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Sample records for cervical mucus plug

  1. The viscoelastic properties of the cervical mucus plug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær Bastholm, Sara; Becher, Naja; Stubbe, Peter Reimer;

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the viscoelastic properties of cervical mucus plugs (CMPs) shed during labor at term. Spontaneously shed cervical mucus plugs from healthy women in active labor, were tested. The viscoelastic properties of cervical mucus plugs were investigated...

  2. The viscoelastic properties of the cervical mucus plug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastholm, Sara K.; Becher, Naja; Stubbe, Peter Reimer;

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo characterize the viscoelastic properties of cervical mucus plugs (CMPs) shed during labor at term. DesignExperimental research. SettingDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Population/SampleSpontaneously shed CMPs from 18 healthy women in active...

  3. Clearance of a Mucus Plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Shiyao; Zheng, Ying; Grotberg, James B.

    2008-11-01

    Mucus plugging may occur in pulmonary airways in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis. How to clear the mucus plug is essential and of fundamental importance. Mucus is known to have a yield stress and a mucus plug behaves like a solid plug when the applied stresses are below its yield stress τy. When the local stresses reaches τy, the plug starts to move and can be cleared out of the lung. It is then of great importance to examine how the mucus plug deforms and what is the minimum pressure required to initiate its movement. The present study used the finite element method (FEM) to study the stress distribution and deformation of a solid mucus plug under different pressure loads using ANSYS software. The maximum shear stress is found to occur near the rear transition region of the plug, which can lead to local yielding and flow. The critical pressure increases linearly with the plug length and asymptotes when the plug length is larger than the half channel width. Experimentally a mucus simulant is used to study the process of plug deformation and critical pressure difference required for the plug to propagate. Consistently, the fracture is observed to start at the rear transition region where the plug core connects the films. However, the critical pressure is observed to be dependent on not only the plug length but also the interfacial shape.

  4. Post-traumatic bronchial mucus plug leading to pneumonectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan M.S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt trauma of the chest is not uncommon these days. By far, the most important cause of significant blunt chest trauma is motor vehicle accidents. Pedestrians struck by vehicles, falls from height, blast injuries and acts of violence are other causative mechanisms. Most of the blunt trauma cases need no operative intervention and can be managed by supportive procedures. Aim: We present a case of a 10-year old boy who had blunt trauma to chest due to fall from height. Findings: The patient was in respiratory distress and developed surgical emphysema and pneumothorax on the left side. He was managed by putting in a chest drain on the left side. Patient improved and was discharged .He again developed respiratory distress 15 days later. On bronchoscopic examination, an obstruction was found just distal to the carina in the left bronchus. Several futile attempts were made to retrieve the obstructing material. Hence, mucus plug was removed through left bronchotomy. There was no improvement in the ventilation of the left lung for 7 days. Bronchoscopic suction was done. All the measures failed and the lung remained collapsed. Patient underwent pneumonectomy as the last treatment option available in our hospital. At the time of reporting this case, patient was doing well. Conclusion: Chest physiotherapy helps in reducing lung collapse. If patient is reluctant to chest physiotherapy and coughing, it can lead to accumulation of respiratory secretions and formation of mucus plug. This mucus plug can cause collapse of the lung and ill consequences.

  5. Crystallization of Bovine Cervical Mucus at Oestrus: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Cortés

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bovine cervical mucus changes its biochemical composition and biophysical properties due to the variations in sex steroid levels during the oestrous cycle. As a consequence of oestrogen rise, cervical mucus is produced in larger amounts at oestrus—a stage also characterized by an increase in mucus crystallization when observed under light microscopy. The objective of this article is to provide an updated review of the main aspects regarding crystallization of bovine cervical mucus. First, it makes reference to the composition of cervical mucus and the critical functions that this secretion exerts on bovine reproductive physiology, as well as in other species. Then, the article deals with the phenomenon of crystallization observed in cervical mucus, describing the main models used to classify the crystalline patterns observable in mucus at oestrus stage (some of them resembling ferns, palm leaves and stellar patterns, among others. Finally, it addresses the importance of the phenomenon of cervical mucus crystallization for the understanding of bovine reproductive physiology.

  6. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... evaluation of a female with chronic infertility, to determine the time of ovulation and the penetrability of... device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  7. Non-parametric Bayesian modeling of cervical mucus symptom

    OpenAIRE

    Bin, Riccardo De; Scarpa, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the cervical mucus symptom is useful to identify the period of maximum fertility of a woman. In this paper we analyze the daily evolution of the cervical mucus symptom during the menstrual cycle, based on the data collected in two retrospective studies, in which the mucus symptom is treated as an ordinal variable. To produce our statistical model, we follow a non-parametric Bayesian approach. In particular, we use the idea of non-parametric mixtures of rounded continuous kerne...

  8. The inhibition of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 activity by crude and purified human pregnancy plug mucus and mucins in an inhibition assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoeman Leann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The female reproductive tract is amongst the main routes for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV transmission. Cervical mucus however is known to protect the female reproductive tract from bacterial invasion and fluid loss and regulates and facilitates sperm transport to the upper reproductive tract. The purpose of this study was to purify and characterize pregnancy plug mucins and determine their anti-HIV-1 activity in an HIV inhibition assay. Methods Pregnancy plug mucins were purified by caesium chloride density-gradient ultra-centrifugation and characterized by Western blotting analysis. The anti-HIV-1 activities of the crude pregnancy plug mucus and purified pregnancy plug mucins was determined by incubating them with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells. Results The pregnancy plug mucus had MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC and MUC5B. The HIV inhibition assay revealed that while the purified pregnancy plug mucins inhibit HIV-1 activity by approximately 97.5%, the crude pregnancy plug mucus failed to inhibit HIV-1 activity. Conclusion Although it is not clear why the crude sample did not inhibit HIV-1 activity, it may be that the amount of mucins in the crude pregnancy plug mucus (which contains water, mucins, lipids, nucleic acids, lactoferrin, lysozyme, immunoglobulins and ions, is insufficient to cause viral inhibition or aggregation.

  9. RESEARCHES ON THE ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE OF CERVICAL MUCUS IN COWS

    OpenAIRE

    IZABELA MARTIN; ANGELA STOICA; PAULA POŞAN; LAURA URDEŞ

    2013-01-01

    To succeed in artificial insemination and to produce the fecundation in cows it isnecessary to have knowledge about optimal time of ovulation. Such possibilityappears using the values of electrical resistance of cervical mucus. The smallestvalues are obtained during the ovulation due to the pH modification influenced by theestrogens. The purpose of the paper was to determine the electrical resistance of thecervical mucus in cows with clinical signs of estrus, depending on females’ age. Also,t...

  10. RESEARCHES ON THE ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE OF CERVICAL MUCUS IN COWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IZABELA MARTIN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To succeed in artificial insemination and to produce the fecundation in cows it isnecessary to have knowledge about optimal time of ovulation. Such possibilityappears using the values of electrical resistance of cervical mucus. The smallestvalues are obtained during the ovulation due to the pH modification influenced by theestrogens. The purpose of the paper was to determine the electrical resistance of thecervical mucus in cows with clinical signs of estrus, depending on females’ age. Also,the electrical resistance of the cervical mucus in cows in different physiologicalstages (pregnant, no pregnant was measured. The ovulation detector DRAMINSKIwas used. This equipment allows to obtained a quickly and precise rapport on thephysiological stage of the cow. It can be detected the cow with atypical ovulation,irregular ovulation. This method improve the insemination efficiency, allowsdetecting early gestation period or the moment of ovulation. All these have a positiveinfluence on the development strategy of the farm and improve the economicperformances.

  11. In situ variation of cervical mucus pH during exposure to atmospheric air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa C.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine if exposure of cervical mucus to air during specular examination could modify mucus pH. Detection of changes is justified because of their possible interference with sperm-mucus interaction, since an acidic pH is unfavorable to sperm penetration and is associated with infertility due to the cervical factor. Twenty women with good quality mucus were evaluated. pH measurements of ecto- and endocervical mucus were made in situ using a glass electrode after 0-, 5- and 10-min exposure to air. There was a progressive alkalinization of mucus pH. Mean values of ectocervical mucus pH were 6.91, 7.16 and 7.27, while mean values of endocervical mucus pH were 7.09, 7.34 and 7.46 at 0, 5 and 10 min, respectively. Significant differences were found between the mean values obtained at 0 and 5 min, and at 0 and 10 min (P<0.05, whereas the differences in mean values at 5 and 10 min were not significant at either site. We conclude that 5 to 10 min of exposure to atmospheric air affects cervical mucus pH in a significant way. Since tests used to evaluate sperm-mucus interaction generally have not considered this possibility, we suggest that they should be performed immediately after mucus collection in order to avoid misinterpretation of the results.

  12. High-attenuation mucus plugs on MDCT in a child with cystic fibrosis: potential cause and differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Andrey; Brown, Shanaree [Indiana University Medical School, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Applegate, Kimberly E. [Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Howenstine, Michelle [Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Pulmonology, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2007-06-15

    High-attenuation mucus plugging is a rare finding in both adults and children. When it occurs, the field of differential diagnoses is typically quite small and includes acute hemorrhage, aspiration of radiodense material, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). The last of these three diagnoses is the most difficult to make, although ABPA is more commonly seen in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) or asthma. ABPA is radiographically characterized by recurrent mucus plugging, atelectasis, and central bronchiectasis. Thus far, high-attenuation mucus plugs have only been reported in adults. We report a rare case of a child with CF who had high-attenuation mucus plugs and atelectasis that raised the possibility of ABPA. We discuss the differential diagnoses of this finding and the role of multidetector CT in these children. (orig.)

  13. High-attenuation mucus plugs on MDCT in a child with cystic fibrosis: potential cause and differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-attenuation mucus plugging is a rare finding in both adults and children. When it occurs, the field of differential diagnoses is typically quite small and includes acute hemorrhage, aspiration of radiodense material, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). The last of these three diagnoses is the most difficult to make, although ABPA is more commonly seen in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) or asthma. ABPA is radiographically characterized by recurrent mucus plugging, atelectasis, and central bronchiectasis. Thus far, high-attenuation mucus plugs have only been reported in adults. We report a rare case of a child with CF who had high-attenuation mucus plugs and atelectasis that raised the possibility of ABPA. We discuss the differential diagnoses of this finding and the role of multidetector CT in these children. (orig.)

  14. Effects of chelating agents on the rheological property of cervical mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi H; Wang, Yicheng; Shin, Sang-Chul; Chien, Yie W

    2002-06-01

    As an ongoing effort to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the calcium-dependent fertility regulation process, the viscoelastic properties of the mucus obtained from lamb cervix and human semen, as well as their water and total protein contents after exposure to EDTA, a chelating agent, or Nonoxynol-9 (N-9), a spermicidal agent, were examined. The viscosity was measured using a Cone Plate Digital Viscometer, while the water and total protein contents were determined by the lyophilization process and the Lowry method, respectively. The significant changes in the rheological properties of mucus, such as its viscosity and the water content, upon exposure to EDTA were demonstrated. The viscosity of cervical mucus and human semen were significantly increased by EDTA treatment (as compared to the controls): lamb cervical mucus (2.9 +/- 0.3 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.3 cps) and human semen (5.0 +/- 0.3 vs. 4.3 +/- 0.3 cps), respectively. The hydration rate was decreased by EDTA treatment as compared with the control (93.6 +/- 0.7 vs. 96.8 +/- 0.8%). Among tested samples, the reduction in the percentage of sperm penetration through the cervical mucus was the highest in the mucus containing EDTA, which had the lowest water content (93.6 +/- 0.7%), indicating that there is a positive relationship between the hydration rate of the cervical mucus and its ability to permit the penetration of spermatozoa. This result indicates that spermicidal activity exerted by high concentrations of EDTA is in part due to its effect on the rheological properties of cervical mucus or semen. PMID:12127644

  15. Cervical mucus symptom and daily fecundability: First results from a new data base

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, Bernardo; Mion, Arianna; Passarin, Katia; Scarpa, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    A prospective study allowed, with the collaboration of Italian centres providing services on natural family planning, to collect data on 2755 menstrual cycles of 193 women. With the information available on daily characteristics of the cervical mucus and intercourse episodes, was constructed a data base. Taking the day of the peak mucus as a conventional marker of ovulation, the base allowed to identify length (12 days) and location of a window of potential fertility, with the highest level o...

  16. LIF analysis of cervical mucus and amniotic fluid for maturity monitoring in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkuviene, Aurelija; Auksorius, Egidijus; Ramasauskaite, Diana; Smilgeviciute, Ale; Tamasauskas, Oldas; Vanseviciute, Rasa; Veleckas, Doras

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of autoflorescence spectroscopy in the diagnosis of cervix maturity through cervical mucus florescence and foetal lung maturity through amniotic fluid fluorescence. LED and broadband Mercury light were used to induce fluorescence in cervical mucus and amniotic fluid respectively. Mature specimens compared to immature ones showed a significant decrease in cervical mucus fluorescence values measured at 420 nm (p = 0.0004) and in measured amniotic fluid fluorescence values at 410 nm (p = 0.0686). Probability-based classification algorithm was developed to identify samples 'maturity' through analysis of the fluorescence spectra. Employing fluorescence intensity at 420 nm for cervix maturity diagnosis rendered optimal sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity of 83.3% and area under the ROC curve of 91.1%.

  17. Ovulation Prediction by using Urine LH Rapid Determination Combinedwith Cervical Mucus Score

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宇芬; 狄文; 桂彪; 张惠英; 金忆; 肖宇红; 丁青; 王寒正; 孙志达; 沈维雄

    1993-01-01

    Infertility may be induced by many causes. It is partly due to the inappropriate time of intercourse from ignorance of the date of ovulation by the infertile couples.Basal body temperature, cervical mucus, B-ultrasonography, blood LH ( luteinizing hormone ) and sex-steroid hormone assay are the common methods used for monitoring ovulation.

  18. The effects of cervical mucus removal before Intrauterine Insemination (IUI in improving pregnancy rates infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemi A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available "n 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Background: Intrauterine insemination (IUI is a less expensive and less invasive treatment in comparison with other assisted reproductive techniques, and it has been widely used for a variety of indications as well as in the treatment of couples with infertility. The outcome of IUI may be affected by numerous factors but in this study, we evaluated the effects of cervical mucus removal undertaken before IUI on clinical pregnancy rates."n"nMethods : In this randomized clinical trial study, all infertile women who were candidates for IUI and attended Shahid Akbar Abadi Hospital during 2009 and 2010 were recruited. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups. Cervical mucus was removed prior to IUI in patients in group A but in group B, a classic IUI was done without removing the cervical mucus. Pregnancy rates were assessed in the two groups by serum levels of β-HCG and detection of fetus in the uterus.  "n"nResults : 291 women including 143 in the classic IUI group and 148 in cervical mucus removal group completed the study. The pregnancy rates were 14.2% (21 pregnancies upon 148 cycles in the cervical mucus removal group and 7% (10 pregnancies upon 143 cycles in the control group (P=0.04, OR: 2.199; CI 95%: 0.997-4.85."n"nConclusion: The findings showed that cervical mucus removal could result in a two-fold increase in pregnancy rate in comparison with classic IUI. Thus, we suggest this practical and noninvasive method to improve pregnancy rate in these patients.

  19. Human sperm quality and lipid content after migration into normal ovulatory human cervical mucus containing low numbers of leukocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nozha Chakroun-Feki; Patrice Therond; Martine Couturier; Florence Eustache; Gerard Limea; Alain Legrand; Pierre Jouannet; Jacques Auger

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a relationship exists between the presence of low number of leukocytes in normal ovulatory cervical mucus and sperm quality and lipid content after migration. The percentages of live, motile and morphologically normal spermatozoa, movement parameters assessed by computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA), and ionophore-induced acrosome reaction measured by flow cytometry were determined before and after migration. High-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection was used to measure the sperm lipid content, including the various diacyl subspecies. The number of leukocytes found in solubilized mucus samples was counted using a haemocytometric method. Overall, the presence of leukocytes in the cervical mucus samples did not significantly influence sperm motility and morphology, sperm kinematic parameters, or the sperm content in sphingomyelin or cholesterol. In contrast, after migration, the decrease in various sperm diacyls and the level of induced acrosome reaction was significantly less pronounced in mucus samples containing ≥ 104 leukocytes than in mucus samples with no or rare leukocytes whereas the level of induced acrosome reaction was higher. The present data suggest that the low level of leukocytes found in normal ovulatory cervical mucus could influence the process of sperm lipid remodelling/capacitation.

  20. Cervical mucus characteristics and hormonal status at insemination of Holstein cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, S.; Rinaudo, A.; Marini, P.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the cervical mucus (CM) collected when inseminating Holstein cows and to relate the secretion pattern with pregnancy. The mucus was collected from mid-cervix of 64 cows with spontaneus estrus (SE) and induced estrus (IE). The quantity, pattern and consistency of the mucus, pH, arborization patterns and the sperm motility were observed. The levels of progesterone and estradiol 17β in serum were also determined. Pregnancy detection was performed by means of transrectal ultrasonography 60 days after insemination. Mucous secretion of cows with SE was significantly different from those with IE, showing a lower degree of crystallization (SE 2.00; IE 2.75) and a lower level of steroid hormones (P4: SE 0.17 ng/ml and IE 0.33 ng/ml (t 1.99547 α 0.05); E2: SE 30.95 pg/ml and IE 47.76 pg/ml (t 1.99495 α 0.05). Progesterone level was significantly lower and estrogen significantly higher in pregnant cows (P) in relation to that observed in non pregnant females (N) (P4: P 0.20 ng/ml and N 0.44 ng/ml (t 1.99602 α 0.05); E2: P 54.77 pg/ml and N 40.75 pg/ml (t 1.99505 α 0.05). In conclusion pregnancy was associated with acopious, clear and watery discharge (similar to egg white), with an arborization degree of 2.25, presence of atypical fern leaves together with rosette formations and needles or thorns on rails due to low levels of progesterone accompanied by high concentrations of estrogens.

  1. [Contraceptive effect of spermicide on cervical mucus in vivo after 24 hours (authors transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batallan, L; Brissi, J; Commerot, J

    1980-10-01

    Efficacy of Alpagelle, a vaginal contraceptive jelly containing benzalkonium chlorohydrate, was tested on 34 women who had been using it for some. The testing was conducted using fresh human spermatozoa, and measuring the penetration into the cervical mucus 24 hours after instillation of 2 ml. of Alpagelle. Maximum penetration of spermatozoa before immobilization and death was 2/10 mm., while it is 2mm. a minute under normal conditions. Alpagelle has no contraindications, and only 1 application every 24 hours will provide contraceptive protection; such method could be ideal for women presenting temporary or permanent contraindications to the IUD, or to the pill, or to those who wish to opt for a method free of side effects. PMID:12262152

  2. Detection of sperm-motivating factor in cervical mucus of ovulatory women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Ray Chaudhuri

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present study was to detect the presence of any sperm selecting and / or motivating factor in the cervical mucus (CM of ovulatory women, which, in turn, might influence pregnancy rate. Materials & Methods: The study was conducted with 190 infertile couples, having indications for moderate seminopathy, enlisted for intra-uterine insemination (IUI, following routine ultrasound and laparoscopic evaluation at our centre, between April 2006 to August 2010. The female partners were in the age group 25-30 years and were randomly divided into 3 groups to receive sperm processed in 3 different methods, with or without CM. Pre and peri-ovulatory CM was subjected to paper electrophoresis on cellulose acetate membrane (CAM strip, to study the protein band pattern. The different procedures of sperm processing were compared primarily on the basis of sperm motility and quality in the swim-up layer and also the pregnancy outcome following IUI, with due emphasis on improvisation of current laboratory methodologies used in IUI. Results: The use of CM layer alongwith medium for swim-up proved to be the best regarding selection of sperm with maximum motility and normal morphology, as well as the pregnancy outcome. The CM of ovulatory women around ovulation showed the presence of a specific band in electrophoresis. Conclusion: The use of CM in sperm preparation technique proves to be beneficial to patients undergoing IUI.

  3. Mucus hypersecretion in the airway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ke; WEN Fu-qiang; XU Dan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Mucus hypersecretion is a distinguishing feature of Chronic intlammation diseases,such as asthma,1chronic bronchitis.2 bronchiectasis3 and cystic fibrosis.4Mucus hypersecretion leads to impairment of mucociliary clearance,abnormal bacterial plantation,mucus plug in the airway,and dysfunction of gas exchange.5

  4. A simple cost-effective modification improves the quality of immunocytochemical staining in cervical scrape samples characterized by presence of excess mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sagar; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Deodhar, Kedar; Teni, Tanuja

    2014-01-01

    Immunocytochemistry (ICC) is a very important tool in a diverse range of biomedical research as well as in diagnostic cytopathology. Smears prepared from cervical scrapes contain a large amount of overlying mucus that interferes with the standard immunocytochemical staining protocol. A modified ICC protocol is described, which involves pretreatment of these smears with 1 mg/ml solution of Ambroxol hydrochloride in methanol for 1 hour. Source of Ambroxol hydrochloride was a 30 mg Mucolite™ tablet, at a cost of 1.70 rupees (∼3·5 US cents) per tablet. This mucolytic solution effectively clears the mucus, facilitating the accessibility of the antibody to the antigenic determinants. This pretreatment resulted in the increased percentage of positively stained cells as well as staining intensity, leading to improved overall ICC staining and score. This is a novel modification that can be cost-effectively applied in ICC staining protocols for cytology samples characterized by the presence of excess mucus. PMID:25620823

  5. A simple cost-effective modification improves the quality of immunocytochemical staining in cervical scrape samples characterized by presence of excess mucus

    OpenAIRE

    Pawar, Sagar; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Deodhar, Kedar; Teni, Tanuja

    2014-01-01

    Immunocytochemistry (ICC) is a very important tool in a diverse range of biomedical research as well as in diagnostic cytopathology. Smears prepared from cervical scrapes contain a large amount of overlying mucus that interferes with the standard immunocytochemical staining protocol. A modified ICC protocol is described, which involves pretreatment of these smears with 1 mg/ml solution of Ambroxol hydrochloride in methanol for 1 hour. Source of Ambroxol hydrochloride was a 30 mg Mucolite™ tab...

  6. Correlation between Copper Ion Concentration in Cervical Mucus and Fllbrinolytic Activity in Menstrual Blood in Copper-releasiag IUD Users

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林建华; 潘家骧; 严隽鸿

    1993-01-01

    In the present study, 44 women using TCu220c-IUD or inert-IUD were asked to make follow-ups before insertion and at the 1st., 3rd., 6th, 9th and 12th month after insertion The mean menstrual blood loss, the fibrinalytic activity including the activation of tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA) and the amount of plasminogen PIG) and fibrinogen-fibrin degradation products (FDP) in menstrual blood and the copper ion concentration in cervical mucus were determined. The correlation between the copper ion concentration and the fibrinalytic activity was considered. It was found that the change of the copper ion concentration was positively correlated with that of the activition of t-PA and the amount of FDP. On the contrary, the change ofthe copper ion concentration was inversely related to the change of PLG value. It is concluded that the high copper ion level can enhance the activation of fibrinolytic system in human endometrium and induce the increase of menorrhagia.

  7. The evolution of cervical mucus infrastructure in normal cyclic baboons (Papio anubis) and castrated females receiving hormonal supplies. A scanning electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrétien, F C

    1980-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope was used to study the evolution of the infrastructure of cervical mucus in normal cyclic baboons and in castrated animals treated with ovarian hormones for establishing an artificial cycle. In both groups, the results make conspicuous the progressive enlargement of the filamentous woof, which attains a maximum at midcycle and then decreases by degrees in the second part of the cycle. It was shown that the evolution of the framework is very similar during normal and artificial cycle, with only variations of slight amplitude. Moreover, the variations in the baboon mucus infrastructure closely resemble those described in the human. The results are briefly discussed in the light of known data. PMID:6770577

  8. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ermund (Anna); L.N. Meiss (Lauren N.); B.J. Scholte (Bob); G.C. Hansson (Gunnar)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSummary: Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Uss

  9. 无精子症配偶宫颈炎状况及其对宫颈黏液影响的临床研究%Status of Cervicitis and Its Effect on Cervical Mucus in Azoospermic Men's Wives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯苗; 李素春; 刘标英; 潘萍; 吴穗妹

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨无精子症配偶官颈炎状况及宫颈炎对宫颈黏液的影响.方法:对在我院助孕的无精子症配偶500例,取阴道分泌物及宫颈管黏液行病原体检查、白细胞检测;同时抽静脉血行ELISA法抗精子抗体(AsAb)、单纯疱疹病毒(HSV)、巨细胞病毒(CMV)检测.围排卵期进行宫颈黏液评分,血AsAb升高者进一步行围排卵期宫颈黏液毛细管测试及精子-宫颈黏液接触试验.结果:①按照诊断标准,500例妇女分为宫颈炎组92例(18.4%),对照组408例(81.6%).②宫颈炎组宫颈黏液CT、UU、BV、HPV感染率较对照组明显增高,差异均有高度统计学意义(P<0.01).宫颈炎组血HSV、CMV感染率较对照组明显增高,差异均有统计学意义(P<0 05).③宫颈炎组围排卵期宫颈黏液评分较对照组(9.32±1.91分对12.67±2 14分)增加,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).两组宫颈黏液的量、成丝性、羊齿化结晶程度比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);而宫颈炎组较对照组宫颈黏液黏稠、黏液细胞数明显增多,差异均有高度统计学意义(P<0.01).④宫颈炎组血AsAb阳性检出率33.7% (31/92),明显高于对照组9.8% (40/408),差异有高度统计学意义(P<0.01).宫颈炎组宫颈黏液毛细管测试及精子-宫颈黏液接触试验异常率分别为10.7% (10/92)、9.8% (9/92),均较对照组1.2% (5/408)、1.2%( 5/408)增加,差异有高度统计学意义(P<0 01).结论:宫颈炎可能造成宫颈黏液理化性状改变及宫颈免疫学功能异常,通过多个环节影响精子的存活、活动、储存和获能,从而导致不孕.育龄妇女应该积极治疗宫颈炎.%Objective:To investigate the status of cecviolis and its effect on cervical mucus in azoospermic men's wives. Methods;During June 2010 to October2010, 500 Azoospermic men's wives who were treated in Infertility Clinic of Guangdong Provincial Family Planning Research Institute were recruited and examined

  10. 两种前处理方法对粘液型宫颈HPV分型结果的比较%Comparison of two different pretreatment methods in detecting genotypes of human papillomavirus in cervical epithelium samples with cervical mucus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍金华; 郑琰; 高月婵; 陈建勇

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of different pretreatment methods on the detection of genotypes of human papillomavirus in cervical epithelium samples with cervical mucus. Methods The 100 cervical epithelium samples with cervical mucus in gynecology department was pre-treated by traditional method (sodium chloride- concussion method )and proteinase K digestion method. The samples were checked for 21 types HPV by flow through hybridization and gene chip technology. The two different pretreatment methods were used to study the efficiency of HPV DNA extraction and genotyping. Results DNA purification aand concentration afrter extraction were 1.63 ±0.71 and(96.35 ± 13.15)μg/ml while that of HPV-DNA extraction( 105.14 ± 18.65 )μg/ml used by proteinase K digestion method were( 1.80 ± 0.52)and( 105.14 ± 18.65 )μg/ml markedly increased compared with those used by traditional method (P<0.01). PCR inhibitors were detected from 4 samples pre-treated by the traditional method,but no PCR reaction inhibitor was detected from the samples pre-treated by proteinase K digestion method. The rates of positive, single types of infection and multiple infection in the HPV types pre-treated by the traditional method and proteinase K digestion method were 28.0%,23.0%,5.0% and 32.0%, 26.0% ,6.0% .respectively. The value of Kappa was 0.888,showing a high degree of consistency. Conclusion The proteinase K digestion method is suitable for detection of HPV-DNA from cervical epithelium samples with cervical mucus, the pretreatment procedure using proteinase K digestion method is easier to get rid of the PCR reaction inhibitors ,which ensures the quality of HPV DNA. It is applicable in clinical laboratory.%目的 研究2种前处理方法对粘液型标本HPV DNA杂交结果的影响,为进一步提高临床检验质量和改进检测技术提供理论依据.方法 收集100例妇科门诊患者粘液型宫颈脱落细胞标本,分别采用常规方法(生理盐水

  11. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Nepper-Christensen, Steen;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults.......To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults....

  12. Efeito da inserção de implante anticoncepcional contendo acetato de nomegestrol sobre a função ovariana, muco cervical e penetração espermática Effects of a contraceptive implant containing nomegestrol acetate on ovarian function, cervical mucus and sperm penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ione Cristina Barbosa

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: estudar o efeito de um único implante de acetato de nomegestrol (Uniplant sobre função ovariana, produção do muco cervical e penetração espermática, quando inserido na fase pré-ovulatória. MÉTODOS: estudo clínico aberto, comparativo, incluindo 20 mulheres com ciclos menstruais regulares que foram estudadas durante um ciclo menstrual antes (controle e um ciclo menstrual depois da inserção do implante. Dosagens de hormônio luteinizante (LH, estradiol e progesterona, ultra-sonografia vaginal, coleta de muco cervical e teste de penetração espermática foram realizados. Para comparação estatística, foi utilizado o Student t-test para grupos pareados e o teste Wilcoxon não paramétrico. Os valores estão mostrados como médias ± erro padrão. RESULTADOS: todos os ciclos controles foram ovulatórios com parâmetros normais. Os níveis pré-ovulatórios de estradiol e LH diminuíram significativamente de 603,2 ± 78,0 pmol/l e 22,5 ± 6,5 UI/l na pré-inserção do implante para 380,7 ± 51,9 pmol/l e 4,9 ± 1,3 UI/l 48 horas após a inserção (p OBJECTIVE: to study the effect of a single contraceptive implant of nomegestrol acetate (Uniplant on the ovarian function, cervical mucus production and sperm penetration, when inserted in women in the preovulatory phase. METHODS: twenty women with regular menstrual cycles were included in an open comparative study. All participants were investigated during one menstrual cycle before (control and one menstrual cycle after implant insertion. Measurements of estradiol, LH, and progesterone, as well as transvaginal sonography, cervical mucus examination and sperm penetration test, were carried out. Statistical analysis was performed with the paired t-test and the non-parametric test of Wilcoxon. RESULTS: all control cycles were ovulatory and presented normal parameters. Preovulatory estradiol and LH peak decreased significantly from 603.2 ± 78.0 pmo/l and 22.5 ± 6.5 IU/l at pre

  13. [Computed tomography in endobronchial mucus accumulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, M; Barone, M; Loria, G; Minutoli, F; Stroscio, S

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the value of CT in depicting endobronchial mucoid collections, the authors retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of 22 patients, 14 with mucous plugs, 7 with mucoid pseudotumors, and one with a bronchocele due to bronchial atresia. Atelectasis could be seen in 11 of 14 patients with mucous plugs. In 12 of 14 patients with mucous plugs CT showed the involved bronchi filled by fluid representing abnormal mucus accumulation. In the patients with atelectasis CT showed mucus-filled bronchi as low-attenuation branching structures (mucoid bronchogram). All the mucoid pseudotumors appeared as low-attenuation (< 20 HU) polypoid wall lesions with no involvement of the bronchial walls. In a patient with bronchial atresia CT showed a solitary pulmonary nodule (representing the obstructed and dilated bronchus filled by mucus) surrounded by peripheral pulmonary hyperinflation. Characteristically, the endobronchial mucoid collections never enhanced after bolus contrast medium. Endobronchial mucoid collections had to be differentiated from endobronchial neoplasms. In some cases bronchoscopy was necessary to make the differential diagnosis. In conclusion, CT is a valuable tool with good sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing endobronchial mucoid collections.

  14. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, L; Thomsen, S F; Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls;

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is a common condition in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Little is known about the incidence, prevalence and determinants of CMH in younger individuals....

  15. Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell L. Van Tassell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host.

  16. Corneal mucus plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraunfelder, F T; Wright, P; Tripathi, R C

    1977-02-01

    Corneal mucus plaques adhered to the anterior corneal surface in 17 of 67 advanced cases of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. The plaques were translucent to opaque and varied in size and shape, from multiple isolated islands to bizarre patterns involving more than half the corneal surface. Ultrastructurally, they consisted of mucus mixed with desquamated degenerating epithelial cells and proteinaceous and lipoidal material. The condition may be symptomatic but can be controlled and prevented in most cases by topical ocular application of 10% acetylcysteine.

  17. Plugging indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is often difficult to measure a plugging temperature when the impurity concentration in liquid sodium is low. Then, the plugging temperature is considered to be inferior to 1100C. Sometimes, a more precise indication is required. We propose a use for the plugging indicator which satisfies this type of requirement. A partial plugging of the indicator orifice is produced and increases at a constant temperature. A mathematical model describes this growth: it is based mainly on the kinetics of Na2O and NaH crystal growth and links the plugging time to oxygen or hydrogen concentrations. (orig.)

  18. Techniques to Bring Up Mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us More COPD: Lifestyle Management Avoiding Infections Breathing Retraining Techniques to Bring Up Mucus Exercises Giving Up Smoking ... mucus is allowed to collect in the airways, breathing may become difficult and infection may occur. Techniques to remove mucus are often done after using ...

  19. Physiotherapy and bronchial mucus transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schans, CP; Postma, DS; Koeter, GH; Rubin, BK

    1999-01-01

    Cough and expectoration of mucus are the best-known symptoms in patients with pulmonary disease, The most applied intervention for these symptoms is the use of chest physiotherapy to increase bronchial mucus transport and reduce retention of mucus in the airways, Chest physiotherapy interventions ca

  20. In Vitro Microfluidic Models of Mucus-Like Obstructions in Small Airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Sznitman, Josué

    2012-11-01

    Liquid plugs can form in the lungs as a result of a host of different diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The existence of such fluid obstructions have been found as far down in the bronchiole tree as the sixteenth generation, where bronchiole openings have diameters on the order of a hundred to a few hundred microns. Understanding the propagation of liquid plugs within the bifurcating branches of bronchiole airways is important because their presence in the lungs, and their rupture and break-up, can cause injury to the epithelial cells lining the airway walls as a result of high wall shear stresses. In particular, liquid plug rupture and break-up frequently occurs at airway bifurcations. Until present, however, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to Newtonian fluids that do not reflect the actual pseudoplastic properties of lung mucus. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of mucus-like liquid plugs in the lower generations of the airway tree using microfluidic models. Our approach allows the dynamics of mucus-like plug break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one in vitro model, as a function of mucus rheology and bronchial tree geometry.

  1. Mucus Distribution Model in a Lung with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zarei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians with a reported incidence of 1 in every 3200 live births. Most strikingly, CF is associated with early mortality. Host in flammatory responses result in airway mucus plugging, airway wall edema, and eventual destruction of airway wall support structure. Despite aggressive treatment, the median age of survival is approximately 38 years. This work is the first attempt to parameterize the distributions of mucus in a CF lung as a function of time. By default, the model makes arbitrary choices at each stage of the construction process, whereby the simplest choice is made. The model is sophisticated enough to fit the average CF patients' spirometric data over time and to identify several interesting parameters: probability of colonization, mucus volume growth rate, and scarring rate. Extensions of the model appropriate for describing the dynamics of single patient MRI data are also discussed.

  2. Post-traumatic bronchial mucus plug leading to pneumonectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Khan M. S.; Sarkar U. N

    2012-01-01

    Background: Blunt trauma of the chest is not uncommon these days. By far, the most important cause of significant blunt chest trauma is motor vehicle accidents. Pedestrians struck by vehicles, falls from height, blast injuries and acts of violence are other causative mechanisms. Most of the blunt trauma cases need no operative intervention and can be managed by supportive procedures. Aim: We present a case of a 10-year old boy who had blunt trauma to chest due to fall from height. Findings: T...

  3. Oestrus synchronisation and superovulation alter the production and biochemical constituents of ovine cervicovaginal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Jessie W; Rickard, Jessica P; Mooney, Ethan; Bernecic, Naomi C; Soleilhavoup, Clement; Tsikis, Guillaume; Druart, Xavier; Leahy, Tamara; de Graaf, Simon P

    2016-09-01

    Controlled breeding programmes utilising exogenous hormones are common in the Australian sheep industry, however the effects of such programmes on cervicovaginal mucus properties are lacking. As such, the aim of this study was to investigate cervicovaginal (CV) mucus from naturally cycling (NAT), progesterone synchronised (P4), prostaglandin synchronised (PGF2α), and superovulated (SOV) Merino ewes. Experiment 1; volume, colour, spinnbarkeit, chemical profile and protein concentration of mucus (NAT, P4, PGF2α and SOV; n=5 ewes/treatment) during the follicular (5 d) and luteal phases (8 d) was investigated. Experiment 2; in vivo mucus pH and in vitro mucus penetration by frozen-thawed spermatozoa (NAT, P4 and SOV; n=11 ewes/treatment) was investigated over oestrus (2 d) and the mid-luteal phase (pH only, 2 d). Oestrus mucus was more abundant, clearer in colour and less proteinaceous than luteal phase mucus (p0.05). Results indicate that exogenous hormones used for controlled breeding affect cervicovaginal mucus production, but few other tested characteristics. Further research is required to explain fertility differences between synchronised and naturally cycling animals following cervical AI. PMID:27496692

  4. Estradiol increases mucus synthesis in bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Tam

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial mucus hypersecretion and mucus plugging are prominent pathologic features of chronic inflammatory conditions of the airway (e.g. asthma and cystic fibrosis and in most of these conditions, women have worse prognosis compared with male patients. We thus investigated the effects of estradiol on mucus expression in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells from female donors grown at an air liquid interface (ALI. Treatment with estradiol in physiological ranges for 2 weeks caused a concentration-dependent increase in the number of PAS-positive cells (confirmed to be goblet cells by MUC5AC immunostaining in ALI cultures, and this action was attenuated by estrogen receptor beta (ER-β antagonist. Protein microarray data showed that nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT in the nuclear fraction of NHBE cells was increased with estradiol treatment. Estradiol increased NFATc1 mRNA and protein in ALI cultures. In a human airway epithelial (1HAE0 cell line, NFATc1 was required for the regulation of MUC5AC mRNA and protein. Estradiol also induced post-translational modification of mucins by increasing total fucose residues and fucosyltransferase (FUT-4, -5, -6 mRNA expression. Together, these data indicate a novel mechanism by which estradiol increases mucus synthesis in the human bronchial epithelium.

  5. Plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagner, G.R.; Garaev, A.S.; Guzenko, L.P.; Khaber, N.V.; Kruglitskii, N.N.; Kurochkin, B.M.; Shumilov, V.A.

    1981-03-23

    Proposed is a plugging solution which contains cement, hydrophilic biosilica, polymer, and water, and which is distinguished by the fact that in order to increase the strength properties of the stone with simultaneous increase in its resistance to the effect of corrosive bed water under conditions of normal temperatures, as hydrophilic biosilica the solution contains carboxy aerosil or aminoethoxy aerosil, and as a polymer, carboxylate divinyl styrene latex and it also contains sodium with the following ingredient ratio, wt %: 63.47-66.08% cement, 0.66-1.28% carboxylate divinyl styrene latex, 1.26-1.32% sodium chloride, 0.22-0.36% carboxy aerosil or aminoethoxy aerosil, and the rest water. The plugging solution is distinguished by the fact that carboxy aerosil or aminoethoxy aerosil have a specific surface of 50-300 m/g.

  6. Epidemiological studies in mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    hypothesis' it was reduced to being an innocent disorder in the 1980s but is now again recognized as a potential risk factor for an accelerated loss of lung function. Whereas early studies in mainly occupational cohorts showed no effect of chronic mucus hypersecretion on decline in lung function, such an...... presence of mucus. In asthma recent findings suggest that in epidemiology chronic mucus hypersecretion may indicate lack of control which leads to an accelerated loss of lung function and increased mortality in subjects with self-reported asthma....

  7. Plugging composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhrimenko, V.Ye.; Antonov, V.A.; Bulatov, A.I.; Gagay, G.I.; Levshin, V.A.; Minakova, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    A plugging composite is proposed for preparing muds containing binding agent with polymer of styrene type. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the quality of the mud by improving its heat resistance, the polymer of styrene type used is a copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene-resin KU-2 with the following ratio of ingredients, % by mass: binding agent 50-90; styrene and divinylbenzene-resin KU-2 copolymer 10-50. The composite is also distinguished by the fact that it contains as the binding agent Portland cement or Portland cement with granulated slag.

  8. Hyper-osmolarity and calcium chelation: Effects on cystic fibrosis mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-10-01

    A non-functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) leads to the disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Although the CFTR is expressed in multiple organs, pulmonary disease is the major cause of illness and death in patients with CF. Stagnant mucus, causing airway obstruction, bacterial overgrowth, persistent inflammation and tissue destruction characterizes the disease, but how the defect in CFTR function is coupled to the mucus phenotype is still controversial. We have recently shown that bicarbonate ions passing through CFTR are necessary for proper unfolding of the MUC2 mucin, thus highlighting the importance of bicarbonate ion transport via the CFTR and the ability of these ions to raise the pH and chelate calcium bound to the mucin as the important steps in forming normal mucus. In order to find potential CF treatments and expand our knowledge about the usefulness of bicarbonate as an active ingredient in formulations to alleviate mucus plugging, we used an Ussing-type chamber and explants from the F508del-CFTR mutant mouse ileum to test the effect of calcium chelators on mucus attachment, either in isolation or in combination with osmolytes such as mannitol or hypertonic saline. We found that increasing the concentration of bicarbonate, both alone or in combination with increased osmolarity of the solution, detached the otherwise attached CF mucus. PMID:26134505

  9. Mucus as a Barrier to Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-01-01

    Viscoelastic mucus lines all mucosal surfaces of the body and forms a potential barrier to mucosal drug delivery. Mucus is mainly composed of water and mucins; high-molecular weight glycoproteins forming an entangled network. Consequently, mucus forms a steric barrier and due to its negative char...... in the development of future oral drug delivery systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......Viscoelastic mucus lines all mucosal surfaces of the body and forms a potential barrier to mucosal drug delivery. Mucus is mainly composed of water and mucins; high-molecular weight glycoproteins forming an entangled network. Consequently, mucus forms a steric barrier and due to its negative charge...... barrier to drug delivery. Current knowledge of mucus characteristics and barrier properties, as achieved by state-of-the-art methodologies, is the topic of this MiniReview emphasizing the gastrointestinal mucus and an overall focus on oral drug delivery. Cell culture-based in vitro models are well...

  10. Enumerating viruses in coral mucus

    OpenAIRE

    Leruste, Amandine; Bouvier, Thierry; Bettarel, Yvan

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of viruses inhabiting the coral mucus remains undetermined, as there is no suitable standardized procedure for their separation from this organic matrix, principally owing to its viscosity and autofluorescence. Seven protocols were tested, and the most efficient separations were obtained from a chemical treatment requiring potassium citrate.

  11. Enumerating viruses in coral mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leruste, Amandine; Bouvier, Thierry; Bettarel, Yvan

    2012-09-01

    The distribution of viruses inhabiting the coral mucus remains undetermined, as there is no suitable standardized procedure for their separation from this organic matrix, principally owing to its viscosity and autofluorescence. Seven protocols were tested, and the most efficient separations were obtained from a chemical treatment requiring potassium citrate. PMID:22729548

  12. Rotating arc spark plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  13. Placental-type alkaline phosphatase in cervical neoplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, P. J.; Warne, P H; Hutchinson, G. E.; Johnson, P. M.; Tucker, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with placental-type alkaline phosphatase have formed the basis of methods for detection of this oncodevelopmental antigen in patients with pre-invasive and invasive cervical neoplasia, with or without evidence of papilloma virus infection. Disease-related elevations of placental-type alkaline phosphatase were not observed in patients' sera. Solubilised cervical smears or biopsy material, and cervical mucus swabs, often contained substantial amounts of this isoen...

  14. Experimental study of cervical blockage induced by continuous low-dose oral progestogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, F C; Sureau, C; Neau, C

    1980-11-01

    An investigation correlating scanning electron microscopic observations with sperm penetration tests carried out on cervical mucus under the influence of low-dose continuous progestogen (Norgestrienone) is presented. The results demonstrate that such type of contraceptive is involved in drastic alterations of mid-cycle cervical mucus at the macromolecular level. The meshwork which constitutes the infrastructure of the cervical secretion appears to be greatly tightened as a result of the treatment, thus giving the woof a general appearance typical of cervical mucus in the late luteal phase. The immobilizing effect of such modified mucus on spermatozoa is demonstrated and the duration of effectiveness after the administration of a last pill on the morning of day 13 is determined. PMID:6894112

  15. Cervical dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by your provider. Make sure to get the HPV vaccine when it is offered to you. This vaccine prevents many cervical cancers. ... Early diagnosis and prompt treatment cures most cases of cervical ... severe cervical dysplasia may change into cervical cancer.

  16. [An almost fatal airway obstruction caused by a secretion plug in an endotracheal tube].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Emir Benjamin; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2014-12-15

    Airway obstruction caused by a secretion plug in an endotracheal tube or a tracheostomy cannula can be a serious complication to mechanical ventilation. This case describes an event caused by a mucus plug localized to the distal part of a tracheostomy tube in a tetraplegic patient. The plug functioned as a check valve, allowing air to pass in - but not out - of the patient. A suction catheter could be passed through the airway without any resistance, and thus the airway was believed to be free. The event, which had an almost fatal outcome due to hyperinflation of the lungs, was relieved by replacement of the tracheostomy cannula. PMID:25497629

  17. The dissolution of urinary mucus after cystoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, G; Mundy, A R

    1989-04-01

    Three agents have been tested for mucolytic activity to prevent or treat difficulties in bladder emptying following augmentation and substitution cystoplasty, particularly in patients emptying by intermittent self-catheterisation. Carbocysteine produced precipitation of mucus, which was found not to be helpful. N-acetylcysteine and urea both dissolved mucus, but urea proved to be more effective.

  18. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  19. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  20. CFTR delivery to 25% of surface epithelial cells restores normal rates of mucus transport to human cystic fibrosis airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Zhang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of CFTR in cystic fibrosis (CF airway epithelium perturbs the normal regulation of ion transport, leading to a reduced volume of airway surface liquid (ASL, mucus dehydration, decreased mucus transport, and mucus plugging of the airways. CFTR is normally expressed in ciliated epithelial cells of the surface and submucosal gland ductal epithelium and submucosal gland acinar cells. Critical questions for the development of gene transfer strategies for CF airway disease are what airway regions require CFTR function and how many epithelial cells require CFTR expression to restore normal ASL volume regulation and mucus transport to CF airway epithelium? An in vitro model of human CF ciliated surface airway epithelium (CF HAE was used to test whether a human parainfluenza virus (PIV vector engineered to express CFTR (PIVCFTR could deliver sufficient CFTR to CF HAE to restore mucus transport, thus correcting the CF phenotype. PIVCFTR delivered CFTR to >60% of airway surface epithelial cells and expressed CFTR protein in CF HAE approximately 100-fold over endogenous levels in non-CF HAE. This efficiency of CFTR delivery fully corrected the basic bioelectric defects of Cl(- and Na(+ epithelial ion transport and restored ASL volume regulation and mucus transport to levels approaching those of non-CF HAE. To determine the numbers of CF HAE surface epithelial cells required to express CFTR for restoration of mucus transport to normal levels, different amounts of PIVCFTR were used to express CFTR in 3%-65% of the surface epithelial cells of CF HAE and correlated to increasing ASL volumes and mucus transport rates. These data demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that restoration of normal mucus transport rates in CF HAE was achieved after CFTR delivery to 25% of surface epithelial cells. In vivo experimentation in appropriate models will be required to determine what level of mucus transport will afford clinical benefit to CF patients

  1. Plug Load Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We provide MATLAB binary files (.mat) and comma separated values files of data collected from a pilot study of a plug load management system that allows for the...

  2. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia with mucous plugs: case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP), a rare eosinophilic lung disease of unknown etiology, is characterized by peripheral blood eosinophilia, chest radiograph infiltrates, and prompt response to corticosteroid therapy.1 The first detailed description of CEP was described by Carrington et al 2 in 1969. The usual symptoms are cough, dyspnea, fever, and weight loss. It is most often seen in middle aged woman and has a subacute onset.1 We report a case of CEP presenting with right lower lung infiltrates and mucus plugging that causing bronchus obstruction.

  3. Fuel rod plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent the formation of voids to the inside of welded portion in fuel rod plugs. Constitution: A fuel rod is tightly sealed by welding end plugs at both ends of a fuel can charged with nuclear fuel material. For the welding of the end plug, laser welding has now been employed with the reason of increasing the welding efficiency and reducing the welding heat distortion. However, if the end plug is laser-welded to the end of the fuel can in the conventional form, there is a problem that voids are liable to be formed near the deepest penetration in the welding portion. That is, gases evolved near the deepest penetration remains in a key-hole like welded metal portion to result in voids there. Accordingly, grooves capable of passing the laser beam key hole therethrough are disposed along the circumferential direction of the pipe at the end plug welded portion in the fuel can. In this way, since gases generating near the deepest penetration are discharged into the grooves, the key hole-like welded metal is completely filled and voids are not formed. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Occurrence of thraustochytrid fungi in corals and coral mucus

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.; Balasubramanian, R.

    Occurrence of thraustochytrid fungi in corals, fresh coral mucus and floating and attached mucus detritus from the Lakshadweep Islands in the Arabian Sea was studied. Corallochytrium limacisporum Raghukumar, Thraustochytrium motivum Goldstein...

  5. Conjunctival mucus ferning in hypovitaminosis A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward D

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available The ocular ferning test was used to qualitatively assess mucus function in early stages of xerophthalmia. The results indicate that inspite of histological evidence of loss of goblet cells in the early stages, mucous function and production is sufficient to produce ferning. It is suggested that such derangements in mucous ferning may occur in more advanced stages of xerophthalmia.

  6. Plugging device for nuclear pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plugging device assembled near an access opening is used for plugging the primary pipes. This plugging device comprises a rim flexible joint put in mechanical pressure by the displacement of mechanical pieces. This joint has a central compartment pressurizable. This joint is fixed by a stirrup-piece and a shaft in support on the tube plate

  7. Playing with Plug-ins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    In today's complex music software packages, many features can remain unexplored and unused. Software plug-ins--available in most every music software package, yet easily overlooked in the software's basic operations--are one such feature. In this article, I introduce readers to plug-ins and offer tips for purchasing plug-ins I have…

  8. Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-06

    Did you know that cervical cancer rates differ by race/ethnicity and region? Or that cervical cancer can usually be prevented if precancerous cervical lesions are found by a Pap test and treated? Find out how getting regular Pap tests can save a woman's life.  Created: 3/6/2007 by National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.   Date Released: 4/25/2007.

  9. Decreased colonic mucus in rats with loperamide-induced constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotoyodome, A; Meguro, S; Hase, T; Tokimitsu, I; Sakata, T

    2000-06-01

    Constipation is a risk factor of colorectal cancer. Mucin is a major component of lumenal mucus, which protects the colorectal mucosa against mechanical and chemical damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate mucus production and to quantitate lumen mucus in a rat model of spastic constipation. We induced constipation with loperamide (1.5 mg/kg), and histochemically evaluated mucus production and the thickness of the mucus layer at the fecal surface. We quantitated the mucus attached to the mucosal surface using colonic perfusion with N-acetylcysteine. While more feces remained in the colon, there was less fecal excretion and lower fecal water content in loperamide-administered rats than in control rats. Crypt epithelial cells contained less mucus in constipated rats than in control rats. The mucus layer at the fecal surface was thinner and less mucus was recovered from the mucosal surface in constipated rats than in control rats. Mucus production of crypt epithelial cells and mucus at the fecal and mucosal surface were reduced by loperamide-induced constipation.

  10. [Development of ultrastructural changes in human cervix mucus during the ovarian cycle. Scanning electron microscope study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrétien, F C; Cohen, J; Psychoyos, A

    1976-01-01

    The use of the Scanning Electron Microscope has made it possible through observation to study the human cervical mucus through the various stages of the ovarian cycle, as well as to describe the significant variations of the meshed woof making up the ultrastructure during the ovarian cycle. While the slackening of the woof and the dimension of the meshes are minimal at both the beginning and end of the cycle, they reach a maximum on forteenth day. In the ovulatory period, lateral expansions from the filaments are numerous. On the other hand, median and terminal thicknesses are almost inexistant during the same period : their frequency decreases during the first part of the cycle, then increases during the luteal phase. During both the preceding and following days of ovulation, one can observe numerous twistings at the level of the filaments which probably express the relaxation and then contraction of the latter. The preparatory technique as well as the method of observation used appear reliable enough to allow a comparison of the cervical mucus ultrastructure in varied physiological, pathological and experimental situations. PMID:956619

  11. Clinical issues of mucus accumulation in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osadnik CR

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Christian R Osadnik,1,2 Christine F McDonald,2,3 Anne E Holland2,4,51Department of Physiotherapy, Monash University, 2Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, 3Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, 4Department of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, 5Department of Physiotherapy, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaWe wish to thank Ramos et al for presenting a succinct and up-to-date synthesis of the evidence relating to the important issue of mucus hypersecretion in COPD.1 The authors highlight the association of mucus hypersecretion with poor outcomes, including increased risk of exacerbations, hospitalization and mortality. These associations have led to interest in the potential benefits of mucus clearance techniques in COPD. As Ramos et al1 point out, although the physiological rationale for airway clearance techniques (ACTs in COPD is strong, clinical efficacy has historically been difficult to establish, perhaps due to the variety of techniques and outcomes that have been employed in small studies. We have recently synthesized this body of evidence in a Cochrane systematic review of ACTs for individuals with COPD. The review demonstrated ACTs are safe and meta-analysis showed they confer small beneficial effects on a limited range of important clinical outcomes, such as the need for and duration of ventilatory assistance during an acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD.2View original paper by Ramos and colleagues.

  12. Chronic mucus hypersecretion in COPD and death from pulmonary infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Lange, P; Vestbo, J

    1995-01-01

    The association of chronic mucus hypersecretion and mortality is a matter of debate. We wished to determine whether the relationship between chronic mucus hypersecretion and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related mortality could be explained by proneness to pulmonary infection. We...... followed 14,223 subjects of both sexes for 10-12 yrs. Cases where COPD was an underlying or contributory cause of death (n = 214) were included, and hospital records were obtained when possible (n = 101). From the presence of increased mucus, purulent mucus, fever, leucocytosis and infiltration on chest...... without chronic mucus hypersecretion. Controlling for covariates, in particular smoking habits, a Cox analysis showed a strong inverse relationship between ventilatory function and COPD-related mortality. Chronic mucus hypersecretion was found to be a significant predictor of COPD-related death with...

  13. PA01.45. An ayurvedic management of vandhyatva w.s.r. to cervical factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donga, Shilpa B.; Parikh, Pallavi; Induben, U

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Vandhyatva (infertility) has been long standing problem since ancient period. Many herbal and herbo mineral formulations are mentioned as a treatment of infertility in the ancient texts, but they are not categorized according to the responsible factor like Ritu Kshetra, Ambu, Beeja. It is the need of time to evaluate the efficacy of formulations in respect to various factors of infertility. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of Aswagandha Ghrita and Phalaghrita in the management of Vandhyatva w.s.r. to cervical factor. Method: In this study, total 14 patients were treated in two groups viz. Group A; Ashwagandha ghrita (Intra cervical Uttarbasti 6days for 2 cycles and Ghritapana 15ml bid for 2 months) and Group B; Phalaghrita (Intra cervical Uttarbasti 6days for 2 cycles and Ghritapana 15 ml bid for 2 months) to assess the role of Ghrita in the management of Vandhytva. Sim's hunter and Moghissi cervical mucus Test and Post coital test were selected for the diagnosis and for evaluation of efficacy of therapy on cervical factor. Result: The overall effects of both the therapies on properties of cervical mucus showed that the administration of Ashwagandha ghrita (group A) was more effective to increase the amount and tradability as compared to Phalaghrita whereas Phalaghrita was more effective in comparison to Ashwagandha ghrita to decrease the cellularity and viscosity of cervical mucus. Conclusion: Significant results were found in both the groups, but Ashwagandha ghrita provided better results in comparison to Phalaghrita.

  14. Cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sravisht; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common clinical scenario. Patients with radiculopathy typically present with neck pain, arm pain, or both. We review the epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy and discuss the diagnosis of this condition. This includes an overview of the pertinent findings on the patient history and physical examination. We also discuss relevant clinical syndromes that must be considered in the differential diagnosis including peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes and shoulder pathology. The natural history of cervical radiculopathy is reviewed and options for management are discussed. These options include conservative management, non-operative modalities such as physical therapy, steroid injections, and operative intervention. While the exact indications for surgical intervention have not yet been elucidated, we provide an overview of the available literature regarding indications and discuss the timing of intervention. The surgical outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), and posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) are discussed. PMID:27250042

  15. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels;

    2012-01-01

    on metered electricity consumption for different types of households. We find effects for single men and couples without children, while we find no effect for single women and households with children. We suggest that this could be because of differences in saving potential (e.g. some households do not have...... appliances where using a plug is relevant), differences in the skills relevant for installing the technology and differences in the willingness to spend time and effort on installation. We conclude that targeting interventions at more responsive households, and tailoring interventions to target groups, can...... increase the efficiency of programs...

  16. Radioisotope measurement of the velocity of tracheal mucus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioisotope scanning technique for measuring the velocity of tracheal mucus has been developed utilizing a canine model. A solution of stannous phytate labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is introduced percutaneously into the lower trachea and the upward movement of the leading edge of the radioactivity is followed by repeat scanning at 2-minute intervals using a modified rectilinear scanner, thus allowing calculation of the velocity of the mucus. It is believed that this technique may be of value in studying the effect of experimentally induced tracheal injuries on mucus velocity. Possible applications of the technique for the study of the velocity of mucus in the human trachea are discussed

  17. Radioisotope measurement of the velocity of tracheal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, K J; Palmer, D W; Beste, D J; Carl, G A; Belson, T P; Pelc, L R; Toohill, R J

    1985-04-01

    A radioisotope scanning technique for measuring the velocity of tracheal mucus has been developed utilizing a canine model. A solution of stannous phytate labeled with 99mTc is introduced percutaneously into the lower trachea and the upward movement of the leading edge of the radioactivity is followed by repeat scanning at 2-minute intervals using a modified rectilinear scanner, thus allowing calculation of the velocity of the mucus. It is believed that this technique may be of value in studying the effect of experimentally induced tracheal injuries on mucus velocity. Possible applications of the technique for the study of the velocity of mucus in the human trachea are discussed. PMID:3921912

  18. Radioisotope measurement of the velocity of tracheal mucus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, K.J.; Palmer, D.W.; Beste, D.J.; Carl, G.A.; Belson, T.P.; Pelc, L.R.; Toohill, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A radioisotope scanning technique for measuring the velocity of tracheal mucus has been developed utilizing a canine model. A solution of stannous phytate labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is introduced percutaneously into the lower trachea and the upward movement of the leading edge of the radioactivity is followed by repeat scanning at 2-minute intervals using a modified rectilinear scanner, thus allowing calculation of the velocity of the mucus. It is believed that this technique may be of value in studying the effect of experimentally induced tracheal injuries on mucus velocity. Possible applications of the technique for the study of the velocity of mucus in the human trachea are discussed.

  19. Property profiling of biosimilar mucus in a novel mucus-containing in vitro model for assessment of intestinal drug absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; Baldursdóttir, Stefania G; Müllertz, Anette;

    2014-01-01

    comparable to freshly isolated porcine intestinal mucus (PIM). Further, this multicomponent biosimilar mucus mixture was optimized with regards to the lipid content in order to obtain cellular biocompatibility with well-differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers. In contrast, PIM was found to severely disrupt...... of the biorelevance of the Caco-2 cell culture model by application of mucus, resulting in an in vitro model of oral mucosa suitable for future assessment of innovative drug delivery approaches....

  20. Polysaccharides and bacterial plugging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogler, H.S.

    1991-11-01

    Before any successful application of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery process can be realized, an understanding of the cells' transport and retentive mechanisms in porous media is needed. Cell transport differs from particle transport in their ability to produce polysaccharides, which are used by cells to adhere to surfaces. Cell injection experiments have been conducted using Leuconostoc cells to illustrate the importance of cellular polysaccharide production as a transport mechanism that hinders cell movement and plugs porous media. Kinetic studies of the Leuconostoc cells, carried out to further understand the plugging rates of porous media, have shown that the cells' growth rates are approximately equal when provided with monosaccharide (glucose and fructose) or sucrose. The only difference in cell metabolism is the production of dextran when sucrose is supplied as a carbon source. Experimentally it has also been shown that the cells' growth rate is weakly dependent upon the sucrose concentration in the media, and strongly dependent upon the concentration of yeast extract. The synthesis of cellular dextran has been found to lag behind cell generation, thus indicating that the cells need to reach maturity before they are capable of expressing the detransucrase enzyme and synthesizing insoluble dextran. Dextran yields were found to be dependent upon the sucrose concentration in the media. 10 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis.

  2. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis. PMID:22640851

  3. Clinical issues of mucus accumulation in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Osadnik, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Christian R Osadnik,1,2 Christine F McDonald,2,3 Anne E Holland2,4,51Department of Physiotherapy, Monash University, 2Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, 3Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, 4Department of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, 5Department of Physiotherapy, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaWe wish to thank Ramos et al for presenting a succinct and up-to-date synthesis of the evidence relating to the important issue of mucus hypersecr...

  4. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing. 19 claims, 3 figures

  5. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  6. Mechanics Model of Plug Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Q. K.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the mechanics of friction plug welding. The model accounts for coupling of plastic deformation (material flow) and thermal response (plastic heating). The model predictions of the torque, energy, and pull force on the plug were compared to the data of a recent experiment, and the agreements between predictions and data are encouraging.

  7. Chronic mucus hypersecretion: prevalence and risk factors in younger individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Lotte; Thomsen, S F; Ingebrigtsen, Truls;

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is a common condition in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Little is known about the incidence, prevalence and determinants of CMH in younger individuals.......Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is a common condition in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Little is known about the incidence, prevalence and determinants of CMH in younger individuals....

  8. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis.

  9. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. PMID:2991089

  10. A new method of separation and quantitation of mucus glycoprotein in rat gastric mucus gel layer and its application to mucus secretion induced by 16,16-dimethyl PGE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komuro, Y; Ishihara, K; Ohara, S; Saigenji, K; Hotta, K

    1991-10-01

    A method was established for recovering the mucus gel layer of rat gastric mucosa without damage to underlying surface epithelium. The mucus gel was solubilized by stirring the gastric mucosa in a solution of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent. Optimal mucus gel solubilization was possible by treatment with 2% NAC for 5 minutes at room temperature. Mucus glycoprotein was quantitatively extracted and measured from the mucus gel sample obtained by the NAC treatment. This treatment caused no damage to surface epithelial cells, as observed by a light microscope. Besides NAC, pronase solution was also adequate for solubilizing the mucus gel layer without any damage to the surface epithelium. However, extraction and measurement of mucus glycoprotein from the pronase-treated mucus gel sample was not possible due to contamination by high molecular hexose-containing substances which were eluted along with the mucus glycoprotein from the column of Bio-Gel A-1.5m. This NAC method was used to examine changes in mucus glycoprotein content in the mucus gel at one hour following the oral administration of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2. A significant increase in mucus glycoprotein of the gel was brought about by the prostaglandin treatment. Thus, the present method was suitable for estimating the amount of mucus secreted in to the mucus gel layer.

  11. A new method of separation and quantitation of mucus glycoprotein in rat gastric mucus gel layer and its application to mucus secretion induced by 16,16-dimethyl PGE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komuro, Y; Ishihara, K; Ohara, S; Saigenji, K; Hotta, K

    1991-10-01

    A method was established for recovering the mucus gel layer of rat gastric mucosa without damage to underlying surface epithelium. The mucus gel was solubilized by stirring the gastric mucosa in a solution of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent. Optimal mucus gel solubilization was possible by treatment with 2% NAC for 5 minutes at room temperature. Mucus glycoprotein was quantitatively extracted and measured from the mucus gel sample obtained by the NAC treatment. This treatment caused no damage to surface epithelial cells, as observed by a light microscope. Besides NAC, pronase solution was also adequate for solubilizing the mucus gel layer without any damage to the surface epithelium. However, extraction and measurement of mucus glycoprotein from the pronase-treated mucus gel sample was not possible due to contamination by high molecular hexose-containing substances which were eluted along with the mucus glycoprotein from the column of Bio-Gel A-1.5m. This NAC method was used to examine changes in mucus glycoprotein content in the mucus gel at one hour following the oral administration of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2. A significant increase in mucus glycoprotein of the gel was brought about by the prostaglandin treatment. Thus, the present method was suitable for estimating the amount of mucus secreted in to the mucus gel layer. PMID:1752389

  12. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc.

  13. Polymers in the gut compress the colonic mucus hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sujit S.; Preska Steinberg, Asher

    2016-01-01

    Colonic mucus is a key biological hydrogel that protects the gut from infection and physical damage and mediates host–microbe interactions and drug delivery. However, little is known about how its structure is influenced by materials it comes into contact with regularly. For example, the gut abounds in polymers such as dietary fibers or administered therapeutics, yet whether such polymers interact with the mucus hydrogel, and if so, how, remains unclear. Although several biological processes have been identified as potential regulators of mucus structure, the polymeric composition of the gut environment has been ignored. Here, we demonstrate that gut polymers do in fact regulate mucus hydrogel structure, and that polymer–mucus interactions can be described using a thermodynamic model based on Flory–Huggins solution theory. We found that both dietary and therapeutic polymers dramatically compressed murine colonic mucus ex vivo and in vivo. This behavior depended strongly on both polymer concentration and molecular weight, in agreement with the predictions of our thermodynamic model. Moreover, exposure to polymer-rich luminal fluid from germ-free mice strongly compressed the mucus hydrogel, whereas exposure to luminal fluid from specific-pathogen-free mice—whose microbiota degrade gut polymers—did not; this suggests that gut microbes modulate mucus structure by degrading polymers. These findings highlight the role of mucus as a responsive biomaterial, and reveal a mechanism of mucus restructuring that must be integrated into the design and interpretation of studies involving therapeutic polymers, dietary fibers, and fiber-degrading gut microbes. PMID:27303035

  14. Polymers in the gut compress the colonic mucus hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sujit S; Preska Steinberg, Asher; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-06-28

    Colonic mucus is a key biological hydrogel that protects the gut from infection and physical damage and mediates host-microbe interactions and drug delivery. However, little is known about how its structure is influenced by materials it comes into contact with regularly. For example, the gut abounds in polymers such as dietary fibers or administered therapeutics, yet whether such polymers interact with the mucus hydrogel, and if so, how, remains unclear. Although several biological processes have been identified as potential regulators of mucus structure, the polymeric composition of the gut environment has been ignored. Here, we demonstrate that gut polymers do in fact regulate mucus hydrogel structure, and that polymer-mucus interactions can be described using a thermodynamic model based on Flory-Huggins solution theory. We found that both dietary and therapeutic polymers dramatically compressed murine colonic mucus ex vivo and in vivo. This behavior depended strongly on both polymer concentration and molecular weight, in agreement with the predictions of our thermodynamic model. Moreover, exposure to polymer-rich luminal fluid from germ-free mice strongly compressed the mucus hydrogel, whereas exposure to luminal fluid from specific-pathogen-free mice-whose microbiota degrade gut polymers-did not; this suggests that gut microbes modulate mucus structure by degrading polymers. These findings highlight the role of mucus as a responsive biomaterial, and reveal a mechanism of mucus restructuring that must be integrated into the design and interpretation of studies involving therapeutic polymers, dietary fibers, and fiber-degrading gut microbes. PMID:27303035

  15. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc. PMID:14533798

  16. Cervical Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accumulation of pus in the uterus is called pyometra. Symptoms Before menopause, cervical stenosis may cause menstrual ... present but not cause symptoms. A hematometra or pyometra can cause pain or cause the uterus to ...

  17. Cervical spondylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past neck injury (often several years before) Past spine surgery Ruptured or slipped disk Severe arthritis Small fractures ... Kshettry VR. Cervical spondylosis. In: Benzel EC, ed. Spine Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap ...

  18. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The virus spreads through sexual contact. Most women's bodies are able to fight HPV infection. But sometimes the virus leads to cancer. You're at higher risk ...

  19. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 162 KB) This information in Spanish (en español) Female reproductive system Select image to view larger Related ... D., FACS, Captain, U.S. Public Health Service Medical Director, National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, ...

  20. 49 CFR 230.59 - Fusible plugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Fusible Plugs § 230.59 Fusible plugs. If boilers are equipped with fusible plugs, the plugs shall be removed and cleaned of scale each time the boiler is washed but not less frequently than during every...

  1. Active microrheology of Chaetopterus mucus determines three intrinsic lengthscales that govern material properties

    CERN Document Server

    Weigand, W J; Deheyn, D D; Morales-Sanz, A; Blair, D L; Urbach, J S; Robertson-Anderson, R M

    2016-01-01

    We characterize the scale-dependent rheological properties of mucus from the Chaetopterus marine worm and determine the intrinsic lengthscales controlling distinct rheological and structural regimes. Mucus produced by this ubiquitous filter feeder serves a host of roles including filtration, protection and trapping nutrients. The ease of clean mucus extraction coupled with similarities to human mucus rheology also make Chaetopterus mucus a potential model system for elucidating human mucus mechanics. We use optically trapped microsphere probes of 2-10 microns, to induce oscillatory strains and measure mucus stress response. We show that viscoelastic properties are highly dependent on the strain scale (l) with three distinct regimes emerging: microscale: l_110 microns. While mucus response is similar to water for l_1 indicating that probes rarely contact the mucus mesh, for l_2 the response is distinctly more viscous and independent of probe size, demonstrating that the mucus behaves as a continuum. However, t...

  2. Effects of drugs on mucus clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtmeyers, E; Gosselink, R; Gayan-Ramirez, G; Decramer, M

    1999-08-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC), the process in which airway mucus together with substances trapped within are moved out of the lungs, is an important defence mechanism of the human body. Drugs may alter this process, such that it is necessary to know the effect of the drugs on MCC. Indeed, agents stimulating MCC may be used therapeutically in respiratory medicine, especially in patients suspected of having an impairment of their mucociliary transport system. In contrast, caution should be taken with drugs depressing MCC as an undesired side-effect, independently of their therapeutic indication. Since cough clearance (CC) serves as a back-up system when MCC fails, the influence of drugs must be examined not only on MCC but also on CC. Ultimately, the clinical repercussions of alterations in mucus transport induced by drug administration must be studied. Tertiary ammonium compounds (anticholinergics), aspirin, anaesthetic agents and benzodiazepines have been shown to be capable of depressing the mucociliary transport system. Cholinergics, methylxanthines, sodium cromoglycate, hypertonic saline, saline as well as water aerosol have been shown to increase MCC. Adrenergic antagonists, guaifenesin, S-carboxymethylcysteine, sodium 2-mercapto-ethane sulphonate and frusemide have been reported not to alter the mucociliary transport significantly. Amiloride, uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), quaternary ammonium compounds (anticholinergics), adrenergic agonists, corticosteroids, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase), N-acetylcysteine, bromhexine and ambroxol have been reported either not to change or to augment MCC. Indirect data suggest that surfactant as well as antibiotics may improve the mucociliary transport system. As for the influence of drugs on CC, amiloride and rhDNase have been demonstrated to increase the effectiveness of cough. A trend towards an improved CC was noted after treatment with adrenergic agonists. The anticholinergic agent ipratropium bromide, which

  3. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERISATION OF MUCUS ADHESION PROTEINS OF LACTOBACILLUS REUTERI

    OpenAIRE

    Etzold, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Mucus is the first point of contact between the gut microbiota and the host. Mucus adhesins are thought to be key mediators in the mucus adhesion of commensal Lactobacillus species. However, knowledge on the structural or functional basis of adhesin interaction with mucin glycoproteins, the main component of mucus, is limited. This work describes the biochemical and structural properties of two cell-surface proteins from Lactobacillus reuteri, the mucus-binding protein (MUB) and the Lar0958 p...

  4. The NAHIF* Plug-in-Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    1981-01-01

    * North Area High Intensity Facility of the CERN SPS. The beamlines with target stations and the plug-in magnets - The plug-in magnet to be removed for repair - The lifting bar and tool for the vacuum connector - The control stand - Controls for vacuum connector tool - The plug-in vacuum connector - Liftingbar with the automatic pins for magnets - The gravitational automatic pin - The plug-in kit in action.

  5. SNS Inner Plug Shipping Cask Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations were performed to evaluate the dose rates outside the shipping cask containing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) inner plug assembly. The analysis consisted of simulating the proton beam interaction with the SNS target, activation calculations with the determined neutron flux levels and assumed SNS operation schedule, and calculation of the decay gamma-rays propagation through the inner plug and shipping cask. Several materials were considered for the inner plug. The results provide guidance for the finalization of the plug design

  6. Retinoic acid suppresses intestinal mucus production and exacerbates experimental enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan H. Oehlers

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to retinoids for the treatment of acne has been linked to the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. The intestinal mucus layer is an important structural barrier that is disrupted in IBD. Retinoid-induced alteration of mucus physiology has been postulated as a mechanism linking retinoid treatment to IBD; however, there is little direct evidence for this interaction. The zebrafish larva is an emerging model system for investigating the pathogenesis of IBD. Importantly, this system allows components of the innate immune system, including mucus physiology, to be studied in isolation from the adaptive immune system. This study reports the characterization of a novel zebrafish larval model of IBD-like enterocolitis induced by exposure to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS. The DSS-induced enterocolitis model was found to recapitulate several aspects of the zebrafish trinitrobenzene-sulfonic-acid (TNBS-induced enterocolitis model, including neutrophilic inflammation that was microbiota-dependent and responsive to pharmacological intervention. Furthermore, the DSS-induced enterocolitis model was found to be a tractable model of stress-induced mucus production and was subsequently used to identify a role for retinoic acid (RA in suppressing both physiological and pathological intestinal mucin production. Suppression of mucin production by RA increased the susceptibility of zebrafish larvae to enterocolitis when challenged with enterocolitic agents. This study illustrates a direct effect of retinoid administration on intestinal mucus physiology and, subsequently, on the progression of intestinal inflammation.

  7. Complex rheological behaviors of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) skin mucus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiang, E-mail: 11229036@zju.edu.cn; Su, Heng, E-mail: shtdyso@163.com; Lv, Weiyang, E-mail: 3090103369@zju.edu.cn; Du, Miao, E-mail: dumiao@zju.edu.cn; Song, Yihu, E-mail: s-yh0411@zju.edu.cn; Zheng, Qiang, E-mail: zhengqiang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The functions and structures of biological mucus are closely linked to rheology. In this article, the skin mucus of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) was proved to be a weak hydrogel susceptible to shear rate, time, and history, exhibiting: (i) Two-region breakdown of its gel structure during oscillatory strain sweep; (ii) rate-dependent thickening followed by three-region thinning with increased shear rate, and straight thinning with decreased shear rate; and (iii) time-dependent rheopexy at low shear rates, and thixotropy at high shear rates. An interesting correlation between the shear rate- and time-dependent rheological behaviors was also revealed, i.e., the rheopexy-thixotropy transition coincided with the first-second shear thinning region transition. Apart from rheology, a structure of colloidal network was observed in loach skin mucus using transmission electron microscopy. The complex rheology was speculated to result from inter- and intracolloid structural alterations. The unique rheology associated with the colloidal network structure, which has never been previously reported in vertebrate mucus, may play a key role in the functions (e.g., flow, reannealing, lubrication, and barrier) of the mucus.

  8. Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Manabu; Nagahama, Ken

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews cervical laminoplasty. The origin of cervical laminoplasty dates back to cervical laminectomy performed in Japan ~50 years ago. To overcome poor surgical outcomes of cervical laminectomy, many Japanese orthopedic spine surgeons devoted their lives to developing better posterior decompression procedures for the cervical spine. Thanks to the development of a high-speed surgical burr, posterior decompression procedures for the cervical spine showed vast improvement from the ...

  9. [Cervical radiculopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijper, B

    2014-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain in the arm. It is caused by nerve root compression in the neck, as a consequence of a herniated disc, or spondyliotic foraminal stenosis. It causes severe pain, especially during the first few weeks, and paraesthesias in the forearm and hand. Patients also suffer from neck pain and loss of strength in the relevant arm. The arm pain can be exacerbated by certain movements of the head; these should be avoided as much as possible. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of history and physical examination. The pain generally disappears without active patient treatment. A semi-rigid cervical collar is recommended to accelerate pain relief. In cases of persistent pain, surgery will be considered. In such cases an MRI should be performed to show the cause and level of nerve root compression. PMID:26185991

  10. Intestinal mucus accumulation in a child with acutemyeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namık Özbek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal mucus accumulation is a very rare situation observed in some solid tumors, intestinal inflammation, mucosal hyperplasia, elevated intestinal pressure, and various other diseases. However, it has never been described in acute myeloblastic leukemia. The pathogenesis of intestinal mucus accumulation is still not clear. Here, we report a 14-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia and febrile neutropenia in addition to typhlitis. She was also immobilized due to joint contractures of the lower extremities and had intestinal mucus accumulation, which was, at first, misdiagnosed as intestinal parasitosis. We speculate that typhlitis, immobilization and decreased intestinal motility due to usage of antiemetic drugs might have been the potential etiologic factors in this case. However, its impact on prognosis of the primary disease is unknown.

  11. Bacterial populations and adaptations in the mucus layers on living corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducklow, H.W.; Mitchell, R.

    1979-07-01

    The external mucus layers of the stony coral Porites astreoides and the soft corals Palythoa sp. and Heteroxenia fuscesens are inhabited by communities of marine heterotrophic bacteria. Population levels of bacteria in coral mucus may be regulated by the self-cleaning behavior of the host. Bacterial populations in coral mucus respond to stresses applied to the host coral by growing to higher population levels in the mucus, indicating that these are populations of viable organisms closely attuned to host metabolism. Members of these microbial populations utilize the mucus compounds and may play a role in processing coral mucus for reef detritus feeders. One such species, Vibrio alginolyticus, grows rapidly on Heteroxenia mucus, is attracted to dissolved mucus, and possesses a mechanism to maintain itself on the coral surface.

  12. IL-13–induced airway mucus production is attenuated by MAPK13 inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alevy, Yael G.; Patel, Anand C.; Romero, Arthur G.; Patel, Dhara A.; Tucker, Jennifer; Roswit, William T.; Miller, Chantel A.; Heier, Richard F.; Byers, Derek E.; Brett, Tom J.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Increased mucus production is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in inflammatory airway diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis. However, the precise molecular mechanisms for pathogenic mucus production are largely undetermined. Accordingly, there are no specific and effective anti-mucus therapeutics. Here, we define a signaling pathway from chloride channel calcium-activated 1 (CLCA1) to MAPK13 that is responsible for IL-13–driven mucus production in human airway epithelial cells. The same pathway was also highly activated in the lungs of humans with excess mucus production due to COPD. We further validated the pathway by using structure-based drug design to develop a series of novel MAPK13 inhibitors with nanomolar potency that effectively reduced mucus production in human airway epithelial cells. These results uncover and validate a new pathway for regulating mucus production as well as a corresponding therapeutic approach to mucus overproduction in inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:23187130

  13. SAMI Automated Plug Plate Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Lorente, Nuria P F; Goodwin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) is a prototype wide-field system at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) which uses a plug-plate to mount its 13 x 61-core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical path at the telescope's prime focus. In this paper we describe the process of determining the positions of the plug-plate holes, where plates contain three or more stacked observation configurations. The process, which up until now has involved several separate processes and has required significant manual configuration and checking, is now being automated to increase efficiency and reduce error. This is carried out by means of a thin Java controller layer which drives the configuration cycle. This layer controls the user interface and the C++ algorithm layer where the plate configuration and optimisation is carried out. Additionally, through the Aladin display package, it provides visualisation and facilitates user verification of the resulting plates.

  14. Investigating the molecular mechanisms of the interactions between Lactobacillus reuteri strains and intestinal mucus

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffers, Faye

    2012-01-01

    Mucus is the first point of contact between the gut microbiota and the host. Here we used the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between gut bacteria and mucus. Firstly, the mucus binding ability of a collection of L. reuteri strains from different vertebrate hosts was assessed in vitro against mucus extracted from mouse and porcine gastrointestinal tracts. The adhesion profile was strain-specific showing the highest bindi...

  15. The Interaction of Large Bowel Microflora with the Colonic Mucus Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Jeffrey P.; Brownlee, Iain A.

    2010-01-01

    The colonic mucus barrier is the first line of defence that the underlying mucosa has against the wide range of potentially damaging agents of microbial, endogenous, and dietary origin that occur within the colonic lumen. The functional component of mucus is the secreted, polymeric glycoprotein mucin. The mucus barrier can either act as an energy source or a support medium for growth to the intestinal microflora. The mucus barrier appears to effectively partition the vast number of microbial ...

  16. Halliburton Composite Bridge Plug Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starbuck, J.M.; Luttrell, C.R.; Aramayo, G.

    2005-01-15

    The overall objectives of this CRADA were to assist Halliburton in analyzing a composite bridge plug and to determine why their original design was failing in the field. In Phase 1, finite element analyses were done on the original composite slip design and several alternative designs. The composite slip was the component in the bridge plug that was failing. The finite element code ABAQUS was used for these calculations and I-DEAS was used as the pre- and post-processor in the analyses. Several different designs and materials were analyzed and recommendations were made towards improving the design. In Phase 2, the objective was to develop finite element models that would accurately represent the deformations in the entire all-composite 4-1/2' diameter bridge plug assembly. The finite element code LS-DYNA was used and the results from this effort were intended to expand Halliburton's composite design and analysis capabilities with regard to developing future composite components for downhole tools. In addition to the finite element modeling, this effort involved the utilization of micromechanics to determine the necessary composite material properties that were needed as input for finite element codes.

  17. Direct visualization of mucus production by the cold-water coral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetsche, E.-M.; Baussant, T.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Van Oevelen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Lophelia pertusa is the dominant reef-building organism of cold-water coral reefs, and is known to produce significant amounts of mucus, which could involve an important metabolic cost. Mucus is involved in particle removal and feeding processes, yet the triggers and dynamics of mucus product

  18. EFFECTIVENESS OF COUGH FOR ENHANCING MUCUS CLEARANCE IN ASYMPTOMATIC SMOKERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using monodisperse aerosols radiolabeled with 99mTc, we studied the effectiveness of ough and rapid inhalations for clearing mucus in en asymptomatic smokers. On three eparate study days, each subject breathed 5 um (MMAD) 99mTc-iron oxide particles under ontrolled breathing condi...

  19. Human intestinal mucus proteins isolated by transanal irrigation and proctosigmoidoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Andrea Gómez Buitrago

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human intestinal mucus essentially consistsof a network of Mucin2 glycoproteinsembedded in many lower molecularweight proteins. This paper contributes tothe proteomic study of human intestinalmucus by comparing two sample collectionmethods (transanal irrigation and brushcytology during proctosigmoidoscopy andanalysis techniques (electrophoresis anddigestion in solution. The entire samplecollection and treatment process is explained,including protein extraction, digestion anddesalination and peptide characterisationusing a nanoAcquity UPLC chromatographcoupled to an HDMS spectrometer equippedwith a nanoESI source. Collecting mucus viatransanal irrigation provided a larger samplevolume and protein concentration from asingle patient. The proctosigmoidoscopysample could be analysed via digestion insolution after depleting albumin. The analysisindicates that a simple mucus lysis methodcan evaluate the electrophoresis and digestionin solution techniques. Studying humanintestinal mucus complexes is importantbecause they perform two essential survivalfunctions for humans as the first biochemicaland physical defences for the gastrointestinaltract and a habitat for intestinal microbiota,which are primarily hosted in the colon andexceeds the human genetic information andcell number 100- and 10-fold (1.

  20. Susceptibility to chronic mucus hypersecretion, a genome wide association study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Dijkstra (Akkelies); J. Smolonska (Joanna); M. van den Berge (Maarten); C. Wijmenga (Ciska); P. Zanen (Pieter); M.A. Luinge (Marjan); I. Platteel (Inge); J.-W.J. Lammers (Jan-Willem); M. Dahlback (Magnus); K. Tosh (Kerrie); P.S. Hiemstra (Pieter); P.J. Sterk (Peter); M.E. Spira (Micha); J. Vestbo (Jorgen); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); M. Benn (Marianne); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); M. Dahl (Morten); W.M.M. Verschuren (W. M. Monique); H.S.J. Picavet (Susan); H.A. Smit (Henriëtte); M. Owsijewitsch (Michael); H.U. Kauczor (Hans); H.J. de Koning (Harry); E. Nizankowska-Mogilnicka (Eva); F. Mejza (Filip); P. Nastalek (Pawel); C.C. van Diemen (Cleo); M.H. Cho (Michael); E.K. Silverman (Edwin); R.O. Crapo (Robert); T.H. Beaty (Terri); D.J. Lomas (David John); A.B. Bakke (Arnold B.); A. Gulsvik (Amund); Y. Bossé (Yohan); M. Obeidat; D.W. Loth (Daan); L. Lahousse (Lies); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); G.G. Brusselle (Guy); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); U. Brouwer (Uilke); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); J.M. Vonk (Judith); M.C. Nawijn (Martijn); H.J.M. Groen (Henk); W. Timens (Wim); H.M. Boezen (H. Marike); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); R.A. de Boer; M. Bruinenberg (M.); L. Franke (Lude); P. van der Harst (Pim); H.L. Hillege (Hans); M.M. van der Klauw (Melanie); G. Navis (Gerjan); J. Ormel (Johan); J. Rosmalen (Jgm); J.P.J. Slaets (Joris); H. Snieder (Harold); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); B. Wolffenbuttel (Bhr)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minor

  1. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign-Hodges, Laura

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. Here, we investigate the use of muco-inert mucus-penetrating nanoparticles (MPP) for improving vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery. Conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles strongly adhere to mucus, facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that mucoadhesive polystyrene nanoparticles (conventional nanoparticles, CP) become mucus-penetrating in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) after pretreatment with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large MPP did not change in F127 pretreated CVM, implying there is no affect on the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for one week. Importantly, HSV virus remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM. Mucosal epithelia use osmotic gradients for fluid absorption and secretion. We hypothesized that hypotonically-induced fluid uptake could be advantageous for rapidly delivering drugs through mucus to the vaginal epithelium. We evaluated hypotonic formulations for delivering water-soluble drugs and for drug delivery with MPP. Hypotonic formulations markedly increased the rate at which drugs and MPP reached the epithelial surface. Additionally, hypotonic formulations greatly enhanced drug and MPP delivery to the entire epithelial surface, including deep into the vaginal folds (rugae) that isotonic formulations

  2. Pretreatment of Human Cervicovaginal Mucus with Pluronic F127 Enhances Nanoparticle Penetration without Compromising Mucus Barrier Properties to Herpes Simplex Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Ensign, Laura M.; Lai, Samuel K.; Wang, Ying-Ying; Yang, Ming; Mert, Olcay; Hanes, Justin; Cone, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal drug delivery nanotechnologies are limited by the mucus barrier that protects nearly all epithelial surfaces not covered with skin. Most polymeric nanoparticles, including polystyrene nanoparticles (PS), strongly adhere to mucus, thereby limiting penetration and facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that PS rapidly penetrate human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM), if the CVM has been pretreated with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diff...

  3. Plug Load Behavioral Change Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, I.; Kandt, A.; VanGeet, O.

    2011-08-01

    This report documents the methods and results of a plug load study of the Environmental Protection Agency's Region 8 Headquarters in Denver, Colorado, conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The study quantified the effect of mechanical and behavioral change approaches on plug load energy reduction and identified effective ways to reduce plug load energy. Load reduction approaches included automated energy management systems and behavioral change strategies.

  4. Cervical insemination versus intra-uterine insemination of donor sperm for subfertility (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Besselink, D.E.; Farquhar, C; Kremer, J A M; Marjoribanks, J.; O'Brien, P

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insemination with donor sperm is an option for couples for whom in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has been unsuccessful, couples with azoospermia and for single women or same sex couples.Insemination of sperm can be done via cervical (CI) or intra-uterine (IUI) routes. IUI has been considered potentially more effective than CI as the sperm bypasses the cervical mucus and is deposited closer to the fallopian tubes. The cost and risks of IUI ma...

  5. Plug into 'the modernizing machine'!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John B.

    2013-01-01

    bodies and minds simultaneously produce academic subjectivities by plugging into these transformative machinic forces and are produced as they are traversed by them. What is experienced as stressful closures vis-à-vis new opportunities depends to a great extent upon how these producing...... before and after this law are productions of those struggles that change what it means to work as an academic subject at a university. This is staged through a host of new social technologies such as development contracts, appraisal interviews, individual performance reviews and so forth. Individual...

  6. The Interaction of Large Bowel Microflora with the Colonic Mucus Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P. Pearson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The colonic mucus barrier is the first line of defence that the underlying mucosa has against the wide range of potentially damaging agents of microbial, endogenous, and dietary origin that occur within the colonic lumen. The functional component of mucus is the secreted, polymeric glycoprotein mucin. The mucus barrier can either act as an energy source or a support medium for growth to the intestinal microflora. The mucus barrier appears to effectively partition the vast number of microbial cells from the underlying epithelium. The normal functionality and biochemistry of this mucus barrier appears to be lost in diseases of the colorectal mucosa. Germ-free animal studies have highlighted the necessity of the presence of the colonic microflora to drive the maturation of the colonic mucosa and normal mucus production. A number of by-products of the microflora have been suggested to be key luminal drivers of colonic mucus secretion.

  7. Plug-In Tutor Agents: Still Pluggin'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Steven

    2016-01-01

    "An Architecture for Plug-in Tutor Agents" (Ritter and Koedinger 1996) proposed a software architecture designed around the idea that tutors could be built as plug-ins for existing software applications. Looking back on the paper now, we can see that certain assumptions about the future of software architecture did not come to be, making…

  8. Mastering Eclipse plug-in development

    CERN Document Server

    Blewitt, Alex

    2014-01-01

    If you are a Java developer who is familiar with the Eclipse plug-in environment, this book covers the advanced concepts that you need to know to achieve true expertise. Prior experience in creating Eclipse plug-ins is assumed for this book.

  9. Coral mucus is a hot spot for viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen-Kim, Hanh; Bettarel, Yvan; Bouvier, Thierry; Bouvier, Corinne; Doan-Nhu, Hai; Nguyen-Ngoc, Lam; Nguyen-Thanh, Thuy; Tran-Quang, Huy; Brune, Justine

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing suspicion that viral communities play a pivotal role in maintaining coral health, yet their main ecological traits still remain poorly characterized. In this study, we examined the seasonal distribution and reproduction pathways of viruses inhabiting the mucus of the scleractinians Fungia repanda and Acropora formosa collected in Nha Trang Bay (Vietnam) during an 11-month survey. The strong coupling between epibiotic viral and bacterial abundance suggested that phages are ...

  10. Microbes enriched in seawater after addition of coral mucus

    OpenAIRE

    Allers, E; Niesner, C; Wild, C; Pernthaler, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated which microbial taxa in coastal Red Sea water were stimulated by addition of mucus from the coral Fungia sp. Decreases in the concentration and C/N ratio of particulate organic material during short-term incubations (50 h) were paralleled by a steep rise in the number of Gammaproteobacteria, particularly Alteromonadaceae, followed by Vibrionaceae. Two almost identical genotypes affiliated with Alteromonas macleodii accounted for up to >85% of all Alteromonadaceae (45% of the t...

  11. A Novel Oligosaccharide from the Mucus of the Loach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel oligosaccharide was isolated and purified from the mucus of the loach,Misgurnus anguillicaudatus.It was identified by several qualitative tests and characterized by elementary analysis,UV and IR spectrum.Its average molecular weight (Mw=1539.4) was determined by gel permeation chromatography.The major structural monomers of Misgurnus anguillicaudatus oligosaccharide were identified to be D-galactose and L-fucose by paper chromatography and gas chromatography.

  12. New developments in goblet cell mucus secretion and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, G M H; Johansson, M E V; Gustafsson, J K; Bergström, J H; Hansson, G C

    2015-07-01

    Goblet cells and their main secretory product, mucus, have long been poorly appreciated; however, recent discoveries have changed this and placed these cells at the center stage of our understanding of mucosal biology and the immunology of the intestinal tract. The mucus system differs substantially between the small and large intestine, although it is built around MUC2 mucin polymers in both cases. Furthermore, that goblet cells and the regulation of their secretion also differ between these two parts of the intestine is of fundamental importance for a better understanding of mucosal immunology. There are several types of goblet cell that can be delineated based on their location and function. The surface colonic goblet cells secrete continuously to maintain the inner mucus layer, whereas goblet cells of the colonic and small intestinal crypts secrete upon stimulation, for example, after endocytosis or in response to acetyl choline. However, despite much progress in recent years, our understanding of goblet cell function and regulation is still in its infancy.

  13. Coral Mucus Is a Hot Spot for Viral Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Kim, Hanh; Bettarel, Yvan; Bouvier, Thierry; Bouvier, Corinne; Doan-Nhu, Hai; Nguyen-Ngoc, Lam; Nguyen-Thanh, Thuy; Tran-Quang, Huy; Brune, Justine

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing suspicion that viral communities play a pivotal role in maintaining coral health, yet their main ecological traits still remain poorly characterized. In this study, we examined the seasonal distribution and reproduction pathways of viruses inhabiting the mucus of the scleractinians Fungia repanda and Acropora formosa collected in Nha Trang Bay (Vietnam) during an 11-month survey. The strong coupling between epibiotic viral and bacterial abundance suggested that phages are dominant among coral-associated viral communities. Mucosal viruses also exhibited significant differences in their main features between the two coral species and were also remarkably contrasted with their planktonic counterparts. For example, their abundance (inferred from epifluorescence counts), lytic production rates (KCN incubations), and the proportion of lysogenic cells (mitomycin C inductions) were, respectively, 2.6-, 9.5-, and 2.2-fold higher in mucus than in the surrounding water. Both lytic and lysogenic indicators were tightly coupled with temperature and salinity, suggesting that the life strategy of viral epibionts is strongly dependent upon environmental circumstances. Finally, our results suggest that coral mucus may represent a highly favorable habitat for viral proliferation, promoting the development of both temperate and virulent phages. Here, we discuss how such an optimized viral arsenal could be crucial for coral viability by presumably forging complex links with both symbiotic and adjacent nonsymbiotic microorganisms. PMID:26092456

  14. Numerical Investigation of Separated Plug Nozzle Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Modern analysis techniques that provide improved viability have enabled further investigation of plug nozzle rocket engines as advanced launch vehicle concepts. A plug nozzle for future single-stage-to-orbit vehicles in China has been designed, and the flow field in the plug nozzle has been studied numerically for different ambient pressures. Calculations were performed by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for an ideal gas. Turbulence is modelled using the k-ε turbulence model. The advantages of the plug nozzles are the external expansion, which automatically adapts to external pressure variations, and the short compact design for high expansion ratios. Expansion waves, compression shocks, and the separated base flow dominate the flow structures and affect the plug nozzle rocket engine performance.

  15. Hydrate plug decomposition: Measurements and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousif, M.H.; Dunayevsky, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Depressurization (venting) is almost the only option available to remove hydrate blockages from subsea natural gas or gas condensate pipelines. This process is normally applied with little or no accurate information about the plug location, size or composition. Hydrate decomposition by depressurization is a heat and mass transfer dependent process. Quantifying this dependency is necessary to perform an optimum plug removal scheme. In this paper, a moving boundary mathematical model is developed to predict the decomposition rate of a hydrate plug under various depressurization scenarios. The model was validated experimentally by measuring the rate of decomposition of hydrate plugs in a 2 inch internal diameter, 38.5 inch long pipe. The motion of the hydrate plug/gas interface is tracked by 16 pairs of infrared light transmitters and receivers diametrically positioned across the pipe.

  16. Optical tweezers reveal relationship between microstructure and nanoparticle penetration of pulmonary mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Julian; Schneider, Andreas; Abou, Bérengère; Hopf, Alexander; Schaefer, Ulrich F.; Schneider, Marc; Schall, Christian; Wagner, Christian; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the mobility of nanoparticles in mucus and similar hydrogels as model systems was assessed to elucidate the link between microscopic diffusion behavior and macroscopic penetration of such gels. Differences in particle adhesion to mucus components were strongly dependent on particle coating. Particles coated with 2 kDa PEG exhibited a decreased adhesion to mucus components, whereas chitosan strongly increased the adhesion. Despite such mucoinert properties of PEG, magnetic nanoparticles of both coatings did not penetrate through native respiratory mucus, resisting high magnetic forces (even for several hours). However, model hydrogels were, indeed, penetrated by both particles in dependency of particle coating, obeying the theory of particle mobility in an external force field. Comparison of penetration data with cryogenic scanning EM images of mucus and the applied model systems suggested particularly high rigidity of the mucin scaffold and a broad pore size distribution in mucus as reasons for the observed particle immobilization. Active probing of the rigidity of mucus and model gels with optical tweezers was used in this context to confirm such properties of mucus on the microscale, thus presenting the missing link between micro- and macroscopical observations. Because of high heterogeneity in the size of the voids and pores in mucus, on small scales, particle mobility will depend on adhesive or inert properties. However, particle translocation over distances larger than a few micrometers is restricted by highly rigid structures within the mucus mesh. PMID:23091027

  17. The influence of small intestinal mucus structure on particle transport ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajka, Balázs H; Rigby, Neil M; Cross, Kathryn L; Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    Mucus provides a barrier to bacteria and toxins while allowing nutrient absorption and waste transport. Unlike colonic mucus, small intestinal mucus structure is poorly understood. This study aimed to provide evidence for a continuous, structured mucus layer and assess the diffusion of different sized particles through it. Mucus structure was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ultra-structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Tracking of 100 nm and 500 nm latex beads was conducted using ex vivo porcine mucus. The porcine jejunum and ileum were filled with mucus. Layered MUC2 staining was visible throughout the small intestine, covering villus tips. Scanning electron microscopy showed net-like mucin sheets covering villi (211 ± 7 nm pore diameter). Particle tracking of 100 nm latex beads, showed no inhibition of diffusion through mucus while 500 nm beads displayed limited diffusion. These results suggest a continuous mucus layer exists throughout the small intestine, which is highly stratified adjacent to the epithelium. The network observed is consistent with previous observations and correlates with stratified MUC2 staining. Mucin pore size is consistent with free diffusion of 100 nm and limited diffusion of 500 nm particles. Small Intestinal mucus structure has important implications for drug delivery systems and prevention and treatment of conditions like mucositis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. The effect of nanoparticle permeation on the bulk rheological properties of mucus from the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, M D; Van Rooij, L K; Chater, P I; Pereira de Sousa, I; Pearson, J P

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of delivering oral therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleotides is often hindered by the protective mucus barrier that covers mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Encapsulation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in nanocarriers is a potential strategy to protect the cargo but they still have to pass the mucus barrier. Decorating nanoparticles with proteolytic enzymes has been shown to increase the permeation through mucus. Here we investigate the effect of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (BRO), a proteolytic enzyme from pineapple stem, on the bulk rheology of mucus as well as non-decorated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. Porcine intestinal mucus from the small intestine was incubated for 30min in the presence of PLGA nanoparticles or polyacrylic nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (PAA-BRO). The effect of nanoparticles on the rheological properties, weight of gel, released glycoprotein content from mucus as well as the viscosity of liquid removed was assessed. Treatment with nanoparticles decreased mucus gel strength with PAA-BRO reducing it the most. PAA-BRO nanoparticles resulted in the release of increased glycoprotein from the gel network whereas mucus remained a gel and exhibited a similar breakdown stress to control mucus. Therefore it would be possible to use bromelain to increase the permeability of nanoparticles through mucus without destroying the gel and leaving the underlying mucosa unprotected. PMID:25758122

  19. The effect of nanoparticle permeation on the bulk rheological properties of mucus from the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, M D; Van Rooij, L K; Chater, P I; Pereira de Sousa, I; Pearson, J P

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of delivering oral therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleotides is often hindered by the protective mucus barrier that covers mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Encapsulation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in nanocarriers is a potential strategy to protect the cargo but they still have to pass the mucus barrier. Decorating nanoparticles with proteolytic enzymes has been shown to increase the permeation through mucus. Here we investigate the effect of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (BRO), a proteolytic enzyme from pineapple stem, on the bulk rheology of mucus as well as non-decorated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. Porcine intestinal mucus from the small intestine was incubated for 30min in the presence of PLGA nanoparticles or polyacrylic nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (PAA-BRO). The effect of nanoparticles on the rheological properties, weight of gel, released glycoprotein content from mucus as well as the viscosity of liquid removed was assessed. Treatment with nanoparticles decreased mucus gel strength with PAA-BRO reducing it the most. PAA-BRO nanoparticles resulted in the release of increased glycoprotein from the gel network whereas mucus remained a gel and exhibited a similar breakdown stress to control mucus. Therefore it would be possible to use bromelain to increase the permeability of nanoparticles through mucus without destroying the gel and leaving the underlying mucosa unprotected.

  20. Manipulating liquid plugs in microchannel with controllable air vents

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hao-Bing; Ting, Eng Kiat; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2012-01-01

    An air venting element on microchannel, which can be controlled externally and automatically, was demonstrated for manipulating liquid plugs in microfluidic systems. The element’s open and closed statuses correspond to the positioning and movement of a liquid plug in the microchannel. Positioning of multiple liquid plugs at an air venting element enabled the merging and mixing of the plugs. Besides these basic functions, other modes of liquid plug manipulations including plug partitioning, mu...

  1. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  2. Separator plugs for liquid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. M.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1984-01-01

    Work performed during Summer 1984 (from June to Sept. 30) in the area of porous media for use in low temperature applications is discussed. Recent applications are in the area of vapor - liquid phase separation, pumping based on the fountain effect and related subsystems. Areas of potential applications of the latter are outlined in supplementary work. Experimental data have been developed. The linear equations of the two-fluid model are inspected critically in the light of forced convection evidence reported recently. It is emphasized that the Darcy permeability is a unique throughput quantity in the porous media application areas whose use will permit meaningful comparisons of data not only in one lab but also within a group of labs doing porous plug studies.

  3. Plug-in Hybrid Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Angie; Moore, Ray; Rowden, Tim

    2013-09-27

    Our main project objective was to implement Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) and charging infrastructure into our electric distribution service territory and help reduce barriers in the process. Our research demonstrated the desire for some to be early adopters of electric vehicles and the effects lack of education plays on others. The response of early adopters was tremendous: with the initial launch of our program we had nearly 60 residential customers interested in taking part in our program. However, our program only allowed for 15 residential participants. Our program provided assistance towards purchasing a PEV and installation of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE). The residential participants have all come to love their PEVs and are more than enthusiastic about promoting the many benefits of driving electric.

  4. COMPARE THE LEVEL OF SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA ANTIGEN IN SERUM AND LOCAL IMMUNITY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT IN WOMEN WITH INVASIVE FORM OF CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Baturina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Cervical cancer continues to take a leading position in the structure of cancer pathology in women. This situation calls for the search for new diagnostic criteria for prognosis of the disease. The study found that tumor marker SCCA is immunologically dependent and its detection should be carried out in conjunction with immunological parameters of cervical mucus. This is important not only for diagnosis but also for monitoring of anticancer therapy conducted to determine prognosis of the disease and preclinical detection recurrence of cervical cancer.

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  6. Comparative permeability of some acyclovir derivatives through native mucus and crude mucin dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legen; Kristl, A

    2001-08-01

    The permeability of some guanine derivatives (acyclovir [ACV], deoxyacyclovir [DCV], and their N-acetyl congeners) through native porcine mucus and crude porcine mucin dispersions (30% and 50% w/v) was investigated in two-compartment dialysis cells. High correlation between apparent permeability coefficients Papp of tested substances determined in these two models was observed, although the examined compounds permeated faster through the native mucus. It was also established that Papp values decrease with increasing hydrophilicity and molecular mass of the tested substances. Furthermore, the influence of some substances that affect mucus structure (cysteine, N-acetylcysteine [NCY], sodium taurocholate [ST], and sodium chloride) on the permeation rate of the examined compounds through mucus and mucin dispersions was examined. It was shown that the Papp values of guanine derivatives were generally lower after the addition of these substances to the native mucus and mucin dispersions, although the lowering effect was more pronounced in the case of native mucus.

  7. Defense and adaptation: The complex inter-relationship between Campylobacter jejuni and mucus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abofu eAlemka

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mucus colonization is the first step towards the establishment of infection and disease by mucosal pathogens. There is an emerging literature implicating specific mucin subtypes and mucin modifications in protecting the host from Campylobacter jejuni infection. However, mucosal pathogens have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to breach the mucus layer and C. jejuni in particular appears to harbor specific adaptations to better colonize intestinal mucus. For example, components of mucus are chemotactic for C. jejuni and the rheological properties of mucus promote motility of the organism. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrate that mucins modulate the pathogenicity of C. jejuni in a species-specific manner and likely help determine whether these bacteria become pathogenic (as in humans, or adopt a commensal mode of existence (as in chickens and other animals. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the complex interplay between C. jejuni and components of the mucus layer.

  8. Size-Limited Penetration of Nanoparticles into Porcine Respiratory Mucus after Aerosol Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Xabier; Pawelzyk, Paul; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Wagner, Christian; Willenbacher, Norbert; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-04-11

    We investigated the rheological properties and the penetration of differently sized carboxylated nanoparticles in pig pulmonary mucus, on different distance and time scales. Nanoparticles were either mechanically mixed into the mucus samples or deposited as an aerosol, the latter resembling a more physiologically relevant delivery scenario. After mechanical dispersion, 500 nm particles were locally trapped; a fraction of carboxylated tracer particles of 100 or 200 nm in diameter could however freely diffuse in these networks over distances of approximately 20 μm. In contrast, after aerosol deposition on top of the mucus layer only particles with a size of 100 nm were able to penetrate into mucus, suggesting the presence of smaller pores at the air-mucus interface compared to within mucus. These findings are relevant to an understanding of the fate of potentially harmful aerosol particles, such as pathogens, pollutants, and other nanomaterials after incidental inhalation, as well as for the design of pulmonary drug delivery systems. PMID:26957140

  9. Coral mucus functions as an energy carrier and particle trap in the reef ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, C.; Huettel, M.; Klueter, A.;

    2004-01-01

    Zooxanthellae, endosymbiotic algae of reef-building corals, substantially contribute to the high gross primary production of coral reefs(1), but corals exude up to half of the carbon assimilated by their zooxanthellae as mucus(2,3). Here we show that released coral mucus efficiently traps organic...... matter from the water column and rapidly carries energy and nutrients to the reef lagoon sediment, which acts as a biocatalytic mineralizing filter. In the Great Barrier Reef, the dominant genus of hard corals, Acropora, exudes up to 4.8 litres of mucus per square metre of reef area per day. Between 56......% and 80% of this mucus dissolves in the reef water, which is filtered through the lagoon sands. Here, coral mucus is degraded at a turnover rate of at least 7% per hour. Detached undissolved mucus traps suspended particles, increasing its initial organic carbon and nitrogen content by three orders...

  10. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  11. End plug welding method for control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cladding tube of a control rod has a coating layer of plated hard chromium or the like on the outer surface of the tube main body. The outer edge of an end plug to be attached to the end portion of the cladding tube has a tapered face opposing to the end portion of the cladding tube. The end plug is inserted under pressure to the end portion of the cladding tube in a state where neutron absorbers are contained and a coil spring is inserted in the cladding tube. Electric current is applied between the tube main body and the end plug in this state. The tube main body and the end plug are heated by their intrinsic resistance and contact resistance up to a weldable temperature. The tube main body and the end plug are joined by an urging pressure applied between the tube main body and the end plug. Since the end plug is welded to the end portion of the cladding tube at the circumference thereof by resistance welding, there is no worry of intruding the coating material to the welding portion, thereby enabling to attain satisfactory welding. (I.N.)

  12. The role of mucus in the cross talk between gut bacteria and the host

    OpenAIRE

    Kober, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The mammalian gastrointestinal tract is home to a complex microbial community engaged in a dynamic interaction with the immune system. Mucus is the first point of contact of the microbiota with the host, acting as a first line of defence. Furthermore γδ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) respond to the invading bacteria that circumvent the mucus barrier. In this study two approaches were used to investigate the role of mucus in intestinal homeostasis; firstly the im...

  13. Protein content and pattern during mucus gland maturation and its ecdysteroid control in honey bee drones

    OpenAIRE

    Colonello, Nínive; Hartfelder, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    International audience We analyzed mucus gland protein content and pattern for drones of Africanized honey bees. The effect of exogenous ecdysteroids on mucus gland maturation was judged against the endogenous ecdysteroid titer. During the first 5 days of adult life, the mucus protein content increases steeply, whereas the protein pattern becomes reduced in complexity. Subsequently, the protein content decreases, reaching a plateau level at day 8. The protein pattern of mature glands is ch...

  14. Different macro- and micro-rheological properties of native porcine respiratory and intestinal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokkasam, Harish; Ernst, Matthias; Guenther, Marco; Wagner, Christian; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-08-20

    Aim of this study was to investigate the similarities and differences at macro- and microscale in the viscoelastic properties of mucus that covers the epithelia of the intestinal and respiratory tract. Natural mucus was collected from pulmonary and intestinal regions of healthy pigs. Macro-rheological investigations were carried out through conventional plate-plate rheometry. Microrheology was investigated using optical tweezers. Our data revealed significant differences both in macro- and micro-rheological properties between respiratory and intestinal mucus.

  15. Nano-carrier systems: Strategies to overcome the mucus gel barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dünnhaupt, S; Kammona, O; Waldner, C; Kiparissides, C; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2015-10-01

    The present review provides an overview of nanotechnology-based strategies to overcome various mucus gel barriers including the intestinal, nasal, ocular, vaginal, buccal and pulmonary mucus layer without destroying them. It focuses on the one hand on strategies to improve the mucus permeation behavior of particles and on the other hand on systems avoiding the back-diffusion of particles out of the mucus gel layer. Nanocarriers with improved mucus permeation behavior either exhibit a high density of positive and negative charges, bearing mucolytic enzymes such as papain and bromelain on their surface or display a slippery surface due to PEG-ylation. Furthermore, self-nanoemulsifying-drug-delivery-systems (SNEDDS) turned out to exhibit comparatively high mucus permeating properties. Strategies in order to avoid back-diffusion are based on thiolated polymers reacting to a higher extent with cysteine subunits of the mucus at pH 7 in deeper mucus regions than at pH 5 being prevalent in luminal mucus regions of the intestinal and vaginal mucosa. Furthermore, particles changing their zeta potential from negative to positive once they have reached the epithelium seem to be promising carriers. The summarized knowledge should provide a good starting point for further developments in this field. PMID:25712487

  16. Luteolin Attenuates Airway Mucus Overproduction via Inhibition of the GABAergic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chen-Hung; Lin, Ching-Huei; Zhou, Ning; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2016-09-01

    Airway mucus overproduction is one of the most common symptoms of asthma that causes severe clinical outcomes in patients. Despite the effectiveness of general asthma therapies, specific treatments that prevent mucus overproduction in asthma patients remain lacking. Recent studies have found that activation of GABAA receptors (GABAAR) is important for promoting mucus oversecretion in lung airway epithelia. Here, we report that luteolin, a natural flavonoid compound, suppresses mucus overproduction by functionally inhibiting the GABAergic system. This hypothesis was investigated by testing the effects of luteolin on goblet cell hyperplasia, excessive mucus secretion, and GABAergic transmission using histological and electrophysiological approaches. Our results showed that 10 mg/kg luteolin significantly decreased the number of goblet cells in the lung tissue and inhibited mucus overproduction in an in vivo asthma model induced by ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Patch-clamp recordings showed that luteolin inhibited GABAAR-mediated currents in A549 cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of luteolin on OVA-induced goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus overproduction were occluded by the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin. In conclusion, our observations indicate that luteolin effectively attenuates mucus overproduction at least partially by inhibiting GABAARs, suggesting the potential for therapeutic administration of luteolin in the treatment of mucus overproduction in asthma patients.

  17. Biochemical characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies on skin mucus of fresh water spiny eel Mastacembelus armatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Venkatachalam Uthayakumar; Venkatachalam Ramasubramanian; Dhanabalan Senthilkumar; Ramasamy Harikrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the biochemical, antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of Mastacembalus armatus skin mucus. Methods: Antimicrobial and antifungal activities of mucus extractions against human and fish pathogens were tested along with ampicillin as control. Hemolytic activity of the extraction was evaluated against sheep and cow blood cells. Amino acid and fatty acid profiles were analyzed by HPLC and gas chromatography in the mucus of fish. SDS-PAGE analysis of mucus and muscle tissue was done. Oneway-ANOVA was performed against all extraction and pathogens, amino acids and fatty acids. Result: All the mucus extracts exhibited higher inhibitory activity than antibiotic ampicillin against bacterial and fungal pathogens. The hemolytic activity was increased with higher mucus concentrations in both sheep and cow blood cells. The protein content soluble and insoluble fractions of mucus were 63.22 μg/g and 55.79μg/g, respectively. Out of 17 amino acids leucine was higher (8.54 mole %) in soluble gel, and glutamic acid was higher (6.92 mole %) in the insoluble gel, Histidine was very low (i.e. 0.20 mole%) both in soluble and (0.30 mole %) insoluble gel. In SDS-PAGE analysis, 6 bands of mucus and 9 bands of muscle were observed. Conclusions: The soluble and insoluble proteins are responsible for antimicrobial and hemolytic activity, these results indicate that mucus gel was prospective applications in fish and human therapeutics.

  18. Antibacterial substance from mucus of a scleractinian coral,Symphyllia gigantea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guohua; HUANG Liangmin; TAN Yehui; YIN Jianqiang; WANG Hankui; HUANG Hui; ZOU Kun; LI Ruiping

    2007-01-01

    Coral mucus covers the surface of coral and contains antibacterial substances as a first line of defense. Coral mucus not only enables the coral itself to resist disease, but also provides antibacterial agents for people. We collected mucus from a scleractinian coral (Symphyllia gigantea) at Sta. Sanya (China), then extracted the antibacterial substances using 10% glacial acetic acid with the help of antiprotease inhibitors, and tested the antibacterial activity by a terrestrial bacterium (Staphylococcus aurevs) and a marine bacterium (Vibrio anguillarum). The result showed that, there were antibacterial agents in the mucus, and their antibacterial activities were lost by treatment of the sample at 90 °C water for 10 min.

  19. Instrumented model pile tests on sand plugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaren, L.J.C. van; Verruijt, A. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Kolk, H.J. [Fugro Engineers B.V., Leidschendam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    0pen ended piles develop internal frictional resistance between the internal soil plug end the pile wall during axial loading. Current pipe pile design practice assumes that the ultimate internal skin friction is of the same order of magnitude as the outer skin friction. This paper describes a series of laboratory pile load tests on instrumented model pipe piles, designed to investigate the development of plug stresses and skin friction along the plug length during pile loading. The piles contain sand columns of various relative densities and of different heights. The soil plugs are loaded to failure under fully drained conditions. The test data indicate that internal skin friction in sand can be substantially higher than assumed in conventional design practice. This finding could lead to significant economical savings on future pipe pile foundations in sand.

  20. Upper end plug of fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a seal-welding of an upper end plug of a fuel rod for nuclear fuels conducted in a final stage of molding fabrication of the fuel rod in a pressurized helium gas. A welding protrusion is formed at the periphery of a vent hole on the upper surface of the upper end plug, and the welding protrusion is melted by irradiation of laser beams. The melted protrusion intrudes into the end portion of the bent hole by capillary to close the vent hole. The upper end plug can be closed by an extremely simple operation of irradiating the laser beams to the protrusion. Control for electrode gap on every fuel rods and exchange for the electrodes as in TIG welding can be saved, thereby enabling to speed up and simplify the sealing operation for the upper end plug. (N.H.)

  1. Modular, Plug and Play, Distributed Avionics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this SBIR effort was to prove the viability of an Ethernet version of the MicroSat Systems, Inc. (MSI) modular, plug and play (PnP) spacecraft...

  2. Hybrid and Plug-in Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-05-20

    Hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles use electricity either as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. This new generation of vehicles, often called electric drive vehicles, can be divided into three categories: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles(PHEVs), and all-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, they have great potential to reduce U.S. petroleum use.

  3. Femoral Bone Plug in Total Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcano, Ettore; Regazzola, Gianmarco M V; Murena, Luigi; Ronga, Mario; Cherubino, Paolo; Surace, Michele F

    2015-10-01

    The intramedullary alignment guides used in total knee replacement disrupt the intramedullary vessels, resulting in greater postoperative blood loss. The use of an autologous bone plug to seal the intramedullary femoral canal has been shown to be effective in reducing postoperative bleeding. The authors present a simple technique to create a bone plug from the anterior chamfer femoral cut to perfectly seal the intramedullary canal of the femur. PMID:26488774

  4. Fate of paclitaxel lipid nanocapsules in intestinal mucus in view of their oral delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groo AC

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Anne-Claire Groo,1,2 Patrick Saulnier,1 Jean-Christophe Gimel,1 Julien Gravier,3 Caroline Ailhas,2 Jean-Pierre Benoit,1,4 Frederic Lagarce1,4 1LUNAM Université, INSERM U1066 Micro et nanomédecines biomimétiques, Angers, France; 2Ethypharm, Grand-Quevilly, France; 3Institut Albert Bonniot, INSERM/UJF U823, La Tronche, France; 4Pharmacy Department, Angers University Hospital, Angers, France Abstract: The bioavailability of paclitaxel (Ptx has previously been improved via its encapsulation in lipid nanocapsules (LNCs. In this work, the interactions between LNCs and intestinal mucus are studied because they are viewed as an important barrier to successful oral delivery. The rheological properties of different batches of pig intestinal mucus were studied under different conditions (the effect of hydration and the presence of LNCs. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET was used to study the stability of LNCs in mucus at 37°C for at least 3 hours. Diffusion through 223, 446, and 893 µm mucus layers of 8.4, 16.8, and 42 µg/mL Ptx formulated as Taxol® (Bristol-Myers Squibb, Rueil-Malmaison, France or encapsulated in LNCs (Ptx-LNCs were investigated. The effect of the size of the LNCs on their diffusion was also investigated (range, 25–110 nm in diameter. Mucus behaves as a non-Newtonian gel with rheofluidifying properties and a flow threshold. The viscous (G˝ and elastic (G´ moduli and flow threshold of the two mucus batches varied with water content, but G´ remained below G˝. LNCs had no effect on mucus viscosity and flow threshold. The FRET efficiency remained at 78% after 3 hours. Because the destruction of the LNCs would lead to a FRET efficiency below 25%, these results suggest only a slight modification of LNCs after their contact with mucus. The diffusion of Taxol® and Ptx-LNCs in mucus decreases if the mucus layer is thicker. Interestingly, the apparent permeability across mucus is higher for Ptx-LNCs than for Taxol® for

  5. Elastocapillary powered manipulation of liquid plug in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D.; Anoop, R.; Sen, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    We report the manipulation of a liquid plug inside a rectangular microchannel, when one of the channel walls is a deformable membrane, which adjoins another parallel microchannel. Elastocapillary flow of a driving liquid (DL) through the adjoining microchannel, when approaches the plug, tries to pull the membrane near the plug, which is initially deflected into the plug, towards the DL. The plug is transported due to a differential pressure that develops across the plug owing to the increase in the radius of curvature of the trailing meniscus of the plug. A theoretical model is proposed to predict the plug velocity, which depends on a parameter J and plug length L ˜ . The predictions of the theoretical model show good agreement with experimental data. The dynamic behaviour of the plug and DL is presented and discussed.

  6. Role of mucus in ischemia/reperfusion-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojzis, J; Hegedüsová, R; Mirossay, L

    2000-01-01

    Gastric mucus plays an important role in gastric mucosal protection. Apart from its "barrier" function, it has been demonstrated that mucus protects gastric epithelial cells against toxic oxygen metabolites derived from the xanthine/ xanthine oxidase system. In this study, we investigated the effect of malotilate and sucralfate (mucus production stimulators) and N-acetylcysteine (mucolytic agent) on ischemia/reperfusion-induced gastric mucosal injury. Gastric ischemia was induced by 30 min clamping of the coeliac artery followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The mucus content was determined by the Alcian blue method. Sucralfate (100 mg/kg), malotilate (100 mg/kg), and N-acetylcysteine (100 mg/kg) were given orally 30 min before surgery. Both sucralfate and malotilate increased the mucus production in control rats. On the other hand, N-acetyloysteine significantly decreased mucus content in control (sham) group. A significant decrease of mucus content was found in the control and the N-acetylcysteine pretreated group during the period of ischemia. On the other hand, sucralfate and malotilate prevented the decrease the content of mucus during ischemia. A similar result can be seen after ischemia/reperfusion. In the control group and N-acetylcysteine pretreated group a significant decrease of adherent mucus content was found. However, sucralfate and malotilate increased mucus production (sucralfate significantly). Sucralfate and malotilate also significantly protected the gastric mucosa against ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury. However, N-acetylcysteine significantly increased gastric mucosal injury after ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest that gastric mucus may be involved in the protection of gastric mucosa after ischemia/reperfusion.

  7. Mucus sugar content shapes the bacterial community structure in thermally stressed Acropora muricata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonny T.M. Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26°C to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed that, at lower temperatures, the main components of mucus were N-acetyl glucosamine and C6 sugars, but these constituted a significantly lower proportion of the mucus in thermally-stressed corals. The change in the mucus composition coincided with a shift from a γ-Proteobacteria- to a Verrucomicrobiae- and α-Proteobacteria-dominated community in the coral mucus. Bacteria in the class Cyanobacteria also started to become prominent in the mucus when the coral was thermally stressed. The increase in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobiae at higher temperature was strongly associated with a change in the proportion of fucose, glucose and mannose in the mucus. Increase in the relative abundance of α-Proteobacteria were associated with GalNAc and glucose, while the drop in relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria at high temperature coincided with changes in fucose and mannose. Cyanobacteria were highly associated with arabinose and xylose. Changes in mucus composition and the bacterial community in the mucus layer occurred at 29°C, which were prior to visual signs of coral bleaching at 31°C. A compositional change in the coral mucus, induced by thermal stress could therefore be a key factor leading to a shift in the associated bacterial community. This, in turn, has the potential to impact the physiological function of the coral holobiont.

  8. Mucus Sugar Content Shapes the Bacterial Community Structure in Thermally Stressed Acropora muricata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sonny T M; Davy, Simon K; Tang, Sen-Lin; Kench, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral's mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26 to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed that, at lower temperatures, the main components of mucus were N-acetyl glucosamine and C6 sugars, but these constituted a significantly lower proportion of the mucus in thermally stressed corals. The change in the mucus composition coincided with a shift from a γ-Proteobacteria- to a Verrucomicrobiae- and α-Proteobacteria-dominated community in the coral mucus. Bacteria in the class Cyanobacteria also started to become prominent in the mucus when the coral was thermally stressed. The increase in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobiae at higher temperature was strongly associated with a change in the proportion of fucose, glucose, and mannose in the mucus. Increase in the relative abundance of α-Proteobacteria were associated with GalNAc and glucose, while the drop in relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria at high temperature coincided with changes in fucose and mannose. Cyanobacteria were highly associated with arabinose and xylose. Changes in mucus composition and the bacterial community in the mucus layer occurred at 29°C, which were prior to visual signs of coral bleaching at 31°C. A compositional change in the coral mucus, induced by thermal stress could therefore be a key factor leading to a shift in the associated bacterial community. This, in turn, has the potential to impact the physiological function of the coral holobiont. PMID:27047481

  9. Smoking produced mucus and clearance of particulates in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some studies of miners have shown a lesser relative lung-cancer risk for smokers than for nonsmokers. For example, experiments by Cross and associates with dogs have shown an apparent protective effect of cigarette smoke against radon-daughter and dust exposure. One reason for these changes may be the thickened mucus layer in the tracheobronchial region of smokers. Physiological changes in the lung due to smoking may decrease the effects of radioactive particles in cancers in the bronchial region by apparently promoting faster clearance, in that region, of radioactive particles and by decreasing the radiation dose through reduced penetration to the sensitive basal epithelial cells. Because of the short half-life of radon daughters, even if there is possible tobacco-related delay of particle clearance from the alveolar region it cannot affect radon clearance. Therefore, the possible mitigating effect of tobacco on radon-produced cancer appears to be limited to the tracheobronchial region. It would be of value to a number of occupations if the same changes in the lungs due to smoking could be produced in exposed workers in the absence of cigarette-smoking. Beta-carotene and vitamin A, which affect maintenance and secretion of the mucosal lining, appear to thicken mucus, thereby providing protection against radon-induced lung cancers that is similar to smoking-related changes in the lung

  10. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cervical Cancer Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Cervical Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview ... be cured. How often should I get screened (tested)? How often you should get screened for cervical ...

  11. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery) depends on ...

  13. Steric and interactive barrier properties of intestinal mucus elucidated by particle diffusion and peptide permeation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; García-Díaz, María; Müllertz, Anette;

    2015-01-01

    The mucus lining of the gastrointestinal tract epithelium is recognized as a barrier to efficient oral drug delivery. Recently, a new in vitro model for assessment of drug permeation across intestinal mucosa was established by applying a biosimilar mucus matrix to the surface of Caco-2 cell monol...

  14. Investigation of mucus transport in an idealized lung airway model using multiphase CFD analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Rahul; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-11-01

    Mucus, a Bingham fluid is transported in the pulmonary airways by consistent beating of the cilia and exhibits a wide range of physical properties in response to the core air flow and various pathological conditions. A better understanding of the interfacial instability is required as it plays a crucial role in gas transport, mixing, mucus clearance and drug delivery. In the current study, mucus is modelled as a Newtonian fluid and the two phase gas-liquid flow in the airways is investigated using an inhomogeneous Eulerian-Eulerian approach. The complex interface between the phases is tracked using the conventional VOF (Volume of Fluid) method. Results from our CFD simulations which are performed in idealized single and double bifurcation geometries will be presented and the influence of airflow rate, mucus layer thickness, mucus viscosity, airway geometry (branching & diameter) and surface tension on mucus flow behavior will be discussed. Mean mucus layer thickness, pressure drop due to momentum transfer & increased airway resistance, mucus transport speed and the flow morphology will be compared to existing experimental and theoretical data.

  15. Bacterial decomposition of coral mucus as evaluated by long-term and quantitative observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Miyajima, T.

    2011-06-01

    Coral mucus released from Acropora formosa and Montipora digitata was incubated with bacteria under dark conditions for 1 year to evaluate the quantitative degradability. All the mucus samples showed a similar decomposition pattern: about 80% of total organic carbon (TOC) in the mucus was mineralized within 1 month, while some mucus was slowly decomposed over the 1 year. Regression analysis using an exponential curve considering three degradability pools (labile, semilabile, and refractory) fitted the changes of the TOC concentrations very well ( r 2 > 0.99). Compiling the data on the two coral species, the labile organic C in the coral mucus had mineralization rates of 10-18% d-1 and accounted for 79-87% of the initial TOC in the mucus. Semilabile organic C had mineralization rates of 0.3-1.6% d-1 and accounted for 11-18% of the initial TOC. Refractory organic C accounted for 6% at most. These results suggest that not all coral mucus is rapidly decomposed by bacteria but some mucus remains as semilabile and refractory organic matter for several months.

  16. Conception rate of artificially inseminated Holstein cows affected by cloudy vaginal mucus, under intense heat conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Mellado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to obtain prevalence estimates of cloudy vaginal mucus in artificially inseminated Holstein cows raised under intense heat, in order to assess the effect of meteorological conditions on its occurrence during estrus and to determine its effect on conception rate. In a first study, an association was established between the occurrence of cloudy vaginal mucus during estrus and the conception rate of inseminated cows (18,620 services, raised under intense heat (mean annual temperature of 22°C, at highly technified farms, in the arid region of northern Mexico. In a second study, data from these large dairy operations were used to assess the effect of meteorological conditions throughout the year on the occurrence of cloudy vaginal mucus during artificial insemination (76,899 estruses. The overall rate of estruses with cloudy vaginal mucus was 21.4% (16,470/76,899; 95% confidence interval = 21.1-21.7%. The conception rate of cows with clean vaginal mucus was higher than that of cows with abnormal mucus (30.6 vs. 22%. Prevalence of estruses with cloudy vaginal mucus was strongly dependent on high ambient temperature and markedly higher in May and June. Acceptable conception rates in high milk-yielding Holstein cows can only be obtained with cows showing clear and translucid mucus at artificial insemination.

  17. Analyses of human colonic mucus obtained by an in vivo sampling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, H.M.; Jonkers, D.M.A.E.; Loof, A.; Houtvin, S.A.L.W. van; Troost, F.J.; Venema, K.; Kodde, A.; Koek, G.H.; Schipper, R.G.; Heerde, W.L. van; Brummer, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The mucus layer is an important dynamic component of the epithelial barrier. It contains mucin glycoproteins and other compounds secreted by the intestinal epithelium, such as secretory IgA. However, a standardized in vivo sampling technique of mucus in humans is not yet available. Aim:

  18. Influence of earthworm mucus and amino acids on tomato seedling growth and cadmium accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Shujie [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Hu Feng, E-mail: fenghu@njau.edu.c [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Li Huixin; Li Xiuqiang [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The effects on the growth of tomato seedlings and cadmium accumulation of earthworm mucus and a solution of amino acids matching those in earthworm mucus was studied through a hydroponic experiment. The experiment included four treatments: 5 mg Cd L{sup -1} (CC), 5 mg Cd L{sup -1} + 100 mL L{sup -1} earthworm mucus (CE), 5 mg Cd L{sup -1} + 100 mL L{sup -1} amino acids solution (CA) and the control (CK). Results showed that, compared with CC treatment, either earthworm mucus or amino acids significantly increased tomato seedling growth and Cd accumulation but the increase was much higher in the CE treatment compared with the CA treatment. This may be due to earthworm mucus and amino acids significantly increasing the chlorophyll content, antioxidative enzyme activities, and essential microelement uptake and transport in the tomato seedlings. The much greater increase in the effect of earthworm mucus compared with amino acid treatments may be due to IAA-like substances in earthworm mucus. - Earthworm mucus increased tomato seedlings growth and Cd accumulation through increasing chlorophyll content, antioxidative enzyme activities, and essential microelement accumulation.

  19. Role of Lactobacillus reuteri cell and mucus-binding protein A (CmbA) in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hanne; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Rud, Ida; Grimmer, Stine; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter; Britton, Robert A; Axelsson, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri, a symbiotic inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract in humans and animals, is marketed as a probiotic. The ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus is an interesting property with regard to probiotic features such as colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and interaction with the host. Here, we present a study performed to elucidate the role of sortase (SrtA), four putative sortase-dependent proteins (SDPs), and one C-terminal membrane-anchored cell surface protein of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 in adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus in vitro. This included mutagenesis of the genes encoding these proteins and complementation of mutants. A null mutation in hmpref0536_10255 encoding srtA resulted in significantly reduced adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus, indicating involvement of SDPs in adhesion. Evaluation of the bacterial adhesion revealed that of the five putative surface protein mutants tested, only a null mutation in the hmpref0536_10633 gene, encoding a putative SDP with an LPxTG motif, resulted in a significant loss of adhesion to both Caco-2 cells and mucus. Complementation with the functional gene on a plasmid restored adhesion to Caco-2 cells. However, complete restoration of adhesion to mucus was not achieved. Overexpression of hmpref0536_10633 in strain ATCC PTA 6475 resulted in an increased adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus compared with the WT strain. We conclude from these results that, among the putative surface proteins tested, the protein encoded by hmpref0536_10633 plays a critical role in binding of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 to Caco-2 cells and mucus. Based on this, we propose that this LPxTG motif containing protein should be referred to as cell and mucus binding protein A (CmbA). PMID:24473252

  20. Efficient mucus permeation and tight junction opening by dissociable "mucus-inert" agent coated trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Xi; Shan, Wei; Li, Lian; Zhong, Jiaju; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2016-01-28

    Oral administration of protein drugs is greatly impeded by the lack of drug carriers that can efficiently overcome the absorption barriers of mucosa tissue, which consists of not only epithelium but also a blanket of mucus gel. We herein report a novel self-assembled nanoparticle (NP) platform for oral delivery of insulin by facilitating the efficient permeation through both of these two barriers. The NP possesses a core composed of insulin and trimethyl chitosan (TMC), and a dissociable "mucus-inert" hydrophilic coating of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide copolymer (pHPMA) derivative. The NPs exhibited free Brownian motion and excellent permeability in mucus, which enabled the access of the NP core to the epithelial cell surface underneath the mucus. Moreover, investigation of NP behavior showed that the pHPMA molecules started to dissociate as the NP permeates through mucus, and the TMC NP core was then exposed to facilitate transepithelial transport via paracellular pathway. The pHPMA coating significantly improved transepithelial transport of TMC-based NP and their ability to open tight junctions between the mucus-secreting epithelial cells. Moreover, in diabetic rats, pHPMA coated NPs generated a prominent hypoglycemic response following oral administration, and exhibited a relative bioavailability 2.8-fold higher than that of uncoated TMC-based NPs. Our study provided the evidence of using pHPMA as "mucus-inert" agent to enhance mucus permeation of TMC-based NPs, and validated a novel strategy to overcome the multiple absorption barriers using NP platform with dissociable hydrophilic coating and TMC-based core possessing tight junction-opening ability.

  1. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc...

  2. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Xiong, Ranhua;

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid...... barriers-the highly viscoelastic gastric mucus and the bacterial cell envelope. We found that LNA/2'OMe is capable of diffusing rapidly through native, undiluted, gastric mucus isolated from porcine stomachs, without degradation. Moreover, although LNA/2'OMe hybridization was still successful without...... permeabilization and fixation of the bacteria, which is normally part of in vitro studies, the ability of LNA/2'OMe to efficiently hybridize with H. pylori was hampered by the presence of mucus. Future research should focus on developing nanocarriers that shield LNA/2'OMe from components in the gastric mucus...

  3. Micro-configuration Observation of Porous Bioceramic for Sliding on Intestinal Mucus Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure of the prepared porous bioceramic material, including surface porosity and apparent contact area with the artificial mucus film are computed and analyzed. The surface micro-configurations of the porous material before and after sliding on the mucus ftlm are observed in 2D and 3 D by digital microscopy. We describe how much mucus enters and stays within different pores, and how the porous material with rough/porous surface contacts with the mucus film ( elastic surface/gel). The presented results illustrate that the material with different porous structure can lead to different mucus suction, surface scraping and changes of contact area and condition during sliding, which will be active for high friction of robotic endoscope with the intestinal wall for intestinal locomotion.

  4. Preventing cervical cancer globally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeler, Kathleen M

    2012-11-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. More than 85% of cases and deaths occur in the developing world where the availability of effective screening is limited. In this issue of the journal, Pierce and colleagues (beginning on page 1273) describe a novel technique using a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) to diagnose cervical dysplasia. This perspective reviews the limitations of existing cervical cancer screening methods currently in use in low-resource settings and the potential for HRME imaging to contribute to cervical cancer prevention in the developing world.

  5. Dynamic changes in mucus thickness and ion secretion during Citrobacter rodentium infection and clearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny K Gustafsson

    Full Text Available Citrobacter rodentium is an attaching and effacing pathogen used as a murine model for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. The mucus layers are a complex matrix of molecules, and mucus swelling, hydration and permeability are affected by many factors, including ion composition. Here, we used the C. rodentium model to investigate mucus dynamics during infection. By measuring the mucus layer thickness in tissue explants during infection, we demonstrated that the thickness changes dynamically during the course of infection and that its thickest stage coincides with the start of a decrease of bacterial density at day 14 after infection. Although quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that mucin mRNA increases during early infection, the increased mucus layer thickness late in infection was not explained by increased mRNA levels. Proteomic analysis of mucus did not demonstrate the appearance of additional mucins, but revealed an increased number of proteins involved in defense responses. Ussing chamber-based electrical measurements demonstrated that ion secretion was dynamically altered during the infection phases. Furthermore, the bicarbonate ion channel Bestrophin-2 mRNA nominally increased, whereas the Cftr mRNA decreased during the late infection clearance phase. Microscopy of Muc2 immunostained tissues suggested that the inner striated mucus layer present in the healthy colon was scarce during the time point of most severe infection (10 days post infection, but then expanded, albeit with a less structured appearance, during the expulsion phase. Together with previously published literature, the data implies a model for clearance where a change in secretion allows reformation of the mucus layer, displacing the pathogen to the outer mucus layer, where it is then outcompeted by the returning commensal flora. In conclusion, mucus and ion secretion are dynamically altered during the C. rodentium infection cycle.

  6. Nozzle dam having a unitary plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Luciano; Wepfer, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for sealing the primary-side coolant flow nozzles of a nuclear steam generator. The steam generator has relatively small diameter manway openings for providing access to the interior of the steam generator including the inside surface of each nozzle, the manway openings having a diameter substantially less than the inside diameter of each nozzle. The apparatus includes a bracket having an outside surface for matingly sealingly engaging the inside surface of the nozzle. The bracket also has a plurality of openings longitudinally therethrough and a plurality of slots transversely therein in communication with each opening. A plurality of unitary plugs sized to pass through the manway opening are matingly sealingly disposed in each opening of the bracket for sealingly plugging each opening. Each plug includes a plurality of arms operable to engage the slots of the bracket for connecting each plug to the bracket, so that the nozzle is sealed as the plugs seal the openings and are connected to the bracket.

  7. iNOS-dependent increase in colonic mucus thickness in DSS-colitic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Schreiber

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate colonic mucus thickness in vivo in health and during experimental inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Colitis was induced with 5% DSS in drinking water for 8 days prior to experiment, when the descending colonic mucosa of anesthetized rats was studied using intravital microscopy. Mucus thickness was measured with micropipettes attached to a micromanipulator. To assess the contributions of NOS and prostaglandins in the regulation of colonic mucus thickness, the non-selective NOS-inhibitor L-NNA (10 mg/kg bolus followed by 3 mg/kg/h, the selective iNOS-inhibitor L-NIL (10 mg/kg bolus followed by 3 mg/kg/h and the non-selective COX-inhibitor diclofenac (5 mg/kg were administered intravenously prior to experiment. To further investigate the role of iNOS in the regulation of colonic mucus thickness, iNOS -/- mice were used. RESULTS: Colitic rats had a thicker firmly adherent mucus layer following 8 days of DSS treatment than untreated rats (88±2 µm vs 76±1 µm. During induction of colitis, the thickness of the colonic mucus layer initially decreased but was from day 3 significantly thicker than in untreated rats. Diclofenac reduced the mucus thickness similarly in colitic and untreated rats (-16±5 µm vs -14±2 µm. While L-NNA had no effect on colonic mucus thickness in DSS or untreated controls (+3±2 µm vs +3±1 µm, L-NIL reduced the mucus thickness significantly more in colitic rats than in controls (-33±4 µm vs -10±3 µm. The importance of iNOS in regulating the colonic mucus thickness was confirmed in iNOS-/- mice, which had thinner colonic mucus than wild-type mice (35±3 µm vs 50±2 µm, respectively. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased levels of iNOS in the colonic surface epithelium following DSS treatment. CONCLUSION: Both prostaglandins and nitric oxide regulate basal colonic mucus thickness. During onset of colitis, the thickness of the mucus layer is initially reduced followed by an i

  8. Rheologic studies on middle ear effusions and their mucus glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, J E; Green, G G; Birchall, J P; Pearson, J P

    1989-04-01

    The properties of pooled thick and thin middle ear effusions, from children with otitis media with effusion, were studied by viscometry. Mucus glycoproteins were responsible for effusion viscosity. Their percentage by weight in thick and thin effusions was 25% and 8.2%, respectively. N-acetylcysteine and 0.2 mol/L of mercaptoethanol caused a 39% viscosity drop in a 5-mg/mL glycoprotein solution, whereas S-carboxymethylcysteine had no effect. Treatment of thick effusions with 0.2 mol/L of mercaptoethanol initially caused a viscosity decrease followed by a gradual increase. Higher reducing agent concentrations (0.5 mol/L) caused a more rapid decrease followed by a rapid increase, presumably by causing nonspecific aggregation of reduced protein molecules. These results suggest that the concentration of and the time that a mucolytic is in the middle ear would be of prime importance in achieving the desired decrease in viscosity.

  9. Radiological case: cervical teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of a third trimester fetus with a cervical mass. Fetal MRI was performed to better evaluate the extension of the mass and the risk of obstruction of the airway in the neonatal period. MRI is very useful in the evaluation of fetal cervical masses.

  10. CDC's Cervical Cancer Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed CDC’s Cervical Cancer Study Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... year. As part of CDC’s Cervical Cancer (Cx3) Study, we surveyed a sample of both health care ...

  11. A molecular plug-socket connector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez, Guillaume; Ribera, Belén Ferrer; Credi, Alberto; Ballardini, Roberto; Gandolfi, Maria Teresa; Balzani, Vincenzo; Liu, Yi; Northrop, Brian H; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2007-04-18

    A monocationic plug-socket connector that is composed, at the molecular level, of three components, (1) a secondary dialkylammonium center (CH2NH2+CH2), which can play the role of a plug toward dibenzo[24]crown-8 (DB24C8), (2) a rigid and conducting biphenyl spacer, and (3) 1,4-benzo-1,5-naphtho[36]crown-10 (BN36C10), capable of playing the role of a socket toward a 4,4'-bipyridinium dicationic plug, was synthesized and displays the ability to act as a plug-socket connector. The fluorescent signal changes associated with the 1,5-dioxynaphthalene unit of its BN36C10 portion were monitored to investigate the association of this plug-socket connector with the complementary socket and plug compounds. The results indicate that (1) the CH2NH2+CH2 part of the molecular connector can thread DB24C8 in a trivial manner and (2) the BN36C10 ring of the connector can be threaded by a 1,1'-dioctyl-4,4'-bipyridinium ion only after the CH2NH2+CH2 site is occupied by a DB24C8 ring. The two connections of the three-component assembly are shown to be controlled reversibly by acid/base and red/ox external inputs, respectively. The results obtained represent a key step for the design and construction of a self-assembling supramolecular system in which the molecular electron source can be connected to the molecular electron drain by a molecular elongation cable. PMID:17388589

  12. Quasi-Porous Plug With Vortex Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. V.

    1985-01-01

    Pressure-letdown valve combines quasi-porous-plug and vortex-chamber in one controllable unit. Valve useful in fossil-energy plants for reducing pressures in such erosive two-phase process streams as steam/water, coal slurries, or combustion gases with entrained particles. Quasi-Porous Plug consists of plenums separated by perforated plates. Number or size of perforations increases with each succeeding stage to compensate for expansion. In Vortex Chamber, control flow varies to control swirl and therefore difference between inlet and outlet pressures.

  13. Therapeutic Potential to Modify the Mucus Barrier in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, numerous studies have shown that disruption of the mucus barrier plays an important role in the exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease, particularly in ulcerative colitis. Alterations in the mucus barrier are well supported by published data and are widely accepted. The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization and Carnoy’s fixation has revealed the importance of the mucus barrier in maintaining a mutualistic relationship between host and bacteria. Studies have raised the possibility that modulation of the mucus barrier may provide therapies for the disease, using agents such as short-chain fatty acids, prebiotics and probiotics. This review describes changes in the mucus barrier of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in animal models of the disease. We also review the involvement of the mucus barrier in the exacerbation of the disease and explore the therapeutic potential of modifying the mucus barrier with short-chain fatty acids, prebiotics, probiotics, fatty acid synthase, H2S, neutrophil elastase inhibitor and phophatidyl choline.

  14. Lactobacillus strains belonging to Casei group display various adherence to enterocytes and mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Markowicz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The ability of lactobacilli to adhere to the surface of the intestine is an important functional characteristic which can largely determine the effective colonization of the intestinal tract by probiotics. The following study compares the adhesion efficiency of the twenty strains of Lactobacillus genus belonging to Casei group to the Caco-2 cells and gastrointestinal mucus. Material and methods. Twenty isolates of lactobacilli belonging to Casei group were tested. The ability of bacterial cells to adhere to mucus was examined using adhesion assay to gastrointestinal mucus. Obtained results were compared with adhesion efficiency to Caco-2 cells. Phylogenetic relationship between isolates was analysed by rep-PCR. Results. The results showed large differences in adhesion efficiency between strains, as well as differences in the efficiency of adhesion to the intestinal epithelial cells and mucus. Group similarity highlighted by a rep-PCR technique does not correspond with groups of similarity in terms of the characteristics of the ability to adhere to mucus or the epithelial cells of intestinal tract. Conclusions. Strains having a high adhesion efficiency to enterocytes do not always show a high adhesion efficiency to the mucus. This may indicate the presence of different and multiple factors responsible for adhesion efficiency of Lactobacillus group Casei strains to epithelial cells and mucus.

  15. "The effects of polysorbate surfactants on the structure of mucus Glycoproteins "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajadi Tabassi A

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic oscillatory technique was used to assess the effect of polysorbate non-ionic surfactants on mucus rheology. Adherent mucus gel was scraped from the surface mucosa of pig stomachs and purified by gel exclusion chromatography followed by ultrafiltration and gelation. Rheological measurements of this gel were carried out on a Carri-Med Controlled Stress Rheometer. Appropriate volumes of surfactant solution were added to weighed samples of mucus gel so that a final concentration of 20 mM surfactant was achieved in a gel containing 8% w/w solids content. Polysorbate 20 (PS20, polysorbate 40 (PS40, polysorbate 60 (PS60 and polysorbate 80 (PS80 all decreased both storage (elastic modulus G’ and loss (viscous modulus G’’ significantly at 10 Hz (PPS20>PS60>PS40. The mechanisms by which surfactants disturb the mucus structure are not fully understood, nonetheless, they could possibly affect the mucus gel properties by causing depletion of the glycoprotein constituents such as non-mucin proteins and mucin associated lipids. This might lead to the conclusion that polysorbates, by reducing the viscoelasticity of mucus gel could alleviate its barrier properties and facilitate the diffusion of concomitantly administered drugs via mucus gel.

  16. Towards a versatile technique for tracking nanoparticle-mucus interaction: a step on the road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafee, N.; Schneider, M.

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory mucus is one of the main barriers for nanoparticle-based pulmonary delivery systems. This holds true especially for lung diseases like cystic fibrosis, where a very tenacious thick mucus layer hinders particle diffusion to the lung epithelium or the target area. Typically, mean square displacement of particles is used for mobility evaluation. In contrast, our objective is to develop a feasible technique to track directed particle penetration as a prerequisite for efficient pulmonary nanotherapy. Therefore, particle diffusion in artificial mucus was monitored based on confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and particle-mucus interaction was observed. As pharmaceutical relevant and benign materials, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared by hot-melt emulsification using glyceryl behenate and different stabilizing agents such as poloxamer-407, tween-80, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The diffusion of labeled SLNs in stained artificial sputum representing CF-patient sputum was verified by 3D time laps imaging. Thus, the effect of coating, particle size and mucus viscosity on nanoparticle diffusion was studied. Using image analysis software "Image J", the total fluorescent signal after 30 min in case of poloxamer-coated SLNs was 5 and 100 folds higher than tween- and PVA-coated SLNs, respectively. Nevertheless, increasing mucus viscosity reduced the diffusion of tweencoated SLNs by a factor of 10. Studying particle-mucus interaction by CLSM can be considered a promising and versatile technique.

  17. Antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of fish epidermal mucus Cynoglossus arel andArius caelatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subramanian Bragadeeswaran; Selvam Priyadharshini; Kolandhasamy Prabhu; Solomon Raj Sophia Rani

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To study the antimicrobial, hemolytic activity and immunomodulatory activity of fish epidermal mucus and their chemical constituents fromCynoglossus arel (C. arel) and Arius caelatus (A. caelatus). Mucus plays an important role in the prevention of colonization by parasites, bacteria and fungi.Methods: Epidermal mucus was obtained from two marine fishes, lyophilized and the chemical composition of epidermal mucus was analysed byFT-IR analysis. Thein vitro antimicrobial activity against human pathogens (fungi, gram positive and gram-negative bacteria) and also the hemolytic activity and immunomodulatory activity were determined.Results:Totally ten human pathogens were tested against the fish mucus. Out of the ten pathogens, five pathogens have proved to be sensitive to the mucus. Maximum zone of inhibition was observed againstVibrio cholera (V. cholera) (9 mm and2 mm in diameter), followed byStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) with a inhibition zone of (6 mm and3 mm),Streptococcus areus (S. areus) (5 mm and4 mm),Vibrio parahemolyticus (V. parahemolyticus) (4mm and5 mm) respectively.Conclusions: The present investigation has revealed that positive progresses in the fish mucus extracts against human pathogens and hemolytic activity. But further efforts are required for the purification and isolation of the active antimicrobial compounds in order to establish their possible applications.

  18. Diffusion-sensitive optical coherence tomography for real-time monitoring of mucus thinning treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Kreda, Silvia M.; Sears, Patrick R.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Hill, David B.; Chapman, Brian S.; Tracy, Joseph B.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mucus hydration (wt%) has become an increasingly useful metric in real-time assessment of respiratory health in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD, with higher wt% indicative of diseased states. However, available in vivo rheological techniques are lacking. Gold nanorods (GNRs) are attractive biological probes whose diffusion through tissue is sensitive to the correlation length of comprising biopolymers. Through employment of dynamic light scattering theory on OCT signals from GNRs, we find that weakly-constrained GNR diffusion predictably decreases with increasing wt% (more disease-like) mucus. Previously, we determined this method is robust against mucus transport on human bronchial epithelial (hBE) air-liquid interface cultures (R2=0.976). Here we introduce diffusion-sensitive OCT (DS-OCT), where we collect M-mode image ensembles, from which we derive depth- and temporally-resolved GNR diffusion rates. DS-OCT allows for real-time monitoring of changing GNR diffusion as a result of topically applied mucus-thinning agents, enabling monitoring of the dynamics of mucus hydration never before seen. Cultured human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3 cell) with a layer of endogenous mucus were doped with topically deposited GNRs (80x22nm), and subsequently treated with hypertonic saline (HS) or isotonic saline (IS). DS-OCT provided imaging of the mucus thinning response up to a depth of 600μm with 4.65μm resolution, over a total of 8 minutes in increments of >=3 seconds. For both IS and HS conditions, DS-OCT captured changes in the pattern of mucus hydration over time. DS-OCT opens a new window into understanding mechanisms of mucus thinning during treatment, enabling real-time efficacy feedback needed to optimize and tailor treatments for individual patients.

  19. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Rix; de Goeij, Jasper M.; Mueller, Christina E.; Ulrich Struck; Middelburg, Jack J.; van Duyl, Fleur C.; Al-Horani, Fuad A.; Christian Wild; Naumann, Malik S.; Dick van Oevelen

    2016-01-01

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrients in DOM to higher trophic levels on Caribbean reefs via the so-called sponge loop. Coral mucus may be a major DOM source for the sponge loop, but mucus uptake by sponges has not been demonstrated....

  20. Bacteria Associated with Mucus and Tissues of the Coral Oculina patagonica in Summer and Winter

    OpenAIRE

    Koren, Omry; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    The relative abundance of bacteria in the mucus and crushed tissue of the Mediterranean coral Oculina patagonica was determined by analyses of the 16S rRNA genes of isolated colonies and from a 16S rRNA clone library of extracted DNA. By SYBR gold staining, the numbers of bacteria in mucus and tissue samples were 6.2 × 107 and 8.3 × 108/cm2 of coral surface, respectively, 99.8% of which failed to produce colonies on Marine Agar. From analysis of mucus DNA, the most-abundant bacterium was Vibr...

  1. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle R&D plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2007-06-01

    FCVT, in consultation with industry and other appropriate DOE offices, developed the Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle R&D Plan to accelerate the development and deployment of technologies critical for plug-in hybrid vehicles.

  2. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  3. 49 CFR 230.58 - Flue plugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flue plugs. 230.58 Section 230.58 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances...

  4. Feasibility of Upper Port Plug tube handling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, J. F.; Elzendorn, B. S.; Ronden, D. M. S.; Klinkhamer, J. F. F.; Biel, W.; Krasikov, Y.; Walker, C. I.

    2011-01-01

    Central, retractable tubes are proposed in several Upper Port Plugs (UPPs) designs for ITER, to enable fast exchange of specific components of diagnostics housed in these UPPs. This paper investigates into possible designs to enable the efficient handling of tubes. The feasibility of tube handling i

  5. An optimal design for millimeter-wide facture plugging zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lost circulation control in millimeter-wide fractures has been a challenge in well drilling all the time. Low pressure-bearing capacity of a plugging zone will result in excessive consumption of lost circulation materials (LCMs and extra down time. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted on the plugging of millimeter-wide fractures to evaluate the plugging effects of different types of LCM including rigid granules, elastic particles and fiber. Maximum plugging pressure, total loss volume before sealing and plugging time were taken as the evaluation index of the LCM plugging effect. According to the experimental results, the synergistic plugging mechanisms of different LCM combinations were also analyzed. Experimental results showed that the total loss volume of the plugging zone formed by rigid and elastic particle combination was generally greater than 400 mL, and the maximum plugging pressure of the plugging zone formed by elastic particle and fiber combination was generally less than 6 MPa. In contrast, the plugging zone formed by the combination of the three types of LCMs has the maximum plugging pressure of up to 13 MPa and total loss volume before sealing of 75 mL. In the synergistic plugging process, rigid granules form a frame with high pressure-bearing capacity in the narrower parts of the fractures; elastic particles generate elastic force through elastic deformation to increase the friction between a fracture and a plugging zone to make the plugging zone more stable; fibers filling in the pore space between the particles increase the tightness and integrity of the plugging zone. The experimental results can provide guidance for the optimal design of LCMs used in the field.

  6. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

  7. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young's modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs

  8. UV-absorbing bacteria in coral mucus and their response to simulated temperature elevations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, J.; Kannapiran, E.; Manikandan, B.; Francis, K.; Arora, S.; Karunya, E.; AmitKumar; Singh, S.K.; Jose, J.

    Reef-building corals encompass various strategies to defend against harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Coral mucus contains UV-absorbing compounds and has rich prokaryotic diversity associated with it. In this study, we isolated and characterized...

  9. Effects of nasal allergen challenge on dynamic viscoelasticity of nasal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, M; Majima, Y; Ukai, K; Sakakura, Y

    1993-04-01

    The effects of nasal provocation on the rheologic properties of nasal mucus were investigated in patients with allergic rhinitis provoked by house dust. The elastic modulus (G') and the dynamic viscosity (eta') of nasal mucus were determined by an oscillating sphere magnetic rheometer. Before and after the allergen challenge, G' increased, whereas eta' decreased with increasing oscillatory frequency; these findings indicate that the nasal mucus under these conditions is a non-newtonian fluid and has the cross-linked gel-like nature typical of mucus. Both G' and eta' values after nasal provocation were significantly lower than before. The values of G' and eta' after allergen challenge were in the optimal viscoelasticity range for mucociliary transport. PMID:8476173

  10. Lectin histochemical aspects of mucus function in the oesophagus of the reticulated python (Python reticulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, W; Luz, S; Schnapper, A

    2009-08-01

    Using lectin histochemistry, the study characterizes basic functional aspects of the mucus produced by the oesophageal epithelium of the Reticulated python (Python reticulatus). Reaction staining varied as related to the two epithelium types present, containing goblet cells and ciliary cells. Remarkable intensities were achieved especially in the luminal mucus layer and the fine mucus covering the epithelial ciliary border for Con A (alpha-D-Man; alpha-D-Glc) as part of neutral glycoproteins, Limax flavus agglutinin (NeuNac = NeuNgc), emphasizing that water binding hyaluronan provides a hydrated interface conductive to the passage of material and UEA-I (alpha-L-Fuc), corroborating the view that fucose-rich highly viscous mucus is helpful against mechanical stress during prey transport.

  11. The effect of mucolytic agents on the rheologic and transport properties of canine tracheal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R; Litt, M; Marriott, C

    1980-03-01

    The effect of several sulfhydryl and other agents on the rheologic and mucociliary transport properties of a model secretion, reconstituted canine tracheal mucus, was investigated. The mucus was obtained via the canine tracheal pouch. Rheologic properties were determined by mirorheometry, and the ciliary transport rate was determined using the frog palate technique. It was found that N-acetyl cysteine decreased the elastic modulus, leading to improved mucociliary transport at concentrations such that the mucin did not precipitate. S-carboxymethyl cysteine had no effect on either mucus properties or mucociliary transport rate, and its reported effectiveness in vivo must be due to some mechanism other than solubilization of mucin. Similar results were found with other blocked sulfhydryl compounds. Urea and potassium iodide to decrease mucus elasticity, but are harmful to cilia at the concentrations needed.

  12. [Inhibitory effect of nasal mucus on the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, H

    1990-01-01

    The absorption of Dibekacin (DKB) through rabbit's tracheal mucosa with and without nasal mucus were examined in vitro. The modified double chamber method was used for the purpose of this study. DKB solution (20 mg/ml) and Hanks' balanced salt solution were put into the donor compartment (DC) and the receiver compartment (RC), respectively. A plate with a hole and the tracheal mucosa were inserted between the compartments in the order of DC, dialytic membrane, the plate, the rabbit tracheal mucosa and RC. The hole of the plate was filled with nasal mucus or Hanks' solution. The latter was used as the control. The chamber was incubated in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air for 3 hours at 37 degrees C. The absorption rate (AR) was obtained by dividing the concentration of DKB in RC by that in DC. The nasal mucus from patients with chronic sinusitis significantly decreased the AR of DKB compared with that in the control (P less than 0.05). The AR significantly decreased with increments in the thickness of nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis. This decreased AR was improved by the addition of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) to DKB solution in DC. NAC can cleave disulfied bonds of mucus glycoprotein and this results in the decrease of viscoelasticity of nasal mucus. The results indicate that nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis intercept the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium in vitro. One of the mechanisms of the intercepter may be due to the high molecular-reticular structure of nasal mucus.

  13. Draft genome sequence of Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from coral mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Rafaella Z. Palermo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe the genomic features of the Actinobacteria Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from mucus of the Brazilian endemic coral Mussismilia hispida. The sequences are available under accession number LDNX01000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/LDNX00000000. The genomic analysis revealed interesting information about the adaptation of bacteria to the marine environment (such as genes involved in osmotic and oxidative stress and to the nutrient-rich environment provided by the coral mucus.

  14. Draft genome sequence of Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from coral mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z; Castro, Daniel B A; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Cauz, Ana Carolina G; Magalhães, Beatriz L; Carlos, Camila; da Costa, Fernanda L P; Scagion, Guilherme P; Higa, Juliana S; Almeida, Ludimila D; das Neves, Meiriele da S; Cordeiro, Melina Aparecida; do Prado, Paula F V; da Silva, Thiago M; Balsalobre, Thiago Willian A; Paulino, Luciana C; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F C; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2016-03-01

    Here, we describe the genomic features of the Actinobacteria Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from mucus of the Brazilian endemic coral Mussismilia hispida. The sequences are available under accession number LDNX01000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/LDNX00000000). The genomic analysis revealed interesting information about the adaptation of bacteria to the marine environment (such as genes involved in osmotic and oxidative stress) and to the nutrient-rich environment provided by the coral mucus. PMID:26981384

  15. New Method for Counting Bacteria Associated with Coral Mucus ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Garren, Melissa; Azam, Farooq

    2010-01-01

    The ability to count bacteria associated with reef-building corals in a rapid, reliable, and cost-effective manner has been hindered by the viscous and highly autofluorescent nature of the coral mucus layer (CML) in which they live. We present a new method that disperses bacterial cells by trypsinization prior to 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and quantification by epifluorescence microscopy. We sampled seawater and coral mucus from Porites lobata from 6 reef sites influenced b...

  16. Calcifying extracellular mucus substances (EMS) of Madrepora oculata; a first geobiological approach

    OpenAIRE

    Reitner, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Colonial non-zooxanthellate corals from deep-water coral reefs, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, produce large amounts of extracellular mucus (EMS). This mucus has various functions, e.g., an antifouling capability protecting the coral skeleton from attacks of endolithic and boring organisms. Both corals show thick epithecal and exothecal skeletal parts with a clear lamellar growth pattern. The formation of the epitheca is unclear. It is supposed that the EMS play a central role during...

  17. Mucus Sugar Content Shapes the Bacterial Community Structure in Thermally Stressed Acropora muricata

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sonny T. M.; Davy, Simon K.; Tang, Sen-Lin; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26 to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed tha...

  18. [Inhibitory effect of nasal mucus on the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, H

    1990-01-01

    The absorption of Dibekacin (DKB) through rabbit's tracheal mucosa with and without nasal mucus were examined in vitro. The modified double chamber method was used for the purpose of this study. DKB solution (20 mg/ml) and Hanks' balanced salt solution were put into the donor compartment (DC) and the receiver compartment (RC), respectively. A plate with a hole and the tracheal mucosa were inserted between the compartments in the order of DC, dialytic membrane, the plate, the rabbit tracheal mucosa and RC. The hole of the plate was filled with nasal mucus or Hanks' solution. The latter was used as the control. The chamber was incubated in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air for 3 hours at 37 degrees C. The absorption rate (AR) was obtained by dividing the concentration of DKB in RC by that in DC. The nasal mucus from patients with chronic sinusitis significantly decreased the AR of DKB compared with that in the control (P less than 0.05). The AR significantly decreased with increments in the thickness of nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis. This decreased AR was improved by the addition of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) to DKB solution in DC. NAC can cleave disulfied bonds of mucus glycoprotein and this results in the decrease of viscoelasticity of nasal mucus. The results indicate that nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis intercept the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium in vitro. One of the mechanisms of the intercepter may be due to the high molecular-reticular structure of nasal mucus. PMID:2319385

  19. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  20. Role of mucus in gastric mucosal injury induced by local ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, K; Joh, T; Yokoyama, Y; Itoh, M

    1995-09-01

    The role of gastric mucus was evaluated in a rat model of gastric epithelial damage induced by local ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) stress. In this model, blood-to-lumen chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) clearance served as an index of injury. Tetraprenyl acetone (TPA; 100 mg, 200 mg/kg IP) was used to stimulate mucus production. Administration of TPA increased both the hexosamine content in gastric tissue and the amount of alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS) stained mucus in the mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. Increases in 51Cr-EDTA clearance induced by I/R were significantly attenuated by TPA in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC; 0.6%, 0.8%) was perfused into the gastric lumen to assess the effect of reduction in mucus on the injury induced by I/R. Although mean values of hexosamine content were increased by perfusion with NAC, AB-PAS-stained mucus in the mucosa was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Perfusion of NAC did not change basal 51Cr-EDTA clearance but significantly exacerbated the increase in clearance induced by I/R in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that gastric mucus protects the gastric mucosa against I/R stress in vivo.

  1. Oxidation increases mucin polymer cross-links to stiffen airway mucus gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shaopeng; Hollinger, Martin; Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E; Kerr, Sheena C; Dunican, Eleanor M; Daniel, Brian M; Ghosh, Sudakshina; Erzurum, Serpel C; Willard, Belinda; Hazen, Stanley L; Huang, Xiaozhu; Carrington, Stephen D; Oscarson, Stefan; Fahy, John V

    2015-02-25

    Airway mucus in cystic fibrosis (CF) is highly elastic, but the mechanism behind this pathology is unclear. We hypothesized that the biophysical properties of CF mucus are altered because of neutrophilic oxidative stress. Using confocal imaging, rheology, and biochemical measures of inflammation and oxidation, we found that CF airway mucus gels have a molecular architecture characterized by a core of mucin covered by a web of DNA and a rheological profile characterized by high elasticity that can be normalized by chemical reduction. We also found that high levels of reactive oxygen species in CF mucus correlated positively and significantly with high concentrations of the oxidized products of cysteine (disulfide cross-links). To directly determine whether oxidation can cross-link mucins to increase mucus elasticity, we exposed induced sputum from healthy subjects to oxidizing stimuli and found a marked and thiol-dependent increase in sputum elasticity. Targeting mucin disulfide cross-links using current thiol-amino structures such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) requires high drug concentrations to have mucolytic effects. We therefore synthesized a thiol-carbohydrate structure (methyl 6-thio-6-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside) and found that it had stronger reducing activity than NAC and more potent and fast-acting mucolytic activity in CF sputum. Thus, oxidation arising from airway inflammation or environmental exposure contributes to pathologic mucus gel formation in the lung, which suggests that it can be targeted by thiol-modified carbohydrates.

  2. Accumulation of dietary and aqueous cadmium into the epidermal mucus of the discus fish Symphysodon sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunder, Richard J., E-mail: richard.maunder@astrazeneca.com [School of Marine Science and Engineering, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Buckley, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.buckley@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Marine Science and Engineering, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Val, Adalberto L., E-mail: dalval@inpa.gov.br [Department of Ecology, Laboratory of Ecophysiology and Molecular Evolution, INPA, Manaus (Brazil); Sloman, Katherine A., E-mail: katherine.sloman@uws.ac.uk [School of Science, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, PA1 2BE, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    The discus fish Symphysodon sp. is an Amazonian cichlid with a unusual form of parental care where fry obligately feed from parental mucus for the first few weeks of life. Here, we investigated the possible impact of environmental cadmium on this species, particularly with respect to mucus contamination. We exposed groups of fish to cadmium either through their food (400 mg kg{sup -1}) or through the water (3 {mu}g l{sup -1}) for 4 weeks, and measured tissue concentrations and ATPase activities at weekly intervals. Cadmium significantly accumulated in all tissues (except for muscle) after 7 days, and tissue concentrations increased until the end of the experiment. Significant alterations in ATPase activities of intestine and kidney were observed at day 7 and 14, but no alterations in gill ATPase activities occurred. The epidermal mucus showed a high accumulation of cadmium from both exposures, but particularly from the diet, indicating that dietary cadmium can be transferred from gut to mucus. Combining this data with approximations of fry bite volumes and bite frequencies, we constructed daily estimates of the cadmium that could potentially be consumed by newly hatched fry feeding on this mucus. These calculations suggest that feeding fry might consume up to 11 {mu}g g{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and hence indicate that this species' dependency on parental mucus feeding of fry could make them particularly susceptible to cadmium contamination of their native habitat.

  3. Analysis of gunshot residues as trace in nasal mucus by GFAAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliste, Marina; Chávez, Luis Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    When a gun is fired, the majority of gunshot residues are deposited on the shooter's hands. But these residues disappear through contact with surfaces or washing. Therefore, the maximum time frame to find GSR on a suspect's hands is 8h. The mucus, inside of a nostril, forms a surface layer where they are trapped foreign particles. In this way, mucus inside of a gunshot suspect's nostrils could act like an adhesive medium to stick on it gaseous particles from a gunshot. In this study, the presence of GSR in nasal mucus and its residence time is examined. A new procedure for the sampling of possible gunshot residue accumulated in the nasal mucus is designed. Samples are taken with cotton swabs moistened with a solution of EDTA and, after an acid digestion, are analysed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, samples of hands are taken for comparison purposes. GSR recovery has been successful. The concentration of GSR in nasal mucus is found to be lower than on the hands, but with a longer residence time. Thus, it is possible to expand the sampling time of a suspect also, as nasal mucus cannot be contaminated by handling weapons. PMID:26874050

  4. High occurrence of viruses in the mucus layer of scleractinian corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Kim, Hanh; Bouvier, Thierry; Bouvier, Corinne; Doan-Nhu, Hai; Nguyen-Ngoc, Lam; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Baudoux, Anne-Claire; Desnues, Christelle; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Ferrier-Pages, Christine; Bettarel, Yvan

    2014-12-01

    Viruses attract increasing interest from environmental microbiologists seeking to understand their function and role in coral health. However, little is known about their main ecological traits within the coral holobiont. In this study, a quantitative and qualitative characterization of viral and bacterial communities was conducted on the mucus of seven different coral species of the Van Phong Bay (Vietnam). On average, the concentrations of viruses and bacteria were, respectively, 17- and twofold higher in the mucus than in the surrounding water. The examination of bacterial community composition also showed remarkable differences between mucus and water samples. The percentage of active respiring cells was nearly threefold higher in mucus (m = 24.8%) than in water (m = 8.6%). Interestingly, a positive and highly significant correlation was observed between the proportion of active cells and viral abundance in the mucus, suggesting that the metabolism of the bacterial associates is probably a strong determinant of the distribution of viruses within the coral holobiont. Overall, coral mucus, given its unique physicochemical characteristics and sticking properties, can be regarded as a highly selective biotope for abundant, diversified and specialized symbiotic microbial and viral organisms. PMID:25756121

  5. Lung gene therapy with highly compacted DNA nanoparticles that overcome the mucus barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Jung Soo; Kim, Anthony J; Trehan, Kanika; Schneider, Craig S; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Woodward, Owen M; Boylan, Nicholas J; Boyle, Michael P; Lai, Samuel K; Guggino, William B; Hanes, Justin

    2014-03-28

    Inhaled gene carriers must penetrate the highly viscoelastic and adhesive mucus barrier in the airway in order to overcome rapid mucociliary clearance and reach the underlying epithelium; however, even the most widely used viral gene carriers are unable to efficiently do so. We developed two polymeric gene carriers that compact plasmid DNA into small and highly stable nanoparticles with dense polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface coatings. These highly compacted, densely PEG-coated DNA nanoparticles rapidly penetrate human cystic fibrosis (CF) mucus ex vivo and mouse airway mucus ex situ. Intranasal administration of the mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles greatly enhanced particle distribution, retention and gene transfer in the mouse lung airways compared to conventional gene carriers. Successful delivery of a full-length plasmid encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was achieved in the mouse lungs and airway cells, including a primary culture of mucus-covered human airway epithelium grown at air-liquid interface, without causing acute inflammation or toxicity. Highly compacted mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles hold promise for lung gene therapy. PMID:24440664

  6. Mucus properties and goblet cell quantification in mouse, rat and human ileal Peyer's patches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ermund

    Full Text Available Peyer's patches (PPs are collections of lymphoid follicles in the small intestine, responsible for scanning the intestinal content for foreign antigens such as soluble molecules, particulate matter as well as intact bacteria and viruses. The immune cells of the patch are separated from the intestinal lumen by a single layer of epithelial cells, the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE. This epithelium covers the dome of the follicle and contains enterocyte-like cells and M cells, which are particularly specialized in taking up antigens from the gut. However, the presence and number of goblet cells as well as the presence of mucus on top of the FAE is controversial. When mouse ileal PPs were mounted in a horizontal Ussing-type chamber, we could observe a continuous mucus layer at mounting and new, easily removable mucus was released from the villi on the patch upon stimulation. Confocal imaging using fluorescent beads revealed a penetrable mucus layer covering the domes. Furthermore, immunostaining of FAE from mice, rats and humans with a specific antibody against the main component of intestinal mucus, the MUC2 mucin, clearly identify mucin-containing goblet cells. Transmission electron micrographs further support the identification of mucus releasing goblet cells on the domes of PPs in these species.

  7. Oxidation increases mucin polymer cross-links to stiffen airway mucus gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shaopeng; Hollinger, Martin; Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E; Kerr, Sheena C; Dunican, Eleanor M; Daniel, Brian M; Ghosh, Sudakshina; Erzurum, Serpel C; Willard, Belinda; Hazen, Stanley L; Huang, Xiaozhu; Carrington, Stephen D; Oscarson, Stefan; Fahy, John V

    2015-02-25

    Airway mucus in cystic fibrosis (CF) is highly elastic, but the mechanism behind this pathology is unclear. We hypothesized that the biophysical properties of CF mucus are altered because of neutrophilic oxidative stress. Using confocal imaging, rheology, and biochemical measures of inflammation and oxidation, we found that CF airway mucus gels have a molecular architecture characterized by a core of mucin covered by a web of DNA and a rheological profile characterized by high elasticity that can be normalized by chemical reduction. We also found that high levels of reactive oxygen species in CF mucus correlated positively and significantly with high concentrations of the oxidized products of cysteine (disulfide cross-links). To directly determine whether oxidation can cross-link mucins to increase mucus elasticity, we exposed induced sputum from healthy subjects to oxidizing stimuli and found a marked and thiol-dependent increase in sputum elasticity. Targeting mucin disulfide cross-links using current thiol-amino structures such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) requires high drug concentrations to have mucolytic effects. We therefore synthesized a thiol-carbohydrate structure (methyl 6-thio-6-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside) and found that it had stronger reducing activity than NAC and more potent and fast-acting mucolytic activity in CF sputum. Thus, oxidation arising from airway inflammation or environmental exposure contributes to pathologic mucus gel formation in the lung, which suggests that it can be targeted by thiol-modified carbohydrates. PMID:25717100

  8. Role of mucus in gastric mucosal injury induced by local ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, K; Joh, T; Yokoyama, Y; Itoh, M

    1995-09-01

    The role of gastric mucus was evaluated in a rat model of gastric epithelial damage induced by local ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) stress. In this model, blood-to-lumen chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) clearance served as an index of injury. Tetraprenyl acetone (TPA; 100 mg, 200 mg/kg IP) was used to stimulate mucus production. Administration of TPA increased both the hexosamine content in gastric tissue and the amount of alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS) stained mucus in the mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. Increases in 51Cr-EDTA clearance induced by I/R were significantly attenuated by TPA in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC; 0.6%, 0.8%) was perfused into the gastric lumen to assess the effect of reduction in mucus on the injury induced by I/R. Although mean values of hexosamine content were increased by perfusion with NAC, AB-PAS-stained mucus in the mucosa was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Perfusion of NAC did not change basal 51Cr-EDTA clearance but significantly exacerbated the increase in clearance induced by I/R in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that gastric mucus protects the gastric mucosa against I/R stress in vivo. PMID:7665977

  9. The Mucus of Actinia equina (Anthozoa, Cnidaria: An Unexplored Resource for Potential Applicative Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Stabili

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The mucus produced by many marine organisms is a complex mixture of proteins and polysaccharides forming a weak watery gel. It is essential for vital processes including locomotion, navigation, structural support, heterotrophic feeding and defence against a multitude of environmental stresses, predators, parasites, and pathogens. In the present study we focused on mucus produced by a benthic cnidarian, the sea anemone Actinia equina (Linnaeus, 1758 for preventing burial by excess sedimentation and for protection. We investigated some of the physico-chemical properties of this matrix such as viscosity, osmolarity, electrical conductivity, protein, carbohydrate, and total lipid contents. Some biological activities such as hemolytic, cytotoxic, and antibacterial lysozyme-like activities were also studied. The A. equina mucus is mainly composed by water (96.2% ± 0.3%, whereas its dry weight is made of 24.2% ± 1.3% proteins and 7.8% ± 0.2% carbohydrates, with the smallest and largest components referable to lipids (0.9% and inorganic matter (67.1%. The A. equina mucus matrix exhibited hemolytic activity on rabbit erythrocytes, cytotoxic activity against the tumor cell line K562 (human erythromyeloblastoid leukemia and antibacterial lysozyme-like activity. The findings from this study improve the available information on the mucus composition in invertebrates and have implications for future investigations related to exploitation of A. equina and other sea anemones’ mucus as a source of bioactive compounds of high pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest.

  10. Cervical motion segment replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, Vincent E.

    2002-01-01

    When symptoms bring to light a cervical spine degenerative disc process that requires surgical intervention, a symptom relieving procedure such as decompression, followed by functional restoration, arthroplasty, offers the benefit of prophylaxis of accelerated spondylosis at the operated level. In addition, by altering the biomechanical stress factors at adjacent levels, theoretically it should offer prophylactic benefit at these levels as well. The design requirements for a cervical disc pro...

  11. Direct Visualization of Mucus Production by the Cold-Water Coral Lophelia pertusa with Digital Holographic Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Zetsche

    Full Text Available Lophelia pertusa is the dominant reef-building organism of cold-water coral reefs, and is known to produce significant amounts of mucus, which could involve an important metabolic cost. Mucus is involved in particle removal and feeding processes, yet the triggers and dynamics of mucus production are currently still poorly described because the existing tools to study these processes are not appropriate. Using a novel microscopic technique-digital holographic microscopy (DHM-we studied the mucus release of L. pertusa under various experimental conditions. DHM technology permits μm-scale observations and allows the visualization of transparent mucoid substances in real time without staining. Fragments of L. pertusa were first maintained in flow-through chambers without stressors and imaged with DHM, then exposed to various stressors (suspended particles, particulate food and air exposure and re-imaged. Under non-stressed conditions no release of mucus was observed, whilst mucus strings and sheaths were produced in response to suspended particles (activated charcoal and drill cuttings sediment i.e. in a stressed condition. Mucus strings and so-called 'string balls' were also observed in response to exposure to particulate food (brine shrimp Artemia salina. Upon air-exposure, mucus production was clearly visible once the fragments were returned to the flow chamber. Distinct optical properties such as optical path length difference (OPD were measured with DHM in response to the various stimuli suggesting that different mucus types are produced by L. pertusa. Mucus produced to reject particles is similar in refractive index to the surrounding seawater, suggesting that the energy content of this mucus is low. In contrast, mucus produced in response to either food particle addition or air exposure had a higher refractive index, suggesting a higher metabolic investment in the production of these mucoid substances. This paper shows for the first time the

  12. Direct Visualization of Mucus Production by the Cold-Water Coral Lophelia pertusa with Digital Holographic Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetsche, Eva-Maria; Baussant, Thierry; Meysman, Filip J R; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Lophelia pertusa is the dominant reef-building organism of cold-water coral reefs, and is known to produce significant amounts of mucus, which could involve an important metabolic cost. Mucus is involved in particle removal and feeding processes, yet the triggers and dynamics of mucus production are currently still poorly described because the existing tools to study these processes are not appropriate. Using a novel microscopic technique-digital holographic microscopy (DHM)-we studied the mucus release of L. pertusa under various experimental conditions. DHM technology permits μm-scale observations and allows the visualization of transparent mucoid substances in real time without staining. Fragments of L. pertusa were first maintained in flow-through chambers without stressors and imaged with DHM, then exposed to various stressors (suspended particles, particulate food and air exposure) and re-imaged. Under non-stressed conditions no release of mucus was observed, whilst mucus strings and sheaths were produced in response to suspended particles (activated charcoal and drill cuttings sediment) i.e. in a stressed condition. Mucus strings and so-called 'string balls' were also observed in response to exposure to particulate food (brine shrimp Artemia salina). Upon air-exposure, mucus production was clearly visible once the fragments were returned to the flow chamber. Distinct optical properties such as optical path length difference (OPD) were measured with DHM in response to the various stimuli suggesting that different mucus types are produced by L. pertusa. Mucus produced to reject particles is similar in refractive index to the surrounding seawater, suggesting that the energy content of this mucus is low. In contrast, mucus produced in response to either food particle addition or air exposure had a higher refractive index, suggesting a higher metabolic investment in the production of these mucoid substances. This paper shows for the first time the potential of

  13. Plugging pig reduces line maintenance, repair costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-01

    A relatively new technique involving the use of plugging pigs to seal-off thruput on liquids lines was used by Ashland Pipe Line Co. during consecutive maintenance and repair projects on a crude trunkline in Illinois. Following completion, cost of the two operations was estimated at about two-thirds of that for similar projects using conventional line-plugging equipment. The pigs are produced by International Pipeline Equipment Co. (IPE) and are inserted into the line from the standard cleaning and batching, pig-launching equipment installed on the system. Ashland used one of the special pigs during reconditioning of a gate valve at its Patoka terminal and then pumped it downstream to seal the line at the site of a damage repair project. The service is provided by Advance Valve Installations, Inc.

  14. TMEM16A mediates the hypersecretion of mucus induced by Interleukin-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies showed that the Ca2+-activated Cl− channel (CaCC) was involved in the pathogenesis of mucus hypersecretion induced by Interleukin-13 (IL-13). However, the mechanisms underlying the process were unknown. Recently, transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A) was identified as the channel underlying the CaCC current. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether the TMEM16A channel is part of the mechanism underlying IL-13-induced mucus hypersecretion. We observed that both TMEM16A mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated after treatment with IL-13 in human bronchial epithelial 16 (HBE 16) cells, which correlated with an increase in mucus production. Additionally, mucus hypersecretion in rat airways was induced by intratracheal instillation of IL-13 and similar increases were observed in the expression of TMEM16A mRNA and protein in the bronchial epithelium. Niflumic acid (NA), a selective antagonist of CaCC, markedly blocked IL-13-induced mucin (MUC) 5AC mRNA and protein production in vivo and in vitro. Further investigation with HBE16 cells revealed that TMEM16A overexpression clearly promoted mucus production, IκBα phosphorylation, and p65 accumulation in the nucleus. The loss of TMEM16A resulted in inhibition of mucus production, and the TMEM16A-mediated production of MUC5AC was significantly blocked by a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor. Therefore, the TMEM16A channel acts upstream of NF-κB in the regulation of mucus production. This is the first demonstration that the TMEM16A-NF-κB pathway is positively involved in IL-13-induced mucus production, which provides novel insight into the molecular mechanism of mucin overproduction. - Highlights: • TMEM16A acts as downstream events of IL-13 signaling pathway. • Established the link between TMEM16A and mucus hypersecretion. • NF-κB activation might be responsible for TMEM16A mediated mucus secretion

  15. TMEM16A mediates the hypersecretion of mucus induced by Interleukin-13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiachen; Jiang, Youfan; Li, Li; Liu, Yanan; Tang, Hui; Jiang, Depeng, E-mail: depengjiang@163.com

    2015-06-10

    Previous studies showed that the Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel (CaCC) was involved in the pathogenesis of mucus hypersecretion induced by Interleukin-13 (IL-13). However, the mechanisms underlying the process were unknown. Recently, transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A) was identified as the channel underlying the CaCC current. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether the TMEM16A channel is part of the mechanism underlying IL-13-induced mucus hypersecretion. We observed that both TMEM16A mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated after treatment with IL-13 in human bronchial epithelial 16 (HBE 16) cells, which correlated with an increase in mucus production. Additionally, mucus hypersecretion in rat airways was induced by intratracheal instillation of IL-13 and similar increases were observed in the expression of TMEM16A mRNA and protein in the bronchial epithelium. Niflumic acid (NA), a selective antagonist of CaCC, markedly blocked IL-13-induced mucin (MUC) 5AC mRNA and protein production in vivo and in vitro. Further investigation with HBE16 cells revealed that TMEM16A overexpression clearly promoted mucus production, IκBα phosphorylation, and p65 accumulation in the nucleus. The loss of TMEM16A resulted in inhibition of mucus production, and the TMEM16A-mediated production of MUC5AC was significantly blocked by a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor. Therefore, the TMEM16A channel acts upstream of NF-κB in the regulation of mucus production. This is the first demonstration that the TMEM16A-NF-κB pathway is positively involved in IL-13-induced mucus production, which provides novel insight into the molecular mechanism of mucin overproduction. - Highlights: • TMEM16A acts as downstream events of IL-13 signaling pathway. • Established the link between TMEM16A and mucus hypersecretion. • NF-κB activation might be responsible for TMEM16A mediated mucus secretion.

  16. Tension free femoral hernia repair with plug

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milivoje Vukovi; Neboja Moljevi; Sinia Crnogorac

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the conventional technique involves treatment of femoral hernia an approximation inguinal ligament to pectineal ligament. In technique which uses mesh closure for femoral canal without tissue tension. Method: A prospective study from January 01. 2007-May 30. 2009. We analyzed 1 042 patients with inguinal hernia, of which there were 83 patients with 86 femoral hernia. Result: Femoral hernias were present in 7.96% of cases. Males were 13 (15.66%) and 70 women (84.34%). The gender distribution of men: women is 1:5.38. Urgent underwent 69 (83%), and the 14 election (17%) patients. Average age was 63 years, the youngest patient was a 24 and the oldest 86 years. Ratio of right: left hernias was 3.4:1. With bilateral femoral hernias was 3.61% of cases. In 7 patients (8.43%) underwent femoral hernia repair with 9 Prolene plug. Conclusions: The technique of closing the femoral canal with plug a simple. The plug is made from monofilament material and is easily formed. This technique allows the reduction of recurrence and can be used safely, quickly and easily in elective and emergency situations.

  17. Anterior Cervical Spinal Surgery for Multilevel Cervical Myelopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Jung-Ju Huang; Lih-Huei Chen; Chi-Chien Niu; Tsai-Sheng Fu; Po-Liang Lai; Wen-Jer Chen

    2004-01-01

    Background: In multilevel spinal cord compression caused by cervical spondylosis, surgeonsface the choice of performing a posterior route as a laminectomy orlaminoplasty, or an anterior route as multiple adjacent interbody decompressionsor corpectomies. The anterior cervical operation is not considered bysome clinicians because of concerns about complications and the complexityof multilevel anterior cervical surgery.Methods: In this retrospective study, 14 patients with multilevel cervical sp...

  18. Cervical syphilitic lesions mimicking cervical cancer: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A woman presented to the hospital due to postcoital vaginal bleeding. The patient was initially diagnosed with cervical carcinoma by clinicians at a local hospital. However, a biopsy of the cervical lesions revealed chronic inflammation and erosion of the cervical mucosa, and the rapid plasma reagin ratio titer was 1:256. The patient was eventually diagnosed with syphilitic cervicitis and treated with minocycline 0.1 g twice a day. The patient was cured with this treatment.

  19. Modeling and Simulation of Mucus Flow in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Cultures – Part I: Idealized Axisymmetric Swirling Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Paula A.; Jin, Yuan; Palmer, Erik; Hill, David; Forest, M. Gregory

    2016-01-01

    A multi-mode nonlinear constitutive model for mucus is constructed directly from micro- and macro-rheology experimental data on cell culture mucus, and a numerical algorithm is developed for the culture geometry and idealized cilia driving conditions. This study investigates the roles that mucus rheology, wall effects, and HBE culture geometry play in the development of flow profiles and the shape of the air-mucus interface. Simulations show that viscoelasticity captures normal stress generation in shear leading to a peak in the air-mucus interface at the middle of the culture and a depression at the walls. Linear and nonlinear viscoelastic regimes can be observed in cultures by varying the hurricane radius and mean rotational velocity. The advection-diffusion of a drug concentration dropped at the surface of the mucus flow is simulated as a function of Peclet number. PMID:27494700

  20. Bioactive potency of epidermal mucus extracts from greasy grouper,Epinephelus tauvina (Forsskal, 1775)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ganesh Manikantan; Somasundarannair Lyla; Syed Ajmal Khan; Packiaraj Vijayanand; George Edward Gnana Jothi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the bio-potency of epidermal mucus fromEpinephelus tauvina. Methods: Mucus was extracted with acidic, organic and aqueous solvents. Protein, carbohydrate, lipid, amino acid and fatty acid content of mucus extracts were quantified by UV-spectrophotometer, high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometer, respectively. Antimicrobial activity was tested against five human and fish pathogens by using agar well diffusion method. The molecular weight of peptides was determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The haemolytic activity of extracts was tested against chick, goat, cow and human red blood cell. Results:Protein contributed with maximum of 26.25% in crude mucus. Arginine was recorded maximum of (133.9 nmol/mL) in crude mucus. 2,4,6-Decatrienoic acid and bis (a-chloroethyl) sulfone were confirmed in organic extract. The antimicrobial activity of acidic extract was significant. Among the human pathogens, maximum zone of inhibition [(26.0 ± 0.3) mm] was observed againstProteus mirabilis. Whereas, among fish pathogens maximum zone of inhibition [(25.0 ± 0.1) mm] was observed againstVibrio parahemolyticus. The activity of other two extracts was not remarkable. The molecular weight of peptides ranged from 115.5–37.1 kDa in acidic extract was determined. Chicken and goat blood were found to be highly vulnerable to the lysis. Conclusions: The whole mucus could be a promising source with numerous bioactive- potency. Consequently, this preliminary information suggested that mucus is a source of novel antimicrobial agents for fish and human health related applications.

  1. Bacteria penetrate the inner mucus layer before inflammation in the dextran sulfate colitis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin E V Johansson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protection of the large intestine with its enormous amount of commensal bacteria is a challenge that became easier to understand when we recently could describe that colon has an inner attached mucus layer devoid of bacteria (Johansson et al. (2008 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 105, 15064-15069. The bacteria are thus kept at a distance from the epithelial cells and lack of this layer, as in Muc2-null mice, allow bacteria to contact the epithelium. This causes colitis and later on colon cancer, similar to the human disease Ulcerative Colitis, a disease that still lacks a pathogenetic explanation. Dextran Sulfate (DSS in the drinking water is the most widely used animal model for experimental colitis. In this model, the inflammation is observed after 3-5 days, but early events explaining why DSS causes this has not been described. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: When mucus formed on top of colon explant cultures were exposed to 3% DSS, the thickness of the inner mucus layer decreased and became permeable to 2 microm fluorescent beads after 15 min. Both DSS and Dextran readily penetrated the mucus, but Dextran had no effect on thickness or permeability. When DSS was given in the drinking water to mice and the colon was stained for bacteria and the Muc2 mucin, bacteria were shown to penetrate the inner mucus layer and reach the epithelial cells already within 12 hours, long before any infiltration of inflammatory cells. CONCLUSION: DSS thus causes quick alterations in the inner colon mucus layer that makes it permeable to bacteria. The bacteria that reach the epithelial cells probably trigger an inflammatory reaction. These observations suggest that altered properties or lack of the inner colon mucus layer may be an initial event in the development of colitis.

  2. Characterization of vibrios diversity in the mucus of the polychaete Myxicola infundibulum (Annellida, Polichaeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabili, Loredana; Giangrande, Adriana; Pizzolante, Graziano; Caruso, Giorgia; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Vibrios are among the most abundant culturable microbes in aquatic environments. They can be either free-living in the water column or associated with several marine organisms as mutualists, saprophytes, or parasites. In the present study we analysed vibrios abundance and diversity in the mucus of the polychaete Myxicola infundibulum, complementing culture-based with molecular methods. Vibrios reached 4.6 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1) thus representing a conspicuous component of the heterotrophic culturable bacteria. In addition, luminous vibrios accounted for about 60% of the total culturable vibrios in the mucus. The isolates were assigned to: Vibrio gigantis, Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio jasicida, Vibrio crassostreae, Vibrio kanaloae, and Vibrio xuii. Two Vibrio isolates (MI-13 and MI-15) may belong to a new species. We also tested the ability of the Vibrio isolates to grow on M. infundibulum mucus as the sole carbon source. All strains showed appreciable growth in the presence of mucus, leading us to conclude that this matrix, which is abundant and covers the animal entirely, may represent a microcosm and a food source for some bacteria, playing a crucial role in the structuring of a mucus-associated beneficial microbial community. Moreover, the trophic relationship between vibrios and M. infundibulum mucus could be enhanced by the protection that mucus offers to vibrios. The results of this study represent a contribution to the growing evidence for complex and dynamic invertebrate-microbe associations present in nature and highlight the importance of exploring relationships that Vibrio species establish with marine invertebrates.

  3. Susceptibility to Chronic Mucus Hypersecretion, a Genome Wide Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Akkelies E.; Smolonska, Joanna; van den Berge, Maarten; Wijmenga, Ciska; Zanen, Pieter; Luinge, Marjan A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Lammers, Jan-Willem; Dahlback, Magnus; Tosh, Kerrie; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Spira, Avi; Vestbo, Jorgen; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Benn, Marianne; Nielsen, Sune F.; Dahl, Morten; Verschuren, W. Monique; Picavet, H. Susan J.; Smit, Henriette A.; Owsijewitsch, Michael; Kauczor, Hans U.; de Koning, Harry J.; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, Eva; Mejza, Filip; Nastalek, Pawel; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Cho, Michael H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Lomas, David A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, M. A.; Loth, Daan W.; Lahousse, Lies; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Andre; Stricker, Bruno H.; Brusselle, Guy G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Brouwer, Uilke; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Vonk, Judith M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Timens, Wim; Boezen, H. Marike; Postma, Dirkje S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minority of smokers develops CMH. A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a predisposing genetic constitution. Therefore, we performed a genome wide association (GWA) study of CMH in Caucasian populations. Methods GWA analysis was performed in the NELSON-study using the Illumina 610 array, followed by replication and meta-analysis in 11 additional cohorts. In total 2,704 subjects with, and 7,624 subjects without CMH were included, all current or former heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years). Additional studies were performed to test the functional relevance of the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Results A strong association with CMH, consistent across all cohorts, was observed with rs6577641 (p = 4.25×10−6, OR = 1.17), located in intron 9 of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 locus (SATB1) on chromosome 3. The risk allele (G) was associated with higher mRNA expression of SATB1 (4.3×10−9) in lung tissue. Presence of CMH was associated with increased SATB1 mRNA expression in bronchial biopsies from COPD patients. SATB1 expression was induced during differentiation of primary human bronchial epithelial cells in culture. Conclusions Our findings, that SNP rs6577641 is associated with CMH in multiple cohorts and is a cis-eQTL for SATB1, together with our additional observation that SATB1 expression increases during epithelial differentiation provide suggestive evidence that SATB1 is a gene that affects CMH. PMID:24714607

  4. Susceptibility to chronic mucus hypersecretion, a genome wide association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkelies E Dijkstra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minority of smokers develops CMH. A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a predisposing genetic constitution. Therefore, we performed a genome wide association (GWA study of CMH in Caucasian populations. METHODS: GWA analysis was performed in the NELSON-study using the Illumina 610 array, followed by replication and meta-analysis in 11 additional cohorts. In total 2,704 subjects with, and 7,624 subjects without CMH were included, all current or former heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years. Additional studies were performed to test the functional relevance of the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. RESULTS: A strong association with CMH, consistent across all cohorts, was observed with rs6577641 (p = 4.25×10(-6, OR = 1.17, located in intron 9 of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 locus (SATB1 on chromosome 3. The risk allele (G was associated with higher mRNA expression of SATB1 (4.3×10(-9 in lung tissue. Presence of CMH was associated with increased SATB1 mRNA expression in bronchial biopsies from COPD patients. SATB1 expression was induced during differentiation of primary human bronchial epithelial cells in culture. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, that SNP rs6577641 is associated with CMH in multiple cohorts and is a cis-eQTL for SATB1, together with our additional observation that SATB1 expression increases during epithelial differentiation provide suggestive evidence that SATB1 is a gene that affects CMH.

  5. Design progress on ITER port plug test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To achieve the overall ITER machine availability target, the availability of diagnostics and heating port plugs shall be as high as 99.5%. To fulfill these requirements, it is mandatory to test the port plugs at operating temperature before installation on the machine and after refurbishment. The ITER port plug test facility (PPTF) provides the possibility to test upper and equatorial port plugs before installation on the machine. The port plug test facility is composed of several test stands. These test stands are first used in the domestic agencies and on the ITER Organization site to test the port plugs at the end of manufacturing. Two of these stands are installed later in the ITER hot cell facility to test the port plugs after refurbishment. The port plugs to be tested are the Ion Cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive antennas, Electron Cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive launchers, diagnostics and test blanket modules port plugs. Test stands shall be capable to perform environmental and functional tests. The test stands are composed of one vacuum tank (3.3 m in diameter, 5.6 m long) and the associated heating, vacuum and control systems. The vacuum tank shall achieve an ultimate pressure of 1 × 10−5 Pa at 100 °C containing a port plug. The heating system shall provide water at 240 °C and 4.4 MPa to heat up the port plugs. Openings are provided on the back of the vacuum tank to insert probes for the functional tests. This paper describes the tests to be performed on the port plugs and the conceptual design of the port plug test facility. The configuration of the standalone test stands and the integration in the hot cell facility are presented.

  6. Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    D. Jenkins(University of York, UK)

    2003-01-01

    Of the many types of human papillomavirus (HPV), more than 30 infect the genital tract. The association between certain oncogenic (high-risk) strains of HPV and cervical cancer is well established. Although HPV is essential to the transformation of cervical epithelial cells, it is not sufficient, and a variety of cofactors and molecular events influence whether cervical cancer will develop. Early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions can prevent progression to cervical cancer. Ident...

  7. Deep cervical infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inflammatory cervical swelling may have several causes. The jugular vein thrombosis is a rare entity, often forgotten. Most frequently arises due to a cervical sepsis by the use of a central venous catheter or intravenous drug abuse (drug addicts. Rarely, is secondary to a hypercoagulability state associated with a visceral carcinoma (Trousseau Syndrome. Material and Methods: The authors present the case of a 65 years old male, who used the ENT Emergency Service due to a painful left cervical swelling with local and systemic inflammatory signs of 3 days duration. Results: An cervical ultrasound suggested a neck abscess. CT was performed and confirmed the ultrasound results. Because of its location in the path of the internal jugular vein, we requested re-evaluation by CT with intravenous contrast and doppler ultrasound, obtaining the diagnosis of thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Further studies were conduct to clarify the hypercoagulability state, since the patient had no known predisposing factor. Finally the diagnosis of unresectable gastric carcinoma was made. Discussion and Conclusion: The ENT must be aware and be able to understand any cervical imagiologic studies. A deep knowledge of the anatomical imagiología is important for the diagnosis of jugular thrombosis. When we have a case of spontaneous jugular thrombosis, we must look for possible visceral carcinoma.

  8. The microbiome of coral surface mucus has a key role in mediating holobiont health and survival upon disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasl, Bettina; Herndl, Gerhard J; Frade, Pedro R

    2016-01-01

    Microbes are well-recognized members of the coral holobiont. However, little is known about the short-term dynamics of mucus-associated microbial communities under natural conditions and after disturbances, and how these dynamics relate to the host's health. Here we examined the natural variability of prokaryotic communities (based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing) associating with the surface mucus layer (SML) of Porites astreoides, a species exhibiting cyclical mucus aging and shedding. Shifts in the prokaryotic community composition during mucus aging led to the prevalence of opportunistic and potentially pathogenic bacteria (Verrucomicrobiaceae and Vibrionaceae) in aged mucus and to a twofold increase in prokaryotic abundance. After the release of aged mucus sheets, the community reverted to its original state, dominated by Endozoicimonaceae and Oxalobacteraceae. Furthermore, we followed the fate of the coral holobiont upon depletion of its natural mucus microbiome through antibiotics treatment. After re-introduction to the reef, healthy-looking microbe-depleted corals started exhibiting clear signs of bleaching and necrosis. Recovery versus mortality of the P. astreoides holobiont was related to the degree of change in abundance distribution of the mucus microbiome. We conclude that the natural prokaryotic community inhabiting the coral SML contributes to coral health and that cyclical mucus shedding has a key role in coral microbiome dynamics. PMID:26953605

  9. The microbiome of coral surface mucus has a key role in mediating holobiont health and survival upon disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasl, Bettina; Herndl, Gerhard J; Frade, Pedro R

    2016-09-01

    Microbes are well-recognized members of the coral holobiont. However, little is known about the short-term dynamics of mucus-associated microbial communities under natural conditions and after disturbances, and how these dynamics relate to the host's health. Here we examined the natural variability of prokaryotic communities (based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing) associating with the surface mucus layer (SML) of Porites astreoides, a species exhibiting cyclical mucus aging and shedding. Shifts in the prokaryotic community composition during mucus aging led to the prevalence of opportunistic and potentially pathogenic bacteria (Verrucomicrobiaceae and Vibrionaceae) in aged mucus and to a twofold increase in prokaryotic abundance. After the release of aged mucus sheets, the community reverted to its original state, dominated by Endozoicimonaceae and Oxalobacteraceae. Furthermore, we followed the fate of the coral holobiont upon depletion of its natural mucus microbiome through antibiotics treatment. After re-introduction to the reef, healthy-looking microbe-depleted corals started exhibiting clear signs of bleaching and necrosis. Recovery versus mortality of the P. astreoides holobiont was related to the degree of change in abundance distribution of the mucus microbiome. We conclude that the natural prokaryotic community inhabiting the coral SML contributes to coral health and that cyclical mucus shedding has a key role in coral microbiome dynamics. PMID:26953605

  10. The degenerative cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. PMID:26878769

  11. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrier, B P; Lichtendonk, W J; Witjes, J A

    2002-05-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) proved to be an effective mucolytic in pulmonary secretions. Our goal was to investigate the in vitro effect of NAC on viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus. The urine of a patient with an ileal neobladder was collected during the first 7 days postoperatively and stored in a refrigerator. After precipitation, the urine was decanted. The residue was stirred to a homogeneous suspension. To samples of 4.5 ml mucus, 0.5 ml NAC 10% was added. To the control sample, 0.5 ml water was added. The samples were incubated in a water bath at 37 degrees C for 5, 30 and 60 min. Viscosity was measured in the Bohlin VOR Rheometer. The viscosity of the ileal neobladder mucus decreased quickly after incubating with NAC 10%. Viscosity increased slightly after I h of incubation. The viscosity in the control sample was higher than in the other incubated samples. NAC was found to decrease the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus, supporting the in vivo experience that NAC can be useful in patients with an ileal neobladder to facilitate the evacuation of mucus by decreasing viscosity.

  12. Interaction of Campylobacter spp. and human probiotics in chicken intestinal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganan, M; Martinez-Rodriguez, A J; Carrascosa, A V; Vesterlund, S; Salminen, S; Satokari, R

    2013-03-01

    Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial food-borne diarrhoeal disease throughout the world. The principal risk of human contamination is handling and consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To colonize poultry, Campylobacter adheres to and persists in the mucus layer that covers the intestinal epithelium. Inhibiting adhesion to the mucus could prevent colonization of the intestine. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the protective effect of defined commercial human probiotic strains on the adhesion of Campylobacter spp. to chicken intestinal mucus, in a search for alternatives to antibiotics to control this food-borne pathogen. The probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS and a starter culture strain Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis adhered well to chicken intestinal mucus and were able to reduce the binding of Campylobacter spp. when the mucus was colonized with the probiotic strain before contacting the pathogen. Human-intended probiotics could be useful as prophylactics in poultry feeding for controlling Campylobacter spp. colonization. PMID:22672405

  13. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Laura; de Goeij, Jasper M; Mueller, Christina E; Struck, Ulrich; Middelburg, Jack J; van Duyl, Fleur C; Al-Horani, Fuad A; Wild, Christian; Naumann, Malik S; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrients in DOM to higher trophic levels on Caribbean reefs via the so-called sponge loop. Coral mucus may be a major DOM source for the sponge loop, but mucus uptake by sponges has not been demonstrated. Here we used laboratory stable isotope tracer experiments to show the transfer of coral mucus into the bulk tissue and phospholipid fatty acids of the warm-water sponge Mycale fistulifera and cold-water sponge Hymedesmia coriacea, demonstrating a direct trophic link between corals and reef sponges. Furthermore, 21-40% of the mucus carbon and 32-39% of the nitrogen assimilated by the sponges was subsequently released as detritus, confirming a sponge loop on Red Sea warm-water and north Atlantic cold-water coral reefs. The presence of a sponge loop in two vastly different reef environments suggests it is a ubiquitous feature of reef ecosystems contributing to the high biogeochemical cycling that may enable coral reefs to thrive in nutrient-limited (warm-water) and energy-limited (cold-water) environments. PMID:26740019

  14. Tensiometric and Phase Domain Behavior of Lung Surfactant on Mucus-like Viscoelastic Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Daniel M; Fiegel, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Lung surfactant has been observed at all surfaces of the airway lining fluids and is an important contributor to normal lung function. In the conducting airways, the surfactant film lies atop a viscoelastic mucus gel. In this work, we report on the characterization of the tensiometric and phase domain behavior of lung surfactant at the air-liquid interface of mucus-like viscoelastic gels. Poly(acrylic acid) hydrogels were formulated to serve as a model mucus with bulk rheological properties that matched those of tracheobronchial mucus secretions. Infasurf (Calfactant), a commercially available pulmonary surfactant derived from calf lung extract, was spread onto the hydrogel surface. The surface tension lowering ability and relaxation of Infasurf films on the hydrogels was quantified and compared to Infasurf behavior on an aqueous subphase. Infasurf phase domains during surface compression were characterized by fluorescence microscopy and phase shifting interferometry. We observed that increasing the bulk viscoelastic properties of the model mucus hydrogels reduced the ability of Infasurf films to lower surface tension and inhibited film relaxation. A shift in the formation of Infasurf condensed phase domains from smaller, more spherical domains to large, agglomerated, multilayer structures was observed with increasing viscoelastic properties of the subphase. These studies demonstrate that the surface behavior of lung surfactant on viscoelastic surfaces, such as those found in the conducting airways, differs significantly from aqueous, surfactant-laden systems. PMID:26894883

  15. Humoral immune response against native or 60Co irradiated venom and mucus from stingray Paratrygon aiereba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poisonings and traumas caused by poisonous freshwater fish such as rays are considered a major public health problem and draw attention because of accidents involving these animals cause serious local symptoms and are disabling, keeping the victim away from work. The therapy of these cases is based only on the symptoms of patients, which implies in its low efficiency, causing suffering for the victims. This study aims to evaluate and compare the humoral immune response in animals inoculated with native or 60Co irradiated Paratrygon aiereba venom and mucus. Ionizing radiation has proven to be an excellent tool to decrease the toxicity of venoms and isolated toxins. The mucus and venom samples of P. aiereba were irradiated using gamma rays from a 60Co source. Animals models were immunized with the native or irradiated mucus or venom. The assays were conducted to assess the production of antibodies by the immunized animals using enzyme immunoassay and western blotting. Preliminary results show the production of antibodies by the immunized animals. The resulting sera were also checked for antigenic cross- reactivity between venom and mucus, demonstrating the potential of mucus as an antigen for serum production for the specific treatment for accidents by stingrays. However, it is essential to carry out further tests in order to verify the neutralization of the toxin by antibodies formed by animals. (author)

  16. Lactobacillus reuteri maintains a functional mucosal barrier during DSS treatment despite mucus layer dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Dicksved

    Full Text Available Treatment with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri has been shown to prevent dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis in rats. This is partly due to reduced P-selectin-dependent leukocyte- and platelet-endothelial cell interactions, however, the mechanism behind this protective effect is still unknown. In the present study a combination of culture dependent and molecular based T-RFLP profiling was used to investigate the influence of L. reuteri on the colonic mucosal barrier of DSS treated rats. It was first demonstrated that the two colonic mucus layers of control animals had different bacterial community composition and that fewer bacteria resided in the firmly adherent layer. During DSS induced colitis, the number of bacteria in the inner firmly adherent mucus layer increased and bacterial composition of the two layers no longer differed. In addition, induction of colitis dramatically altered the microbial composition in both firmly and loosely adherent mucus layers. Despite protecting against colitis, treatment with L. reuteri did not improve the integrity of the mucus layer or prevent distortion of the mucus microbiota caused by DSS. However, L. reuteri decreased the bacterial translocation from the intestine to mesenteric lymph nodes during DSS treatment, which might be an important part of the mechanisms by which L. reuteri ameliorates DSS induced colitis.

  17. Ulcerative colitis as a polymicrobial infection characterized by sustained broken mucus barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shui-Jiao; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Jian-Ping; Yang, Xi-Yan; Lu, Fang-Gen

    2014-01-01

    To reduce medication for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), we need to establish the etiology of UC. The intestinal microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been shown to differ from that of healthy controls and abundant data indicate that it changes in both composition and localization. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is significantly higher in IBD patients compared with controls. Probiotics have been investigated for their capacity to reduce the severity of UC. The luminal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract are covered by a mucus layer. This normally acts as a barrier that does not allow bacteria to reach the epithelial cells and thus limits the direct contact between the host and the bacteria. The mucus layer in the colon comprises an inner layer that is firmly adherent to the intestinal mucosa, and an outer layer that can be washed off with minimal rinsing. Some bacteria can dissolve the protective inner mucus layer. Defects in renewal and formation of the inner mucus layer allow bacteria to reach the epithelium and have implications for the causes of colitis. In this review, important elements of UC pathology are thought to be the intestinal bacteria, gut mucus, and the mucosa-associated immune system. PMID:25071341

  18. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrier, B P; Lichtendonk, W J; Witjes, J A

    2002-05-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) proved to be an effective mucolytic in pulmonary secretions. Our goal was to investigate the in vitro effect of NAC on viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus. The urine of a patient with an ileal neobladder was collected during the first 7 days postoperatively and stored in a refrigerator. After precipitation, the urine was decanted. The residue was stirred to a homogeneous suspension. To samples of 4.5 ml mucus, 0.5 ml NAC 10% was added. To the control sample, 0.5 ml water was added. The samples were incubated in a water bath at 37 degrees C for 5, 30 and 60 min. Viscosity was measured in the Bohlin VOR Rheometer. The viscosity of the ileal neobladder mucus decreased quickly after incubating with NAC 10%. Viscosity increased slightly after I h of incubation. The viscosity in the control sample was higher than in the other incubated samples. NAC was found to decrease the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus, supporting the in vivo experience that NAC can be useful in patients with an ileal neobladder to facilitate the evacuation of mucus by decreasing viscosity. PMID:12088194

  19. Results from the Bell Canyon borehole plugging test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    The BHP is an integrated program involving consequence assessment and plug performance calculations, materials evaluation, instrumentation development and field testing, and interfaces directly with other WIPP-related activities. This paper describes an in situ test conducted under the BHP Field Test Task. The Bell Canyon Test was conducted to evaluate candidate grout plugging mixes and plug emplacement techniques, and to assess plug performance under in-situ cure conditions. Laboratory testing of the brine-grout/rock combination revealed an adverse reaction between the brine-grout and the anhydrite. This discovery permitted a timely change to an additional laboratory compatibility testing program with an alternate fresh-water mix to permit maintenance of the test schedule with little delay. While cement emplacement technology is generally adequate to satisfy repository plugging requirements, plug compatibility with the host rock must be carefully assessed for each repository site. Generally accepted laboratory cement-testing techniques need to include flow characteristics and geochemical stability.

  20. Cervical spine chordoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díez-González L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chordomas are neoplasms that arise from notochord embryonic remnants, been the sacrococcygeal spine the main site of involvement; the cervical spine site is uncommon and it account for less than 10% of chordomas. Because of their slow growth, the diagnosis is delayed until they reach a large size, despite which they are locally aggressive tumours due to their relation to critical neurovascular structures and present a high rate of local recurrence. Radical surgery is the elective treatment and proton radiotherapy is used when residual tumour tissue and recurrences.Because of the uncommonness of this pathology, we report a case of a patient with cervical chordoma.

  1. CERVICAL NECROTIZING FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dimofte

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual encounter in the general surgical practice, but is a life-threatening condition requiring early recognition and adequate surgical treatment. We present the case of a 65 year old male patient referred to our department from a General Hospital. Large excisions of both superficial and deep cervical fascia were required together with necrotic skin on a very large surface. Rapid recovery with early sterilization allowed adequate skin grafting with good results. We advocate for aggressive debridment with excision in viable healthy tissue, with no concern for the future reconstruction followe by early grafting of the skin defect.

  2. A plug with infinite order and some exotic 4-manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Tange, Motoo

    2012-01-01

    Every exotic pair in 4-dimension is obtained each other by twisting a {\\it cork} or {\\it plug} which are codimension 0 submanifolds embedded in the 4-manifolds. The twist was an involution on the boundary of the submanifold. We define cork (or plug) with order $p\\in {\\Bbb N}\\cup \\{\\infty\\}$ and show there exists a plug with infinite order. Furthermore we show twisting $(P,\\varphi^2)$ gives to enlargements of $P$ compact exotic manifolds with boundary.

  3. Residual solidification stress in plug welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Installation of the plugs in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers is performed using GTAW process with filler metal. During the cooling phase of the weld puddle residual stresses will be generated in the weld. The residual stresses together with the stresses from the primary and secondary loads will define the total stress in the weld. The level of total stress is important for the reliability of the plug joints. Typically, the welding procedures prescribe a range of values for each welding parameters, therefore the welder has the option to select a relative wide range of combinations of parameters based on test results, welding position, experience, etc. Manual welding processes are more susceptible to larger variation of the heat input than the automatic welding processes. The combination of the welding parameters may be controlled by a generic parameter called welding heat input. The net effect of the heat input is to control the energy introduced by an arc at weld joint such that adequate weld puddle is produced. The heat input along with the thermal properties of the materials control the temperature distribution in the welded joint. Ultimately, the response of the structure to the thermal loads resulted from the non-uniform distribution of temperature is a non-uniform distribution of the plastic strains that results in residual stresses. This paper presents the effect of variation of welding heat input on distribution of residual stresses. Finite element method is used to simulate the welding process for various heat inputs that may be encountered during plug welding. The analysis is performed in two steps. In the first step a thermal transient analysis is performed in which the temperature distribution due to a moving heat source is obtained. The resulting thermal field is used as input data for structural analysis. It is shown that the extent of residual stresses in the weld joint is affected by the energy used to produce the weld and can be related to the

  4. Testing and plugging power plant heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutor, F. [Expando Seal Tools, Inc., Montgomeryville, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Heat Exchanger tubes fail for any number of reasons including but certainly not limited to the cumulative effects of corrosion, erosion, thermal stress and fatigue. This presentation will attempt to identify the most common techniques for determining which tubes are leaking and then introduce the products in use to plug the leaking tubes. For the sake of time I will limit the scope of this presentation to include feedwater heaters and secondary system heat exchangers such as Hydrogen Coolers, Lube Oil Coolers, and nuclear Component Cooling Water, Emergency Cooling Water, Regenerative Heat Recovery heat exchangers.

  5. Plug ‘n’ Play with DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Andreasen, Elisa W.; Korgaard, Jaide V.;

    Synthetic biology has evolved dramatically within the past decade, which calls for a revolution of the Standard Assembly method that makes the foundation of BioBricks. We believe that iGEM should be about fast assembly of BioBricks, where any thinkable part, device or existing BioBrick can be com...... be combined for any type of organism within one day. Therefore, we have designed a new BioBrick Kit based on a novel assembly standard; called “Plug 'n' Play with DNA”....

  6. Knowledge-Based System to Support Plug Load Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electrical plug loads comprise an increasingly larger share of building energy consumption as improvements have been made to Heating, Ventilation, and Air...

  7. Effects of Different Progesterone Plugs on Estrous Control in Ewe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hongda

    2009-01-01

    In breeding season and non-breeding season, the effects of three kinds of progesterone plugs on estrous control in ewes were studied. Meanwhile, the advantages and the disadvantages of the progesterone plugs were analyzed. The results showed that there were no significant difference among three progesterone plugs on modulating the ewes' estrus and pregnancy, and affecting estrous rate and fecundation rate (P>0.05). It was observed that the progesterone plug produced by Animal Husbandry Research Center of Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences could modulate the ewes' estrus and pregnancy effectively, and the low cost and convenience in operation made it popularize in the reproducation of sheep widely.

  8. Bacterial communities and species-specific associations with the mucus of Brazilian coral species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Camila; Torres, Tatiana T; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the existence of species-specific associations between Brazilian coral species and bacteria. Pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rDNA was used to analyze the taxonomic composition of bacterial communities associated with the mucus of four coral species (Madracis decactis, Mussismilia hispida, Palythoa caribaeorum, and Tubastraea coccinea) in two seasons (winter and summer), which were compared with the surrounding water and sediment. The microbial communities found in samples of mucus, water, and sediment differed according to the composition and relative frequency of OTUs. The coral mucus community seemed to be more stable and resistant to seasonal variations, compared to the water and sediment communities. There was no influence of geographic location on the composition of the communities. The sediment community was extremely diverse and might act as a "seed bank" for the entire environment. Species-specific OTUs were found in P. caribaeorum, T. coccinea, and M. hispida. PMID:23567936

  9. Ciliary and mucus-net filter feeding, with special reference to fluid mechanical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.B.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Møhlenberg, F.;

    1984-01-01

    Filter characteristics were determined and compared in ciliary and mucus-net filter feeders. The ciliary feeders include the polychaete Sabella penicillus, the brachiopod Terebratulina retusa, the marine bivalves Monia squama, Cardium glaucum, and Petricola pholadiformis, and the freshwater...... bivalves Dreissena polymorpha, Unio pictorum and Anodonta cygnea. The mucus-net feeders are the polychaete Chaetopterus variopedatus, the gastropod Crepidula fornicata and the ascidians Styela clava, Ciona intestinalis, Ascidia virginea, A. obliqua and A. mentula. Efficiencies of particle retention as a...... function of particle size was determined by counting of particles in samples of inhalant and exhalant water. The lower threshold for efficient particle retention varied from .apprx. 6 .mu.m in T. retuso to .apprx. 1 .mu.m in D. polymorpha. Mucus nets efficiently retained particles down to 1-2 .mu.m. Filter...

  10. Attenuation of cigarette smoke-induced airway mucus production by hydrogen-rich saline in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunye Ning

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over-production of mucus is an important pathophysiological feature in chronic airway disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma. Cigarette smoking (CS is the leading cause of COPD. Oxidative stress plays a key role in CS-induced airway abnormal mucus production. Hydrogen protected cells and tissues against oxidative damage by scavenging hydroxyl radicals. In the present study we investigated the effect of hydrogen on CS-induced mucus production in rats. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: sham control, CS group, hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment group and hydrogen-rich saline control group. Lung morphology and tissue biochemical changes were determined by immunohistochemistry, Alcian Blue/periodic acid-Schiff staining, TUNEL, western blot and realtime RT-PCR. RESULTS: Hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment attenuated CS-induced mucus accumulation in the bronchiolar lumen, goblet cell hyperplasia, muc5ac over-expression and abnormal cell apoptosis in the airway epithelium as well as malondialdehyde increase in the BALF. The phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1068 and Nrf2 up-regulation expression in the rat lungs challenged by CS exposure were also abrogated by hydrogen-rich saline. CONCLUSION: Hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment ameliorated CS-induced airway mucus production and airway epithelium damage in rats. The protective role of hydrogen on CS-exposed rat lungs was achieved at least partly by its free radical scavenging ability. This is the first report to demonstrate that intraperitoneal administration of hydrogen-rich saline protected rat airways against CS damage and it could be promising in treating abnormal airway mucus production in COPD.

  11. A simulated mucus layer protects Lactobacillus reuteri from the inhibitory effects of linoleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Weirdt, R; Coenen, E; Vlaeminck, B; Fievez, V; Van den Abbeele, P; Van de Wiele, T

    2013-12-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is a commensal, beneficial gut microbe that colonises the intestinal mucus layer, where it makes close contact with the human host and may significantly affect human health. Here, we investigated the capacity of linoleic acid (LA), the most common polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in a Western-style diet, to affect L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 prevalence and survival in a simulated mucus layer. Short-term (1 h) survival and mucin-agar adhesion assays of a log-phase L. reuteri suspension in intestinal water demonstrated that the simulated mucus layer protected L. reuteri against the inhibitory effects of LA by lowering its contact with the bacterial cell membrane. The protective effect of the simulated mucus layer was further evaluated using a more complex and dynamic model of the colon microbiota (SHIME®), in which L. reuteri survival was monitored during 6 days of daily exposure to LA in the absence (L-SHIME) and presence (M-SHIME) of a simulated mucus layer. After 6 days, luminal L- and M-SHIME L. reuteri plate counts had decreased by 3.1±0.5 and 2.6±0.9 log cfu/ml, respectively. Upon supplementation of 1.0 g/l LA, the decline in the luminal L. reuteri population started earlier than was observed for the control. In contrast, mucin-agar levels of L. reuteri (in the M-SHIME) remained unaffected throughout the experiment even in the presence of high concentrations of LA. Overall, the results of this study indicate the importance of the mucus layer as a protective environment for beneficial gut microbes to escape from stress by high loads of the antimicrobial PUFA LA to the colon, i.e. due to a Western-style diet. PMID:24311313

  12. Ultraviolet-B wavelengths regulate changes in UV absorption of cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus mucus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill P Zamzow

    Full Text Available High-energy wavelengths in the ultraviolet-B (UVB, 280-315 nm and the UVA (315-400-nm portion of the spectrum are harmful to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Interestingly, UVA is also involved in the repair of UV induced damage. Organisms living in shallow coral reef environments possess UV absorbing compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids, to protect them from UV radiation. While it has been demonstrated that exposure to UV (280-400 nm affects the UV absorbance of fish mucus, whether the effects of UV exposure vary between UVB and UVA wavelengths is not known. Therefore, we investigated whether the UVB, UVA, or photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm portions of the spectrum affected the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus and Fulton's body condition index of the cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus. We also compared field-measured UV absorbance with laboratory based high-performance liquid chromatography measurements of mycosporine-like amino acid concentrations. After 1 week, we found that the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus was higher in the UVB+UVA+PAR treatment compared with the UVA+PAR and PAR only treatments; after 2 and 3 weeks, however, differences between treatments were not detected. After 3 weeks, Fulton's body condition index was lower for fish in the UVB+UVA+PAR compared with PAR and UVA+PAR treatments; furthermore, all experimentally treated fish had a lower Fulton's body condition index than did freshly caught fish. Finally, we found a decrease with depth in the UV absorbance of mucus of wild-caught fish. This study suggests that the increase in UV absorbance of fish mucus in response to increased overall UV levels is a function of the UVB portion of the spectrum. This has important implications for the ability of cleaner fish and other fishes to adjust their mucus UV protection in response to variations in environmental UV exposure.

  13. Ultraviolet-B wavelengths regulate changes in UV absorption of cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamzow, Jill P; Siebeck, Ulrike E; Eckes, Maxi J; Grutter, Alexandra S

    2013-01-01

    High-energy wavelengths in the ultraviolet-B (UVB, 280-315 nm) and the UVA (315-400-nm) portion of the spectrum are harmful to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Interestingly, UVA is also involved in the repair of UV induced damage. Organisms living in shallow coral reef environments possess UV absorbing compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids, to protect them from UV radiation. While it has been demonstrated that exposure to UV (280-400 nm) affects the UV absorbance of fish mucus, whether the effects of UV exposure vary between UVB and UVA wavelengths is not known. Therefore, we investigated whether the UVB, UVA, or photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) portions of the spectrum affected the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus and Fulton's body condition index of the cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus. We also compared field-measured UV absorbance with laboratory based high-performance liquid chromatography measurements of mycosporine-like amino acid concentrations. After 1 week, we found that the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus was higher in the UVB+UVA+PAR treatment compared with the UVA+PAR and PAR only treatments; after 2 and 3 weeks, however, differences between treatments were not detected. After 3 weeks, Fulton's body condition index was lower for fish in the UVB+UVA+PAR compared with PAR and UVA+PAR treatments; furthermore, all experimentally treated fish had a lower Fulton's body condition index than did freshly caught fish. Finally, we found a decrease with depth in the UV absorbance of mucus of wild-caught fish. This study suggests that the increase in UV absorbance of fish mucus in response to increased overall UV levels is a function of the UVB portion of the spectrum. This has important implications for the ability of cleaner fish and other fishes to adjust their mucus UV protection in response to variations in environmental UV exposure. PMID:24143264

  14. Nanoparticles decorated with proteolytic enzymes, a promising strategy to overcome the mucus barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira de Sousa, Irene; Cattoz, Beatrice; Wilcox, Matthew D; Griffiths, Peter C; Dalgliesh, Robert; Rogers, Sarah; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    The intestinal mucus gel layer represents a stumbling block for drug adsorption. This study is aimed to formulate a nanoparticulate system able to overcome this barrier by cleaving locally the glycoprotein substructures of the mucus. Mucolytic enzymes such as papain (PAP) and bromelain (BRO) were covalently conjugated to poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). Nanoparticles (NPs) were then formulated via ionic gelation method and characterized by particle size, zeta potential, enzyme content and enzymatic activity. The NPs permeation quantified by rotating tube studies was correlated with changes in the mucus gel layer structure determined by pulsed-gradient-spin-echo NMR (PGSE-NMR), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and spin-echo SANS (SESANS). PAP and BRO functionalized NPs had an average size in the range of 250 and 285 nm and a zeta potential that ranged between -6 and -5 mV. The enzyme content was 242 μg enzyme/mg for PAP modified NPs and 253 μg enzyme/mg for BRO modified NPs. The maintained enzymatic activity was 43% for PAP decorated NPs and 76% for BRO decorated NPs. The rotating tube technique revealed a better performance of BRO decorated NPs compared to PAA decorated NPs, with a 4.8-fold higher concentration of NPs in the inner slice of mucus. Addition of 0.5 wt% of enzyme functionalized NPs to 5 wt% intestinal mucin led to c.a. 2-fold increase in the mobility of the mucin as measured by PGSE-NMR indicative of a significant break-up of the structure of the mucin. SANS and SESANS measurements further revealed a change in structure of the intestinal mucus induced by the incorporation of the functionalized NPs mostly occurring at a length scale longer than 0.5 μm. Accordingly, BRO decorated NPs show higher potential than PAP functionalized NPs as mucus permeating drug delivery systems. PMID:25661320

  15. Characterization of mucus-associated proteins from abalone (Haliotis) - candidates for chemical signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuanpradit, Chitraporn; Stewart, Michael J; York, Patrick S; Degnan, Bernard M; Sobhon, Prasert; Hanna, Peter J; Chavadej, Jittipan; Cummins, Scott F

    2012-02-01

    Living in groups is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom. For free-spawning aquatic animals, such as the abalone (Haliotis), being in the close proximity to potential mating partners enhances reproductive success. In this study, we investigated whether chemical cues could be present in abalone mucus that enable species-specific aggregation. A comparative MS analysis of mucus obtained from trailing or fixed stationary Haliotis asinina, and from seawater surrounding aggregations, indicated that water-soluble biomolecules are present and that these can stimulate sensory activity in conspecifics. Purified extracts of trail mucus contain at least three small proteins [termed H. asinina mucus-associated proteins (Has-MAPs)-1-3], which readily diffuse into the surrounding seawater and evoke a robust cephalic tentacle response in conspecifics. Mature Has-MAP-1 is approximately 9.9 kDa in size, and has a glycine-rich N-terminal region. Has-MAP-2 is approximately 6.2 kDa in size, and has similarities to schistosomin, a protein that is known to play a role in mollusc reproduction. The mature Has-MAP-3 is approximately 12.5 kDa in size, and could only be identified within trail mucus of animals outside of the reproductive season. All three Has-MAP genes are expressed at high levels within secretory cells of the juvenile abalone posterior pedal gland, consistent with a role in scent marking. We infer from these results that abalone mucus-associated proteins are candidate chemical cues that could provide informational cues to conspecifics living in close proximity and, given their apparent stability and hydrophilicity, animals further afield.

  16. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risk? What Are the Symptoms? What Should I Know About Screening? Statistics Related Links Inside Knowledge Campaign What CDC Is Doing Research AMIGAS Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Printable Versions Standard quality PDF [PDF-877KB] High-quality PDF for professional ...

  17. Prevent Cervical Cancer!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-08

    Cervical cancer can be prevented. Listen as two friends—one a doctor—talk about screening tests and early detection. Learn what test you might need.  Created: 1/8/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/8/2015.

  18. Cervical silicone lymphadenopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Latoni Kaysha; Thiruchelvam, Janavikulam

    2016-07-01

    A patient presented to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery with a rare case of cervical silicone lymphadenopathy. She had a painless ovoid mass in the left side of her neck and had had cosmetic breast augmentation 10 years before. Radiological imaging and core biopsy examination were consistent with silicone lymphadenopathy. PMID:26830068

  19. Deep Space Habitat Wireless Smart Plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joseph A.; Porter, Jay; Rojdev, Kristina; Carrejo, Daniel B.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has been interested in technology development for deep space exploration, and one avenue of developing these technologies is via the eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge. In 2013, NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH) project was in need of sensors that could monitor the power consumption of various devices in the habitat with added capability to control the power to these devices for load shedding in emergency situations. Texas A&M University's Electronic Systems Engineering Technology Program (ESET) in conjunction with their Mobile Integrated Solutions Laboratory (MISL) accepted this challenge, and over the course of 2013, several undergraduate students in a Capstone design course developed five wireless DC Smart Plugs for NASA. The wireless DC Smart Plugs developed by Texas A&M in conjunction with NASA's Deep Space Habitat team is a first step in developing wireless instrumentation for future flight hardware. This paper will further discuss the X-Hab challenge and requirements set out by NASA, the detailed design and testing performed by Texas A&M, challenges faced by the team and lessons learned, and potential future work on this design.

  20. Adhesion mechanisms of Vibrio fluvialis to skin mucus of Epinephelus awoara

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢庆枇; 赵敏慧; 王晓露; 邹文政; 陈昌生

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio fluvialis incubated in trypticase soy broth(TSB)showed stronger adhesion to the skin mucus of Epinephelus awoara than V.fluvialis grown on trypticase soy agar(TSA),and this bacterial adhesion was assessed in terms of saturation kinetics.Treating bacteria with antibody against O-antigens resulted in significantly reduced bacterial adhesion.In the early growth stage,the adhering bacteria numbers increased with incubation time,peaked at 24 h,and then dropped sharply.Prior heat treatment of the mucus at ...

  1. The detection of gunshot residues in the nasal mucus of suspected shooters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Daniele; Brandone, Alberto; Amadasi, Alberto; Cattaneo, Cristina; Profumo, Antonella

    2016-07-01

    The identification and quantification of metallic residues produced by gunshots, called gunshot residues (GSR), provide crucial elements in forensic investigations. The research has been largely focused on their collection onto the hands of suspected shooters, but the method is often burdened by risks of contamination. This research was focused on the possibility of sampling GSR trapped inside the nasal mucus of consenting shooters. Samples of the nasal mucus of "blank" control subjects and shooters were chemically analysed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), for residues of antimony (Sb) and barium (Ba), while lead (Pb) was excluded as ubiquitously environmental contaminant and due to high instrumental quantification limit (IQL) of INAA for this element. Shots were fired using two types of weapons (pistols and revolvers) and different firing sequences. The mucus was sampled at different times: immediately after the shots, after 30-60-120 and 180 min. Different amounts of Sb and Ba were detected between controls and shooters, witnessing the ability of the nasal mucus to retain GSR at concentrations significantly different even from the highest basal levels. Moreover, in order to simulate actual cases, nasal mucus from five groups of shooters was sampled after different shots with the same weapon and cartridges, immediately and after 1, 3, 12, and 24 h. The highest values were always found in the first 3 h from firing, for both weapons. Interestingly, for all the weapons, significant Sb and Ba concentrations were also found up to 12 h after firing, contrary to what occurs on hands, even though a progressive decrease was detected, with values below the detection threshold only after 24 h, thus demonstrating that GSR are persistent in nasal mucus. These first results proving that both Sb and Ba were qualitatively detectable in the nasal mucus of shooters indicate that the chemical analysis of the nasal mucus of suspected shooters may represent a

  2. Mucus sugar content shapes the bacterial community structure in thermally stressed Acropora muricata

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sonny T. M.; Davy, Simon K.; Sen-Lin eTang; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26°C to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed t...

  3. Innovative cement plug setting process reduces risk and lowers NPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, T.; Rogers, H.; Lloyd, S.; Quinton, C. [Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada); Tetrault, N. [Apache Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    With increased drilling in mature fields and unconventional reservoirs, Canadian operators are experiencing a higher rate of lost circulation events. When drilling into lower fracture-gradient zones, operators face the risk of drilling through shallower depleted zones. The unique challenges associated with setting cement plugs in such open hole wells were described. The best solution to address lost circulation events is a properly designed cement slurry where cement can be squeezed into the lost circulation zones to strengthen the wellbore when set. The cement plug is drilled through, leaving the residual cement setting inside the problem zones. Since cement plugs are used for a wide range of reasons, such as healing losses, abandonment, and directional drilling, it is important that a competent cement plug is placed the first time. This paper presented a newly developed tool and a special process designed to meet the challenges associated with setting cement plugs. It is based on a tubing-release tool (TRT) in which a sacrificial tubing is placed into the lost circulation zone to balance the cement plug. The sacrificial tubing is released from the drillstring and remains in the wellbore. The TRT has been used as a plug-setting aid for lost-circulation plugs; shallow-water shut-off; kick-off plug placement; and multizone plugs to abandon. An overview of the TRT features was presented. The tool and process has been used by more than 20 operating companies around the world to successfully place cement plugs downhole on the first attempt. The disconnect has been used successfully in more than 120 wells throughout North and South America, Europe, the Middle East, and Australia. It has proven to lower the risk and non-productive time associated with drilling in mature fields and unconventional reservoirs. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Effects of verapamil, carbenoxolone and N-acetylcysteine on gastric wall mucus and ulceration in stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, M W; Ogle, C W; Cho, C H

    1986-01-01

    The effects of verapamil on gastric wall mucus and ulceration were studied in rats which were restrained and exposed to 4 degrees C (stress). Stress for 2 h significantly depleted stomach wall mucus and produced marked gastric glandular ulcers. Verapamil pretreatment (2, 4, 8 or 16 mg/kg), injected intraperitoneally 30 min before experimentation, significantly prevented stress-induced mucus depletion and gastric ulceration; however, it did not itself influence stomach wall mucus levels in nonstressed animals. Intragastric administration of carbenoxolone (100 or 200 mg/kg), also given 30 min before stress, exhibited similar actions as verapamil. A 15% solution of N-acetylcysteine (10 ml/kg), given orally, strongly decreased the mucus content in both nonstress and stress conditions; it induced ulcers in nonstressed rats, and worsened stress ulceration. These effects were not reversed by verapamil pretreatment. The influence of multiple-dose pretreatment with verapamil or carbenoxolone on mucus content and ulceration in the gastric glandular mucosa during stress is also discussed. It is concluded that gastric wall mucus depletion is likely to play an important role in stress ulcer formation; the antiulcer action of verapamil could partly be due to the preservation of mucus.

  5. The microstructure and bulk rheology of human cervicovaginal mucus are remarkably resistant to changes in pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Lai, Samuel K; Ensign, Laura M; Zhong, Weixi; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2013-12-01

    The protective barrier, lubricant, and clearance functions of mucus are intimately coupled to its microstructure and bulk rheology. Mucus gels consist of a network of mucin biopolymers along with lipids, salts, and other proteins and exhibit similar biochemical and physical properties across diverse mucosal surfaces. Nevertheless, mucus is exposed to a broad range of pH values throughout the human body. Protein functions are typically sensitive to small changes in pH, and prior investigations using reconstituted, purified mucin gels suggested mucus undergoes a transition from a low-viscosity liquid at neutral pH to a highly viscoelastic solid at low pH. We sought to determine whether those observations hold for fresh, minimally perturbed human mucus ex vivo by using different-sized muco-inert nanoparticles to probe microstructure and cone-and-plate rheometry to measure bulk rheology. We demonstrate that both the microstructure and bulk rheology of fresh, undiluted, and minimally perturbed cervicovaginal mucus exhibit relatively minor changes from pH 1-2 to 8-9, in marked contrast with the pH sensitivity of purified mucin gels. Our work also suggests additional components in mucus secretions, typically eliminated during mucin purification and reconstitution, may play an important role in maintaining the protective properties of mucus. PMID:24266646

  6. Archaeal and Bacterial Communities Associated with the Surface Mucus of Caribbean Corals Differ in Their Degree of Host Specificity and Community Turnover Over Reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frade, P.R.; Roll, K.; Bergauer, K.; Herndl, G.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the distribution of archaeal versus bacterial communities associatedwith the surface mucus layer of corals have rarely taken place. It has thereforeremained enigmatic whether mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities exhibita similar specificity towards coral hosts a

  7. Pretreatment of human cervicovaginal mucus with pluronic F127 enhances nanoparticle penetration without compromising mucus barrier properties to herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, Laura M; Lai, Samuel K; Wang, Ying-Ying; Yang, Ming; Mert, Olcay; Hanes, Justin; Cone, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Mucosal drug delivery nanotechnologies are limited by the mucus barrier that protects nearly all epithelial surfaces not covered with skin. Most polymeric nanoparticles, including polystyrene nanoparticles (PS), strongly adhere to mucus, thereby limiting penetration and facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that PS rapidly penetrate human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM), if the CVM has been pretreated with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated, nonmucoadhesive nanoparticles (PS-PEG) did not change in F127-pretreated CVM, implying that F127 did not significantly alter the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM, indicating that the presence of F127 did not reduce adhesive interactions between CVM and the virions. In contrast to treatment with a surfactant that has been approved for vaginal use as a spermicide (nonoxynol-9 or N9), there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for 1 week. Pluronic F127 pretreatment holds potential as a method to safely improve the distribution, retention, and efficacy of nanoparticle formulations without compromising CVM barrier properties to pathogens. PMID:25347518

  8. California Statewide Plug-In Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc; Helwig, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The California Statewide Plug-In Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Assessment conveys to interested parties the Energy Commission’s conclusions, recommendations, and intentions with respect to plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) infrastructure development. There are several relatively low-risk and high-priority electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) deployment options that will encourage PEV sales and

  9. Plug and Play Process Control of a District Heating System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangbaek, Klaus; Knudsen, Torben; Skovmose Kallesøe, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The main idea of plug and play process control is to initialise and reconfigure control systems automatically. In this paper these ideas are applied to a scaled laboratory model of a district heating pressure control system.  First of all this serves as a concrete example of plug and play control...

  10. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in dynamical energy markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, J.T.B.A.; Bosch, P.P.J. van den

    2008-01-01

    The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle allows vehicle propulsion from multiple internal power sources. Electric energy from the grid can be utilized by means of the plug-in connection. An on-line energy management (EM) strategy is proposed to minimize the costs for taking energy from each power source.

  11. The Losing Battle against Plug-and-Chug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    I think most physics teachers would agree that two important components of a proper solution to a numerical physics problem are to first figure out a final symbolic solution and to only plug in numbers in the end. However, in spite of our best efforts, this is not what the majority of students is actually doing. Instead, they tend to plug numbers…

  12. Numerical modeling of an end-plugged theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical and numerical studies of an end-plugged theta pinch are described. The analytical model treats the ablated plug plasma in the quasi-static limit where radiation losses balance energy flowing from the main plasma. This model is used to calculate the enhancement in energy confinement due to an ablating end plug for various plug species. The numerical model employs a one-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydro-dynamic code. Results of calculations simulating the Scylla IV-P end-plugged theta pinch experiment are presented. The calculations achieve good agreement with the observed decay time of the energy line density. Moreover, the observed tendency toward longer decay times at lower atomic number is also predicted. However, certain notable discrepancies are found. For Si plugs, the calculations indicate a somewhat longer decay time than observed with SiO2 plugs. In addition, an axial compression wave driven by plug ablation causes the calculated energy line density to rise after 15 to 20 μsec which was not observed in the experiments. This is believed to be a feature of the one radial cell model which forbids axial wave dispersion; such dispersion would tend to mute the appearance of such waves. For fusion reactor scale plasma, the calculations predict that higher atomic number leads to negligible enhancements in confinement time

  13. Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-05-01

    Hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), all-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, they have great potential to cut U.S. petroleum use and vehicle emissions.

  14. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Hai-Bin; Wang, Yi; ZHANG Li-ying; Liu, Jing-cheng; WANG Zheng-guo

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, ...

  15. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  16. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  17. A Genre Classification Plug-in for Data Collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehn-Schiøler, Tue; Arenas-García, Jerónimo; Petersen, Kaare Brandt;

    2006-01-01

    This demonstration illustrates how the methods developed in the MIR community can be used to provide real-time feedback to music users. By creating a genre classifier plug-in for a popular media player we present users with relevant information as they play their songs. The plug-in can furthermor...... be used as a data collection platform. After informed consent from a selected set of users the plug-in will report on music consumption behavior back to a central server.......This demonstration illustrates how the methods developed in the MIR community can be used to provide real-time feedback to music users. By creating a genre classifier plug-in for a popular media player we present users with relevant information as they play their songs. The plug-in can furthermore...

  18. Unbalanced-flow, fluid-mixing plug with metering capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Van Buskirk, Paul D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A fluid mixer plug has holes formed therethrough such that a remaining portion is closed to fluid flow. The plug's inlet face defines a central circuit region and a ring-shaped region with the ring-shaped region including at least some of the plug's remaining portion so-closed to fluid flow. This remaining portion or closed region at each radius R of the ring shaped region satisfies a radius independent, flow-based relationship. Entry openings are defined in the plug's inlet face in correspondence with the holes. The entry openings define an open flow area at each radius of the ring-shaped region. The open flow area at each such radius satisfies the inverse of the flow-based relationship defining the closed regions of the plug.

  19. Plugging criteria for WWER SG tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, L.; Wilam, M. [Vitkovice NPP Services (Switzerland); Herman, M. [Vuje, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    At operated Czech and Slovak nuclear power plants the 80 % criteria for crack or other bulk defect depth is used for steam generator heat exchanging tubes plugging. This criteria was accepted as the recommendation of designer of WWER steam generators. Verification of this criteria was the objective of experimental program performed by Vitkovice, J.S.C., UJV Rez, J.S.C. and Vuje Trnava, J.S.C .. Within this program the following factors were studied: (1) Influence of secondary water chemistry on defects initiation and propagation, (2) Statistical evaluation of corrosion defects progression at operated SG, and (3) Determination of critical pressure for tube rupture as a function of eddy current indications. In this presentation items (2) and (3) are considered.

  20. Welding nuclear reactor fuel rod end plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus for applying a vacuum to a nuclear fuel rod cladding tube's interior through its open end while girth welding an inserted end plug to its other end. An airtight housing has an orifice with a seal which can hermetically engage the tube's open end. A vacuum hose has one end connected to the housing and the other end connected to a vacuum pump. A mechanized device which moves the housing to engage or disengage its seal with the tube's open end includes at least one arm having one end attached to the housing and the other end pivotally attached to a movable table; an arm rotating device to coaxially align the housing's orifice with the welding-positioned tube; and a table moving device to engage the seal of the coaxially aligned orifice with the tube's open end. (author)

  1. Borehole plugging by compaction process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, R.; MacGowan, C.; Nolan, E.; Morey, R.; Palty, A.

    1976-08-01

    The requirements of an overall program to preserve the integrity of a repository formation are documented. The repository is intended to be in stable earth stratum used as a safe and permanent storage area for nuclear waste material. These wastes represent an environmental hazard for a period of up to 200,000 years. An engineering analysis, a reliability and quality-assurance program, and a development program for borehole plugging by compaction process, using natural earthen materials, are presented. Part 1 provides the engineering analysis of downhole compaction methods and related instrumentation along with a recommended development plan from concept through a pilot in-situ experiment. Part 2 provides a reliability and quality-assurance program from laboratory testing of materials through an in-situ experiment.

  2. Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockelie, Michael J. [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-06-29

    This Final Report summarizes research performed to develop a technology to mitigate the plugging and fouling that occurs in the syngas cooler used in many Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. The syngas cooler is a firetube heat exchanger located downstream of the gasifier. It offers high thermal efficiency, but its’ reliability has generally been lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The buildup of ash deposits that form on the fireside surfaces in the syngas cooler (i.e., fouling) lead to reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs. Our approach to address this problem is that fouling of the syngas cooler cannot be eliminated, but it can be better managed. The research program was funded by DOE using two budget periods: Budget Period 1 (BP1) and Budget Period 2 (BP2). The project used a combination of laboratory scale experiments, analysis of syngas cooler deposits, modeling and guidance from industry to develop a better understanding of fouling mechanisms and to develop and evaluate strategies to mitigate syngas cooler fouling and thereby improve syngas cooler performance. The work effort in BP 1 and BP 2 focused on developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to syngas cooler plugging and fouling and investigating promising concepts to mitigate syngas cooler plugging and fouling. The work effort focused on the following: • analysis of syngas cooler deposits and fuels provided by an IGCC plant collaborating with this project; • performing Jet cleaning tests in the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor to determine the bond strength between an ash deposit to a metal plate, as well as implementing planned equipment modifications to the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor and the one ton per day, pressurized Pilot Scale Gasifier; • performing Computational Fluid Dynamic modeling of industrially relevant syngas cooler configurations to develop a better

  3. Plugging criteria for WWER SG tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At operated Czech and Slovak nuclear power plants the 80 % criteria for crack or other bulk defect depth is used for steam generator heat exchanging tubes plugging. This criteria was accepted as the recommendation of designer of WWER steam generators. Verification of this criteria was the objective of experimental program performed by Vitkovice, J.S.C., UJV Rez, J.S.C. and Vuje Trnava, J.S.C .. Within this program the following factors were studied: (1) Influence of secondary water chemistry on defects initiation and propagation, (2) Statistical evaluation of corrosion defects progression at operated SG, and (3) Determination of critical pressure for tube rupture as a function of eddy current indications. In this presentation items (2) and (3) are considered

  4. Welding nuclear reactor fuel rod end plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus for applying a vacuum to a nuclear fuel rod cladding tube's interior through its open end while girth welding an inserted end plug to its other end. An airtight housing has an orifice with a seal which can hermetically engage the tube's open end. A vacuum hose has one end connected to the housing and the other end connected to a vacuum pump. A mechanized device moves the housing to engage or disengage its seal with the tube's open end. Preferably the mechanized device includes an arm having one end attached to the housing and the other end pivotally attached to a moveable table; an arm rotating device to coaxially align the housing's orifice with the welding-positioned tube; and a table moving device to engage the seal of the coaxially aligned orifice with the tube's open end

  5. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrier, B.P.; Lichtendonk, W.J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) proved to be an effective mucolytic in pulmonary secretions. Our goal was to investigate the in vitro effect of NAC on viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus. The urine of a patient with an ileal neobladder was collected during the first 7 days postoperatively and stored in a

  6. Eosinophil cationic protein stimulates and major basic protein inhibits airway mucus secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, J D; Davey, R T; Lundgren, B;

    1991-01-01

    Possible roles of eosinophil (EO) products in modulating the release of mucus from airway explants were investigated. Cell- and membrane-free lysates from purified human EOs (1 to 20 x 10(5)) caused a dose-dependent release of respiratory glycoconjugates (RGC) from cultured feline tracheal explants...

  7. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rix, L.; de Goeij, J.M.; Mueller, C.E.; Struck, U.; Middelburg, J.J.; van Duyl, F.C.; Al-Horani, F.A.; Wild, C.; Naumann, M.S.; Van Oevelen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrient

  8. Lung protease/anti-protease network and modulation of mucus production and surfactant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Descamps, Delphyne; Chignard, Michel; Touqui, Lhousseine; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2010-11-01

    Lung epithelium guarantees gas-exchange (performed in the alveoli) and protects from external insults (pathogens, pollutants…) present within inhaled air. Both functions are facilitated by secretions lining airway surface liquid, mucus (in the upper airways) and pulmonary surfactant (in the alveoli). Mucins, the main glycoproteins present within the mucus, are responsible for its rheologic properties and participate in lung defense mechanisms. In parallel, lung collectins are pattern recognition molecules present in pulmonary surfactant that also modulate lung defense. During chronic airways diseases, excessive protease activity can promote mucus hypersecretion and degradation of lung collectins and therefore contribute to the pathophysiology of these diseases. Importantly, secretion of local and systemic anti-proteases might be crucial to equilibrate the protease/anti-protease unbalance and therefore preserve the function of lung host defense compounds and airway surface liquid homeostasis. In this review we will present information relative to proteases able to modulate mucin production and lung collectin integrity, two important compounds of innate immune defense. One strategy to preserve physiological mucus production and collectin integrity during chronic airways diseases might be the over-expression of local 'alarm' anti-proteases such as SLPI and elafin. Interestingly, a cross-talk between lung collectins and anti-protease activity has recently been described, implicating the presence within the lung of a complex network between proteases, anti-proteases and pattern recognition molecules, which aims to keep or restore homeostasis in resting or inflamed lungs. PMID:20493919

  9. Mucus-secreting 'signet-ring' cells in CSF revealing the site of primary cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Agnelli, G.; Gresele, P.

    1980-01-01

    A case is reported of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in which identification of mucus-secreting 'signet-ring' carcinoma cells in the CSF allowed diagnosis of an otherwise asymptomatic gastric cancer. When lumbar puncture is performed, careful cytological examination of the CSF should be carried out in any undiagnosed patient with neurological symptoms and signs.

  10. Proteomic analysis of pure human airway gland mucus reveals a large component of protective proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Soo Joo

    Full Text Available Airway submucosal glands contribute to innate immunity and protect the lungs by secreting mucus, which is required for mucociliary clearance and which also contains antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proteolytic and anti-oxidant proteins. We stimulated glands in tracheal trimmings from three lung donors and collected droplets of uncontaminated mucus as they formed at the gland orifices under an oil layer. We analyzed the mucus using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Analysis identified 5486 peptides and 441 proteins from across the 3 samples (269-319 proteins per subject. We focused on 269 proteins common to at least 2 0f 3 subjects, of which 102 (38% had protective or innate immunity functions. While many of these have long been known to play such roles, for many others their cellular protective functions have only recently been appreciated in addition to their well-studied biologic functions (e.g. annexins, apolipoproteins, gelsolin, hemoglobin, histones, keratins, and lumican. A minority of the identified proteins are known to be secreted via conventional exocytosis, suggesting that glandular secretion occurs via multiple mechanisms. Two of the observed protective proteins, major vault protein and prohibitin, have not been observed in fluid from human epithelial cultures or in fluid from nasal or bronchoalveolar lavage. Further proteomic analysis of pure gland mucus may help clarify how healthy airways maintain a sterile environment.

  11. Arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Seijas Vázquez, Roberto; García Balletbó, Montserrat; Álvarez Díaz, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Cuscó Segarra, Xavier; Rius Vilarrubia, Marta; Cugat Bertomeu, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Partial or total meniscectomy are common procedures performed at Orthopedic Surgery departments. Despite providing a great relief of pain, it has been related to early onset knee osteoarthritis. Meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. The purposes of this study were to describe an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs technique and to report the preliminary results. All meniscal allograft transplantations performed between 2001 and 2006 were approached for eligibility, and a total of 35 patients (involving 37 menisci) were finally engaged in the study. Patients were excluded if they had ipsilateral knee ligament reconstruction or cartilage repair surgery before meniscal transplantation or other knee surgeries after the meniscal transplantation. Scores on Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale for pain were obtained at a mean follow-up of 38.6 months and compared to pre-operative data. Data on chondral lesions were obtained during the arthroscopic procedure and through imaging (radiographs and MRI) studies pre-operatively. Two graft failures out of 59 transplants (3.4%) were found. Daily life accidents were responsible for all graft failures. Significant improvements for Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and VAS for pain scores following the meniscal allograft transplantation were found (P lesion, there was no significant interactions for Lysholm (n.s.), Subjective IKDC Form (n.s.), and VAS for pain scores (n.s.). This study demonstrated that an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs improved knee function and symptoms after a total meniscectomy. Improvements were observed independently of the degree of chondral lesion.

  12. Strategies for Controlling Plug Loads. A Tool for Reducing Plug Loads in Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torcellini, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bonnema, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sheppy, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Shanti [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Plug loads are often not considered as part of the energy savings measures in Commercial Buildings; however, they can account for up to 50% of the energy used in the building. These loads are numerous and often scattered throughout a building. Some of these loads are purchased by the owner and some designed into the building or the tenant finishes for a space. This document provides a strategy and a tool for minimizing these loads.

  13. Degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, So; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Cervical myelopathy is the most common cause of acquired spinal cord compromise. The concept of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM), defined as symptomatic myelopathy associated with degenerative arthropathic changes in the spine axis, is being introduced. Given its progressive nature, treatment options have to be chosen in a timely manner. Surgical options include anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF), anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACCF), arthroplasty (in highly select cases), posterior laminectomy with/without fusion, and laminoplasty. Indications for each should be carefully considered in individual patients. Riluzole, a sodium-glutamate antagonist, is a promising option to optimize neurologic outcomes post-surgery and is being examined in the CSM-Protect Randomized Controlled Trial. Preoperative risk assessment is mandatory for prognostication. Sagittal alignment is known to play an important role to optimize surgical outcome. Guidelines for optimal management of DCM are in process. In principle, all but the mildest cases of DCM should be offered surgery for optimal outcome. PMID:27250040

  14. Operations for cervical incompetence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, D W

    1986-06-01

    At present, cervical cerclage is indicated in those patients with a classic history of cervical incompetence. For the majority of these patients, a postconceptional cerclage procedure is better suited because it is done after the fetus has been evaluated ultrasonographically for obvious abnormalities and after the risk for spontaneous abortion is past. The greatest experience is with the Shirodkar and the McDonald procedures; allowing for operator differences, neither appears to have an important advantage. The transabdominal cervicoisthmic cerclage may be a useful postconceptional procedure in the selected patient whose cervix is either markedly foreshortened, deeply lacerated, or infected. Preconceptional cerclages are best reserved for those rare patients in whom a markedly foreshortened incompetent cervix is associated with early second-trimester pregnancy losses (preconceptional isthmic cerclage) or in whom the cervix has a single, identifiable scar or deep laceration extending through the internal os (Lash procedure). PMID:3522005

  15. [Preventing cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, P; Noël, J-C

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer has hopefully been dropping down in our industrialized countries since the introduction of both primary and secondary prevention. Nevertheless, it is still lethal in one out of two affected women though the introduction of cytological screening has dramatically reduced the mortality. Progressive diffusion of anti-HPV vaccination, the broadening of the viral types concerned, its association with existing screening measures and finally the introduction of viral detection as a screening tool must optimize the results already obtained.

  16. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  17. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  18. Future Directions - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about possible changes in cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  19. [Pediatric orthopedic cervical spine problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Ilkka

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-requiring diseases of the cervical spine in children are rare. The most common cases requiring medical assessment and treatment are acute torticollis and various accidents. A torticollis having lasted for more than a week should be recognized, because it can be treated by skull traction. Cervical spine fractures in children under school age are very rare, the most common being a fracture of the base of the dens of the second cervical vertebra. Cervical spine instability is almost always associated with an underlying disease. PMID:27400588

  20. 16s rRNA Identification of Pediococcus spp. from Broiler and Studies of Adherence Ability on Immobilized Mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ema Damayanti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to study taxonomical status of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from broiler and adherence ability on mucus in vitro. Molecular analysis was performed by analyzing 16S rRNA gene using universal primer. The adherence assay on mucus was carried out using microplate method with total plate count (TPC, absorbance (A550 and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results of this studies revealed that three of LAB isolates have closed relation to Pediococcus acidilactici (99.9% species.Three isolates of P. acidilactici have adherence ability on broiler mucus higher than that on porcine mucin with an adherence percentage of 55.5% versus 50.8% and absorbance A550 of 0.061 versus 0.051, respectively. The highest adherence ability showed by P. acidilactici R02 with adherence percentage was 59.3% and absorbance A550 = 0.068. Adherence on mucus were affected by the addition of 3 g/l of gastric juice and 0.3% (b/v of bile salt. Adherence analysis using SEM also showed that the adherence on broiler mucus was higher than the adherence on porcine mucin. Altogether this adherence studies, suggest that three isolates of P. acidilactici LAB were capable of colonizing host intestinal mucus in vitro as important property to be promising probiotic bacteria for broiler.Key words : adherence, broiler, Pediococcus, mucus, 16S rRNA

  1. Evaluation of preconceptual plug designs using experts' judgement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of preconceptual plug designs for an underground nuclear waste repository were to be evaluated based on the available information on plug materials and placement techniques. Because of complex environment and loading conditions, long time frame under consideration, rigid performance characteristics and considerable uncertainties present in preconceptual design and material properties, a qualitative and judgmental evaluation procedure was needed to supplement technical studies. A structured procedure was developed to qualitatively capture evaluator's views and reservations on the proposed preconceptual schemes. Since a thorough evaluation of each proposed plug scheme required in-depth experience and familiarity with many components of the plug, three knowledgeable experts with specialties in the most relevant aspects of the problem were independently interviewed. Each plug scheme was broken down into three subcomponents and each subcomponent was evaluated separately. The proposed schemes were then rated taking their subcomponents into consideration. Because the experts had different specialties, their subcomponent and overall ratings were not in full agreement. Each plug scheme's lowest overall rating was used as the most significant determinant of the judgmental preference categories reported in this study. The approach used discriminated between the proposed schemes for those with highest probability of being successful. The most preferred schemes were then reviewed with respect to the data produced in the technical analysis performed during the project. The results of the judgmental analysis were then synthesized and modified with results of the technical analysis to produce the preconceptual plug designs

  2. Development of weld plugging for steam generator tubes of FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to develop a method of weld plugging of the heat-exchanger tubes of steam generator of Prototype FBR 'MONJU' in case these tubes are damaged for some reason. We studied mainly the shape of plug, welding procedure and effect of postweld heat treatment (PWHT). Evaporator tube sheet, tube and plug are made of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel and usually preheating and PWHT will be required for welding of this steel. The results of this study is as follows. 1) Plug was designed to make butt joint welding with grooved tube sheet around the tube hole to satisfy the requirements of plug designing, stress analysis, and good weldability. 2) TIG welding process was selected and certified its good weldability and good performance. 3) PWHT can be done by using high frequency induction heating method locally and also designing the plug to weld joint with tube sheet which was grooved around the tube hole. 4) Mock up test was done and it was certified that this plugging procedure has good weldability and good performance ability for Non Destructive Inspection. (author)

  3. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  4. Significance of cervical length and cervical gland area in cervical maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channaveeregowda Savitha

    2016-08-01

    Results: Amongst 160 pregnant women who were induced (20 women were excluded has they underwent LSCS for some other reasons during latent phase cervical length by sonography 4. Cervical length 4. Conclusions: Sonographically detected cervical gland area and cervical length was evaluated in predicting response to induction. Absent CGA and CL < 2cm was associated with greater incidence of successful labor induction. This results show the CL and CGA has significant role in predicting outcome of labor. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(8.000: 2634-2639

  5. Mechanical and thermo-mechanical analyses of the tapered plug for plugging of deposition tunnels. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faelth, Billy (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Gatter, Patrik (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    This report presents results from a study that was carried out in order to examine the applicability of the tapered plug concept for plugging of deposition tunnels in the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The report presents results from mechanical and thermo-mechanical models of the tapered plug. The models were analyzed with 3DEC. The models included a portion of a deposition tunnel and its intersection with a main tunnel. In the deposition tunnel, a tapered concrete plug was installed. The plug was subjected to the combined load from the swelling backfill material and from pore pressure inside the deposition tunnel. The thermo-mechanical effects due to the heat generation in the spent fuel were also included in the analyses. Generic material parameter values for the concrete were used. The following items were studied: - Stresses and displacements in the plug. - Shear stresses and shear displacements in the rock-concrete interface. - Stress additions in the rock due to the loads. The sensitivity of the results to changes of constitutive models, to changes of the plug geometry and to pore water pressure in the rock-concrete interface was examined. The results indicate that the displacements in the plug will be within reasonable ranges but the stresses may locally be high enough that they exceed acceptable levels. However, they can be reduced by choice of advantageous plug geometry and by having a good rock-concrete bond. The results also show that the stress additions in the rock due to the thermal load may yield stresses that locally exceed the spalling strength of the rock. At most locations, however, the rock stresses will amount at lower levels. It was concluded that, with choice of an appropriate design, the tapered plug seems to be an applicable concept for plugging of deposition tunnels. It was also concluded that further studies of the tapered plug concept should use material properties parameter values for low-pH concrete. Further, they should also

  6. A Genre Classification Plug-in for Data Collection

    OpenAIRE

    Lehn-Schiøler, Tue; Arenas-García, Jerónimo; Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    This demonstration illustrates how the methods developed in the MIR community can be used to provide real-time feedback to music users. By creating a genre classifier plug-in for a popular media player we present users with relevant information as they play their songs. The plug-in can furthermore be used as a data collection platform. After informed consent from a selected set of users the plug-in will report on music consumption behavior back to a central server.

  7. Uterine didelphys with cervical incompetence

    OpenAIRE

    Aher Gautam S, Gavali Urmila G, Kulkarni Meghana

    2013-01-01

    Uterine didelphys represents a uterine malformation where the uterus is present as a paired organ. There is presence of double uterine bodies with two separate cervices, and often a double or septate vagina as well. We report a case of single pregnancy in the right sided uterine body of a didelphic uterus with cervical incompetence.

  8. Uterine didelphys with cervical incompetence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aher Gautam S, Gavali Urmila G, Kulkarni Meghana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Uterine didelphys represents a uterine malformation where the uterus is present as a paired organ. There is presence of double uterine bodies with two separate cervices, and often a double or septate vagina as well. We report a case of single pregnancy in the right sided uterine body of a didelphic uterus with cervical incompetence.

  9. Evaluation of a concrete plug : From the Dome Plug Experiment DOMPLU at Äspö HRL

    OpenAIRE

    Kristiansson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    In SKB’s Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) a full scale test of a concrete plug,part of a sealing structure for the depository of spent nuclear fuel, has been carriedout. The aim of this thesis is to evaluate the behavior of the concrete plug and howit corresponds to assumptions made during the design. The concrete plug is domeshaped, un-reinforced and casted in situ with low-pH concrete. It will be exposed tohigh water and swelling pressures and designed for a life span of 100 years. Duringthe...

  10. Welding zircaloy thin tubes to end plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aimed at optimizing parameters while welding zircaloy-2 tubes with end plugs, as a simulation of a part of the fabrication of the nuclear fuel pins. Samples were welded by tungsten-inert gas-arc welding (TIC) process under controlled atmosphere of pure argon. Some samples were welded using electron beam (EB) welding process. For samples welded using TIC process both the design of the welding chamber (size and tightness) , and the purity of the shielding atmosphere were found to have appreciable effect on the quality of the welded joint. Increasing the are length and/or the welding current increases grain growth and extends both fusion and heat-affected zones. However, heat input (are length and welding current) must be high enough to give complete penetration welds. Optimum are length of 1.2 mm was found to give good welds with the smallest possible heat affected and fusion zones. Optimum parameters of EB welding process (vacuum, welding current and EB amplitude) were determined. welds prepared by EB welding were found to have finer grain size and less extended fusion and heat-affected zones. Welds prepared by both TIC and EB processes were inspected visually, metallo graphically and by using X-ray radiography. Welds integrity were tested using helium leak and pressure tests. 7 figs

  11. Engaging Tenants in Reducing Plug Load Energy Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schantz, Marta; Langner, Rois

    2016-08-26

    Plug and Process Loads (PPLs) account for an increasingly large percentage of commercial building energy use in the U.S. due to the rising number of energy intensive plug-in devices. In addition, buildings are becoming more and more efficient and plug load energy use has become an increasingly pertinent component to achieving aggressive energy targets and netzero energy status. For multi-tenant buildings, controlling plug loads in tenant spaces can be a significant challenge. Luckily, there are a number of PPL reduction strategies, best practices, and lessons learned from numerous commercial real estate and higher education leaders who have successfully engaged building occupants and tenants in reducing PPL energy use. This paper provides actionable PPL reduction strategies and best practices that building owners and managers can immediately apply to their own buildings.

  12. Consequence assessment of hydrological communications through borehole plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the effect of borehole plug integrity on consequence assessments performed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The study is based on scenarios described in the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix K, for the WIPP, US Department of Energy, October 1980. The flow rates through a borehole, assumed to penetrate the waste storage location and to connect underlying and overlying aquifers, are determined as a function of the hydraulic conductance of the plugs. Similar calculations are performed for multiple boreholes communicating with the aquifers. It is concluded that low permeability plugs (less than 1 md) are not essential to satisfy public health and safety requirements at the WIPP, but rather that such plugs act as a redundant barrier in the multiple barrier isolation concept

  13. Frictional Fluid Dynamics and Plug Formation in Multiphase Millifluidic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumazer, Guillaume; Sandnes, Bjørnar; Ayaz, Monem; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik Grude

    2016-07-01

    We study experimentally the flow and patterning of a granular suspension displaced by air inside a narrow tube. The invading air-liquid interface accumulates a plug of granular material that clogs the tube due to friction with the confining walls. The gas percolates through the static plug once the gas pressure exceeds the pore capillary entry pressure of the packed grains, and a moving accumulation front is reestablished at the far side of the plug. The process repeats, such that the advancing interface leaves a trail of plugs in its wake. Further, we show that the system undergoes a fluidization transition—and complete evacuation of the granular suspension—when the liquid withdrawal rate increases beyond a critical value. An analytical model of the stability condition for the granular accumulation predicts the flow regime.

  14. Plug engine systems for future launch vehicle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immich, H.; Parsley, R. C.

    1993-06-01

    Based on improved viability resulting from modern analysis techniques, plug nozzle rocket engines are once again being investigated with respect to advanced launch vehicle concepts. The advantage of these engines is the external expansion, which self-adapts to external pressure variation, as well as the short compact design for high expansion ratios. This paper describes feasible design options ranging from a plug nozzle engine with an annular combustion chamber to a segmented modular design, to the integration of a number of conventional engines around a common plug. The advantages and disadvantages of these options are discussed for a range of potential applications including single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles, as well as upper stage vehicles such as the second stage of the SAeNGER HTOL launch vehicle concept. Also included is a discussion of how maturing computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling techniques could significantly reduce installed performance uncertainties, reducing plug engine development risk.

  15. Waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) borehole plugging program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tests and experiments described attempt to provide a mix of borehole (with limited access) and in-mine (with relatively unlimited access) environments in which assessment of the various issues involved can be undertaken. The Bell Canyon Test provides the opportunity to instrument and analyze a plug in a high pressure region. The Shallow Hole Test permits application of best techniques for plugging and then access to both the top and bottom of the plug for further analysis. The Diagnostic Test Hole permits recovery of bench scale size samples for analysis and establishes an in-borehole laboratory in which to conduct testing and analysis in all strata from the surface into the salt horizon. The additional in mine experiments provide the opportunity to investigate in more detail specific effects on plugs in the salt region and allows evaluation of instrumentation systems

  16. Wireless Plug and Play Control Systems: Hardware, Networks, and Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meybodi, Soroush Afkhami

    2012-01-01

    . The scope is, however, constrained to the challenges that are relevant to the wireless communication framework which provides underlying services for plug and play control systems. Other aspects of plug and play control systems are studied in other research projects within P3C. The main results of this Ph......This dissertation reports the result of efforts to identify and solve the problems that arise when a control system is to be designed for various industrial case studies of the Plug and Play Process Control (P3C) project that require autonomous addition/removal of sensors, actuators and subsystems......D project are presented in two distinct areas which are: 1) Signal propagation in underground and confined areas, and 2) Access and Networking protocols that accommodate the required flexibility, scalability, and quality of services for plug and play control systems. The first category finds application...

  17. Application of Inductive Monitoring System to Plug Load Anomaly Detection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA Ames Research Center’s Sustainability Base is a new 50,000 sq. ft. LEED Platinum office building. Plug loads are expected to account for a significant portion...

  18. Microstructure Formation and Degradation Mechanism of Cementitious Plugging Agent Slurries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Peiyu; ZHOU Yongxiang; YANG Zhenjie; QIN Jian

    2007-01-01

    The hydration products and microstructure of class G oil well cement and a newly developed plugging agent (YLD) slurries cured in the simulated temperature and pressure environment, which was of similar temperature and pressure with those at the bottom of oil well in a normal depth, were investigated using XRD, TG and SEM. Severe leakage is confirmed at the interface between hardened slurries and steel tube during the dynamically curing process, which induces the quick loss of cementing property of slurries. This should be the dominating cause of degradation of class G oil well cement slurry. A secondary hydration process can take place at the eroded interface of hardened YLD plugging agent slurry. Newly formed C-S-H gel has a self-healing effect to repair the damaged interface, which unceasingly maintains the cementing property of the YLD plugging agent slurry. Therefore, the effective using period of YLD plugging agent can be prolonged.

  19. EPIDEMIOLOCICAL INVESTIGATION ON THE SAFETY OF REVERSIBLE PLUGGING OF DUCTUS DEFERENS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOSheng-Cai; LIANYi-He; ZHANGShu-Ping

    1989-01-01

    The safety of rversible plugging was follow-up investigated in 21463 cases with ductus deferens plugged for 0.5-6 years, as compared with 2746 cases of non-plugging and with other contraceptive methods with plugging of ductus dcferens reported in the

  20. 30 CFR 250.1717 - After I permanently plug a well, what information must I submit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Decommissioning Activities Permanently Plugging Wells § 250.1717 After I permanently plug a well, what information must I submit? Within 30 days after you permanently plug a well, you must submit form MMS-124... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false After I permanently plug a well,...

  1. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  2. Electrodiagnosis of cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Kevin; Spanier, David

    2013-02-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common diagnosis with a peak onset in the fifth decade. The most commonly affected nerve root is C7, C6, and C8. The etiology is often compressive, but may arise from noncompressive sources. Patients commonly complain of pain, weakness, numbness, and/or tingling. Examination may reveal sensory or motor disturbance in a dermatomal/myotomal distribution. Neural compression and tension signs may be positive. Diagnostic tests include imaging and electrodiagnostic study. Electrodiagnostic study serves as an extension of the neurologic examination. Electrodiagnostic findings can be useful for patients with atypical symptoms, potential pain-mediated weakness, and nonfocal imaging findings.

  3. Comparative end-plug study for tandem mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative evaluation was made of several end plug configurations for tandem mirror fusion reactors with thermal barriers. The axicell configuration has been selected for further study and will be the basis for a detailed conceptual design study to be carried out over the next two years. The axicell end plug has a simple mirror cell produced by two circular coils followed by a transition coil and a yin-yang pair, which provides for MHD stability

  4. Mesh Plug Repair of Inguinal Hernia; Single Surgeon Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Serdar Karaca

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Mesh repair of inguinal hernia repairs are shown to be an effective and reliable method. In this study, a single surgeon%u2019s experience with plug-mesh method performs inguinal hernia repair have been reported. Material and Method: 587 patients with plug-mesh repair of inguinal hernia, preoperative age, body / mass index, comorbid disease were recorded in terms of form. All of the patients during the preoperative and postoperative hernia classification of information, duration of oper...

  5. Plug flow formation and growth in da Vinci Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Moshe; Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    A new, da Vinci, fluid is described as a model for flow of dense granular matter. We postulate local properties of the fluid, which are generically different from ordinary fluids in that energy is dissipated by solid friction. We present the equation of flow of such a fluid and show that it gives rise to formation and growth of plug flow regions, which is characteristic of flow of granular matter. Simple explicit examples are presented to illustrate the evolution of plug flow regions.

  6. Plug-in electric vehicles automated charging control

    OpenAIRE

    Dallinger, David; Kohrs, Robert; Mierau, Michael; Marwitz, Simon; Wesche, Julius

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how plug-in electric vehicles can be managed to balance the fluctuation of renewable electricity sources. In this context, different control strategies are introduced. To investigate indirect control via electricity tariffs, an electricity market analysis is conducted of a system with a high share of generation from renewable electricity sources. The analysis uses driving data collected from battery electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles in a research project which means tha...

  7. Engineering activities on the ITER representative diagnostic equatorial port plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of ITER diagnostic systems are integrated in port plugs, which are water cooled stainless steel structures inserted into the vacuum vessel ports. The port plug must provide basic functions such as neutron and gamma shielding, supporting the first wall armour (BSM), closing the vacuum vessel ports, while supporting the diagnostic equipments. ITER diagnostic port plug must resist a severe environment like high temperature due to neutron interaction with the structures and high electromechanical loading during disruptions events. CEA has contributed to the design and integration tasks in the frame of the representative equatorial port plug EQ no. 01, in particular on the engineering, structural and thermal finite element analysis. These detailed analyses have highlighted some design issues which were worked out through different solutions. This paper contains a description of the engineering activities performed such as: -The static mechanical calculations of the top plate closure system under disruption load. -The static mechanical calculations of the BSM attachment to the port plug. These two first studies led to design changes proposals which significantly improved the behaviour of the structures but also showed that the safety margin with respect to design limits is quite low. -The design of a Diagnostic Shield Module (DSM) integrated inside the port plug and a proposition of attachment scheme, with respect to disruption loads. The manufacturing of the DSM has been taken into account, as well as diagnostic integration inside the structure and maintenance aspects. -The thermal assessment of the port plug under neutronic load during normal operation, with the optimization of the cooling system. The maximum temperature calculated in normal operation has been reduced from 900 deg. C to less than 400 deg. C in the front plate; and the cooling arrangement at the back of the port plug has been simplified without important temperature increase.

  8. The welding of magnesium alloy plugs and canning (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The end or lateral welding of Mg-Zr plugs presents no special difficulties in the manufacture of fuel element slugs. The welding parameters were determined from penetrations and from the mechanical resistance. The unavoidable notching effect has received particular attention. It is possible to substitute a Mg-Zr plug without any modification of the optimum welding conditions and the various qualities of the weld. (author)

  9. Chemotactic Activity of Cyclophilin A in the Skin Mucus of Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco and Its Active Site for Chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farman Ullah Dawar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fish skin mucus is a dynamic barrier for invading pathogens with a variety of anti-microbial enzymes, including cyclophilin A (CypA, a multi-functional protein with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase activity. Beside various other immunological functions, CypA induces leucocytes migration in vitro in teleost. In the current study, we have discovered several novel immune-relevant proteins in yellow catfish skin mucus by mass spectrometry (MS. The CypA present among them was further detected by Western blot. Moreover, the CypA present in the skin mucus displayed strong chemotactic activity for yellow catfish leucocytes. Interestingly, asparagine (like arginine in mammals at position 69 was the critical site in yellow catfish CypA involved in leucocyte attraction. These novel efforts do not only highlight the enzymatic texture of skin mucus, but signify CypA to be targeted for anti-inflammatory therapeutics.

  10. Hydrate plugging or slurry flow : effect of key variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellecase, E.; Geraci, G.; Barrios, L.; Estanga, D.; Domingues, R.; Volk, M. [Tulsa Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Although oil and gas companies have proven design criteria and proper operating procedures to prevent hydrate plugs from forming, hydrates remain the primary issue in flow assurance. The costs associated with hydrate prevention affect project economics, particularly in deepwater pipelines. As such, there is an interest in developing a technology that allows hydrates to be transported as a slurry, while avoiding plugs. The feasibility of managing such hydrate flow was investigated. This study used a hydrate flow loop to investigate the effects of flow conditions on the transportability of a slurry in both steady-state and restart conditions. For most cases, uninhibited steady-state slurry flow conditions above 25 per cent water-cut were marginal, and most likely not feasible at 50 per cent water-cut or above. Liquid loading and velocity appeared to have a marginal effect on plugging tendency. However, minimum velocity may be needed to guarantee slurry transportation. Some of the important parameters and key variables that determine if a plug will form, particularly in restart conditions, include oil-water dispersion properties; oil-water phase segregation on the plugging tendency of model fluids; the location and state of the water; and the flow pattern. It was concluded that the plugging behaviour of oil systems changes with these variables, and with the oil-water chemistry. As such, specific strategies must be developed for each field. 4 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs.

  11. HCO3- Transport in Relation to Mucus Secretion from Submucosal Glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo NS

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of HCO(3(- transport in relation to fluid secretion by submucosal glands is being studied in sheep, pigs, cats and humans. Optical methods have been developed to measure secretion rates of mucus volume from single glands with sufficient temporal resolution to detect differences in minute-by-minute secretion rates among glands. The ionic composition and viscoelastic properties of the uncontaminated gland mucus are measured with a combination of ratiometric fluorescent indicators, ion-selective microelectrodes, FRAP, and a miniaturized, magnetic force viscometer. Sheep glands secreted basally at low rates, showed small, transient responses to alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonists, and large responses to a cholinergic agonist, carbachol. Peak rates and temporal patterns of responses to carbachol differed markedly among glands. To assess the contribution of HCO(3(- transport to gland secretion, we either inhibited Na(+/K(+/2Cl(- cotransporter (NKCC with bumetanide or replaced HCO(3(- with HEPES and gassed with O(2. Bumetanide caused a small, non-significant inhibition of basal secretion, but removal of HCO(3(-/CO(2 significantly reduced basal secretion almost by half. Both bumetanide and removal of HCO(3(-/CO(2 reduced carbachol-stimulated secretion significantly, with HCO(3(- removal having the larger effect: a reduction to 33% of control (P less than 0.01. The remaining secretory response to carbachol was nearly eliminated by bumetanide. Sheep mucus pH measured with ion selective electrodes was about 0.4 log more acidic than the bath. In humans, we observed the same pattern of responses to agonists and antagonists as in sheep, and observed a mucus pH of 7.0 using 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl-5,6-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF. We hypothesize that HCO(3(- transport is important in the formation of mucus secretion, but that most HCO(3(- is scavenged before the final mucus appears at the duct opening. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

  12. Glycan profiling of gel forming mucus layer from the scleractinian symbiotic coral Oculina arbuscula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddeville, Bernadette; Maes, Emmanuel; Ferrier-Pages, Christine; Guerardel, Yann

    2011-06-13

    The gel forming mucus layer surrounding scleractinian corals play fundamental functions in the maintenance of a favorable microenvironment required for the survival of these organisms. In particular, it harbors a rich partially species-specific symbiotic community through yet poorly understood molecular interactions. However, removal or contamination of this community by exogenous bacteria is closely linked to the worldwide bleaching events that are presently devastating coral colonies. The present study investigates the structure of major high molecular weight glycoconjugates that are responsible for both rheological properties of mucus and sugar-protein interactions with microbial communities. We demonstrated that it is composed by two distinct types of sulfated macromolecules: mucin type glycoproteins densely substituted by short unusual O-linked glycans and repetitive polysaccharides. PMID:21517058

  13. Preparation and characterization of mucus-penetrating papain/poly(acrylic acid) nanoparticles for oral drug delivery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Christiane; Leithner, Katharina; Hauptstein, Sabine; Hintzen, Fabian [Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, CCB-Centrum for Chemistry und Biomedicine, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Institute of Pharmacy (Austria); Salvenmoser, Willi [University of Innsbruck, Department for Evolutionary Developmental Biology, Institute of Zoology and Center for Molecular Biosciences (Austria); Bernkop-Schnuerch, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.bernkop@uibk.ac.at [Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, CCB-Centrum for Chemistry und Biomedicine, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Institute of Pharmacy (Austria)

    2013-01-15

    Particle diffusion through the intestinal mucosal barrier is restricted by the viscoelastic and adhesive properties of the mucus gel layer, preventing their penetration to the underlying absorptive endothelial cells. To overcome this natural barrier, we developed nanoparticles which have a remarkable ability to cleave mucoglycoprotein substructures responsible for the structural and rheological properties of mucus. After rheological screening of various mucolytic proteases, nanoparticles composed of poly(acrylic acid) and papain were prepared and characterized regarding particle size and zeta potential. Analysis of nanoparticles showed mean diameters sub-200 nm (162.8-198.5 nm) and negative zeta potentials advancing the mobility in mucus gel. Using diffusion chamber studies and the rotating diffusion tubes method, we compared the transport rates of papain modified (PAPC) and unaltered poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) particles through freshly excised intestinal porcine mucus. Results of the diffusion assays demonstrated strongly enhanced permeation behavior of PAPC particles owing to local mucus disruption by papain. Improved transport rates, reduction in mucus viscosity and the retarded release of hydrophilic macromolecular compounds make proteolytic enzyme functionalized nanoparticles of substantial interest for improved targeted drug delivery at mucosal surfaces. Although cytotoxicity tests of the nanoparticles could not be performed, safety of papain and PAA was already verified making PAPC particles a promising candidate in the pharmaceutical field of research. The focus of the present study was the development of particles which penetrate the mucus barrier to approach the underlying epithelium. Improvements of particles that penetrate the mucus followed by cell uptake in this direction are ongoing.

  14. Imaging of mucus clearance in the airways of living spontaneously breathing mice by optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Mario; Schulz-Hildebrandt, Hinnerk; Hüttmann, Gereon; König, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Mucus transport is essential to remove inhaled particles and pathogens from the lung. Impaired removal of mucus often results in worsening of lung diseases. To understand the mechanisms of mucus transport and to monitor the impact of therapeutic strategies, it is essential to visualize airways and mucus in living animals without disturbing transport processes by intubation or surgically opening the airways. We developed a custom-built optical coherence microscope (OCM) providing a lateral and axial resolution of approximately 1.5 µm with a field of view of 2 mm at up to 150 images/s. Images of the intact trachea and its mucus transport were recorded in anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice. NaCl solution (0.9% and 7%) or Lipopolysaccharide were applied intranasally. OCM resolved detailed structure of the trachea and enabled measuring the airway surface liquid (ASL) thickness through the tracheal wall. Without stimulation, the amount of ASL was only a few µm above the epithelium and remained constant. After intranasal application of 30 µl saline at different concentrations, an early fast cough-like fluid removal with velocities higher than 1 mm/s was observed that removed a high amount of liquid. The ASL thickness increased transiently and quickly returned to levels before stimulation. In contrast to saline, application of Lipopolysaccharide induced substantial mucus release and an additional slow mucus transport by ciliary beating (around 100 µm/s) towards the larynx was observed. In conclusion, OCM is appropriate unique tool to study mechanisms of mucus transport in the airways and effects of therapeutic interventions in living animals.

  15. 16s rRNA Identification of Pediococcus spp. from Broiler and Studies of Adherence Ability on Immobilized Mucus

    OpenAIRE

    Ema Damayanti; Lies Mira Yusiati; Achmad Dinoto

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to study taxonomical status of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from broiler and adherence ability on mucus in vitro. Molecular analysis was performed by analyzing 16S rRNA gene using universal primer. The adherence assay on mucus was carried out using microplate method with total plate count (TPC), absorbance (A550) and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of this studies revealed that three of LAB isolates have closed relation ...

  16. Members of native coral microbiota inhibit glycosidases and thwart colonization of coral mucus by an opportunistic pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Cory J Krediet; Ritchie, Kim B.; Alagely, Ali; Teplitski, Max

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of the interactions between native commensal microorganisms and opportunistic pathogens is crucial to the health of the coral holobiont. During the establishment within the coral surface mucus layer, opportunistic pathogens, including a white pox pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100, compete with native bacteria for available nutrients. Both commensals and pathogens employ glycosidases and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase to utilize components of coral mucus. This study tested the hypothes...

  17. Preparation and characterization of mucus-penetrating papain/poly(acrylic acid) nanoparticles for oral drug delivery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle diffusion through the intestinal mucosal barrier is restricted by the viscoelastic and adhesive properties of the mucus gel layer, preventing their penetration to the underlying absorptive endothelial cells. To overcome this natural barrier, we developed nanoparticles which have a remarkable ability to cleave mucoglycoprotein substructures responsible for the structural and rheological properties of mucus. After rheological screening of various mucolytic proteases, nanoparticles composed of poly(acrylic acid) and papain were prepared and characterized regarding particle size and zeta potential. Analysis of nanoparticles showed mean diameters sub-200 nm (162.8–198.5 nm) and negative zeta potentials advancing the mobility in mucus gel. Using diffusion chamber studies and the rotating diffusion tubes method, we compared the transport rates of papain modified (PAPC) and unaltered poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) particles through freshly excised intestinal porcine mucus. Results of the diffusion assays demonstrated strongly enhanced permeation behavior of PAPC particles owing to local mucus disruption by papain. Improved transport rates, reduction in mucus viscosity and the retarded release of hydrophilic macromolecular compounds make proteolytic enzyme functionalized nanoparticles of substantial interest for improved targeted drug delivery at mucosal surfaces. Although cytotoxicity tests of the nanoparticles could not be performed, safety of papain and PAA was already verified making PAPC particles a promising candidate in the pharmaceutical field of research. The focus of the present study was the development of particles which penetrate the mucus barrier to approach the underlying epithelium. Improvements of particles that penetrate the mucus followed by cell uptake in this direction are ongoing.

  18. HIV gp120 induces mucus formation in human bronchial epithelial cells through CXCR4/α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sravanthi Gundavarapu

    Full Text Available Lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, asthma, and lung infections are major causes of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients even in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART. Many of these diseases are strongly associated with smoking and smoking is more common among HIV-infected than uninfected people; however, HIV is an independent risk factor for chronic bronchitis, COPD, and asthma. The mechanism by which HIV promotes these diseases is unclear. Excessive airway mucus formation is a characteristic of these diseases and contributes to airway obstruction and lung infections. HIV gp120 plays a critical role in several HIV-related pathologies and we investigated whether HIV gp120 promoted airway mucus formation in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells. We found that NHBE cells expressed the HIV-coreceptor CXCR4 but not CCR5 and produced mucus in response to CXCR4-tropic gp120. The gp120-induced mucus formation was blocked by the inhibitors of CXCR4, α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAAR but not the antagonists of CCR5 and epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR. These results identify two distinct pathways (α7-nAChR-GABAAR and EGFR for airway mucus formation and demonstrate for the first time that HIV-gp120 induces and regulates mucus formation in the airway epithelial cells through the CXCR4-α7-nAChR-GABAAR pathway. Interestingly, lung sections from HIV ± ART and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV ± ART have significantly more mucus and gp120-immunoreactivity than control lung sections from humans and macaques, respectively. Thus, even after ART, lungs from HIV-infected patients contain significant amounts of gp120 and mucus that may contribute to the higher incidence of obstructive pulmonary diseases in this population.

  19. [Cervical Spondylotic Amyotrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Keegan (1965) reported a patient who presented with "dissociated motor loss," an acute paralysis of the upper extremity with minimal sensory signs and no long tract signs, and documented an anterior root lesion following autopsy. Sobue et al. (1975) reported similar cases using the term "cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA)," but postulated pathology of the anterior horn. Although Keegan's "dissociated motor loss" surely referred to isolated motor paresis with no or minimal sensory signs, contrary to existing criticism, a more general term, CSA, should be preferred. CSA is divided into proximal and distal types. Distal CSA often presents with a drop finger, and thus may be misdiagnosed as posterior interosseous nerve palsy. Documentation of the involvement of ulnar muscles by clinical signs and EMG would lead to the diagnosis of distal CSA. Proximal CSA may be confused with neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), although the sparing of the serratus anterior and the stereotypic involvement of deltoid, infraspinatus, biceps brachii, and brachioradialis suggest CSA. Cervical MRI is not diagnostic in around half of CSA cases, and denervation in paraspinal EMG is a more sensitive test that can exclude NA. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is another important differential diagnosis for CSA. PMID:27156504

  20. Altered goblet cell differentiation and surface mucus properties in Hirschsprung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay R Thiagarajah

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease-associated enterocolitis (HAEC leads to significant mortality and morbidity, but its pathogenesis remains unknown. Changes in the colonic epithelium related to goblet cells and the luminal mucus layer have been postulated to play a key role. Here we show that the colonic epithelium of both aganglionic and ganglionic segments are altered in patients and in mice with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR. Structurally, goblet cells were altered with increased goblet cell number and reduced intracellular mucins in the distal colon of biopsies from patients with HSCR. Endothelin receptor B (Ednrb mutant mice showed increased goblet cell number and size and increased cell proliferation compared to wild-type mice in aganglionic segments, and reduced goblet cell size and number in ganglionic segments. Functionally, compared to littermates, Ednrb-/- mice showed increased transepithelial resistance, reduced stool water content and similar chloride secretion in the distal colon. Transcript levels of goblet cell differentiation factors SPDEF and Math1 were increased in the distal colon of Ednrb-/- mice. Both distal colon from Ednrb mice and biopsies from HSCR patients showed reduced Muc4 expression as compared to controls, but similar expression of Muc2. Particle tracking studies showed that mucus from Ednrb-/- mice provided a more significant barrier to diffusion of 200 nm nanoparticles as compared to wild-type mice. These results suggest that aganglionosis is associated with increased goblet cell proliferation and differentiation and subsequent altered surface mucus properties, prior to the development of inflammation in the distal colon epithelium. Restoration of normal goblet cell function and mucus layer properties in the colonic epithelium may represent a therapeutic strategy for prevention of HAEC.

  1. Structural and molecular insights into novel surface-exposed mucus adhesins from Lactobacillus reuteri human strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzold, Sabrina; MacKenzie, Donald A; Jeffers, Faye; Walshaw, John; Roos, Stefan; Hemmings, Andrew M; Juge, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    The mucus layer covering the gastrointestinal tract is the first point of contact of the intestinal microbiota with the host. Cell surface macromolecules are critical for adherence of commensal bacteria to mucus but structural information is scarce. Here we report the first molecular and structural characterization of a novel cell-surface protein, Lar_0958 from Lactobacillus reuteri JCM 1112(T) , mediating adhesion of L. reuteri human strains to mucus. Lar_0958 is a modular protein of 133 kDa containing six repeat domains, an N-terminal signal sequence and a C-terminal anchoring motif (LPXTG). Lar_0958 homologues are expressed on the cell-surface of L. reuteri human strains, as shown by flow-cytometry and immunogold microscopy. Adhesion of human L. reuteri strains to mucus in vitro was significantly reduced in the presence of an anti-Lar_0958 antibody and Lar_0958 contribution to adhesion was further confirmed using a L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 lar_0958 KO mutant (6475-KO). The X-ray crystal structure of a single Lar_0958 repeat, determined at 1.5 Å resolution, revealed a divergent immunoglobulin (Ig)-like β-sandwich fold, sharing structural homology with the Ig-like inter-repeat domain of internalins of the food borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. These findings provide unique structural insights into cell-surface protein repeats involved in adhesion of Gram-positive bacteria to the intestine. PMID:24593252

  2. Preliminary investigation on antimicrobial and proteolytic property of the epidermal mucus secretion of marine stingrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rathinam Vennila; Kalainesan Rajesh Kumar; Shankar Kanchana; Muthuvel Arumugam; Shanmugam Vijayalakshmi; Thangavel Balasubramaniam

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To determine the antibacterial, antifungal, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the protease activity of the stingray mucus Dasyatis sephen (D. sephen) and Himantura gerrardi (H. gerrardi). Methods: Antimicrobial activity of crude aqueous, acidic and organic mucus extract was evaluated by disc diffusion method against human pathogens, MIC of the active samples were determined by spectrophotometric method and the protease activity which is responsible for the antimicrobial activity was determined by using zymogram method. Results:The crude acidic extracts of both the species showed antibacterial activity against Salmonella typhi (S. typhi), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae) and the acidic extracts of both the species exhibit antifungal activity against all the tested pathogens. Remaining extracts didn't show any inhibitory activity. The acidic extracts of H. gerrardi is significantly active against S. typhi, E. coli, V. cholerae, Trichophyton mentagrophytes (T. mentagrophytes), Alternaria alternaria (A. alternaria), Trichophyton rubrum (T. rubrum), Candida tropicalis (C. tropicalis) at the minimum concentration of 16μg/mL, but the acidic extract of D. sephen required 32μg/mL of protein to inhibit S.typhi, E. coli, Aspergillus niger (A. niger), penicillium sp, T. mentagrophytes, A. alternaria. Both the D. sephen and H. gerrardi shows the proteolytic activity above the molecular mass of> 66 KDa. The characterization of protease class using inhibitors showed the presence of both serine and metallo protease in the the samples. Conclusions:Protease activity present in the sting ray mucus is one of the key factor responsible for the antimicrobial activity and the results proved the role of mucus in the innate immunity.

  3. Bacterial communities and species-specific associations with the mucus of Brazilian coral species

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Carlos; Tatiana T. Torres; Ottoboni, Laura M.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the existence of species-specific associations between Brazilian coral species and bacteria. Pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rDNA was used to analyze the taxonomic composition of bacterial communities associated with the mucus of four coral species (Madracis decactis, Mussismilia hispida, Palythoa caribaeorum, and Tubastraea coccinea) in two seasons (winter and summer), which were compared with the surrounding water and sediment. The microbial communities found in s...

  4. Draft genome sequence of Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from coral mucus

    OpenAIRE

    Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z.; Castro, Daniel B.A.; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Cauz, Ana Carolina G.; Beatriz L. Magalhães; Carlos, Camila; da Costa, Fernanda L.P.; Guilherme P. Scagion; Higa, Juliana S.; Almeida, Ludimila D.; das Neves, Meiriele da S.; Cordeiro, Melina Aparecida; Paula F.V. do Prado; da Silva, Thiago M.; Balsalobre, Thiago Willian A.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the genomic features of the Actinobacteria Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from mucus of the Brazilian endemic coral Mussismilia hispida. The sequences are available under accession number LDNX01000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/LDNX00000000). The genomic analysis revealed interesting information about the adaptation of bacteria to the marine environment (such as genes involved in osmotic and oxidative stress) and to the nutrient-rich environment provided by the cora...

  5. Functional diversity of microbial communities associated to the mucus of scleractinians around Moorea (French Polynesia)

    OpenAIRE

    Ladrière, Ophélie; Theunis, Laetitia; Wilmotte, Annick; Poulicek, Mathieu

    2008-01-01

    Mucus production by scleractinians appears as an antifouling mechanism which prevents settlement of other organisms and accumulation of sediments on their surface. This Surface Muccopolysaccharide Layer (SML) harbours dense populations of bacteria which play a paramount role in scleractinians nutrition, metabolism and good health maintenance. However, environmental disturbances can alter these microbiocenoses. Characterization of bacterial communities was carried out using a set of simple tec...

  6. Bacterial dynamics within the mucus, tissue and skeleton of the coral Porites lutea during different seasons

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Li; Qi Chen; Li-Juan Long; Jun-De Dong; Jian Yang; Si Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the response of coral microbial communities to seasonal ecological environment at the microscale will advance our understanding of the relationship between coral-associated bacteria community and coral health. In this study, we examined bacteria community composition from mucus, tissue and skeleton of Porites lutea and surrounding seawater every three months for 1 year on Luhuitou fringing reef. The bacterial communities were analyzed using pyrosequencing of the V1-V2 region ...

  7. Draft genome sequence of Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from coral mucus

    OpenAIRE

    Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z.; Castro, Daniel B.A.; Letícia Bianca Pereira; Cauz, Ana Carolina G.; Beatriz L. Magalhães; Camila Carlos; da Costa, Fernanda L.P.; Guilherme P. Scagion; Higa, Juliana S.; Almeida, Ludimila D.; das Neves, Meiriele da S.; Melina Aparecida Cordeiro; Paula F.V. do Prado; da Silva, Thiago M.; Balsalobre, Thiago Willian A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe the genomic features of the Actinobacteria Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from mucus of the Brazilian endemic coral Mussismilia hispida. The sequences are available under accession number LDNX01000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/LDNX00000000). The genomic analysis revealed interesting information about the adaptation of bacteria to the marine environment (such as genes involved in osmotic and oxidative stress) and to the nutrient-rich environment provided by the cora...

  8. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate in corals and its interrelations with bacterial assemblages in coral surface mucus

    OpenAIRE

    Frade, P.R.; Schwaninger, V.; Glasl, B.; Sintes, E.; Hill, R. W.; Simó, R.; Herndl, G.

    2016-01-01

    Corals produce copious amounts of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a sulfur compound thought toplay a role in structuring coral-associated bacterial communities. We tested the hypothesis that a linkage exists betweenDMSP availability in coral tissues and the community dynamics of bacteria in coral surface mucus. We determinedDMSP concentrations in three coral species (Meandrina meandrites, Porites astreoides and Siderastrea siderea) at twosampling depths (5 and 25 m) and times of day (dawn ...

  9. High occurrence of viruses in the mucus layer of scleractinian corals

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen-Kim, H.; Bouvier, T.; Bouvier, C.; Hai, D. N.; Lam, N. N.; Rochelle Newall, Emma; Baudoux, A.C.; Desnues, C.; Reynaud, S.; Ferrier-Pages, C.; Bettarel, Yvan

    2014-01-01

    Viruses attract increasing interest from environmental microbiologists seeking to understand their function and role in coral health. However, little is known about their main ecological traits within the coral holobiont. In this study, a quantitative and qualitative characterization of viral and bacterial communities was conducted on the mucus of seven different coral species of the Van Phong Bay (Vietnam). On average, the concentrations of viruses and bacteria were, respectively, 17- and tw...

  10. Nutritional and environmental impacts on skin and mucus condition in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Linda Beate

    2015-01-01

    The skin and associated mucus layer of Atlantic salmon constitutes its first line of defence against the aqueous environment. Through intensive farming, a range of stressors including both mechanical and environmental factors are known to have an impact on the skin condition of fish. Damaged skin can serve as a portal of entry for primary pathogens and secondary infections. Two of the current main problems in the salmon farming industry are skin related: ectoparasitism with sea...

  11. GENETIC INSTABILITY IN CERVICAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵旻; 伍欣星; 邱小萍; 李晖; 戴天力; 谭云

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the development of cervical carcinoma has been clearly established but other factors could be involved in cervical tumorigenesis such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetic instability in cervical carcinoma tissues and provide evidence for discoveringnew tumor suppressor genes and screening diagnostic molecular marker of cervical carcinoma. Methods: Fifty primary cervical carcinoma samples from high-incidence area were analyzed by PCR for HPV16 infection, LOH and microsatellite instability. Results: HPV16 was detected in 88% of the cases. Sixty-six percent of total cases showed LOH with no more than 3 different loci per case. The highest frequency of the allelic loss was found in D18S474 (18q21, 40.5%). MI was detected in 4 cases (8%) only. Conclusion: Different percentages of LOH on specific chromosomal regions were found and MI was very infrequent in cervical carcinoma. The putative suppressor gene(s) could be located on specific chromosome regions such as 18q, and genetic instability could be involved in cervical tumorigenesis.

  12. High quality new type spark plug pressure sensor; Koseino plug gata shiatsu sensor ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakawa, H.; Yanagihara, S.; Kawa, T. [Tsukasa Sokken Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Enomoto, Y. [Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, T. [Dai Ichi Institute of Technology, Kagoshima (Japan); Gotthard, E.

    1998-05-01

    Investigations were made on a spark plug type pressure sensor using GaPO4 piezoelectric material developed recently by AVL Corporation. This sensor has the ignition electrode installed decentered to assure the installing position for the pressure sensor, where the small pressure sensor with a diameter of 4.4 mm, model GU12P is installed on the side. Experiments were performed on this sensor, a water cooled sensor for comparison, and a cooling-free type sensor for reference. The engine was operated at an outlet cooling water temperature maintained constant at 80 degC, and experimented in a normal combustion condition with full load at 2000 rpm and 4000 rpm, in a knocking condition with full load at 2000 rpm, and in a transient condition from full load at 4000 rpm to no load at 1300 rpm. As a result, it was made clear that the spark plug type pressure sensor showed an output of the same level as that with the water cooled sensor in the normal combustion pressure. Load change drift under the transient condition was found as good as 2.5% FS at maximum. No effect of columnar vibration was discovered, and a knocking waveform of 14 kHz was observed. 6 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Mucolysis of the colonic mucus barrier by faecal proteinases: inhibition by interacting polyacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, D A; Pearson, J P; Allen, A; Foster, S N

    1990-03-01

    1. Mucolytic (mucus solubilizing) activity in human faeces has been characterized with both purified human and pig colonic mucin and shown to be mediated by proteolysis. 2. Mucolytic activity was demonstrated by: (i) a drop in mucin viscosity; (ii) a substantial reduction in mucin size, from polymer to degraded subunit, as assessed by Sepharose CL-2B gel filtration; (iii) formation of new N-terminal peptides. 3. Mucolytic activity was also followed in faecal extracts by its proteolytic activity using standard succinyl albumin substrate. Proteolysis extended over the pH range 4.5-11.0. Proteolysis was inhibited at pH 7.5 by soybean trypsin inhibitor and phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride, suggesting the presence of serine proteinases. 4. The polyacrylate carbomer (934P) inhibited both mucolysis of pig colonic mucin and proteolysis of succinyl albumin. 5. Interaction between the polyacrylate (carbomer 934P) and purified human and pig colonic mucin was demonstrated by a marked synergistic increase in solution viscosity (360% above control). 6. The results demonstrate the presence of a mucolytic activity in the human colonic lumen that has the potential to degrade the mucus barrier, and that polyacrylates inhibit this mucolysis and interact to strengthen the colonic mucus barrier. Polyacrylates may therefore have therapeutic potential in inflammatory bowel disease where luminal proteolytic activity can be raised. PMID:2156646

  14. Mimicking microbial strategies for the design of mucus-permeating nanoparticles for oral immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, Carlos; Martín-Arbella, Nekane; Brotons, Ana; Camacho, Ana I; Irache, J M

    2015-10-01

    Dealing with mucosal delivery systems means dealing with mucus. The name mucosa comes from mucus, a dense fluid enriched in glycoproteins, such as mucin, which main function is to protect the delicate mucosal epithelium. Mucus provides a barrier against physiological chemical and physical aggressors (i.e., host secreted digestive products such as bile acids and enzymes, food particles) but also against the potentially noxious microbiota and their products. Intestinal mucosa covers 400m(2) in the human host, and, as a consequence, is the major portal of entry of the majority of known pathogens. But, in turn, some microorganisms have evolved many different approaches to circumvent this barrier, a direct consequence of natural co-evolution. The understanding of these mechanisms (known as virulence factors) used to interact and/or disrupt mucosal barriers should instruct us to a rational design of nanoparticulate delivery systems intended for oral vaccination and immunotherapy. This review deals with this mimetic approach to obtain nanocarriers capable to reach the epithelial cells after oral delivery and, in parallel, induce strong and long-lasting immune and protective responses.

  15. Coral-mucus-associated Vibrio integrons in the Great Barrier Reef: genomic hotspots for environmental adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Jeremy E; Bourne, David G; Curtis, Bruce; Dlutek, Marlena; Stokes, H W; Doolittle, W Ford; Boucher, Yan

    2011-06-01

    Integron cassette arrays in a dozen cultivars of the most prevalent group of Vibrio isolates obtained from mucus expelled by a scleractinian coral (Pocillopora damicornis) colony living on the Great Barrier Reef were sequenced and compared. Although all cultivars showed >99% identity across recA, pyrH and rpoB genes, no two had more than 10% of their integron-associated gene cassettes in common, and some individuals shared cassettes exclusively with distantly-related members of the genus. Of cassettes shared within the population, a number appear to have been transferred between Vibrio isolates, as assessed by phylogenetic analysis. Prominent among the mucus Vibrio cassettes with potentially inferable functions are acetyltransferases, some with close similarity to known antibiotic-resistance determinants. A subset of these potential resistance cassettes were shared exclusively between the mucus Vibrio cultivars, Vibrio coral pathogens and human pathogens, thus illustrating a direct link between these microbial niches through exchange of integron-associated gene cassettes. PMID:21270840

  16. Adhesion of pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus to the gill mucus of Pseudosciaena crocea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qiang; YAN Qingpi; MA Shen; ZHUANG Zhixia; WANG Xiaoru

    2007-01-01

    Adhesion of Vibrio alginolyticus to the gill mucus of Pseudosciaena crocea has been investigated using [methyl-3H]thymidine as isotope tracer. The results showed that: the adhesive quantity of V. alginolyticus increased with bacterial concentrations and reached equilibrium after incubated for 180 min; the higher adhesive quantity was obtained at 15~30 ℃ and sourish conditions; adhesion of V. alginolyticus could not achieved without Na+, and Ca2+ played an auxiliary role in the bacterial adhesion; adhesion of V. alginolyticus was inhibited remarkably by starvation, heat treatment and periodic acid treatment; all of the eight kinds of carbohydrates investigated enhanced the adhesion of V. alginolyticus to the gill mucus of P. crocea, among them, glucose, mannose, fructose and maltose showed the specially enhanced adhesion. The results indicated that V. alginolyticus could adhere to the gill mucus of P. crocea facilely in seawater, and this bacterial adhesion was influenced by environmental factors and closely related to superficial carbohydrate structures and some heat-sensitive structures.

  17. Autophagy is essential for ultrafine particle-induced inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Hua; Wu, Yin-Fang; Wang, Ping-Li; Wu, Yan-Ping; Li, Zhou-Yang; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Jie-Sen; Zhu, Chen; Cao, Chao; Mao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Feng; Wang, Bei-Bei; Cormier, Stephania A; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Environmental ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is capable of inducing airway injury, while the detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate pivotal roles of autophagy in regulation of inflammation and mucus hyperproduction induced by PM containing environmentally persistent free radicals in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and in mouse airways. PM was endocytosed by HBE cells and simultaneously triggered autophagosomes, which then engulfed the invading particles to form amphisomes and subsequent autolysosomes. Genetic blockage of autophagy markedly reduced PM-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines, e.g. IL8 and IL6, and MUC5AC in HBE cells. Mice with impaired autophagy due to knockdown of autophagy-related gene Becn1 or Lc3b displayed significantly reduced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in response to PM exposure in vivo. Interference of the autophagic flux by lysosomal inhibition resulted in accumulated autophagosomes/amphisomes, and intriguingly, this process significantly aggravated the IL8 production through NFKB1, and markedly attenuated MUC5AC expression via activator protein 1. These data indicate that autophagy is required for PM-induced airway epithelial injury, and that inhibition of autophagy exerts therapeutic benefits for PM-induced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction, although they are differentially orchestrated by the autophagic flux.

  18. Angiotensins processing activities in the venom and epidermic mucus of Scorpaena plumieri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, Humberto de Araújo; Costa, Ricardo Bezerra; Costa Marques, Maria Elizabeth; Victor Dos Santos, Claudio Wilian; Gomes, Francis Soares; Vieira Pereira, Hugo Juarez

    2016-09-01

    The venom of marine animals is a rich source of compounds with remarkable selectivity and functional diversity. Scorpaena plumieri is the most venomous fish in the Brazilian fauna and is responsible for relatively frequent accidents involving anglers and bathers. In humans, its venom causes edema, erythema, ecchymoses, anxiety, nausea, vomiting, and syncope. The venom is chemically characterized by Sp-CTx, a enzyme able to generate an initial endothelium-dependent relaxation response, followed by a contraction response. This study sought to investigate the proteolytic activities regarding vasopeptides angiotensin I and II. Both the venom and the epidermal mucus presented angiotensin conversion activity for angiotensin I, as well as a capacity to form Ang 1-7 directly via Ang I and II. Captopril (10 μM) and EDTA (1 mM) were able to abolish the converting activity of the venom and the epidermal mucus, representing the first description of a converting activity in S. plumieri venom and epidermal mucus. PMID:27215174

  19. Helicobacter pylori Couples Motility and Diffusion to Actively Create a Heterogeneous Complex Medium in Gastric Mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Fu, Henry Chien

    2016-05-13

    Helicobacter pylori swims through mucus gel by generating ammonia that locally neutralizes the acidic gastric environment, turning nearby gel into a fluid pocket. The size of the fluid zone is important for determining the physics of the motility: in a large zone swimming occurs as in a fluid through hydrodynamic principles, while in a very small zone the motility could be strongly influenced by nonhydrodynamic cell-mucus interactions including chemistry and adhesion. Here, we calculate the size of the fluid pocket. We model how swimming depends on the de-gelation range using a Taylor sheet swimming through a layer of Newtonian fluid bounded by a Brinkman fluid. Then, we model how the de-gelation range depends on the swimming speed by considering the advection-diffusion of ammonia exuded from a translating sphere. Self-consistency between both models determines the values of the swimming speed and the de-gelation range. We find that H. pylori swims through mucus as if unconfined, in a large pocket of Newtonian fluid. PMID:27232048

  20. Beyond the mucus escalator: Complex ciliary hydrodynamics in disease and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Janna; Guo, Hanliang; John, Dabiri; Kanso, Eva; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures lining external and internal body surfaces where they interact with fluids. The main function of motile cilia is often described as that of a ``mucus escalator'', i.e., a homogeneous ciliary carpet moving along layer of mucus along the surface to transport food, germ cells, debris, or pathogens. Accordingly, the performance of ciliary systems is usually measured in terms of a single metric, transport velocity, or its presumed proxy, ciliary beat frequency. We challenge this simple view through the observation that both healthy and diseased biological systems exhibit a variety of cilia morphologies, beat patterns, and arrangements, resulting in complex flow patterns and transport phenomena that cannot be reduced to a single parameter. Here we present two case studies. In one system, the ciliated surface creates two distinct flow regimes for first trapping and then sheltering potential symbiont bacteria for further biochemical screening. In the other system, chronic disease induces a misalignment of ciliary beat, leading to a pathological transition from uniform mucus transport to a pattern of stagnation and circulation. These studies suggest that (a), we need to develop a wider range of metrics for describing ciliary transport in biological and clinical contexts, and (b), engineered ciliated systems exploiting a variety of design parameters could provide novel ways of manipulating fluids at the microscale.

  1. Helicobacter pylori Couples Motility and Diffusion to Actively Create a Heterogeneous Complex Medium in Gastric Mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Fu, Henry Chien

    2016-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori swims through mucus gel by generating ammonia that locally neutralizes the acidic gastric environment, turning nearby gel into a fluid pocket. The size of the fluid zone is important for determining the physics of the motility: in a large zone swimming occurs as in a fluid through hydrodynamic principles, while in a very small zone the motility could be strongly influenced by nonhydrodynamic cell-mucus interactions including chemistry and adhesion. Here, we calculate the size of the fluid pocket. We model how swimming depends on the de-gelation range using a Taylor sheet swimming through a layer of Newtonian fluid bounded by a Brinkman fluid. Then, we model how the de-gelation range depends on the swimming speed by considering the advection-diffusion of ammonia exuded from a translating sphere. Self-consistency between both models determines the values of the swimming speed and the de-gelation range. We find that H. pylori swims through mucus as if unconfined, in a large pocket of Newtonian fluid.

  2. A Tale of Transmission: Aeromonas veronii Activity within Leech-Exuded Mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Brittany M; Dacks, Andrew M; Ryan, Kenneth J; Rio, Rita V M

    2016-05-01

    Transmission, critical to the establishment and persistence of host-associated microbiotas, also exposes symbionts to new environmental conditions. With horizontal transmission, these different conditions represent major lifestyle shifts. Yet genome-wide analyses of how microbes adjust their transcriptomes toward these dramatic shifts remain understudied. Here, we provide a comprehensive and comparative analysis of the global transcriptional profiles of a symbiont as it shifts between lifestyles during transmission. The gammaproteobacteriumAeromonas veroniiis transmitted from the gut of the medicinal leech to other hosts via host mucosal castings, yetA. veroniican also transition from mucosal habitancy to a free-living lifestyle. These three lifestyles are characterized by distinct physiological constraints and consequently lifestyle-specific changes in the expression of stress-response genes. Mucus-boundA. veroniihad the greatest expression in terms of both the number of loci and levels of transcription of stress-response mechanisms. However, these bacteria are still capable of proliferating within the mucus, suggesting the availability of nutrients within this environment. We found thatA. veroniialters transcription of loci in a synthetic pathway that obtains and incorporatesN-acetylglucosamine (NAG; a major component of mucus) into the bacterial cell wall, enabling proliferation. Our results demonstrate that symbionts undergo dramatic local adaptation, demonstrated by widespread transcriptional changes, throughout the process of transmission that allows them to thrive while they encounter new environments which further shape their ecology and evolution. PMID:26896136

  3. Far from superficial: microbial diversity associated with the skin and mucus of fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Rocco C.; Dove, Alistair; Cipriano, R.C.; Bruckner, A.W.; Shchelkunov, I.S.

    2011-01-01

    During horizontal or water-borne infection involving an obligate pathogen (e.g. – Aeromonas salmonicida, cause of furunculosis), the pathogen interacted with and influenced the microbial diversity of the dermal mucus of fish. Prior to infection, the prevalent bacterial flora cultured from juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) included Pseudomonas fluorescens, Comomonas terrigenia, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp., Pseudomonas dimunita, Alcaligenes denitrificans, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Serratia liquefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, other motile Aeromonas spp., and Corynebacterium aquaticum. After A. salmonicida was initially detected in this population as an external mucus infection, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp., C. terrigenia, P. fluorescens, and P. dimunita, Staphylococcus sp., and A. hydrophila, were also present in appreciable numbers. Within several weeks, however, the A. salmonicida infection amplified and composed 78% of the total flora in the mucus. Only P. dimunita (4%). P. fluorescens (2%), and C. terrigenia (1%) were cultured at that time and more than a third of these fish showed evidence of a systemic A. salmonicida infection within their kidneys. Eight weeks after oral oxytetracycline treatments, A. salmonicida was no longer isolated from the mucus or kidneys of any fish and glucose inert or other oxidative microbes (e.g., P. fluorescens, C. terrigenia, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp.) were beginning to repopulate the external surface of the salmon in increasing frequency. Still present and composing fairly large percentages of the total flora were A. hydrophila, as well as Enterobacter sp., and P. putrefaciens. A normal microbial diversity was re-established as the fish recovered. In another investigation, reduced biological diversity was noted in the dermal mucus among smallmouth bass that were sampled from the Jackson River (Covington, VA). In these fish, A. hydrophila and P. putrefaciens were the two

  4. Reduced-dimension model of liquid plug propagation in tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Hideki; Halpern, David; Ryans, Jason; Gaver, Donald P.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the flow resistance caused by the propagation of a liquid plug in a liquid-lined tube and propose a simple semiempirical formula for the flow resistance as a function of the plug length, the capillary number, and the precursor film thickness. These formulas are based on computational investigations of three key contributors to the plug resistance: the front meniscus, the plug core, and the rear meniscus. We show that the nondimensional flow resistance in the front meniscus varies as a function of the capillary number and the precursor film thickness. For a fixed capillary number, the flow resistance increases with decreasing precursor film thickness. The flow in the core region is modeled as Poiseuille flow and the flow resistance is a linear function of the plug length. For the rear meniscus, the flow resistance increases monotonically with decreasing capillary number. We investigate the maximum mechanical stress behavior at the wall, such as the wall pressure gradient, the wall shear stress, and the wall shear stress gradient, and propose empirical formulas for the maximum stresses in each region. These wall mechanical stresses vary as a function of the capillary number: For semi-infinite fingers of air propagating through pulmonary airways, the epithelial cell damage correlates with the pressure gradient. However, for shorter plugs the front meniscus may provide substantial mechanical stresses that could modulate this behavior and provide a major cause of cell injury when liquid plugs propagate in pulmonary airways. Finally, we propose that the reduced-dimension models developed herein may be of importance for the creation of large-scale models of interfacial flows in pulmonary networks, where full computational fluid dynamics calculations are untenable.

  5. Hemangiopericytoma of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra V Ramdasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old male presented with neck pain and dysesthesias in the right upper limb. On examination, he had a firm, well-defined midline posterior cervical mass discernible on palpation at the mid-cervical level. He had no neurological deficit. Neuroradiology revealed a variegated enhancing cervical mass is arising from C3 lamina. The mass extended into the right extradural space eroding the C3 lamina and posteriorly into the intermuscular plane. The tumor was excised totally. Histopathology of the tumor showed features of hemangiopericytoma (HPC. The patient underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Primary osseous spinal HPC are rare malignant extra-axial tumors that tend to recur and metastasize. Only two cases of primary osseous HPC have been reported earlier to involve the cervical spine. The clinical presentation and management of the present case with a review of the literature is presented.

  6. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  7. Immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of muco-ciliary transport: effect of mucus depth at various amounts of cilia beat frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmardan, M. M.; Sedaghat, M. H.; Norouzi, M.; Nazari, M.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation based on immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method has been employed to study 2D muco-ciliary transport problem. The periciliary liquid (PCL) and mucus layers in this study are considered as the Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid respectively. An Oldroyd-B model is used as the constitutive equations of mucus layer. To simulate accurate effects of the cilia and PCL-mucus interface on the fluid, immersed boundary method is used. Numerical simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of mucus depth on the muco-ciliary clearance at various values of cilia beat frequencies. Our results show that, by increasing mucus depth, which results from air pollution and smoking, mean mucus velocity decreases. But it can be completely modified by increasing cilia beat frequency and the cilia beat frequency has great effect on the muco-ciliary clearance.

  8. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael; Cho, Samuel Kang-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential c...

  9. Cervical Disc Disease: Biomechanical Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Kolstad, Frode

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease in the cervical spine may cause significant pain and disability. Patients present themselves with neck pain, radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy. When the symptoms do not improve with conservative treatment, surgical treatment is considered. The goal of surgical treatment is to decompress nervous structures and to restore the normal anatomical conditions of disc height, alignment, and stability.The present thesis concerns four studies involving the treatment of cervical...

  10. Report on electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars; Redegoerelse - elbiler og plug-in hybridbiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkjaer Toennesen, A.; Winther, K.; Noerregaard, K. (Teknologisk Institut, Taastrup (Denmark)); Larsen, Esben; Christensen, Linda; Kveiborg, O. (Danmarks Teknologiske Univ., Kgs. Lyngby (DTU) (Denmark))

    2010-04-15

    The Center for Green Transport at the Danish Transport Authority has prepared this statement in order to uncover driving technical aspects, user expectations and needs, and the environmental consequences of using electric and plug-in hybrid cars. An electric car is defined as a car driven by an electric motor that has a battery that can be charged with power from the grid. A plug-in hybrid car is defined as a car that combines gasoline or diesel engine with an electric motor with a battery which can be recharged with power from the grid. From an overall consideration related to the transport sector electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars have the major advantage that negative impacts on environment and climate from traffic can be reduced while the high mobility is maintained. Through an increased use of electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars, the many advantages attached to the car as an individual transportation form is maintained, while CO{sub 2} emissions etc. are reduced. Electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars is one of the technologies that are considered to have particularly great prospects in the medium term when it comes to promoting new technologies in transport. Another advantage of using electric vehicles is the power supply factor. An increased use of electricity in transport will reduce the need for and dependence on fossil fuels in the sector. Both electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars are expected to be used for storage of wind power, a possibility which is hardly available today. The plug-in hybrid car could meet some of the challenges facing the pure electric car, because it also can use conventional fuel. The report presents analyses based on three focus areas: a) Users' needs, expectations and economics in relation to vehicles; b) The technology - and hence the manufacturers' opportunities and challenges; c) Connection to the power grid. (ln)

  11. The Plug-in Concept: Technology and Aesthetics of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Šenk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The architecture concept of plug-in is based on the duality of the infrastructure system and units or elements connected to it. In the context of megastructures, the concept was most vividly characterised by works of Archigram and Japanese Metabolists in the 1960s and early 1970s. Blurring the boundary between the building and the city, the plug-in concept outgrew architectural boundaries and was slowly transformed into an urbanistic concept.The paper presents the cultural context relevant to contemporaneity, which influenced specific development of the technology-driven concept of plug-in in the British Archigram Group and Japanese Metabolists. Based on the aesthetics of change and incompleteness, which was characterised by similar architectural manifestations despite entirely different cultural backgrounds, the plug-in concept foreshadowed social transformation based on freedom, individualisation and mobility in an utopian manner and held a promise of urban development with adaptability to unpredictable needs and desires of residents, who would become its co-creators with an active approach.Although the revolutionary sixties are quite some time behind, the plug-in concept in its commodified form has become and remained operational and relevant at least on the metaphorical level; in the contemporary space it is evident primarily in urbanism and not as much in its original architectural form.

  12. Plug-in electric vehicles integrating fluctuating renewable electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallinger, David

    2013-11-01

    This paper examines a method to model plug-in electric vehicles as part of the power system and presents results for the contribution of plug-in electric vehicles to balance the fluctuating electricity generation of renewable energy sources. The scientific contribution includes: - A novel approach to characterizing fluctuating generation. This allows the detailed comparison of results from energy analysis and is the basis to describe the effect of electricity from renewable energy sources and plug-in electric vehicles on the power system. - The characterization of mobile storage, which includes the description of mobility behavior using probabilities and battery discharging costs. - The introduction of an agent-based simulation approach, coupling energy markets and distributed grids using a price-based mechanism design. - The description of an agent with specific driving behavior, battery discharging costs and optimization algorithm suitable for real plug-in vehicles and simulation models. - A case study for a 2030 scenario describing the contribution of plug-in electric vehicles to balance generation from renewable energy sources in California and Germany.

  13. An evaluation of coral lophelia pertusa mucus as an analytical matrix for environmental monitoring: A preliminary proteomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provan, Fiona; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Larssen, Eivind; Uleberg, Kai-Erik; Sydnes, Magne O; Lyng, Emily; Øysæd, Kjell Birger; Baussant, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    For the environmental monitoring of coral, mucus appears to be an appropriate biological matrix due to its array of functions in coral biology and the non-intrusive manner in which it can be collected. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of using mucus of the stony coral Lophelia pertusa (L. pertusa) as an analytical matrix for discovery of biomarkers used for environmental monitoring. More specifically, to assess whether a mass-spectrometry-based proteomic approach can be applied to characterize the protein composition of coral mucus and changes related to petroleum discharges at the seafloor. Surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) screening analyses of orange and white L. pertusa showed that the mucosal protein composition varies significantly with color phenotype, a pattern not reported prior to this study. Hence, to reduce variability from phenotype difference, L. pertusa white individuals only were selected to characterize in more detail the basal protein composition in mucus using liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In total, 297 proteins were identified in L. pertusa mucus of unexposed coral individuals. Individuals exposed to drill cuttings in the range 2 to 12 mg/L showed modifications in coral mucus protein composition compared to unexposed corals. Although the results were somewhat inconsistent between individuals and require further validation in both the lab and the field, this study demonstrated preliminary encouraging results for discovery of protein markers in coral mucus that might provide more comprehensive insight into potential consequences attributed to anthropogenic stressors and may be used in future monitoring of coral health. PMID:27484144

  14. Spray-dried powders enhance vaginal siRNA delivery by potentially modulating the mucus molecular sieve structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu N

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Na Wu,1,2,* Xinxin Zhang,2,* Feifei Li,2 Tao Zhang,2 Yong Gan,2 Juan Li1 1School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Vaginal small interfering RNA (siRNA delivery provides a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of vaginal diseases. However, the densely cross-linked mucus layer on the vaginal wall severely restricts nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery to the vaginal epithelium. In order to overcome this barrier and enhance vaginal mucus penetration, we prepared spray-dried powders containing siRNA-loaded nanoparticles. Powders with Pluronic F127 (F127, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC, and mannitol as carriers were obtained using an ultrasound-assisted spray-drying technique. Highly dispersed dry powders with diameters of 5–15 µm were produced. These powders showed effective siRNA protection and sustained release. The mucus-penetrating properties of the powders differed depending on their compositions. They exhibited different potential of opening mesh size of molecular sieve in simulated vaginal mucus system. A powder formulation with 0.6% F127 and 0.1% HPMC produced the maximum increase in the pore size of the model gel used to simulate vaginal mucus by rapidly extracting water from the gel and interacting with the gel; the resulting modulation of the molecular sieve effect achieved a 17.8-fold improvement of siRNA delivery in vaginal tract and effective siRNA delivery to the epithelium. This study suggests that powder formulations with optimized compositions have the potential to alter the steric barrier posed by mucus and hold promise for effective vaginal siRNA delivery. Keywords: siRNA delivery, vaginal administration, spray-dried powders, mucus penetration, molecular sieve effect

  15. Direct visualization of mucus production by the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa with digital holographic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zetsche, E.-M.; Baussant, T.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Van Oevelen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Lophelia pertusa is the dominant reef-building organism of cold-water coral reefs, and is known to produce significant amounts of mucus, which could involve an important metabolic cost. Mucus is involved in particle removal and feeding processes, yet the triggers and dynamics of mucus production are currently still poorly described because the existing tools to study these processes are not appropriate. Using a novel microscopic technique—digital holographic microscopy (DHM)–we studied the mu...

  16. Interaction of clay and concrete plugs - Plugging of 5 m deep hole KA1621G01 at Aespoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Drawrite AB, Lund (Sweden); Luleaa Technical Univ., Luleaa (Sweden); Ramqvist, Gunnar [Eltekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Sealing of deep boreholes in repository rock is planned to be made by installing dense smectite clay plugs where the rock is low-permeable and casting concrete where the holes intersect water-bearing fracture zones. Such zones have to be stabilized before sealing starts because fragments of rock can otherwise fall off and make it difficult to bring equipment for concrete casting and clay plug units down. These parts of the holes are filled with concrete and clay plugs are then inserted up to the nearest fracture zone where concrete is filled to the required level etc. The role of the concrete in the hole and in the closest part of the surrounding fracture zone is to provide stable parts that are sufficiently fine-porous to prevent clay particles from contacting clay plugs to migrate into the fractures and be lost by erosion. While the larger parts of long clay plugs are believed to stay largely intact chemically for hundreds of thousands of years, the parts adjacent to concrete plugs may undergo changes and so can the concrete plugs themselves. The objective of the presently reported project was to identify the detailed processes and quantify associated changes in physical properties by investigating samples of clay and concrete from a 2.5 m long plug of clay over which an equally long concrete plug had been cast and left to rest for 3 years. The outcome of the investigations was that significant chemically induced changes in mineralogy and physical performance had occurred within a few centimetres distance from the clay/concrete contact but that virtually no changes had taken place at larger distance. A comprehensive laboratory study including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) on the sample material was performed including also dual beam (combined ion and electron) microscopy. It was found that the clay had infiltrated the contacting concrete plug after filling of the borehole since clay was detected both

  17. Reliability assessment of reserved water disposal with erodible fuse plug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosichenko Yuriy Mikhaylovich

    Full Text Available Water disposal constructions are one of the most responsible constructions of reservoir hydrosystem, that’s why the a lot of attention was always paid to the problems of estimating and providing their reliability and safety. The most important function of such objects is providing reliability and safety of other hydraulic constructions and economic assets in afterbay and water head. The authors offer estimation method for reliability and faultless performance of reserved water disposal with erodible fuse plug on low-head water development. In order to estimate the reliability of reserved water disposal with erodible fuse plug the Bayesian treatment was used. The calculation of diagnoses (states of reserved water disposal isoffered in case of diagnostic properties k 1 and k 2. One of the main demands placed onreserved water disposals is erosion of soil plug in case of flood discharge exeedance over the estimated frequency with the full opening of the waste sluice.

  18. Flexible Plug Repair for Shuttle Wing Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Sikora, Joseph; Smith, Russel; Rivers, H.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Fuller, Alan M.; Klacka, Robert; Reinders, Martin; Schwind, Francis; Sullivan, Brian; Lester, Dean

    2012-01-01

    In response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, a plug repair kit has been developed to enable astronauts to repair the space shuttle's wing leading edge (WLE) during orbit. The plug repair kit consists of several 17.78- cm-diameter carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) cover plates of various curvatures that can be attached to the refractory carbon-carbon WLE panels using a TZM refractory metal attach mechanism. The attach mechanism is inserted through the damage in the WLE panel and, as it is tightened, the cover plate flexes to conform to the curvature of the WLE panel within 0.050 mm. An astronaut installs the repair during an extravehicular activity (EVA). After installing the plug repair, edge gaps are checked and the perimeter of the repair is sealed using a proprietary material, developed to fill cracks and small holes in the WLE.

  19. Integrity evaluation of ice plugged pipes applied on short jacket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeong Don; Son, Geum Su [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Doo Ri; Ha, Byeong Guk; Hwang, Sang Moon; Kang, Beom Soo [Busan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    In special industrial fields such as nuclear power plants and chemical plants, it is often necessary to repair system components without plant shutdown or drainage of system having many piping structures which may have hazardous or expensive fluid. A temporary ice plugging method for blocking internal flow is considered as a useful method in that case. According to the pipe freezing guideline of the nuclear power plant, the length of a freezing jacket must be longer than twice of the pipe diameter. However, for applying the ice plugging to short pipes which do not have enough freezing length because of geometrical configuration, it is inevitable to use shorter jacket less than twice of the pipe diameter. In this study, the integrity evaluation for short pipes in the nuclear power plant is conducted by an experiment and the finite element analysis. From the results, the ice plugging process in short pipes can be safely carried out without any plastic deformation and fracture.

  20. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  1. Varying nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug length during capillary electrophoresis†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Varuni; Griffith, Lindsay; Haes, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis based separations of the hypothesized Parkinson’s disease biomarkers dopamine, epinephrine, pyrocatechol, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), glutathione, and uric acid are performed in the presence of a 1 nM 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid functionalized gold (Au@MUA) nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug. Au@MUA nanoparticles are monitored in the capillary and remain stable in the presence of electrically-driven flow. Migration times, peak areas, and relative velocity changes (vs. no pseudostationary) are monitored upon varying (1) the Au@MUA nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug length at a fixed separation voltage and (2) the separation voltage for a fixed Au@MUA nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug length. For instance, the migration times of positively charged dopamine and epinephrine increase slightly as the nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug length increases with concomitant decreases in peak areas and relative velocities as a result of attractive forces between the positively charged analytes and the negatively charged nanoparticles. Migration times for neutral pyrocatechol and slightly negative L-DOPA did not exhibit significant changes with increasing nanoparticle pseudostationary plug length; however, reduction in peak areas for these two molecules were evident and attributed to non-specific interactions (i.e. hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions) between the biomarkers and nanoparticles. Moreover, negatively charged uric acid and glutathione displayed progressively decreasing migration times and peak areas and as a result, increased relative velocities with increasing nanoparticle pseudostationary phase plug length. These trends are attributed to partitioning and exchanging with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid on nanoparticle surfaces for uric acid and glutathione, respectively. Similar trends are observed when the separation voltage decreased thereby suggesting that nanoparticle-biomarker interaction

  2. Antimicrobial proteins of Snail mucus (Achatina fulica against Streptococcus mutans and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herluinus Mafranenda DN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achasin and mytimacin-AF are proteins of snail mucus (Achatina fulica which have antimicrobial activity. Snail mucus is suspected to have other proteins which have antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans the oral pathologic bacteria. Purpose: The study were aimed to characterize the proteins of snail mucus (Achatina fulica that have antimicrobial activities to Streptococcus mutans and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and to compared the antimicrobial effect of achasin and mytimacin-AF. Methods: The sample of study was the mucus of snails which were taken from Yogyakarta Province. The isolation and characterization of protein were conducted by using SDS-PAGE method, electroelution, and dialysis. Nano drop test was conducted to determine protein concentration. The sensitivity test was conducted by using dilution test, and followed by spectrophotometry and paper disc diffusion tests. Results: The study showed that proteins successfully characterized from snail mucus (Achatina fulica were proteins with molecular weights of 83.67 kDa (achasin, 50.81 kDa, 15 kDa, 11.45 kDa (full amino acid sequence of mytimacin-AF and 9.7 kDa (mytimacin-AF. Based on the dilution test, Achasin had better antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans, while mytimacin-AF had better antimicrobial activities against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. But the paper disc diffusion test result showed that Achasin had antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, while mytimacin-AF had no antimicrobial activities. Conclusion: The proteins with molecular weights of 50.81 kDa, 15 kDa, 11.45 kDa were considered as new antimicrobial proteins isolated from snail mucus. Achasin, had better antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans, while mytimacin-AF had better antimicrobial activities against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

  3. Analysis of digitized cervical images to detect cervical neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Daron G.

    2004-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. If diagnosed in the premalignant stage, cure is invariably assured. Although the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear has significantly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer where implemented, the test is only moderately sensitive, highly subjective and skilled-labor intensive. Newer optical screening tests (cervicography, direct visual inspection and speculoscopy), including fluorescent and reflective spectroscopy, are fraught with certain weaknesses. Yet, the integration of optical probes for the detection and discrimination of cervical neoplasia with automated image analysis methods may provide an effective screening tool for early detection of cervical cancer, particularly in resource poor nations. Investigative studies are needed to validate the potential for automated classification and recognition algorithms. By applying image analysis techniques for registration, segmentation, pattern recognition, and classification, cervical neoplasia may be reliably discriminated from normal epithelium. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in cooperation with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has embarked on a program to begin this and other similar investigative studies.

  4. Warning: safety risk with some Apple AC Wall Plug Adapters

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN IT department

    2016-01-01

    Dear Mac and iOS Users, Apple has determined that some of its two prong Apple AC wall plug adapters may break and create a risk of electrical shock.   CERN users can now exchange their affected Apple wall plug adapters at the Service Desk. To find out if your adapter is affected and for any further information concerning the procedure to follow to exchange it, please check the following URL: https://cern.service-now.com/service-portal/view-outage.do?n=OTG0028639.

  5. Charge It: The Promise of Plug-in Electric Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Recker, W. W.; Kang, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    With rising energy prices and battery improvements, the plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, a variant of the betterknown self-charging hybrid electric vehicle, is fast gaining popularity. Because plug-in hybrids can recharge via a wall socket while resting, they can run purely on electric power for many trips without having to revert to gasoline. This significantly reduces emissions over conventional hybrids, which can only recharge while they’re operating and are thus more likely to rely on t...

  6. [Therapy of cervical rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, R; Wiesner, L; Rüther, W

    2004-08-01

    The rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine can be divided into three phases. In the early stage of the disease there is an isolated atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS), followed by vertical instability and subaxial instability. If patients show clear symptoms of cervical myelopathy, which can occur during any stage of the disease, the progression cannot be stopped by conservative treatment, which is of great importance at the beginning of the cervical manifestation. Patient education, physiotherapy and immobilization with a stiff collar can significantly reduce pain. Early and effective DMARD therapy can have a positive effect on the natural history of the disease. In case of progressive instability, cervical myelopathy or severe pain operative treatment is indicated. If there is an isolated AAS, fusion can be restricted to the C1/C2 segment. The Magerl transarticular screw fixation is the preferred technique for stabilization. If there is evidence for vertical instability or severe destruction of the C0/C1 joints, occipital cervical fusion has to be performed. Durin the preoperative planning it is necessary to look for signs of subaxial instability. If this is the case, fusion should include the entire cervical spine. Transoral decompression may be necessary when there is persistent anterior compression of the myelon, typically seen in fixed AAS. Non-ambulatory myelopathic patients are more likely to develop severe surgical complications. Therefore, it is important to avoid the development of severe cervical instability by early surgical intervention. The right timing for surgery is still a matter of controversy. Future prospective randomized trials should address this topic to improve the treatment concept for the rheumatoid patient.

  7. Humoral immune response against native or {sup 60}Co irradiated venom and mucus from stingray Paratrygon aiereba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Turibio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, Andre Moreira; Spencer, Patrick Jack; Nascimento, Nanci do, E-mail: 0916@prof.itpacporto.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Seibert, Carla Simone, E-mail: carlaseibert@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT), Porto Nacional, TO (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Poisonings and traumas caused by poisonous freshwater fish such as rays are considered a major public health problem and draw attention because of accidents involving these animals cause serious local symptoms and are disabling, keeping the victim away from work. The therapy of these cases is based only on the symptoms of patients, which implies in its low efficiency, causing suffering for the victims. This study aims to evaluate and compare the humoral immune response in animals inoculated with native or {sup 60}Co irradiated Paratrygon aiereba venom and mucus. Ionizing radiation has proven to be an excellent tool to decrease the toxicity of venoms and isolated toxins. The mucus and venom samples of P. aiereba were irradiated using gamma rays from a {sup 60}Co source. Animals models were immunized with the native or irradiated mucus or venom. The assays were conducted to assess the production of antibodies by the immunized animals using enzyme immunoassay and western blotting. Preliminary results show the production of antibodies by the immunized animals. The resulting sera were also checked for antigenic cross- reactivity between venom and mucus, demonstrating the potential of mucus as an antigen for serum production for the specific treatment for accidents by stingrays. However, it is essential to carry out further tests in order to verify the neutralization of the toxin by antibodies formed by animals. (author)

  8. Proteomics of buccal cavity mucus in female tilapia fish (Oreochromis spp.): a comparison between parental and non-parental fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iq, Koe Chun; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong

    2011-01-01

    Mouthbrooding is an elaborate form of parental care displayed by many teleost species. While the direct benefits of mouthbrooding such as protection and transportation of offsprings are known, it is unclear if mouthbrooding offers additional benefits to embryos during incubation. In addition, mouthbrooding could incur negative costs on parental fish, due to limited feeding opportunities. Parental tilapia fish (Oreochromis spp.) display an elaborated form of parental care by incubating newly hatched embryos in oral buccal cavity until the complete adsorption of yolk sac. In order to understand the functional aspects of mouthbrooding, we undertake a proteomics approach to compare oral mucus sampled from mouthbrooders and non-mouthbrooders, respectively. Majority of the identified proteins have also been previously identified in other biological fluids or mucus-rich organs in different organisms. We also showed the upregulation of 22 proteins and down regulation of 3 proteins in mucus collected from mouthbrooders. Anterior gradient protein, hemoglobin beta-A chain and alpha-2 globin levels were lower in mouthbrooder samples. Mouthbrooder oral mucus collectively showed increase levels of proteins related to cytoskeletal properties, glycolytic pathway and mediation of oxidative stress. Overall the findings suggest cellular stress response, probably to support production of mucus during mouthbrooding phase. PMID:21533134

  9. Proteomics of buccal cavity mucus in female tilapia fish (Oreochromis spp.: a comparison between parental and non-parental fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koe Chun Iq

    Full Text Available Mouthbrooding is an elaborate form of parental care displayed by many teleost species. While the direct benefits of mouthbrooding such as protection and transportation of offsprings are known, it is unclear if mouthbrooding offers additional benefits to embryos during incubation. In addition, mouthbrooding could incur negative costs on parental fish, due to limited feeding opportunities. Parental tilapia fish (Oreochromis spp. display an elaborated form of parental care by incubating newly hatched embryos in oral buccal cavity until the complete adsorption of yolk sac. In order to understand the functional aspects of mouthbrooding, we undertake a proteomics approach to compare oral mucus sampled from mouthbrooders and non-mouthbrooders, respectively. Majority of the identified proteins have also been previously identified in other biological fluids or mucus-rich organs in different organisms. We also showed the upregulation of 22 proteins and down regulation of 3 proteins in mucus collected from mouthbrooders. Anterior gradient protein, hemoglobin beta-A chain and alpha-2 globin levels were lower in mouthbrooder samples. Mouthbrooder oral mucus collectively showed increase levels of proteins related to cytoskeletal properties, glycolytic pathway and mediation of oxidative stress. Overall the findings suggest cellular stress response, probably to support production of mucus during mouthbrooding phase.

  10. Changes in the reproductive system of the snail Helix aspersa caused by mucus from the love dart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koene, J M; Chase, R

    1998-08-01

    The function of the love dart in certain species of terrestrial snails is unknown. In Helix aspersa, the dart is a sharp calcareous structure that is used to pierce the partner's skin during courtship. When expelled, the dart is covered with a thick mucus. The hypothesis tested here is that the mucus contains a biologically active substance. Extracts of the digitiform glands that produce this mucus were applied to parts of the reproductive system in vitro. The extracts triggered an initial reconfiguration of the copulatory canal that caused the bursa tract diverticulum to become more accessible to the spermatophore. The reconfiguration of the copulatory canal also closed off the tract leading to the bursa copulatrix, a sperm-digesting organ. A few minutes after the initial contraction, the peristaltic contractions in the diverticulum became significantly more frequent. This latter effect continued for at least 1 h, provided that the mucus extract remained in the saline bath. The minimum effective dosage was less than the 2.2 mg of mucus transferred with the dart. Sperm competition is expected in Helix aspersa since multiple matings occur before eggs are laid. By influencing the female organs involved in the processing of foreign sperm, the dart shooter may increase the chance that his sperm will fertilise eggs.

  11. Resistance of mucus-lined tubes to steady and oscillatory airflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M; Chang, H K; Weber, M E

    1982-05-01

    We examined the effects of quantity and physical properties of mucus on resistance to steady and oscillatory flows in a circular tube. Gels with similar rheological properties to canine tracheal mucus were prepared from hog gastric mucin or locust bean gum cross-linked with Na2B4O7. A horizontal straight tube (D 1.85 cm) was lined with these mucus simulants to depths ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 mm. The pressure difference over a 50-cm portion of the tube and the volumetric flow rate were determined simultaneously. Low-amplitude oscillatory flow were generated with a modified Harvard pump. For steady flow, the resistance at low Reynolds number (Re) increased with increasing gel depth only to the extent expected for simple constriction of the tube cross-sectional area. The same was true for oscillatory (0.25--6 Hz) flow resistance at low flow amplitude (corresponding to Re less than 4,000). No effect of gel cross-link density at low Re was observed. At high steady-flow rates, and for high-amplitude oscillatory flow, resistance increased beyond that predicted for simple constriction. Plots of friction factor (f) vs. Re showed a critical point (Recrit) of the order of 1.5 x 10(4), at which f increased sharply. Recrit, which corresponded to the onset of wave formation in the lining layer, was insensitive to changes in gel depth. However, gel cross-link density did affect the onset of wave formation: in oscillatory flow Recrit was shifted to higher Re, and the rise in f in steady flow was blunted with high degrees of cross-linking. The existence of Recrit and its association with wave formation are consistent with predictions based on two-phase flow theory.

  12. Prevention program of cervical cancer - Enrique Pouey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the first basic objectives in the prevention of cervical cancer in Uruguay. The Papanicolaou test, the biopsia, and the colposcopy are important studies for the early cervical cancer detection

  13. A Combined Therapy for Cervical Spondylopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佳

    2004-01-01

    @@ Cervical spondylopathy is a common disease frequently encountered in the middle-aged and old people. It is a consequence of degeneration, strain or deformation of the physiological curvature of the cervical vertebral body.

  14. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  15. Three-level cervical disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St. Iencean Andrei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease is well known in the cervical spine pathology, with radicular syndromes or cervical myelopathy. One or two level cervical herniated disc is common in adult and multilevel cervical degenerative disc herniation is common in the elderly, with spinal stenosis, and have the same cause: the gradual degeneration of the disc. We report the case of a patient with two level cervical disc herniation (C4 – C5 and C5 – C6 treated by anterior cervical microdiscectomy both levels and fusion at C5 – C6; after five years the patient returned with left C7 radiculopathy and MRI provided the image of a left C6 – C7 disc herniation, he underwent an anterior microsurgical discectomy with rapid relief of symptoms. Three-level cervical herniated disc are rare in adults, and the anterior microdiscectomy with or without fusion solve this pathology.

  16. Post laminoplasty cervical kyphosis—Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E. Dugoni

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The anterior approach is a good surgical option in flexible cervical kyphosis. It is of primary importance the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine in order to decompress the nervous structures and to guarantee a long-term stability.

  17. Coral-mucus-associated Vibrio integrons in the Great Barrier Reef: genomic hotspots for environmental adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, Jeremy E.; Bourne, David G; Curtis, Bruce; Dlutek, Marlena; Stokes, H. W.; Doolittle, W Ford; Boucher, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Integron cassette arrays in a dozen cultivars of the most prevalent group of Vibrio isolates obtained from mucus expelled by a scleractinian coral (Pocillopora damicornis) colony living on the Great Barrier Reef were sequenced and compared. Although all cultivars showed >99% identity across recA, pyrH and rpoB genes, no two had more than 10% of their integron-associated gene cassettes in common, and some individuals shared cassettes exclusively with distantly-related members of the genus. Of ...

  18. Laparoscopic Fertility Sparing Management of Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Facchini; Giuseppina Rapacchia; Giulia Montanari; Paolo Casadio; Gianluigi Pilu; Renato Seracchioli

    2014-01-01

    Fertility can be preserved after conservative cervical surgery. We report on a 29-year-old woman who was obese, para 0, and diagnosed with cervical insufficiency at the first trimester of current pregnancy due to a previous trachelectomy. She underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cervical cerclage (LTCC) for cervical cancer. The surgery was successful and she was discharged two days later. The patient underwent a caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation. Laparoscopic surgery ...

  19. Vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Gregory D.; Hsu, Wellington K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vertebral artery injuries during cervical spine surgery are rare, but potentially fatal. When performing cervical spine surgery, it is imperative that the surgeon has a systematic approach for avoiding, and if necessary, dealing with a vertebral artery injury. Methods: This is a review paper. Results: Upper posterior cervical spine surgeries put the vertebral artery at the highest risk, as opposed to anterior subaxial cervical spine procedures, which put the artery at the least ri...

  20. Cervical incompetence: preliminary evaluation with MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricak, H; Chang, Y C; Cann, C E; Parer, J T

    1990-03-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to demonstrate cervical incompetence in nonpregnant women was investigated in a prospective study of 41 volunteers referred in random order. These included 20 patients with normal cervices, 11 with cervical incompetence of traumatic or congenital origin, and 10 with clinically small cervices due to in utero diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposure. On MR images of the normal patients, cervical length was 33.0 mm +/- 1.0 (mean +/- standard error of the mean) and the width of the internal cervical os was 3.3 mm +/- 0.1. In patients with cervical incompetence, the cervical length did not significantly differ from those in the normal group. However, the internal cervical os was significantly wider (4.5 mm +/- 0.3, P less than .001), and localized irregularity of the endocervical canal was demonstrated in two patients. The MR appearance of the cervical stroma varied from normal, uniformly low signal intensity (n = 4) to uniformly (n = 3) or partially (n = 4) medium-to-high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In the patients with in utero DES exposure, the mean length of the cervical canal (22.9 mm +/- 1.7) was significantly shorter than that of the normal group. The width of the internal cervical os and the MR signal intensity of the cervical stroma were normal. In summary, MR findings of a cervical length shorter than 3.1 mm (95% confidence limit), an internal cervical os wider than 4.2 mm (95% confidence limit), or abnormal signal intensity in the cervical stroma are highly suggestive of incompetent cervix and should assist in planning further therapeutic decisions. PMID:2305065

  1. Course prognosis of cervical osteochondrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesov V.N.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Today we can state that in spite of a considerable number of cervical osteochondrosis studies, there is a lack of research devoted to analysis of its course. There is no correlation between initial expert evaluations of cervical osteo-chondrosis cases and further course of pathological process. Goal of the research is to develop system of course prognosis of cervical osteochondrosis taking into account environmental infuence, heredity, living conditions, psychological profle of patient’s personality. Materials and methods. Dynamics of degenerative-dystrophic changes progressing of cervical vertebrae in 236 patients was analyzed. Results. Received data demonstrated that probability of stage I changing to stage II, III and IV depended on patients’ sex, age and type of labour activity, frequent supercooling and stress. Probability of fast progression of cervical osteochondrosis (5-year cycle of stage I changing to stage III and IV was to a great extent associated with heredity, urban living, presence of endocrine system diseases, syndrome of nonspecifc dysplasia of connective tissue and low indices of quality of life. Conclusion. Proposed system allows making prognosis of morphologic changes in spinal cord, and is based on radiation methods of verifcation without taking into consideration dynamics of neurological symptomatology.

  2. Fusion around cervical disc prosthesis: case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Donk, R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Cervical arthroplasty is a relatively new method to maintain motion after cervical anterior discectomy. Two cases are presented in which bony fusion occurred around a cervical disc prosthesis. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 30-year-old man and a 49-year-old woman underwent a righ

  3. A Rigorous Methodology for Analyzing and Designing Plug-Ins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasie, Marieta V.; Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth; Kiniry, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    . This paper addresses these problems by describing a rigorous methodology for analyzing and designing plug-ins. The methodology is grounded in the Extended Business Object Notation (EBON) and covers informal analysis and design of features, GUI, actions, and scenarios, formal architecture design, including...

  4. PIXASTIC: STEGANOGRAPHY BASED ANTI-PHISHING BROWSER PLUG-IN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Thiyagarajan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of existence of many standard security mechanisms for ensuring secure e- Commerce business, users still fall prey for onlin e attacks. One such simple but powerful attack is ‘Phishing’. Phishing is the most alarming threat in the e-Commerce world and effective anti-phishing technique is the need of the hour. This paper focuses on a novel anti-phishing browser plug-in which uses information hiding technique - Steganography. A Robust Message based Image Steganography (RMIS algorithm has been proposed. The same has been incorporated in the form of a browser plug-in (safari called Pixastic. Pixastic is tested in an online banking scenario and it is compared with other well-known anti-phishing plug-in methods in practice. Various parameters such as robustness, usability and its behavior on various attacks have been analysed. From experimental results, it is ev ident that our method Pixastic performs well compared to other anti-phishing plug-ins.

  5. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for fleet managers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits for fleets, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

  6. Tandem-mirror end plugs for future fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    Electrostatic fields for confining central-cell plasma are achieved by heating the electrons in end-plugs via electron-cyclotron-resonance heating. Four end-plug magnetic configurations are being developed and tested to determine which will provide the best thermal barrier between plug- and central-cell electrons in a fusion reactor: (1) the inside barrier, with its auxiliary solenoid; (2) the auxiliary-mirror-cell (A-cell) barrier, which makes use of C-shaped magnet coils; (3) the axisymmetric-cusp barrier, using circular coils; and (4) the electron-ring barrier, in which two magnetic coils are stabilized by a ring of hot electrons. Calculations of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability are being performed with respect to the magnetic curvatures of each end-plug configuration. Models for describing the behavior of plasmas with finite ion orbits are being developed to predict MHD stability. Charge-exchange pumping systems for reactors with inside, A-cell, and axisymmetric-cusp barriers have already been designed, and a pumping system for removing thermalized helium ions is being explored.

  7. Analysis of ITER upper port plug remote handling maintenance scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, J. F.; M.R. de Baar,; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; Heemskerk, C. J. M.; Ronden, D. M. S.; Schuth, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ITER tokamak has a modular design, with port plugs, blanket modules and divertor cassettes. This set-up allows for maintenance of diagnostics, heating systems and first wall elements. The maintenance can be done in situ, or in the Hot Cell. Safe and effective remote handling (RH) will be ensured

  8. Axicell design for the end plugs of MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain changes in the end-plug design in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) are described. The Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to implement these changes as soon as possible in order to construct the machine in an axicell configuration. The present physics and technology goals as well as the project cost and schedule will not be affected by these changes

  9. Microscopic weld evaluation of FBTR end plug welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SS316 Stainless steel has been chosen as a reference cladding material for Fast Breeder Test Reactor. Both the ends of the clad tubes are encapped with a solid stainless steel plug by Tungsten Inert Gas welding processes. Due to the thick-thin geometry of the end plug and the fuel clad tube, getting defect free weld joint is a challenging task. Microscopic weld evaluation of the weld defects of these end plug welds have been carried out as per standard ASTM metallography practice. Requirement of the good quality weld joint is very essential to contain the fission gas release and to enable it to sustain the high burn up of the fuel in the nuclear reactor. This paper presents the typical weld defects encountered during the development and fabrication of the actual fuel pin and it also shows some of the weld characteristics like multiple weld pool, spherical weld pool, through and through weld penetration, outer edge depression at the tube side and the plug side of the weld pool observed during the pin fabrication campaign. (author)

  10. Seating tool for preparing molded-plug terminations on FCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, C. M.; Corum, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    Hand-operated tool positions and seats window piece and conductor spacer onto conductors of two stripped cables during process of terminating cables with molded plug. Tool accommodates cables up to 3 in. wide and is used in conjunction with folding tools.

  11. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Consumers (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for consumers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

  12. UV-absorbing bacteria in coral mucus and their response to simulated temperature elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, J.; Kannapiran, E.; Manikandan, B.; Francis, K.; Arora, Shruti; Karunya, E.; Kumar, Amit; Singh, S. K.; Jose, Jiya

    2013-12-01

    Reef-building corals encompass various strategies to defend against harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Coral mucus contains UV-absorbing compounds and has rich prokaryotic diversity associated with it. In this study, we isolated and characterized the UV-absorbing bacteria from the mucus of the corals Porites lutea and Acropora hyacinthus during the pre-summer and summer seasons. A total of 17 UV-absorbing bacteria were isolated and sequenced. The UV-absorbing bacteria showed UV absorption at wavelengths ranging from λ max = 333 nm to λ min = 208 nm. Analysis of the DNA sequences revealed that the majority of the UV-absorbing bacteria belonged to the family Firmicutes and the remaining belonged to the family Proteobacteria (class Gammaproteobacteria). Comparison of the sequences with the curated database yielded four distinct bacterial groups belonging to the genus Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Salinicoccus and Vibrio. The absorption peaks for the UV-absorbing bacteria shifted to the UV-A range (320-400 nm) when they were incubated at higher temperatures. Deciphering the complex relationship between corals and their associated bacteria will help us to understand their adaptive strategies to various stresses.

  13. Proteomic analysis of epidermal mucus from sea lice-infected Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provan, F; Jensen, L B; Uleberg, K E; Larssen, E; Rajalahti, T; Mullins, J; Obach, A

    2013-03-01

    Health diets that contain immunostimulants and other functional ingredients can strengthen the immune response in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, and thereby reduce sea lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, infection levels. Such diets can be used to supplement other treatments and will potentially reduce the need for delousing and medication. A sea lice infection trial was conducted on fish with an average weight of 215 g. One control diet and four experimental diets containing functional ingredients were produced. The diets were fed to salmon for 4 weeks before infection with sea lice copepodids. When lice had developed to chalimus III/IV, 88 fish per diet were examined for lice loads. Mucus samples from fish fed the different diets were taken before and after lice infection. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics was used to characterize the protein composition in the epidermal mucus of Atlantic salmon and to identify quantitative alterations in protein expression. Multivariate analysis of the generated data sets was performed to identify protein biomarkers. Putative biomarkers associated with functional feed intake and with sea lice infection have been identified and can form the basis for strategic validation experiments with selected functional feeds. PMID:23305410

  14. Effect of chest physiotherapy on the removal of mucus in patients with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the effectiveness of some of the components of a physiotherapy regimen on the removal of mucus from the lungs of 6 subjects with cystic fibrosis. On 5 randomized study days, after inhalation of a 99mTc-human serum albumin aerosol to label primarily the large airways, the removal of lung radioactivity was measured during 40 min of (a) spontaneous cough while at rest (control), (b) postural drainage, (c) postural drainage plus mechanical percussion, (d) combined maneuvers (postural drainage, deep breathing with vibrations, and percussion) administered by a physiotherapist, (e) directed vigorous cough. Measurements continued for an additional 2 h of quiet rest. Compared with the control day, all forms of intervention significantly improved the removal of mucus: cough (p less than 0.005), physiotherapy maneuvers (0.005 less than or equal to p less than 0.01), postural drainage (p less than 0.05), and postural drainage plus percussion (p less than 0.01). However, there was no significant difference between regimented cough alone and therapist-administered combined maneuvers, nor between postural drainage alone and with mechanical percussion. We conclude that in cystic fibrosis, vigorous, regimented cough sessions may be as effective as therapist-administered physiotherapy in removing pulmonary secretions. Postural drainage, although better than the control maneuver, was not as effective as cough and was not enhanced by mechanical percussion. Frequent, vigorous self-directed cough sessions are potentially as useful as more complex measures for effective bronchial toilet

  15. Effect of chest physiotherapy on the removal of mucus in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossman, C.M.; Waldes, R.; Sampson, D.; Newhouse, M.T.

    1982-07-01

    We studied the effectiveness of some of the components of a physiotherapy regimen on the removal of mucus from the lungs of 6 subjects with cystic fibrosis. On 5 randomized study days, after inhalation of a /sup 99/mTc-human serum albumin aerosol to label primarily the large airways, the removal of lung radioactivity was measured during 40 min of (a) spontaneous cough while at rest (control), (b) postural drainage, (c) postural drainage plus mechanical percussion, (d) combined maneuvers (postural drainage, deep breathing with vibrations, and percussion) administered by a physiotherapist, (e) directed vigorous cough. Measurements continued for an additional 2 h of quiet rest. Compared with the control day, all forms of intervention significantly improved the removal of mucus: cough (p less than 0.005), physiotherapy maneuvers (0.005 less than or equal to p less than 0.01), postural drainage (p less than 0.05), and postural drainage plus percussion (p less than 0.01). However, there was no significant difference between regimented cough alone and therapist-administered combined maneuvers, nor between postural drainage alone and with mechanical percussion. We conclude that in cystic fibrosis, vigorous, regimented cough sessions may be as effective as therapist-administered physiotherapy in removing pulmonary secretions. Postural drainage, although better than the control maneuver, was not as effective as cough and was not enhanced by mechanical percussion. Frequent, vigorous self-directed cough sessions are potentially as useful as more complex measures for effective bronchial toilet.

  16. Histomorphological Pattern of Cervical Lymphadenopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Mannan Sikder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enlarged palpable cervical lymph nodes as a primary presenting sign are very common and may be due to inflammatory lesions and tumors. Correlation between clinical findings and laboratory data is essential in arriving at a diagnosis. In patients presenting with cervical lymphadenopathy, excision biopsy provides material to establish an early diagnosis. We designed this study in our population for histological evaluation of cervical lymph node biopsies that might be important in the management of these patients. Objective: Histopathological evaluation of different diseases involving the cervical lymph nodes in relation to age and sex of the study population. Materials and Methods: It was a cross sectional study conducted in the department of Pathology, Enam Medical College & Hospital, Savar, Dhaka during the period from January 2006 to December 2010. A total of 107 patients were evaluated for specific cause of cervical lymphadenopathy in relation to age and sex. Lymph node biopsies of all patients of both sexes and all age groups were included in the study. Results: Among the 107 subjects 58 (54.2% were males and 49 (45.8% were females with a male to female ratio of 1.2:1. The age of the patients ranged from 2 to 85 years with a mean age of 32.68 ± 18.01 years. Of the 107 lymph node biopsies, 34 cases (31.8% were reactive lymphadenitis, 41 cases (38.3% were tuberculosis, 2 cases (1.9% were non-caseous granuloma, 6 cases (5.6% were Hodgkin lymphoma, 8 cases (7.5% were non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 12 cases (11.2% were metastatic neoplasm and 4 cases (3.7% were other specific lesions. Conclusion: The commonest cause of cervical lymphadenopathy was tuberculosis, followed by reactive lymphadenitis, lymphoma and metastatic neoplasm.

  17. Treatment of cervical dislocation with locked facets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ze-sheng; James J.Yue; WEI Feng; LIU Zhong-jun; CHEN Zhong-qiang; DANG Geng-ting

    2007-01-01

    Background Lower cervical dislocation with locked facets is common in cervical injury. The locked facets include unilateral and bilateral types. Different successful closed reduction rates has been achieved between unilateral and bilateral types by using rapid skull traction, which was commonly used to reduce the cervical dislocation. It is important to investigate a suitable management specific to patients with different types of cervical locked facets.Methods A total of 38 patients with cervical dislocation with locked facet due to cervical injury treated by rapid skull traction and operation from 1988 to 2005 were reviewed. Rapid skull traction was used in all the patients. Successful closed reduction rate was 88.0% in patients with bilateral cervical locked facets and that was 15.4% in those with unilateral cervical locked facets. These data were then statistically compared by Chi-square test. Patients who were reduced successfully underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion at the injured level, and those who failed in closed reduction received posterior open reduction and fixation.Results In this series, there was statistically significant difference (P<0.05) in the rate of successful closed skull traction reduction between unilateral and bilateral locked facets dislocation. Unilateral cervical locked facets dislocation was not easily reduced by skull traction which was suitable for reduction of bilateral cervical locked facets dislocation. However,unilateral cervical locked facets dislocation can be reduced by posterior open reduction.Conclusions Unilateral cervical locked facets dislocation should be treated immediately with posterior open reduction and instrumentation. Bilateral cervical locked facets dislocation can be reduced by rapid skull traction firstly and anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion later.

  18. A new paradigm in respiratory hygiene: modulating respiratory secretions to contain cough bioaerosol without affecting mucus clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonilla Gloria

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several strategies and devices have been designed to protect health care providers from acquiring transmissible respiratory diseases while providing care. In modulating the physical characteristics of the respiratory secretions to minimize the aerosolization that facilitates transmission of airborne diseases, a fundamental premise is that the prototype drugs have no adverse effect on the first line of respiratory defense, clearance of mucus by ciliary action. Methods To assess and demonstrate the primary mechanism of our mucomodulators (XLs, we have built our evidence moving from basic laboratory studies to an ex-vivo model and then to an in-vivo large animal model. We exposed anesthetized dogs without hypersecretion to different dose concentrations of aerosolized XL "B", XL "D" and XL "S". We assessed: cardio-respiratory pattern, tracheal mucus clearance, airway patency, and mucus viscoelastic changes. Results Exposure of frog palate mucus to XLs did not affect the clearance of mucus by ciliary action. Dogs maintained normal cardio-respiratory pattern with XL administration. Tracheal mucociliary clearance in anesthetized dogs indicated a sustained 40% mean increase. Tracheal mucus showed increased filance, and there was no mucus retention in the airways. Conclusion The ex-vivo frog palate and the in-vivo mammalian models used in this study, appear to be appropriate and complement each other to better assess the effects that our mucomodulators exert on the mucociliary clearance defence mechanism. The physiological function of the mucociliary apparatus was not negatively affected in any of the two epithelial models. Airway mucus crosslinked by mucomodulators is better cleared from an intact airway and normally functioning respiratory system, either due to enhanced interaction with cilia or airflow-dependent mechanisms. Data obtained in this study allow us to assure that we have complied with the fundamental requirement

  19. 40 CFR 144.62 - Cost estimate for plugging and abandonment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost estimate for plugging and... Waste Injection Wells § 144.62 Cost estimate for plugging and abandonment. (a) The owner or operator must prepare a written estimate, in current dollars, of the cost of plugging the injection well...

  20. Test Confessions: A Study of Testing Practices for Plug-in Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greiler, M.; Van Deursen, A.; Storey, M-A.

    2011-01-01

    Testing plug-in-based systems is challenging due to complex interactions among many different plug-ins, and variations in version and configuration. The objective of this paper is to increase our understanding of what testers and developers think and do when it comes to testing plug-inbased systems.

  1. Strangulated bowel obstruction resulting from mesh plug migration after open inguinal hernioplasty:case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao; CAI Xiu-jun; YU Hong; WANG Yi-fan

    2008-01-01

    @@ The use of mesh plug in hernioplasty was introduced by Shulman et al 1 in 1990 as a"rolled plug"fixed with two stitches to close the internal inguinal ring.Robbins and Rutkow 2 described their mesh plug technique in 1993.

  2. Polysaccharides and bacterial plugging. Final report, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogler, H.S.

    1995-02-01

    In situ core plugging experiments and transport experiments, using the model bacteria Leuconostoc m., have been conducted. Results demonstrated that cellular polysaccharide production increases cell distribution in porous media and caused an overall decrease in media permeability. Further, a parallel core plugging experiment was conducted and showed the feasibility of this system to divert injection fluid from high permeability zones into low permeability zones within porous media as is needed for profile modification. To implement this type of application, however, controlled placement of cells and rates of polymer production are needed. Therefore, kinetic studies were performed. A kinetic model was subsequently developed for Leuconostoc m. bacteria. This model is based on data generated from batch growth experiments and allows for the prediction of saccharide utilization, cell generation, and dextran production. These predictions can be used to develop injection strategies for field implementation. Transport and in situ growth micromodel experiments have shown how dextran allow cells to remain as clusters after cell division which enhanced cell capture and retention in porous media. Additional Damkohler experiments have been performed to determine the effects of the nutrient injection rate and nutrient concentration on the rate of porous media plugging. As shown experimentally and as predicted by a model for in situ growth, an increase in nutrient concentration and/or its injection rate will result in a faster rate of porous media plugging. Through continuum model simulations, it has been shown that the initial cell profiles play a key role on the core plugging rate. Controlling the location of the inoculating cells is thus another key factor in using bacteria for profile modification.

  3. Alternate tube plugging criteria for steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, C.; Aparicio, C.B. [Tecnatom, S.A., Madrid (Spain)

    1997-02-01

    The tubing of the Steam Generators constitutes more than half of the reactor coolant pressure boundary. Specific requirements governing the maintenance of steam generator tubes integrity are set in Plant Technical Specifications and in Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The operating experience of Steam Generator tubes of PWR plants has shown the existence of some types of degradatory processes. Every one of these has an specific cause and affects one or more zones of the tubes. In the case of Spanish Power Plants, and depending on the particular Plant considered, they should be mentioned the Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) at the roll transition zone (RTZ), the Outside Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking (ODSCC) at the Tube Support Plate (TSP) intersections and the fretting with the Anti-Vibration Bars (AVBs) or with the Support Plates in the preheater zone. The In-Service Inspections by Eddy Currents constitutes the standard method for assuring the SG tubes integrity and they permit the monitoring of the defects during the service life of the plant. When the degradation reaches a determined limit, called the plugging limit, the SG tube must be either repaired or retired from service by plugging. Customarily, the plugging limit is related to the depth of the defect. Such depth is typically 40% of the wall thickness of the tube and is applicable to any type of defect in the tube. In its origin, that limit was established for tubes thinned by wastage, which was the predominant degradation in the seventies. The application of this criterion for axial crack-like defects, as, for instance, those due to PWSCC in the roll transition zone, has lead to an excessive and unnecessary number of tubes being plugged. This has lead to the development of defect specific plugging criteria. Examples of the application of such criteria are discussed in the article.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha triggers mucus production in airway epithelium through an IkappaB kinase beta-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, José M; Zhang, Dong Mei; Liao, Sha Mei; Burwell, Timothy; King, Anne Marie; Barker, Philip A; Singh, Latika; Keaveney, Marie; Morgenstern, Jay; Gutiérrez-Ramos, José Carlos; Coyle, Anthony J; Fraser, Christopher C

    2005-10-28

    Excessive mucus production by airway epithelium is a major characteristic of a number of respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic bronchitis, and cystic fibrosis. However, the signal transduction pathways leading to mucus production are poorly understood. Here we examined the potential role of IkappaB kinase beta (IKKbeta) in mucus synthesis in vitro and in vivo. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or transforming growth factor-alpha stimulation of human epithelial cells resulted in mucus secretion as measured by MUC5AC mRNA and protein. TNF-alpha stimulation induced IKKbeta-dependent p65 nuclear translocation, mucus synthesis, and production of cytokines from epithelial cells. TNF-alpha, but not transforming growth factor-alpha, induced mucus production dependent on IKKbeta-mediated NF-kappaB activation. In vivo, TNF-alpha induced NF-kappaB as determined by whole mouse body bioluminescence. This activation was localized to the epithelium as revealed by LacZ staining in NF-kappaB-LacZ transgenic mice. TNF-alpha-induced mucus production in vivo could also be inhibited by administration into the epithelium of an IKKbeta dominant negative adenovirus. Taken together, our results demonstrated the important role of IKKbeta in TNF-alpha-mediated mucus production in airway epithelium in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16123045

  5. Successive shifts in the microbial community of the surface mucus layer and tissues of the coral Acropora muricata under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sonny T M; Davy, Simon K; Tang, Sen-Lin; Fan, Tung-Yung; Kench, Paul S

    2015-12-01

    The coral mucus may harbor commensal bacteria that inhibit growth of pathogens. Therefore, there is a need to understand the dynamics of bacterial communities between the coral mucus and tissues. Nubbins of Acropora muricata were subjected to increasing water temperatures of 26°C-33°C, to simultaneously explore the bacterial diversity in coral mucus and tissues by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Photochemical efficiency of symbiotic dinoflagellates within the corals declined above 31°C. Both the mucus and tissues of healthy A. muricata were dominated by γ-Proteobacteria, but under thermal stress there was a shift towards bacteria from the Verrucomicrobiaceae and α-Proteobacteria. Members of Cyanobacteria, Flavobacteria and Sphingobacteria also become more prominent at higher temperatures. The relative abundance of Vibrio spp. in the coral mucus increased at 29°C, but at 31°C, there was a drop in the relative abundance of Vibrio spp. in the mucus, with a reciprocal increase in the tissues. On the other hand, during bleaching, the relative abundance of Endozoicomonas spp. decreased in the tissues with a reciprocal increase in the mucus. This is the first systematic experiment that shows the potential for a bacterial community shift between the coral surface mucus and tissues in a thermally stressed coral. PMID:26564958

  6. Radiculopatía cervical

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Murillo Calderón

    2012-01-01

    La patología cervical traumática y su relación con el quehacer de la medicina legal tiene gran importancia y vigencia, principalmente cuando se hace necesario realizar valoraciones a pacientes con alteraciones cervicales y se debe definir si estas están en relación a un trauma determinado o repetitivo en el tiempo como puede ocurrir en algunos casos de riesgos de trabajo. El médico forense debe estar muy bien preparado, conocer la anatomía cervical y de los miembros superiores, realizar un in...

  7. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  8. Cervical spine in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Amy Hoi-Ying; Clark, Bruce Eric; David, David John; Anderson, Peter John

    2012-05-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a congenital syndrome with characteristic craniofacial malformations, which are well described in the literature. However, the presence of cervical spine dysmorphology in this syndrome has been minimally described. This study reviews cervical spine radiographs of 40 patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. In this sample, 7 of 40 patients displayed cervical spine anomalies, with 3 of these patients displaying multiple cervical spine anomalies. The patterns of spinal anomalies were variable, suggesting that the underlying genetic mutation has variable expressivity in cervical spine development as it does elsewhere in the craniofacial skeleton.

  9. Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Yan, Deng-lu; Zhang, Zai-Heng

    2008-12-01

    Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of 2002 to June of 2005, 126 consecutive patients with contained cervical disc herniations have presented at the authors' clinic and treated by PCN. The patients' gender distribution for PCN was 65 male, 61 female. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 66 years (mean 51.9 +/- 10.2 years). The levels of involvement were 21 cases at C3-4, 30 cases at C4-5, 40 cases at C5-6, and 35 cases at C6-7. The clinical outcomes, pain reduction and the segment stability were all recorded during this study. A clinical outcome was quantified by the Macnab standard and using VAS. The angular displacement (AD) > or =11 degrees or horizontal displacement (HD) > or =3 mm was considered to be radiographically unstable. In the results of this study, puncture of the needle into the disc space was accurately performed under X-ray guidance in all cases. There was one case where the Perc-D Spine Wand had broken in the disc space during the procedure. The partial Perc-D Spine Wand, which had broken in the disc space could not be removed by the percutaneous cervical discectomy and thus remained there. There were no recurrent cases or complications in our series. Macnab standard results were excellent in 62 cases, good in 41 cases and fair in 23 cases. The rate of excellent and good was 83.73%. The VAS scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement in PCN at the 2-week, 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up visits when compared to preoperational values (P PCN procedure. There was no significant difference in stability either preoperatively or

  10. Field-test programs of borehole plugs in southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives a general overview of the repository-sealing field test effort being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeast New Mexico. Summary descriptions of supporting activities, such as performance assessment and plugging materials development, are included to create the connection between modeling and laboratory activities as they relate to field results. Results of tests on a portion of a 17-year-old plug (Plug 217) recovered from a mine horizon and the Bell Canyon Test, in which a cement plug was emplaced to isolate a naturally pressurized aquifer, are given. Conclusions from these field plugging tests are included

  11. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Primary adenocarcinoma of cervical esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrawi, S J; Winston, J; Tan, D; Gibbs, J; Loree, T R; Hicks, W; Rigual, N; Lorè, J M

    2005-06-01

    Most upper esophageal malignancies are squamous cell carcinomas, rarely adenocarcinomas arising from Barrett's esophagus and very rarely adenocarcinomas from heterotopic gastric mucosa without evidence of Barrett's especially in the cervical part of the esophagus. We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the polypoid type in the upper esophagus (cervical esophagus) arising from ectopic gastric mucosa, in a 60 year-old man who presented with progressive dysphagia. Accurate diagnosis by esophagogram revealed a large mass in the cervical esophagus; CAT scan showed intraluminal mass at the level of thoracic inlet, esophagogastroscopy showed a fleshy polyp (3.2cm x 3.0cm) at 20 cm from the incisors with a biopsy confirming moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with no evidence of Barrett's esophagus. Through a left cervical approach and resection of medial third of clavicle, the tumor was removed by partial esophagectomy followed by lymph node dissection, and proved to be T1NOMO, stage I (AJCC staging 6th ed.). Post operatively, the patient received chemoradiation with no evidence of recurrence or metastasis in six years of follow up. It seems this tumor has a much better prognosis than adenocarcinomas arising from Barrett's. To our knowledge only 19 cases have been reported in literature so far. PMID:16110768

  13. Treatment protocols for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujkov Tamara

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide and the second cause of cancer death among women. About 95% (90% in developed countries of invasive carcinomas are of sqamous types, and 5% (10% in developed countries are adenocarcinomas. FIGO classification of cervical carcinomas, based on clinical staging and prognostic factor dictate therapeutic procedures and help in designing treatment protocols. Therapeutic modalities Surgical therapy includes conization, radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy and palliative operation urinary diversion and colostomy. Radiotherapy, brachytherapy and teletherapy are most recently combined with chemotherapy as concurrent chemoradiation. Discussion and conclusion No change in therapeutic modalities will ever decrease mortality rate of cervical carcinoma as much as education, prevention and early screening. The 5-year survival for locally advanced disease has not improved during the last 40 years as a result of failure to deliver therapy to the paraaortic region. Paraaortic lymph nodes should be evaluated before therapy planning by different imaging procedures, or more exactly by surgical staging: laparoscopy or laparotomy. Radical operations of cervical carcinoma should be performed by experienced surgeons, educated for this type of operation, with sufficient number of cases.

  14. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery. PMID:27175952

  15. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  16. Is posterior fusion necessary with laminectomy in the cervical spine?

    OpenAIRE

    McAllister, Beck D.; Rebholz, Brandon J.; Wang, Jeffery C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical decompressive laminectomy is a common procedure for addressing multilevel cervical spine pathology. The most common reasons for performing simultaneous posterior cervical fusion include the prevention of progressive postlaminectomy kyphotic deformity or other types of instability which can contribute to late neurological deterioration. Methods: The medical literature (Pub Med with MeSH) concerning cervical laminectomy, posterior cervical fusion, and complications of lamin...

  17. Value of preoperative cervical discography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Joon Woo [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-07-15

    The aim of this study was to describe the method and the value of cervical discography as correlated with the MR findings. Twenty-one discs in 11 consecutive patients who underwent cervical discography were analyzed. MR and CT discography (CTD) were performed in all patients. Discography was performed after swallowing barium for visualizing the pharynx and the esophagus to prevent penetration. We also analyzed the preceding causes of the subjects' cervical pain. The results of the pain provocation test were classified into concordant pain, discordant pain and a negative test. MRI was analyzed according to the T2-signal intensity (SI) of the disc, disc height, annular bulging and disc herniation. The CTD was analyzed for degeneration or radial tear of the disc, epidural leakage of the contrast agent and pooling of the contrast agent at the periphery of the disc. The pain provocation tests were correlated with the MR and CTD findings. We used the chi-square test to analyze the results. Concordant pain was observed in 14 cases, discordant pain in 3 cases and there were negative tests in 4 cases. There were no complications related to the procedure. Four patients had undergone anterior cervical fusion and four patients that developed after traffic injuries. The decreased T2-SI and annular bulging on MRI, disc degeneration and peripheral pooling of the contrast agent on CT were significantly correlated with pain provocation. When the diagnosis of disc disease is difficult with performing MRI, cervical discography with using swallowed barium solution to reduce the penetration of the esophagus or hypopharynx may play be helpful. The decreased T2-SI and annular bulging on MRI correlated significantly with a positive result on the pain provocation test.

  18. Modified-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles downregulate cellular CDX2 expression and cross the gastric mucus barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sadio

    Full Text Available Development of effective non-viral vectors is of crucial importance in the implementation of RNA interference in clinical routine. The localized delivery of siRNAs to the gastrointestinal mucosa is highly desired but faces specific problems such as the stability in gastric acidity conditions and the presence of the mucus barrier. CDX2 is a transcription factor critical for intestinal differentiation being involved in the initiation and maintenance of gastrointestinal diseases. Specifically, it is the trigger of gastric intestinal metaplasia which is a precursor lesion of gastric cancer. Its expression is also altered in colorectal cancer, where it may constitute a lineage-survival oncogene. Our main objective was to develop a nanoparticle-delivery system of siRNA targeting CDX2 using modified chitosan as a vector. CDX2 expression was assessed in gastric carcinoma cell lines and nanoparticles behaviour in gastrointestinal mucus was tested in mouse explants. We show that imidazole-modified chitosan and trimethylchitosan/siRNA nanoparticles are able to downregulate CDX2 expression and overpass the gastric mucus layer but not colonic mucus. This system might constitute a potential therapeutic approach to treat CDX2-dependent gastric lesions.

  19. Urgent problems of improvement of stomatologic aid to patients with locally extended cancer of oral cavity mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova О.V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the investigation: to develop the methods of increasing effectiveness of stomatologic accompanying therapy at all stages of locally extended cancer of oral cavity mucus. Material and methods: The results of treatment of 563 patients with locally extended cancer of oral cavity mucus have been analyzed. Among them 205 patients with the proved diagnosis were examined by a dentist. A special committee developed a plan of accompanying therapy where a stomatologic treatment was significant. Other 358 patients were not examined by a dentist before therapy. Re-sults. Planning of stomatologic aid and carrying out measures directed to the prevention of complications against the background of combined and complex therapy of locally extended cancer of oral cavity mucus allows to decrease the number of hemorrhagic complications to 4,9%, local inflammatory processes — to 2,7% as well as other complications. Conclusion: Planning of accompanying stoma-tologic therapy and organization of adequate curable and rehabilitation measures significantly improves life quality of the patients with locally extended cancer of oral cavity mucus.

  20. Effect of pheromone induction on transfer of the Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pCF10 in intestinal mucus ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Tine Rask; Hammerum, Anette Marie; Jensen, Lars Bogø;

    2001-01-01

    The effect of synthetic sex pheromone on pheromone-inducible conjugation between the isogenic Enterococcus faecalis strains OG1RF and OG1SS was investigated in (i) Todd-Hewitt broth medium and (ii) intestinal mucus isolated from germ-free rats. In broth, the presence of synthetic pheromone cCF10...

  1. Association of chronic mucus hypersecretion with FEV1 decline and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease morbidity. Copenhagen City Heart Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J; Prescott, E; Lange, P

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between chronic mucus hypersecretion, and FEV1 decline, and subsequent hospitalization from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We used data from The Copenhagen City Heart Study on 5,354 women and 4,081 men 30 to 79 yr of age with...

  2. Culture independent characterization of bacteria associated with the mucus of the coral Acropora digitifera from the Gulf of Mannar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithyanand, Paramasivam; Indhumathi, Thiruvalluvan; Ravi, Arumugam Veera; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2011-06-01

    Corals are sessile eukaryotic hosts which provide a unique surface for microbial colonization. Culture independent studies show that the coral mucus and tissue harbour diverse and abundant prokaryotic communities. However, little is known about the diversity of bacteria associated with the corals of Gulf of Mannar. The present study characterised the bacterial diversity associated with the mucus of the coral Acropora digitifera from the Gulf of Mannar by 16S rRNA gene clone library construction. The bacterial communities of the mucus of A. digitifera were diverse, with representatives within the Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and several unclassified bacteria. The culture independent bacterial population was totally different from our previous culture dependent study of the mucus and tissue of the same coral. 36% of the bacteria in the clone library of A. digitifera were found to be novel after full length sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene wherein several clones were found to be novel at the Genus and species level. The current study further supports the findings that Actinobacteria amount to a certain proportion among bacterial communities associated with corals. PMID:25187139

  3. Composition and Functional Characterization of Microbiome Associated with Mucus of the Coral Fungia echinata Collected from Andaman Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Badhai, Jhasketan; Ghosh, Tarini S.; Das, Subrata K.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the community composition and functions of the microbiome associated with the mucus of the coral Fungia echinata based on metagenomic approach. Metagenome sequence data showed a dominance of the class Gammaproteobacteria followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, Bacilli, and Clostridia. At the order level, the most abundant groups were Pseudomonadales, Oceanospirillales, Alteromonadales, and Rhodobacterales. The genus Psychr...

  4. Novel mucus-penetrating liposomes as a potential oral drug delivery system: preparation, in vitro characterization, and enhanced cellular uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuying; Chen, Dan; Le, Chaoyi; Zhu, Chunliu; Gan, Yong; Hovgaard, Lars; Yang, Mingshi

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal mucus-penetrating properties and intestinal cellular uptake of two types of liposomes modified by Pluronic F127 (PF127). Methods The two types of liposomes, ie, PF127-inlaid liposomes and PF127-adsorbed liposomes, were prepared by a thin-film hydration method followed by extrusion, in which coumarin 6 was loaded as a fluorescence marker. A modified Franz diffusion cell mounted with the intestinal mucus of rats was used to study the diffusion characteristics of the two types of PF127 liposomes. Cell uptake studies were conducted in Caco-2 cells and analyzed using confocal laser scanning microcopy as well as flow cytometry. Results The diffusion efficiency of the two types of PF127-modified liposomes through intestinal rat mucus was 5–7-fold higher than that of unmodified liposomes. Compared with unmodified liposomes, PF127-inlaid liposomes showed significantly higher cellular uptake of courmarin 6. PF127-adsorbed liposomes showed a lower cellular uptake. Moreover, and interestingly, the two types of PF127-modified liposomes showed different cellular uptake mechanisms in Caco-2 cells. Conclusion PF127-inlaid liposomes with improved intestinal mucus-penetrating ability and enhanced cellular uptake might be a potential carrier candidate for oral drug delivery. PMID:22163166

  5. Comparison of mucus flow rate, radiolabelled glycoprotein output and smooth muscle contraction in the ferret trachea in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyle, H.; Widdicombe, J.G.; Wilffert, B.

    1988-01-01

    1. The concentration-response curves for rate of mucus output, labelled-glycoprotein output and smooth muscle contraction in response to methacholine, phenylephrine and salbutamol were determined in the ferret trachea in vitro. 2. The potencies of methacholine and phenylephrine are both in order: sm

  6. Lycopene, Lutein and Zeaxanthin May Reduce Faecal Blood, Mucus and Pus but not Abdominal Pain in Individuals with Ulcerative Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głąbska, Dominika; Guzek, Dominika; Zakrzewska, Paulina; Włodarek, Dariusz; Lech, Gustaw

    2016-01-01

    Background: The main symptom of ulcerative colitis is diarrhoea, which is often accompanied by painful tenesmus and faecal blood and mucus. It sometimes co-occurs with abdominal pain, fever, feeling of fatigue, loss of appetite and weight loss. Some dietary factors have been indicated as important in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. The aim of the study was to analyse the association between retinoid intake (total vitamin A, retinol, β-carotene, α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin) and ulcerative colitis symptoms (abdominal pain, faecal blood, faecal mucus, faecal pus) in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission. Methods: Assessment of diet was based on self-reported data from each patient’s dietary records taken over a period of three typical, random days (2 weekdays and 1 day of the weekend). Results: A total of 56 individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission (19 males and 37 females) were recruited for the study. One in every four individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission was characterised as having inadequate vitamin A intake. Higher lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin intakes in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission were associated with lower faecal blood, mucus and pus but not with lower incidence of abdominal pain. Higher carotene intake in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission may contribute to higher incidence of faecal mucus. Conclusions: Optimising intake of specific retinoids may enhance disease control in individuals with ulcerative colitis. Prospective studies, including patient reported and objective outcomes, are required to confirm this. PMID:27706028

  7. Improving bovine semen diluents: insights from the male and female reproductive tracts, and the potential relevance of cervical mucins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGetrick, J A; Reid, C J; Carrington, S D

    2014-05-01

    The commercial applicability of bovine artificial insemination (AI) depends on the effectiveness of diluents for maintaining sperm fertility. Challenges faced by the AI industry due to recent advances in assisted reproduction, and the limitations inherent in using fresh and frozen-thawed sperm for AI, could be overcome with the development of better semen diluents. Research into the different microenvironments of bovine sperm as they progress towards maturity, capacitation and fertilisation is revealing various mechanisms that could be exploited to improve the formulation of semen diluents. These are reviewed here. A rationale for a more detailed investigation of bovine cervical mucus for factors that may allow further progress towards this goal are also discussed. PMID:24680194

  8. Plug and Process Loads Capacity and Power Requirements Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppy, M.; Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-09-01

    This report addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that would help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. Limited initial data, however, suggest that actual PPL densities in leased buildings are substantially lower. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems. Better guidance will enable improved sizing and design of these systems, decrease upfront capital costs, and allow systems to operate more energy efficiently. The main focus of this report is to provide industry with reliable, objective third-party guidance to address the information gap in typical PPL densities for commercial building tenants. This could drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands.

  9. Standard metrics for a plug-and-play tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonisse, Jim; Young, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    The Motion Imagery Standards Board (MISB) has previously established a metadata "micro-architecture" for standards-based tracking. The intent of this work is to facilitate both the collaborative development of competent tracking systems, and the potentially distributed and dispersed execution of tracker system components in real-world execution environments. The approach standardizes a set of five quasi-sequential modules in image-based tracking. However, in order to make the plug-and-play architecture truly useful we need metrics associated with each module (so that, for instance, a researcher who "plugs in" a new component can ascertain whether he/she did better or worse with the component). This paper proposes the choice of a new, unifying set of metrics based on an informationtheoretic approach to tracking, which the MISB is nominating as DoD/IC/NATO standards.

  10. Strength and stability of microbial plugs in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, A.K. [NIPER/BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Sharma, M.M.; Georgiou, G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Mobility reduction induced by the growth and metabolism of bacteria in high-permeability layers of heterogeneous reservoirs is an economically attractive technique to improve sweep efficiency. This paper describes an experimental study conducted in sandpacks using an injected bacterium to investigate the strength and stability of microbial plugs in porous media. Successful convective transport of bacteria is important for achieving sufficient initial bacteria distribution. The chemotactic and diffusive fluxes are probably not significant even under static conditions. Mobility reduction depends upon the initial cell concentrations and increase in cell mass. For single or multiple static or dynamic growth techniques, permeability reduction was approximately 70% of the original permeability. The stability of these microbial plugs to increases in pressure gradient and changes in cell physiology in a nutrient-depleted environment needs to be improved.

  11. Polymer grouts for plugging lost circulation in geothermal wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbreath, D. (Green Mountain International, Waynesvile, NC); Mansure, Arthur James; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2004-12-01

    We have concluded a laboratory study to evaluate the survival potential of polymeric materials used for lost circulation plugs in geothermal wells. We learned early in the study that these materials were susceptible to hydrolysis. Through a systematic program in which many potential chemical combinations were evaluated, polymers were developed which tolerated hydrolysis for eight weeks at 500 F. The polymers also met material, handling, cost, and emplacement criteria. This screening process identified the most promising materials. A benefit of this work is that the components of the polymers developed can be mixed at the surface and pumped downhole through a single hose. Further strength testing is required to determine precisely the maximum temperature at which extrusion through fractures or voids causes failure of the lost circulation plug.

  12. Nuclear engineering of diagnostic port plugs on ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, C.S., E-mail: spencer.pitcher@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Barnsley, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Feder, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, Princeton, NJ (United States); Hu, Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Loesser, G.D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, Princeton, NJ (United States); Lyublin, B. [Efremov, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Padasalagi, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Pak, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Reichle, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Sato, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Udintsev, V.S.; Walker, C.; Walsh, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Zhai, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The nuclear engineering infrastructure of port-based diagnostics on ITER is presented, including the equatorial and upper port plug generic designs, the adopted modular concept, the loads and associated load response and the remote handling. A modular approach is adopted for the internal shielding modules as this helps to reduce the dominant electromagnetic loads, reduces interfaces and accelerates remote handling. Extensive use of gun-drilling is employed to produce water channels in the stainless steel plate and forgings used to construct the port plugs and modules. The French Nuclear Code RCC-MR (2007) is employed in the design and the manufacturing. An integrated remote handling scheme is described, including a description of maintenance operations in the Hot Cell Facility.

  13. Development of port plug handling tractor for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron shield plug installed into the horizontal port of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) vacuum vessel is a heavy component, which mainly consists of stainless steel and cooling water. It has a typical size of 2.3 m x 1.9 m x 3.6 m, and its weight is assumed to be around 40 tons. Development of the remote handling system of the port plug is a key technology for ITER port maintenance because high positioning accuracy is required in spite of narrow handling space. In order to overcome this problem, design and manufacturing of a 1/2.5-scaled mockup of the handling machine has been performed. (author)

  14. Flow induced vibration studies on PFBR control plug components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, V., E-mail: prakash@igcar.gov.in [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India); Kumar, P. Anup; Anandaraj, M.; Thirumalai, M.; Anandbabu, C.; Rajan, K.K. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flow induced vibration studies on Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor control plug model carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Velocity similitude was followed for the study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Frequencies and amplitude of vibrations of various control plug components measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overall values of vibration are well within permissible limits. - Abstract: The construction of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), a 500 MWe liquid sodium cooled reactor, is in progress at Kalpakkam in India. Control plug (CP) is located right above the core subassemblies in the hot pool. Control plug is an important component as many of the critical reactor parameters are sensed and controlled by the components housed in the control plug assembly. In PFBR primary circuit, components are basically thin walled, slender shells with diameter to thickness ratio ranging from 100 to 650. These components are prone to flow induced vibrations. The existence of free liquid (sodium) surfaces, which is the source of sloshing phenomenon and the operation of primary sodium pump in the primary pool are other potential sources of vibration of reactor components. Control plug is a hollow cylindrical shell structure and provides passages and support for 12 absorber rod drive mechanisms (ARDM) which consists of 9 control and safety rods and 3 diverse safety rods, 210 thermo wells to measure the sodium temperature at the exit of various fuel subassemblies, three failed fuel localization modules (FFLM) and acoustic detectors. It consists of a core cover plate (CCP), which forms the bottom end, two intermediate supports plate, i.e. lower stay plate (LSP) and upper stay plate (USP) and an outer shell. The CCP is located at a distance of 1.3 m from the core top. With such a gap, there will be long free hanging length of the thermocouple sleeves, Delayed neutron detector (DND) sampling tubes and ARDM shroud tubes and hence they are

  15. Fissures and boreholes plugging in fractured geologic deposits (granites)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives the results of bench-scale experiments and field tests, destined to describe the bentonite behavior in fractured scale models and in boreholes, and to allow to study the rock weathering phenomenons under specific conditions. Dry and compact bentonite, used for exploratory drilling plugging, in crystalline rock deposits and in contact with groundwater, show hydration, swelling and mobility properties with penetration in conducting fractures. The purpose of this work is to define the procedure of clay weathering after the swelling phase, under groundwater circulation effect, to estimate plugs longevity. This study is prepared for the European Atomic Energy Community cost-sharing research program on radioactive waste management and disposal. 63 refs., 100 figs., 30 tabs., 17 plates

  16. Cervical cancer: screening, diagnosis and staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Manav, Bachar; Tomara, Eirini; Iatrakis, George; Romanidis, Constantinos; Bothou, Anastasia; Galazios, George

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread screening programs, cervical cancer remains the third most common cancer in developing countries. Based on the implementation of cervical screening programs with the referred adoption of improved screening methods in cervical cytology with the knowledge of the important role of the human papilloma virus (HPV) it's incidence is decreased in the developed world. Even if cervical HPV infection is incredibly common, cervical cancer is relatively rare. Depending on the rarity of invasive disease and the improvement of detection of pre-cancerous lesions due to the participation in screening programs, the goal of screening is to detect the cervical lesions early in order to be treated before cancer is developed. In populations with many preventive screening programs, a decrease in cervical cancer mortality of 50-75% is mentioned over the past 50 years. The preventive examination of vagina and cervix smear, Pap test, and the HPV DNA test are remarkable diagnostic tools according to the American Cancer Association guidelines, in the investigation of asymptomatic women and in the follow up of women after the treatment of pre-invasive cervical cancer. The treatment of cervical cancer is based on the FIGO 2009 cervical cancer staging.

  17. STOMATOLOGIC ASPECTS IN THERAPY OF LOCALLY DISTRIBUTED CANCER OF ORAL CAVITY MUCUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Matyakin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the investigation: to improve prophylaxis of dental complications during the therapy in the patients with locally distributed cancer of oral cavity mucus.Materials. Results of sanation of oral cavity in 305 patients with cancer of oral and pharyngeal area are analyzed.Results. The best results are noted in the patients given surgical sanation before chemo-radial therapy. The most number of complications is observed when teeth were extracted after chemical therapy in the period of radial therapy at summary focal dose above 20 Gy as well as in the late periods after radial therapy.Conclusion. A complex of preventive measures with using haemostatic sponge with canamycin in such patients decreases the number of complications and the terms of healing of alveoli of extracted teeth.

  18. Mucus altering agents as adjuncts for nonviral gene transfer to airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, S; Kitson, C; Farley, R; Steel, R; Marriott, C; Parkins, D A; Scarpa, M; Wainwright, B; Evans, M J; Colledge, W H; Geddes, D M; Alton, E W

    2001-09-01

    Nonviral vectors have been shown to be a safe and valid alternative to recombinant viruses for gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF). Nevertheless, gene transfer efficiency needs to be increased before clinical efficacy is likely in man. One barrier to increased efficacy is normal airway mucus. Using an ex vivo model of sheep tracheal epithelium, we show that this barrier can, in part, be overcome by treatment with the mucolytic agents, Nacystelyn or N-acetylcysteine using either a cationic lipid or a cationic polymer as the gene transfer agent. Further, in vivo application of either Nacystelyn or the anticholinergic glycopyrrolate, both clinically used agents, resulted in increased reporter gene expression in the mouse lung, but no significant correction of the bioelectric defect in CF null mice. These results, whilst unlikely to be sufficient in themselves to achieve clinically relevant gene therapy, may be a further useful step in the attainment of this goal.

  19. Mucus altering agents as adjuncts for nonviral gene transfer to airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, S; Kitson, C; Farley, R; Steel, R; Marriott, C; Parkins, D A; Scarpa, M; Wainwright, B; Evans, M J; Colledge, W H; Geddes, D M; Alton, E W

    2001-09-01

    Nonviral vectors have been shown to be a safe and valid alternative to recombinant viruses for gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF). Nevertheless, gene transfer efficiency needs to be increased before clinical efficacy is likely in man. One barrier to increased efficacy is normal airway mucus. Using an ex vivo model of sheep tracheal epithelium, we show that this barrier can, in part, be overcome by treatment with the mucolytic agents, Nacystelyn or N-acetylcysteine using either a cationic lipid or a cationic polymer as the gene transfer agent. Further, in vivo application of either Nacystelyn or the anticholinergic glycopyrrolate, both clinically used agents, resulted in increased reporter gene expression in the mouse lung, but no significant correction of the bioelectric defect in CF null mice. These results, whilst unlikely to be sufficient in themselves to achieve clinically relevant gene therapy, may be a further useful step in the attainment of this goal. PMID:11571577

  20. Purification and characterization of elastase-specific inhibitor. Sequence homology with mucus proteinase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenave, J M; Ryle, A P

    1991-01-01

    Elastase-specific inhibitor (ESI) was purified from sputum of patients with chronic bronchitis and compared with mucus proteinase inhibitor (MPI, BrI) isolated, without the use of affinity chromatography on an enzyme, from non-purulent sputum of a patient with bronchial carcinoma. The N-terminal sequence of 27 residues of the latter was determined and showed serine as the only N-terminus. The partial N-terminal amino-acid sequence of ESI shows some homology with MPI, especially around the reactive site of MPI for human neutrophil elastase. This region could therefore be the reactive site of ESI. The thermodynamic and kinetic constants of the reactions of ESI with human neutrophil elastase and with porcine pancreatic elastase show that ESI is a fast-acting inhibitor. PMID:2039600

  1. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding.

  2. Mesh Plug Repair of Inguinal Hernia; Single Surgeon Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Serdar Karaca

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Mesh repair of inguinal hernia repairs are shown to be an effective and reliable method. In this study, a single surgeon%u2019s experience with plug-mesh method performs inguinal hernia repair have been reported. Material and Method: 587 patients with plug-mesh repair of inguinal hernia, preoperative age, body / mass index, comorbid disease were recorded in terms of form. All of the patients during the preoperative and postoperative hernia classification of information, duration of operation, antibiotics, perioperative complications, and later, the early and late postoperative complications, infection, recurrence rates and return to normal daily activity, verbal pain scales in terms of time and postoperative pain were evaluated. Added to this form of long-term pain ones. The presence of wound infection was assessed by the presence of purulent discharge from the incision. Visual analog scale pain status of the patients was measured. Results: 587 patients underwent repair of primary inguinal hernia mesh plug. One of the patients, 439 (74% of them have adapted follow-ups. Patients%u2019 ages ranged from 18-86. Was calculated as the mean of 47±18:07. Follow-up period of the patients was found to be a minimum of 3 months, maximum 55 months. Found an average of 28.2±13.4 months. Mean duration of surgery was 35.07±4.00 min (min:22mn-max:52mn, respectively. When complication rates of patients with recurrence in 2 patients (0.5%, hematoma development (1.4% in 6 patients, the development of infection in 11 patients (2.5% and long-term groin pain in 4 patients (0.9% appeared. Discussion: In our experience, the plug-mesh repair of primary inguinal hernia repair safe, effective low recurrence and complication rates can be used.

  3. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Workplace Charging Hosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-08-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have immense potential for increasing the country's energy, economic, and environmental security, and they will play a key role in the future of U.S. transportation. By providing PEV charging at the workplace, employers are perfectly positioned to contribute to and benefit from the electrification of transportation. This handbook answers basic questions about PEVs and charging equipment, helps employers assess whether to offer workplace charging for employees, and outlines important steps for implementation.

  4. AP1000 Features Prevent Potential Containment Recirculation Screen Plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of plant design development and evaluations that demonstrate that the AP1000 plant is not subject to potential containment recirculation screen plugging following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). Following a LOCA in a pressurized water reactor, it is necessary to recirculate water from the containment back into the reactor to maintain long term core cooling. The AP1000 utilizes passive safety systems to provide containment recirculation for long term core cooling following a LOCA. The AP1000 also has non-safety pumps which provide a backup means of providing recirculation. Screens are provided around the recirculation pipes to prevent debris from blocking recirculation flow and core cooling passages. Debris may be generated by the LOCA blowdown from insulation and coatings used inside containment. Even with effective cleanliness programs, there may be some resident debris such as dust and dirt. The potential for plugging the recirculation screens is a current PWR licensing issue. The AP1000 design provides inherent advantages with respect to the potential plugging of containment recirculation screens. These characteristics include prevention of fibrous debris generation, improved debris settling and improved recirculation screen design. Debris settling analysis demonstrates that failure of coatings does not result in debris being transported to the screens before it settles to the floor. Additional analysis also shows that the plant can tolerate conservative amounts of resident debris being transported to the screens. The AP1000 significantly reduces the probability of plugging the containment recirculation screens and significantly reduces inspection and maintenance of coatings used inside containment. (authors)

  5. Experimental Investigation of Near-Borehole Crack Plugging with Bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, R. A.; Islam, M. N.; Bunger, A.

    2015-12-01

    The success of the disposal of nuclear waste in a deep borehole (DBH) is determined by the integrity of the components of the borehole plug. Bentonite clay has been proposed as a key plugging material, and its effectiveness depends upon its penetration into near-borehole cracks associated with the drilling process. Here we present research aimed at understanding and maximizing the ability of clay materials to plug near-borehole cracks. A device was constructed such that the borehole is represented by a cylindrical chamber, and a near-borehole crack is represented by a slot adjacent to the center chamber. The experiments consist of placing bentonite clay pellets into the center chamber and filling the entire cavity with distilled water so that the pellets hydrate and swell, intruding into the slot because the cell prohibits swelling in the vertical direction along the borehole. Results indicate that the bentonite clay pellets do not fully plug the slot. We propose a model where the penetration is limited by (1) the free swelling potential intrinsic to the system comprised of the bentonite pellets and the hydrating fluid and (2) resisting shear force along the walls of the slot. Narrow slots have a smaller volume for the clay to fill than wider slots, but wider slots present less resistive force to clay intrusion. These two limiting factors work against each other, leading to a non-monotonic relationship between slot width and intrusion length. Further experimental results indicate that the free swelling potential of bentonite clay pellets depends on pellet diameter, "container" geometry, and solution salinity. Smaller diameter pellets possess more relative volumetric expansion than larger diameter pellets. The relative expansion of the clay also appears to decrease with the container size, which we understand to be due to the increased resistive force provided by the container walls. Increasing the salinity of the solution leads to a dramatic decrease in the clay

  6. Controlling droplet incubation using close-packed plug flow

    OpenAIRE

    Mary, Pascaline; Abate, Adam R.; Agresti, Jeremy J.; Weitz, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Controlling droplet incubation is critical for droplet-based microfluidic applications; however, current techniques are either of limited precision or place strict limits on the incubation times that can be achieved. Here, we present a simple technique to control incubation time by exploiting close-packed plug flow. In contrast to other techniques, this technique is applicable to very short and very long incubation times.

  7. Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?

    OpenAIRE

    Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S; Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    The notion persists that battery technology and cost remain as barriers to commercialization of electric-drive passenger vehicles. Within the context of starting a market for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), we explore two aspects of the purported problem: (1) PHEV performance goals and (2) the abilities of present and near-term battery chemistries to meet the resulting technological requirements. We summarize evidence stating that battery technologies do not meet the requirements th...

  8. Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Concerns regarding air pollution, energy dependence, and, increasingly, climate change continue to motivate the search for new transportation solutions. Much of the focus is on light-duty vehicles, as they account for approximately 60% of transportation energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Battery-powered, electric-drive vehicles (EVs), such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs), are among the most promising of the advanced vehicle and fuel...

  9. PIXASTIC: STEGANOGRAPHY BASED ANTI-PHISHING BROWSER PLUG-IN

    OpenAIRE

    P.Thiyagarajan; G.Aghila; V. Prasanna Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    In spite of existence of many standard security mechanisms for ensuring secure e- Commerce business, users still fall prey for onlin e attacks. One such simple but powerful attack is ‘Phishing’. Phishing is the most alarming threat in the e-Commerce world and effective anti-phishing technique is the need of the hour. This paper focuses on a novel anti-phishing browser plug-in which uses information hiding technique - Steganography. A Robust Message based Im...

  10. Pixastic: Steganography based Anti-Phihsing Browser Plug-in

    OpenAIRE

    P.Thiyagarajan; G.Aghila; Venkatesan, V. Prasanna

    2012-01-01

    In spite of existence of many standard security mechanisms for ensuring secure e-Commerce business, users still fall prey for online attacks. One such simple but powerful attack is 'Phishing'. Phishing is the most alarming threat in the e-Commerce world and effective anti-phishing technique is the need of the hour. This paper focuses on a novel anti-phishing browser plug-in which uses information hiding technique - Steganography. A Robust Message based Image Steganography (RMIS) algorithm has...

  11. N-acetyl-cysteine and prostaglandin. Comparable protection against experimental ethanol injury in the stomach independent of mucus thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henagan, J M; Smith, G S; Schmidt, K L; Miller, T A

    1986-12-01

    The role of barrier mucus in mediating the protective effects of 16,16 dimethyl PGE2 (dm PGE2) against ethanol-induced gastric injury, with and without concomitant treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a potent mucolytic agent, was evaluated. Fasted rats were orally administered either saline, 10 micrograms/kg dm PGE2, 20% NAC, or 10 micrograms/kg dm PGE2 plus 20% NAC. In the first study, the rats were killed 15 minutes later and their stomachs were removed and assayed for barrier mucus adherent to the gastric wall using the Alcian blue technique. In the second study, the rats were orally given 2 mL of absolute ethanol (EtOH) after receiving one of these pretreatment regimens, and 5 minutes later they were killed and their stomachs were evaluated histologically by light microscopy for the magnitude of EtOH injury. Although NAC significantly reduced the thickness of barrier mucus by 76% when compared with control animals, it did not adversely affect the ability of dm PGE2 to spare the deep epithelium from injury by EtOH. In fact, NAC was as effective a protective agent as dm PGE2. Neither agent prevented damage to the surface epithelium by EtOH, verifying previous studies regarding the protective effects of prostaglandins. These results indicate that both dm PGE2 and NAC prevent EtOH-induced damage to the deeper layers of the gastric mucosa independent of mucus gel layer thickness, suggesting that other mechanisms than mucus are involved in mediating this protection.

  12. Members of native coral microbiota inhibit glycosidases and thwart colonization of coral mucus by an opportunistic pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krediet, Cory J; Ritchie, Kim B; Alagely, Ali; Teplitski, Max

    2013-05-01

    The outcome of the interactions between native commensal microorganisms and opportunistic pathogens is crucial to the health of the coral holobiont. During the establishment within the coral surface mucus layer, opportunistic pathogens, including a white pox pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100, compete with native bacteria for available nutrients. Both commensals and pathogens employ glycosidases and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase to utilize components of coral mucus. This study tested the hypothesis that specific glycosidases were critical for the growth of S. marcescens on mucus and that their inhibition by native coral microbiota reduces fitness of the pathogen. Consistent with this hypothesis, a S. marcescens transposon mutant with reduced glycosidase and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activities was unable to compete with the wild type on the mucus of the host coral Acropora palmata, although it was at least as competitive as the wild type on a minimal medium with glycerol and casamino acids. Virulence of the mutant was modestly reduced in the Aiptasia model. A survey revealed that ∼8% of culturable coral commensal bacteria have the ability to inhibit glycosidases in the pathogen. A small molecular weight, ethanol-soluble substance(s) produced by the coral commensal Exiguobacterium sp. was capable of the inhibition of the induction of catabolic enzymes in S. marcescens. This inhibition was in part responsible for the 10-100-fold reduction in the ability of the pathogen to grow on coral mucus. These results provide insight into potential mechanisms of commensal interference with early colonization and infection behaviors in opportunistic pathogens and highlight an important function for the native microbiota in coral health. PMID:23254513

  13. Novel mucus-penetrating liposomes as a potential oral drug delivery system: preparation, in vitro characterization, and enhanced cellular uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li X

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Xiuying Li1, Dan Chen1, Chaoyi Le2, Chunliu Zhu1, Yong Gan1, Lars Hovgaard3, Mingshi Yang41Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China; 2University of Toronto Mississauga Campus, Ontario, Canada; 3Oral Formulation Development, Novo Nordisk A/S, Maalov; 4Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkBackground: The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal mucus-penetrating properties and intestinal cellular uptake of two types of liposomes modified by Pluronic F127 (PF127.Methods: The two types of liposomes, ie, PF127-inlaid liposomes and PF127-adsorbed liposomes, were prepared by a thin-film hydration method followed by extrusion, in which coumarin 6 was loaded as a fluorescence marker. A modified Franz diffusion cell mounted with the intestinal mucus of rats was used to study the diffusion characteristics of the two types of PF127 liposomes. Cell uptake studies were conducted in Caco-2 cells and analyzed using confocal laser scanning microcopy as well as flow cytometry.Results: The diffusion efficiency of the two types of PF127-modified liposomes through intestinal rat mucus was 5–7-fold higher than that of unmodified liposomes. Compared with unmodified liposomes, PF127-inlaid liposomes showed significantly higher cellular uptake of courmarin 6. PF127-adsorbed liposomes showed a lower cellular uptake. Moreover, and interestingly, the two types of PF127-modified liposomes showed different cellular uptake mechanisms in Caco-2 cells.Conclusion: PF127-inlaid liposomes with improved intestinal mucus-penetrating ability and enhanced cellular uptake might be a potential carrier candidate for oral drug delivery.Keywords: Pluronic F127, mucus-penetrating, particles, liposomes, oral drug delivery

  14. N-acetyl-cysteine and prostaglandin. Comparable protection against experimental ethanol injury in the stomach independent of mucus thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henagan, J M; Smith, G S; Schmidt, K L; Miller, T A

    1986-12-01

    The role of barrier mucus in mediating the protective effects of 16,16 dimethyl PGE2 (dm PGE2) against ethanol-induced gastric injury, with and without concomitant treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a potent mucolytic agent, was evaluated. Fasted rats were orally administered either saline, 10 micrograms/kg dm PGE2, 20% NAC, or 10 micrograms/kg dm PGE2 plus 20% NAC. In the first study, the rats were killed 15 minutes later and their stomachs were removed and assayed for barrier mucus adherent to the gastric wall using the Alcian blue technique. In the second study, the rats were orally given 2 mL of absolute ethanol (EtOH) after receiving one of these pretreatment regimens, and 5 minutes later they were killed and their stomachs were evaluated histologically by light microscopy for the magnitude of EtOH injury. Although NAC significantly reduced the thickness of barrier mucus by 76% when compared with control animals, it did not adversely affect the ability of dm PGE2 to spare the deep epithelium from injury by EtOH. In fact, NAC was as effective a protective agent as dm PGE2. Neither agent prevented damage to the surface epithelium by EtOH, verifying previous studies regarding the protective effects of prostaglandins. These results indicate that both dm PGE2 and NAC prevent EtOH-induced damage to the deeper layers of the gastric mucosa independent of mucus gel layer thickness, suggesting that other mechanisms than mucus are involved in mediating this protection. PMID:3789839

  15. Nanocomplexes for gene therapy of respiratory diseases: Targeting and overcoming the mucus barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gioia, Sante; Trapani, Adriana; Castellani, Stefano; Carbone, Annalucia; Belgiovine, Giuliana; Craparo, Emanuela Fabiola; Puglisi, Giovanni; Cavallaro, Gennara; Trapani, Giuseppe; Conese, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Gene therapy, i.e. the delivery and expression of therapeutic genes, holds great promise for congenital and acquired respiratory diseases. Non-viral vectors are less toxic and immunogenic than viral vectors, although they are characterized by lower efficiency. However, they have to overcome many barriers, including inflammatory and immune mediators and cells. The respiratory and airway epithelial cells, the main target of these vectors, are coated with a layer of mucus, which hampers the effective reaching of gene therapy vectors carrying either plasmid DNA or small interfering RNA. This barrier is thicker in many lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. This review summarizes the most important advancements in the field of non-viral vectors that have been achieved with the use of nanoparticulate (NP) systems, composed either of polymers or lipids, in the lung gene delivery. In particular, different strategies of targeting of respiratory and airway lung cells will be described. Then, we will focus on the two approaches that attempt to overcome the mucus barrier: coating of the nanoparticulate system with poly(ethylene glycol) and treatment with mucolytics. Our conclusions are: 1) Ligand and physical targeting can direct therapeutic gene expression in specific cell types in the respiratory tract; 2) Mucopenetrating NPs are endowed with promising features to be useful in treating respiratory diseases and should be now advanced in pre-clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the development of such polymer- and lipid-based NPs in the context of in vitro and in vivo disease models, such as lung cancer, as well as in clinical trials. PMID:26192479

  16. Searching the Evolutionary Origin of Epithelial Mucus Protein Components-Mucins and FCGBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Tiange; Klasson, Sofia; Larsson, Erik; Johansson, Malin E V; Hansson, Gunnar C; Samuelsson, Tore

    2016-08-01

    The gel-forming mucins are large glycosylated proteins that are essential components of the mucus layers covering epithelial cells. Using novel methods of identifying mucins based on profile hidden Markov models, we have found a large number of such proteins in Metazoa, aiding in their classification and allowing evolutionary studies. Most vertebrates have 5-6 gel-forming mucin genes and the genomic arrangement of these genes is well conserved throughout vertebrates. An exception is the frog Xenopus tropicalis with an expanded repertoire of at least 26 mucins of this type. Furthermore, we found that the ovomucin protein, originally identified in chicken, is characteristic of reptiles, birds, and amphibians. Muc6 is absent in teleost fish, but we now show that it is present in animals such as ghost sharks, demonstrating an early origin in vertebrate evolution. Public RNA-Seq data were analyzed with respect to mucins in zebrafish, frog, and chicken, thus allowing comparison in regard of tissue and developmental specificity. Analyses of invertebrate proteins reveal that gel-forming-mucin type of proteins is widely distributed also in this group. Their presence in Cnidaria, Porifera, and in Ctenophora (comb jellies) shows that these proteins were present early in metazoan evolution. Finally, we examined the evolution of the FCGBP protein, abundant in mucus and related to gel-forming mucins in terms of structure and localization. We demonstrate that FCGBP, ubiquitous in vertebrates, has a conserved N-terminal domain. Interestingly, this domain is also present as an N-terminal sequence in a number of bacterial proteins.

  17. Protease-activated receptor 2 mediates mucus secretion in the airway submucosal gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jae Lee

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2, a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in airway epithelia and smooth muscle, plays an important role in airway inflammation. In this study, we demonstrated that activation of PAR2 induces mucus secretion from the human airway gland and examined the underlying mechanism using the porcine and murine airway glands. The mucosa with underlying submucosal glands were dissected from the cartilage of tissues, pinned with the mucosal side up at the gas/bath solution interface of a physiological chamber, and covered with oil so that secretions from individual glands could be visualized as spherical bubbles in the oil. Secretion rates were determined by optical monitoring of the bubble diameter. The Ca(2+-sensitive dye Fura2-AM was used to determine intracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](i by means of spectrofluorometry. Stimulation of human tracheal mucosa with PAR2-activating peptide (PAR2-AP elevated intracellular Ca(2+ and induced glandular secretion equal to approximately 30% of the carbachol response in the human airway. Porcine gland tissue was more sensitive to PAR2-AP, and this response was dependent on Ca(2+ and anion secretion. When the mouse trachea were exposed to PAR2-AP, large amounts of secretion were observed in both wild type and ΔF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant mice but there is no secretion from PAR-2 knock out mice. In conclusion, PAR2-AP is an agonist for mucus secretion from the airway gland that is Ca(2+-dependent and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-independent.

  18. Searching the Evolutionary Origin of Epithelial Mucus Protein Components-Mucins and FCGBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Tiange; Klasson, Sofia; Larsson, Erik; Johansson, Malin E V; Hansson, Gunnar C; Samuelsson, Tore

    2016-08-01

    The gel-forming mucins are large glycosylated proteins that are essential components of the mucus layers covering epithelial cells. Using novel methods of identifying mucins based on profile hidden Markov models, we have found a large number of such proteins in Metazoa, aiding in their classification and allowing evolutionary studies. Most vertebrates have 5-6 gel-forming mucin genes and the genomic arrangement of these genes is well conserved throughout vertebrates. An exception is the frog Xenopus tropicalis with an expanded repertoire of at least 26 mucins of this type. Furthermore, we found that the ovomucin protein, originally identified in chicken, is characteristic of reptiles, birds, and amphibians. Muc6 is absent in teleost fish, but we now show that it is present in animals such as ghost sharks, demonstrating an early origin in vertebrate evolution. Public RNA-Seq data were analyzed with respect to mucins in zebrafish, frog, and chicken, thus allowing comparison in regard of tissue and developmental specificity. Analyses of invertebrate proteins reveal that gel-forming-mucin type of proteins is widely distributed also in this group. Their presence in Cnidaria, Porifera, and in Ctenophora (comb jellies) shows that these proteins were present early in metazoan evolution. Finally, we examined the evolution of the FCGBP protein, abundant in mucus and related to gel-forming mucins in terms of structure and localization. We demonstrate that FCGBP, ubiquitous in vertebrates, has a conserved N-terminal domain. Interestingly, this domain is also present as an N-terminal sequence in a number of bacterial proteins. PMID:27189557

  19. Searching the Evolutionary Origin of Epithelial Mucus Protein Components—Mucins and FCGBP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Tiange; Klasson, Sofia; Larsson, Erik; Johansson, Malin E. V.; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Samuelsson, Tore

    2016-01-01

    The gel-forming mucins are large glycosylated proteins that are essential components of the mucus layers covering epithelial cells. Using novel methods of identifying mucins based on profile hidden Markov models, we have found a large number of such proteins in Metazoa, aiding in their classification and allowing evolutionary studies. Most vertebrates have 5–6 gel-forming mucin genes and the genomic arrangement of these genes is well conserved throughout vertebrates. An exception is the frog Xenopus tropicalis with an expanded repertoire of at least 26 mucins of this type. Furthermore, we found that the ovomucin protein, originally identified in chicken, is characteristic of reptiles, birds, and amphibians. Muc6 is absent in teleost fish, but we now show that it is present in animals such as ghost sharks, demonstrating an early origin in vertebrate evolution. Public RNA-Seq data were analyzed with respect to mucins in zebrafish, frog, and chicken, thus allowing comparison in regard of tissue and developmental specificity. Analyses of invertebrate proteins reveal that gel-forming-mucin type of proteins is widely distributed also in this group. Their presence in Cnidaria, Porifera, and in Ctenophora (comb jellies) shows that these proteins were present early in metazoan evolution. Finally, we examined the evolution of the FCGBP protein, abundant in mucus and related to gel-forming mucins in terms of structure and localization. We demonstrate that FCGBP, ubiquitous in vertebrates, has a conserved N-terminal domain. Interestingly, this domain is also present as an N-terminal sequence in a number of bacterial proteins. PMID:27189557

  20. End plug for fuel rod and welding method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An end plug of a fuel rod comprises a pressure-insertion portion having a diameter somewhat greater than the inner diameter of a fuel cladding tube and a welding portion having a diameter substantially the same as the outer diameter of the cladding tube. A V-shaped recess having an outer diameter smaller than the greatest outer diameter of the pressure-insertion portion is formed over the entire circumferential surface of the outer circumference of the connection portion of the pressure-insertion portion and the welding portion. The pressure-insertion portion of the end plug is inserted to the end of the cladding tube till the end of the cladding tube abuts against the inclined surface of the V-shaped recess. The abutting surfaces of the end plug and the cladding tube are subjected to resistance welding in this state. The inner portion bulged from the inclined surface of the V-shaped recess is filled in the recess in a molten state. Lowering of temperature of the cladding tube in the vicinity of the welded portion is decreased by γ heat during reactor operation. Accordingly, lowering of ductility of the cladding tube and degradation of material of the welded region due to segregation of hydrogen in the cladding tube can be suppressed. (I.N.)