% patients in the non-tracheotomy group underwent tracheotomy or endotracheal intubation for dyspnea and hypoxemia. There was no significant difference between two groups in the incidence of pulmonary infection (9.1% vs 7.0%) or surgical incision site infection (0 vs 2.3%). The mortality of non-tracheotomy group was 3.07 folds of that of tracheotomy group (9.1% vs 27.9%). But there was no significant statistical difference. The preventive tracheotomy is an effective solution for the patients with respiratory compromises, a high risk of dyspnea and with an indication for preventive tracheotomy. The preventive tracheotomy for severe cervical spinal cord can improve respiratory function effectively and fixation may be performed earlier. And there are lower rates of mortality and infection.

  8. Cervical spondylitis and spinal abscess due to Actinomyces meyeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvignaud, Alexandre; Ribeiro, Emmanuel; Moynet, Daniel; Longy-Boursier, Maïté; Malvy, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Human actinomycosis with involvement of the spine is a rare condition although it has been first described a long time ago. It is probably underrecognized since its clinical presentation is often misleading and accurate bacteriological diagnosis is challenging. We herein report a rare case of cervical actinomycosis with paravertebral abscess and spondylitis imputed to an infection by Actinomyces meyeri in a 52-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian man. A. meyeri should be considered as a potential cause for subacute or chronic spondylitis, even in immunocompetent subjects. Modern diagnostic tools such as Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight mass spectrometry and 16S rRNA sequencing are efficient for accurate microbiological identification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Cervical spondylitis and spinal abscess due to Actinomyces meyeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Duvignaud

    Full Text Available Human actinomycosis with involvement of the spine is a rare condition although it has been first described a long time ago. It is probably underrecognized since its clinical presentation is often misleading and accurate bacteriological diagnosis is challenging. We herein report a rare case of cervical actinomycosis with paravertebral abscess and spondylitis imputed to an infection by Actinomyces meyeri in a 52-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian man. A. meyeri should be considered as a potential cause for subacute or chronic spondylitis, even in immunocompetent subjects. Modern diagnostic tools such as Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption–Ionization Time of Flight mass spectrometry and 16S rRNA sequencing are efficient for accurate microbiological identification.

  10. Man-in-the-barrel syndrome: Case report of ventral epidural abscess and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmaro, Karam; Pabaney, Aqueel H; Rammo, Richard; Tahir, Rizwan; Kole, Max K

    2018-01-01

    Man-in-the-barrel syndrome (MBS) is an uncommon clinical condition for which patients present with bilateral brachial diplegia but intact lower extremity strength. This syndrome is typically attributed to a cranial/cortical injury rather than a spinal pathology. A 62-year-old diabetic male presented with bilateral upper extremity paresis attributed to a ventral cervical epidural abscess diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging. Emergent cervical decompression resulted in slight improvement of upper extremity strength. However, he later expired due to sepsis and respiratory compromise. Establishing the correct diagnosis via clinical examination and proceeding with appropriate management of MBS attributed to a cervical epidural abscess is critical to achieve a good outcome.

  11. Newly Detected Cervical Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula on Magnetic Resonance Angiography Causing Intracranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Minami, Hiroaki; Yamaura, Ikuya; Yoshida, Yasuhisa; Hirata, Yutaka

    2017-09-01

    Although an asymptomatic spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) can sometimes be incidentally detected on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there are no previous reports showing the development of an SDAVF on MRI or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). A 64-year old man with unruptured vertebral artery dissection (VAD) developed a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) during regular follow-up. Emergent endovascular coil internal trapping for the VAD was performed; however, angiography after the endovascular treatment showed a lower cervical SDAVF. The SDAVF was considered the bleeding source based on subsequent spinal MRI, and endovascular embolization was performed. In this case, previous serial MRA examinations indicated that the SDAVF appeared for the first time during follow-up, and SAH occurred. This may be the first report in which serial MRA studies demonstrated the course of this condition, from the appearance of an SDAVF to the development of SAH. An abnormal vascular structure detected on MRA indicated abnormal enlargement of the perimedullary vein and the presence of a cervical SDAVF. A lower cervical SDAVF should be suspected if such an abnormal vascular structure is detected on MRA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Serotonin(2) receptors mediate respiratory recovery after cervical spinal cord hemisection in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S Y; Basura, G J; Goshgarian, H G

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to specifically investigate the involvement of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT(2))] receptors in 5-HT-mediated respiratory recovery after cervical hemisection. Experiments were conducted on C(2) spinal cord-hemisected, anesthetized (chloral hydrate, 400 mg/kg ip), vagotomized, pancuronium- paralyzed, and artificially ventilated female Sprague-Dawley rats in which CO(2) levels were monitored and maintained. Twenty-four hours after spinal hemisection, the ipsilateral phrenic nerve displayed no respiratory-related activity indicative of a functionally complete hemisection. Intravenous administration of the 5-HT(2A/2C)-receptor agonist (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI) induced respiratory-related activity in the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to hemisection under conditions in which CO(2) was maintained at constant levels and augmented the activity induced under conditions of hypercapnia. The effects of DOI were found to be dose dependent, and the recovery of activity could be maintained for up to 2 h after a single injection. DOI-induced recovery was attenuated by the 5-HT(2)-receptor antagonist ketanserin but not with the 5-HT(2C)-receptor antagonist RS-102221, suggesting that 5-HT(2A) and not necessarily 5-HT(2C) receptors may be involved in the induction of respiratory recovery after cervical spinal cord injury.

  13. Risk factors relating to the need for mechanical ventilation in isolated cervical spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertudomphonwanit, Thamrong; Wattanaapisit, Thanet; Chavasiri, Cholavech; Chotivichit, Areesak

    2014-09-01

    Cervical spinal cord injuries (SCI) are a major public health problem. Respiratory complications are among the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with cervical SCI, especially respiratory failure. Based on our evaluation of the existing English language literature, few previous studies appear to have reported on risk factors associated with the need for mechanical ventilation in isolated cervical SCI patients who had no concomitant injuries or diseases at the time ofadmission. The purpose of this study was to determine incidence and riskfactors relating to the needfor mechanical ventilation in isolated cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) patients who had no concomitant injuries. This retrospective study was conducted by reviewing and analyzing the patient data of 66 isolated cervical-SCI patients who were admitted in our hospital between January 1995 andDecember 2009. Patient medical records were reviewed for demographic data, neurological injuries, needfor mechanical ventilation, definitive treatment, complications, and outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to identify predisposing risk factors relating to patient dependency on mechanical ventilation. Of the 66patients, 30.3% (20/66) required mechanical ventilation and 22.7% (15/66) were identified as complete cord injury, ofwhich seven sustained injury above CS. Of the patients with complete SCI, 66.7% (10/15) were dependent on mechanical ventilation, as were 85% (6/7) with SCI above C5. All five of the patients with complete-SCI above C5 who received operative treatment were dependent upon mechanical ventilation, postoperatively. Only 19.6% (10/51) of the incomplete injury group required mechanical ventilation. Univariate analysis indicated the following factors as significantly increasing the risk ofventilator dependence: complete SCI (p = 0.001), SCI above C5 level (p = 0.011) and operative treatment (p = 0.008). Multivariate analysis identified the following factors

  14. Pathogenesis of spinal cord involvement induced by lower cervical instability in rheumatoid spondylitis

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    Taniguchi, Hironobu; Kuwabara, Shigeru; Fukuda, Kenji; Kuroki, Tatsuji; Tajima, Naoya (Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan))

    1994-07-01

    To examine prognostic factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), plain radiography findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were compared with histopathological findings in 129 RA patients who had local or neurologic symptoms due to the cervical spine. All patients underwent plain radiography, and subdislocation more than 2 mm towards the anterior and posterior directions on plain radiographs was defined as instability. In predicting induction of instability of the inferior cervical spine and risk for spinal compression, erosion of the vertebral rim, as seen on plain X-rays, and irregular findings of the end-plate of the vertebral body and Gd-enhanced nodules around the intervertebral disk, as seen on MRI, seemed to be important. (N.K.).

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging predictors for respiratory failure after cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hua; Ou, Chien-Yu

    2014-11-01

    Patients after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) may experience ventilator-dependent respiratory failure during the acute hospitalization period. The aim of the study is to identify imaging factors that predict respiratory failure after acute CSCI. We enrolled 108 patients diagnosed with CSCI in 4 years. The definition of respiratory failure consisted of the requirement of a definitive airway and the assistance of mechanical ventilation. Objective neurological function was determined using the classification of the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA). We evaluated the characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. Respiratory failure occurred in 8 (7.40%) of 108 CSCI patients. The ASIA classification of the 108 patients were A (6), B (3), C (60), D (27), and E (12), and the 8 respiratory failure patients were A (3), B (1), and C (4). Seven of 8 patients with respiratory failure and 78 of 100 patients without respiratory failure had a neurological level of C5 or above by the ASIA standards (p=1.000). The imaging level of injury at C3 by MRI was identified in 5 of 8 patients that developed respiratory failure and more frequent than injury at the lower cervical levels (pspinal cord edema was another predictor of respiratory failure (p=0.009). MRI can accurately localize CSCI and identify those patients at risk of respiratory failure. Imaging level of injury at C3 and presence of spinal cord edema are both predictors. To prevent secondary cord injury from prolonged hypoxia and facilitate pulmonary care, definitive airways should be established early in high risk patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Individualized three-dimensional printed cage for spinal cervical fusion

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    Uwe Spetzger

    2017-01-01

    Uwe Spetzger, MD, is the Chairman of Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Karlsruhe, and Institute for Anthropomatics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany. Uwe Spetzger received his medical degree in 1989 at the Medical Faculty, University of Heidelberg, Germany. He passed the US American medical exam (ECFMG in 1990. He has started his neurosurgical training in 1990 at the Department of Neurosurgery, Technical University (RWTH Aachen and got his board certification of neurosurgeon in 1996. The Grant of the Wilhelm-Tonnis-Foundation of the German Society of Neurosurgery (DGNC enables his scientific internship in 1999 at Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC. In June 1999, he passed the European Examination in Neurosurgery (EANS. From 1999 - 2002 he was vice-chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Freiburg and the director of the interdisciplinary centre for skull base surgery at Freiburg University. Since 2002 he is Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Karlsruhe and in 2003 he became an active member of the Faculty of Computer Science, Humanoids and Intelligence Systems Lab - Institute for Anthropomatics at KIT. Prof. Spetzger became the president of the international Society of Medical Innovation and Technology iSMIT in 2013 and the congress president of the 66th Annual Meeting of German Society of Neurosurgery DGNC in 2015 and the Vice-President of the International Society of Digital Medicine in 2016. He is member of several national and international neurosurgical and medical technological societies. His main surgical and research interests are cerebrovascular surgery, skull base surgery, computer-assisted and robotic surgery, neuronavigation and spinal microsurgery.

  17. Investigation of the Differential Contributions of Superficial and Deep Muscles on Cervical Spinal Loads with Changing Head Postures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsiu Cheng

    Full Text Available Cervical spinal loads are predominately influenced by activities of cervical muscles. However, the coordination between deep and superficial muscles and their influence on the spinal loads is not well understood. This study aims to document the changes of cervical spinal loads and the differential contributions of superficial and deep muscles with varying head postures. Electromyography (EMG of cervical muscles from seventeen healthy adults were measured during maximal isometric exertions for lateral flexion (at 10°, 20° and terminal position as well as flexion/extension (at 10°, 20°, 30°, and terminal position neck postures. An EMG-assisted optimization approach was used to estimate the muscle forces and subsequent spinal loads. The results showed that compressive and anterior-posterior shear loads increased significantly with neck flexion. In particular, deep muscle forces increased significantly with increasing flexion. It was also determined that in all different static head postures, the deep muscle forces were greater than those of the superficial muscle forces, however, such pattern was reversed during peak efforts where greater superficial muscle forces were identified with increasing angle of inclination. In summary, the identification of significantly increased spinal loads associated with increased deep muscle activation during flexion postures, implies higher risks in predisposing the neck to occupationally related disorders. The results also explicitly supported that deep muscles play a greater role in maintaining stable head postures where superficial muscles are responsible for peak exertions and reinforcing the spinal stability at terminal head postures. This study provided quantitative data of normal cervical spinal loads and revealed motor control strategies in coordinating the superficial and deep muscles during physical tasks.

  18. Investigation of the Differential Contributions of Superficial and Deep Muscles on Cervical Spinal Loads with Changing Head Postures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Chien, Andy; Hsu, Wei-Li; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal loads are predominately influenced by activities of cervical muscles. However, the coordination between deep and superficial muscles and their influence on the spinal loads is not well understood. This study aims to document the changes of cervical spinal loads and the differential contributions of superficial and deep muscles with varying head postures. Electromyography (EMG) of cervical muscles from seventeen healthy adults were measured during maximal isometric exertions for lateral flexion (at 10°, 20° and terminal position) as well as flexion/extension (at 10°, 20°, 30°, and terminal position) neck postures. An EMG-assisted optimization approach was used to estimate the muscle forces and subsequent spinal loads. The results showed that compressive and anterior-posterior shear loads increased significantly with neck flexion. In particular, deep muscle forces increased significantly with increasing flexion. It was also determined that in all different static head postures, the deep muscle forces were greater than those of the superficial muscle forces, however, such pattern was reversed during peak efforts where greater superficial muscle forces were identified with increasing angle of inclination. In summary, the identification of significantly increased spinal loads associated with increased deep muscle activation during flexion postures, implies higher risks in predisposing the neck to occupationally related disorders. The results also explicitly supported that deep muscles play a greater role in maintaining stable head postures where superficial muscles are responsible for peak exertions and reinforcing the spinal stability at terminal head postures. This study provided quantitative data of normal cervical spinal loads and revealed motor control strategies in coordinating the superficial and deep muscles during physical tasks. PMID:26938773

  19. Comparison of MRI pulse sequences for investigation of lesions of the cervical spinal cord

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    Campi, A.; Pontesilli, S.; Gerevini, S.; Scotti, G. [San Raffaele Hospital, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2000-09-01

    Small spinal cord lesions, even if clinically significant, can be due to the low sensitivity of some pulse sequences. We compared T2-weighted fast (FSE), and conventional (CSE) spin-echo and short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR)-FSE overlooked on MRI sequences to evaluate their sensitivity to and specificity for lesions of different types. We compared the three sequences in MRI of 57 patients with cervical spinal symptoms. The image sets were assessed by two of us individually for final diagnosis, lesion detectability and image quality. Both readers arrived at the same final diagnoses with all sequences, differentiating four groups of patients. Group 1 (30 patients, 53 %), with a final diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Demyelinating lesions were better seen on STIR-FSE images, on which the number of lesions was significantly higher than on FSE, while the FSE and CSE images showed approximately equal numbers of lesions; additional lesions were found in 9 patients. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 17 demyelinating lesions was significantly higher on STIR-FSE images than with the other sequences. Group 2, 19 patients (33 %) with cervical pain, 15 of whom had disc protrusion or herniation: herniated discs were equally well delineated with all sequences, with better myelographic effect on FSE. In five patients with intrinsic spinal cord abnormalities, the conspicuity and demarcation of the lesions were similar with STIR-FSE and FSE. Group 3, 4 patients (7 %) with acute myelopathy of unknown aetiology. In two patients, STIR-FSE gave better demarcation of lesions and in one a questionable additional lesions. Group 4, 4 patients (7 %) with miscellaneous final diagnoses. STIR-FSE had high sensitivity to demyelinating lesions, can be considered quite specific and should be included in spinal MRI for assessment of suspected demyelinating disease. (orig.)

  20. Cervical Cord-Canal Mismatch: A New Method for Identifying Predisposition to Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Aria; Montejo, Julio; Sun, Xin; Virojanapa, Justin; Kolb, Luis E; Abbed, Khalid M; Cheng, Joseph S

    2017-12-01

    The risk for spinal cord injuries (SCIs) ranging from devastating traumatic injuries, compression because of degenerative pathology, and neurapraxia is increased in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. Classical diagnostic criteria include an absolute anteroposterior diameter of cord, which varies across patients, independent of canal size. Recent large magnetic resonance imaging studies of population cohorts have allowed newer methods to emerge that account for both cord and canal size by measuring a spinal cord occupation ratio (SCOR). A SCOR defined as ≥70% on midsagittal imaging or ≥80% on axial imaging appears to be an effective method of identifying cord-canal mismatch, but requires further validation. Cord-canal size mismatch predisposes patients to SCI because of 1) less space within the canal lowering the amount of degenerative changes needed for cord compression, and 2) less cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord decreasing the ability to absorb kinetic forces directed at the spine. Patients with cord-canal mismatch have been reported to be at a substantially higher risk of traumatic SCI, and present with degenerative cervical myelopathy at a younger age than patients without cord-canal mismatch. However, neurologic outcome after SCI has occurred does not appear to be different in patients with or without a cord-canal mismatch. Recognition that canal and cord size are both factors which predispose to SCI supports that cord-canal size mismatch rather than a narrow cervical canal in isolation should be viewed as the underlying mechanism predisposing to SCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Using surface electromyography to detect changes in innervation zones pattern after human cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharipour, Babak; Sandhu, Milap S; Rasool, Ghulam; Suresh, Nina L; Rymer, William Z

    2016-08-01

    Human spinal cord injuries (SCI) disrupt the pathways between brain and spinal cord, resulting in substantial impairment and loss of function. Currently, we do not have the ability to precisely quantify the "functional" level of motor injury. The aim of this study is to determine if high-density surface electromyography imaging (SEI) can be used to characterize the location and extent of the spinal lesion. SEI is a safe and non-invasive technique, which uses several electrodes to provide a map of muscle activity. We applied the SEI technique to characterize muscle activity in individuals with chronic incomplete cervical SCI. Surface electromyogram signals (sEMG) from Biceps Brachii (BB) were recorded at submaximal levels (20%, 40%, and 60%) of maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) during isometric elbow flexion, shoulder flexion, and elbow abduction in two individuals with SCI. Through time-domain analysis of the collected data, we detected signs of de-innervation and re-innervations by analyzing the innervation zones (IZ) on the left and right BB muscles. We found that the distribution of IZs was different between the two sides. In addition, analysis of sEMG data collected at rest (no voluntary contraction) showed evidence of superficial active motor units that were active during rest (in the absence of spasms). These findings highlight the potential of SEI technique as a potential clinical tool to quantitatively describe the extent of the damage to motor spinal circuitry, and provide added precision to the clinical examinations and radiological findings.

  2. Complete medulla/cervical spinal cord transection after atlanto-occipital dislocation: an extraordinary case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautschi, O P; Woodland, P R; Zellweger, R

    2007-05-01

    Case report. Traumatic atlanto-occipital dislocation (AOD) with a complete medulla/spinal cord transection is rare and believed to be fatal owing to the high level of the spinal cord injury. Clinical outcome is poor. Consequently, relatively few case reports of adult patients surviving this injury appear in the literature. OBJECTIVES AND RESULT: We present the case of a 20-year-old male, who sustained an AOD with a complete medulla/spinal cord transection in a motorcycle accident to discuss the possibility of long-term survival with this condition. The patient underwent occipito-cervical stabilization. With an Injury Severity Score of 75, by definition unsurvivable, the patient is 16 months after the injury, ventilated and fully dependent for all care. Long-term survival following AOD with a complete medulla/spinal cord transection is possible if immediate resuscitation at the scene is available. Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether or not a patient with such a devastating injury and without any prospect of functional recovery should be kept alive under all circumstances.

  3. Muscle atrophy is associated with cervical spinal motoneuron loss in BACHD mouse model for Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadão, Priscila Aparecida Costa; de Aragão, Bárbara Campos; Andrade, Jéssica Neves; Magalhães-Gomes, Matheus Proença S; Foureaux, Giselle; Joviano-Santos, Julliane Vasconcelos; Nogueira, José Carlos; Ribeiro, Fabíola Mara; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Guatimosim, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Involuntary choreiform movements are clinical hallmark of Huntington's disease, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an increased number of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the huntingtin gene. Involuntary movements start with an impairment of facial muscles and then affect trunk and limbs muscles. Huntington's disease symptoms are caused by changes in cortex and striatum neurons induced by mutated huntingtin protein. However, little is known about the impact of this abnormal protein in spinal cord motoneurons that control movement. Therefore, in this study we evaluated abnormalities in the motor unit (spinal cervical motoneurons, motor axons, neuromuscular junctions and muscle) in a mouse model for Huntington's disease (BACHD). Using light, fluorescence, confocal, and electron microscopy, we showed significant changes such as muscle fibers atrophy, fragmentation of neuromuscular junctions, axonal alterations, and motoneurons death in BACHD mice. Noteworthy, the surviving motoneurons from BACHD spinal cords were smaller than WT. We suggest that this loss of larger putative motoneurons is accompanied by a decrease in the expression of fast glycolytic muscle fibers in this model for Huntington's disease. These observations show spinal cord motoneurons loss in BACHD that might help to understand neuromuscular changes in Huntington's disease. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Spinal Cord Herniation After Cervical Corpectomy with Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guppy, Kern H; Silverthorn, James W

    2017-04-01

    Spinal cord herniation (SCH) is rare, is mostly idiopathic, and occurs predominantly in the thoracic spine. SCH is less common in the cervical spine and has been reported after posterior cervical spine surgery associated with the development of pseudomeningoceles. Two cases of SCH have been reported after anterior cervical corpectomies for ossified posterior longitudinal ligament with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. We report the third such case, but the first in a patient without ossified posterior longitudinal ligament (degenerative disc disease and pseudarthrosis). A 56-year-old woman presented with bilateral arm pain and weakness. She had undergone 3 previous anterior cervical spine surgeries at an outside medical center with the most recent 7 years ago with C5 and C6 corpectomies and fusion with a persistent CSF leak. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography myelography showed spinal cord herniation through the mesh cage at C6. The patient underwent a redo C5 and C6 corpectomy with untethering of the spinal cord. The patient was asymptomatic 2 years later. This is the first reported case of anterior cervical SCH in a patient without ossified posterior longitudinal ligament after multiple anterior cervical fusions including a cervical corpectomy for pseudarthrosis with a CSF leak. We hypothesize that persistent CSF leak causes a pressure gradient across the dura mater through the cage to the lower pressure in the retropharyngeal space, which led to herniation of the spinal cord into the anterior cage. We review the literature and discuss the treatment choices for anterior cervical SCH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lumbar spinal anesthesia with cervical nociceptive blockade. Critical review of a series of 1,330 procedures

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    Percio Ramón Becker Benitez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The manufacture of minimally traumatic needles and synthesis of pharmacological adjuncts with safe and effective action on inhibitory and neuromodulatory synapses distributed along the nociceptive pathways were crucial for a new expansion phase of spinal anesthesia. The objectives of this paper are present our clinical experience with 1330 lumbar spinal anesthesia performed with purposeful nociceptive blockade of the thoracic and cervical spinal nerves corresponding to dermatomes C4 or C3; warn about the method pathophysiological risks, and emphasize preventive standards for the safe application of the technique. CONTENT: Review of the historical background and anatomical spinal anesthesia with cervical levels of analgesia. Description of the technique used in our institution; population anesthetized; and surgery performed with the described method. Critical exposition of the physiological, pathophysiological, and clinical effects occurred and registered during anesthesia-surgery and postoperative period. CONCLUSION: Spinal anesthesia with nociceptive blockade to dermatome C4, or C3, is an effective option for surgery on somatic structures distal to the metamer of the third cervical spinal nerve, lasting no more than four or five hours. The method safety depends on the unrestricted respect for the essential rules of proper anesthesia.

  6. Metastatic Epidural Spinal cord compression. Prognostic factors and results following radiation therapy; Metastatische epidurale Spinalkanalkompression: Prognostische Faktoren und Ergebnisse der Strahlentherapie

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    Loevey, G.; Gademann, G. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Koch, K. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Klinikum Ernst-von-Bergmann, Potsdam (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    Background: The metastatic epidural spinal cord compression is an oncologic emergency. Presently, there is no agreement on a standard diagnostic or therapeutic algorithm. In spite of improvement in diagnostic imaging, a great proportion of patients are plegic at the time of the first presentation. Patients and Methods: Therapy charts of 53 consecutive patients - 31 male and 22 female - with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression treated with radiation therapy only have been analyzed. Median age was 60 years. The most frequent primary tumors were bronchogenic carcinoma (13 patients), breast cancer (ten patients) and prostate cancer (ten patients). Results: MRI was the most sensitive diagnostic tool in detecting spinal cord compression. Plain X-ray films were not useful. Pain symptoms were improved in 66% of the patients. The most important prognostic factor was the pretreatment mobility status. 94% of the ambulatory patients kept their walking ability, but only one plegic patient could walk again after radiation therapy (p < 0.001). Patients whose back pain was presented to an oncologist were more likely to keep their walking ability by the end of the therapy. Patients with bronchogenic cancer and plegic patients had a significantly worse survival. Conclusion: Patients with a known malignant tumor and progressive or axial back pain should undergo MRI scan to rule out spinal cord compression. For patients without severe neurologic deficit and MRI proven epidural compression, radiation therapy is able to preserve walking ability and reduce pain. For patients with neurologic symptoms radiation therapy should start within 24 hours. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die metastatisch bedingte epidurale Spinalkanalkompression ist eine onkologische Notfallsituation mit zunehmender Inzidenz. Ein eindeutiger diagnostischer und therapeutischer Algorithmus fehlt bislang. Trotz verbesserter diagnostischer Methoden werden viele Patienten mit bereits manifester

  7. Effects of training on upper limb function after cervical spinal cord injury: a systematic review.

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    Lu, Xiao; Battistuzzo, Camilla R; Zoghi, Maryam; Galea, Mary P

    2015-01-01

    To summarize the evidence for the effectiveness of exercise training in promoting recovery of upper extremity function after cervical spinal cord injury. Medline, Cochrane, CINAHL, EMBASE and PEDro were used to search the literature. Two reviewers independently selected and summarized the included studies. Methodological quality of the selected articles was scored using the Downs and Black checklist. A total of 16 studies were included, representing a total of 426 participants. Overall, the internal validity and reporting of the studies was fair to good, while power and external validity were poor. Interventions included exercise therapy, electrical stimulation, functional electrical stimulation, robotic training and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Most of the studies reported improvements in muscle strength, arm and hand function, activity of daily living or quality of life after intervention. Training including exercise therapy, electrical stimulation, functional electrical stimulation of the upper limb following cervical spinal cord injury leads to improvements in muscle strength, upper limb function and activity of daily living or quality of life. Further research is needed into the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and robotic training on upper limb function. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Vector-mediated expression of erythropoietin improves functional outcome after cervical spinal cord contusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Wu, Z; Chiang, P; Fink, D J; Mata, M

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic effect of erythropoietin (EPO) delivered by direct injection of a nonreplicating herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vector coding for EPO (vEPO) in a model of cervical hemicord contusion at C7. At 1 h after spinal cord injury (SCI), either vEPO or control vector carrying a reporter gene (vC) was injected into the cord above and below the lesion. Animals injected with vEPO showed a statistically significant improvement in the ipsilateral forelimb function, as measured by open-field evaluation of motor performance, forelimb reaching in the cylinder test and misplacement in grid walk. This correlated with preservation of gray matter in the area of the lesion. There was also mild but significant improvement of hindlimb motor function measured by Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score and computerized gait analysis in vEPO compared with control vector-injected animals. Microtubule-associated protein tau, phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein and the synaptic proteins synaptophysin and PSD-95 were all significantly increased in the spinal cord of vEPO-treated animals compared with control vector-injected animals. These data suggest that gene transfer of EPO after cervical SCI by minimizing the injury size and enhancing tissue sparing preserves large-caliber axons and promotes synaptogenesis.

  9. Comparison of modic changes in the lumbar and cervical spine, in 3167 patients with and without spinal pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sheng-yun

    Full Text Available There are few comparisons of Modic changes (MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine.Compare the prevalence of MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine, and determine how MC prevalence depends on spinal pain, age, disc degeneration, spinal level, and the presence or absence of kyphosis.Retrospective clinical survey.Magnetic resonance images (MRIs were compared from five patient groups: 1. 1223 patients with low-back pain/radiculopathy only; 2. 1023 patients with neck pain/radiculopathy only; 3. 497 patients with concurrent low-back and neck symptoms; 4. 304 asymptomatic subjects with lumbar MRIs; and 5. 120 asymptomatic subjects with cervical MRIs.The prevalence of MCs was higher in those with spinal pain than in those without, both in the lumbar spine (21.0% vs 10.5% and cervical spine (8.8% vs 3.3%. Type II MCs were most common and Type III were least common in all groups. The prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was little affected by the presence of concurrent neck pain, and the same was true for the prevalence of cervical MCs in people with neck pain with or without concurrent back pain. When symptomatic patients were reclassified into two groups (back pain, neck pain, the prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was greater than that of cervical MCs in people with neck pain. The prevalence of lumbar and cervical MCs increased with age, disc degeneration, (descending spinal level, and increased kyphosis.There is a significantly higher prevalence of MCs in patients with back and neck pain. The reported association with increased kyphosis (flat back is novel.

  10. Three cases of hemiplegia after cervical paraspinal muscle needling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Choi, Won-Seok; Lee, Jang-Bo

    2015-03-01

    Muscle needling therapy is common for chronic pain management, but the development of unusual complications such as hemiplegia is not well understood. We report on three cases with hemiplegia after cervical paraspinal muscle needling and propose possible explanations for these unusual complications. Case report. The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical charts from a decade (2002-2013) at Korea University Hospital. The records were systematically searched, and the cases with hemiplegia (gradehemiplegia by cervical subdural or epidural hematoma after cervical posterior paraspinal muscle needling without direct invasion (intramuscular stimulation, acupuncture, or intramuscular lidocaine) were observed. All patients were taken for emergent decompressive laminectomy, and their postoperative motor function improved substantially. Spinal hematoma after muscle needling is unusual but was thought to result after a rupture of the epidural or subarachnoid veins by a sharp increase in blood pressure delivered in the intraabdominal or intrathoracic areas after needling therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cervical duraplasty with tenting sutures via laminoplasty for cervical flexion myelopathy in patients with Hirayama disease: successful decompression of a "tight dural canal in flexion" without spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Takai, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Hirayama disease, juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity, is a rare type of cervical flexion segmental myelopathy and its etiology is still being debated. Two theories have been proposed: a "contact pressure" theory and "tight dural canal in flexion" theory. Previously reported treatments, including conservative neck collar therapy and surgical spinal fusion, used fixation of the cervical spine with the aim of avoiding contact pressure between the cord and anterior structures. On the other hand, treatment by duraplasty without spinal fusion has also been used, which aims at decompressing a tight dural canal in flexion by preventing abnormal forward displacement of the posterior dura mater without restricting cervical motion in young patients. The authors developed a new surgical approach for treating a tight dural canal in flexion in patients with Hirayama disease: cervical duraplasty with tenting sutures via laminoplasty without spinal fusion. With this treatment they aimed to both decompress the spinal cord and preserve as much cervical motion as possible. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent this new surgical procedure and to investigate the etiology of Hirayama disease. Six male patients (age range 17-23 years) with Hirayama disease underwent surgery between 2006 and 2012. The pre- and postoperative anteroposterior diameters of the dural canal in the flexed neck position, grip strength of the bilateral upper extremities, cervical alignment (C2-7), and cervical local flexion range of motion were compared. The presence or absence of surgical complications was assessed. To investigate the comparison group of Hirayama disease treated with spinal decompression, the PubMed database was searched for all relevant English-language case reports and series published between 1990 and 2013. The postoperative anteroposterior diameters of the dural canal were significantly expanded in the flexed neck position

  12. Trunk control impairment is responsible for postural instability during quiet sitting in individuals with cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Milosevic, Matija; Masani, Kei; Kuipers, Meredith J; Rahouni, Hossein; Verrier, Mary C; McConville, Kristiina M V; Popovic, Milos R

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with cervical spinal cord injury usually sustain impairments to the trunk and upper and lower limbs, resulting in compromised sitting balance. The objectives of this study were to: 1) compare postural control of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury and able-bodied individuals; and 2) investigate the effects of foot support and trunk fluctuations on postural control during sitting balance. Ten able-bodied individuals and six individuals with cervical spinal cord injury were asked to sit quietly during two 60s trials. The forces exerted on the seat and the foot support surfaces were measured separately using two force plates. The global centre of pressure sway was obtained from the measurements on the two force plates, and the sway for each force plate was calculated individually. Individuals with spinal cord injury had at least twice as large global and seat sways compared to able-bodied individuals, while foot support sway was not significantly different between the two groups. Comparison between global and seat sways showed that anterior-posterior velocity of global sway was larger compared to the seat sway in both groups. Postural control of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury was worse than that of able-bodied individuals. The trunk swayed more in individuals with spinal cord injury, while the stabilization effect of the feet did not differ between the groups. Foot support affected anterior-posterior fluctuations in both groups equally. Thus, trunk control is the dominant mechanism contributing to sitting balance in both able-bodied and spinal cord injury individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MRI Prognostication Factors in the Setting of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Secondary to Trauma.

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    Martínez-Pérez, Rafael; Cepeda, Santiago; Paredes, Igor; Alen, Jose F; Lagares, Alfonso

    2017-05-01

    Several studies have looked for an association between radiologic findings and neurologic outcome after cervical trauma. In the current literature, there is a paucity of evidence proving the prognostic role of soft tissue damage or bony integrity. Our objective is to determine radiologic findings related to neurologic prognosis in patients after incomplete acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury, regardless of initial neurologic examination results. We retrospectively reviewed patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury who had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within the first 96 hours. Clinical and epidemiologic data were recorded from the medical records along with several radiologic findings from the initial computed tomographic scan and MRI. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric test. Significant prognostic factors were analyzed through a stepwise multivariable logistic regression, adjusted by neurologic status at baseline. The receiver-operating characteristic curve was used to test the discriminative capacity of the model. Eighty-six patients (68 males and 18 females) were included for the analysis. Mean age was 49 years. Ligamentum flavum injury, intramedullary edema larger than 36 mm, and facet dislocation were demonstrated to be associated with a lack of neurologic improvement at follow-up. Multivariable analysis showed that edema larger than 36 mm and facet dislocation were strong predictors of clinical outcome, regardless of the initial neurologic examination result. Early MRI has an intrinsic prognostic value. Ligamentous injury and larger edema are strong predicting factors of a bad neurologic outcome at long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiovascular response to peak voluntary exercise in males with cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machač, Stanislav; Radvanský, Jiří; Kolář, Pavel; Kříž, Jiří

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic damage to the cervical spinal cord is usually associated with a disruption of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and impaired cardiovascular control both during and following exercise. The magnitude of the cardiovascular dysfunction remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to compare cardiovascular responses to peak voluntary exercise in individuals with tetraplegia and able-bodied participants. A case-control study. Twenty males with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) as the Tetra group and 27 able-bodied males as the Control group were included in the study. Blood pressure (BP) response one minute after the peak exercise, peak heart rate (HRpeak), and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) on an arm crank ergometer were measured. In the second part of the study, 17 individuals of the Control group completed the Tetra group's workload protocol with the same parameters recorded. There was no increase in BP in response to the exercise in the Tetra group. Able-bodied individuals exhibited significantly increased post-exercise systolic BP after the maximal graded exercise test (123±16%) and after completion of the Tetra group's workload protocol (114±11%) as compared to pre-exercise. The Tetra group VO2peak was 59% and the HRpeak was 73% of the Control group VO2peak and HRpeak, respectively. BP did not increase following maximal arm crank exercise in males with a cervical SCI unlike the increases observed in the Control group. Some males in the Tetra group appeared to be at risk of severe hypotension following high intensity exercise, which can limit the ability to progressive increase and maintain high intensity exercise.

  15. Neurological outcome in surgically treated patients with incomplete closed traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, B; Mohammed, A; Samuel, J; Mues, J; Kluger, P

    2008-09-01

    Retrospective study based on a reference paper. Neurological outcome in patients who were managed surgically with closed traumatic cervical spine injury was evaluated using the ASIA motor scoring system and Frankel grading. To assess the accuracy of motor charting and Frankel grading as tools to evaluate neurological outcome in closed traumatic cervical spine injury, and also to evaluate how the surgically treated patients fared in their neurological recovery by measurement tools as in the reference paper. National Spinal Injuries Centre, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, UK. Fifty-seven patients were admitted within 2 days of the injury with closed traumatic cervical spine injuries (1997-2004). Thirty-seven (65%) met the inclusion criteria as per the referenced paper, that is, were treated surgically, were Frankel grade B and above and had at least 12 months follow up. The remaining 20 patients were not included as they did not meet the inclusion criteria. The breakdown of the 20 patients is given in Table 1. The mean recovery percentage (MRP) and mean deficit percentage (MDP) were calculated as per the referenced paper. An evaluation of 37 patients surgically treated, who had follow up of at least 12 months, showed that preservation of pin prick below the level of lesion, and preservation of anal tone and perianal sensation were good prognostic indicators. There was no correlation between degree of encroachment of canal or the degree of kyphosis to MDP or MRP. The mean time from injury to mobilization was 7.6 days in 25 out of 37 patients. Twelve of the 37 patients had prolonged immobilization because of ITU stay or because they were initially treated conservatively. Three out of the 37 patients developed DVT/PE. Mean hospital stay was 6.4 months. The neurological outcome in surgically treated patients is comparable to the conservatively treated patients. The Frankel grading and ASIA motor charting combined is a powerful tool in assessing the neurological

  16. Risk factors for laryngeal penetration-aspiration in patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalainen, Tiina; Rinta-Kiikka, Irina; Luoto, Teemu M; Thesleff, Tuomo; Helminen, Mika; Korpijaakko-Huuhka, Anna-Maija; Ronkainen, Antti

    2017-06-30

    Laryngeal penetration-aspiration, the entry of material into the airways, is considered the most severe subtype of dysphagia and is common among patients with acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of this study was to investigate risk factors for penetration-aspiration in patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (TCSCI). This is a prospective cohort study. Thirty-seven patients with TCSCI were included in the study. The highest Rosenbek penetration-aspiration scale (PAS; range 1-8) score of each patient was the primary outcome measure. The risk factors consisted of patient characteristics, demographics, and clinical signs observed during a clinical swallowing trial. A clinical swallowing trial and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) was performed on all patients within 28 days post injury. For group comparisons, the patients were divided into two groups: (1) penetrator-aspirators (PAS score ≥3) and (2) non-penetrator-aspirators (PAS score ≤2). Of the 37 patients, 83.8% were male. The mean age at the time of the injury was 61.2 years. Most patients had an incomplete TCSCI (78.4%) caused by a fall (75.7%). In the VFSS, 51.4% of the patients were penetrator-aspirators, and 71.4% had silent aspiration. The risk factors for predicting penetration-aspiration were (1) necessity of bronchoscopies, (2) lower level of anterior cervical operation, (3) coughing, throat clearing, choking related to swallowing, and (4) changes in voice quality related to swallowing. Binary logistic regression identified coughing, throat clearing, choking, and changes in voice quality related to swallowing as independent risk factors for penetration-aspiration. The necessity of bronchoscopies, postinjury lower cervical spine anterior surgery, coughing, throat clearing, choking, and changes in voice quality related to swallowing was a markedrisk factor for aspiration and penetration following a cervical SCI. These factors and signs should be used to suspect

  17. Fast and reproducible in vivo T1 mapping of the human cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Marco; Schneider, Torben; Prados, Ferran; Grussu, Francesco; Yiannakas, Marios C; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S

    2017-07-24

    To develop a fast and robust method for measuring T1 in the whole cervical spinal cord in vivo, and to assess its reproducibility. A spatially nonselective adiabatic inversion pulse is combined with zonally oblique-magnified multislice echo-planar imaging to produce a reduced field-of-view inversion-recovery echo-planar imaging protocol. Multi- inversion time data are obtained by cycling slice order throughout sequence repetitions. Measurement of T1 is performed using 12 inversion times for a total protocol duration of 7 min. Reproducibility of regional T1 estimates is assessed in a scan-rescan experiment on five heathy subjects. Regional mean (standard deviation) T1 was: 1108.5 (±77.2) ms for left lateral column, 1110.1 (±83.2) ms for right lateral column, 1150.4 (±102.6) ms for dorsal column, and 1136.4 (±90.8) ms for gray matter. Regional T1 estimates showed good correlation between sessions (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.89 (P value T1 estimates in the cervical spinal cord are reproducible using inversion-recovery zonally oblique-magnified multislice echo-planar imaging. The short acquisition time and large coverage of this method paves the way for accurate T1 mapping for various spinal cord pathologies. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Synergistic effects of BDNF and rehabilitative training on recovery after cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weishaupt, N; Li, S; Di Pardo, A; Sipione, S; Fouad, K

    2013-02-15

    Promoting the rewiring of lesioned motor tracts following a spinal cord injury is a promising strategy to restore motor function. For instance, axonal collaterals may connect to spared, lesion-bridging neurons, thereby establishing a detour for descending signals and thus promoting functional recovery. In our rat model of cervical spinal cord injury, we attempted to promote targeted rewiring of the unilaterally injured corticospinal tract (CST) via the spared reticulospinal tract (RtST). To promote new connections between the two tracts in the brainstem, we administered viral vectors producing two neurotrophins. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a known promotor of collateral growth, was expressed in the motor cortex, and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), which has chemoattractive properties, was expressed in the reticular formation. Because rehabilitative training has proven to be beneficial in promoting functionally meaningful plasticity following injury, we added training in a skilled reaching task. Different neurotrophin or control treatments with or without training were evaluated. As hypothesized, improvements of motor performance with the injured forelimb following neurotrophin treatment alone were absent or modest compared to untreated controls. In contrast, we found a significant synergistic effect on performance when BDNF treatment was combined with training. The mechanism of this recovery remains unidentified, as histological analyses of CST and RtST collateral projections did not reveal differences among treatment groups. In conclusion, we demonstrate that following a cervical spinal lesion, rehabilitative training is necessary to translate effects of BDNF into functional recovery by mechanisms which are likely independent of collateral sprouting of the CST or RtST into the gray matter. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Community-Acquired Serratia Marcescens Spinal Epidural Abscess in a Patient Without Risk Factors: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Parkins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens has rarely been reported as an agent of invasive disease in patients presenting from the community. Furthermore, S marcescens is frequently opportunistic, affecting individuals with serious medical comorbidities including immune suppression and diabetes. A case of a community-acquired S marcescens spontaneous lumbar epidural abscess presenting as cauda equina syndrome is reported in a previously well 36-year-old man with no identifiable risk factors. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of invasive S marcescens causing disease in a patient with no medical comorbidities.

  20. Optimizing Speech Production in the Ventilator-Assisted Individual Following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBean, Naomi; Ward, Elizabeth; Murdoch, Bruce; Cahill, Louise; Solley, Maura; Geraghty, Timothy; Hukins, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mechanical ventilation is commonly used during the acute management of cervical spinal cord injury, and is required on an ongoing basis in the majority of patients with injuries at or above C3. However, to date there have been limited systematic investigations of the options available to improve speech while ventilator-assisted…

  1. A Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion Injury Model in Non-Human Primates (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salegio, Ernesto A.; Sparrey, Carolyn J.; Camisa, William; Fischer, Jason; Leasure, Jeremi; Buckley, Jennifer; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S.; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Moseanko, Rod; Strand, Sarah; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Haefeli, Jenny; Ma, Xiaokui; Nielson, Jessica L.; Edgerton, V.R.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The development of a non-human primate (NHP) model of spinal cord injury (SCI) based on mechanical and computational modeling is described. We scaled up from a rodent model to a larger primate model using a highly controllable, friction-free, electronically-driven actuator to generate unilateral C6-C7 spinal cord injuries. Graded contusion lesions with varying degrees of functional recovery, depending upon pre-set impact parameters, were produced in nine NHPs. Protocols and pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to optimize the predictability of outcomes by matching impact protocols to the size of each animal's spinal canal, cord, and cerebrospinal fluid space. Post-operative MRI confirmed lesion placement and provided information on lesion volume and spread for comparison with histological measures. We evaluated the relationships between impact parameters, lesion measures, and behavioral outcomes, and confirmed that these relationships were consistent with our previous studies in the rat. In addition to providing multiple univariate outcome measures, we also developed an integrated outcome metric describing the multivariate cervical SCI syndrome. Impacts at the higher ranges of peak force produced highly lateralized and enduring deficits in multiple measures of forelimb and hand function, while lower energy impacts produced early weakness followed by substantial recovery but enduring deficits in fine digital control (e.g., pincer grasp). This model provides a clinically relevant system in which to evaluate the safety and, potentially, the efficacy of candidate translational therapies. PMID:26788611

  2. Multimodal decoding and congruent sensory information enhance reaching performance in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Anna Corbett

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI paralyzes muscles of the hand and arm, making it difficult to perform activities of daily living. Restoring the ability to reach can dramatically improve quality of life for people with cervical SCI. Any reaching system requires a user interface to decode parameters of an intended reach, such as trajectory and target. A challenge in developing such decoders is that often few physiological signals related to the intended reach remain under voluntary control, especially in patients with high cervical injuries. Furthermore, the decoding problem changes when the user is controlling the motion of their limb, as opposed to an external device. The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefits of combining disparate signal sources to control reach in people with a range of impairments, and to consider the effect of two feedback approaches. Subjects with cervical SCI performed robot-assisted reaching, controlling trajectories with either shoulder electromyograms (EMGs or EMGs combined with gaze. We then evaluated how reaching performance was influenced by task-related sensory feedback, testing the EMG-only decoder in two conditions. The first involved moving the arm with the robot, providing congruent sensory feedback through their remaining sense of proprioception. In the second, the subjects moved the robot without the arm attached, as in applications that control external devices. We found that the multimodal decoding algorithm worked well for all subjects, enabling them to perform straight, accurate reaches. The inclusion of gaze information, used to estimate target location, was especially important for the most impaired subjects. In the absence of gaze information, congruent sensory feedback improved performance. These results highlight the importance of proprioceptive feedback, and suggest that multi-modal decoders are likely to be most beneficial for highly impaired subjects and in tasks where such

  3. Cervical Spine Injuries: A Whole-Body Musculoskeletal Model for the Analysis of Spinal Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgrove, Timothy P.; Preatoni, Ezio; Gill, Harinderjit S.; Trewartha, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Cervical spine trauma from sport or traffic collisions can have devastating consequences for individuals and a high societal cost. The precise mechanisms of such injuries are still unknown as investigation is hampered by the difficulty in experimentally replicating the conditions under which these injuries occur. We harness the benefits of computer simulation to report on the creation and validation of i) a generic musculoskeletal model (MASI) for the analyses of cervical spine loading in healthy subjects, and ii) a population-specific version of the model (Rugby Model), for investigating cervical spine injury mechanisms during rugby activities. The musculoskeletal models were created in OpenSim, and validated against in vivo data of a healthy subject and a rugby player performing neck and upper limb movements. The novel aspects of the Rugby Model comprise i) population-specific inertial properties and muscle parameters representing rugby forward players, and ii) a custom scapula-clavicular joint that allows the application of multiple external loads. We confirm the utility of the developed generic and population-specific models via verification steps and validation of kinematics, joint moments and neuromuscular activations during rugby scrummaging and neck functional movements, which achieve results comparable with in vivo and in vitro data. The Rugby Model was validated and used for the first time to provide insight into anatomical loading and cervical spine injury mechanisms related to rugby, whilst the MASI introduces a new computational tool to allow investigation of spinal injuries arising from other sporting activities, transport, and ergonomic applications. The models used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and allow to integrate in silico analyses with experimental approaches in injury prevention. PMID:28052130

  4. Changes in Cervical Alignment after Multilevel Schwab Grade II Thoracolumbar Osteotomies for Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, George M; Lebwohl, Nathan H; Green, Barth A; Gjolaj, Joseph P

    2017-05-19

    Retrospective Cohort OBJECTIVE.: To describe changes in cervical alignment(CA) and deformity (CD) after multilevel Schwab Grade II Osteotomies for adult spinal deformity (ASD). Reciprocal cervical and global changes after ASD surgery have not been previous described in the setting of multilevel osteotomy. Patients with long-segment (> 5 levels) fusion and osteotomy for ASD were radiographically evaluated. Pre- and post-operative cervical parameters evaluated included cervical lordosis (CL), C2-C7 sagittal vertical axis (C2-C7 SVA), and the T1 slope (T1S) minus the CL (T1S-CL). CD was defined as C2-C7 SVA >4 cm, CL SVA) was 7.54 ± 6.7 cm, pelvic tilt (PT) was 30.0° ± 8.96°, lumbopelvic mismatch was 32° ± 17.1°, and the T1 pelvic angle (TPA) was 26.8° ± 12.9°. The C7 SVA and TPA corrected to 3.90 cm (p SVA from 10.1 cm to 6.37 cm (p SVA (ρ=.624, p SVA and CLIn this study, the presence of any single preoperative CD criterion was noted to be a risk for persistent global deformity on postoperative radiograph (OR = 2.5) and the development of PJK (OR = 2.1). The T1-CL < 15° may indicate an even greater risk for persistent 3global deformity (OR = 3.5). Thoracolumbar fusion with multilevel Schwab Grade II Osteotomies was associated with a decreased CL and reciprocal increases in TK and T1S-CL. 3.

  5. Cervical Spine Injuries: A Whole-Body Musculoskeletal Model for the Analysis of Spinal Loading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Cazzola

    Full Text Available Cervical spine trauma from sport or traffic collisions can have devastating consequences for individuals and a high societal cost. The precise mechanisms of such injuries are still unknown as investigation is hampered by the difficulty in experimentally replicating the conditions under which these injuries occur. We harness the benefits of computer simulation to report on the creation and validation of i a generic musculoskeletal model (MASI for the analyses of cervical spine loading in healthy subjects, and ii a population-specific version of the model (Rugby Model, for investigating cervical spine injury mechanisms during rugby activities. The musculoskeletal models were created in OpenSim, and validated against in vivo data of a healthy subject and a rugby player performing neck and upper limb movements. The novel aspects of the Rugby Model comprise i population-specific inertial properties and muscle parameters representing rugby forward players, and ii a custom scapula-clavicular joint that allows the application of multiple external loads. We confirm the utility of the developed generic and population-specific models via verification steps and validation of kinematics, joint moments and neuromuscular activations during rugby scrummaging and neck functional movements, which achieve results comparable with in vivo and in vitro data. The Rugby Model was validated and used for the first time to provide insight into anatomical loading and cervical spine injury mechanisms related to rugby, whilst the MASI introduces a new computational tool to allow investigation of spinal injuries arising from other sporting activities, transport, and ergonomic applications. The models used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and allow to integrate in silico analyses with experimental approaches in injury prevention.

  6. Postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis mimicking epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz, Mehmet Sabri; Erdoğan, Baris; Yüksel, Mehmet Onur; Somay, Hakan

    2013-11-06

    Lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture is a very rare condition. Arachnoiditis may also present with fever and elevated infection markers and may mimic epidural abscess, which is one of the well known infectious complications of lumbar puncture. We report the case of a 56-year-old man with lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture who was operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess. In the intraoperative and postoperative microbiological and histopathological examination, no epidural abscess was detected. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient with postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess reported in the literature. The authors suggest that arachnoiditis may mimic epidural abscess due to its clinical and radiological features and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complications of lumbar puncture.

  7. The Therapeutic Effectiveness of Delayed Fetal Spinal Cord Tissue Transplantation on Respiratory Function Following Mid-Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Chia-Ching; Lai, Sih-Rong; Shao, Yu-Han; Chen, Chun-Lin; Lee, Kun-Ze

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory impairment due to damage of the spinal respiratory motoneurons and interruption of the descending drives from brainstem premotor neurons to spinal respiratory motoneurons is the leading...

  8. Magnetic resonance evaluation of the intervertebral disc, spinal ligaments, and spinal cord before and after closed traction reduction of cervical spine dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, A R; Falatyn, S P; Flanders, A E; Balderston, R A; Northrup, B E; Cotler, J M

    1999-06-15

    A prospective clinical study using magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine in a consecutive series of patients with cervical spine dislocations. To determine the incidence of intervertebral disc herniations and injury to the spinal ligaments before and after awake closed traction reduction of cervical spine dislocations. Prior series in which the prereduction imaging of disc herniations in the dislocated cervical spine are described have been anecdotal and have involved small numbers of patients. In addition, no uniform clinical criteria to define the presence of an intervertebral disc herniation in the dislocated cervical spine has been described. The incidence of disc herniations in the unreduced dislocated cervical spine is unknown. Eleven consecutive patients with cervical spine dislocations who met the clinical criteria for an awake closed traction reduction had prereduction and postreduction magnetic resonance imaging. Using strict clinical criteria for the definition of an intervertebral disc herniation, the presence or absence of disc herniation, spinal ligament injury, and cord injury was determined. Neurologic status before, during, and after the closed reduction maneuver was documented. Disc herniations were identified in 2 of 11 patients before reduction. Awake closed traction reduction was successful in 9 of the 11 patients. Of the nine patients with a successful closed reduction, two had disc herniations before reduction, and five had disc herniations after reduction. No patient had neurologic worsening after attempted awake closed traction reduction. The process of closed traction reduction appears to increase the incidence of intervertebral disc herniations. The relation of these findings, however, to the neurologic safety of awake closed traction reduction remain unclear.

  9. Spinal cord injury after blunt cervical spine trauma: correlation of soft-tissue damage and extension of lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Cepeda, S; Ramos, A; Castaño-León, A M; García-Fuentes, C; Lobato, R D; Gómez, P A; Lagares, A

    2014-05-01

    In patients with spinal cord injury after blunt trauma, several studies have observed a correlation between neurologic impairment and radiologic findings. Few studies have been performed to correlate spinal cord injury with ligamentous injury. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate whether ligamentous injury or disk disruption after spinal cord injury correlates with lesion length. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients diagnosed with traumatic spinal cord injury after cervical trauma between 1990-2011. Plain films, CT, and MR imaging were performed on patients and then reviewed for this study. MR imaging was performed within 96 hours after cervical trauma for all patients. Data regarding ligamentous injury, disk injury, and the extent of the spinal cord injury were collected from an adequate number of MR images. We evaluated anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and the ligamentum flavum. Length of lesion, disk disruption, and ligamentous injury association, as well as the extent of the spinal cord injury were statistically assessed by means of univariate analysis, with the use of nonparametric tests and multivariate analysis along with linear regression. There were significant differences in lesion length on T2-weighted images for anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and ligamentum flavum in the univariate analysis; however, when this was adjusted by age, level of injury, sex, and disruption of the soft tissue evaluated (disk, anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and ligamentum flavum) in a multivariable analysis, only ligamentum flavum showed a statistically significant association with lesion length. Furthermore, the number of ligaments affected had a positive correlation with the extension of the lesion. In cervical spine trauma, a specific pattern of ligamentous injury correlates with the length of the spinal cord lesion in MR imaging studies

  10. Manual muscle test score and force comparisons after cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham-Shropshire, B M; Klose, K J; Tucker, M E; Thomas, C K

    1997-07-01

    Manual muscle test scores (MMTS) and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force measurements were made from triceps brachii muscles of 70 individuals with chronic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Both MMTS and strength assessments showed that asymmetrical motor deficits were common. Muscles with MMTS of 3 generated an average of nine percent MVC force produced by control muscles. In this SCI population, little residual voluntary force is apparently needed for triceps brachii to work against gravity. Only 24 percent of muscles tested had this strength, however, indicating the need to develop strategies to alleviate this muscle weakness. MMTS and force were related positively but each MMTS was not associated with a unique force range. MVC force generating capacity is therefore only one factor that determines whether or not a muscle can work with or against gravity and against resistance.

  11. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Christopher R; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Campbell, Ian G; Romer, Lee M

    2014-07-01

    We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) performed submaximal and maximal incremental exercise tests on a treadmill, both with and without abdominal binding. Measurements included pulmonary function, pressure-derived indices of respiratory mechanics, operating lung volumes, tidal flow-volume data, gas exchange, blood lactate, and symptoms. Residual volume and functional residual capacity were reduced with binding (77 ± 18 and 81 ± 11% of unbound, P respiratory mechanics with binding may benefit O2 transport capacity by an improvement in central circulatory function. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Enhancing neural activity to drive respiratory plasticity following cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormigo, Kristiina M; Zholudeva, Lyandysha V; Spruance, Victoria M; Marchenko, Vitaliy; Cote, Marie-Pascale; Vinit, Stephane; Giszter, Simon; Bezdudnaya, Tatiana; Lane, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) results in permanent life-altering sensorimotor deficits, among which impaired breathing is one of the most devastating and life-threatening. While clinical and experimental research has revealed that some spontaneous respiratory improvement (functional plasticity) can occur post-SCI, the extent of the recovery is limited and significant deficits persist. Thus, increasing effort is being made to develop therapies that harness and enhance this neuroplastic potential to optimize long-term recovery of breathing in injured individuals. One strategy with demonstrated therapeutic potential is the use of treatments that increase neural and muscular activity (e.g. locomotor training, neural and muscular stimulation) and promote plasticity. With a focus on respiratory function post-SCI, this review will discuss advances in the use of neural interfacing strategies and activity-based treatments, and highlights some recent results from our own research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electrical impedance myography changes after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury: An examination of hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; Shin, Henry; Stampas, Argyrios; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Ping

    2017-11-01

    This study was to apply the newly developed electrical impedance myography (EIM) technique to examine hand muscles in patients with an incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). EIM was performed on the thenar, hypothenar, and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles of SCI (n=16) and age-matched healthy control (n=18) subjects. By sending low intensity and high frequency current through the skin and measuring the consequent voltage, EIM estimates the major impedance parameters, which include resistance (R), reactance (X) and phase angle (θ). The SCI group had lower reactance and phase angle (pmuscles, and lower resistance in the thenar muscle (pmuscles could be due tochanges of membrane integrity and fat infiltration, whereas the change in the anisotropy may reflect the rearrangement of muscle fiber geometry. The EIM provides a quick and convenient tool for examination of muscle alterations after SCI. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of descending volleys evoked by transcranial and epidural motor cortex stimulation in a conscious patient with bulbar pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Oliviero, A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Meglio, M; Cioni, B; Papacci, F; Tonali, P A; Rothwell, J C

    2004-04-01

    To compare the pattern of activation of motor cortex produced by transcranial magnetic stimulation and epidural electrical stimulation. The spinal volleys evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation and epidural electrical stimulation over the cerebral motor cortex were recorded from an electrode inserted into the cervical epidural space of one conscious subject who also had a cortical epidural electrode over the motor area. The volleys were termed D- and I-waves according to their latency. Magnetic stimulation was performed with a figure-of-eight coil and the induced current flowed either in a postero-anterior (PA) or in latero-medial (LM) direction. At active motor threshold intensity LM magnetic stimulation evoked a D wave whereas PA stimulation evoked an I(1) wave with later I waves being recruited at increasing stimulus intensities. Electrical epidural stimulation evoked both a D wave and I waves. However, the D wave evoked by electrical epidural stimulation had a longer latency than the LM D wave, suggesting either a more proximal site of activation of the pyramidal axon or activation of slightly faster conducting set of corticospinal fibres by LM stimulation. The I3 wave evoked by electrical epidural stimulation also had a longer latency than the PA I3-wave Epidural stimulation of the motor cortex can produce repetitive excitation of corticospinal neurones. The order of recruitment of the volleys, and the latency of the D and I3 waves may be slightly different to that seen after transcranial magnetic stimulation. Our findings suggest that there may be subtle differences in the populations of neurones activated by the two forms of stimulation.

  15. Fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injection for management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: short-term and long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Myung, Jae Sung; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-do (Korea); Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S. [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-do (Korea); Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-do (Korea)

    2010-07-15

    To evaluate the short-term and long-term effects of fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injection (ESI) for the management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) and to analyze outcome predictors. All patients who underwent caudal ESI in 2006 for DLSS were included in the study. Response was based on chart documentation (aggravated, no change, slightly improved, much improved, no pain). In June 2009 telephone interviews were conducted, using formatted questions including the North American Spine Society (NASS) patient satisfaction scale. For short-term and long-term effects, age difference was evaluated by the Mann-Whitney U test, and gender, duration of symptoms, level of DLSS, spondylolisthesis, and previous operations were evaluated by Fisher's exact test. Two hundred and sixteen patients (male: female = 75:141; mean age 69.2 years; range 48{proportional_to}91 years) were included in the study. Improvements (slightly improved, much improved, no pain) were seen in 185 patients (85.6%) after an initial caudal ESI and in 189 patients (87.5%) after a series of caudal ESIs. Half of the patients (89/179, 49.8%) replied positively to the NASS patient satisfaction scale (1 or 2). There were no significant outcome predictors for either the short-term or the long-term responses. Fluoroscopically guided caudal ESI was effective for the management of DLSS (especially central canal stenosis) with excellent short-term and good long-term results, without significant outcome predictors. (orig.)

  16. The preliminary results of a comparative effectiveness evaluation of adhesiolysis and caudal epidural injections in managing chronic low back pain secondary to spinal stenosis: a randomized, equivalence controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; McManus, Carla D; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Singh, Vijay; Benyamin, Ramsin

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar surgery and epidural injections for spinal stenosis are the most commonly performed interventions in the United States. However, there is only moderate evidence to the effectiveness of surgery and caudal epidural injections. The next sequential step is adhesiolysis and hypertonic neurolysis with targeted delivery. There have not been any randomized trials evaluating the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis and targeted delivery of local anesthetic, steroid and hypertonic sodium chloride solution in lumbar spinal stenosis. A randomized, equivalence, controlled trial. An interventional pain management practice, a specialty referral center, a private practice setting in the United States. To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain with lumbar central spinal stenosis and compare with fluoroscopically directed caudal epidural injections. Patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups with 25 patients in each group. Group I patients received caudal epidural injections with catheterization up to S3 with local anesthetic, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, non-particulate betamethasone and served as the control group. Group II patients received percutaneous adhesiolysis with targeted delivery and injection of lidocaine, 10% hypertonic sodium chloride solution, and non-particulate Betamethasone and formed the intervention group. Randomization was performed by computer-generated random allocation sequence by simple randomization. Multiple outcome measures were utilized including the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), the Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI), employment status, and opioid intake with assessment at 3, 6, and 12 months post treatment. Significant pain relief was described as 50% or more, whereas significant improvement in the disability score was defined as a reduction of 40% or more. This evaluation showed significant pain relief (>or= 50%) in 76% of the patients at one

  17. Effects of fractionated doses of fast neutrons or photons on the canine cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, B.C. (George Washington Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC); Bradley, E.W.; Casarett, G.W.

    1981-10-01

    The cervical spinal cords of 36 young adult male beagles were irradiated with fast neutrons with a mean energy of 15 MeV in four fractions/week/5 weeks to total doses of 1167, 1750, 2625, or 3938 rad. Nineteen beagles received 3500, 5250, or 7875 rad of photons in like manner. Sensory evoked responses recorded before and periodically after irradiations remained stable on 22 test and 6 control dogs. The cerebrospinal fluid contained excess protein and erythrocytes often before and always after the onset of neurological symptons. All dogs in the 3938-rad neutron, 6/9 dogs in the 2625-rad neutron, and 4/6 dogs in the 7875-rad photon groups developed cervical muscular spasms, incoordination, and progressive paralysis and were euthanatized. The relative biological effectiveness of fast neutrons as measured by the onset of neurological signs is approximately 3 (7875 photons/ 2625 neutrons) and is less than 4.5 (7875 photons/1750 neutrons). Gross pathological findings included hemorrhages, softening, and poliomyelomalacia, especially of the dorsal horns. Two dogs developed neoplasms in the irradiated field 1065 and 1470 days following neutron irradiation.

  18. Mechanism of Restoration of Forelimb Motor Function after Cervical Spinal Cord Hemisection in Rats: Electrophysiological Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Takeuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to electrophysiologically assess the corticospinal tracts of adult rats and the recovery of motor function of their forelimbs after cervical cord hemisection. Of 39 adult rats used, compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs of the forelimbs of 15 rats were evaluated, before they received left C5 segmental hemisection of the spinal cord, by stimulating the pyramid of the medulla oblongata on one side using an exciting microelectrode. All 15 rats exhibited contralateral electrical activity, but their CMAPs disappeared after hemisection. The remaining 24 rats received hemisection first, and CMAPs of 12 rats were assessed over time to study their recovery time. All of them exhibited electrical activity of the forelimbs in 4 weeks after surgery. The remaining 12 rats received additional right C2 segmental hemisection, and variation of CMAPs between before and after surgery was examined. The right side of the 12 rats that received the additional hemisection exhibited no electrical activity in response to the stimulation of the pyramids on both sides. These results suggest that changes in path between the resected and healthy sides, activation of the ventral corticospinal tracts, and propriospinal neurons were involved in the recovery of motor function after cervical cord injury.

  19. Epicritic sensation in cervical spinal cord injury: diagnostic gains beyond testing light touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velstra, Inge-Marie; Bolliger, Marc; Baumberger, Michael; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Curt, Armin

    2013-08-01

    Abstract Applied as a bedside test of gross dorsal column function, the testing of light touch (LT) sensation is of high clinical value in the diagnosis of human spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the assessment of overall dorsal column deficit by testing only LT may be limited, because the dorsal column pathway conveys several large diameter afferent modalities (e.g., sensation of touch, two-point discrimination, and proprioception). Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the epicritic sensation assessed by LT, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM), and electrical perception threshold (EPT) across cervical dermatomes (C3-C8) in individuals with cervical SCI. A multicenter cross-sectional study was performed at 6 months after cervical SCI, applying combined measures of LT, SWM, and EPT, bilaterally over predefined key sensory points (C3-C8). A total of 300 left- and right-sided dermatomes were tested for each outcome measure in 25 participants. The percentage agreement between classifications according to LT and SWM/EPT testing for all dermatomes between C3 and C8 ranged from 95.5% to 36.2%. The degree of agreement showed considerably variable κ coefficients (-0.1≥kw≤0.7) for each dermatome between C3 and C8. The additional measurements of epicritic sensation by SWM and EPT increased sensitivity by detecting and quantifying differences in sensory thresholds above, at, and below the LT level of injury. This is relevant for early clinical trials (phase 1/2), in which disclosing any biological activity of an intervention may be revealed by subtle sensory changes that might gain a clinical relevance.

  20. Characterization of DTI Indices in the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spinal Cord in Healthy Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael L. Bosma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize in vivo measurements of diffusion along the length of the entire healthy spinal cord and to compare DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD, between cord regions. The objective is to determine whether or not there are significant differences in DTI indices along the cord that must be considered for future applications of characterizing the effects of injury or disease. A cardiac gated, single-shot EPI sequence was used to acquire diffusion-weighted images of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions of the spinal cord in nine neurologically intact subjects (19 to 22 years. For each cord section, FA versus MD values were plotted, and a k-means clustering method was applied to partition the data according to tissue properties. FA and MD values from both white matter (average FA=0.69, average MD=0.93 × 10−3 mm2/s and grey matter (average FA=0.44, average MD=1.8 × 10−3 mm2/s were relatively consistent along the length of the cord.

  1. Flow-metabolism uncoupling in the cervical spinal cord of ALS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Toru; Hatakeyama, Tetsuhiro; Sato, Kota; Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tamiya, Takashi; Abe, Koji

    2017-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease. In ALS, both glucose consumption and neuronal intensity reportedly decrease in the cerebral motor cortex when measured by positron emission tomography (PET). In this study, we evaluated cervical spinal glucose metabolism, blood flow, and neuronal intensity of 10 ALS patients with upper extremity (U/E) atrophy both with (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET and (11)C-flumazenil ((11)C-FMZ) PET. On the ipsilateral side of C5 and T1 levels, (18)F-FDG uptake increased significantly (*p ALS FRS-R-U/E score (R = 0.645, *p = 0.041). Despite this hyperglucose metabolism, the (11)C-FMZ PET study did not show a coupled increase of spinal blood flow even though neuronal intensity did not decrease. These results indicate a strong correlation between hyperglucose metabolism and ALS progression alongside the uncoupling of flow-metabolism. This mechanism, which could result in subsequent motor neuronal death, may be a potential therapeutic target for ALS.

  2. External validation of a model to predict the survival of patients presenting with a spinal epidural metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Feuth, T.; Rades, D.; Hedlund, R.; Villas, C.; Linden, Y. van der; Borm, W.; Kappelle, A.C.; Maazen, R.W. van der; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    The surgical treatment of spinal metastases is evolving. The major problem is the selection of patients who may benefit from surgical treatment. One of the criteria is an expected survival of at least 3 months. A prediction model has been previously developed. The present study has been performed in

  3. Epidural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... belts). Follow safety precautions at work and in sports and recreation. For example, do not dive into water if the water depth is unknown or if rocks may be present. Alternative Names Extradural hematoma; Extradural hemorrhage; Epidural hemorrhage; EDH ...

  4. Epidural abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms: Bowel or bladder incontinence Difficulty urinating (urinary retention) Fever and back pain Intracranial epidural abscess may ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  5. Theophylline treatment improves mitochondrial function after upper cervical spinal cord hemisection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttemann, Maik; Nantwi, Kwaku D.; Lee, Icksoo; Liu, Jenney; Mohiuddin, Syed; Petrov, Theodor

    2010-01-01

    The importance of mitochondria in spinal cord injury has mainly been attributed to their participation in apoptosis at the site of injury. But another aspect of mitochondrial function is the generation of more than 90% of cellular energy in the form of ATP, mediated by the oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) process. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a central OxPhos component and changes in its activity reflect changes in energy demand. A recent study suggests that respiratory muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is compromised via alterations in mitochondrial function. In an animal model of cervical spinal cord hemisection (C2HS) respiratory dysfunction, we have shown that theophylline improves respiratory function. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that theophylline improves respiratory function at the cellular level via improved mitochondrial function in the C2HS model. We demonstrate that CcO activity was significantly (33%) increased in the spinal cord adjacent to the site of injury (C3–C5), and that administration of theophylline (20 mg/kg 3× daily orally) after C2HS leads to an even more pronounced increase in CcO activity of 62% compared to sham-operated animals. These results are paralleled by a significant increase in cellular ATP levels (51% in the hemidiaphragm ipsilateral to the hemisection). We conclude that C2HS increases energy demand and activates mitochondrial respiration, and that theophylline treatment improves energy levels through activation of the mitochondrial OxPhos process to provide energy for tissue repair and functional recovery after paralysis in the C2HS model. PMID:20144890

  6. Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Causing Progressive Quadriparesis After Spinal Manipulation Therapy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hwan-Seo; Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2016-02-01

    Cervical intradural disc herniation (IDH) is an extremely rare condition, comprising only 0.27% of all disc herniations. Three percent of IDHs occur in the cervical, 5% in the thoracic, and over 92% in the lumbar spinal canal. There have been a total of 31 cervical IDHs reported in the literature. The pathogenesis and imaging characteristics of IDH are not fully understood. A preoperative diagnosis is key to facilitating prompt intradural exploration in patients with ambivalent findings, as well as in preventing reoperation. The purpose of reporting our case is to remind clinicians to consider the possibility of cervical IDH during spinal manipulation therapy in patient with chronic neck pain.The patient signed informed consent for publication of this case report and any accompanying image. The ethical approval of this study was waived by the ethics committee of Chonbuk National University Hospital, because this study was case report and the number of patients was manipulation for chronic neck pain over the course of a month. The day prior, he had noticed neck pain and tingling in the bilateral upper and lower extremities during the manipulation procedure. The following day, he presented with bilateral weakness of all 4 extremities, which rendered him unable to walk. Neurological examination demonstrated a positive Hoffmann sign and ankle clonus bilaterally, hypoesthesia below the C5 dermatome, 3/5 strength in the bilateral upper extremities, and 2/5 strength in the lower extremities. This motor weakness was progressive, and he further complained of voiding difficulty.Urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine revealed large, central disc herniations at C4-C5 and C5-C6 that caused severe spinal cord compression and surrounding edema. We performed C4-C5-C6 anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.The patient's limb weakness improved rapidly within 1 day postoperatively, and he was discharged 4 weeks later. At his 12-month follow-up, the patient had

  7. Minimally invasive “separation surgery” plus adjuvsant stereotactic radiotherapy in the management of spinal epidural metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda K Turel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Early reports such as this suggest that MIS techniques can be successfully and safely applied in accomplishing “separation surgery” with adjuvant SBRT in the management of metastatic spinal disease. The potential advantages conferred by MIS techniques such as shortened hospital stay, decreased blood loss, reduced perioperative complications, and earlier initiation of adjuvant radiation are highly desirable in the treatment of this challenging patient population.

  8. Anterior spinal pseudomeningocele after C0-C2 traumatic injuries: role of the "dural transitional zone" in the etiopathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Federica; Bernucci, Claudio; D'Aliberti, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Spinal pseudomeningoceles (SPM) are extradural collections of CSF (cerebrospinal fluid); a frequent association with upper cervical injuries (UCI) has been observed. We propose a possible etiopathogenetic mechanism supporting the formation of cervical SPM based on some considerations. We present four cases of SPM. All patients sustained a severe UCI. Three patients were symptomatic with delayed and progressive clinical signs. One patient was misinterpreted as epidural hematoma and operated on due to progressive signs with postoperative clinical improvement. The rest of patients were treated conservatively; spontaneous reduction of CSF collection occurred. From a radiological standpoint: (1) a line of demarcation separated the intradural cervical compartment from the anterior epidural space, (2) CSF epidural collection was never evident at C0-C2 level and extended from C2 downwards, and (3) shape of collection was similar to epidural hematomas suggesting a ball-valve mechanism. The dural layer at C0-C2 level is adherent to the thick ligamentous apparatus, as opposed to the segments below where it is solely covered by the posterior longitudinal ligament. A "transitional zone" of dura exists between the C0-C2 region and subaxial segment of the cervical spine. This watershed area constitutes a point of minor resistance. Lacerations of the meningeal layers, caused by severe UCI at the "transitional zone", drain CSF into the anterior epidural space and form SPM.

  9. Idiopathic Lumbar Epidural Lipomatosis Mimicking Disc Herniation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFE Duran

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare condition which is described as the accumulation of fat in the extradural territory and often causes dural impingement. Spinal epidural lipomatosis has been implicated in causing a variety of neurologic impairments ranging from back pain, radiculopathy, claudication, myelopathy or even cauda equina syndrome. We report a 46-year-old female with obesity and a history of chronic back pain and radiculopathy who developed idiopathic Spinal epidural lipomatosis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this report is to present a case of spinal epidural lipomatosis presenting with symptomatic cord compression and also remind this rare condition as a the differential diagnosis of epidural lesions in patients with risk factors.

  10. Cervical lordotic alignment following posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: reciprocal changes and risk factors for malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Terai, Hidetomi; Suzuki, Akinobu; Hoshino, Masatoshi; Tamai, Koji; Ohyama, Shoichiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Numerous reports have been published on the effectiveness and safety of correction of the coronal Cobb angle and thoracolumbar sagittal alignment in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Suboptimal sagittal alignment, such as decreased thoracic kyphosis (TK), after corrective surgery, is a possible cause of lumbar or cervical spinal degeneration and junctional malalignment; however, few reports are available on reciprocal changes outside of the fused segments, such as the cervical lordotic angle (CLA). This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the perioperative CLA and other radiographic factors or clinical results in AIS, and to identify independent risk factors of postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis. METHODS A total of 51 AIS patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with the placement of pedicle screw (PS) constructs at thoracic levels were included in the study. Clinical and radiographic follow-up of patients was conducted for a minimum of 2 years, and the postoperative course was evaluated. The authors measured and identified the changes in the CLA and other radiographic parameters using whole-spine radiography, with the patient in the standing position, performed immediately before surgery, 2 weeks after surgery, and 2 years after surgery. The postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis group included patients whose CLA at 2-year follow-up was smaller than -10°. The reciprocal changes of the CLA and other parameters were also investigated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to determine the associated risk factors for postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis. RESULTS This study comprised 48 females and 3 males (mean age 16.0 years). The mean follow-up period was 47 months (range 24-90 months). The main coronal thoracic curve was corrected from 54.6° to 16.4°, and the mean correction rate was 69.8% at 2 years. The CLA significantly increased from the mean preoperative measurement (-5.4° ± 14°) to the 2

  11. The Natural History of Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy and the Rate of Hospitalization Following Spinal Cord Injury: An Updated Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreault, Lindsay A.; Karadimas, Spyridon; Wilson, Jefferson R.; Arnold, Paul M.; Kurpad, Shekar; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2017-01-01

    Study Method: Systematic review (update). Objective: Degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) is a degenerative spine disease and the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in adults worldwide. The objective of this study is to determine the natural history of DCM by updating the systematic review by Karadimas et al. The specific aims of this review were (1) to describe the natural history of DCM and (2) to determine potential risk factors of disease progression. Method: An updated search based on a previous protocol was conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Collaboration library for studies published between November 2012 and February 15, 2015. Results: The updated search yielded 3 additional citations that met inclusion criteria and reported the incidence of spinal cord injury and severe disability in patients with DCM. Based on 2 retrospective cohort studies, the incidence rate of hospitalization for spinal cord injury is 13.9 per 1000 person-years in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and 4.8 per 1000 person-years in patients with myelopathy secondary to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). In a third small prospective study, the risk of being wheelchair bound or bedridden was 66.7% in DCM patients with OPLL. Conclusion: The overall level of evidence for these estimated rates of hospitalization following spinal cord injury was rated as low. PMID:29164030

  12. Anatomical features of the cervical spinal canal in Chiari I deformity with presyrinx: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Judith A; Shah, Vinil; Liebo, Greta B; Ringstad, Geir A; Pomeraniec, I Jonathan; Bakke, Soren J; Fric, Radek; Ksendzovsky, Alexander; Jane, John A; Schwartz, Erin S; Haughton, Victor

    2017-10-01

    Purpose The relationship between syringomyelia and presyrinx, characterized by edema in the spinal cord, has not been firmly established. Patients with syringomyelia have abnormal spinal canal tapering that alters cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics, but taper ratios in presyrinx have never been reported. We tested the hypothesis that presyrinx patients have abnormal spinal canal tapering. Materials and methods At six medical institutions, investigators searched the PACS system for patients with Chiari I and spinal cord edema unassociated with tumor, trauma, or other evident cause. In each case taper ratios were calculated for C1 to C4 and C4 to C7. In two age- and gender-matched control groups, Chiari I patients with no syringomyelia and patients with normal MR scans, the same measurements were made. Differences between groups were tested for statistical significance with t tests. Results The study enrolled 21 presyrinx patients and equal numbers of matched Chiari I and normal controls. C4 to C7 taper ratios were positive and steeper in presyrinx patients than in the normal controls ( p = 0.04). The upper cervical spine, C1 to C4, tapered negatively in cases and controls without significant differences between the groups. The difference in degree of tonsillar herniation was statistically significant between presyrinx patients and Chiari I controls ( p = 0.01). Conclusions Presyrinx patients have greater than normal positive tapering in the lower cervical spine and greater degree of tonsillar herniation than the controls.

  13. Distribution of collateral fibers in the monkey cervical spinal cord detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Ptito, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    techniques. We calculate the diffusion tensor and the persistent angular structure (PAS), a multi-fiber reconstruction technique, from high quality post mortem data of a perfusion-fixed vervet monkey cervical spinal cord sample and simulated crossing fiber data. Our results show that (i) cylindrical geometry......Diffusion anisotropy monitored with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) is a sensitive marker to monitor developmental or pathological microstructural changes in spinal cord. The white matter is often treated as a unidirectional axonal bundle but collateral fibers branching off...... in the white matter of the spinal cord is an invalid assumption due to collateral fibers. We also demonstrate that (ii) collateral fibers can be resolved as distinct peaks in the water diffusion propagator in white matter using multi-fiber models. Finally, we show that (iii) crossing fibers are mainly located...

  14. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a patient with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury and multimorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Robert D.; Gosselin, Donna M.; Thurmond, Jeb; Case, Kimberlee; Bruch, Frederick R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: This report describes interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a 51-year-old male recovering from incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple comorbidities following an automobile accident. Patient concerns: The patient was admitted to a rehabilitation specialty hospital approximately 2 months post SCI and 2 separate surgical fusion procedures (C3–C6). Diagnoses: Clinical presentation at the rehabilitation hospital included moderate to severe motor strength loss in both upper and lower extremities, a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube (PEG), dysphagia, bowel/bladder incontinence, dependence on a mechanical lift and tilting wheelchair due to severe orthostatic hypotension, and pre-existing shoulder pain from bilateral joint degeneration. Interventions: The interdisciplinary team formally coordinated rehabilitative care from multiple disciplines. Internal medicine managed medications, determined PEG removal, monitored co-morbid conditions, and overall progress. Chiropractic care focused on alleviating shoulder and thoracic pain and improving spinal and extremity mobility. Physical therapy addressed upright tolerance, transfer, gait, and strength training. Occupational therapy focused on hand coordination and feeding/dressing activities. Psychology assisted with coping strategies. Nursing ensured medication adherence, nutrient intake, wound prevention, and incontinence management, whereas physiatry addressed abnormal muscle tone. Outcomes: Eleven months post-admission the patient's progress allowed discharge to a long-term care facility. At this time he was without dysphagia or need for a PEG. Orthostatic hypotension and bilateral shoulder pain symptoms were also resolved while bowel/bladder incontinence and upper and lower extremity motor strength loss remained. He was largely independent in transferring from bed to wheelchair and in upper body dressing. Lower body dressing/bathing required maximal assistance. Gait with a 2

  15. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a patient with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury and multimorbidity: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Robert D; Gosselin, Donna M; Thurmond, Jeb; Case, Kimberlee; Bruch, Frederick R

    2017-08-01

    This report describes interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a 51-year-old male recovering from incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple comorbidities following an automobile accident. The patient was admitted to a rehabilitation specialty hospital approximately 2 months post SCI and 2 separate surgical fusion procedures (C3-C6). Clinical presentation at the rehabilitation hospital included moderate to severe motor strength loss in both upper and lower extremities, a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube (PEG), dysphagia, bowel/bladder incontinence, dependence on a mechanical lift and tilting wheelchair due to severe orthostatic hypotension, and pre-existing shoulder pain from bilateral joint degeneration. The interdisciplinary team formally coordinated rehabilitative care from multiple disciplines. Internal medicine managed medications, determined PEG removal, monitored co-morbid conditions, and overall progress. Chiropractic care focused on alleviating shoulder and thoracic pain and improving spinal and extremity mobility. Physical therapy addressed upright tolerance, transfer, gait, and strength training. Occupational therapy focused on hand coordination and feeding/dressing activities. Psychology assisted with coping strategies. Nursing ensured medication adherence, nutrient intake, wound prevention, and incontinence management, whereas physiatry addressed abnormal muscle tone. Eleven months post-admission the patient's progress allowed discharge to a long-term care facility. At this time he was without dysphagia or need for a PEG. Orthostatic hypotension and bilateral shoulder pain symptoms were also resolved while bowel/bladder incontinence and upper and lower extremity motor strength loss remained. He was largely independent in transferring from bed to wheelchair and in upper body dressing. Lower body dressing/bathing required maximal assistance. Gait with a 2-wheeled walker was possible up to 150 feet with verbal cues and occasional

  16. Admission ASIA motor score predicting the need for tracheostomy after cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaker, Jay; Kufera, Joseph A; Glaser, Jeffrey; Stein, Deborah M; Scalea, Thomas M

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory compromise and the need for tracheostomy are common after cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI). The purpose of the study was to evaluate if admission American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor score is associated with the need for tracheostomy following cSCI. The trauma registry identified patients with isolated cSCI during a 3-year period. Patients with an Abbreviated Injury Scale score greater than 3 in other body regions were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, admission ASIA motor score, ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS), anatomic level of injury, need for a tracheostomy, and length of stay (LOS). Logistic regression models were constructed to examine the effect of admission ASIA motor scores on the outcome of tracheostomy. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to determine risk factors for time to tracheostomy. A total of 128 patients were identified. Seventy-four patients had a tracheostomy performed on mean (SD) hospital Day 9 (4). Median admission ASIA motor score was 22.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 8-54). Median anatomic level of injury was 5 (IQR, 4-6). Patients requiring tracheostomy had significantly lower median admission ASIA motor score (9 [IQR, 3-17] vs. 57 [IQR, 30-77], p admission ASIA motor score and "complete" cSCI are significantly associated with the need for tracheostomy. Anatomic level of injury was not associated with tracheostomy after cSCI. Classification of incomplete patients by AIS indicates that ASIA motor score may be used as a surrogate for grade of injury. When looking only at patients with an "incomplete" cSCI, those with an admission ASIA score of less than 10 should have an early tracheostomy. Those with an AIS D scale should not be considered for early tracheostomy. Therapeutic/care management, level II.

  17. Primary epidural lymphoma without vertebral involvement in a HIV-positive patient; Linfoma epidural primario sin afectacion vertebral en un paciente VIH positivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, M. O.; Grive, E.; Quiroga, S.; Rovira, A. [Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron. Barcelona. (Spain)

    1999-05-01

    Epidural involvement is rarely associated with lymphoma, it being more typical of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma in advanced stages of the disease. The invasion of the epidural space is usually caused by the extension of a paravertebral mass or by the affected vertebrae. However, the epidural space alone can be involved. We present a case of epidural lymphoma in a patient who presented with clinical evidence of spinal cord compression. Magnetic resonance disclosed the existence of an epidural mass compressing and displacing the spinal cord without involving the adjacent vertebra or the associated paravertebral mass. (Author) 9 refs.

  18. An optimized framework for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging of the cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Marco; Grussu, Francesco; Ianus, Andrada; Schneider, Torben; Prados, Ferran; Fairney, James; Ourselin, Sebastien; Alexander, Daniel C; Cercignani, Mara; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S

    2018-05-01

    To develop a framework to fully characterize quantitative magnetization transfer indices in the human cervical cord in vivo within a clinically feasible time. A dedicated spinal cord imaging protocol for quantitative magnetization transfer was developed using a reduced field-of-view approach with echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. Sequence parameters were optimized based in the Cramer-Rao-lower bound. Quantitative model parameters (i.e., bound pool fraction, free and bound pool transverse relaxation times [ T2F, T2B], and forward exchange rate [k FB ]) were estimated implementing a numerical model capable of dealing with the novelties of the sequence adopted. The framework was tested on five healthy subjects. Cramer-Rao-lower bound minimization produces optimal sampling schemes without requiring the establishment of a steady-state MT effect. The proposed framework allows quantitative voxel-wise estimation of model parameters at the resolution typically used for spinal cord imaging (i.e. 0.75 × 0.75 × 5 mm 3 ), with a protocol duration of ∼35 min. Quantitative magnetization transfer parametric maps agree with literature values. Whole-cord mean values are: bound pool fraction = 0.11(±0.01), T2F = 46.5(±1.6) ms, T2B = 11.0(±0.2) µs, and k FB  = 1.95(±0.06) Hz. Protocol optimization has a beneficial effect on reproducibility, especially for T2B and k FB . The framework developed enables robust characterization of spinal cord microstructure in vivo using qMT. Magn Reson Med 79:2576-2588, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  19. Effects of baclofen on motor units paralysed by chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häger-Ross, Charlotte K.; Klein, Cliff S.

    2010-01-01

    Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptorB agonist, is used to reduce symptoms of spasticity (hyperreflexia, increases in muscle tone, involuntary muscle activity), but the long-term effects of sustained baclofen use on skeletal muscle properties are unclear. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether baclofen use and paralysis due to cervical spinal cord injury change the contractile properties of human thenar motor units more than paralysis alone. Evoked electromyographic activity and force were recorded in response to intraneural stimulation of single motor axons to thenar motor units. Data from three groups of motor units were compared: 23 paralysed units from spinal cord injured subjects who take baclofen and have done so for a median of 7 years, 25 paralysed units from spinal cord injured subjects who do not take baclofen (median: 10 years) and 45 units from uninjured control subjects. Paralysed motor unit properties were independent of injury duration and level. With paralysis and baclofen, the median motor unit tetanic forces were significantly weaker, twitch half-relaxation times longer and half maximal forces reached at lower frequencies than for units from uninjured subjects. The median values for these same parameters after paralysis alone were comparable to control data. Axon conduction velocities differed across groups and were slowest for paralysed units from subjects who were not taking baclofen and fastest for units from the uninjured. Greater motor unit weakness with long-term baclofen use and paralysis will make the whole muscle weaker and more fatigable. Significantly more paralysed motor units need to be excited during patterned electrical stimulation to produce any given force over time. The short-term benefits of baclofen on spasticity (e.g. management of muscle spasms that may otherwise hinder movement or social interactions) therefore have to be considered in relation to its possible long-term effects on muscle rehabilitation

  20. [Right sensory-motor syndrome as the presentation of a spontaneous cervico-thoracic epidural hematoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, M; Egido, J A; Saldaña, C; Andrés, M T

    1998-10-01

    A spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma is an infrequent cause of cord compression. The commonest clinical presentations are with paraparesia and tetraparesia. Transient hemiparesia is very rare and a sensory-motor syndrome is exceptional. A 38 year old man had sudden onset of spontaneous interscapular vertebral pain with bilateral root radiation. A few minutes later he started to have weakness and sensory loss in his right limbs. On clinical examination there was pain on pressure over the spinal apophyses of the T4 and T5 vertebrae, hemiparesia and hemi-hypoalgesia of the right limbs. After ten hours this had all returned to normal. MRI of the cord showed an epidural hematoma extending from C6 to T2. Coagulation studies and spinal arteriography were normal. The sensory motor syndrome is an unusual form of presentation of a spontaneous cervico-thoracic epidural hematoma. Root pain is a symptom of great value for orientation of a syndrome which would otherwise seem to be of central origin. The explanation for this clinical findings may be compression of both lateral cord pathways due to their particular blood distribution. Regarding therapeutic approach, this should be conservative, with close observation to see whether it will resolve spontaneously in a short period of time.

  1. Thoracic epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, L K; Rigamonti, D; Wolf, A L; Robinson, W L; Edwards, C C; DiPatri, A

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-one cases of thoracic spinal epidural abscess occurring over a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Diagnosis was made by MRI or myelography and confirmed in the operative cases. A bacterial agent was isolated in 18 of the cases (86%). When measured, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated in all cases. Four patients who presented without neurologic deficits remained intact. All patients who presented with neurological deficits underwent surgical intervention in addition to intravenous antibiotics. Of the 15 patients who presented with a paraparesis of less than antigravity strength, five eventually were independent ambulators and continent. A good outcome resulted in 80% of those who underwent decompression within 24 h, as opposed to only 10% of the patients decompressed after 24 h. Good results can be obtained despite severe neurologic compromise when treated by rapid diagnosis and decompression of the spinal canal.

  2. Circadian variations in melatonin and cortisol in patients with cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, G; Sharma, V P; Verma, N S

    2016-05-01

    In cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI), afferent and efferent circuits that influence the basal production of melatonin and cortisol may be disrupted and hence disrupt the basal functions of human physiology. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess circadian changes, if any, in serum cortisol and melatonin in patients with CSCI. Serum levels of cortisol and melatonin were measured at 6-h intervals of the day (0600, 1200, 1800 and 0000 hours) in 22 CSCI patients, as well as 22 healthy controls. Significantly higher melatonin levels were observed in the patient group in morning hours, whereas a significantly lower level of melatonin was found during the night time in the patient group than in the control group. Moreover, significantly higher values were obtained in the evening and night time serum cortisol levels among the patients compared with controls. Further, when the mean values of cortisol throughout the day were tested among patient and control groups similar circadian rhythm was found. The only difference being that serum cortisol declined much more in controls in evening and night samples as compared with CSCI patients. We conclude that circadian variations exist in the circulating levels of serum cortisol and melatonin in patients with CSCI. Low levels of melatonin secretion during night may contribute to the pervasive sleep disruption and increased pain perception.

  3. Risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J; Shao, J; Qi, H-H; Song, D-W; Zhu, W

    2015-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Total 180 tetraplegia cases after acute traumatic CSCI treated in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed retrospectively and the frequency of respiratory failure in these patients were analyzed against the factors including age, gender, cause of injury, level/severity of injury, high-dose methylprednisolone (MP) therapy, and surgery intervention, using Chi-square test to look into the correlations of the prevalence of respiratory failure to those factors. Of the 180 tetraplegia with acute traumatic CSCI, 29 patients (16.11%) developed respiratory failure. The factors, including age, level and severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention, were found to significantly correlate with the appearance of respiratory failure in tetraplegia after acute traumatic CSCI (p < 0.05), while no significant correlation was found between the other factors: gender and cause of injury and the frequency of respiratory failure. Age, level/severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention are the four major relevant factors of respiratory failure in patients with acute traumatic CSCI. The appropriate and timing treatments involving high-dose MP therapy and surgical decompression and reconstruction can substantially increase the rates of clinical improvements and reduce the frequency of respiratory failure.

  4. The Segmental Morphometric Properties of the Horse Cervical Spinal Cord: A Study of Cadaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Sadullah; Bolat, Durmus; Selcuk, Muhammet Lutfi

    2013-01-01

    Although the cervical spinal cord (CSC) of the horse has particular importance in diseases of CNS, there is very little information about its segmental morphometry. The objective of the present study was to determine the morphometric features of the CSC segments in the horse and possible relationships among the morphometric features. The segmented CSC from five mature animals was used. Length, weight, diameter, and volume measurements of the segments were performed macroscopically. Lengths and diameters of segments were measured histologically, and area and volume measurements were performed using stereological methods. The length, weight, and volume of the CSC were 61.6 ± 3.2 cm, 107.2 ± 10.4 g, and 95.5 ± 8.3 cm3, respectively. The length of the segments was increased from C 1 to C 3, while it decreased from C 3 to C 8. The gross section (GS), white matter (WM), grey matter (GM), dorsal horn (DH), and ventral horn (VH) had the largest cross-section areas at C 8. The highest volume was found for the total segment and WM at C 4, GM, DH, and VH at C 7, and the central canal (CC) at C 3. The data obtained not only contribute to the knowledge of the normal anatomy of the CSC but may also provide reference data for veterinary pathologists and clinicians. PMID:23476145

  5. Pleural puncture with thoracic epidural: A rare complication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Wadhwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Freedom from pain has almost developed to be a fundamental human right. Providing pain relief via epidural catheters in thoracic and upper abdominal surgeries is widely accepted. Pain relief through this technique not only provides continuous analgesia but also reduces post-operative pulmonary complications and also hastens recovery. But being a blind procedure it is accompanied by certain complications. Hypotension, dura puncture, high epidural, total spinal, epidural haematoma, spinal cord injury and infection are some of the documented side effects of epidural block. There are case reports eliciting neurological complications, catheter site infections, paresthesias, radicular symptoms and worsening of previous neurological conditions. Few technical problems related to breakage of epidural catheter are also mentioned in the literature. The patient had no sequelae on long term follow up even when a portion of catheter was retained. We present a case report where epidural catheter punctured pleura in a patient undergoing thoracotomy for carcinoma oesophagus.

  6. Infektioner i forbindelse med epidural kateterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, H M; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Andersen, S S

    1996-01-01

    coagulase- negative staphylococci (41%), Staphylococcus aureus (35%), Gram-negative bacilli (14%) and other bacteria (10%). The Gram-negative bacilli and S. aureus caused serious infections more frequently than the others. We discuss the symptoms and diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and propose......Seventy-eight patients with culture-positive epidural catheters were studied. Fifty-nine had symptoms of exit site infection and 11 patients had clinical meningitis, two of whom also had en epidural abscess. This corresponds to a local infection incidence of at least 4.3% and an incidence...

  7. Efficacy of Poly(D,L-Lactic Acid-co-Glycolic acid)-Poly(Ethylene Glycol)-Poly(D,L-Lactic Acid-co-Glycolic Acid) Thermogel As a Barrier to Prevent Spinal Epidural Fibrosis in a Postlaminectomy Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Lin; Lin, Hong; Cao, Luping; Cheng, Ji'an; Dong, Jian; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2017-04-01

    Experimental animal study. The authors conducted a study to determine the efficacy and safety of the poly(D,L-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) thermogel to prevent peridural fibrosis in an adult rat laminectomy model. Peridural fibrosis often occurs after spinal laminectomy. It might cause persistent back and/or leg pain postoperatively and make a reoperation more difficult and dangerous. Various materials have been used to prevent epidural fibrosis, but only limited success has been achieved. The PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogel was synthesized by us. Total L3 laminectomies were performed on 24 rats. The PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogel or chitosan (CHS) gel (a positive control group) was applied to the operative sites in a blinded manner. In the control group, the L3 laminectomy was performed and the defect was irrigated with the NS solution 3 times. All the rats were killed 4 weeks after the surgery. The cytotoxicity of this thermogel was evaluated in vitro and the result demonstrated that no evidence of cytotoxicity was observed. The extent of epidural fibrosis, the area of epidural fibrosis, and the density of the fibroblasts and blood vessel were evaluated histologically. There were statistical differences among the PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogel or CHS gel group compared with the control group. Although there was no difference between the PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogel and CHS gel, the efficiency of the PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogel was shown to be slightly improved compared with the CHS gel. The biocompatibility of the PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogel was proven well. The application of this thermogel effectively reduced epidural scarring and prevented the subsequent adhesion to the dura mater. No side effects were noted in the rats.

  8. Surgical challenges associated with the morphology of the spinal accessory nerve in the posterior cervical triangle: functional or structural?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Stetler, William; Louis, Robert G; Gupta, Ankmalika A; Loukas, Marios; Kelly, David R; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2010-01-01

    The spinal accessory nerve (SAN) has been reported to have a distinctly coiled appearance in its course through the posterior cervical triangle of the neck. As this is unusual compared with other peripheral nerves including the cranial nerves, the present histological analysis was performed to further elucidate the reason for this anatomy with potential application in nerve injury and repair. Ten adult cadavers underwent dissection of the neck. The SAN was harvested proximally and within the posterior cervical triangle. For comparison with other cranial nerves within the neck, the cervical vagus and hypoglossal nerves were also harvested. All nerves underwent histological analysis. Additionally, 2 human fetuses (11 and 20 weeks' gestation) underwent examination of the SAN in the posterior cervical triangle, and 3 randomly selected specimens were submitted for electromicroscopy. All SANs were found to have a straight gross configuration proximal to the posterior triangle and a coiled appearance within this geometrical area. Histologically, no differences were identified for the SAN in these 2 locations (that is, proximal to and within the posterior cervical triangle). The histology of the SAN both with routine analysis and electron microscopy was similar in both regions and to nerves used as controls (for example, vagus and hypoglossal nerves). Interestingly, both fetal specimens were found to have coiled SANs in the posterior cervical triangle. Based on this study, it appears that the tortuous course of the SAN in the posterior triangle arises from functional as opposed to structural forces. It is hoped that this analysis will provide some insight into the nature behind the morphology observed in the SAN within the posterior cervical triangle and aid in future investigations regarding its injury. Moreover, such a coiled nature of this nerve may assist the neurosurgeon in identifying it during, for example, neurotization procedures.

  9. Epidural abscess caused by Streptococcus milleri in a pregnant woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampen, Russell; Bearman, Gonzalo

    2005-11-03

    Bacteria in the Streptococcus milleri group (S. anginosus, S. constellatus, and S. intermedius) are associated with bacteremia and abscess formation. While most reports of Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) infection occur in patients with underlying medical conditions, SMG infections during pregnancy have been documented. However, SMG infections in pregnant women are associated with either neonatal or maternal puerperal sepsis. Albeit rare, S. milleri spinal-epidural abscess in pregnancy has been reported, always as a complication of spinal-epidural anesthesia. We report a case of spinal-epidural abscess caused by SMG in a young, pregnant woman without an antecedent history of spinal epidural anesthesia and without any underlying risk factors for invasive streptococcal disease. A 25 year old pregnant woman developed neurological symptoms consistent with spinal cord compression at 20 weeks gestation. She underwent emergency laminectomy for decompression and was treated with ceftriaxone 2 gm IV daily for 28 days. She was ambulatory at the time of discharge from the inpatient rehabilitation unit with residual lower extremity weakness. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a Streptococcus milleri epidural abscess in a healthy, pregnant woman with no history of epidural anesthesia or invasive procedures. This report adds to the body of literature on SMG invasive infections. Treatment of SMG spinal-epidural abscess with neurologic manifestations should include prompt and aggressive surgical decompression coupled with targeted anti-infective therapy.

  10. Epidural abscess caused by Streptococcus milleri in a pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bearman Gonzalo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria in the Streptococcus milleri group (S. anginosus, S. constellatus, and S. intermedius are associated with bacteremia and abscess formation. While most reports of Streptococcus milleri group (SMG infection occur in patients with underlying medical conditions, SMG infections during pregnancy have been documented. However, SMG infections in pregnant women are associated with either neonatal or maternal puerperal sepsis. Albeit rare, S. milleri spinal-epidural abscess in pregnancy has been reported, always as a complication of spinal-epidural anesthesia. We report a case of spinal-epidural abscess caused by SMG in a young, pregnant woman without an antecedent history of spinal epidural anesthesia and without any underlying risk factors for invasive streptococcal disease. Case presentation A 25 year old pregnant woman developed neurological symptoms consistent with spinal cord compression at 20 weeks gestation. She underwent emergency laminectomy for decompression and was treated with ceftriaxone 2 gm IV daily for 28 days. She was ambulatory at the time of discharge from the inpatient rehabilitation unit with residual lower extremity weakness. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a Streptococcus milleri epidural abscess in a healthy, pregnant woman with no history of epidural anesthesia or invasive procedures. This report adds to the body of literature on SMG invasive infections. Treatment of SMG spinal-epidural abscess with neurologic manifestations should include prompt and aggressive surgical decompression coupled with targeted anti-infective therapy.

  11. Influence of the Number of Predicted Words on Text Input Speed in Participants With Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouplin, Samuel; Roche, Nicolas; Vaugier, Isabelle; Jacob, Antoine; Figere, Marjorie; Pottier, Sandra; Antoine, Jean-Yves; Bensmail, Djamel

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the number of words displayed in the word prediction software (WPS) list affects text input speed (TIS) in people with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), and whether any influence is dependent on the level of the lesion. A cross-sectional trial. A rehabilitation center. Persons with cervical SCI (N=45). Lesion level was high (C4 and C5, American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] grade A or B) for 15 participants (high-lesion group) and low (between C6 and C8, ASIA grade A or B) for 30 participants (low-lesion group). TIS was evaluated during four 10-minute copying tasks: (1) without WPS (Without); (2) with a display of 3 predicted words (3Words); (3) with a display of 6 predicted words (6Words); and (4) with a display of 8 predicted words (8Words). During the 4 copying tasks, TIS was measured objectively (characters per minute, number of errors) and subjectively through subject report (fatigue, perception of speed, cognitive load, satisfaction). For participants with low-cervical SCI, TIS without WPS was faster than with WPS, regardless of the number of words displayed (Pinfluence TIS (P=.99). There was no influence of the number of words displayed in a word prediction list on TIS; however, perception of TIS differed according to lesion level. For persons with low-cervical SCI, a small number of words should be displayed, or WPS should not be used at all. For persons with high-cervical SCI, a larger number of words displayed increases the comfort of use of WPS. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Current trends in spinal arthroplasty: an assessment of surgeon practices and attitudes regarding cervical and lumbar disk replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Peter G; Simpson, Andrew K; Rechtine, Glenn; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2009-02-01

    Survey study involving orthopedic and neurosurgical spine surgeons. To report the current practices and opinions of spine surgeons regarding cervical and lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) as alternatives to arthrodesis for the treatment of degenerative conditions of the spine. TDA represents an alternative surgical treatment for degenerative spinal conditions that may avoid the deleterious effects associated with fusion. Unfortunately, the prevailing opinions of surgeons about TDA have not been well characterized and the patterns of its utilization have not been documented previously in the literature. A questionnaire was developed to record the attitudes of spine surgeons regarding cervical and lumbar TDA and to assess their utilization of this technology. This survey was distributed to all of the surgeons attending the 2007 "Contemporary Update on Disorders of the Spine" meeting in Whistler, British Columbia. One hundred thirteen of the 133 surgeons present at the meeting completed the questionnaire, corresponding to a return rate of 85%. The percentage of surgeons who had performed lumbar TDA was significantly higher than that for cervical TDA (42% vs. 30%, P=0.05). However, 81% of respondents stated that they were more likely to perform cervical TDA now compared with 1 year ago, whereas 64% indicated that they were less likely to perform lumbar TDA. The most frequently cited reasons for not performing both cervical and lumbar TDA were questions concerning long-term outcomes and perceived difficulties with obtaining financial compensation from insurance companies; in addition, surgeons were also concerned about revising lumbar TDA cases. Although the results of this study confirm that the enthusiasm for TDA was shared by many of these respondents, it is clear that additional long-term, prospective, comparative data are required before this technology may be considered as a replacement for more traditional spinal fusion procedures.

  13. Lhermitte sign and myelopathy after irradiation of the cervical spinal cord in radiotherapy treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mul, V E M; de Jong, J M A; Murrer, L H P; van den Ende, P L A; Houben, R M A; Lacko, M; Lambin, P; Baumert, B G

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work was to examine toxicity and risk factors after irradiation of the cervical spinal cord. A total of 437 patients irradiated for a laryngeal and oropharyngeal carcinoma were eligible (median follow-up 27 months). Spinal cord contouring was defined differently over time as anatomically defined spinal cord area (SCA) and the spinal cord on CT (SC) with a margin of 3 or 5 mm (SCP3/SCP5). None developed chronic progressive radiation myelopathy (CPRM) (maximum spinal dose 21.8-69 Gy); 3.9% (17/437) developed a Lhermitte sign (LS) with a median duration of 6 months (range 1-30 months) and was reversible in all patients. Risk factors for developing LS were younger age (52 vs. 61 years, p < 0.001), accelerated RT (12/17 patients, p < 0.005), and dose-volume relationships for SCA with ≥ 45 Gy of 14.15 cm(3) and 7.9 cm(3) for patients with and without LS, respectively. LS is more frequently observed in younger patients and in patients treated with accelerated radiotherapy. A dose-volume relationship was seen for V45 in the case of SCA. For higher doses, no clear dose-volume relationships were observed.

  14. Lhermitte sign and myelopathy after irradiation of the cervical spinal cord in radiotherapy treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mul, V.E.M. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. Radiation-Oncology; Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. Radiation-Oncology; Jong, J.M.A. de; Murrer, L.H.P.; Ende, P.L.A. van den; Houben, R.M.A.; Lambin, P.; Baumert, B.G. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. Radiation-Oncology; Lacko, M. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery

    2012-01-15

    The goal of this work was to examine toxicity and risk factors after irradiation of the cervical spinal cord. Patients and methods A total of 437 patients irradiated for a laryngeal and oropharyngeal carcinoma were eligible (median follow-up 27 months). Spinal cord contouring was defined differently over time as anatomically defined spinal cord area (SCA) and the spinal cord on CT (SC) with a margin of 3 or 5 mm (SCP3/SCP5). Results None developed chronic progressive radiation myelopathy (CPRM) (maximum spinal dose 21.8-69 Gy); 3.9% (17/437) developed a Lhermitte sign (LS) with a median duration of 6 months (range 1-30 months) and was reversible in all patients. Risk factors for developing LS were younger age (52 vs. 61 years, p < 0.001), accelerated RT (12/17 patients, p < 0.005), and dose-volume relationships for SCA with {>=} 45 Gy of 14.15 cm{sup 3} and 7.9 cm{sup 3} for patients with and without LS, respectively. Conclusion LS is more frequently observed in younger patients and in patients treated with accelerated radiotherapy. A dose-volume relationship was seen for V45 in the case of SCA. For higher doses, no clear dose-volume relationships were observed. (orig.)

  15. The effects of cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation on motor pathways supplying the upper limb in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongés, Siobhan C; D'Amico, Jessica M; Butler, Jane E; Taylor, Janet L

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive, weak direct current stimulation can induce changes in excitability of underlying neural tissue. Many studies have used transcranial direct current stimulation to induce changes in the brain, however more recently a number of studies have used transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation to induce changes in the spinal cord. This study further characterises the effects following cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation on motor pathways supplying the upper limb. In Study 1, on two separate days, participants (n = 12, 5 F) received 20 minutes of either real or sham direct current stimulation at 3 mA through electrodes placed in an anterior-posterior configuration over the neck (anode anterior). Biceps brachii, flexor carpi radialis and first dorsal interosseous responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor evoked potentials) and cervicomedullary stimulation (cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials) were measured before and after real or sham stimulation. In Study 2, on two separate days, participants (n = 12, 7 F) received either real or sham direct current stimulation in the same way as for Study 1. Before and after real or sham stimulation, median nerve stimulation elicited M waves and H reflexes in the flexor carpi radialis. H-reflex recruitment curves and homosynaptic depression of the H reflex were assessed. Results show that the effects of real and sham direct current stimulation did not differ for motor evoked potentials or cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials for any muscle, nor for H-reflex recruitment curve parameters or homosynaptic depression. Cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation with the parameters described here does not modify motor responses to corticospinal stimulation nor does it modify H reflexes of the upper limb. These results are important for the emerging field of transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation.

  16. Preliminary results after upper cervical chiropractic care in patients with chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Sandro; Marceca, Giuseppe; Moser, Jon; Niglio, Tarcisio; d'Alessandro, Aldo; Ciccone, Matteo Marco; Zito, Annapaola; Mandolesi, Dimitri; d'Alessandro, Alessandro; Fedele, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical and X-ray results of the Upper Cervical Chiropractic care through the specific adjustments (corrections) of C1-C2 on patients with chronic venous cerebral-spinal insufficiency (CCSVI) and multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied a sample of 77 patients before and after the Upper Cervical Chiropractic care, and we analyzed: A) The change of the X-ray parameters; B) The clinical results using a new set of questions. The protocol of the C1- C2 upper Cervical Chiropractic treatment, specific for these patients, lasts four months. From a haemodynamic point of view we divided the patients in 3 types: Type 1 - purely vascular with intravenous alterations; Type 2 - "mechanical" with of external venous compressions; Type 3 - mixed. We found an improvement in all kinds of subluxations after the treatment with respect to the pre-treatment X-ray evaluation, with a significant statistical difference. The differences between the clinical symptoms before and after the specific treatment of C1-C2 are statistically significant with pcerebro-spinal fluid.

  17. Evaluation of lung volumes, vital capacity and respiratory muscle strength after cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcio Aparecido; Vidotto, Milena Carlos; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Almeida, Renato; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Jardim, José Roberto; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that physiopathological changes to the respiratory system can occur following thoracic and abdominal surgery. Laminectomy is considered to be a peripheral surgical procedure, but it is possible that thoracic spinal surgery exerts a greater influence on lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary volumes and maximum respiratory pressures of patients undergoing cervical, thoracic or lumbar spinal surgery. Prospective study in a tertiary-level university hospital. Sixty-three patients undergoing laminectomy due to diagnoses of tumors or herniated discs were evaluated. Vital capacity, tidal volume, minute ventilation and maximum respiratory pressures were evaluated preoperatively and on the first and second postoperative days. Possible associations between the respiratory variables and the duration of the operation, surgical diagnosis and smoking status were investigated. Vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure presented reductions on the first postoperative day (20.9% and 91.6%, respectively) for thoracic surgery (P = 0.01), and maximum expiratory pressure showed reductions on the first postoperative day in cervical surgery patients (15.3%; P = 0.004). The incidence of pulmonary complications was 3.6%. There were reductions in vital capacity and maximum respiratory pressures during the postoperative period in patients undergoing laminectomy. Surgery in the thoracic region was associated with greater reductions in vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure, compared with cervical and lumbar surgery. Thus, surgical manipulation of the thoracic region appears to have more influence on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle action.

  18. Mechanism of Forelimb Motor Function Restoration after Cervical Spinal Cord Hemisection in Rats: A Comparison of Juveniles and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Hasegawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate forelimb motor function after cervical spinal cord injury in juvenile and adult rats. Both rats received a left segmental hemisection of the spinal cord after C3-C4 laminectomy. Behavioral evaluation of motor function was monitored and assessed using the New Rating Scale (NRS and Forelimb Locomotor Scale (FLS and by measuring the range of motion (ROM of both the elbow and wrist. Complete left forelimb motor paralysis was observed in both rats. The NRS showed motor function recovery restored to 50.2±24.7% in juvenile rats and 34.0±19.8% in adult rats. FLS was 60.4±26.8% in juvenile rats and 46.5±26.9% in adult rats. ROM of the elbow and wrist were 88.9±20.6% and 44.4±24.1% in juvenile rats and 70.0±29.2% and 40.0±21.1% in adult rats. Thus, the NRS and ROM of the elbow showed a significant difference between age groups. These results indicate that left hemisection of the cervical spinal cord was not related to right-sided motor functions. Moreover, while motor paralysis of the left forelimb gradually recovered in both groups, the improvement was greater in juvenile rats.

  19. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging issues for a wirelessly powered lead used for epidural, spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellock, Frank G; Audet-Griffin, Annabelle J

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues (magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts) for a wirelessly powered lead used for spinal cord stimulation (SCS). A newly developed, wirelessly powered lead (Freedom-4, Stimwave Technologies Inc., Scottsdale, AZ, USA) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions (translational attraction and torque) at 3 Tesla, MRI-related heating at 1.5 Tesla/64 MHz and 3 Tesla/128 MHz, and artifacts at 3 Tesla using standardized techniques. MRI-related heating tests were conducted by placing the lead in a gelled-saline-filled phantom and performing MRI procedures using relatively high levels of radiofrequency energy. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted, spin echo (SE), and gradient echo (GRE) pulse sequences. The lead exhibited minor magnetic field interactions (2 degree deflection angle and no torque). Heating was not substantial under 1.5 Tesla/64 MHz (highest temperature change, 2.3°C) and 3 Tesla/128 MHz (highest temperature change, 2.2°C) MRI conditions. Artifacts were moderate in size relative to the size and shape of the lead. These findings demonstrated that it is acceptable for a patient with this wirelessly powered lead used for SCS to undergo MRI under the conditions utilized in this investigation and according to other necessary guidelines. Artifacts seen on magnetic resonance images may pose possible problems if the area of interest is in the same area or close to this lead. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  20. Cervical spinal locking plate in combination with cortical ring allograft for a one level fusion in dogs with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Robert L; Levine, Jonathan M; Coates, Joan R; Bahr, Anne; Hettlich, Bianca F; Kerwin, Sharon C

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate use of a surgical technique commonly used in humans for treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) in dogs. Prospective case series. Dogs with CSM (n=10). Dogs weighing >30 kg that had CSM at 1 vertebral articulation were eligible for inclusion. Dogs had vertebral column distraction/fusion performed using a cortical ring allograft, cancellous autograft, and a spinal locking plate. Dogs were evaluated temporally by repeat neurological examinations and by client perception of postsurgical outcome, determined by telephone interview. Nine dogs survived the immediate postoperative period. Seven of 8 dogs had moderate to complete improvement without recurrence (mean follow-up, 2.48 years). The most common postsurgical complications were screw loosening (n=4) and plate shifting (2), neither of which required surgical revision. One dog had pseudoarthrosis that may have negatively impacted outcome. Treatment of single level CSM in dogs with ring allograft and a spinal locking plate system may lead to successful outcomes. The major problems encountered with included cost of the implants and adjusting the system designed for humans to fit the vertebral column of a dog. For dogs with CSM at a single level, the use of a spinal locking plate in combination with a cortical ring allograft can be an effective surgical treatment. Costs of the implants as well as anatomic differences in dogs make this type of surgery less appealing.

  1. Single-Fraction Versus 5-Fraction Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Limited Survival Prognoses: Results of a Matched-Pair Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Huttenlocher, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Šegedin, Barbara; Perpar, Ana [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Conde, Antonio J.; Garcia, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Consorcio Hospital Provincial de Castellón, Castellón (Spain); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cacicedo, Jon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cruces University Hospital, Barakaldo, Vizcaya (Spain); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: This study compared single-fraction to multi-fraction short-course radiation therapy (RT) for symptomatic metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) in patients with limited survival prognosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 121 patients who received 8 Gy × 1 fraction were matched (1:1) to 121 patients treated with 4 Gy × 5 fractions for 10 factors including age, sex, performance status, primary tumor type, number of involved vertebrae, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval between tumor diagnosis and MESCC, pre-RT ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits prior to RT. Endpoints included in-field repeated RT (reRT) for MESCC, overall survival (OS), and impact of RT on motor function. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test for in-field reRT for MESCC and OS and with the ordered-logit model for effect of RT on motor function. Results: Doses of 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 4 Gy × 5 fractions were not significantly different with respect to the need for in-field reRT for MESCC (P=.11) at 6 months (18% vs 9%, respectively) and 12 months (30% vs 22%, respectively). The RT regimen also had no significant impact on OS (P=.65) and post-RT motor function (P=.21). OS rates at 6 and 12 months were 24% and 9%, respectively, after 8 Gy × 1 fraction versus 25% and 13%, respectively, after 4 Gy × 5 fractions. Improvement of motor function was observed in 17% of patients after 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 23% after 4 Gy × 5 fractions, respectively. Conclusions: There were no significant differences with respect to need for in-field reRT for MESCC, OS, and motor function by dose fractionation regimen. Thus, 8 Gy × 1 fraction may be a reasonable option for patients with survival prognosis of a few months.

  2. Difference in Spinal Sagittal Alignment and Health-Related Quality of Life between Males and Females with Cervical Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oe, Shin; Togawa, Daisuke; Yoshida, Go; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Yamato, Yu; Kobayashi, Sho; Yasuda, Tatsuya; Banno, Tomohiro; Mihara, Yuki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2017-12-01

    Large cohort study. To clarify spinal sagittal alignment and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) according to sex in volunteers aged >50 years with cervical deformity (CD). Adult spinal deformities, especially those associated with lumbosacral lesions, are more frequent in females; however, CD is observed to a greater extent in males. We divided 656 volunteers (263 males, 393 females; age, 50-89 years [mean, 73 years]) as follows: males with CD (CDM; 82 patients); males without CD (NCDM, 181); females with CD (CDF, 36); and females without CD (NCDF, 357). CD was defined as C2-7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA) ≥40 mm. We measured pelvic tilt (PT), pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis (PI-LL), thoracic kyphosis, T1 slope, cervical lordosis, C7 SVA, and C2-7 SVA. HRQOL was evaluated using EuroQOL five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D). In CDM, NCDM, CDF, and NCDF groups, the respective parameters were as follows: PT: 15°, 14°, 26°, and 21°; PI-LL: 7°, 5°, 16°, and 10°; C2-7 SVA: 49, 24, 46, and 20 mm; C7 SVA: 61, 40, 75, and 47 mm; and EQ-5D: 0.82, 0.88, 0.78, and 0.81. PT and PI-LL were significantly greater in the CDF group than in the NCDF group (pspinal deformity may have different mechanisms in males and females. The deterioration of spinal sagittal alignment in males may originate from the cervical spine, and CD may be associated with HRQOL.

  3. Axial MR diffusion tensor imaging and tractography in clinical diagnosed and pathology confirmed cervical spinal cord astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mangsuo; Shi, Bingxin; Chen, Tuoyu; Zhang, Yuqi; Geng, Tongchao; Qiao, Liyan; Zhang, Mingjie; He, Le; Zuo, Huancong; Wang, Guihuai

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) features of cervical spinal cord astrocytoma. Eleven patients with cervical spinal cord astrocytomas and 10 healthy volunteers were recruited in this study. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and axial DTI were performed on a 3.0T MRI system. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) values for the lesions were measured. DTT was performed using the principal diffusion direction method. ADC values of the lesions and the normal-appearing tissue around the tumour (NATAT) on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) increased. The ADC values of the lesions were higher. The FA values of the lesions and the NATAT decreased significantly, with the lesions having lower FA values. The RD value (1.36±0.49) of the tumours was significantly higher than those found in the healthy controls, but similar for the AD value (1.84±0.56). There were no differences in ADC or FA values between lesions and NATAT in McCormick Type I vs. Type II patients. Based on the DTT, 7 patients with solid mass tumours were classified as Type I. One patient with a solid mass, 2 patients with cystic degeneration inside the lesions, and 1 patient with a cyst around the mass were classified as Type II. FA values of the cervical spinal cord astrocytoma decreased, but the ADC values increased. DTI was sensitive for the evaluation of pathological changes that could not be visualized on T2WI. Our preliminary study indicates that DTT can be used to guide operation planning, and that axial images of DTT may be more valuable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Treated with a Targeted CT-Guided Epidural Blood Patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Correia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH is an important cause of new daily persistent headache. It is thought to be due to spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leaks, which probably have a multifactorial etiology. The classic manifestation of SIH is an orthostatic headache, but other neurological symptoms may be present. An epidural blood patch is thought to be the most effective treatment, but a blind infusion may be ineffective. We describe the case of a young man who developed an acute severe headache, with pain worsening when assuming an upright posture and relief gained with recumbency. No history of previous headache, recent cranial or cervical trauma, or invasive procedures was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging showed pachymeningeal enhancement and other features consistent with SIH and pointed towards a cervical CSF leak site. After failure of conservative treatment, a targeted computer tomography-guided EBP was performed, with complete recovery.

  5. Surgical treatment of a broken neuroplasty catheter in the epidural space: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Shin, Jun Jae; Lee, Woo Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Percutaneous epidural neuroplasty with a Racz catheter is widely used to treat radicular pain caused by spinal stenosis or a herniated intervertebral disc. The breakage or shearing of an epidural catheter, particularly a percutaneous epidural neuroplasty catheter, is reported as a rare complication. There has been a controversy over whether surgical removal of a shorn epidural catheter is needed. Until now, only three cases related to sheared Racz neuroplasty catheters have been re...

  6. Intravenous Transplantation of Mesenchymal Progenitors Distribute Solely to the Lungs and Improve Outcomes in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Seok Voon; Czisch, Chris E; Han, May H; Plant, Christine D; Harvey, Alan R; Plant, Giles W

    2016-07-01

    Cellular transplantation strategies utilizing intraspinal injection of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) have been reported as beneficial for spinal cord injuries. However, intraspinal injection is not only technically challenging, but requires invasive surgical procedures for patients. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility and potential benefits of noninvasive intravenous injection of MPCs in two models of cervical spinal cord injury, unilateral C5 contusion and complete unilateral C5 hemisection. MPCs isolated from green fluorescence protein (GFP)-luciferase transgenic mice compact bone (1 × 10(6) cells), or vehicle Hank's Buffered Saline Solution (HBSS), were intravenously injected via the tail vein at D1, D3, D7, D10, or D14. Transplanted MPCs were tracked via bioluminescence imaging. Live in vivo imaging data showed that intravenously injected MPCs accumulate in the lungs, confirmed by postmortem bioluminescence signal-irrespective of the time of injection or injury model. The results showed a rapid, positive modulation of the inflammatory response providing protection to the injured spinal cord tissue. Histological processing of the lungs showed GFP(+) cells evenly distributed around the alveoli. We propose that injected cells can act as cellular target decoys to an immune system primed by injury, thereby lessening the inflammatory response at the injury site. We also propose that intravenous injected MPCs modulate the immune system via the lungs through secreted immune mediators or contact interaction with peripheral organs. In conclusion, the timing of intravenous injection of MPCs is key to the success for improving function and tissue preservation following cervical spinal cord injury. Stem Cells 2016;34:1812-1825. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  7. The cervical spinal cord in neuromyelitis optica patients: A comparative study with multiple sclerosis using diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessôa, Fernanda Miraldi Clemente, E-mail: fernandamiraldi@hotmail.com [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Medical Student, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Fernanda Cristina Rueda, E-mail: frueda81@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, João Victor Altamiro, E-mail: victoraltamiro@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Leon, Soniza Vieira Alves, E-mail: sonizavleon@globo.com [Department of Neurology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Domingues, Romeu Côrtes, E-mail: romeu@CDPi.com.br [CDPI – Clínica de Diagnóstico Por Imagem, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro, E-mail: egasparetto@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); CDPI – Clínica de Diagnóstico Por Imagem, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    Introduction: This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), using diffusion tensor MR imaging, comparing to controls and patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and methods: We studied 8 patients with NMO and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Also, 32 MS patients were selected. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results: At C2, the FA value was decreased in NMO patients compared to MS and controls in the anterior column. Also in this column, RD value showed increase in NMO compared to MS and to controls. The FA value of the posterior column was decreased in NMO in comparison to controls. At C7, AD value was higher in NMO than in MS in the right column. At the same column, MD values were increased in NMO compared to MS and to controls. Conclusions: There is extensive NASC damage in NMO patients, including peripheral areas of the cervical spinal cord, affecting the white matter, mainly caused by demyelination. This suggests a new spinal cord lesion pattern in NMO in comparison to MS.

  8. Trauma related changes in cervical spine and spinal cord in myelography and MRI; Zmiany pourazowe kregoslupa i rdzenia w odcinku szyjnym, w mielografii i w obrazie NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozniak, E.; Bronarski, J.; Kiwerski, J.; Krasuski, M. [Akademia Medyczna, Warsaw (Poland)]|[Stoleczny Zespol Rehabilitacji, Konstancin (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Myelographic and MRI results in 14 patients treated in 1992 because of cervical spine injury with neurological complications have been presented. Myelography proves to be useful in posttraumatic spine diagnostics but in some cases does not render sufficient information, especially if the trauma superimposes previously existing pathological changes. MRI is exceptionally valuable diagnostic modality in cervical spine injuries offering an advantage of both early and late evaluation of the post-traumatic spinal cord changes. (author). 12 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs.

  9. [Epidural analgesia for painless delivery. Our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, D; Giustiniano, E; Cascini, V

    1999-10-01

    We know that a stress condition causes hormonal responses (cortisol, prolactin, TSH, ACTH, catecholamines, beta-endorphines). This hormonal "storm" causes metabolic and haemodynamic changes that can get worse postoperative outcome as well as birth. Analgesia for labour is an anesthesiological procedure which spreading in Italy resulted very difficult, for instance, especially in southern Italy, "old popular believes" (such as paralysis risk after lumbar puncture, Post-Dural Puncture Headache (PDPH) and the confusion between epidural and subdural anesthesia). In front of these problems we report our experience in this field. Experimental plan: in our retrospective study we examined painless labour cases and we compared them with natural labour cases without analgesia. women of this study were pregnant admitted in obstetrics department of our hospital at the end of pregnancy. pregnant women who wanted epidural analgesia were 50 (group A); data group A were compared with data of 50 pregnant women who refused analgesia (group B). beginning labour, when cervical dilatation was 3 cm and foetal head was going down we performed epidural puncture and positioned, catheter in epidural space giving opiate and local anesthetic drugs using "top-up" method. we compared APGAR-score after birth and the judgement expressed by women of the two groups. APGAR-score in new-borns with epidural analgesia in higher than new-born without epidural analgesia; furthermore, patients who choose painless labour expressed a better judgement than women who refused epidural analgesia.

  10. Prognostic value of 18F-FDG PET in monosegmental stenosis and myelopathy of the cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floeth, Frank W; Stoffels, Gabriele; Herdmann, Jörg; Eicker, Sven; Galldiks, Norbert; Rhee, Sascha; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2011-09-01

    MRI offers perfect visualization of spondylotic stenosis of the cervical spine, but morphologic imaging does not correlate with clinical symptoms and postoperative recovery after decompression surgery. In this prospective study, we investigated the role of (18)F-FDG PET in patients with degenerative stenosis of the cervical spinal cord in relation to postsurgical outcome. Twenty patients with monosegmental spondylotic stenosis of the middle cervical spine (C3/C4 or C4/C5) showing intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted MRI and clinical symptoms of myelopathy (myelopathic patients) were investigated by (18)F-FDG PET. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV(max)) were measured at all levels of the cervical spine (C1-C7). Decompression surgery and anterior cervical fusion were performed on all patients, and clinical status (Japanese Orthopedic Association [JOA] score) was assessed before and 6 mo after surgery. The (18)F-FDG data of 10 individuals without cervical spine pathology were used as a reference (controls). The myelopathic patients showed a significant decrease in (18)F-FDG uptake in the area of the lower cervical cord, compared with the control group (C7 SUV(max), 1.49 ± 0.18 vs. 1.71 ± 0.27, P = 0.01). Ten myelopathic patients exhibited focally increased (18)F-FDG uptake at the level of the stenosis (SUV(max), 2.27 ± 0.41 vs. 1.75 ± 0.22, P = 0.002). The remaining 10 patients showed inconspicuous (18)F-FDG uptake at the area of the stenosis. Postoperatively, the patients with focally increased (18)F-FDG accumulation at the level of stenosis showed good clinical recovery and a significant improvement in JOA scores (13.6 ± 2.3 vs. 9.5 ± 2.5, P = 0.001), whereas no significant improvement was observed in the remaining patients (JOA score, 12.0 ± 2.4 vs. 11.6 ± 2.5, not statistically significant). Multiple regression analysis identified the presence of focally increased (18)F-FDG uptake at the level of the stenosis as an independent predictor of

  11. Cervicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a sexually transmitted infection, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. Cervicitis can develop from noninfectious causes, too. Successful ... result from common sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including gonorrhea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis and genital herpes. Allergic reactions. An ...

  12. Cervicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... virus ( genital herpes ) Human papilloma virus ( genital warts ) Trichomoniasis Other things that can cause cervicitis include: A ... the discharge under a microscope (may show candidiasis , trichomoniasis , or bacterial vaginosis) Pap test Tests for gonorrhea ...

  13. The impact of spine stability on cervical spinal cord injury with respect to demographics, management, and outcome: a prospective cohort from a national spinal cord injury registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Jérôme; Rivers, Carly S; Kurban, Dilnur; Finkelstein, Joel; Tee, Jin W; Noonan, Vanessa K; Kwon, Brian K; Hurlbert, R John; Christie, Sean; Tsai, Eve C; Ahn, Henry; Drew, Brian; Bailey, Christopher S; Fourney, Daryl R; Attabib, Najmedden; Johnson, Michael G; Fehlings, Michael G; Parent, Stefan; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2018-01-01

    Emergent surgery for patients with a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is seen as the gold standard in acute management. However, optimal treatment for those with the clinical diagnosis of central cord syndrome (CCS) is less clear, and classic definitions of CCS do not identify a unique population of patients. The study aimed to test the authors' hypothesis that spine stability can identify a unique group of patients with regard to demographics, management, and outcomes, which classic CCS definitions do not. This is a prospective observational study. The sample included participants with cervical SCI included in a prospective Canadian registry. The outcome measures were initial hospitalization length of stay, change in total motor score from admission to discharge, and in-hospital mortality. Patients with cervical SCI from a prospective Canadian SCI registry were grouped into stable and unstable spine cohorts. Bivariate analyses were used to identify differences in demographic, injury, management, and outcomes. Multivariate analysis was used to better understand the impact of spine stability on motor score improvement. No conflicts of interest were identified. Compared with those with an unstable spine, patients with cervical SCI and a stable spine were older (58.8 vs. 44.1 years, p<.0001), more likely male (86.4% vs. 76.1%, p=.0059), and have more medical comorbidities. Patients with stable spine cervical SCI were more likely to have sustained their injury by a fall (67.4% vs. 34.9%, p<.0001), and have high cervical (C1-C4; 58.5% vs. 43.3%, p=.0009) and less severe neurologic injuries (ASIA Impairment Scale C or D; 81.3% vs. 47.5%, p<.0001). Those with stable spine injuries were less likely to have surgery (67.6% vs. 92.6%, p<.0001), had shorter in-hospital lengths of stay (median 84.0 vs. 100.5 days, p=.0062), and higher total motor score change (20.7 vs. 19.4 points, p=.0014). Multivariate modeling revealed that neurologic severity of injury and spine stability

  14. Emerging Safety of Intramedullary Transplantation of Human Neural Stem Cells in Chronic Cervical and Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Allan D; Okonkwo, David O; Park, Paul; Jenkins, Arthur L; Kurpad, Shekar N; Parr, Ann M; Ganju, Aruna; Aarabi, Bizhan; Kim, Dong; Casha, Steven; Fehlings, Michael G; Harrop, James S; Anderson, Kim D; Gage, Allyson; Hsieh, Jane; Huhn, Stephen; Curt, Armin; Guzman, Raphael

    2017-05-24

    Human central nervous system stem cells (HuCNS-SC) are multipotent adult stem cells with successful engraftment, migration, and region-appropriate differentiation after spinal cord injury (SCI). To present data on the surgical safety profile and feasibility of multiple intramedullary perilesional injections of HuCNS-SC after SCI. Intramedullary free-hand (manual) transplantation of HuCNS-SC cells was performed in subjects with thoracic (n = 12) and cervical (n = 17) complete and sensory incomplete chronic traumatic SCI. Intramedullary stem cell transplantation needle times in the thoracic cohort (20 M HuCNS-SC) were 19:30 min and total injection time was 42:15 min. The cervical cohort I (n = 6), demonstrated that escalating doses of HuCNS-SC up to 40 M range were well tolerated. In cohort II (40 M, n = 11), the intramedullary stem cell transplantation needle times and total injection time was 26:05 ± 1:08 and 58:14 ± 4:06 min, respectively. In the first year after injection, there were 4 serious adverse events in 4 of the 12 thoracic subjects and 15 serious adverse events in 9 of the 17 cervical patients. No safety concerns were considered related to the cells or the manual intramedullary injection. Cervical magnetic resonance images demonstrated mild increased T2 signal change in 8 of 17 transplanted subjects without motor decrements or emerging neuropathic pain. All T2 signal change resolved by 6 to 12 mo post-transplant. A total cell dose of 20 M cells via 4 and up to 40 M cells via 8 perilesional intramedullary injections after thoracic and cervical SCI respectively proved safe and feasible using a manual injection technique.

  15. LAMINOPLASTY FUSION FOR CERVICAL SPINAL CORD INJURY WITH OSSIFICATION OF POSTERIOR LONGITUDINAL LIGAMENT: Combination technique for better result (Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. B. Mahadewa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This was a retrospective study of 10 cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI, concomitant with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL, that were treated by the author at Sanglah General Hospital-Bali during 2013-2014. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combination technique of laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion for canal compression due to OPLL in CSCI. There were 9 male patients of 10, average age was 58,3 years old. American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA scale preoperative was average in C scale and ASIA scale postoperative was in D. Mean JOA score preoperative was 9,5 and mean Japan orthopedic association (JOA score postoperative was 13,3. Improvement after surgery using improvement formula of JOA was achieved by mean of 19,16%. All patients survived and improved neurologically, there was no surgical complication and implant failure in this series. No kyphotic deformity was observed in follow up cervical spine x-ray after 6 months. The author present a combination technique of 10 consecutive patients who underwent laminoplasty fusion for OPLL in CSCI with better result.

  16. Robot-Assisted Training of Arm and Hand Movement Shows Functional Improvements for Incomplete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Gerard E; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Berliner, Jeffrey; OʼMalley, Marcia K; Pehlivan, Ali Utku; Kadivar, Zahra; Fitle, Kyle; Boake, Corwin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the feasibility, tolerability, and effectiveness of robotic-assisted arm training in incomplete chronic tetraplegia. Pretest/posttest/follow-up was conducted. Ten individuals with chronic cervical spinal cord injury were enrolled. Participants performed single degree-of-freedom exercise of upper limbs at an intensity of 3-hr per session for 3 times a week for 4 wks with MAHI Exo-II. Arm and hand function tests (Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, Action Research Arm Test), strength of upper limb (upper limb motor score, grip, and pinch strength), and independence in daily living activities (Spinal Cord Independence Measure II) were performed at baseline, end of training, and 6 mos later. After 12 sessions of training, improvements in arm and hand functions were observed. Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (0.14[0.04]-0.21[0.07] items/sec, P = 0.04), Action Research Arm Test (30.7[3.8]-34.3[4], P = 0.02), American Spinal Injury Association upper limb motor score (31.5[2.3]-34[2.3], P = 0.04) grip (9.7[3.8]-12[4.3] lb, P = 0.02), and pinch strength (4.5[1.1]-5.7[1.2] lb, P = 0.01) resulted in significant increases. Some gains were maintained at 6 mos. No change in Spinal Cord Independence Measure II scores and no adverse events were observed. Results from this pilot study suggest that repetitive training of arm movements with MAHI Exo-II exoskeleton is safe and has potential to be an adjunct treatment modality in rehabilitation of persons with spinal cord injury with mild to moderate impaired arm functions.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute trauma of the cervical spine: spectrum of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, B.B.; Koopmans, R.A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrum of acute injury to the cervical spine was illustrated in this pictorial essay. The appearance of the traumatized cord was discussed, including intramedullary hemorrhage, and the causes of spinal cord compression, such as disk herniation, epidural hematoma, fracture, dislocation and underlying spinal stenosis. The ability of MRI to directly reveal the severity of cord injury and simultaneously indicate the cause of cord compression proved particularly useful in the management of incomplete injury, for which surgical intervention may prevent further deterioration. The protocol for MRI of cervical spinal trauma included sagittal T1-weighted and T2-weighted conventional spin-echo sequences. In addition, transverse T2-weighted gradient-echo images were obtained. MRI`s ability to directly reveal the extent of cord injury was said to be a powerful tool in the management of incomplete injuries where further deterioration could be prevented by timely surgical intervention. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Age-related changes of the diffusion tensor imaging parameters of the normal cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kun, E-mail: medsciwangkun@126.com [Orthopedics Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Song, Qingxin; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Zhi; Hou, Canglong; Tang, Yixing [Orthopedics Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Shiyue [Radiology Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Hao, Qiang, E-mail: haoqiang@189.cn [Radiology Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Shen, Hongxing, E-mail: shenhxgk@126.com [Orthopedics Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • It is essential to determine the DTI parameters in the whole CSC. • To analyze DTI parameters in all intervertebral space levels of the CSC. • To study the impact of age on these parameters in healthy Chinese subjects. • Provide better insights in factors that could bias the diagnosis of CSC pathologies. - Abstract: Background: The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the cervical spinal cord (CSC) changes with age. However, previous studies only examined specific CSC areas. Objectives: To analyze the DTI parameters in all intervertebral space levels of the whole normal CSC and to study the impact of age on these parameters in a Chinese population. Methods: Thirty-six healthy subjects aged 20–77 years were recruited. DTI parameters were calculated for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) funiculi in all the CSC intervertebral spaces (C1/2-C6/7). Age-related changes of DTI parameters were analyzed for the GM and WM funiculi. Results: Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were lower in GM than in WM. MD and FA values were lower in the WM in the lower CSC compared with the upper CSC (all P < 0.05), but no difference was observed in GM. In ventral funiculi, MD increased with age, while FA decreased (all P < 0.001). In lateral and dorsal funiculi, MD and FA decreased with age (all P < 0.001). In GM, MD and FA decreased with age (all P < 0.001). Significant age-related changes were observed in FA and MD from GM and WM funiculi. FA was correlated with age in all funiculi (ventral: r = −0.733; lateral: r = −0.468; dorsal: r = −0.607; GM: r = −0.724; all P < 0.01). Conclusion: Important changes in MD and FA were observed with advancing age at all levels of CSC in Chinese patients. DTI parameters may be useful to assess CSC pathology, but the influence of age and segments need to be taken into account in diagnosis.

  19. Theophylline-induced respiratory recovery following cervical spinal cord hemisection is augmented by serotonin 2 receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Nantwi, Kwaku D; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2002-11-22

    Cervical spinal cord hemisection leads to a disruption of bulbospinal innervation of phrenic motoneurons resulting in paralysis of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm. We have previously demonstrated separate therapeutic roles for theophylline, and more recently serotonin (5-HT) as modulators to phrenic nerve motor recovery; mechanisms that likely occur via adenosine A1 and 5-HT2 receptors, respectively. The present study was designed to specifically determine if concurrent stimulation of 5-HT2 receptors may enhance motor recovery induced by theophylline alone. Adult female rats (250-350 g; n=7 per group) received a left cervical (C2) hemisection that resulted in paralysis of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm. Twenty-four hours later rats were given systemic theophylline (15 mg/kg, i.v.), resulting in burst recovery in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve. Theophylline-induced recovery was enhanced with the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist, (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI; 1.0 mg/kg). DOI-evoked augmentation of theophylline-induced recovery was attenuated following subsequent injection of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin (2.0 mg/kg). In a separate group, rats were pretreated with ketanserin, which did not prevent subsequent theophylline-induced respiratory recovery. However, pretreatment with ketanserin did prevent DOI-induced augmentation of the theophylline-evoked phrenic nerve burst recovery. Lastly, using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time a positive co-localization of adenosine A1 receptor mRNA and immunoreactivity with phrenic motoneurons of the cervical ventral horns. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that theophylline may induce motor recovery likely at adenosine A1 receptors located at the level of the spinal cord, and the concurrent stimulation of converging 5-HT2 receptors may augment the response.

  20. Peripheral response to cervical or thoracic spinal manual therapy: an evidence-based review with meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jennifer; Allen, Diane D; Pawlowsky, Sarah; Smoot, Betty

    2014-11-01

    Spinal manual therapy (SMT) is commonly used for treatment of musculoskeletal pain in the neck, upper back, or upper extremity. Some authors report a multi-system effect of SMT, including peripheral alterations in skin conductance and skin temperature, suggesting that SMT may initiate a sympathetic nervous system (SNS) response. The focus of this evidence-based review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the evidence of SNS responses and clinically relevant outcomes following SMT to the cervical or thoracic spine. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH USED THE TERMS: 'manual therapy', 'SMT', 'spinal manipulation', 'mobilization', 'SNS', 'autonomic nervous system', 'neurophysiology', 'hypoalgesia', 'pain pathophysiology', 'cervical vertebrae', 'thoracic vertebrae', 'upper extremity', and 'neurodynamic test'. Data were extracted and within-group and between-group effect sizes were calculated for outcomes of skin conductance, skin temperature, pain, and upper extremity range of motion (ROM) during upper limb neurodynamic tests (ULNTs). Eleven studies were identified. Statistically significant changes were seen with increased skin conductance, decreased skin temperature, decreased pain, and increased upper extremity ROM during ULNT. A mechanical stimulus at the cervical or thoracic spine can produce a SNS excitatory response (increased skin conductance and decreased skin temperature). Findings of reduced pain and increased ROM during ULNT provide support to the clinical relevance of SMT. This evidence points toward additional mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of SMT. The effect sizes are small to moderate and no long-term effects post-SMT were collected. Future research is needed to associate peripheral effects with a possible centrally-mediated response to SMT.

  1. Magnetic resonance 4D flow characteristics of cerebrospinal fluid at the craniocervical junction and the cervical spinal canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunck, Alexander C. [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); University Hospital Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Kroeger, Jan-Robert; Juettner, Alena; Schwindt, Wolfram; Heindel, Walter; Niederstadt, Thomas; Maintz, David [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Brentrup, Angela [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Neurosurgery, Muenster (Germany); Fiedler, Barbara [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of General Pediatrics, Subdivision Pediatric Neurology, Muenster (Germany); Schaarschmidt, Frank [Leibniz University Hannover, Institute of Biostatistics, Hannover (Germany); Crelier, Gerard R. [ETH and University of Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate the applicability of 4D phase contrast (4D PC) MR imaging in the assessment of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in healthy volunteers and patients with lesions at the craniocervical junction or the cervical spinal canal. Ten healthy volunteers and four patients with lesions including Chiari I malformation and cervical canal stenoses were examined by a cardiac-gated 4D PC imaging sequence on 1.5T MRI. Phase contrast images were postprocessed allowing for flow quantification and flow pathline visualisation. Velocity data were compared with conventional axial 2D phase contrast images. The 4D PC sequence allowed for flow quantification and visualisation in all individuals. Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement of 2D and 4D PC velocity data. In healthy volunteers, CSF flow was homogeneously distributed in the anterior and anterolateral subarachnoid space with the flow directed caudally during systole and cranially during diastole. Flow velocities were closely related to the width of the subarachnoid space. Patients showed grossly altered CSF flow patterns with formation of flow jets with increased flow velocities. 4D PC MR imaging allows for a detailed assessment of CSF flow dynamics helping to distinguish physiological from complex pathological flow patterns at the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine. (orig.)

  2. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of complete and chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guanghui; Liu, Xuebin; Zhang, Zan; Yang, Zhijun; Dai, Yiwu; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-10-02

    Neuronal injuries have been a challenging problem for treatment, especially in the case of complete and chronic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, particular attention is paid to the potential of stem cell in treating SCI, but there are only few clinical studies and insufficient data. This study explored the efficacy of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) transplantation in the treatment of SCI. Forty patients with complete and chronic cervical SCI were selected and randomly assigned to one of the two experimental groups, treatment group and control group. The treatment group received BMMSCs transplantation to the area surrounding injury, while the control group was not treated with any cell transplantation. Both the transplant recipients and the control group were followed up to 6 months, postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative neurological functions were evaluated with AIS grading, ASIA score, residual urine volume and neurophysiological examination. Results showed that in the treatment group 10 patients had a significant clinical improvement in terms of motor, light touch, pin prick sensory and residual urine volume, while nine patients showed changes in AIS grade. Neurophysiological examination was consistent with clinical observations. No sign of tumor was evident until 6 months postoperatively. In the control group, no improvement was observed in any of the neurological functions specified above. BMMSCs transplantation improves neurological function in patients with complete and chronic cervical SCI, providing valuable information on applications of BMMSCs for the treatment of SCI. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. MRI findings of nonprogressive juvenile spinal muscular atrophy of the distal upper limbs (Hirayama's disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Hak Jin; Song, Jong Woon; Lee, Suk Hong; Choi, Kwang Dong; Park, Kyoung Pil; Choi, Ki Bok [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dynamic changes of the cervical dural sac and the spinal cord during neck flexion in patients suffering from Hirayama's disease and to present the usefulness of flexion MR study for the diagnosis. Seven consecutive male patients (age ranging 17-43 years, mean age 23.7 years) with the clinical diagnosis of Hirayama's disease and 5 healthy subjects (aged 25-32 years) for controls had done cervical MRI from January 2001 through June 2002. Cervical MRI was done in neutral and neck flexed positions using 1.5T system (Sonata, Siemens, Germany) and obtained images were reviewed by two radiologists. We compared the cervical MRI findings of 7 patients with those of 5 healthy controls regarding neck flexion induced changes in the lower cervical segments. Neutral positioned cervical sagittal MR images revealed subtle or mild cord atrophy in only 2 patients. On maximal neck flexion, AP diameter of the cresent posterior epidural space was increased and also cord flattening with anterior shifting of posterior wall of the lower cervical dural canal was noted in all 7 patients. In all 7 cases, the level and side of spinal cord changes corresponded to the clinical phenotype. All control subjects showed neither cord flattening nor widening of posterior epidural space on neck flexion. In patients with the clinical diagnosis of Hirayama's disease, MRI scans obtained on maximal neck flexion showed characteristically dynamic flattening of lower cervical cord and widening of posterior epidural space. Therefore, a flexion MR study is needed to prove the diagnosis.

  4. MRI findings of nonprogressive juvenile spinal muscular atrophy of the distal upper limbs(Hirayama's disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Hak Jin; Song, Jong Woon; Lee, Suk Hong; Choi, Kwang Dong; Park, Kyoung Pil [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ki Bok [Inje University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dynamic changes of the cervical dural sac and the spinal cord during neck flexion in patients suffering from Hirayama's disease and to present the usefulness of flexion MR study for the diagnosis. Seven consecutive male patients (age ranging 17-43 years, mean age 23.7 years) with the clinical diagnosis of Hirayama's disease and 5 healthy subjects (aged 25-32 years) for controls had done cervical MRI from January 2001 through June 2002. Cervical MRI was done in neutral and neck flexed positions using 1.5 T system (Sonata, Siemens, Germany) and obtained images were reviewed by two radiologists. We compared the cervical MRI findings of 7 patients with those of 5 healthy controls regarding neck flexion induced changes in the lower cervical segments. Neutral positioned cervical sagittal MR images revealed subtle or mild cord atrophy in only 2 patients. On maximal neck flexion, AP diameter of the cresent posterior epidural space was increased and also cord flattening with anterior shifting of posterior wall of the lower cervical dural canal was noted in all 7 patients. In all 7 cases, the level and side of spinal cord changes corresponded to the clinical phenotype. All control subjects showed neither cord flattening nor widening of posterior epidural space on neck flexion. In patients with the clinical diagnosis of Hirayama's disease, MRI scans obtained on maximal neck flexion showed characteristically dynamic flattening of lower cervical cord and widening of posterior epidural space. Therefore, a flexion MR study is needed to prove the diagnosis.

  5. Discrepancies between clinical assessments of sensory function and electrical perceptual thresholds after incomplete chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, R A; Brooke, V J; Calabro, F J; Ellaway, P H; Perez, M A

    2016-01-01

    Prospective experimental. To compare sensory function as revealed by light touch and pin prick tests of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) and the electrical perceptual threshold (EPT) exams in individuals with chronic incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Pittsburgh, United States. EPT was tested using cutaneous electrical stimulation (0.5 ms pulse width, 3 Hz) in 32 healthy controls and in 17 participants with SCI over key points on dermatomes C2 to T4 on each side of the body. Light touch and pin prick ISNCSCI scores were tested at the same key dermatomes in SCI participants. In controls, EPT values were higher in older males (1.26±0.2 mA, mean±s.d.) compared with younger males (1.0±0.2 mA) and older females (0.9±0.2 mA), regardless of the dermatome and side tested. Fifteen out of the seventeen SCI participants showed that the level of sensory impairment detected by the EPT was below the level detected by the ISNCSCI (mean=4.5±2.4, range 1-9). The frequency distribution of EPTs was similar to older male controls in dermatomes above but not below the ISNCSCI sensory level. The difference between EPT and ISNCSCI sensory level was negatively correlated with the time post injury. The results show that, in the chronic stage of cervical SCI, the EPT reveals spared sensory function at lower (~5) spinal segments compared with the ISNCSCI sensory exam. It is hence found that the EPT is a sensitive tool to assess recovery of sensory function after chronic SCI.

  6. Reticulospinal plasticity after cervical spinal cord injury in the rat involves withdrawal of projections below the injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weishaupt, N; Hurd, C; Wei, D Z; Fouad, K

    2013-09-01

    Restoring voluntary fine motor control of the arm and hand is one of the main goals following cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Although the functional improvement achievable with rehabilitative training in rat models is frequently accompanied by corticospinal tract (CST) plasticity, CST rewiring alone seems insufficient to account for the observed recovery. Recent investigations in animal models of SCI have suggested that the reticulospinal tract (RtST) might contribute to mediating improved motor performance of the forelimb. Here we investigate whether the spared RtST can compensate for the loss of CST input and whether RtST projections rearrange in response to cervical SCI. Animals underwent unilateral ablation of the dorsal CST and rubrospinal tract at spinal level C4, while the ventral RtST projections were spared. At the end of the six-week recovery period, injured animals had made significant improvements in single pellet reaching. This was not accompanied by increased sprouting of the injured CST above the injury compared to uninjured control animals. Injury-induced changes in RtST fiber density within the gray matter, as well as in the number of RtST collaterals entering the gray matter or crossing the cord midline were minor above the injury. However, all analyses directly below the injured spinal level consistently point to a significant decrease of RtST projections. The mechanism and the functional relevance behind this new finding warrant further study. Our results also suggest that mechanisms other than anatomical plasticity, such as plastic changes on a cellular level, might be responsible for the observed spontaneous recovery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Skull traction for cervical spinal injury in Enugu: A 5‑year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-05

    Nov 5, 2015 ... Background: Treatment of cervical spine injury is the most challenging of all the injuries of the spine, and there is yet no agreement on the best method of care. Objective: We studied the complications and outcome of two skull traction devices used to treat cases of cervical spine injury in three centers in ...

  8. Survival analysis of malignant epidural spinal cord compression after palliative radiotherapy using Tokuhashi scoring system and the impact of systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mui, Wing Ho; Lam, Tai Chung; Wong, Frank Chi Sing; Sze, Wing King

    2017-08-29

    Previous studies have shown similar clinical outcomes of both single and multi-fraction (Fr) radiation therapy among malignant epidural spinal cord compression (MSCC) patients with poor prognosis; whereas, patients expected to have longer survival may require long-course radiotherapy to prevent local failure. However, such a poor prognosis risk group has not yet been clearly identified for use in daily clinical practice. We examined if the known predictive Tokuhashi scoring system could be adapted in MSCC patients treated with palliative radiation therapy. A retrospective review of the treatment outcomes of MSCC patients who received palliative radiotherapy from January 2014 to May 2015 was conducted. The patients were stratified into two groups according to the Tokuhashi scoring system: group 1 (score 8), expected survival >6 months. Their survival was tested against subsequent systemic therapy (chemotherapy, targeted or hormonal therapy) and other risk factors including age, primary site, visceral metastasis, baseline motor function, prior radiotherapy and radiotherapy fractionation (single or multiple). The outcomes of 119 patients were studied, 116 (97.5%) patients had already succumbed. The overall median survival was 55 days (range, 4-576 days). Ninety-three patients (78.2%) belonged to group 1. The median dose delivered was 25 Gy in 5 Frs [range, 7 Gy in 2 Frs-40 Gy in 10 Frs (to the cauda equina)]. Only nine patients (7.6%) received single-Fr radiotherapy, all belonging to Tokuhashi group 1. Patients belonging to group 1 had shorter median survival than group 2; 49 and 108 days, respectively (P=0.003). Among all the patients, subsequent systemic treatment [hazard ratio (HR) =0.407; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.236-0.702; P=0.001], non-visceral metastasis (HR =0.608; 95% CI, 0.387-0.956; P=0.031) and primary lung or breast or prostate cancer (P=0.029) were associated with better survival in multivariate analysis. For patients in group 1, primary breast or

  9. MRI features of epidural extramedullary hematopoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alorainy, Ibrahim A. E-mail: alorainy@ksu.edu.sa; Al-Asmi, Abdullah R.; Carpio, Raquel del

    2000-07-01

    A case of {beta}-thalassemia intermedia with spinal cord compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis, which was successfully treated by blood transfusion, is presented. Emphasis was made on the MRI appearance of extramedullary hematopoiesis on different pulse sequences. The theories that aimed to explain the involvement of the epidural space by extramedullary hematopoiesis are discussed.

  10. Perioperative effect of epidural dexmedetomidine with intrathecal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-10

    Jun 10, 2011 ... dexmedetomidine with 0.75% ropivacaine, and observed that epidural dexmedetomidine 1 mg/kg enhances motor and sensory blockade, and prolongs analgesia duration.15. The analgesic effect of dexmedetomidine is produced by the stimulation of the drug at spinal cord level.16 At the dorsal root neuron ...

  11. Influence of gravity compensation on kinematics and muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Marieke G. M.; Snoek, Govert J.; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Nene, Anand V.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many interventions in upper-limb rehabilitation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) use arm support (gravity compensation), however, its specific effects on kinematics and muscle activation characteristics in subjects with a CSCI are largely unknown We conducted a cross-sectional explorative

  12. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Endovascular embolisation of a cervical spinal AVF in a patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vascular abnormalities associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are well described. Spinal arterio-venous fistula (AVF) is a rare finding in NF1 and may present with neurological symptoms that require treatment. Management of spinal AVFs can be endovascular or surgical. We present a patient with known NF1 and ...

  14. Discordant lumbar epidural hematoma after caudal steroid injection: A case report (CARE-compliant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Ju; Chang, Young Jin; Jung, Wol Seon; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kim, Ju Ho; Jo, Youn Yi

    2017-06-01

    Caudal epidural injection is one of the conventional treatments of chronic back pain. Even though spinal epidural hematoma after caudal epidural injection is rare but it can cause serious neurologic complication. An 83-year-old woman taking cilostazol received caudal epidural steroid injection because of her chronic back pain. Six hours later, she experienced an acute hip pain which worsened with time. Magnetic resonance image showed acute cord compression due to a spinal epidural hematoma at L2-S1 level with concomitant central canal compromise at L2/3, L3/4 level. Emergency decompressive laminectomy and evacuation of the lumbar epidural hematoma were performed. All of her symptoms were resolved over the 72 hours following surgery. Continuous vigilance after caudal epidural injection is important to prevent catastrophic neurologic deterioration with early detection and early treatment.

  15. Hypercapnia Caused by a Therapeutic Dosage of Pregabalin in a Tetraplegic Patient With Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Kyung Hee; Choi, Eun Jung; Chang, Min Cheol; Yang, Hea-Eun

    2017-12-01

    Pregabalin is often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). We reported a patient with C5 [S(C5/C6)] ASIA Impairment Scale C SCI due to cervical myelopathy who presented CO2 retention when taking a therapeutic dosage of pregabalin. An 88-year-old patient with cervical SCI was transferred to the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation. When he had transferred, his neuropathic pain had been treated with 150-mg pregabalin per day (75 mg twice a day); however, he still exhibited severe neuropathic pain with a Numeric Pain Rating Scale score of 7 to 8. Dosage for the pregabalin increased from 150 mg/d (75 mg twice a day) to 225 mg/d (150 mg at morning and 75 mg at dinner). That afternoon, he presented drowsiness and confusion, and arterial blood gas analysis (ABGA) demonstrated respiratory acidosis with CO2 retention; pH, 7.312; PaCO2, 62.8 mm Hg; PaO2,58.9 mm Hg; HCO3 concentration, 30.8 mmol/L; base excess, 3.2 mmol/L; and oxygen saturation, 90.4%. Finally, he required tracheal intubation and ventilation. After 6 weeks, the patient was transferred to a general ward, and the follow-up ABGA and end-tidal CO2 showed normal range with the discontinuation of pregabalin. We demonstrated CO2 retention via ABGA in a patient with SCI due to cervical myelopathy who developed hypercapnia after taking a therapeutic dose of pregabalin. Physicians should pay particular attention to CO2 retention when prescribing a therapeutic dosage of pregabalin in a patient with cervical SCI.

  16. Incremental Hospital Cost and Length-of-stay Associated With Treating Adverse Events Among Medicare Beneficiaries Undergoing Cervical Spinal Fusion During Fiscal Year 2013 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Steven D; McGuire, Kevin J; Little, Kenneth M; Jevsevar, David; Shea, Kevin; Schlosser, Michael; Ambrose, Karen E; Simon, April W

    2017-10-15

    A retrospective study. To report the incremental hospital resources consumed with treating adverse events experienced by Medicare beneficiaries undergoing a two or three vertebrae level cervical spinal fusion. Hospitals are increasingly at financial risk for patients experiencing adverse events due "pay for performance." Little is known about incremental resources consumed when treating patients who experienced an adverse event after cervical spinal fusions. Fiscal years 2013 and 2014 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review file was used to identify 86,265 beneficiaries who underwent 2 or 3 vertebrae level cervical spinal fusion. International Classification of Diseases 9th Clinical Modification diagnostic and procedure codes were used to identify 10 adverse events. This study estimated both the observed and risk-adjusted incremental hospital resources consumed (cost [2014 US $] and length-of-stay) in treating beneficiaries experiencing each adverse event. Overall, 6.2% of beneficiaries undergoing cervical spinal fusion experienced at least one of the study's adverse events. Beneficiaries experiencing any complication consumed significantly more hospital resources (incremental cost of $28,638) and had longer length-of-stay (incremental stays of 9.1 days). After adjusting for patient demographics and comorbid conditions, incremental cost of treating adverse events ranged from $42,358 (infection) to $10,100 (dural tear). Adverse events frequently occur and add substantially to the hospital costs of patients undergoing cervical spinal fusion. Shared decision-making instruments should clearly provide these risk estimates to the patient before surgical consideration. Investment in activities that have been shown to reduce specific adverse events is warranted, and this study may allow health systems to prioritize performance improvement areas. 3.

  17. [History and Technique of Epidural Anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waurick, Katrin; Waurick, René

    2015-07-01

    In 1901, the first Epidural anesthesia via a caudal approach was independently described by two FrenchmanJean-Anthanase Sicard and Fernand Cathelin.. The Spanish military surgeon, Fidel Pagés Miravé, completed the lumbar approach successfully in 1921. The two possibilities for identification of the epidural space the "loss of resistance" technique and the technique of the "hanging drop" were developed by Achille Mario Dogliotti, an Italian, and Alberto Gutierrez, an Argentinean physician, at the same time. In 1956 John J. Bonica published the paramedian approach to the epidural space. As early as 1931 Eugene Aburel, a Romanian obstetrician, injected local anaesthetics via a silk catheter to perform lumbar obstetric Epidural analgesia. In 1949 the first successful continuous lumbar Epidural anaesthesia was reported by Manuel Martinez Curbelo, a Cuban. Epidural anaesthesia can be performed in sitting or lateral position in all segments of the spinal column via the median or paramedian approach. Different off-axis angles pose the challenge in learning the technique. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  18. TrkB gene therapy by adeno-associated virus enhances recovery after cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Zambrano, Juan M; Diaz Soto, Juan C; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Gransee, Heather M; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-02-01

    Unilateral cervical spinal cord hemisection at C2 (C2SH) interrupts descending bulbospinal inputs to phrenic motoneurons, paralyzing the diaphragm muscle. Recovery after C2SH is enhanced by brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling via the tropomyosin-related kinase subtype B (TrkB) receptor in phrenic motoneurons. The role for gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of TrkB to phrenic motoneurons is not known. The present study determined the therapeutic efficacy of intrapleural delivery of AAV7 encoding for full-length TrkB (AAV-TrkB) to phrenic motoneurons 3 days post-C2SH. Diaphragm EMG was recorded chronically in male rats (n=26) up to 21 days post-C2SH. Absent ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity was verified 3 days post-C2SH. A greater proportion of animals displayed recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity during eupnea by 14 and 21 days post-SH after AAV-TrkB (10/15) compared to AAV-GFP treatment (2/11; p=0.031). Diaphragm EMG amplitude increased over time post-C2SH (pAAV-TrkB treated animals displaying recovery achieved 48% of the pre-injury values compared to 27% in AAV-GFP treated animals. Phrenic motoneuron mRNA expression of glutamatergic AMPA and NMDA receptors revealed a significant, positive correlation (r(2)=0.82), with increased motoneuron NMDA expression evident in animals treated with AAV-TrkB and that displayed recovery after C2SH. Overall, gene therapy using intrapleural delivery of AAV-TrkB to phrenic motoneurons is sufficient to promote recovery of diaphragm activity, adding a novel potential intervention that can be administered after upper cervical spinal cord injury to improve impaired respiratory function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Delayed Intervention with Intermittent Hypoxia and Task Training Improves Forelimb Function in a Rat Model of Cervical Spinal Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser-Loose, Erin J; Hassan, Atiq; Mitchell, Gordon S; Muir, Gillian D

    2015-09-15

    The reduction of motor, sensory and autonomic function below the level of an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) has devastating consequences. One approach to restore function is to induce neural plasticity as a means of augmenting spontaneous functional recovery. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH-brief exposures to reduced O2 levels alternating with normal O2 levels) elicits plasticity in respiratory and nonrespiratory somatic spinal systems, including improvements in ladder walking performance in rats with incomplete SCI. Here, we determined whether delayed treatment with AIH, with or without concomitant motor training, could improve motor recovery in a rat model of incomplete cervical SCI. In a randomized, blinded, sham-controlled study, rats were exposed to AIH for 7 days beginning at 4 weeks post-SCI, after much spontaneous recovery on a horizontal ladder-crossing task had already occurred. For up to 2 months post-treatment, AIH-treated rats made fewer footslips on the ladder task compared with sham-treated rats. Importantly, concomitant ladder-specific motor training was needed to elicit AIH-induced improvements, such that AIH-treated SCI rats receiving no motor training or nontask-specific treadmill training during the treatment week did not show improvements over sham-treated rats with SCI. AIH treatment combined with task-specific training did not improve recovery on two different reach-to-grasp tasks, however, nor on tasks involving unskilled forepaw use. In brief, our results indicate that task-specific training is needed for AIH to improve ladder performance in a rat model of incomplete cervical SCI.

  20. Reliability of cervical lordosis and global sagittal spinal balance measurements in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Christophe; Ilharreborde, Brice; Azoulay, Robin; Sebag, Guy; Mazda, Keyvan

    2013-06-01

    Radiological reproducibility study. To assess intra and interobserver reliability of radiographic measurements for global sagittal balance parameters and sagittal spine curves, including cervical spine. Sagittal spine balance in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a main issue and many studies have been reported, showing that coronal and sagittal deformities often involve sagittal cervical unbalance. Global sagittal balance aims to obtain a horizontal gaze and gravity line at top of hips when subject is in a static position, involving adjustment of each spine curvature in the sagittal plane. To our knowledge, no study did use a methodologically validated imaging analysis tool able to appreciate sagittal spine contours and distances in AIS and especially in the cervical region. Lateral full-spine low-dose EOS radiographs were performed in 75 patients divided in three groups (control subjects, AIS, operated AIS). Three observers digitally analyzed twice each radiograph and 11 sagittal measures were collected for each image. Reliability was assessed calculating intraobserver Pearson's r correlation coefficient, interobserver intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) completed with a two-by-two Bland-Altman plot analysis. This measurement method has shown excellent intra and interobserver reliability in all parameters, sagittal curvatures, pelvic parameters and global sagittal balance. This study validated a simple and efficient tool in AIS sagittal contour analysis. It defined new relevant landmarks allowing to characterize cervical segmental curvatures and cervical involvement in global balance.

  1. [Complications related to epidural catheter in caesarean delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leykin, Y; Lucca, M

    2001-09-01

    A review of complications related to epidural catheters in caesarean delivery is presented. Catheters for prolongation of nerve blocks were first used in 1940s. Thereafter, there has been steady development in the design and plastic material technology of the different catheters. In the last decade the regional anaesthesia for caesarean section became very popular, as well as continuous increase in the use of epidural catheters. The anatomical changes of pregnancy like marked distension of the epidural veins resulted in increased risk of the complications due to the epidural catheter placement. It is likely that permanent neurologic sequelae due to regional anaesthesia in obstetrics almost never occur, while minor self-limiting complications do occur. The possible complications of epidural catheter techniques are: trauma, malposition and migration of the catheter, knotting and breaking, radiculopathy, dural puncture, subdural injection, abscess and infection, haematoma and wrong solution injection. Most of the malpositions of the epidural catheter can be avoided by a careful technique, advancing the catheter with no forceful movement and not more than 3 to 4 cm into epidural space. Broken parts of the catheters should be left as a rule within the spinal space. Test dose should be always done for continuous epidural anaesthesia. Early diagnosis and prompt appropriate treatment will usually lead to complete resolution of the neurological deficit even in cases of epidural haematoma or abscess.

  2. Morphology of Donor and Recipient Nerves Utilised in Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Limb Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Messina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Loss of hand function after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI impacts heavily on independence. Multiple nerve transfer surgery has been applied successfully after cervical SCI to restore critical arm and hand functions, and the outcome depends on nerve integrity. Nerve integrity is assessed indirectly using muscle strength testing and intramuscular electromyography, but these measures cannot show the manifestation that SCI has on the peripheral nerves. We directly assessed the morphology of nerves biopsied at the time of surgery, from three patients within 18 months post injury. Our objective was to document their morphologic features. Donor nerves included teres minor, posterior axillary, brachialis, extensor carpi radialis brevis and supinator. Recipient nerves included triceps, posterior interosseus (PIN and anterior interosseus nerves (AIN. They were fixed in glutaraldehyde, processed and embedded in Araldite Epon for light microscopy. Eighty percent of nerves showed abnormalities. Most common were myelin thickening and folding, demyelination, inflammation and a reduction of large myelinated axon density. Others were a thickened perineurium, oedematous endoneurium and Renaut bodies. Significantly, very thinly myelinated axons and groups of unmyelinated axons were observed indicating regenerative efforts. Abnormalities exist in both donor and recipient nerves and they differ in appearance and aetiology. The abnormalities observed may be preventable or reversible.

  3. Spontaneous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus epidural abscess in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connealy, Brendan D; Lovgren, Todd R; Tomich, Paul G; Smith, Carl V; Berg, Teresa G

    2010-08-01

    Epidural abscess is a rare complication of regional anesthesia, and spontaneous formation is even more uncommon. Diabetes mellitus, concomitant infection, intravenous drug use, and immune suppression are risk factors for spontaneous epidural abscess. A 29-year-old white woman presented at 28 weeks of estimated gestational age reporting an intermittent headache. She had Horner syndrome and was hospitalized. A cervicothoracic epidural abscess was diagnosed. Surgical decompression and parenteral antibiotics resulted in complete resolution of neurologic symptoms. Cultures were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureous. Spontaneous epidural abscess is a rare condition and diagnosis is often delayed. The finding of Horner syndrome led to imaging of the cervical spine and diagnosis of epidural abscess. Early intervention resulted in resolution of neurologic symptoms and a successful pregnancy outcome.

  4. Neural stem cell mediated recovery is enhanced by Chondroitinase ABC pretreatment in chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Suzuki

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs affect millions of people worldwide; the majority of whom are in the chronic phase of their injury. Unfortunately, most current treatments target the acute/subacute injury phase as the microenvironment of chronically injured cord consists of a well-established glial scar with inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs which acts as a potent barrier to regeneration. It has been shown that CSPGs can be degraded in vivo by intrathecal Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC to produce a more permissive environment for regeneration by endogenous cells or transplanted neural stem cells (NSCs in the subacute phase of injury. Using a translationally-relevant clip-contusion model of cervical spinal cord injury in mice we sought to determine if ChABC pretreatment could modify the harsh chronic microenvironment to enhance subsequent regeneration by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived NSCs (iPS-NSC. Seven weeks after injury-during the chronic phase-we delivered ChABC by intrathecal osmotic pump for one week followed by intraparenchymal iPS-NSC transplant rostral and caudal to the injury epicenter. ChABC administration reduced chronic-injury scar and resulted in significantly improved iPSC-NSC survival with clear differentiation into all three neuroglial lineages. Neurons derived from transplanted cells also formed functional synapses with host circuits on patch clamp analysis. Furthermore, the combined treatment led to recovery in key functional muscle groups including forelimb grip strength and measures of forelimb/hindlimb locomotion assessed by Catwalk. This represents important proof-of-concept data that the chronically injured spinal cord can be 'unlocked' by ChABC pretreatment to produce a microenvironment conducive to regenerative iPS-NSC therapy.

  5. Neural stem cell mediated recovery is enhanced by Chondroitinase ABC pretreatment in chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Ahuja, Christopher S; Salewski, Ryan P; Li, Lijun; Satkunendrarajah, Kajana; Nagoshi, Narihito; Shibata, Shinsuke; Fehlings, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) affect millions of people worldwide; the majority of whom are in the chronic phase of their injury. Unfortunately, most current treatments target the acute/subacute injury phase as the microenvironment of chronically injured cord consists of a well-established glial scar with inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) which acts as a potent barrier to regeneration. It has been shown that CSPGs can be degraded in vivo by intrathecal Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to produce a more permissive environment for regeneration by endogenous cells or transplanted neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subacute phase of injury. Using a translationally-relevant clip-contusion model of cervical spinal cord injury in mice we sought to determine if ChABC pretreatment could modify the harsh chronic microenvironment to enhance subsequent regeneration by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived NSCs (iPS-NSC). Seven weeks after injury-during the chronic phase-we delivered ChABC by intrathecal osmotic pump for one week followed by intraparenchymal iPS-NSC transplant rostral and caudal to the injury epicenter. ChABC administration reduced chronic-injury scar and resulted in significantly improved iPSC-NSC survival with clear differentiation into all three neuroglial lineages. Neurons derived from transplanted cells also formed functional synapses with host circuits on patch clamp analysis. Furthermore, the combined treatment led to recovery in key functional muscle groups including forelimb grip strength and measures of forelimb/hindlimb locomotion assessed by Catwalk. This represents important proof-of-concept data that the chronically injured spinal cord can be 'unlocked' by ChABC pretreatment to produce a microenvironment conducive to regenerative iPS-NSC therapy.

  6. Localized delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-expressing mesenchymal stem cells enhances functional recovery following cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gransee, Heather M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2015-02-01

    Neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are important in modulating neuroplasticity and promoting recovery after spinal cord injury. Intrathecal delivery of BDNF enhances functional recovery following unilateral spinal cord hemisection (SH) at C2, a well-established model of incomplete cervical spinal cord injury. We hypothesized that localized delivery of BDNF-expressing mesenchymal stem cells (BDNF-MSCs) would promote functional recovery of rhythmic diaphragm activity after SH. In adult rats, bilateral diaphragm electromyographic (EMG) activity was chronically monitored to determine evidence of complete SH at 3 days post-injury, and recovery of rhythmic ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity over time post-SH. Wild-type, bone marrow-derived MSCs (WT-MSCs) or BDNF-MSCs (2×10(5) cells) were injected intraspinally at C2 at the time of injury. At 14 days post-SH, green fluorescent protein (GFP) immunoreactivity confirmed MSCs presence in the cervical spinal cord. Functional recovery in SH animals injected with WT-MSCs was not different from untreated SH controls (n=10; overall, 20% at 7 days and 30% at 14 days). In contrast, functional recovery was observed in 29% and 100% of SH animals injected with BDNF-MSCs at 7 days and 14 days post-SH, respectively (n=7). In BDNF-MSCs treated SH animals at 14 days, root-mean-squared EMG amplitude was 63±16% of the pre-SH value compared with 12±9% in the control/WT-MSCs group. We conclude that localized delivery of BDNF-expressing MSCs enhances functional recovery of diaphragm muscle activity following cervical spinal cord injury. MSCs can be used to facilitate localized delivery of trophic factors such as BDNF in order to promote neuroplasticity following spinal cord injury.

  7. Evaluation with CT scans of gas collection in the epidural space. Evaluacion mediante TC de colecciones de gas en el espacio epidural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolledo Vicente, J.; Martinez San Millan, J.; Trujillo Peco, M.; Aunion Diaz, P.; Millan Juncos, J.M. (Hospital Ramon y Cajal. Departamento de Radiodiagnostico. Madrid (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    We present 9 cases of gas collection in the epidural space, revealed in CT scans of the spinal column. Five cases of herniated disc with accompanying vacuum, three of ''aerogen pseudocyst'' and a case of gas introduced iatrogenically via epidural installation catheter are included. (Author)

  8. Radiographic Analysis of Cervical and Spinal Alignment in Multilevel ACDF with Lordotic Interbody Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuura, Yoshihiro; Lemons, Alex; Lorenz, Eileen; Swafford, Rachel; Osborn, James; Cason, Garrick

    2017-01-01

    Restoration and maintenance of cervical lordosis is an important clinical parameter in spine surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which a multilevel anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF: greater than 3 levels) procedure restores cervical lordosis and the affect of increasing lordosis on sagittal vertical axis. We performed a retrospective radiographic analysis of 69 patients who underwent multilevel ACDF by 2 surgeons between 2013 and 2014. We measured the global and segmental sagittal alignment of the cervical spine using the cobb method at 4 time intervals (preop, post op 4wks, 10wks and 6 months) as well as the sagittal vertical axis (SVA) using both a C1-S1 and C7-S1 plumb line methods at 2 time intervals (preop and post op 4wks). Radiographs were measured by three reviewers. Interrater reliability was good to excellent for all measurements. Cervical lordosis significantly increased from preop 10.26° to 4 weeks postop 19.44° and was maintained up to 6 months 19.34 (p<0.0005). Segmental cervical lordosis was also significantly increased from preop 8.22° to post op at 4 weeks (20.26°) and was maintained at post op 10weeks 20.30° and post op 6 months 19.56° (p<0.0005). C7-S1 SVA and C1-S1 SVA also significantly increased from 12.04mm preop to 27.49mm post op 4 wks (p<0.0005) and -1.93mm preop to 8.67mm post op (p<0.0005) respectively. A change in C2-C7 lordosis positively correlated with a change in C7-SVA and C1-SVA (r=0.37, P<0.005, and r=0.312, p<0.05 respectively). Multilevel ACDF significantly increases and maintains both segmental and global cervical lordosis up to 6 months after surgery. Increasing C2-C7 global lordosis is correlated with increasing positive sagittal vertical axis. Level of evidence: IV.

  9. Cervical Spinal Cord Atrophy Profile in Adult SMN1-Linked SMA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed-Mounir El Mendili

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the topography of motor deficits in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA remain unknown. We investigated the profile of spinal cord atrophy (SCA in SMN1-linked SMA, and its correlation with the topography of muscle weakness.Eighteen SMN1-linked SMA patients type III/V and 18 age/gender-matched healthy volunteers were included. Patients were scored on manual muscle testing and functional scales. Spinal cord was imaged using 3T MRI system. Radial distance (RD and cord cross-sectional area (CSA measurements in SMA patients were compared to those in controls and correlated with strength and disability scores.CSA measurements revealed a significant cord atrophy gradient mainly located between C3 and C6 vertebral levels with a SCA rate ranging from 5.4% to 23% in SMA patients compared to controls. RD was significantly lower in SMA patients compared to controls in the anterior-posterior direction with a maximum along C4 and C5 vertebral levels (p-values < 10-5. There were no correlations between atrophy measurements, strength and disability scores.Spinal cord atrophy in adult SMN1-linked SMA predominates in the segments innervating the proximal muscles. Additional factors such as neuromuscular junction or intrinsic skeletal muscle defects may play a role in more complex mechanisms underlying weakness in these patients.

  10. Epicritic Sensation in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Diagnostic Gains Beyond Testing Light Touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velstra, Inge-Marie; Bolliger, Marc; Baumberger, Michael; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Curt, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Applied as a bedside test of gross dorsal column function, the testing of light touch (LT) sensation is of high clinical value in the diagnosis of human spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the assessment of overall dorsal column deficit by testing only LT may be limited, because the dorsal column

  11. Only spinal fixation as treatment of prolapsed cervical intervertebral disc in patients presenting with myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Goel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Spinal segmental fixation aiming at arthrodesis with or without distraction of facets and without any direct surgical manipulation in the disc space or removal of the prolapsed portion of the disc can be considered in the armamentarium of the surgeon.

  12. Skull traction for cervical spinal injury in Enugu: A 5‑year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty‑one had the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Grade A whereas 64 had incomplete cord injury of ASIA Grades B–E. Forty‑eight had Crutchfield traction whereas 57 had Gardner‑Wells traction. At the end of treatment, no patient improved among those with ASIA Grades A and B. All the 12 cases of mortality ...

  13. Delineation of the white and gray matter of the normal human cervical spinal cord using diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayoshi, Kensuke; Ito, Yoshinori; Monzen, Yoshio; Kimura, Shojiro [Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital (Japan); Yamaguchi, Juichiro

    1998-09-01

    To delineate the white and gray matter of the normal human cervical spinal cord, diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging (DW-EPI) was performed in 11 healthy volunteers. Three axial (X-, Y- and Z-axis) anisotrophic diffusion-weighted images were obtained on a 1.5 T superconducting clinical unit using a single-shot DW-EPI sequence. On X- and Y-axis DWIs the white and gray matter could be well differentiated: the former showed high intensity and the latter low intensity. Anterior columns were clearly visible, whereas posterior columns were not. On Z-axis DWI the white and gray matter could not be differentiated at all, because both showed low intensity. In conclusion, DW-EPI can clearly delineate the white and gray matter of the cervical spinal cord, and this technique will be useful to evaluate white matter disorders such as ischemic or demyelinating disease. (author)

  14. An Autopsy Case of Respiratory Failure Induced by Repetitive Cervical Spinal Cord Damage due to Abnormal Movement of the Neck in Athetoid Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Yo-Ichi; Koshihara, Hiroshi; Oguchi, Kenya; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Ohara, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    We herein report the clinical and autopsy findings of a 48-year-old right-handed man with athetoid cerebral palsy who suffered from cervical myelopathy due to abnormal neck movement, and who died of respiratory failure. Pathologically, the external appearance of the ventral surface of the cervical spinal cord revealed a linear indentation running obliquely at the level between the C4 and C5 segments. In the most severely compressed lesion, the gray matter was predominantly affected and severely atrophic. Microscopically, clusters of oligodendrocytes associated with thinly myelinated axons were also observed in the lateral funiculus. The latter findings are unique, and could be interpreted as regenerative and/or restorative phenomena of the central nervous system following chronic repetitive spinal cord compression.

  15. Long descending cervical propriospinal neurons differ from thoracic propriospinal neurons in response to low thoracic spinal injury

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    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propriospinal neurons, with axonal projections intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than supraspinal neurons after axotomy due to spinal cord injury (SCI. Our previous work focused on the response of axotomized short thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons following a low thoracic SCI (T9 spinal transection or moderate spinal contusion injury in the rat. The present investigation analyzes the intrinsic response of cervical propriospinal neurons having long descending axons which project into the lumbosacral enlargement, long descending propriospinal tract (LDPT axons. These neurons also were axotomized by T9 spinal injury in the same animals used in our previous study. Results Utilizing laser microdissection (LMD, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we studied LDPT neurons (located in the C5-C6 spinal segments between 3-days, and 1-month following a low thoracic (T9 spinal cord injury. We examined the response of 89 genes related to growth factors, cell surface receptors, apoptosis, axonal regeneration, and neuroprotection/cell survival. We found a strong and significant down-regulation of ~25% of the genes analyzed early after injury (3-days post-injury with a sustained down-regulation in most instances. In the few genes that were up-regulated (Actb, Atf3, Frs2, Hspb1, Nrap, Stat1 post-axotomy, the expression for all but one was down-regulated by 2-weeks post-injury. We also compared the uninjured TPS control neurons to the uninjured LDPT neurons used in this experiment for phenotypic differences between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons. We found significant differences in expression in 37 of the 84 genes examined between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons with LDPT neurons exhibiting a significantly higher base line expression for all but 3 of these genes compared to TPS neurons. Conclusions Taken collectively these data indicate a broad overall down

  16. Epidural blood patch: A study on an experimental model

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    S K Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Epidural blood patch has been used to treat spinal headache with varying success. An experimental model was designed to ascertain whether an epidural blood patch can be used to seal the needle puncture sites in dural repair. Materials and Methods: Bovine dura was secured to the lower end of an open-ended calibrated plastic cylinder. Multiple interrupted stitches were applied over a 02 cm length of the dura without any incision. The cylinder was filled with colored saline gradually with t...

  17. SEGMENTAL EPIDURAL ANAESTHESIA FOR INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

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    Sachidanand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidural anaesthesia is suitable as a sole agent for lower abdominal surgery and surgery on lower limbs. It has some definite advantages over spinal anaesthesia like avoidance of post spinal headache, minimal chances of meningitis, and minimal chances of nausea and vomiting in postoperative period. But administration of conventional dosage of local epidural anaesthetics (15ml and above for surgical anaesthesia frequently results in multiple hemodynamic changes, including decreases in chronotropism, inotro pism, dromotropism, systemic vascular resistance, cardiac output, and myocardial oxygen consumption. The segmental epidural block denotes the use of a small volume enough to block only the segments involved in the field of surgery. AIM: To study the effect iveness of segmental epidural anaesthesia for inguinal hernia repair. DESIGN: R andomized control study. METHODS: 100 pts belonging to ASA PS I & II posted for inguinal hernia repair given 5ml of 0.5% bupivacaine through epidural route at L1 - L2 level and a fter conforming the adequacy and level of analgesia, the surgery was commenced. If the patient complained of pain during needle prick, then injected local anaesthetic (0.5% Bupivacaine with an incremental dosage of 1ml at a time, till the complete onset o f analgesia Pulse Rate and Blood Pressure were recorded at an interval of 1 minute for first 5 minutes and then every 5 minutes till the end of the surgery. Oxygen saturation and ECG monitoring was done continuously. Onset of analgesia, level of analgesia ( P re & post operatively, duration of analgesia, total dosage of local anaesthetic used were recorded. Complications like bradycardia, hypotension, respiratory depression, shivering, nausea and vomiting, sweating and inadvertent dural puncture were recorde d. RESULTS: 53% of patients had excellent quality of analgesia and relaxation. 34% patients had good quality analgesia and relaxation, mild discomfort while handling sac

  18. Epidural failure rate using a standardised definition.

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    Thangamuthu, A; Russell, I F; Purva, M

    2013-11-01

    There is no globally-accepted definition of epidural failure; this leads to wide differences in reported failure rates. A definition of epidural failure was standardised using a modified Delphi approach involving senior obstetric anaesthetists in the UK. Using this definition, epidural failures were calculated in our institution. Following clinical governance approval, anonymised data from 1521 epidurals inserted between September 2010 and December 2011 were collected from our database. Details included pain relief 45 min from the start of the procedure, accidental dural puncture, epidural re-siting, maternal satisfaction, time of insertion and positioning for insertion. The overall failure rate was 23%. Individual failure rates for trainees were: Year 2, 26.8%; Year 3, 26.3%; Year 4, 21.4%; Year 5, 25%; Year 6, 18.5%; and Year 7, 13.5%. Epidural re-site rates for trainees were: Year 2, 6.5%; Year 3, 3.5%; Year 4, 4%; Year 5 and above, 1.5%. Cervical dilatation, time of day and position for insertion did not have a statistically significant association with the failure rate. However, the failure rate of the Year 2, Year 3, and Year 4 trainees was significantly higher when compared to that of Year 5 and above. The re-site rate was statistically higher for Year 2 and Year 4 trainees when compared to those of Year 5 and above. The accidental dural puncture rate was statistically higher among Year 3 trainees when compared to Year 5 and above. The study identified epidural failure rates using a standardised definition. This information could be used to guide training decisions and to support doctors during their training period. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Epidural Anesthesia in a Patient with High Cardiac Risk

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    Tuğba Doğu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac morbidity is the most common cause postoperative of mortality furthermore anesthesia technics are associated with cardiac morbidity and mortality. A 48-year-old male, 90 kg, ASA physical status IV patient underwent femoropopliteal bypass under epidural anesthesia. Comorbidities included atrial fibrillation, dilated cardiomyopathy and 20%  left ventricular ejection fraction. Epidural anesthesia was established with bupivacaine and fentanyl at L3-L4 intervertebral space. Hemodynamic stability and pain relief were established during and after the surgery. We consider that epidural anesthesia is preferable as an alternative regarding the risks of spinal anesthesia and general anesthesia for high cardiac risky patients.

  20. Association of myelopathy scores with cervical sagittal balance and normalized spinal cord volume: analysis of 56 preoperative cases from the AOSpine North America Myelopathy study.

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    Smith, Justin S; Lafage, Virginie; Ryan, Devon J; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank J; Patel, Alpesh A; Brodke, Darrel S; Arnold, Paul M; Riew, K Daniel; Traynelis, Vincent C; Radcliff, Kris; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Fehlings, Michael G; Ames, Christopher P

    2013-10-15

    Post hoc analysis of prospectively collected data. Development of methods to determine in vivo spinal cord dimensions and application to correlate preoperative alignment, myelopathy, and health-related quality-of-life scores in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). CSM is the leading cause of spinal cord dysfunction. The association between cervical alignment, sagittal balance, and myelopathy has not been well characterized. This was a post hoc analysis of the prospective, multicenter AOSpine North America CSM study. Inclusion criteria for this study required preoperative cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neutral sagittal cervical radiography. Techniques for MRI assessment of spinal cord dimensions were developed. Correlations between imaging and health-related quality-of-life scores were assessed. Fifty-six patients met inclusion criteria (mean age = 55.4 yr). The modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (mJOA) scores correlated with C2-C7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA) (r = -0.282, P = 0.035). Spinal cord volume correlated with cord length (r = 0.472, P sagittal balance (C2-C7 SVA) to myelopathy severity. We found a moderate negative correlation in kyphotic patients of cord volume and cross-sectional area to mJOA scores. The opposite (positive correlation) was found for lordotic patients, suggesting a relationship of cord volume to myelopathy that differs on the basis of sagittal alignment. It is interesting to note that sagittal balance but not kyphosis is tied to myelopathy score. Future work will correlate alignment changes to cord morphology changes and myelopathy outcomes. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: This is the first study to correlate sagittal balance (C2-C7 SVA) to myelopathy severity. We found a moderate negative correlation in kyphotic patients of cord volume and cross-sectional area to mJOA scores. The opposite (positive correlation) was found for lordotic patients, suggesting a relationship of cord volume to myelopathy that differs on

  1. Distribution of serotonin 2A and 2C receptor mRNA expression in the cervical ventral horn and phrenic motoneurons following spinal cord hemisection.

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    Basura, G J; Zhou, S Y; Walker, P D; Goshgarian, H G

    2001-06-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury leads to a disruption of bulbospinal innervation from medullary respiratory centers to phrenic motoneurons. Animal models utilizing cervical hemisection result in inhibition of ipsilateral phrenic nerve activity, leading to paralysis of the hemidiaphragm. We have previously demonstrated a role for serotonin (5-HT) as one potential modulator of respiratory recovery following cervical hemisection, a mechanism that likely occurs via 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2C receptors. The present study was designed to specifically examine if 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2C receptors are colocalized with phrenic motoneurons in both intact and spinal-hemisected rats. Adult female rats (250-350 g; n = 6 per group) received a left cervical (C2) hemisection and were injected with the fluorescent retrograde neuronal tracer Fluorogold into the left hemidiaphragm. Twenty-four hours later, animals were killed and spinal cords processed for in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Using (35)S-labeled cRNA probes, cervical spinal cords were probed for 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA expression and double-labeled using an antibody to Fluorogold to detect phrenic motoneurons. Expression of both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA was detected in motoneurons of the cervical ventral horn. Despite positive expression of both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA-hybridization signal over phrenic motoneurons, only 5-HT2A silver grains achieved a signal-to-noise ratio representative of colocalization. 5-HT2A mRNA levels in identified phrenic motoneurons were not significantly altered following cervical hemisection compared to sham-operated controls. Selective colocalization of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA with phrenic motoneurons may have implications for recently observed 5-HT2A receptor-mediated regulation of respiratory activity and/or recovery in both intact and injury-compromised states. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. Unusual case of persistent Horner′s syndrome following epidural anaesthesia and caesarean section

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    Shubhra Goel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a rare case of persistent Horner′s syndrome following epidural anesthesia and Caesarean section. A 33-year-old female presented with persistent ptosis and miosis following epidural anesthesia and Caesarian section several months prior. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA of head, neck, and chest were unremarkable. Medline search using terms Horner′s, epidural, spinal anesthesia, delivery, childbirth, Caesarian, and pregnancy identified 31 articles describing Horner′s syndrome in obstetric epidural anesthesia, of which 11 were following Caesarean section. The increased incidence of Horner′s syndrome in the setting of epidural anesthesia in pregnancy may be related to epidural venous engorgement and cephalic spread of the local anaesthetic, with disruption in the oculosympathetic pathway. It is important to include recent epidural anesthesia within the differential diagnosis of acute Horner′s syndrome in a postpartum female. Rarely, the ptosis may be permanent and require surgical intervention.

  3. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Diskectomy with Percutaneous Epidural Neuroplasty in Lumbar Disk Herniation: Technical Note.

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    Lee, Hyeong-Jin; Kim, Jin-Sung; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik

    2017-02-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar diskectomy and percutaneous epidural neuroplasty is a commonly used minimally invasive spinal surgery in lumbar disk herniation. But to our knowledge, there is no report about the results of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar diskectomy with percutaneous epidural neuroplasty. We did this study to evaluate the effect of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar diskectomy with percutaneous epidural neuroplasty in lumbar disk herniation. We report a series of cases about techniques and results of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar diskectomy with percutaneous epidural neuroplasty in lumbar disk herniation, as well as introduce technical procedures and advantages. Seven patients improved axial back pain with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar diskectomy with percutaneous epidural neuroplasty and had no complications. The percutaneous endoscopic lumbar diskectomy with percutaneous epidural neuroplasty has many advantages with removing lumbar disk herniation in procedures. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar diskectomy with percutaneous epidural neuroplasty is a safe and effective surgical method in lumbar disk herniation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cervical Laminoplasty for Multilevel Cervical Myelopathy

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    Murali Krishna Sayana; Hassan Jamil; Ashley Poynton

    2011-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy can result from degenerative cervical spondylosis, herniated disk material, osteophytes, redundant ligamentum flavum, or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Surgical intervention for multi-level myelopathy aims to decompress the spinal cord and maintain stability of the cervical spine. Laminoplasty was major surgical advancement as laminectomy resulted in kyphosis and unsatisfactory outcomes. Hirabayashi popularised the expansive open door lami...

  5. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging may show abnormalities in the normal-appearing cervical spinal cord from patients with multiple sclerosis

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    Fernanda Miraldi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord (NASC in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS compared to controls, using diffusion tensor MR imaging. Methods We studied 32 patients with MS and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD and mean diffusivity (MD were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results At C2, FA value was decreased in MS patients. Besides, RD value was higher in MS than in controls. At C7, MD values were increased in MS. Conclusion The NASC in the right column of the cervical spinal cord showed abnormal FA, RD and MD values, which is possibly related to demyelination, since the FA abnormality was related to the RD and not to the AD.

  6. Distinct development of the glycinergic terminals in the ventral and dorsal horns of the mouse cervical spinal cord.

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    Sunagawa, Masanobu; Shimizu-Okabe, Chigusa; Kim, Jeongtae; Kobayashi, Shiori; Kosaka, Yoshinori; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Matsushita, Masayuki; Okabe, Akihito; Takayama, Chitoshi

    2017-02-20

    In the spinal cord, glycine and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) are inhibitory neurotransmitters. However, the ontogeny of the glycinergic network remains unclear. To address this point, we examined the developmental formation of glycinergic terminals by immunohistochemistry for glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2), a marker of glycinergic terminals, in developing mouse cervical spinal cord. Furthermore, the developmental localization of GlyT2 was compared with that of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), a marker of GABAergic terminals, and vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), a marker of inhibitory terminals, by single and double immunolabeling. GlyT2-positive dots (glycinergic terminals) were first detected in the marginal zone on embryonic day 14 (E14). In the ventral horn, they were detected at E16 and increased in observed density during postnatal development. Until postnatal day 7 (P7), GAD-positive dots (GABAergic terminals) were dominant and GlyT2 immunolabeling was localized at GAD-positive dots. During the second postnatal week, GABAergic terminals markedly decreased and glycinergic terminals became dominant. In the dorsal horn, glycinergic terminals were detected at P0 in lamina IV and P7 in lamina III and developmentally increased. GlyT2 was also localized at GAD-positive dots, and colocalizing dots were dominant at P21. VGAT-positive dots (inhibitory terminals) continued to increase until P21. These results suggest that GABAergic terminals first appear during embryonic development and may often change to colocalizing terminals throughout the gray matter during development. The colocalizing terminals may remain in the dorsal horn, whereas in the ventral horn, colocalizing terminals may give rise to glycinergic terminals. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Similarities and differences in cervical and thoracolumbar multisegmental motor responses and the combined use for testing spinal circuitries

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    Sabbahi, Mohamed A.; Uzun, Selda; Ovak Bittar, Fikriye; Sengul, Yesim

    2014-01-01

    Study design Experimental study. Objective To determine similarities and differences of C7 and T11–12 multisegmental motor responses (MMR) studies for the upper limbs (UL) and lower limbs (LL). Settings Neuroscience Lab, TWU (School of Physical Therapy, TX, USA). Methods C7 and T11–12 percutaneous electrical stimulations were applied while recording muscle action potentials from ULs and LLs. Results The procedure of cervical MMR (CMMR) was easier in application than thoracolumbar MMR (TMMR), requiring less current intensities but cause more “jolts” in the trapezius/shoulder complex, due to close proximity of the stimulation electrodes. CMMR evoked large amplitude motor responses in the millivolts range in (UL) muscles, but smaller amplitude signal in (LL) muscles (in microvolts). TMMR evoked large amplitude motor responses in both UL and LL (in millivolts). The MMR amplitude was generally larger in the UL as compared to the LL, in the distal limb muscles more than in the proximal limb muscles. CMMR and TMMR for the UL were comparable in amplitude, latencies and action potential shapes. Signal latencies were longer for distal limb muscles as compared to proximal limb muscles and were slightly longer for LL as compared to UL muscles. MMR signals were either biphasic or triphasic in shape. Conclusion CMMR and TMMR have similarities and differences in the methods and recording signal that must be considered during its clinical applications. Comparing the signal of the UL muscles with CMMR and TMMR could be a useful test for the integrity of the ascending and descending spinal pathways in patients with spinal cord injuries and diseases. PMID:24621020