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Sample records for cervical flexion relaxation

  1. Load and speed effects on the cervical flexion relaxation phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descarreaux Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP represents a well-studied neuromuscular response that occurs in the lumbar and cervical spine. However, the cervical spine FRP has not been investigated extensively, and the speed of movement and loading effects remains to be characterized. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the influence of load and speed on cervical FRP electromyographic (EMG and kinematic parameters and to assess the measurement of cervical FRP kinematic and EMG parameter repeatability. Methods Eighteen healthy adults (6 women and 12 men, aged 20 to 39 years, participated in this study. They undertook 2 sessions in which they had to perform a standardized cervical flexion/extension movement in 3 phases: complete cervical flexion; the static period in complete cervical flexion; and extension with return to the initial position. Two different rhythm conditions and 3 different loading conditions were applied to assess load and speed effects. Kinematic and EMG data were collected, and dependent variables included angles corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence as well as the root mean square (RMS values of EMG signals. Repeatability was examined in the first session and between the 2 sessions. Results Statistical analyses revealed a significant load effect (P Conclusions The load increase evoked augmented FRP onset and cessation angles as well as heightened muscle activation. Such increments may reflect the need to enhance spinal stability under loading conditions. The kinematic and EMG parameters showed promising repeatability. Further studies are needed to assess kinematic and EMG differences between healthy subjects and patients with neck pain.

  2. Effects of Cervical Flexion on the Flexion-relaxation Ratio during Smartphone Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, HyeonHui; Kim, KyeongMi

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to measure the cervical flexion-relaxation ratio (FRR) and intensity of neck pain and identify the differences according to postures adopted while using smartphones. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy adults with no neck pain, spinal trauma, or history cervical surgery participated in this study. [Methods] The activity of the cervical erector spinae muscle was recorded while performing a standardized cervical flexion-extension movement in three phases (flexion, sustained full flexion, extension). And neck pain intensity was recorded using a visual analog scale (VAS) with values between 0 and 10. Postures held while using a smartphone are distinguished between desk postures and lap postures. The FRR was calculated by dividing the maximal muscle activation during the extension phase by average activation during the complete flexion phase. [Results] No significant differences were found in the FRR between desk posture, lap posture, and baseline, though the intensity of the neck pain increased in the lap posture. [Conclusion] The FRR could be a significant criterion of neuromuscular impairment in chronic neck pain or lumbar pain patients, but it is impossible to distinguish neck pain that is caused by performing task for a short time. Prolonged lap posture might cause neck pain, so the use of smartphones for a long time in this posture should be avoided.

  3. Relationship between active cervical range of motion and flexion-relaxation ratio in asymptomatic computer workers.

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    Yoo, Won-Gyu; Park, Se-Yeon; Lee, Mi-Ra

    2011-01-01

    A high prevalence and incidence of neck and shoulder pain is present in the working population, especially sedentary workers. Recent findings have indicated that the flexion-relaxation (FR) ratio in the cervical erector spinae (CES) muscles might be a significant criteria of neuromuscular impairment and function. Additionally, the active cervical range of motion (ROM) is frequently used for discriminating between individuals with pain and those who are asymptomatic. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the active cervical ROM and the FR ratio in a sample of regular visual display terminal (VDT) workers. In total, 20 asymptomatic male VDT workers were recruited. Active cervical ROM was measured by a cervical ROM (CROM) instrument. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to collect myoelectrical signals from the CES muscles, and the FR ratio was calculated for statistical analysis. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quantify the linear relationship between the active cervical ROM and the FR ratio. The values obtained for the FR ratio in the right CES muscles correlated significantly with the active cervical ROM measured in flexion (r=0.73, pcervical FR ratio had a positive correlation with cervical movements, and that changes of the activation patterns in CES demonstrated as cervical FR ratio are associated with reduction of the cervical range of motion including flexion and lateral flexion. In addition, muscular dysfunction of the CES could occur in regular computer workers prior to occurrence of pain; this means that the FR ratio could be used to evaluate the potential risk of neck discomfort in computer workers.

  4. Cervical flexion-relaxation response to neck muscle fatigue in males and females.

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    Nimbarte, Ashish D; Zreiqat, Majed M; Chowdhury, Suman Kanti

    2014-12-01

    In this study the effect of muscle fatigue on the cervical spine flexion-relaxation response was studied. Twenty healthy participants (10 males and 10 females) were recruited for data collection. The Sorenson protocol was utilized to induce neck muscle fatigue. Surface electromyography and optical motion capture systems were used to measure neck muscle activation and head-neck posture, respectively. A post-fatigue reduction in the Flexion-Relaxation Ratio (FRR) and higher FRR for females compared to males were observed. A post-fatigue decrease was also observed in the onset and offset angles resulting in an expansion of the myoelectric silence period. Gender had no effect on the onset and offset angles of the silence period. Post-fatigue shift in the onset and offset angles and the expansion of the silence period indicate an increased contribution by the passive viscoelastic tissues in stabilizing the cervical spine under fatigued condition.

  5. Comparison of Upper Cervical Flexion and Cervical Flexion Angle of Computer Workers with Upper Trapezius and Levator Scapular Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we compared upper cervical flexion and cervical flexion angle of computer workers with upper trapezius and levator scapular pain. [Subject] Eight male computer workers with upper trapezius muscle pain and eight others with levator scapular muscle pain participated. [Methods] Each subject was assessed in terms of upper cervical flexion angle and total cervical flexion angles using a cervical range of motion instrument after one hour of computer work. [Results] The uppe...

  6. Comparison of the Symmetry of Right and Left Lateral Cervical Flexion and Rotation and the Cervical FRR in Young Computer Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the symmetry of right and left lateral cervical flexion and rotation, and the cervical flexion-relaxation ratio (FRR) in young computer workers in Korea. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty computer workers (14 males and 6 females) participated in this study. We measured their right and left lateral cervical flexion, rotation, and FRR. [Results] Right and left lateral flexion and right and left rotation showed no significant differences between the sides. The left cerv...

  7. Flexion/extension cervical spine views in blunt cervical

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    Nasir Sadaf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To examine the contribution of flexion and extension radiographs in the evaluation of ligamentous injury in awake adults with acute blunt cervical spine trauma, who show loss of cervical lordosis and neck pain. Methods: All patients who presented to our emer-gency department following blunt trauma were enrolled in this study, except those with schiwora, neurological defi-cits or fracture demonstrated on cross-table cervical spine X-rays, and those who were either obtunded or presented after cervical spine surgery. Adequacy of flexion and exten-sion views was checked by the neurosurgery and radiology team members. All these patients underwent cross-table cervical spine view followed by flexion/extension views based on the loss of lordosis on cross-table imaging and the presence of neck pain. Results: A total of 200 cases were reviewed, of whom 90 (45% underwent repeat X-rays because of either inadequate exposure or limited motion. None of the patients with loss of lordosis on cross-table view had positive flexion and extension views of cervical spine for instability. Conclusions: Our results show that in patients who underwent acute radiographic evaluation of blunt cervical spine trauma, flexion and extension views of the cervical spine are unlikely to yield positive results in the presence of axial neck pain and/or loss of cervical lordosis. We can also hypothesize that performing flexion and extension views will be more useful once the acute neck pain has settled. Key words: X-rays; Cervical vertebrae; Lordosis

  8. Flexion/extension cervical spine views in blunt cervical trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sadaf Nasir; Manzar Hussain; Roomi Mahmud

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the contribution of flexion and extension radiographs in the evaluation of ligamentous injury in awake adults with acute blunt cervical spine trauma,who show loss of cervical lordosis and neck pain.Methods: All patients who presented to our emergency department following blunt trauma were enrolled in this study,except those with schiwora,neurological deficits or fracture demonstrated on cross-table cervical spine X-rays,and those who were either obtunded or presented after cervical spine surgery.Adequacy of flexion and extension views was checked by the neurosurgery and radiology team members.All these patients underwent cross-table cervical spine view followed by flexion/extension views based on the loss of lordosis on cross-table imaging and the presence of neck pain.Results: A total of 200 cases were reviewed,of whom 90 (45%) underwent repeat X-rays because of either inadequate exposure or limited motion.None of the patients with loss of lordosis on cross-table view had positive flexion and extension views of cervical spine for instability.Conclusions: Our results show that in patients who underwent acute radiographic evaluation of blunt cervical spine trauma,flexion and extension views of the cervical spine are unlikely to yield positive results in the presence of axial neck pain and/or loss of cervical lordosis.We can also hypothesize that performing flexion and extension views will be more useful once the acute neck pain has settled.

  9. Flexion/extension cervical spine views in blunt cervical

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir Sadaf; Hussain Manzar; Mahmud Roomi

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】Objective: To examine the contribution of flexion and extension radiographs in the evaluation of ligamentous injury in awake adults with acute blunt cervical spine trauma, who show loss of cervical lordosis and neck pain. Methods: All patients who presented to our emer-gency department following blunt trauma were enrolled in this study, except those with schiwora, neurological defi-cits or fracture demonstrated on cross-table cervical spine X-rays, and tho...

  10. Comparison of the Symmetry of Right and Left Lateral Cervical Flexion and Rotation and the Cervical FRR in Young Computer Workers.

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    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the symmetry of right and left lateral cervical flexion and rotation, and the cervical flexion-relaxation ratio (FRR) in young computer workers in Korea. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty computer workers (14 males and 6 females) participated in this study. We measured their right and left lateral cervical flexion, rotation, and FRR. [Results] Right and left lateral flexion and right and left rotation showed no significant differences between the sides. The left cervical FRR was significantly lower than the right cervical FRR. [Conclusion] The cervical FRR, expressed as a numerical value, is a more sensitive marker for measuring neuromuscular changes associated with mild asymmetry than CROM.

  11. Comparison of upper cervical flexion and cervical flexion angle of computer workers with upper trapezius and levator scapular pain.

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    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we compared upper cervical flexion and cervical flexion angle of computer workers with upper trapezius and levator scapular pain. [Subject] Eight male computer workers with upper trapezius muscle pain and eight others with levator scapular muscle pain participated. [Methods] Each subject was assessed in terms of upper cervical flexion angle and total cervical flexion angles using a cervical range of motion instrument after one hour of computer work. [Results] The upper cervical flexion angle of the group with levator scapular pain was significantly lower than that of the group with upper trapezius pain after computer work. The total cervical flexion angle of the group with upper trapezius pain was significantly lower than that of the group with levator scapular pain after computer work. [Conclusion] For selective and effective intervention for neck pain, therapists should evaluate upper and lower cervical motion individually.

  12. Scapular Winging as a Symptom of Cervical Flexion Myelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Tashiro, Jun; Tsuji, Sachiko; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2007-01-01

    A 23-year-old man complained of weakness of the right arm that he first noted six years prior to his visit. Neurological examination revealed atrophy and weakness of the triceps and serratus anterior muscle on the right side, which resulted in scapular winging on that side. MRI with neck flexion revealed compression of the cervical cord enabling a diagnosis of flexion myelopathy. Proximal muscle weakness and atrophy in flexion myelopathies including Hirayama disease are extremely rare. Here, ...

  13. Effects of the sustained computer work on upper cervical flexion motion.

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    Park, Se-Yeon; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sustained computer work on cervical flexion, especially the upper cervical region. [Subjects] We recruited 11 sedentary workers who used a computer for at least 4 hours a day. [Methods] Total range of cervical flexion, upper cervical flexion, and their ratio were measured before and after 1 hour of computer work. [Results] The total range of cervical flexion was not significantly different between pre-and post-measurement. However, upper cervical flexion, and the ratio between the upper cervical flexion and total cervical flexion significantly decreased after 1 hour of computer work, compared to pre-measurement. [Conclusion] Sustained computer work affects the range of cervical flexion, especially in the upper cervical region.

  14. Effects of the Sustained Computer Work on Upper Cervical Flexion Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Se-Yeon; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sustained computer work on cervical flexion, especially the upper cervical region. [Subjects] We recruited 11 sedentary workers who used a computer for at least 4 hours a day. [Methods] Total range of cervical flexion, upper cervical flexion, and their ratio were measured before and after 1 hour of computer work. [Results] The total range of cervical flexion was not significantly different between pre-and post-measurement. Howe...

  15. Flexion-relaxation ratio in computer workers with and without chronic neck pain.

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    Pinheiro, Carina Ferreira; dos Santos, Marina Foresti; Chaves, Thais Cristina

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) and flexion-relaxation ratios (FR-ratios) using surface electromyography (sEMG) of the cervical extensor muscles of computer workers with and without chronic neck pain, as well as of healthy subjects who were not computer users. This study comprised 60 subjects 20-45years of age, of which 20 were computer workers with chronic neck pain (CPG), 20 were computer workers without neck pain (NPG), and 20 were control individuals who do not use computers for work and use them less than 4h/day for other purposes (CG). FRP and FR-ratios were analyzed using sEMG of the cervical extensors. Analysis of FR-ratios showed smaller values in the semispinalis capitis muscles of the two groups of workers compared to the control group. The reference FR-ratio (flexion relaxation ratio [FRR], defined as the maximum activity in 1s of the re-extension/full flexion sEMG activity) was significantly higher in the computer workers with neck pain compared to the CG (CPG: 3.10, 95% confidence interval [CI95%] 2.50-3.70; NPG: 2.33, CI95% 1.93-2.74; CG: 1.99, CI95% 1.81-2.17; p<0.001). The FR-ratios and FRR of sEMG in this study suggested that computer use could increase recruitment of the semispinalis capitis during neck extension (concentric and eccentric phases), which could explain our results. These results also suggest that the FR-ratios of the semispinalis may be a potential functional predictive neuromuscular marker of asymptomatic neck musculoskeletal disorders since even asymptomatic computer workers showed altered values. On the other hand, the FRR values of the semispinalis capitis demonstrated a good discriminative ability to detect neck pain, and such results suggested that each FR-ratio could have a different application.

  16. Immediate effects of active cranio-cervical flexion exercise versus passive mobilisation of the upper cervical spine on pain and performance on the cranio-cervical flexion test.

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    Lluch, Enrique; Schomacher, Jochen; Gizzi, Leonardo; Petzke, Frank; Seegar, Dagmar; Falla, Deborah

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the immediate effects of an assisted plus active cranio-cervical flexion exercise (exercise group) versus a passive mobilisation plus assisted cranio-cervical flexion (mobilisation group) on performance of the cranio-cervical flexion test (CCFT), cervical range of motion (ROM) and pain in patients with chronic neck pain. Eighteen volunteers with chronic idiopathic neck pain participated in the study and were randomised to one of the two intervention groups. Current level of pain, cervical ROM and pain perceived during movement, pressure pain threshold (PPT) and surface electromyography (EMG) during performance of the CCFT were measured before and immediately after the intervention. A significant reduction in resting pain and PPT measured over cervical sites was observed immediately following both interventions, although a greater change was observed for the exercise group. No change in cervical ROM was observed after either intervention. Reduced sternocleidomastoid and anterior scalene EMG amplitude were observed during stages of the CCFT but only for the participants in the active exercise group. Although both active and passive interventions offered pain relief, only the exercise group improved on a task of motor function highlighting the importance of specific active treatment for improved motor control of the cervical spine.

  17. How does the neck flexion affect the cervical MRI features of Hirayama disease?

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    Hou, Chao; Han, Hongbin; Yang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xiaojuan; Gao, Hui; Fan, Dongsheng; Fu, Yu; Sun, Yu; Liu, Bo

    2012-10-01

    Although flexion cervical MRI has been recommended for the diagnosis of Hirayama disease (HD), no study focused on the MR features at different neck flexion angles. Moreover, no uniform flexion angle has been confirmed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively investigate the MRI typical signs of HD patients in different neck flexion degree and gives a suggestion to the MR scanning. Cervical MRI in neutral and different flexion positions (cervical flexion angle 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, and 40°) were performed in 45 HD patients. Three MRI features including anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the cervical dural canal (ASD), widening of cervical epidural space, and epidural flow voids (EFV) at each flexed position were summarized. To evaluate ASD quantitatively, the widest cervical epidural space with the maximum sagittal diameters (d) and cervical canal sagittal diameter (D) at the same level were measured. The d/D values at different angles were calculated and compared. ASD was demonstrated in 34 out of 45 cases (75.6%) at 20° and in all cases (100%) at other 4 angles (χ (2) = 25.728, P flexion angles have effects on ASD, widening of cervical epidural space and EFV. 25° is recommended as the least effective diagnostic flexion angle for MRI diagnosis of HD, and 35° may be the best one.

  18. Kinematic analysis of the lower cervical spine in the protracted and retracted neck flexion positions

    OpenAIRE

    Park, So Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze lower cervical spine kinematics in protracted and retracted neck flexion positions in healthy people. [Subjects and Methods] The craniovertebral angle (CVA) and intervertebral body angles of the lower cervical spine of 10 healthy individuals were analyzed using fluoroscopy in a neutral sitting with the head in the neutral (N), protracted (Pro), and retracted (Ret) positions and with the neck in full flexion with the head in the neutral (N-fx), pr...

  19. Image Segmentation and Analysis of Flexion-Extension Radiographs of Cervical Spines

    OpenAIRE

    Eniko T. Enikov; Rein Anton

    2014-01-01

    We present a new analysis tool for cervical flexion-extension radiographs based on machine vision and computerized image processing. The method is based on semiautomatic image segmentation leading to detection of common landmarks such as the spinolaminar (SL) line or contour lines of the implanted anterior cervical plates. The technique allows for visualization of the local curvature of these landmarks during flexion-extension experiments. In addition to changes in the curvature of the SL lin...

  20. Image Segmentation and Analysis of Flexion-Extension Radiographs of Cervical Spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eniko T. Enikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new analysis tool for cervical flexion-extension radiographs based on machine vision and computerized image processing. The method is based on semiautomatic image segmentation leading to detection of common landmarks such as the spinolaminar (SL line or contour lines of the implanted anterior cervical plates. The technique allows for visualization of the local curvature of these landmarks during flexion-extension experiments. In addition to changes in the curvature of the SL line, it has been found that the cervical plates also deform during flexion-extension examination. While extension radiographs reveal larger curvature changes in the SL line, flexion radiographs on the other hand tend to generate larger curvature changes in the implanted cervical plates. Furthermore, while some lordosis is always present in the cervical plates by design, it actually decreases during extension and increases during flexion. Possible causes of this unexpected finding are also discussed. The described analysis may lead to a more precise interpretation of flexion-extension radiographs, allowing diagnosis of spinal instability and/or pseudoarthrosis in already seemingly fused spines.

  1. Changes in the flexion-relaxation response induced by hip extensor and erector spinae muscle fatigue

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    Cantin Vincent

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP is defined by reduced lumbar erector spinae (ES muscle myoelectric activity during full trunk flexion. The objectives of this study were to quantify the effect of hip and back extensor muscle fatigue on FRP parameters and lumbopelvic kinematics. Methods Twenty-seven healthy adults performed flexion-extension tasks under 4 different experimental conditions: no fatigue/no load, no fatigue/load, fatigue/no load, and fatigue/load. Total flexion angle corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence, hip flexion angle, lumbar flexion angle and maximal trunk flexion angle were compared across different experimental conditions by 2 × 2 (Load × Fatigue repeated-measures ANOVA. Results The angle corresponding to the ES onset of myoelectric silence was reduced after the fatigue task, and loading the spine decreased the lumbar contribution to motion compared to the hip during both flexion and extension. A relative increment of lumbar spine motion compared to pelvic motion was also observed in fatigue conditions. Conclusions Previous results suggested that ES muscles, in a state of fatigue, are unable to provide sufficient segmental stabilization. The present findings indicate that, changes in lumbar-stabilizing mechanisms in the presence of muscle fatigue seem to be caused by modulation of lumbopelvic kinematics.

  2. The Occupancy of the Components in the Cervical Spine and Their Changes with Extension and Flexion.

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    Sayıt, Emrah; Aghdasi, Bayan; Daubs, Michael D; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objectives The kinematics of the cervical spine has been investigated by many researchers. However, the occupancy of the disk bulges, spinal cord, ligamentum flavum, and the rest of the canal as well as the changes of these structures with motion have not yet been investigated. The goal of this study is to investigate these dynamic changes. Methods The kinetic magnetic resonance images of 248 patients (124 men and 124 women) were evaluated, and the occupancy of each structure for each cervical level at neutral, flexion, and extension were calculated. Results Whole canal anteroposterior (AP) diameters showed significant differences between neutral-extension and flexion-extension at the C4-C5 and C5-C6 levels (p flexion and flexion-extension at the C4-C5, C5-C6, C6-C7, and C7-T1 levels (p flexion-extension and neutral-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p flexion at the C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p flexion-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p flexion at the C5-C6 and C6-C7 levels (p flexion at the C2-C3 and C3-C4 levels (p flexion-extension at the C3-C4 and C4-C5 levels (p flexion-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p flexion at the C5-C6 and C6-C7 levels (p cervical spine for each level was revealed by this study. In addition, the dynamic changes in the cervical spine with flexion and extension were seen to have different characteristics for each level.

  3. Flexion and extension structural properties and strengths for male cervical spine segments.

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    Nightingale, Roger W; Carol Chancey, V; Ottaviano, Danielle; Luck, Jason F; Tran, Laura; Prange, Michael; Myers, Barry S

    2007-01-01

    New vehicle safety standards are designed to limit the amount of neck tension and extension seen by out-of-position motor vehicle occupants during airbag deployments. The criteria used to assess airbag injury risk are currently based on volunteer data and animal studies due to a lack of bending tolerance data for the adult cervical spine. This study provides quantitative data on the flexion-extension bending properties and strength on the male cervical spine, and tests the hypothesis that the male is stronger than the female in pure bending. An additional objective is to determine if there are significant differences in stiffness and strength between the male upper and lower cervical spine. Pure-moment flexibility and failure testing was conducted on 41 male spinal segments (O-C2, C4-C5, C6-C7) in a pure-moment test frame and the results were compared with a previous study of females. Failures were conducted at approximately 90 N-m/s. In extension, the male upper cervical spine (O-C2) fails at a moment of 49.5 (s.d. 17.6)N-m and at an angle of 42.4 degrees (s.d. 8.0 degrees). In flexion, the mean moment at failure is 39.0 (s.d. 6.3 degrees) N-m and an angle of 58.7 degrees (s.d. 5.1 degrees). The difference in strength between flexion and extension is not statistically significant. The difference in the angles is statistically significant. The upper cervical spine was significantly stronger than the lower cervical spine in both flexion and extension. The male upper cervical spine was significantly stiffer than the female and significantly stronger than the female in flexion. Odontoid fractures were the most common injury produced in extension, suggesting a tensile mechanism due to tensile loads in the odontoid ligamentous complex.

  4. Cervical spine segmental vertebral motion in healthy volunteers feigning restriction of neck flexion and extension.

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    Puglisi, Filadelfio; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Papathanasiou, Matthildi; Kapreli, Eleni; Bonelli, Aurelio; Sgambetterra, Sergio; Ferrari, Robert

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain comparative data concerning the percentage contribution of segmental cervical vertebral motion to the cervical range of motion (ROM) in healthy volunteers under two conditions: (1) normal, voluntary neck flexion and extension and (2) feigned restriction of neck flexion and extension. Each healthy subject's angular motion over forward cervical flexion and extension was measured first by X-ray analysis during normal, voluntary motion. Then the subjects were asked to pretend that they had a 50% restricted neck range due to pain or stiffness and thus to move in both flexion and extension only as far as about 50% of their normal range. A total of 26 healthy subjects (ten males and sixteen females, age 28.7+/-7.7 years) participated. The total angular motion from C2 to C7 was normal in the unrestricted condition and was significantly reduced in the feigned restriction condition (prange. A greater percentage contribution was made by C2-C3 and C3-C4 than under normal conditions (Prange (pcervical segments and less contribution to the angular rotation by the lowest cervical segment. Feigners of restricted neck range thus produce a pattern different from nonfeigning subjects.

  5. Performance in the cranio-cervical flexion test is altered in elderly subjects.

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    Uthaikhup, Sureeporn; Jull, Gwendolen

    2009-10-01

    The cranio-cervical flexion test (CCFT) tests the coordination of the deep and superficial cervical flexor muscles during a cranio-cervical flexion task. The test has revealed impairments in muscle function in younger/middle aged patients with various neck pain disorders. Neck pain and headache are common in elders but it is unknown if age alone affects performance in the CCFT. This study compared performance in the CCFT between healthy asymptomatic elderly and younger subjects. Electromyographic (EMG) amplitude in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), angle of cranio-cervical flexion and ability to target the pressure levels of each test stage were examined in 44 elderly and 39 young participants. The results indicated that the elderly group had higher measures of normalized EMG signal amplitude in the SCM during the test (pcervical flexion range of motion for the five successive stages of the test (particularly at 26, 28 and 30 mm Hg stages) compared to young subjects. Clinicians must be aware of this occurrence when assessing performance in the CCFT in elders with neck pain.

  6. Changes in the flexion relaxation response induced by lumbar muscle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantin Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP is an interesting model to study the modulation of lumbar stability. Previous investigations have explored the effect of load, angular velocity and posture on this particular response. However, the influence of muscular fatigue on FRP parameters has not been thoroughly examined. The objective of the study is to identify the effect of erector spinae (ES muscle fatigue and spine loading on myoelectric silence onset and cessation in healthy individuals during a flexion-extension task. Methods Twenty healthy subjects participated in this study and performed blocks of 3 complete trunk flexions under 4 different experimental conditions: no fatigue/no load (1, no fatigue/load (2, fatigue/no load(3, and fatigue/load (4. Fatigue was induced according to the Sorenson protocol, and electromyographic (EMG power spectral analysis confirmed that muscular fatigue was adequate in each subject. Trunk and pelvis angles and surface EMG of the ES L2 and L5 were recorded during a flexion-extension task. Trunk flexion angle corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence was then compared across the different experimental conditions using 2 × 2 repeated-measures ANOVA. Results Onset of myoelectric silence during the flexion motion appeared earlier after the fatigue task. Additionally, the cessation of myoelectric silence was observed later during the extension after the fatigue task. Statistical analysis also yielded a main effect of load, indicating a persistence of ES myoelectric activity in flexion during the load condition. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the presence of fatigue of the ES muscles modifies the FRP. Superficial back muscle fatigue seems to induce a shift in load-sharing towards passive stabilizing structures. The loss of muscle contribution together with or without laxity in the viscoelastic tissues may have a substantial impact on post fatigue stability.

  7. Detection method of flexion relaxation phenomenon based on wavelets for patients with low back pain

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    Nougarou, François; Massicotte, Daniel; Descarreaux, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) can be defined as a reduction or silence of myoelectric activity of the lumbar erector spinae muscle during full trunk flexion. It is typically absent in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Before any broad clinical utilization of this neuromuscular response can be made, effective, standardized, and accurate methods of identifying FRP limits are needed. However, this phenomenon is clearly more difficult to detect for LBP patients than for healthy patients. The main goal of this study is to develop an automated method based on wavelet transformation that would improve time point limits detection of surface electromyography signals of the FRP in case of LBP patients. Conventional visual identification and proposed automated methods of time point limits detection of relaxation phase were compared on experimental data using criteria of accuracy and repeatability based on physiological properties. The evaluation demonstrates that the use of wavelet transform (WT) yields better results than methods without wavelet decomposition. Furthermore, methods based on wavelet per packet transform are more effective than algorithms employing discrete WT. Compared to visual detection, in addition to demonstrating an obvious saving of time, the use of wavelet per packet transform improves the accuracy and repeatability in the detection of the FRP limits. These results clearly highlight the value of the proposed technique in identifying onset and offset of the flexion relaxation response in LBP subjects.

  8. Effect of the cervical flexion angle during smart phone use on muscle fatigue of the cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius.

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    Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee; Park, Jungseo

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the cervical flexion angle when using a smart phone on muscle fatigue of the cervical erector spinae (CES) and upper trapezius (UT). [Subjects] This study recruited 12 healthy adults. [Methods] Each subject sat on a chair, with his/her back against the wall and held a smart phone with both hands. Fatigue of the neck and shoulder muscles at different cervical flexion angles (0°, 30°, and 50°) was measured by electromyography. The following muscles were assessed: the right upper trapezius (RtUT), left upper trapezius (LtUT), right cervical erector spinae (RtCES), and left cervical erector spinae (LtCES). A cervical range of motion instrument was attached to the subjects' heads to measure the cervical angle during the experiment. [Results] The RtUT and LtUT showed the highest muscle fatigue at a cervical flexion angle of 50° and the lowest fatigue at an angle of 30°. There was no significant difference in the muscle fatigue of the RtCES and LtCES at any of the cervical flexion angles. [Conclusion] UT muscle fatigue depends on the cervical flexion angle when using a smart phone.

  9. Improved MR imaging of the cervical spine, 2; Study of disk protrusion in the cervical spine in flexion-versus-extension views

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanno, Munehiko; Kyomasu, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Masafumi (Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)) (and others)

    1990-12-01

    Comparative study of incidence of disk protrusion was performed on the basis of MR imaging in a state of flexion versus extension. The results showed that the incidnece of disk protrusion at each disk level was generally higher on the extension images than on the flexion images at the corresponding levels. The degree of difference in the incidence of the disk protrusion on flexion and extension was the greatest at the mid-cervical level spine. Based on the results with respect to features of the cervical spine in extension and flexion, it appears that the difference in incidence of disk protrusion is probably caused by movement in response to bending of the cervical spine. These results may provide information concerning the dynamic of cervical disks and may partly explain cases in which patients have symptoms of cervical myelopathy and/or radiculopathy but have no disk protrusion on images in the neutral position. (author).

  10. Are magnetic resonance flexion views useful in evaluating the cervical spine of patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reijnierse, M.; Kroon, H.M.; Bloem, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Breedveld, F.C. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Hansen, B. [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Pope, T.L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem (United States)

    2000-02-01

    Objective. To determine whether MR imaging in flexion adds value relative to imaging in the neutral position with respect to displaying involvement of the subarachnoid space, brainstem and spinal cord. Design and patients. T1-weighted MR images of the cervical spine in 42 rheumatoid arthritis patients with cervical spine involvement were obtained and analyzed prospectively. We assessed changes between images obtained in the neutral position and following active flexion, especially horizontal atlantoaxial and subaxial motion, presence or absence of brainstem compression, subarachnoid space involvement at the atlantoaxial and subaxial level and the cervicomedullary angle. Vertical atlantoaxial subluxation and the amount of pannus were correlated with motion and change in subarachnoid space. Results. The flexion images showed horizontal atlantoaxial motion in 21 patients and subaxial motion in one patient. The flexion view displayed brainstem compression in only one patient. Involvement of the subarachnoid space increased at the atlantoaxial level in eight (19%) patients (P=0.004) and at the level below C2 in five (12%) patients (P=0.03). There were no patients with a normal subarachnoid space in neutral position and compression in the flexed position. The cervicomedullary angle changed significantly with flexion. Vertical atlantoaxial subluxation and the amount of pannus did not show a significant correlation with motion or subarachnoid space involvement. Conclusion. MR imaging in the flexed position shows a statistically significant narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the atlantoaxial level and below C2. Cord compression is only observed on flexion views if the subarachnoid space in neutral position is already decreased. MR imaging in the flexed position might be useful, since subarachnoid space involvement may be an indicator for the development of neurologic dysfunction. (orig.)

  11. Cervical flexion myelopathy in a patient showing apparent long tract signs: a severe form of Hirayama disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kenji; Ono, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Hideki; Yamada, Masahito

    2011-05-01

    We describe an 18-year-old male with cervical flexion myelopathy with Hirayama disease-like features who showed apparent long tract signs. He first experienced insidious-onset hand muscle weakness and atrophy at the age of 15. Subsequently, he developed sensory disturbance in his lower limb. Neurological examination revealed atrophy and weakness in the right hand and forearm, pyramidal signs in the right lower extremity, and disturbance of superficial sensation in the lower left half of the body. Cervical magnetic resonance images and computed tomographic myelography revealed anterior displacement with compression of the cervical cord in flexion that was more apparent in the right side. The right side of the cervical cord showed severe atrophy. The mechanisms of myelopathy in our patient appeared to be same as that of "tight dural canal in flexion," which has been reported to be the mechanism of juvenile muscular atrophy of the unilateral upper extremity (Hirayama disease). Patients with Hirayama disease generally show minimal sensory signs and no pyramidal signs. An autopsy case of Hirayama disease revealed confined necrosis of the cervical anterior horn without obvious changes in the white matter. Our patient's disease progression suggests that cervical flexion myelopathy patients with severe cervical cord compression in flexion may develop extensive cervical cord injury beyond the anterior horn.

  12. Extension and flexion in the upper cervical spine in neck pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Markus J; Crawford, Rebecca J; Schelldorfer, Sarah; Rausch-Osthoff, Anne-Kathrin; Barbero, Marco; Kool, Jan; Bauer, Christoph M

    2015-08-01

    Neck pain is a common problem in the general population with high risk of ongoing complaints or relapses. Range of motion (ROM) assessment is scientifically established in the clinical process of diagnosis, prognosis and outcome evaluation in neck pain. Anatomically, the cervical spine (CS) has been considered in two regions, the upper and lower CS. Disorders like cervicogenic headache have been clinically associated with dysfunctions of the upper CS (UCS), yet ROM tests and measurements are typically conducted on the whole CS. A cross-sectional study assessing 19 subjects with non-specific neck pain was undertaken to examine UCS extension-flexion ROM in relation to self-reported disability and pain (via the Neck Disability Index (NDI)). Two measurement devices (goniometer and electromagnetic tracking) were employed and compared. Correlations between ROM and the NDI were stronger for the UCS compared to the CS, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and the NDI-headache (r = -0.62). Correlations between UCS and CS ROM were fair to moderate, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and CS extension ROM (r = -0.49). UCS flexion restriction is related to headache frequency and intensity. Consistency and agreement between both measurement systems and for all tests was high. The results demonstrate that separate UCS ROM assessments for extension and flexion are useful in patients with neck pain.

  13. Analysis of right anterolateral impacts: the effect of trunk flexion on the cervical muscle whiplash response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Yogesh

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cervical muscles are considered a potential site of whiplash injury, and there is a need to understand the cervical muscle response under non-conventional whiplash impact scenarios, including variable body position and impact direction. There is no data, however, on the effect of occupant position on the muscle response to frontal impacts. Therefore, the objective of the study was to measure cervical muscle response to graded right anterolateral impacts. Methods Twenty volunteers were subjected to right anterolateral impacts of 4.3, 7.8, 10.6, and 12.8 m/s2 acceleration with their trunk flexed forward 45 degrees and laterally flexed right or left by 45 degrees. Bilateral EMG of the sternocleidomastoids, trapezii, and splenii capitis and acceleration of the sled, torso, and head were measured. Results and discussion With either direction of trunk flexion at impact, the trapezius EMGs increased with increasing acceleration (p Conclusion When the subject sits with trunk flexed out of neutral posture at the time of anterolateral impact, the cervical muscle response is dramatically reduced compared to frontal impacts with the trunk in neutral posture. In the absence of bodily impact, the flexed trunk posture appears to produce a biomechanical response that would decrease the likelihood of cervical muscle injury in low velocity impacts.

  14. Effect of the cervical flexion angle during smart phone use on muscle fatigue of the cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee; Park, Jungseo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the cervical flexion angle when using a smart phone on muscle fatigue of the cervical erector spinae (CES) and upper trapezius (UT). [Subjects] This study recruited 12 healthy adults. [Methods] Each subject sat on a chair, with his/her back against the wall and held a smart phone with both hands. Fatigue of the neck and shoulder muscles at different cervical flexion angles (0°, 30°, and 50°) was measured by electromyography. ...

  15. Kinematic analysis of the lower cervical spine in the protracted and retracted neck flexion positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze lower cervical spine kinematics in protracted and retracted neck flexion positions in healthy people. [Subjects and Methods] The craniovertebral angle (CVA) and intervertebral body angles of the lower cervical spine of 10 healthy individuals were analyzed using fluoroscopy in a neutral sitting with the head in the neutral (N), protracted (Pro), and retracted (Ret) positions and with the neck in full flexion with the head in the neutral (N-fx), protracted (Pro-fx), and retracted (Ret-fx) positions. [Results] There were significant differences in the CVA and intervertebral body angle at the C3-4 level, and the Ret position showed the highest values followed by the N and Pro positions. Regarding the intervertebral body angle at the C4-5 level, the Pro position showed a higher value than the N and Ret positions. At the C6-7 level, the Pro position showed the lowest value compared with the N and Ret positions. In the CVA, the Ret-fx position showed a higher value than the N-fx and Ret-fx positions. [Conclusion] The results suggest that in the neutral sitting position, protraction is an ineffective posture due to overstress of the C6-7 segment, which is placed in a hyperflexed position at this level. Instead, retraction is the recommend posture for the patient with C6-7 degeneration, which makes for a more flexed position in the upper cervical spine and a less flexed position in the lower cervical spine.

  16. Influence of Cervical Muscle Fatigue on Musculo-Tendinous Stiffness of the Head-Neck Segment during Cervical Flexion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Portero

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine if the fatigue of cervical muscles has a significant influence on the head-neck segment musculo-tendinous stiffness.Ten men (aged 21.2 ± 1.9 years performed four quick-release trials of flexion at 30 and 50% MVC before and after the induction of muscular fatigue on cervical flexors. Electromyographic activity was recorded on the sternocleidomastoids (SCM and spinal erectors (SE, bilaterally. Musculo-tendinous stiffness was calculated through the quick-release method adapted to the head-neck segment.We noticed a significant linear increase of the head-neck segment musculo-tendinous stiffness with the increase of exertion level both before (P < 0.0001 and after the fatigue procedure (P < 0.0001. However, this linear relationship was not different before and after the fatigue procedure. EMG analysis revealed a significant increase of the root mean square for the right SCM (P = 0.0002, the left SCM (P < 0.0001, the right SE (P < 0.0001, and the left SE (P < 0.0001 and a significant decrease of the median power frequency only for the right (P = 0.0006 and the left (P = 0.0003 SCM with muscular fatigue.We did not find significant changes in the head-neck segment musculo-tendinous stiffness with fatigue of cervical muscles. We found a significant increase in EMG activity in the SCM and the SE after the induction of fatigue of the SCM. Our findings suggest that with fatigue of cervical flexors, neck muscle activity is modulated in order to maintain the musculo-tendinous stiffness at a steady state.

  17. EMG activities of the quadratus lumborum and erector spinae muscles during flexion-relaxation and other motor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E A; Oddsson, L I E; Grundström, H; Nilsson, J; Thorstensson, A

    1996-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to provide new information on the myoelectrical activation of the quadratus lumborum, the deep lateral and the superficial medial lumbar erector spinae, the psoas, and the iliacus muscles in various motor tasks. DESIGN: An intramuscular electromyographic study was performed. BACKGROUND: The contribution of individual deep trunk muscles to the stability of the lumbar spine is relatively unknown in different tasks, including the flexion-relaxation phenomenon. METHODS: Seven healthy subjects participated. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted with a needle guided by ultrasound. RESULTS: The highest activity observed for quadratus lumborum and deep lateral erector spinae occurred in ipsilateral trunk flexion in a side-lying position and for superficial medial erector spinae during bilateral leg lift in a prone position. Quadratus lumborum and deep lateral erector spinae were activated when the flexion-relaxation phenomenon was present for superficial medial erector spinae, i.e. when its activity ceased in the latter part of full forward flexion of the trunk, held relaxed and kyphotic. CONCLUSIONS: In general, the activation of the investigated muscles showed a high degree of task specificity, where activation of a certain muscle was not always predictable from its anatomical arrangement and mechanical advantage.

  18. Systematic review of flexion/extension radiography of the cervical spine in trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierink, J.C., E-mail: j.c.sierink@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lieshout, W.A.M. van, E-mail: w.a.vanlieshout@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M., E-mail: l.f.beenen@amc.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schep, N.W.L., E-mail: n.w.schep@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vandertop, W.P., E-mail: w.p.vandertop@amc.nl [Neurosurgical Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goslings, J.C., E-mail: j.c.goslings@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    Introduction: The aim of this review was to investigate whether Flexion/Extension (F/E) radiography adds diagnostic value to CT or MRI in the detection of cervical spine ligamentous injury and/or clinically significant cervical spine instability of blunt trauma patients. Methods: A systematic search of literature was done in Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. Primary outcome was sensitivity and specificity of F/E radiography. Secondary outcomes were the positive predicting value (PPV) and negative predicting value (NPV) (with CT or MRI as reference tests due to the heterogeneity of the included studies) of each modality and the quality of F/E radiography. Results: F/E radiography was overall regarded to be inferior to CT or MRI in the detection of ligamentous injury. This was reflected by the high specificity and NPV for CT with F/E as reference test (ranging from 97 to 100% and 99 to 100% respectively) and the ambiguous results for F/E radiography with MRI as its reference test (0–98% and 0–83% for specificity and NPV respectively). Image quality of F/E radiography was reported to have 31 to 70% adequacy, except in two studies which reported an adequacy of respectively 4 and 97%. Conclusion: This systematic review of the literature shows that F/E radiography adds little diagnostic value to the evaluation of blunt trauma patients compared to CT and MRI, especially in those cases where CT or MRI show no indication of ligamentous injury.

  19. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, San-Seong; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the differences in the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) of the right and left erector spinae muscles in asymptomatic subjects and the effect of lumbar stabilization exercises on these differences. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six participants (12 in the exercise group and 14 in the control group) with a difference in the FRP in the right and left erector spinae muscles were recruited from among healthy students attending Silla University. The exercise group performed two lumbar stabilization exercises (back bridge exercise and hand-knee exercise) for 4 weeks. The control group did not exercise. [Results] No significant group-by-exercise interaction was found. The right and left erector spinae muscles did show a difference in FRP between the control and exercise groups (119.2 ± 69.2 and 131.1 ± 85.2 ms, respectively). In addition, the exercise group showed a significant decrease in post-exercise (50.0 ± 27.0 ms) compared to pre-exercise (112.3 ± 41.5 ms) differences in the right and left FRP. [Conclusion] These results suggest that lumbar stabilization exercises may counter asymmetry of the FRP in the erector spinae muscles, possibly preventing low back pain in the general population.

  20. Study of the influence of degenerative intervertebral disc changes on the deformation behavior of the cervical spine segment in flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakova, Tatyana V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the model of the cervical spine segment (C3-C4) and the calculation results of the deformation behavior of the segment under degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc. The segment model was built based on the experimental literature data taking into account the presence of the cortical and cancellous bone tissue of vertebral bodies. The calculation results show that degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc cause the immobility of the C3 vertebra at flexion.

  1. Cervical flexion myelopathy in a patient showing apparent long tract signs: A severe form of Hirayama disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Kenji; Ono, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; MURAKAMI, Hideki; Yamada, Masahito

    2011-01-01

    We describe an 18-year-old male with cervical flexion myelopathy with Hirayama disease-like features who showed apparent long tract signs. He first experienced insidious-onset hand muscle weakness and atrophy at the age of 15. Subsequently, he developed sensory disturbance in his lower limb. Neurological examination revealed atrophy and weakness in the right hand and forearm, pyramidal signs in the right lower extremity, and disturbance of superficial sensation in the lower left half of the b...

  2. Flexion Relaxation Ratio Not Responsive to Acutely Induced Low Back Pain from a Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Maggie E.; Bishop, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The flexion relaxation ratio (FRR) has been suggested as a measure of muscular performance in patients with low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the FRR was responsive to acute LBP produced from a delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) protocol. Methods. Fifty-one pain-free volunteers performed DOMS to induce LBP. Current pain intensity, trunk flexion range of motion (ROM), and passive straight leg raise (SLR) were measured at baseline, 24 and 48 hours after DOMS. Participants were categorized into pain groups based on reported current pain intensity. Changes in FRR, trunk flexion ROM, and SLR ROM were examined using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Results. Pain group was not found to have a significant effect on FRR (F1,29 = 0.054, P = 0.818), nor were there any two-way interactions for changes in FRR. The pain group had decreased trunk flexion ROM compared to the minimal pain group (F1,38 = 7.21, P = 0.011), but no decreases in SLR ROM (F1,38 = 3.51, P = 0.057) over time. Interpretation. There were no differences in FRR based on reported pain intensity of LBP from a DOMS protocol. The responsiveness of FRR might be limited in patients with acute onset LBP of muscular origin. PMID:27335879

  3. Soft tissue artifact evaluation of the cervical spine in motion patterns of flexion and lateral bending: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Soft tissue artifact (STA is increasingly becoming a focus of research as the skin marker method is widely employed in motion capture technique. At present, medical imaging methods provide reliable ways to investigate the cervical STA. Among these approaches, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a highly preferred tool because of its low radiation. Methods. In the study, the 3D spatial location of vertebral landmarks and corresponding skin markers of the spinous processes of the second (C2, fifth (C5, and sixth (C6 cervical levels during flexion and lateral bending were investigated. A series of static postures were scanned using MRI. Skin deformation was obtained by the Mimics software. Results. Results shows that during flexion, the maximum skin deformation occurs at C6, in the superior–inferior (Z direction. Upon lateral bending, the maximum skin displacement occurs at C2 level, in the left–right (Y direction. The result presents variability of soft tissue in the terms of direction and magnitude, which is consistent with the prevailing opinion. Discussion. The results testified variability of cervical STA. Future studies involving large ranges of subject classification, such as age, sex, height, gravity, and etc. should be performed to completely verify the existing hypothesis on human cervical skin deformation.

  4. The influence of age, gender, lifestyle factors and sub-clinical neck pain on the cervical flexion-rotation test and cervical range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenric; Hall, Toby; Robinson, Kim

    2008-12-01

    The flexion-rotation test (FRT) is commonly used when assessing cervicogenic headache. Additionally, active range of motion (AROM) is frequently used to evaluate impairment in neck pain. No studies have investigated the interaction of the FRT and AROM with age, gender, pain and lifestyle factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of these factors on the FRT and cervical AROM. A group of 66 participants (aged 20-78) were studied, 28 experienced sub-clinical neck pain (recurrent neck pain or discomfort which has not received treatment from a healthcare professional) while 38 did not. Age, gender, lifestyle factors and sub-clinical neck pain were assessed using a questionnaire. Measurement of AROM was performed by two examiners blind to the results of the questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analysis found that 59% of the variance in the FRT was explained by the presence of sub-clinical pain and cervical lateral flexion measures. Secondly, 58-72% of the variance in active cervical ROM measures was influenced by factors including the FRT, gender and movements of the neck in other planes. This study found that lifestyle factors do not influence the cervical FRT and AROM.

  5. Ranges of Cervical Intervertebral Disc Deformation during an In-Vivo Dynamic Flexion-Extension of the Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Mao, Haiqing; Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Cheng, Liming; Wood, Kirkham B; Li, Guoan; Cha, Thomas D

    2017-03-23

    While abnormal loading is widely believed to cause cervical spine disc diseases, in-vivo cervical disc deformation during dynamic neck motion has not been well delineated. This study investigated the range of cervical disc deformation during an in-vivo functional flexion-extension of the neck. Ten asymptomatic human subjects were tested using a combined dual fluoroscopic imaging system and MRI based 3D modeling technique. Overall disc deformation was determined using the changes of the space geometry between upper and lower endplates of each intervertebral segment (C3/4, C4/5, C5/6 and C6/7). Five points (anterior, center, posterior, left and right) of each disc were analyzed to examine the disc deformation distributions. The data indicated that between the functional maximum flexion and extension of the neck, the anterior points of the discs experienced large changes of distraction/compression deformation and shear deformation. The higher level discs experienced higher ranges of disc deformation. No significant difference was found in deformation ranges at posterior points of all discs. The data indicated that the range of disc deformation is disc level dependent and the anterior region experienced larger changes of deformation than the center and posterior regions, except for the C6/7 disc. The data obtained from this study could serve as baseline knowledge for the understanding of the cervical spine disc biomechanics and for investigation of the biomechanical etiology of disc diseases. These data could also provide insights for development of motion preservation surgeries for cervical spine.

  6. Clinical and radiological profile of Hirayama disease: A flexion myelopathy due to tight cervical dural canal amenable to collar therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hirayama disease (HD is benign focal amyotrophy of the distal upper limbs, often misdiagnosed as motor neuron disease. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often reported normal. Objective: To study the clinicoradiological profile of hand wasting in young males. Materials and Methods: Patients presenting with insidious-onset hand wasting from March 2008 to May 2011 were evaluated electrophysiologically. Cervical MRI in neutral position was done in 11 patients and flexion contrast imaging was done in 10 patients. Results: All patients were males less than 25 years of age, with median age 23 years, except one patient who was 50 years old. Duration of illness was 3 months to 3 years. All (100% had oblique amyotrophy, four (36% cold paresis, 10 (91% minipolymyoclonus and three (27% had fasciculations. Regional reflexes were variably absent. Two patients (18% had brisk reflexes of lower limbs with flexor plantars. Electromyography (EMG showed chronic denervation in the C7-T1 myotomes. Neutral position MRI showed loss of cervical lordosis in 10/11 (91%, localized lower cervical cord atrophy in 9/11 (82%, asymmetric cord flattening in 11/11 (100% and intramedullary hyperintensity in 2/11 (18%; flexion study showed loss of dural attachment, anterior displacement of dorsal dura, epidural flow voids in 9/10 (90% and enhancing epidural crescent in 10/10 (100%. Clinical profile, imaging and electrophysiological findings of the patient aged 50 years will be described in detail as presentation at this age is exceptional. Collar therapy slowed progression in most cases. Conclusion: Clinical features of HD corroborated well with electrophysiological diagnosis of anterior horn cell disease of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast MRI is characteristic, routine studies have a high predictive value for diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy.

  7. The influence of breathing type, expiration and cervical posture on the performance of the cranio-cervical flexion test in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnie, Barbara; Danneels, Lieven; Cools, Ann; Dickx, Nele; Cambier, Dirk

    2008-06-01

    The cranio-cervical flexion test (CCF-T) is used as a clinical evaluation tool for the deep cervical flexors (DCF). The influence of breathing type, expiration and cervical posture on the performance of the test is evaluated in asymptomatic subjects. Thirty volunteers participated in the study and were classified according to their breathing type: costo-diaphragmatic breathing type and upper costal breathing type. Sternocleidomastoid (SCM) electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded during five incremental levels of CCF during normal breathing as well as during expiration. The cranio-vertebral angle of each subject was measured to quantify cervical posture. During normal inspiration, higher EMG activity of the SCM muscles was observed in subjects with an upper costal breathing pattern compared to costo-diaphragmatic breathing subjects. This difference was statistically significant (Pangle and the EMG activity of the SCM muscles. Performing the CCF-T during slow expiration diminishes the activity of the SCM muscles in subjects with a predominantly upper costal breathing pattern. Using a costo-diaphragmatic breathing pattern while performing the test will optimize the performance. Studies on neck pain patients are required to further clarify this issue.

  8. Utility of flexion-extension radiography for the detection of ligamentous cervical spine injury and its current role in the clearance of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jason Jaeseong; Asha, Stephen Edward

    2016-04-01

    Detecting the presence of injuries to the cervical spine is an important component of the initial assessment of patients sustaining blunt trauma. A small proportion of cervical spine injuries consists of ligamentous disruption. Accurate detection of ligamentous injury is essential as it may result in sequelae including radiculopathy, quadriplegia and death. Flexion-extension (FE) radiography has traditionally been utilised for the detection of ligamentous injury in patients who have been cleared of bony injury. There are controversies surrounding the use of FE for alert patients with neck pain. There are studies that call into question the diagnostic accuracy of FE, the high proportion of inadequate FE images due to muscle spasm and the adverse effects of prolonged cervical collar immobilisation while awaiting FE. Other literature indicates that FE provides no additional diagnostic information following a multi-detector helical computed tomography. This review evaluates the literature on the utility of FE for the detection of ligamentous injury and explores alternate strategies for clearing the cervical spine of ligamentous injury.

  9. A Comparison of the Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Thicknesses in Subjects with and without Neck Pain during Craniocervical Flexion Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ilsub; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the amount of change in the thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles in subjects with neck pain and subjects without neck pain during craniocervical flexion exercise (CCFE). [Subjects] The total number of subjects was 40, comprising 20 in the no-pain group (males 11, females 9) and 20 in the pain group (males 8, females 12). [Methods] Muscle images were obtained using ultrasound, and the thicknesses of the individual muscles were measured using the NIH ImageJ software. [Results] During CCFE, as pressure increased, the no-pain group recruited the DCF more than the pain group, while the pain group recruited the SCM more. [Conclusion] Selective DCF contraction exercises are considered very useful in the treatment of patients with neck pain.

  10. Compressive force magnitude and intervertebral joint flexion/extension angle influence shear failure force magnitude in the porcine cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P

    2012-02-02

    Despite the findings that peak anterior shear load is highly correlated with low-back pain reporting, very little research has been conducted to determine how vertebral shear injury potential is influenced. The current study quantified the combined effects of vertebral joint compression and flexion/extension postural deviation from neutral on ultimate shear failure. Ninety-six porcine cervical specimens (48C3-C4, 48C5-C6) were tested. Each specimen was randomly assigned to one of twelve combinations of compressive force (15%, 30%, 45%, or 60% of predicted compressive failure force) and flexion/extension postural deviation (extended, neutral, or flexed). Vertebral joint shear failure was induced by applying posterior shear displacement of the caudal vertebra at a constant rate of 0.15 mm/s. Throughout shear failure tests, vertebral joint kinematics were measured using an optoelectronic camera and a series of infrared light emitting diodes while shear force was measured from load cells rigidly interfaced in series with linear actuators that applied the shear displacement. Measurements of shear stiffness, ultimate force, displacement, and energy stored were made from the force-displacement data. Compressive force and postural deviation demonstrated main effects without a statistically significant interaction for any of the measurements. Shear failure force increased by 11.1% for each 15% increment in compressive force (pflexion (pflexion/extension postural deviation should be equally considered while assessing shear injury potential.

  11. Effect of short-term application of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk repositioning in healthy females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Sara A; Frost, Lydia R; Vallis, Lori Ann; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential effects of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk position sense when applied for a short period (30 min) to the low back of healthy female participants. Twenty-four participants were assigned to one of two groups: kinesio tape applied in either the recommended stretched or non-stretched (control) manner over the low back. Tests were performed at three time points (pre-tape, with tape, post-tape) to assess low-back muscle flexion-relaxation, position sense during active trunk repositioning and trunk postural control during seated balance. Results demonstrated that wearing kinesio tape did not affect the angle at which the erector spinae muscles became silent during trunk flexion (flexion-relaxation). Trunk repositioning error increased when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and this increased error persisted after the tape was removed. Seated balance control improved when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and these improvements persisted after the tape was removed. In conclusion, these findings do not support the general suggestions that short-term use of kinesio tape on the low-back region alter low-back muscle activation and enhance tasks related to proprioception, at least under these taping conditions in a group of healthy females.

  12. Impact responses of the cervical spine: A computational study of the effects of muscle activity, torso constraint, and pre-flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Roger W; Sganga, Jake; Cutcliffe, Hattie; Bass, Cameron R 'Dale'

    2016-02-29

    Cervical spine injuries continue to be a costly societal problem. Future advancements in injury prevention depend on improved physical and computational models, which are predicated on a better understanding of the neck response during dynamic loading. Previous studies have shown that the tolerance of the neck is dependent on its initial position and its buckling behavior. This study uses a computational model to examine three important factors hypothesized to influence the loads experienced by vertebrae in the neck under compressive impact: muscle activation, torso constraints, and pre-flexion angle of the cervical spine. Since cadaver testing is not practical for large scale parametric analyses, these factors were studied using a previously validated computational model. On average, simulations with active muscles had 32% larger compressive forces and 25% larger shear forces-well in excess of what was expected from the muscle forces alone. In the short period of time required for neck injury, constraints on torso motion increased the average neck compression by less than 250N. The pre-flexion hypothesis was tested by examining pre-flexion angles from neutral (0°) to 64°. Increases in pre-flexion resulted in the largest increases in peak loads and the expression of higher-order buckling modes. Peak force and buckling modality were both very sensitive to pre-flexion angle. These results validate the relevance of prior cadaver models for neck injury and help explain the wide variety of cervical spine fractures that can result from ostensibly similar compressive loadings. They also give insight into the mechanistic differences between burst fractures and lower cervical spine dislocations.

  13. MR imaging and radiography of patients with cervical hyperextension-flexion injuries after car accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchgrevink, G.E. [The Emergency Clinic, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Smevik, O. [MR-Centre Medical Section, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Nordby, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Rinck, P.A. [MR-Centre Medical Section, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Stiles, T.C. [Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioural Medicine, Trondheim Univ. (Norway); Lereim, I. [The Emergency Clinic, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway)

    1995-07-01

    Fifty-two patients underwent MR imaging and conventional radiography of the neck within 4 days after a hyperextension-flexion injury. The patients also had follow-up investigations during the first 2 years. The images did not reveal any serious lesions in any of them. Based on the main MR and radiographical findings the patients were divided into 4 groups; no findings, posture abnormalities, spondylosis and disc pathology (from MR images) or reduced intervertebral space (from the radiographs). The outcomes of the different groups were compared with reference to neck stiffness, neck pain and headache during a 2-year follow-up period. The patient groups did not correspond completely when diagnosed from MR imaging and radiography. However, patients with pre-existing spondylosis had more symptoms when examined by both modalities. Based on the radiographs, the group with posture abnormalities had significant fewer symptoms than the other groups. (orig.).

  14. Effects of manipulation of the thorax and intensity of the pressure biofeedback unit on the superficial cervical flexors muscle during craniocervical flexion exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin Mo; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of manipulation of the thorax and the intensity of the pressure biofeedback unit on the superficial cervical flexors muscle during craniocervical flexion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty three subjects participated in the experiment. Thirty three healthy people without any orthopedic history were also selected. The subjects could monitor the pressure applied to cervical vertebra 3 of the craniocervical junction by markings on the pressure biofeedback unit. Craniocervical flexion exercise was performed for 20 seconds per pressure, and two minutes of rest was allowed after exercise to reduce muscle fatigue. [Results] Significant differences in the post-training gains in the sternocleidomastoid and scalene were observed between the thorax fixation group and thorax non-fixation group. The thorax fixation group showed that muscle activation of the sternocleidomastoid and scalene was increased when the pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 40 mmHg than when pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 20 mmHg and 30 mmHg in the post-hoc result. The thorax non-fixation group showed that muscle activation of the sternocleidomastoid and scalene was higher when the pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 40mmHg compared to that when the pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 20mmHg in the post-hoc result. [Conclusion] Craniocervical flexion exercise is a clinically effective method that reduces the superficial neck flexor muscle activation. PMID:28265158

  15. The relationship between superficial muscle activity during the cranio-cervical flexion test and clinical features in patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Shaun; Falla, Deborah; Jull, Gwendolen

    2011-10-01

    Changes in motor behavior are a known feature of chronic mechanical neck pain disorders. This study examined the strength of the association between reported levels of pain and disability from 84 individuals (63 women, 21 men) with chronic mechanical neck pain and levels of electromyographic activity recorded from superficial cervical flexor (sternocleidomastoid; SCM and anterior scalene; AS) muscles during progressive stages of the cranio-cervical flexion muscle test. A significant positive association was observed between superficial muscle activity and pain intensity (P 0.5) or perceived disability (P > 0.21). The strongest relationship between pain intensity and superficial muscle activity occurred at the final increment of the cranio-cervical flexion test (inner-range test position) for both the SCM and AS muscles (R(2) = 0.16). Although a positive and significant relationship between pain intensity and superficial muscle activity was shown, the relationship was only modest (16% explained variance), indicating that multiple factors contribute to the altered motor function observed in individuals with chronic mechanical neck pain.

  16. Intubation biomechanics: laryngoscope force and cervical spine motion during intubation in cadavers-effect of severe distractive-flexion injury on C3-4 motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley J; Fontes, Ricardo B; From, Robert P; Traynelis, Vincent C; Todd, Michael M; Puttlitz, Christian M; Santoni, Brandon G

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE With application of the forces of intubation, injured (unstable) cervical segments may move more than they normally do, which can result in spinal cord injury. The authors tested whether, during endotracheal intubation, intervertebral motion of an injured C3-4 cervical segment 1) is greater than that in the intact (stable) state and 2) differs when a high- or low-force laryngoscope is used. METHODS Fourteen cadavers underwent 3 intubations using force-sensing laryngoscopes while simultaneous cervical spine motion was recorded with lateral fluoroscopy. The first intubation was performed with an intact cervical spine and a conventional high-force line-of-sight Macintosh laryngoscope. After creation of a severe C3-4 distractive-flexion injury, 2 additional intubations were performed, one with the Macintosh laryngoscope and the other with a low-force indirect video laryngoscope (Airtraq), used in random order. RESULTS During Macintosh intubations, between the intact and the injured conditions, C3-4 extension (0.3° ± 3.0° vs 0.4° ± 2.7°, respectively; p = 0.9515) and anterior-posterior subluxation (-0.1 ± 0.4 mm vs -0.3 ± 0.6 mm, respectively; p = 0.2754) did not differ. During Macintosh and Airtraq intubations with an injured C3-4 segment, despite a large difference in applied force between the 2 laryngoscopes, segmental extension (0.4° ± 2.7° vs 0.3° ± 3.3°, respectively; p = 0.8077) and anterior-posterior subluxation (0.3 ± 0.6 mm vs 0.0 ± 0.7 mm, respectively; p = 0.3203) did not differ. CONCLUSIONS The authors' hypotheses regarding the relationship between laryngoscope force and the motion of an injured cervical segment were not confirmed. Motion-force relationships (biomechanics) of injured cervical intervertebral segments during endotracheal intubation in cadavers are not predicted by the in vitro biomechanical behavior of isolated cervical segments. With the limitations inherent to cadaveric studies, the results of this study suggest

  17. In-vivo T2-relaxation times of asymptomatic cervical intervertebral discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Sean J.; Mao, Haiqing; Li, Guoan [Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Bioengineering Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Zhong, Weiye [Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Bioengineering Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Second Xiangya Hospital and Central South University, Department of Spinal Surgery, Changsha, Hunan (China); Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wood, Kirkham B.; Cha, Thomas D. [Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Spine Service, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Limited research exists on T2-mapping techniques for cervical intervertebral discs and its potential clinical utility. The objective of this research was to investigate the in-vivo T2-relaxation times of cervical discs, including C2-C3 through C7-T1. Ten asymptomatic subjects were imaged using a 3.0 T MR scanner and a sagittal multi-slice multi-echo sequence. Using the mid-sagittal image, intervertebral discs were divided into five regions-of-interest (ROIs), centered along the mid-line of the disc. Average T2 relaxation time values were calculated for each ROI using a mono-exponential fit. Differences in T2 values between disc levels and across ROIs of the same disc were examined. For a given ROI, the results showed a trend of increasing relaxation times moving down the spinal column, particularly in the middle regions (ROIs 2, 3 and 4). The C6-C7 and C7-T1 discs had significantly greater T2 values compared to superior discs (discs between C2 and C6). The results also showed spatial homogeneity of T2 values in the C3-C4, C4-C5, and C5-C6 discs, while C2-C3, C6-C7, and C7-T1 showed significant differences between ROIs. The findings indicate there may be inherent differences in T2-relaxation time properties between different cervical discs. Clinical evaluations utilizing T2-mapping techniques in the cervical spine may need to be level-dependent. (orig.)

  18. 平山病患者屈颈位F波的变化%Cervical flexion F-waves in the patients with Hirayama diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑超君; 吕飞舟; 马晓生; 夏新雷; 金翔; 殷骏; 姜建元; 朱愈

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify whether there is significant changes between the cervical neutral F-waves and cervical flexion F-waves in the patients with Hirayama disease.Methods This study was performed on 25 normal subjects and 22 male patients with identified Hirayama disease (age:15 to 44 years; height:165 to 183 cm; duration:6 to 240 months) between May 2010 and March 2014.Both cervical flexion F-wave (cervical flexion 45 °,30 minutes) and conventional F-waves to median nerve stimulation and to ulnar nerve stimulation were performed in all subjects bilaterally.Results were analyzed by t-test or Fisher exact probability.Results In the normal subjects,all measurements of the bilateral F-waves didn't have any difference between the cervical flexion position and the cervical neutral position.On the cervical neutral position,the persistence (t =5.209,P =0.000),average latencies (t =4.731,P =0.022) and minimal latencies (t =23.843,P =0.006) of ulnar F-wave on the symptomatic heavier side from the patients with identified Hirayama disease were significantly lower or longer than those from the normal subjects,and the repeat F-waves were found in 3 patients (13.6%).On the symptomatic lighter side,the ulnar F-waves only had lower persistence (t =22.306,P =0.001) along with 5 repeat F-waves.Only lower persistence were found in the median F-wave on the both side (higher side t =23.696,P =0.000 ; lighter side t =23.998,P =0.000),along with 5 (22.7%) repeat F-waves on the symptomatic heavier side and 6 (27.3%) ones on the symptomatic lighter side.After cervical flexion maintaining 30 minutes,the increased maximal amplitudes (t =-2.552,P =0.019),average amplitudes (t =-3.322,P =0.003),duration (t =-3.323,P =0.00),persistence (t =-2.604,P =0.017) and frequency of repeat F-waves (9/22,41%) (P =0.044) were found on the symptomatic heavier side of ulnar F-wave,and 5 of 10 absent ulnar F-wave on the cervical neutral position were also recover.The median F-wave on the symptomatic

  19. The ratio of change in muscle thickness between superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test and a suggestion regarding clinical treatment of patients with musculoskeletal neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Miran; Kim, Seong-Gil; Jun, Deokhoon

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test by using ultrasonography and to propose the optimal level of pressure in clinical craniocervical flexion exercise for people with neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 18 students (9 males and 9 females) with neck pain at D University in Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea, participated in this study. The change in muscle thickness in superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test was measured using ultrasonography. The ratio of muscle thickness changes between superficial and deep muscles during the test were obtained to interpret the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles. [Results] The muscle thickness ratio of the sternocleidomastoid muscle/deep cervical flexor muscles according to the incremental pressure showed significant differences between 22 mmHg and 24 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 28 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 30 mmHg, and between 26 mmHg and 28 mmHg. [Conclusion] Ultrasonography can be applied for examination of cervical flexor muscles in clinical environment, and practical suggestion for intervention exercise of craniocervical flexors can be expected on the pressure level between 24 mmHg and 26 mmHg enabling the smallest activation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

  20. Sonography assessment of the median nerve during cervical lateral glide and lateral flexion. Is there a difference in neurodynamics of asymptomatic people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochwicz, Peter; von Piekartz, Harry; Zalpour, Christoff

    2013-06-01

    There is clinical evidence that cervical lateral glide (CLG) improves neurodynamics and alleviates pain in patients who suffer from neurogenic arm pain. Cervical lateral flexion (CLF) is also a treatment method and a means of testing neurodynamics. However, for both techniques nerve movement has not yet been investigated using ultrasound imaging (US). The purpose of this study was to quantify median nerve movement in the arm during CLG and CLF. For this study 27 healthy participants were recruited. Longitudinal movement of the median nerve was measured using US during CLG and CLF with the shoulder in 30° abduction in the middle and distal forearm (Fad). Data could be obtained from 11 participants (6 women and 5 men, average age 25.6 years, ± 2.25) at the middle forearm (Fam) and from 9 participants (5 women and 4 men, average age 27.2 years, ± 2.75) at the Fad. When applying CLF, the median nerve moved 2.3 mm (SEM ± 0.1 mm) at the Fam. At the same measuring point the median nerve moved 3.3 mm (SEM ± 0.3 mm, p = 0.005) by applying CLG. At the Fad the difference between CLF and CLF amounted to 0.6 mm (CLF: 1.9 mm (SEM ± 0.2 mm, CLG: 2.5 mm (SEM ± 0.2 mm, p ≤ 0.05). The movements during CLG are larger than during CLF. This difference is statistically significant. However, the statistical relevance cannot be extrapolated to a clinical relevance.

  1. The Cervical Vestibular-Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMPs) Recorded Along the Sternocleidomastoid Muscles During Head Rotation and Flexion in Normal Human Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, Alexander; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Chunming; Wei, Wei; Mustain, William; Eby, Thomas; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Wu

    2016-08-01

    Tone burst-evoked myogenic potentials recorded from tonically contracted sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) (cervical VEMP or cVEMP) are widely used to assess the vestibular function. Since the cVEMP response is mediated by the vestibulo-collic reflex (VCR) pathways, it is important to understand how the cVEMPs are determined by factors related to either the sensory components (vestibular end organs) or the motor components (SCM) of the VCR pathways. Compared to the numerous studies that have investigated effects of sound parameters on the cVEMPs, there are few studies that have examined effects of SCM-related factors on the cVEMPs. The goal of the present study is to fill this knowledge gap by testing three SCM-related hypotheses. The first hypothesis is that contrary to the current view, the cVEMP response is only present in the SCM ipsilateral to the stimulated ear. The second hypothesis is that the cVEMP response is not only dependent on tonic level of the SCM, but also on how the tonic level is achieved, i.e., by head rotation or head flexion. The third hypothesis is that the SCM is compartmented and the polarity of the cVEMP response is dependent on the recording site. Seven surface electrodes were positioned along the left SCMs in 12 healthy adult subjects, and tone bursts were delivered to the ipsilateral or contralateral ear (8 ms plateau, 1 ms rise/fall, 130 dB SPL, 50-4000 Hz) while subjects activated their SCMs by head rotation (HR condition) or chin downward head flexion (CD condition). The first hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the contralateral cVEMPs were minimal at all recording sites for all the tested tones during both HR and CD conditions. The second hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the ipsilateral cVEMPs were larger in HR condition than in CD condition at recording sites above and below the SCM midpoint. Finally, the third hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the cVEMPs exhibit reversed polarities at the sites

  2. Risco de tração excessiva nas lesões tipo distração-flexão da coluna cervical baixa Risk of excessive traction on distraction-flexion-type injuries of the low cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa de Barros Filho

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O estudo em questão visa avaliar a relação entre risco e benefício do uso de tração com halo craniano como alternativa para estabilização nas fraturas-luxações por mecanismo de distração-flexão tipo IV de Allen e Ferguson, considerando a natureza da lesão, seu extenso dano ligamentar e o risco de apresentar distração excessiva e conseqüente lesão da medula espinhal. Para tanto, realizamos uma análise retrospectiva no IOT-HC-FMUSP envolvendo um período de 10 anos, quando 34 casos foram diagnosticados como fratura-luxação por distração-flexão da coluna cervical baixa, sendo 12 deles do tipo IV. Todos foram submetidos à tração esquelética com halo craniano num momento inicial. Durante o controle radiográfico seqüencial, observou-se distração excessiva em sete casos, mesmo com baixo peso inicial (4 kg. Em dois pacientes houve surgimento de nistagmo. Em todos os casos a tração foi retirada e seguiu-se normalização do quadro clínico.This study aims to evaluate the risk/ benefit ratio in the use of traction with cranial halo as an alternative to stabilize fractures-dislocations by Allen & Ferguson's type IV- distraction-flexion mechanism, considering the nature of the injury, its extensive ligament damage and the risk of presenting excessive distraction and resultant spinal cord injury. Thus, we performed a retrospective analysis at IOT-HC-FMUSP comprising a period of 10 years, when 34 cases were diagnosed as fractures-dislocations due to distraction-flexion of the low cervical spine, of which 12 were IV-type. All individuals have been submitted to skeletal traction with cranial halo at an early phase. During sequential X-ray management, an excessive distraction was seen in seven cases, even with initial light weight (4 kg. In two patients, the onset of nistagmus was seen. In all cases, traction was removed, which was followed by stabilization of the clinical picture.

  3. Cervical Laminoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spine showing extension of the spine following a cervical laminoplasty. B) Post-operative lateral x-rays of the same patient showing flexion. Note that the range of motion is maintained after the laminoplasty and that no ...

  4. 改变颈椎屈曲角度对平山病特异性MRI征象的影响%MRI features of Hirayama disease at different cervical flexion angles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高慧; 韩鸿宾; 徐晓娟; 侯超; 和清源; 樊东升; 傅瑜; 孙宇

    2010-01-01

    目的 比较平山病患者颈椎不同屈曲角度MRI表现,研究颈椎屈曲角度对平山病MRI征象的影响.方法 20例临床确诊为平山病的患者,行颈椎中立位及屈曲位20°、25°、30°、35°、40°MR扫描,观察不同屈曲位MRI硬脊膜前移、硬膜外间隙增宽2个征象出现率.并测量硬膜外间隙最大矢状径(d)及同水平椎管矢状径(D),计算d/D用于定量分析上述2个征象.不同屈曲位各征象出现率的比较使用Fisher精确概率法.各组间d/D平均值比较使用重复测量资料方差分析,之后对任意两组间d/D平均值进行比较.结果 患者颈椎背侧硬脊膜前移及硬膜外间隙增宽征象出现率在屈曲角度20°时为70%(14/20),25°以上均为100%,20°与25°时特殊征象出现率差异有统计学意义(χ2=5.760,P=0.020).20°、25°、30°、35°、40°时,对应d/D值分别为0.51±0.06、0.54±0.08、0.57±0.09、0.61±0.09、0.59±0.07,差异有统计学意义(F=3.450,P=0.013),两两比较提示d/D平均值在屈曲35°时>20°和25°,在屈曲40°时>20°(P值均<0.05).结论 颈椎屈曲角度可以影响颈椎背侧硬脊膜前移及硬膜外间隙增宽的MRI征象.%Objective To analyze MRI features of different cervical flexion positions in Hirayama disease (HD) and discuss the effects on these features by different cervical flexion angles.Methods The cervical MR images of neutral and different flexion positions (20°, 25°, 30°, 35° ,40°) of 20 patients, who were clinically diagnosed as HD,were studied.At flexion positions, the appearance of anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the cervical dural canal and widening of epidural space was recorded.The maximum sagittal diameters (d) of widened cervical epidural space and the cervical canal sagittal diameters (D) on the same level were measured to calculate d/D value for quantitative evaluation of the two signs.Comparisons of appearance of the signs among different flexion positions were made using F

  5. 模塑式颈椎矫形器对颈部烧伤患者屈曲畸形的预防作用%Preventive effects of moulded cervical orthosis on the flexion deformity in burn pateints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张孝超; 杨文兵; 陈述清

    2005-01-01

    effectiveness evaluation.RESULTS: All nineteen patients with cervical deformities due to burn reached the effects of correcting cervical flexion and restoring cervical functions through wearing orthosis. The cervical functions restored entirely in seven cases, almost restored in eight cases and improved in four cases.CONCLUSION: MCO can be clinically used on cervical deformities resulted by burn and provide good effects on remedy and rehabilitation.

  6. Design of a mechanism to simulate the quasi-static moment-deflection behaviour of the osteoligamentous structure of the C3-C4 cervical spine segment in the flexion-extension and lateral bending directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Samuel; Arsenault, Marc; Moglo, Kodjo

    2012-11-01

    The human neck is susceptible to traumatic injuries due to impacts as well as chronic injuries caused by loads such as those attributed to the wearing of heavy headgear. To facilitate the analysis of the loads that cause injuries to the cervical spine, it is possible to replicate the human neck's behaviour with mechanical devices. The goal of this work is to lay the foundation for the eventual development of a novel mechanism used to simulate the behaviour of the cervical spine during laboratory experiments. The research presented herein focuses on the design of a mechanism capable of reproducing the non-linear relationships between moments applied to the C3 vertebra and its corresponding rotations with respect to the C4 vertebra. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the mechanism are optimized based on the ability of the latter to replicate the load-deflection profile of the osteoligamentous structure of the C3-C4 vertebral pair in the flexion-extension and lateral bending directions. The results show that the proposed design concept is capable of faithfully replicating the non-linear behaviour of the motion segment within acceptable tolerances.

  7. Estudo biomecânico em flexão da coluna cervical de cadáveres humanos submetida à corpectomia e estabilização com enxerto de fíbula Cervical spine flexion biomechanical study in cadaver submitted to resection of vertebral body and stabilization with fibular graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Marchetto

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo apresenta e discute os resultados da análise biomecânica, radiográfica e anatômica de 20 peças de coluna cervical de cadáveres humanos, submetidas à corpectomia de C5, discectomia adjacente e estabilização com enxerto de fíbula. Os ensaios em flexão foram realizados em Máquina Universal de Testes. Nenhuma fratura ou extrusão do enxerto foi observada. A falha mecânica ocorreu na interface corpo vertebral-enxerto fibular, caracterizada por fratura dos corpos vertebrais adjacentes em 11 experimentos e afundamento da esponjosa em nove. O ligamento longitudinal posterior e o complexo ligamentar posterior não foram lesados em nenhuma das peças. Concluem que, em estudo experimental, o enxerto de fíbula é resistente e proporciona estabilidade imediata à coluna cervical quando submetido a carga em flexão.The authors present and discuss the results of a biomechanical, radiographic and anatomical analysis of 20 specimens, obtained from human cadaver of cervical spine submitted to C5 corpectomy, adjacent discectomy and stabilization with fibular graft. The flexion tests were carried out in the Test Universal Machine. Fracture or graft extrusion was not observed. Mechanical failure was observed in the vertebral body-fibular graft interface, characterized by fracture of the adjacent vertebral bodies in 11 experiments and depression of the cancellous bone in nine. The posterior longitudinal ligament and the posterior ligamental complex were not injured in any of the specimens. The authors concluded that, in an experimental study, the fibular graft is resistant and provides immediate stability to the cervical spine when submitted to flexion load.

  8. Clinical characteristics and surgical options of distractive flexion injuries in lower cervical spine%下颈椎屈曲分离型损伤的临床特点与手术选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙浩; 肖杰; 郭涛; 陈艺新; 邹伟; 吴陈

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨下颈椎屈曲分离型损伤的临床特点与手术选择.方法 回顾性分析2007年1月~2010年12月收治的有随访资料的25例下颈椎屈曲分离型损伤病例.其中新鲜损伤(﹤11d)15例,5例出现脊髓损伤,4例出现神经根损伤;陈旧性损伤(1个月~25年)10例均出现明显的颈痛及不同程度脊髓压迫或者神经根刺激症状.15例新鲜损伤患者中11例牵引复位后行前路手术,4例复位失败者行前后路切开复位手术;10例陈旧性损伤患者均采用前路脱位椎下方椎体次全切除术.结果 25例术后随访平均13个月(6~21个月),15例新鲜损伤有9例合并脊髓及神经根损伤,其中7例完全恢复.10例陈旧性损伤中8例患者颈痛及脊髓压迫神经根牵拉症状完全消失.X线片及CT提示椎体间融合好,颈椎生理曲度恢复满意.结论 新鲜下颈椎屈曲分离型损伤患者应积极通过牵引或者手术复位,根据术前复位情况决定手术方式.陈旧性患者可不作勉强复位,通过脱位椎下方椎体次全切除亦能达到神经组织减压的目的.%O b jective To discuss tie clinical characteristics of distractive flexion injuries in kwer cervical spine and to give suggestion on surgical options M ethods Retrospective study was perfomed on25 patients with distractive flexion injuries in kwer cervical spine admitted from Jan2007 toDec2010. There werel5 cases of fresh injury, including5 cases of spinal cord injuries,4 cases of nerve root injuries There were 10 cases of old injuries, all of whan complained of neck pain and neurological dysfunction Preoperative reduction was achieved in 11 cases of fresh injuries, followed by anterior discectomy and fusion Reduction failed in the other4 cases and then they underwent anterior-posterior surgeries Ten cases of old injuries underwent anterior corpectany( the vertebra adjacent to the dislocated vertebrae). Results The average follow-up wasl3 months(6-21 months) in this group Seven

  9. Cervicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much growth of normal bacteria in the vagina (bacterial vaginosis) can also cause cervicitis. ... under a microscope (may show candidiasis , trichomoniasis , or bacterial vaginosis) Pap test Tests for gonorrhea or chlamydia Rarely, ...

  10. Study of basilar artery hemodynamic changes in cervical rotation and flexion by color Doppler ultrasound%彩色多普勒超声对正常人头颈部分别向左右转动后基底动脉血流的观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉杰; 李敬府; 白志勇; 王金锐

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the basilar artery hemodynamical changes in cervical rotation and ventral flexion by color Doppler flow imaging(CDFI). Methods Basilar artery blood flow were detected during cervical With cervical right lateral,left lateral rotation and ventral flexion, the detection ratio of basilar artery by ultrasound were 89% ,84% ,81% respectively. There were no difference in statistics between the detction ratio of three kinds during cervical flexion,peak systolic velocity(PSV) and end-diastolic velocity(EDV) decreased apparently during left lateral rotation,which did not change during right lateral rotation. No changing was found with resistant index between the three kinds of cervical position. Conclusions The hemodynamic changing of basilar artery during cervical rotation and flexion could be detected by CDFI accurately,which might be useful in clinical study.%目的 应用彩色多普勒超声评价正常人头颈部分别向左右转动后基底动脉(BA)血流动力学参数.方法 应用彩色多普勒超声对62例正常人在俯卧位低头以及头颈部分别向左右转动90°后三种姿势下,观察BA血流,并对其血流动力学指标进行对比分析.结果 ①三种姿势下BA的检出率:俯卧位低头为89%,头颈部左转为84%,头颈部右转为81%,三种姿势下BA血流的显示率比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).②椎动脉颁段内径:左侧大于右侧[左侧(0.34±0.06)cm对右侧(0.32±0.05)cm,P0.05),三种姿势下阻力指数差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 彩色多普勒超声对BA检出率高,能够准确清晰地显示不同姿势下BA的血流动力学情况,提示正常人头颈部向左转时对BA血流有影响,对研究椎-基底动脉系血流动力学有着重要的临床意义.

  11. Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    the articulation between C1 and the os odontoideum on flexion imaging. The remainder of his cervical vertebral bodies had normal alignment with no...appears normal. Figure 3. Flexion view of plain cervical spine. This image shows abnormal translation of the articulation between C1 and the C2 os...worldwide. Peer Reviewed Title: Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion Journal Issue: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 12(4) Author: Robson

  12. Flexion in Abell 2744

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Justin P

    2016-01-01

    We present the first flexion-focused gravitational lensing analysis of the first of the strong-lensing "cosmic telescope" galaxy clusters, observed as part of the Hubble Frontier Fields initiative. Using HST observations of Abell 2744 (z = 0.308), we apply a modified Analytic Image Model (AIM) technique to measure source galaxy flexion and shear values at a final number density of 82 arcmin$^{-2}$. By using flexion data alone we are able to identify the primary mass structure aligned along the heart of the cluster in addition to a major substructure peak offset 1.43' from the cluster core. We generate two types of nonparametric reconstructions: a flexion aperture mass map, which identifies the central potential and substructure peak with mass signal-to-noise of 3.5$\\sigma$ and 2.3$\\sigma$ respectively; and a convergence map derived directly from the smoothed flexion field. For the primary peak we find a mass of $1.93\\times10^{14}\\,h^{-1}\\,M_{\\odot}$ within a 45" (145h$^{-1}$ kpc) aperture, and for the western...

  13. Value of MRI Examination of Supine Sagittal Flexion,Hyperextension in Diagnosis of Cervical Spinal Stenosis%仰卧矢状过屈、过伸位磁共振成像对颈椎椎管狭窄诊断的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁继军; 袁文昭; 邓德茂; 陈文福

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨仰卧矢状过屈、过伸位磁共振成像( MRI)在颈椎椎管狭窄诊断中的价值。方法对30例颈椎椎管狭窄患者行颈椎仰卧静息状矢状位、过屈位及过伸位MRI检查,比较不同体位下颈椎管矢状径的变化。结果怀疑颈椎管狭窄者在静息仰卧矢状位MRI检查无明显变化时,颈椎过屈或过伸位MRI检查椎管狭窄可以较明显地显示;静息仰卧矢状位MRI检查有明显变化时,颈椎过屈或过伸位MRI检查椎管狭窄程度表现更明显。仰卧矢状过屈位、过伸位MRI检查显示颈椎椎管狭窄程度比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),过伸位MRI检查显示颈椎椎管狭窄程度加重的比例明显高于过屈位( P<0.05)。结论仰卧矢状过屈、过伸位MRI检查在颈椎椎管狭窄诊断中有重要临床应用价值。%Objective To investigate the value of MRI examination of supine sagittal flexion ,hyperextension in the diagnosis of cervical spinal stenosis .Methods MRI scans were performed in 30 spinal stenosis patients with supine sagittal in resting,flexion,hyperextension positions,and the changes of sagittal diameter among patients in 3 different positions were statistically compared .Results MRI scans showed no obvious changes of sagittal diameter among patients with suspected cervical stenosis in supine sagittal resting position ,but the changes were observed clearly in flexion or hyperextension position .MRI scans showed obvious changes of sagittal diameter among patients in supine sagittal resting position,while the degree of cervical spinal stenosis could be observed more clearly in flexion or hyperextension position.There was significant difference in the degree of cervical spinal stenosis between hyperextension and flexion positions (P<0.05),and the degree of the former one was significantly higher than that of the latter one(P<0.05).Conclusion MRI using supine sagittal flexion ,hyperextension position

  14. 下颈椎牵张屈曲型损伤手术入路的选择及疗效分析%Choice of surgical approach for distraction-flexion injury to the lower cervical spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡卫华; 张宁; 刘永明; 殷国勇; 胡志毅; 曹晓建; 金正帅

    2010-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively compare the clinical results of 3 surgical approaches used in the treatment of distraction-flexion injury to the lower cervical spine. Methods Included in this analysis were 30 patients who had been treated surgically for a distraction-flexion injury to the lower cervical spine from August 2002 to August 2008. Seven of them were treated through anterior approach, 5 through posterior approach, 11 through posterior-anterior approaches and 7 through anterior-posterior-anterior ap-preach. The different approaches were compared in terms of changes in transverse displacement and Cobb angle, neurologic recovery (Frankel criteria), fusion time, fusion rate, surgery time, and complications.Results The mean follow-up was 8 (5 to 24) months. Bone fusion was obtained in all patients. No plate or screw loosening occurred. The mean Frankel score increased from 1.67 preoperatively to 2.22 postopera-tively. The mean Cobb angle was 7.78° before operation and 1.79° after operation, and the transverse dis-placement was 3.67 mm before operation and 0.53 nun after operation. The combined anterior and posterior approach resulted in significantly longer operation time and more blood loss than either the anterior or the posterior approach alone (P0.05).Conclusion Since all the different approaches can lead to satisfactory results, the choice of surgical ap-proach should be based on the conditions of dislocated facet joint, reduction and injury of the disc.%目的 回顾性分析不同手术入路治疗下颈椎牵张屈曲型损伤的疗效. 方法 回顾性分析自2002年8月至2008年8月手术治疗的30例下颈椎牵张屈曲型损伤患者,根据不同类型、是否合并椎间盘损伤和术前牵引复位情况选择不同的手术方法,其中前路手术7例,后路手术5例,前后联合入路手术18例.分析3组的损伤节段Cobb角、椎体水平移化的变化、神经功能恢复(Frankel评分)、融合时间、融合率、手术

  15. Slight head extension: does it change the sagittal cervical curve?

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Deed E.; Harrison, Donald D.; Janik, Tadeusz J.; Holland, Burt; Siskin, Leonard A.

    2001-01-01

    It is commonly believed that slight flexion/extension of the head will reverse the cervical lordosis. The goal of the present study was to determine whether slight head extension could result in a cervical kyphosis changing into a lordosis. Forty consecutive volunteer subjects with a cervical kyphosis and with flexion in their resting head position had a neutral lateral cervical radiograph followed immediately by a lateral cervical view taken in an extended head position to level the bite lin...

  16. The correlation analysis of the cervical spine alignment, flexion ROM of adjacent segments with the spinal cord atrophy in Hirayama disease%平山病患者颈椎曲度和相邻节段椎体屈曲度与脊髓萎缩的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鑫; 孙宇

    2013-01-01

    curvature,flexion ROM of adjacent segment with spinal cord atrophy of Hirayama disease,and to provide rationale for its surgical management.Methods:36 consecutive patients underwent flexion X-ray and neutral position cervical MRI.The radiological mcasurement included the cervical spine alignment from C2 to C7 and the arc chord distance (ACD) by the Borden's method,flexion ROM of adjacent segments by calculating the difference between neutral and flexion position of Cobb angle defined as the tangent of the posterior body line of every two adjacent segments from C3-C7,observing spinal cord atrophy on sagittal position MRI and measuring the cross-sectional area of spinal from C3-C7 on neutral position cervical MRI.According to the ACD of cervical curvature,all patients were divided into 4 groups:7mm≤ACD≤17mm,normal cervical spine alignment; 1mm<ACD<7mm,straight or mild kyphosis;-4mm<ACD≤1mm,moderate kyphosis; ACD≤-4mm,severe kyphosis.The correlation analysis was performed between the adjacent vertebral flexion ROM and the cross-sectional area of corresponding cervical spinal cord on neutral position MRI.Results:In the 36 patients,normal cervical alignment accounted for 8 cases,straight or mild kyphosis for 13 cases; moderatc or severe kyphosis for 15 cases,of these 15 patients,14 had apex of kyphosis on C5 and 1 on C44.14 patients showed lower spinal cord atrophy on neutral MRI.13/28 cases with cervical straight or ankylosis presented with spinal cord compression was much higher than 1/8 of cases with normal cervical alignment (P<0.05).There were significant differences among flexion ROM of adjacent segments from C3 to C7 (P<0.05),with a higher flexion ROM of C5-C6 & C6-C7.Significant differences also existed between the cross-sectional area of spinal cord form C3 to C7 (P<0.05),with the lowest value at C5-C6 & C6-C7.Flexion ROM of adjacent segments was negatively correlated with the corresponding cross-sectional area of spinal cord in neutral MRI(r=-0

  17. 多方法评价仰卧位屈颈牵引治疗神经根型颈椎病的随机对照研究%Randomized Controlled study on Multi-method Evaluation of the Clinical Value of Supine Cervical Vertebra Traction with Neck Flexion in the Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王一; 蔚浩; 周睿

    2016-01-01

    Objective To probe into the clinical value of supine cervical vertebra traction with neck flexion in treating cervical spondylotic radiculopathy.Methods From August 2011 to December 2013,71 patients were divided randomly into a treatment group of 36 cases and a control group of 35 cases.They were treated respectively with supine cervical vertebra traction with neck flexion,and cervical vertebra traction on a sitting position.Both groups had acupuncture,moxibustion,massage and medium frequency electrotherapy.The period of observation was 15 days.We evaluated the results by surveying physiological curvature of the cervical spine on lateral radiograph,and visual analogue scale (VAS),neck disability index (NDI),criteria of diagnosis and therapeutic effect of syndromes in traditional Chinese medicine syndrome and clinical assessment scale for cervical spondylosis (CASCS) were also used.Results Physiological curvature of cervical spine was much improved in both groups after treatment (P < 0.05).The distance of cervical vertebra arc between vertebral anterior edge sequences in treatment group before treating was (4.07±3.63) mm and it was (9.03±4.31) mm after treatment.For the control group,those two numbers were respectively (4.13±3.02) and (8.87±3.97)mm.There was no significant difference in the distance of cervical vertebra arc and its increase between vertebral anterior edge between the two groups after treatment.There was significant difference in the efficiency rate between the two groups (P < 0.05) (treatment group 100.00%,control group 97.14%).When cured rate and cured-markedly effective rate were added,the treatment group (80.56%) was much better than the control group (51.43%) (P < 0.01).As to VAS score,NDI and CASCS scores,both groups got much better after treatment (P < 0.01).For VAS,the treatment group decreased from 8.43±0.75 before treatment to 1.40±0.61 after treatment,while the control group from 8.35±0.78 before treatment to 2.55±0

  18. Anterior cervical plating plus axial screw fixation for treating cervical flexion-distraction injury: anatomic study%颈椎前路钢板并轴向螺钉固定治疗屈曲牵张型损伤的解剖学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿东滨; 邹琳; 杨勇; 徐准; 程勇泉

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the anatomical flexibility of anterior cervical plating plus axial screw fixation for treating cervical flexion-distraction. Methods Fifty cases of digital lateral X-ray films from adult healthy volunteers aged 24-48 years, with mean 28 years, were measured directly in the JW-PACS picture system. Measuring parameters included vertebral body height, intervertebral disc height and disc depth. The line started from anteroinferior point of the inferior vertebrae to posterosuperior point of the superior vertebrae was drawn to mimic the axial screw fixation in the lateral film. The maximal screw length, screw cephalic inclination angle and the distance between screw and anterior vertebral margin at disc level was recorded. Simulated anterior cervical plating and axial screw fixation was carried out in one preserved human specimen under the guidance of C-arm X-ray fluoroscope. Results The maximal length of anterior cervical axial screw was (41.18+3.92 )mm, and the axial screw inclination angle (25.21±3.58)°. The suitable depth of interbody graft was more than (11.69±1.63)mm, but less than (17.09±1.50)mm of disc depth. Simulated procedure in the preserved specimen demonstrated that axial screw fixation could be successfully completed at C2/3, C3/4, C4/5, and C5/6 levels, but difficult be performed at C6/7 due to obstacle of sternum. Conclusions The flexibility of axial screw fixation plus anterior cervical plating is confirmed from this study for managing of cervical flexion-distraction injuries.%目的 提出一种联合颈椎前路钢板固定治疗屈曲牵张型颈椎损伤的新术式—颈椎轴向螺钉固定术,进行解剖学可行性研究.方法 随机调取50例正常成年志愿者的颈椎侧位片.年龄22~48岁,平均28岁.通过JW-PACS图像系统,测量C2~6椎体高度;C2/3~C5/6椎间盘高度以及椎间盘矢径;并模拟轴向螺钉固定,即下位椎体前下缘至上位椎体后上缘的连线,测量轴向螺钉最大

  19. In-vivo spinal cord deformation in flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Dougherty, Lawrence; Margulies, Susan S.

    1997-05-01

    Traumatic mechanical loading of the head-neck complex results cervical spinal cord injury when the distortion of the cord is sufficient to produce functional or structural failure of the cord's neural and/or vascular components. Characterizing cervical spinal cord deformation during physiological loading conditions is an important step to defining a comprehensive injury threshold associated with acute spinal cord injury. In this study, in vivo quasi- static deformation of the cervical spinal cord during flexion of the neck in human volunteers was measured using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of motion with spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM). A custom-designed device was built to guide the motion of the neck and enhance more reproducibility. the SPAMM pulse sequence labeled the tissue with a series of parallel tagging lines. A single- shot gradient-recalled-echo sequence was used to acquire the mid-sagittal image of the cervical spine. A comparison of the tagged line pattern in each MR reference and deformed image pair revealed the distortion of the spinal cord. The results showed the cervical spinal cord elongates during head flexion. The elongation experienced by the spinal cord varies linearly with head flexion, with the posterior surface of the cord stretching more than the anterior surface. The maximal elongation of the cord is about 12 percent of its original length.

  20. Competitive inhibition of the nondepolarizing muscle relaxant rocuronium on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels in the rat superior cervical ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengmi; Wang, Zhenmeng; Zhang, Jinmin; Qiu, Haibo; Sun, Yuming; Yang, Liqun; Wu, Feixiang; Zheng, Jijian; Yu, Weifeng

    2014-05-01

    A number of case reports now indicate that rocuronium can induce a number of serious side effects. We hypothesized that these side effects might be mediated by the inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons. Conventional patch clamp recordings were used to study the effects of rocuronium on nAChR currents from enzymatically dissociated rat SCG neurons. We found that ACh induced a peak transient inward current in rat SCG neurons. Additionally, rocuronium suppressed the peak ACh-evoked currents in rat SCG neurons in a concentration-dependent and competitive manner, and it increased the extent of desensitization of nAChRs. The inhibitory rate of rocuronium on nAChR currents did not change significantly at membrane potentials between -70 and -20 mV, suggesting that this inhibition was voltage independent. Lastly, rocuronium preapplication enhanced its inhibitory effect, indicating that this drug might prefer to act on the closed state of nAChR channels. In conclusion, rocuronium, at clinically relevant concentrations, directly inhibits nAChRs at the SCG by interacting with both opened and closed states. This inhibition is competitive, dose dependent, and voltage independent. Blockade of synaptic transmission in the sympathetic ganglia by rocuronium might have potentially inhibitory effects on the cardiovascular system.

  1. Fracture and Viscoelastic Characteristics of the Human Cervical Spine,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    flexion moments ranging from -800 N-mm to - 4r 9000 N-mm with no dependence on cervical spinal level. In future testing, the angles of rotation should...loaded in compression while controlling the anterior-posterior shear load at zero and the flexion - extension angle at a constant setting. The final...specimen, tests were performed at fixed flexion -extension angles of 0 degrees, 2 degrees extension and 2 degrees flexion in sequence. The test lasted 1

  2. Improved knee flexion following high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionberger David R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of new techniques and materials in total knee arthroplasty (TKA continue to be a primary focus in orthopedic surgery. The primary aim of the present study is to evaluate post TKA total range of motion (ROM among a group of patients who received a gender specific high-flexion design modification implant compared to a control group of patients who received non-gender specific implants. Methods and results The control group was comprised of 39 TKAs that were recruited pre-operatively and received the non-gender specific implant while the study group consisted of 39 TKAs who received gender specific implants. The study group yielded an improvement in mean post-operative ROM of 21° at 12 months, whereas the mean improvement in ROM among the control group was 11°. Thus, the study group had a 10° increased ROM improvement (91% over the control group (p = 0.00060. In addition, 100% of the subjects with gender specific high-flexion implants achieved greater or equal ROM post-operatively compared to 82% for the control cohort. Lastly, women who exhibited greater pre-operative ROM and lower body mass index (BMI were found to benefit the most with the gender specific prosthesis. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that among subjects with a normal BMI, the gender specific high-flexion knee implant is associated with increased ROM as compared to the non-gender specific non-high-flexion implant designs.

  3. Radioanatomy of upper airways in flexion and retroflexion of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penning, L.

    1988-02-01

    Ten flexion-retroflexion radiographs of the cervical spine (in lateral projection) were utilized to study anatomical configuration and topography of the upper airpassages in these two positions. Measurements of AP diameters revealed narrowing in flexion and widening in retroflexion, being maximal at the region of the epiglottis, and minimal at the regions of larynx and trachea. The distance from the pharyngeal attachment of the skull-base, to the upper chest aperture proved to be markedly greater in retroflexion than in flexion. As the pharynx virtually does not change its length during these movements, it is drawn up (with respect to the upper chest aperture) in retroflexion, and pushed down in flexion, over a mean distance of 42 mm. The up and down movement of the upper part of the trachea is slightly less: 38 mm.

  4. Head flexion angle while using a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sojeong; Kang, Hwayeong; Shin, Gwanseob

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive or prolonged head flexion posture while using a smartphone is known as one of risk factors for pain symptoms in the neck. To quantitatively assess the amount and range of head flexion of smartphone users, head forward flexion angle was measured from 18 participants when they were conducing three common smartphone tasks (text messaging, web browsing, video watching) while sitting and standing in a laboratory setting. It was found that participants maintained head flexion of 33-45° (50th percentile angle) from vertical when using the smartphone. The head flexion angle was significantly larger (p neck pain of heavy smartphone users. Practitioner Summary: In this laboratory study, the severity of head flexion of smartphone users was quantitatively evaluated when conducting text messaging, web browsing and video watching while sitting and standing. Study results indicate that text messaging while sitting caused the largest head flexion than that of other task conditions.

  5. Analysis of functional CT scan in cervical vertebral disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirofuji, Eiichi; Tanaka, Seisuke; Tomihara, Mitsuo; Kita, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki

    1982-12-01

    The atlantoaxial joint showed displacement in various directions in rheumatoid arthritis and cervical spondylosis. The displacements were promoted by anterior flexion and rotatory movements, exerting great influences on the spnial cord. The intervertebral space between the 5th and 6th vertebra showed narrowing of the vertebral canal in cervical spondylosis and was promoted by posterior flexion to affect the spinal cord to a great extent. Functional CT scan was useful for observation of pathologic conditions of vertebral diseases.

  6. Effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid and abdominal muscle activity during curl-up exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Moon, Dong-Chul; Hong, Ki-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid (SCM), rectus abdominis (RA), and external oblique (EO) muscle activity during a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up with neck flexion restriction. [Subjects] In total, 13 healthy male subjects volunteered for this study. [Methods] All subjects performed a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up exercise in which neck flexion was restricted by the subject's hand. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from the SCM, RA, and EO during the curl-up. [Results] There was significantly lower EMG activity of the SCM during the curl-up exercise with neck flexion restriction compared to the traditional curl-up exercise. Conversely, the activity of the RA and EO muscles was significantly higher in the curl-up exercise with neck flexion restriction than in the traditional curl-up exercise. [Conclusion] Neck flexion restriction is recommended to prevent excessive activation of superficial cervical flexors during the curl-up exercise.

  7. Analytic PSF Correction for Gravitational Flexion Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Levinson, Rebecca Sobel

    2013-01-01

    Given a galaxy image, one cannot simply measure its flexion. An image's spin one and three shape properties, typically associated with F- and G-flexion, are actually complicated functions of the galaxy's intrinsic shape and the telescope's PSF, in addition to the lensing properties. The same is true for shear. In this work we create a completely analytic mapping from apparent measured galaxy flexions to gravitational flexions by (1) creating simple models for a lensed galaxy and for a PSF whose distortions are dominated by atmospheric smearing and optical aberrations, (2) convolving the two models, and (3) comparing the pre- and post-convolved flexion-like shape variations of the final image. For completeness, we do the same for shear. As expected, telescope astigmatism, coma, and trefoil can corrupt measurements of shear, F- flexion, and G-flexion, especially for small galaxies. We additionally find that PSF size dilutes the flexion signal more rapidly than the shear signal. Moreover, mixing between shears, ...

  8. Influence of flexion angle of files on the decentralization of oval canals during instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Antonieta Veloso Carvalho de; Alves, Letícia Duarte; Pereira, Analice Giovani; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Biffi, João Carlos Gabrielli

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the flexion angle of files on the decentralization of root canals during instrumentation. Fifteen lower incisors were instrumented with Protaper Universal files and radiographed in two directions (mesiodistal and buccolingual) before and after instrumentation with a #15 K-file in position for evaluating the flexion angle of files. The specimens were also scanned before and after instrumentation using micro-computed tomography to obtain the canal area and the distance from the center position of the file to the canal walls. Sections located 1.0 mm (end of the canal), 3.0 mm (apical third), 9.0 mm (middle third), and 15.0 mm (cervical third) from the apex were verified. After instrumentation, the flexion angles of files decreased by an average of 0.76º in the buccolingual direction and 1.92º in the mesiodistal direction (p cervical to the end of the root canal (p flexion angles of files influence the final shape of the root canal, resulting in file decentralization along the pathway of the canal.

  9. Torso flexion modulates stiffness and reflex response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, K P; Rogers, E

    2007-08-01

    Neuromuscular factors that contribute to spinal stability include trunk stiffness from passive and active tissues as well as active feedback from reflex response in the paraspinal muscles. Trunk flexion postures are a recognized risk factor for occupational low-back pain and may influence these stabilizing control factors. Sixteen healthy adult subjects participated in an experiment to record trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflex gain during voluntary isometric trunk extension exertions. The protocol was designed to achieve trunk flexion without concomitant influences of external gravitational moment, i.e., decouple the effects of trunk flexion posture from trunk moment. Systems identification analyses identified reflex gain by quantifying the relation between applied force disturbances and time-dependent EMG response in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Trunk stiffness was characterized from a second order model describing the dynamic relation between the force disturbances versus the kinematic response of the torso. Trunk stiffness increased significantly with flexion angle and exertion level. This was attributed to passive tissue contributions to stiffness. Reflex gain declined significantly with trunk flexion angle but increased with exertion level. These trends were attributed to correlated changes in baseline EMG recruitment in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Female subjects demonstrated greater reflex gain than males and the decline in reflex gain with flexion angle was greater in females than in males. Results reveal that torso flexion influences neuromuscular factors that control spinal stability and suggest that posture may contribute to the risk of instability injury.

  10. The increased range of cervical flexed motion detected by radiographs in Hirayama disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xiaojuan, E-mail: xu_xiaojuan@126.com [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, North Huayuan Road No.49, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Han Hongbin, E-mail: hhb1630@vip.sina.com [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, North Huayuan Road No.49, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Gao Hui, E-mail: gaohui815@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, North Huayuan Road No.49, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Hou Chao, E-mail: houchaao@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, North Huayuan Road No.49, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Fan Dongsheng, E-mail: dsfan@sina.com [Department of Neurology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Fu Yu, E-mail: lilac_fu@tom.com [Department of Neurology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Sun Yu, E-mail: sunyuor@vip.sina.com [Department of Orthopedic, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Cervical flexion movement is supposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Hirayama disease. But there is no report on the range of cervical flexed motion in this disease. The purpose of current study was to compare the range of cervical flexed motion in patients with Hirayama disease with the one in healthy controls using conventional lateral flexion radiographs of the cervical spine, and to investigate the diagnostic value of radiographs for Hirayama disease. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by a local institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. From August 2007 to March 2009, conventional flexion cervical radiographs and flexion cervical MRI were performed on 31 Hirayama disease patients (all men, age range, 16-24 years, mean age, 19.52 {+-} 2.29 years) and 40 control subjects (all men, age range, 16-25 years, mean age, 23.10 {+-} 2.20 years). The segmental and overall range of cervical flexed motion was quantitatively measured. Receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated and the diagnostic accuracy was qualified by using the area under the curve Az. Results: Both the segmental and overall range of cervical flexed motion of patients determined by flexion cervical radiographs was greater than that of controls. The Az value was 0.90, indicating a moderate to good ability of conventional flexion radiographs in the diagnosis of Hirayama disease. Conclusion: Hirayama disease patients have an increased flexed motion range of cervical spine which would contribute to the pathophysiological change and determine its treatment. Conventional flexion radiographs might be suitable to be used as first line radiographic examination, followed by MRI in cases of suspected Hirayama disease.

  11. Review of National Work Programme on the Long Term Effects of Sustained High G on the Cervical Spine (Analyse du programme de travail national : les effets long terme sur la colonne cervicale d’un nombre de G lev et prolong )

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    defined by the pilot. The test consisted of two parts, first to return to their own neutral position after a sub maximum range cervical flexion -extension...healthy group had a significant better movement time and this in both cervical beamer tests. The MVC ratio flexion /extension was significant higher in...KINGDOM NATIONAL WORK PROGRAMME ON THE LONG TERM EFFECTS OF SUSTAINED HIGH G ON THE CERVICAL SPINE RTO-TR-HFM-083 6 - 7 • In flexion , MDF of the

  12. Effects of thoracic kyphosis and forward head posture on cervical range of motion in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, June; Pua, Yong-Hao; Clark, Ross A; Bryant, Adam L

    2013-02-01

    It is unclear how age-related postural changes such as thoracic spine kyphosis influence cervical range-of-motion (ROM) in patients with cervical spine dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the mediating effects of forward head posture (FHP) on the relationship between thoracic kyphosis and cervical mobility in older adults with cervical spine dysfunction. Fifty-one older adults (30 females, mean[SD]age = 66[4.9] years) with cervical spine dysfunction - that is, cervical pain with or without referred pain, numbness or paraesthesia - participated. Pain-related disability was measured using the neck disability index (NDI). Thoracic kyphosis was measured using a flexicurve. FHP was assessed via the craniovertebral angle (CVA) measured from a digitized, lateral-view photograph of each subject. Cervical ROM - namely, upper and general cervical rotation and cervical flexion - was measured by the Cervical Range-of-Motion (CROM) device. Greater thoracic kyphosis was significantly associated with lesser CVA (Spearman ρ = -0.48) whereas greater CVA was significantly associated with greater cervical flexion (Spearman ρ = 0.30) and general rotation ROM (ρ = 0.33), but not with upper cervical rotation ROM (ρ = 0.15). Bootstrap mediational analyses, adjusted for age, gender, weight and NDI, revealed significant indirect effects of thoracic kyphosis on cervical flexion and general rotation ROM through a FHP. Our results show that FHP mediated the relationship between thoracic kyphosis and cervical ROM, specifically general cervical rotation and flexion. These results not only support the justifiable attention given to addressing FHP to improve cervical impairments, but they also suggest that addressing thoracic kyphosis impairments may constitute an "upstream" approach.

  13. Functional cervical myelography with iohexol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakstad, P.; Aaserud, O.; Nyberg-Hansen, R.; Ganes, T.

    1985-05-01

    Thirty patients underwent functional cervical myelography, i.e. radiographs in the lateral view were obtained in extension as well as in flexion of the neck. Sagittal tomography was performed in both positions. Narrowing of the subarachnoid space and increased sagittal diameter of the spinal cord due to shortening were demonstrated in the lateral view in extension. In flexion a widening of the subarachnoid space was seen in almost all. In some cases with advanced narrowing or spinal block in extension, such widening in flexion resulted in better diagnostic images by providing passage of the contrast medium caudally. Although iohexol (Omnipaque, Nyegaard and Co., Oslo) was regularly forced into the posterior cranial fossa by the movements, the frequency of side effects was approximately the same as in our former trials with iohexol in conventional cervical myelography. EEG changes occurred in two patients (7%). A sitting position for 3-4 min after the examination followed by an elevated head end of the bed was probably important for preventing side effects from the contrast medium. Specific questioning revealed twice as many subjective side effects as reported after general questions alone.

  14. Influence of flexion angle of files on the decentralization of oval canals during instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonieta Veloso Carvalho de OLIVEIRA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the flexion angle of files on the decentralization of root canals during instrumentation. Fifteen lower incisors were instrumented with Protaper Universal files and radiographed in two directions (mesiodistal and buccolingual before and after instrumentation with a #15 K-file in position for evaluating the flexion angle of files. The specimens were also scanned before and after instrumentation using micro-computed tomography to obtain the canal area and the distance from the center position of the file to the canal walls. Sections located 1.0 mm (end of the canal, 3.0 mm (apical third, 9.0 mm (middle third, and 15.0 mm (cervical third from the apex were verified. After instrumentation, the flexion angles of files decreased by an average of 0.76º in the buccolingual direction and 1.92º in the mesiodistal direction (p < 0.001; the canal area increased by an average of 0.58, 0.37, 0.23 and 0.13 mm2 from the cervical to the end of the root canal (p < 0.001. Non-instrumented areas were observed on the buccal and lingual walls, and effective action of files was determined on the mesial and distal walls. The sections from the end of the canal showed canal deviation toward the lingual wall, whereas the other sections showed deviation toward the buccal wall. The flexion angles of files influence the final shape of the root canal, resulting in file decentralization along the pathway of the canal.

  15. Differences between two subgroups of low back pain patients in lumbopelvic rotation and symmetry in the erector spinae and hamstring muscles during trunk flexion when standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-hee; Yoo, Won-gyu; Choi, Bo-ram

    2013-04-01

    The present study was performed to examine lumbopelvic rotation and to identify asymmetry of the erector spinae and hamstring muscles in people with and without low back pain (LBP). The control group included 16 healthy subjects, the lumbar-flexion-rotation syndrome LBP group included 17 subjects, and the lumbar-extension-rotation syndrome LBP group included 14 subjects. Kinematic parameters were recorded using a 3D motion-capture system, and electromyography parameters were measured using a Noraxon TeleMyo 2400T. The two LBP subgroups showed significantly more lumbopelvic rotation during trunk flexion in standing than did the control group. The muscle activity and flexion-relaxation ratio asymmetries of the erector spinae muscles in the lumbar-flexion-rotation syndrome LBP group were significantly greater than those in the control group, and the muscle activity and flexion-relaxation ratio asymmetry of the hamstring muscles in the lumbar-extension-rotation syndrome LBP group were significantly greater than those in the control group. Imbalance or asymmetry of passive tissue could lead to asymmetry of muscular activation. Muscle imbalance can cause asymmetrical alignment or movements such as unexpected rotation. The results showed a greater increase in lumbopelvic rotation during trunk flexion in standing among the lumbar-flexion-rotation syndrome and lumbar-extension-rotation syndrome LBP groups compared with the control group. The differences between the two LBP subgroups may be a result of imbalance and asymmetry in erector spinae and hamstring muscle properties.

  16. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  17. The effects of a single game of rugby on active cervical range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Sally D; McCarthy, Peter W

    2009-03-01

    The cumulative effect of playing rugby over many years decreases active cervical range of motion, especially in the forwards. This in itself should influence long-term neck care; however, it leaves the important question of how noticeable the acute effects of active cervical range of motion are following a single game. The active cervical range of motion was measured in 21 elite rugby players (mean age 24.4 +/- 4.3 years; average professional career of 7 +/- 3.4 years) before and after a single game of rugby at the start of the season. The active cervical range of motion was recorded in flexion, extension, left and right side flexion, plus left and right rotation using a cervical range of motion device. The results show generally decreased active cervical range of motion from before to after a game independent of position played. Rugby backs had significantly (P cervical range of motion in flexion, while forwards were affected in extension and left lateral flexion (P cervical range of motion), and the affected neck movement appears to be related to the role of positional play. The authors suggest that neck training and muscle damage repair should be an important part of a rugby player's post-game recovery to limit the reduction in functional capacity.

  18. Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-06

    Did you know that cervical cancer rates differ by race/ethnicity and region? Or that cervical cancer can usually be prevented if precancerous cervical lesions are found by a Pap test and treated? Find out how getting regular Pap tests can save a woman's life.  Created: 3/6/2007 by National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.   Date Released: 4/25/2007.

  19. Improving Pre-Operative Flexion in Primary TKA: A Surgical Technique Emphasizing Knee Flexion with 5-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward McPherson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study prospectively reviews a consecutive series of 228 primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA procedures utilizing a technique to optimize knee flexion. The main features include: (1the use of a “patellar friendly” femoral component and reduced thickness patellar components, (2 patient individualized adjustment of the femoral component rotation set strictly to the anterior-posterior femoral axis, (3a rigorous flexion compartment debridement to remove non-essential posterior femoral bone with a Z-osteotome, and (4incorporation of a rapid recovery protocol with features to promote knee flexion. Results were categorized into three groups: low pre-op flexion (90 degrees and below, regular pre-op flexion (91-125 degrees, and high pre-op flexion (126 degrees and above. Average flexion in the low flexion group improved by 20 degrees at 6 weeks, 28 degrees at 3 months, 31 degrees at 1 year, and 30 degrees at 5 years. In the regular flexion group, average flexion improved by 2 degrees at 6 weeks, 10 degrees at 3 months, 12 degrees at 1 year, and 13 degrees at 5 years. Finally, in the high flexion group, average flexion decreased by 7 degrees at 6 weeks, regained preoperative levels at 3 months, and increased by 3 degrees at 1 year and 4 degrees at 5 years. In summary, a technique that emphasizes patellofemoral kinematics can consistently improve flexion in TKA in short and long-term follow-up.

  20. The Effect of the Cervical Orthosis on Swallowing Physiology and Cervical Spine Motion During Swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekata, Kojiro; Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Matsubayashi, Jun; Toda, Kazukiyo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Cervical orthosis is used to immobilize the neck in various disorders such as trauma and post-operation. However, it is still uncertain how cervical orthosis restricts the degree of movement of the cervical spine during swallowing and how they affect swallowing physiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these issues using the Philadelphia(®) Collar. We conducted videofluorography of swallowing in 39 healthy subjects (23 men, 16 women; mean age of 34.3 years) with and without cervical orthosis. To compare the two conditions regarding the cervical spine motion, we determined the angular and positional changes of the occipital bone (C0) and each cervical vertebra (C1-C7) from the oral phase to the pharyngeal phase. Similarly, to compare swallowing physiology, we assessed the start and end times and the durations of soft palate elevation, rapid hyoid anterosuperior movement, epiglottis inversion, closure of the laryngeal vestibule, and pharyngoesophageal segment (PES) opening. Finally, we compared the transit times of contrast agent in the two conditions. The respective extensions of C1, C2, and C3 were 0.31°, 0.07°, and 0.05° (mean) with cervical orthosis, and the respective flexions of C1, C2, and C3 were 0.98°, 1.42°, and 0.85° (mean) without. These results suggested that cervical orthosis restricted the flexion of C1-C3. Analysis of swallowing physiology revealed that the average durations of hyoid anterosuperior elevation, epiglottic inversion, and PES opening were prolonged by 0.09, 0.19, and 0.05 s, respectively. In conclusion, the cervical orthosis restricted the movement of the cervical spine during swallowing and changed swallowing physiology.

  1. THE EFFECT OF THE UPPER LIMB TENSION TEST IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ROM LIMITATION AND PAIN IN CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Sarfraznawaz F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objectives: To study the effect of the upper limb tension test in the management of limitation of range of motion and pain in patients with cervical radiculopathy compared with a control group. Intervention and Outcomes: A total of 40 patients were treated with two types of interventions. The Control group received a conservative management protocol and the Experimental group received an experimental protocol that included mobilization using the Upper Limb Tension Test in addition to the conservative protocol .The outcomes measures were flexion, extension, right side flexion and left side flexion ranges of the cervical spine and VAS score for Pain. Results: All data collected was statistically analysed on the Stat Pac 3.0. Pre and Post test values were taken for both cervical range of motion and pain for both the Control and Experimental groups. Paired ‘t’ test was used for within the group comparison. Unpaired ‘t’ test was used for between the group comparison which showed a highly significant difference in favor of the experimental group at 99.9%(P<0.001 between the ROM of Flexion, Extension, right Side Flexion and left Side Flexion of the cervical spine. Conclusion: The results of the study showed that adding neural mobilization using ULLT certainly benefits patients of cervical radiculopathy as far as the cervical range of motion and pain is considered.

  2. Improving lensing cluster mass estimate with flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, Vincenzo F; Er, Xinzhong; Maoli, Roberto; Scaramella, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational lensing has long been considered as a valuable tool to determine the total mass of galaxy clusters. The shear profile as inferred from the statistics of ellipticity of background galaxies allows to probe the cluster intermediate and outer regions thus determining the virial mass estimate. However, the mass sheet degeneracy and the need for a large number of background galaxies motivate the search for alternative tracers which can break the degeneracy among model parameters and hence improve the accuracy of the mass estimate. Lensing flexion, i.e. the third derivative of the lensing potential, has been suggested as a good answer to the above quest since it probes the details of the mass profile. We investigate here whether this is indeed the case considering jointly using weak lensing, magnification and flexion. We use a Fisher matrix analysis to forecast the relative improvement in the mass accuracy for different assumptions on the shear and flexion signal - to - noise (S/N) ratio also varying t...

  3. Age-Related Changes in Cervical Sagittal Range of Motion and Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Nam, Ji Hoon; Riew, K. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To compare sagittal cervical range of motion (ROM) and alignment in young versus middle-aged adults. Methods One hundred four asymptomatic adults were selected randomly out of 791 subjects who underwent lateral cervical radiographs in neutral, flexion, and extension positions. They were divided into two groups: young (age 20 to 29, 52 people) and middle-aged adults (age 50 to 59, 52 people). We determined the ROMs of upper cervical (occipital...

  4. In Vivo Healthy Knee Kinematics during Dynamic Full Flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Hamai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion were evaluated using 3D-to-2D model registration techniques. Continuous knee motions were recorded during full flexion in a lunge from 85° to 150°. Medial and lateral tibiofemoral contacts and femoral internal-external and varus-valgus rotations were analyzed as a function of knee flexion angle. The medial tibiofemoral contact translated anteroposteriorly, but remained on the center of the medial compartment. On the other hand, the lateral tibiofemoral contact translated posteriorly to the edge of the tibial surface at 150° flexion. The femur exhibited external and valgus rotation relative to the tibia over the entire activity and reached 30° external and 5° valgus rotations at 150° flexion. Kinematics’ data during dynamic full flexion may provide important insight as to the designing of high-flexion total knee prostheses.

  5. Cervical Angina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Walter I.; Makovitch, Steven A.; Merchant, Shabbir Hussain I.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical angina has been widely reported as a cause of chest pain but remains underrecognized. This series demonstrates the varied clinical presentation of patients with cervical angina, the delay in diagnosis, and the extensive cardiac examinations patients with this condition typically undergo prior to a definitive diagnosis. Recognition of this condition in patients with acute chest pain requires a high index of suspicion and an awareness of the common presenting features and clinical findings of cervical angina. PMID:25553225

  6. Weak lensing goes bananas: What flexion really measures

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In weak gravitational lensing, the image distortion caused by shear measures the projected tidal gravitational field of the deflecting mass distribution. To lowest order, the shear is proportional to the mean image ellipticity. If the image sizes are not small compared to the scale over which the shear varies, higher-order distortions occur, called flexion. For ordinary weak lensing, the observable quantity is not the shear, but the reduced shear, owing to the mass-sheet degeneracy. Likewise, the flexion itself is unobservable. Rather, higher-order image distortions measure the reduced flexion, i.e., derivatives of the reduced shear. We derive the corresponding lens equation in terms of the reduced flexion and calculate the resulting relation between brightness moments of source and image. Assuming an isotropic distribution of source orientations, estimates for the reduced shear and flexion are obtained; these are then tested with simulations. In particular, the presence of flexion affects the determination o...

  7. INFLUENCE OF FLEXION POSITION OF THE KNEE ON LIMB ALIGNMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋雷生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To verify the influence of flexion position of the knee on limb alignment,the change of the standing femorotibial angle(FTA)with knee flexion was radiologically investigated. MethodsRadiographs were taken on each left knee of 47 volunteers with seldom complaints in a one-leg standing position,The standing femorotibial angles(FTA)in full knee extension were compared with the corresponding ones in different angles of knee flexion,and the relationship between the FTA and the flexion angle was investigated. Results Standing FTAs in knee flexion were always smaller than the corresponding ones in full knee extension.With the increment of the flexion angle,the FTA decreased.Positive correlation was found between the difference(△FTA)of the standing FTA in full extension and in flexion and the flexion angle of the knee.Conclusion In the preoperative planning of knee surgeries such as high tibial osteotomy and arthroplasty,the influence of flexion contracture on limb alignment should be taken into consideration to avoid overcorrection or undercorrection.

  8. Cervical dysplasia - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to detect cervical cancer. Limited or early cervical cancer (carcinoma in situ, or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, or dysplasia) requires treatment with ablation therapy, usually in the form of ...

  9. A stiff collar can restrict atlantoaxial instability in rheumatoid cervical spine in selected cases.

    OpenAIRE

    Kauppi, M; Anttila, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the efficiency of a stiff collar in restricting the instability of anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS). METHODS--Twenty two successive patients with an unstable AAS were studied. Lateral view radiographs were taken of the cervical spine in flexion, extension, and neutral positions without a collar, and in full flexion with a custom made stiff collar. RESULTS--The collar restricted more than 30% of the maximal instability of the AAS in 50% of the patients. These patient...

  10. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Armijo-Olivo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods: A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. Results: A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82. Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07. However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82 were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Conclusions: Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders.

  11. Thigh-calf contact force measurements in deep knee flexion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.G.; Barink, M.; Loeffen, R.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knee models often do not contain thigh-calf contact which occurs in deep knee flexion. Thigh-calf contact is expected to reduce muscle forces and thereby affects internal stresses in the knee joint. The purpose of this study was to measure thigh-calf contact forces. Two deep knee flexion

  12. Intratester and intertester reliability of the Cybex electronic digital inclinometer (EDI-320) for measurement of active neck flexion and extension in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousignant, M; Boucher, N; Bourbonnais, J; Gravelle, T; Quesnel, M; Brosseau, L

    2001-11-01

    This study examined the intratester and intertester reliability of the electronic digital goniometer EDI-320 for the measurement of active neck flexion and extension in healthy subjects. In the context of evidence-based practice, the EDI-320 instrument has the potential to improve patient assessment, provide a clearer picture of patient progress, and confirm the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions. However, the psychometric properties of the EDI-320 have not yet been documented for cervical spine range of motion. Forty-four individuals with no known history of cervical disorder within the three months prior to the testing, voluntarily consented to participate in this study. Repeated measurements with the EDI-320 were taken by two trained testers (TH1 and TH2) and data were recorded by two separate observers. Subjects performed a standardized warm-up. Testers were required to repeat palpation of bony landmarks prior to each trial. Measurements were taken at the end-range of active cervical flexion and extension for each subject. Both testers measured each subject twice. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were derived from one-way ANOVA for intratester reliability and a two-way ANOVA for intertester reliability. Paired t -tests were then applied to verify for systematic error. Moderate intratester reliability was found for both testers for flexion (TH1: ICC=0.77; 95% CI: 0.62-0.87; TH2: ICC=0.77; 95% CI: 0.58-0.87). As for extension, high intratester reliability was found for TH1 (ICC=0.79; 95% CI: 0.65-0.88) and moderate for TH2: (ICC=0.83; 95% CI: 0.63-0.92). Intertester reliability results showed a moderate reliability for both flexion and extension (ICC=0.66; 95% CI: 0.24-0.84) on the first trial. On the second trial, reliability was moderate for flexion (ICC=0.73; 95% CI: 0.53-0.85) and high for extension (ICC=0.80; 95% CI: 0.64-0.89). The t -test analysis revealed the inclusion of systematic error by Tester 2 for intratester reliability

  13. Cervical spondylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical osteoarthritis; Arthritis - neck; Neck arthritis; Chronic neck pain; Degenerative disk disease ... therapist). Sometimes, a few visits will help with neck pain. Cold packs and heat therapy may help your ...

  14. Weak lensing goes bananas: what flexion really measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, P.; Er, X.

    2008-07-01

    In weak gravitational lensing, the image distortion caused by shear measures the projected tidal gravitational field of the deflecting mass distribution. To lowest order, the shear is proportional to the mean image ellipticity. If the image sizes are not small compared to the scale over which the shear varies, higher-order distortions occur, called flexion. For ordinary weak lensing, the observable quantity is not the shear, but the reduced shear, owing to the mass-sheet degeneracy. Likewise, the flexion itself is unobservable. Instead, higher-order image distortions measure the reduced flexion, i.e., derivatives of the reduced shear. We derive the corresponding lens equation in terms of the reduced flexion and calculate the resulting relation between brightness moments of source and image. Assuming an isotropic distribution of source orientations, estimates for the reduced shear and flexion are obtained and then tested with simulations. In particular, the presence of flexion affects the determination of the reduced shear. The results of these simulations yield the amount of bias of the estimators as a function of the shear and flexion. We point out and quantify a fundamental limitation of the flexion formalism in terms of the product of reduced flexion and source size. If this product increases above the derived threshold, multiple images of the source are formed locally, and the formalism breaks down. Finally, we show how a general (reduced) flexion field can be decomposed into its four components. Two of them are due to a shear field, carrying an E- and B-mode in general. The other two components do not correspond to a shear field, and they can also be split up into corresponding E- and B-modes.

  15. Hyperextension strain of ``whiplash`` injuries to the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, H.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Olson, P.N. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Everson, L.I. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Winemiller, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    A full cervical spine radiographic series (including flexion and extension views) was reviewed in 40 patients with clinically proven ``whiplash`` injuries and compared to the radiographs in 105 normal controls. The level and degree of kinking or kyphosis, subluxation, and the difference in the amount of fanning between spinous processes on flexion and extension films were measured in each patient. Localized kinking greater than 10 and over 12 mm of fanning, often occurring at the level below the kinking or kyphosis, occurred mainly in the group of whiplash patients (sensitivity 81%, specificity 76%, accuracy 80%). (orig./VHE)

  16. Natural relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  17. 'Crashing' the rugby scrum -- an avoidable cause of cervical spinal injury. Case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, A T

    1982-06-12

    Deliberate crashing of the opposing packs prior to a rugby scrum is an illegal but commonly practised manoeuvre which can lead to abnormal flexion forces being applied to players in the front row, with resultant cervical spine and spinal cord injury. Two cases of cervical spinal cord injury sustained in this manner are presented. The mechanism of injury, the forces involved and preventive measures are discussed.

  18. Does dragonfly's abdomen flexion help with fast turning maneuvers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Geng; Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2013-11-01

    Dragonflies are able to achieve fast turning maneuvers during take-off flights. Both asymmetric wing flapping and abdomen flexion have been observed during the fast turning. It's widely thought that the asymmetric wing beats are responsible of producing the aerodynamic moment needed for the body rotation. However, the dynamic effect of the abdomen flexion is not clear yet. In this study, an integrated experimental and computational approach is used to study the underlying dynamic effect of dragonfly abdomen flexion. It's found that dragonfly abdomen tended to bend towards the same side as the body reorienting to. Quantitative analysis have shown that during take-off turning maneuver the abdomen flexion can modulate the arm of force by changing the position of the center of mass relative to the thorax. As a result, roll and yaw moments produced by the wing flapping can be enhanced. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  19. Cervical biomechanics and neck pain of "head-spinning" breakdancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauther, M D; Piotrowski, M; Hussmann, B; Lendemans, S; Wedemeyer, C; Jaeger, M

    2014-05-01

    The cervical spine of breakdancers is at great risk due to reversed body loading during headspin manoeuvers. This study focused on the cervical biomechanics of breakdancers and a correlation with neck pain. A standardized interview and biomechanical testing of the cervical spine of 25 participants with "headspin" ability ages 16-34 years and an age-matched cohort of 25 participants without any cervical spine problems was conducted. Neck pain history, Neck Disability Index (NDI), cervical range of motion (CROM) and cervical torque were recorded. The "headspin" group reported significantly better subjective fitness, more cervical complaints, higher pain intensity, a longer history of neck pain and a worse NDI compared to the "normal" collective. The "headspin" group showed a 2-2.5 times higher rate of neck pain than the normal population, with increased cervical flexion (pcervical torque in all planes (p<0.001). The CROM showed a negative moderate to strong correlation with NDI, pain intensity and history of neck pain. Sports medicine practitioners should be aware of headspin maneuver accidents that pose the risk of fractures, dislocations and spinal cord injuries of breakdancers.

  20. Femoral neck radiography: effect of flexion on visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garry, S.C. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Walter C Mackenzie Health Sciences Centre, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Jhangri, G.S. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. Public Health Sciences, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Lambert, R.G.W. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept.of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Walter C Mackenzie Health Sciences Centre, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)]. E-mail: rglamber@cha.ab.ca

    2005-06-15

    To determine whether flexion improves radiographic visualization of the femoral neck when the femur is externally rotated. Five human femora, with varying neck-shaft and anteversion angles, were measured and immobilized. Degree of flexion required to bring the femoral neck horizontal was measured, varying the rotation. Next, one bone was radiographed in 16 positions, varying rotation in 15{sup o} and flexion in 10{sup o} increments. Radiographs were presented in randomized blinded fashion to 15 staff radiologists for scoring of femoral neck visualization. Following this, all 5 bones were radiographed in 4 positions of rotation and at 0{sup o} and 20{sup o} flexion, and blinded randomized review of radiographs was repeated. Comparisons between angles and rotations were made using the Mann-Whitney test. The flexion angle required to bring the long axis of the femoral neck horizontal correlated directly with the degree of external rotation ({rho} < 0.05). Visualization of the femoral neck in the extended position progressively deteriorated from 15{sup o} internal rotation to 30{sup o} external rotation ({rho} <0.01). However, when 20{sup o} flexion was applied to bones in external rotation, visualization significantly improved at 15{sup o} ({rho} <0.05) and 30{sup o} ({rho} <0.01). Flexion of the externally rotated femur can bring the femoral neck into horizontal alignment, and a relatively small amount (20{sup o}) of flexion can significantly improve radiographic visualization. This manoeuvre could be useful for radiography of the femoral neck when initial radiographs are inadequate because of external rotation of the leg. (author)

  1. High resolution weak lensing mass mapping combining shear and flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Leonard, A.; Pires, S.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We propose a new mass mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. Methods: To preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, which is regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. Results: We tested our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures with the inclusion of flexion, which are otherwise lost if only shear information is used. In particular, we can detect substructures on the 15'' scale well outside of the critical region of the clusters. In addition, flexion also helps to constrain the shape of the central regions of the main dark matter halos. Our mass mapping software, called Glimpse2D, is made freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/glimpse

  2. Cervical range of movement in relation to neck dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jeremy; Marsh, D; Koller, Heiko; Zenenr, Juliane; Bannister, G

    2009-06-01

    The authors investigated the effect of neck dimension upon cervical range of motion. Data relating to 100 healthy subjects, aged between 20 and 40 years, were recorded with respect to age, gender and range of motion in three planes. Additionally, two widely used methods of measuring neck motion, chin-sternal distance and uniplanar goniometer, were assessed against a validated measurement tool, the 'CROM goniometer'. Using multiple linear regression analysis it was determined that sagittal flexion (P = 0.002) and lateral rotation (P cervical range of motion as outcome variable or as a measure at posttreatment follow-up, neck circumference was shown to be one of the factors influencing total neck motion, particularly sagittal flexion and lateral tilt. Comparison of cervical range of motion assessed with a validated measurement tool, the CROM goniometer, with results of both frequently applied clinician's instruments, the uniplanar goniometer and measurement of chin-sternal distance, showed low reliability with the latter techniques, and motion values measured with these techniques should be interpreted with caution if using them for comparison of cervical range of motion of alike groups. We demonstrated that neck dimension should be incorporated into cervical functional outcome assessment and one should be wary about recorded values for neck motion from non-validated measurement tools.

  3. Local Muscle Fatigue and 3D Kinematics of the Cervical Spine in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Daniel; Vogt, Lutz; Pippig, Torsten; Wall, Rudolf; Banzer, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    The authors aimed to further explore the effects of local muscle fatigue on cervical 3D kinematics and the interrelationship between these kinematic characteristics and local muscle endurance capacity in the unimpaired cervical spine. Twenty healthy subjects (38 ± 10 years; 5 women) performed 2 × 10 maximal cervical flexion-extension movements. Isometric muscle endurance tests (prone/supine lying) were applied between sets to induce local muscle fatigue quantified by Borg scale rates of perceived exertion (RPE) and slope in mean power frequency (MPF; surface electromyography; m. sternocleidomastoideus, m. splenius capitis). Cervical motion characteristics (maximal range of motion [ROM], coefficient of variation of the 10 repetitive movements, mean angular velocity, conjunct movements in transversal and frontal plane) were calculated from raw 3D ultrasonic movement data. Average isometric strength testing duration for flexion and extension correlated to the cervical ROM (r = .49/r = .48; p parameter following local muscle fatigue (p > .05). Although subjects' cervical muscle endurance capacity and motor output seems to be conjugated, no impact of local cervical muscle fatigue on motor function was shown. These findings underline the importance of complementary measures to address muscular performance and kinematic characteristics in outcome assessment and functional rehabilitation of the cervical spine.

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of Caspar and Cervical Spine Locking Plate systems in a cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J D; Ryken, T C; Traynelis, V C; Sawin, P D; Dexter, F; Goel, V K

    1996-06-01

    There exist two markedly different instrumentation systems for the anterior cervical spine: the Cervical Spine Locking Plate (CSLP) system, which uses unicortical screws with a locking hub mechanism for attachment, and the Caspar Trapezial Plate System, which is secured with unlocked bicortical screws. The biomechanical stability of these two systems was evaluated in a cadaveric model of complete C5-6 instability. The immediate stability was determined in six loading modalities: flexion, extension, right and left lateral bending, and right and left axial rotation. Biomechanical stability was reassessed following fatigue with 5000 cycles of flexion-extension, and finally, the spines were loaded in flexion until the instrumentation failed. The Caspar system stabilized significantly in flexion before (p < 0.05) but not after fatigue, and it stabilized significantly in extension before (p < 0.01) and after fatigue (p < 0.01). The CSLP system stabilized significantly in flexion before (p < 0.01) but not after fatigue, and it did not stabilize in extension before or after fatigue. The moment needed to produce failure in flexion did not differ substantially between the two plating systems. The discrepancy in the biomechanical stability of these two systems may be due to differences in bone screw fixation.

  5. The use of forced flexion/extension views in the obtunded trauma patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Harry J.; Wagner, Jason; Anglen, Jeff; Bunn, Paul; Metzler, Michael [Department of Radiology, Departments of Radiology/Orthopaedics and Surgery, University of Missouri-Columbia, One Hospital Drive - DC069.10, Columbia, MO 65212 (United States)

    2002-10-01

    To determine whether forced flexion/extension (F/E) films for ''clearing'' the cervical spine in unconscious or semiconscious patients are useful or actually dangerous.Design and patients. Of 810 patients admitted for blunt trauma over a 5-year period, 479 patients whose films and charts were available received passive F/E film views of the cervical spine. Of these, 447 were reviewed retrospectively in masked fashion for any exacerbation of neurological changes subsequent to the procedure and with respect to the final neurological status at discharge.Results. Twenty-nine patients (6%) had various abnormalities including fractures and ligamentous injuries seen on the initial films. Following forced F/E films no change was made in the diagnosis of 23 patients. Of the remaining six patients, two required no treatment, two only required the use of a collar but two did have surgical intervention, this decision being based on the findings seen in the initial films. However, 285 films (59%) were judged inadequate due either to inadequate F/E (150 patients, 31%) or poor visualization (194 patients, 40%). There were three false positives all subsequently cleared by other studies and there were no false negatives. From the chart review, there were no complications or deaths attributable to the procedure.Conclusion. Although we were unable to find any complication or deaths directly attributable to the procedure, the clinicians abandoned passive F/E views in obtunded patients on the grounds of expense. Our present method of ''clearing'' a cervical spine in an obtunded patient is a cross-table lateral radiograph followed by a high-resolution thin-slice CT scan with sagittal and coronal reconstruction. We are against the use of routine MRI studies and of a forced F/E view in these patients. (orig.)

  6. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery.

  7. Abnormal surface EMG during clinically normal wrist movement in cervical dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, P. M.; Leenders, K. L.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; de Jong, B. M.; Kuiper, A. J.; Maurits, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether patients with cervical dystonia (CD) have abnormal muscle activation in non-dystonic body parts. Eight healthy controls and eight CD patients performed a flexion-extension movement of the right wrist. Movement execution was recorded by surface electromyography (EMG) from fore

  8. Standard versus high-flexion posterior stabilized total knee prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Li, Junwei; Li, Peng; Wang, Dan; Liu, Ming; Xia, Lei

    2015-03-01

    This meta-analysis compared clinical outcomes between standard and high-flexion posterior-stabilized total knee prostheses to evaluate which type of total knee prosthesis was superior. Randomized, controlled trials published until October 2013 comparing standard and high-flexion posterior-stabilized total knee prostheses were reviewed. Methodologic quality was assessed with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. After data extraction, the authors compared results with fixed effects or random effects models, depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Eight randomized, controlled trials involving 660 patients met the predetermined inclusion criteria. No statistically significant differences between patients undergoing standard and high-flexion posterior-stabilized total knee prostheses were noted in postoperative range of motion (ROM) (weighted mean difference, -1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.52 to 1.67; P=.37); flexion angle (weighted mean difference, 0.54; 95% CI, -3.75 to 4.84; P=.80); Knee Society Score (weighted mean difference, 0.92; 95% CI, -0.64 to 2.48; P=.25); Hospital for Special Surgery knee score (weighted mean difference, 0.57; 95% CI, -0.42 to 1.55; P=.26); or Knee Society function score (weighted mean difference, 1.00; 95% CI, -1.49 to 3.49; P=.43). No statistical difference was found between the 2 prosthesis types in complications, involving 21 cases in the standard group and 14 cases in the high-flexion group. The current findings confirm that high-flexion posterior-stabilized total knee prostheses are not superior to standard prostheses in terms of ROM, flexion angle, knee scores, or complications with 5 years or less of follow-up.

  9. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 756x576 ... Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing and inset ...

  10. The knee in full flexion: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinskerova, V; Samuelson, K M; Stammers, J; Maruthainar, K; Sosna, A; Freeman, M A R

    2009-06-01

    There has been only one limited report dating from 1941 using dissection which has described the tibiofemoral joint between 120 degrees and 160 degrees of flexion despite the relevance of this arc to total knee replacement. We now provide a full description having examined one living and eight cadaver knees using MRI, dissection and previously published cryosections in one knee. In the range of flexion from 120 degrees to 160 degrees the flexion facet centre of the medial femoral condyle moves back 5 mm and rises up on to the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. At 160 degrees the posterior horn is compressed in a synovial recess between the femoral cortex and the tibia. This limits flexion. The lateral femoral condyle also rolls back with the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus moving with the condyle. Both move down over the posterior tibia at 160 degrees of flexion. Neither the events between 120 degrees and 160 degrees nor the anatomy at 160 degrees could result from a continuation of the kinematics up to 120 degrees . Therefore hyperflexion is a separate arc. The anatomical and functional features of this arc suggest that it would be difficult to design an implant for total knee replacement giving physiological movement from 0 degrees to 160 degrees .

  11. Developmental biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuckley, David J; Linders, David R; Ching, Randal P

    2013-04-05

    Head and neck injuries, the leading cause of death for children in the U.S., are difficult to diagnose, treat, and prevent because of a critical void in our understanding of the biomechanical response of the immature cervical spine. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional and failure biomechanics of the cervical spine across multiple axes of loading throughout maturation. A correlational study design was used to examine the relationships governing spinal maturation and biomechanical flexibility curves and tolerance data using a cadaver human in vitro model. Eleven human cadaver cervical spines from across the developmental spectrum (2-28 years) were dissected into segments (C1-C2, C3-C5, and C6-C7) for biomechanical testing. Non-destructive flexibility tests were performed in tension, compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. After measuring their intact biomechanical responses, each segment group was failed in different modes to measure the tissue tolerance in tension (C1-C2), compression (C3-C5), and extension (C5-C6). Classical injury patterns were observed in all of the specimens tested. Both the functional (pcervical spine throughout maturation and elucidated age, spinal level, and mode of loading specificity. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental perspective and facilitate the generation of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects.

  12. Age-related changes in cervical sagittal range of motion and alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Nam, Ji Hoon; Riew, K Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To compare sagittal cervical range of motion (ROM) and alignment in young versus middle-aged adults. Methods One hundred four asymptomatic adults were selected randomly out of 791 subjects who underwent lateral cervical radiographs in neutral, flexion, and extension positions. They were divided into two groups: young (age 20 to 29, 52 people) and middle-aged adults (age 50 to 59, 52 people). We determined the ROMs of upper cervical (occipital-C2 angle), midcervical (C2-C7 angle), and cervicothoracic spine (cervicosternal angle). We compared the alignment differences of the two groups by calculating the distances between C2 and C7 plumb lines, and C2 central-offset distance. Results In neutral position, there was no significant difference between young and middle-aged adults. However, in flexion, C2-C7 angle, distance between C2-C7 plumb lines, and C2 central-offset distance decreased with age. In extension, C2-C7 angle and C2 central-offset distance decreased with age. During flexion and extension, midcervical ROM and the range of C2 central-offset distance decreased in the middle-aged group. However, there was no difference between the two age groups in the ROM of the upper cervical and the cervicothoracic regions during flexion and extension. Conclusion We found that, despite of the presence of age-related cervical alignment changes, the only difference between the two groups was in the sagittal ROM of the midcervical spine during flexion and extension. Only the ROM of the midcervical spine appears to change significantly, consistent with findings that these levels are most likely to develop both symptomatic and asymptomatic degenerative changes.

  13. Range of motion in the upper and lower cervical spine in people with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolfsson, Thomas; Björklund, Martin; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2012-02-01

    Reduced cervical range of motion (ROM) is a common finding in people with neck pain. With few exceptions, only the angle between head and thorax has been measured. Our aim was to use an extended model to compare active cervical flexion and extension, separate for upper and lower cervical levels, between people with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and controls. We also investigated associations between ROM measures, symptoms and self-rated functioning. In this cross-sectional study, 102 subjects with neck pain and 33 healthy controls participated. An electromagnetic tracker system was used to measure the kinematics to construct a three-segment model including the thorax, cervical spine and head. Neutral flexion/extension were defined at subjects' self-selected seated posture. We found that in the neck pain group, extension in the upper cervical levels and predominately flexion for the lower levels were reduced. The ratio between ROM for the upper and lower levels was altered in the neck pain group so that the lower levels contributed to a lesser extent to the total sagittal ROM compared to controls. These findings could not be explained by a greater forward head posture but must have other origins. For the neck pain group, ROM measures were weakly associated to pain and self-rated functioning. Altogether, this implies that using a three-segment model for assessment of ROM can be a valuable improvement for characterisation of patients and treatment evaluation.

  14. The trigemino-cervical reflex in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanov, I; Bogdanova, D; Ishpekova, B

    2001-01-01

    There are only few reports on the trigemino-cervical reflex in humans and there is debate over the best method of reflex examination. The aim of this study was, comparing different methods, to provide a reproducible method for evaluating the trigemino-cervical reflex. The trigemino-cervical reflex was studied in 32 healthy volunteers. The stimulation was applied to the supraorbital, infraorbital or mental nerve. Recordings were performed bilaterally from the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles at rest. The reflex was also examined during maximal voluntary contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle after supraorbital nerve stimulation. It presented as a two-component reflex if recorded from a tonically active muscle and as a one-component reflex if recorded from a relaxed muscle. The most reproducible reflex responses were obtained from the resting sternocleidomastoid muscle after stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. In conclusion, the trigemino-cervical reflex may be most easily obtained from the relaxed sternocleidomastoid muscle after supraorbital nerve stimulation.

  15. Reproducibility of cervical range of motion in patients with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vet Henrica CW

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproducibility measurements of the range of motion are an important prerequisite for the interpretation of study results. The aim of the study is to assess the intra-rater and inter-rater reproducibility of the measurement of active Range of Motion (ROM in patients with neck pain using the Cybex Electronic Digital Inclinometer-320 (EDI-320. Methods In an outpatient clinic in a primary care setting 32 patients with at least 2 weeks of pain and/or stiffness in the neck were randomly assessed, in a test- retest design with blinded raters using a standardized measurement protocol. Cervical flexion-extension, lateral flexion and rotation were assessed. Results Reliability expressed by the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC was 0.93 (lateral flexion or higher for intra-rater reliability and 0.89 (lateral flexion or higher for inter-rater reliability. The 95% limits of agreement for intra-rater agreement, expressing the range of the differences between two ratings were -2.5 ± 11.1° for flexion-extension, -0.1 ± 10.4° for lateral flexion and -5.9 ± 13.5° for rotation. For inter-rater agreement the limits of agreement were 3.3 ± 17.0° for flexion-extension, 0.5 ± 17.0° for lateral flexion and -1.3 ± 24.6° for rotation. Conclusion In general, the intra-rater reproducibility and the inter-rater reproducibility were good. We recommend to compare the reproducibility and clinical applicability of the EDI-320 inclinometer with other cervical ROM measures in symptomatic patients.

  16. Knee flexion deformity and patella alta in spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotman, D B

    1976-06-01

    A study on spastic knee flexion deformity has revealed a recurrence rate of 32 per cent following attempted surgical correction on 170 knees (103 patients). This rate appeared to be unrelated to concomitant surgery for correction of hip and ankle deformity. An additional study demonstrated patella alta in 72 per cent of 100 spastic knees (50 patients) and only 2 per cent and 50 knees of a comparable group of 25 non-spastic patients. It is suggested that restoration of a normal patello-femoral relationship may reduce both the functional disability and recurrence rate of spastic knee flexion deformity when this disease is managed surgically.

  17. Effect of posterior subsidence on cervical alignment after anterior cervical corpectomy and reconstruction using titanium mesh cages in degenerative cervical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae-Won; Lee, Jung-Kil; Lee, Jung-Heon; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Soo-Han

    2014-10-01

    Subsidence after anterior cervical reconstruction using a titanium mesh cage (TMC) has been a matter of debate. The authors investigated and analyzed subsidence and its effect on clinical and radiologic parameters after cervical reconstruction using a TMC for degenerative cervical disease. Thirty consecutive patients with degenerative cervical spine disorders underwent anterior cervical corpectomy followed by reconstruction with TMC. Twenty-four patients underwent a single-level corpectomy, and six patients underwent a two-level corpectomy. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Fusion status, anterior and posterior subsidence of the TMC, segmental angle (SA) and cervical sagittal angle (CSA) were assessed by lateral and flexion-extension radiographs of the neck. The mean follow-up period was 27.6 months (range, 24 to 49 months). The VAS, NDI and JOA scores were all significantly improved at the last follow-up. No instances of radiolucency or motion-related pseudoarthrosis were detected on radiographic analysis, yielding a fusion rate of 100%. Subsidence occurred in 28 of 30 patients (93.3%). The average anterior subsidence of the cage was 1.4 ± 0.9 mm, and the average posterior subsidence was 2.9 ± 1.2 mm. The SA and CSA at the final follow-up were significantly increased toward a lordotic angle. Anterior cervical reconstruction using TMC and plating in patients with cervical degenerative disease provides good clinical and radiologic outcomes. Cage subsidence occurred frequently, especially at the posterior part of the cage. Despite the prominent posterior subsidence of the TMC, SA and CSA were improved on final follow-up radiographs, suggesting that posterior subsidence may contribute to cervical lordosis.

  18. Assessment of neck pain and cervical mobility among female computer workers at Hail University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Walaa S; Hamza, Hayat H; ElSais, Walaa M

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of neck pain among computer workers at Hail University, Saudi Arabia and to compare the cervical range of motion (ROM) of female computer workers suffering from neck pain to the cervical ROM of healthy female computer workers. One hundred and seventy-six female volunteers between 20 and 46 years of age were investigated. Fifty-six of these volunteers were staff members, 22 were administrators and 98 were students. The Cervical Range of Motion (CROM) instrument was used to measure the ROM of the cervical spine. A questionnaire was used to assess participants for the presence of neck pain. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software, and the level of significant was set at p cervical lateral flexion, rotation to the right side and protraction range between the pain and pain-free groups. Our results demonstrated that cervical ROM measurements, particularly cervical lateral flexion, rotation and protraction, could be useful for predicting changes in head and neck posture after long-term computer work.

  19. The influence of changes in cervical lordosis on bulging disk and spinal stenosis: functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Joon; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To assess the effect of lordotic curve change of the cervical spine on disk bulging and spinal stenosis by means of functional cervical MR imaging at the flexion and extension position. Using a 1.5T imager, kinematic MR examinations of 25 patients with degenerative spondylosis (average age, 41 years) were performed at the neutral, flexed and extended position of the cervical spine. Sagittal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were obtained during each of the three phases. Lordotic angle, bulging thickness of the disk, AP diameter of the spinal canal, and distance between the disk and spinal cord were measured on the workstation at each disk level. After qualitative independent observation of disk bulging, one of four grades(0, normal; 1, mild; 2, moderate; 3, marked) was assigned at each phase, and after further comparative observation, one of five scores (-2, prominent decrease; -1, mild decrease; 0, no change; 1, notable increase; 2 prominent increase) was also assigned. In addition, bulging thickness of the disk was measured and compared at the neutral, flexed, and extended positions. Average angles of the cervical spine were 160.5{+-}5.9 deg (neutral position, lordotic angle); 185.4{+-}8.5 deg (flexion, kyphotic angle); and 143.7{+-}6.7 deg (extension, lordotic angle). Average grades of disk bulging were 0.55 at the neutral position. 0.16 at flexion, and 0.7 at extension. Comparative observation showed that average scores of disk bulging were -0.39 at flexion and 0.31 at extension. The bulging thickness of the disk decreased by 24.2% at flexion and increased by 30.3% at extension, while the diameter of the spinal canal increased by 4.5% at flexion and decreased by 3.6% at extension. The distance from the posterior margin of the disk to the anterior margin of the spinal cord decreased at both flexion(6.6%) and extension(19.1%). Functional MRI showed that compared with the neutral position, disk bulging and spinal stenosis are less prominent at flexion and

  20. Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Gudavalli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction.

  1. Deep flexion-oriented bisurface-type knee joint and its tibial rotation that attributes its high performance of flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueo, Toyoji; Kihara, Yuuichi; Ikeda, Noboru; Kawai, Jun; Nakamura, Kenji; Hirokawa, Shunji

    2011-04-01

    In 1989, we developed an artificial knee prosthesis that could accommodate the oriental lifestyle where people would sit more often on the floor than on a chair. The knee had a bisurface feature with an auxiliary joint of a ball and socket at the center of the posterior part aiming at an improved flexional function. The auxiliary joint functions not only to facilitate a rollback movement but also to add a rotational movement. It was investigated whether this knee prosthesis could show an internal rotation of the tibia during flexion such as the physiologic movement of the knee. The internal rotation of the tibia was evaluated for the patients who could sit on legs in the oriental style after total knee arthroplasty. The average flexion angle of patients who achieved this style of sitting was 144.1°, and the average internal rotation was estimated as 14.3° by a pattern matching method using a computer-assisted design system.

  2. Spine lateral flexion strength development differences between exercises with pelvic stabilization and without pelvic stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straton, Alexandru; Gidu, Diana Victoria; Micu, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Poor lateral flexor muscle strength can be an important source of lumbar/thoracic back pain in women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pelvic stabilization (PS) and no pelvic stabilization (NoPS) lateral flexion strength exercise training on the development of isolated right and left lateral flexion strength. Isometric torque of the isolated right and left lateral flexion muscles was measured at two positions (0° and 30° opposed angle range of motion) on 42 healthy women before and after 8 weeks of PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise training. Subjects were assigned in three groups, the first (n=14) trained 3 times/week with PS lateral flexion strength exercise, the second (n=14) trained 3 times/week with NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise and the third (control, n=14) did not train. Post training isometric strength values describing PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength improved in greater extent for the PS lateral flexion strength exercise group and in lesser extent for the NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise group, in both angles (p<0.05) relative to controls. These data indicate that the most effective way of training the spine lateral flexion muscles is PS lateral flexion strength exercises; NoPS lateral flexion strength exercises can be an effective way of training for the spine lateral flexion muscles, if there is no access to PS lateral flexion strength training machines.

  3. Adjacent-level arthroplasty following cervical fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakumar, Deshpande V; Hari, Akshay; Krishna, Murali; Konar, Subhas; Sharma, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-level disc degeneration following cervical fusion has been well reported. This condition poses a major treatment dilemma when it becomes symptomatic. The potential application of cervical arthroplasty to preserve motion in the affected segment is not well documented, with few studies in the literature. The authors present their initial experience of analyzing clinical and radiological results in such patients who were treated with arthroplasty for new or persistent arm and/or neck symptoms related to neural compression due to adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS During a 5-year period, 11 patients who had undergone ACDF anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and subsequently developed recurrent neck or arm pain related to adjacent-level cervical disc disease were treated with cervical arthroplasty at the authors' institution. A total of 15 devices were implanted (range of treated levels per patient: 1-3). Clinical evaluation was performed both before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological outcomes were analyzed using pre- and postoperative flexion/extension lateral radiographs measuring Cobb angle (overall C2-7 sagittal alignment), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM). RESULTS There were no major perioperative complications or device-related failures. Statistically significant results, obtained in all cases, were reflected by an improvement in VAS scores for neck/arm pain and NDI scores for neck pain. Radiologically, statistically significant increases in the overall lordosis (as measured by Cobb angle) and ROM at the treated disc level were observed. Three patients were lost to follow-up within the first year after arthroplasty. In the remaining 8 cases, the duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. None of these 8 patients required surgery for the same vertebral level during the follow

  4. Research Paradigms in Psychosomatic Medicine with Special Emphasis on Whiplash - Cervical Hyperextension Flexion Injury (CHFI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Merskey

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of attempts, particularly in the last five decades to understand the origins of pain in terms of psychological or psychosomatic patterns. These include psychoanalytic explanations relying on hysterical mechanisms, and psychophysiological proposals. The occurrence of pain in the course of psychiatric illness and its remission after the illness, has long been known and is not a controversial issue. However, the reported explanations of pain without overt and obvious prior psychiatric illness have largely failed to convince a significant portion of the professional establishment. These explanations have very often coincided with the interests of insurance companies, whether those insurance companies were providing medical benefits, disability insurance or workers' or accident compensation. Critical examination of the evidence generated by insurance company related research indicates profound weaknesses in it.

  5. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  6. [A man with a painful knee with restricted flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkering, L.J.; Zengerink, M.; Kampen, A. van

    2015-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with knee pain and limited knee flexion. MRI showed a mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (celery stalk sign). This rare condition can be treated with arthroscopic debridement with volume reduction of the anterior cruciate ligament. In severe cases, ante

  7. Local and global subaxial cervical spine biomechanics after single-level fusion or cervical arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Michael A; Brodke, Darrel S; Daubs, Michael; Patel, Alpesh; Bachus, Kent N

    2009-10-01

    An experimental in vitro biomechanical study was conducted on human cadaveric spines to evaluate the motion segment (C4-C5) and global subaxial cervical spine motion after placement of a cervical arthroplasty device (Altia TDI,Amedica, Salt Lake City, UT) as compared to both the intact spine and a single-level fusion. Six specimens (C2-C7) were tested in flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation under a +/- 1.5 Nm moment with a 100 N axial follower load. Following the intact spine was tested; the cervical arthroplasty device was implanted at C4-C5 and tested. Then, a fusion using lateral mass fixation and an anterior plate was simulated and tested. Stiffness and range of motion (ROM) data were calculated. The ROM of the C4-C5 motion segment with the arthroplasty device was similar to that of the intact spine in flexion/extension and slightly less in lateral bending and rotation, while the fusion construct allowed significantly less motion in all directions. The fusion construct caused broader effects of increasing motion in the remaining segments of the subaxial cervical spine, whereas the TDI did not alter the adjacent and remote motion segments. The fusion construct was also far stiffer in all motion planes than the intact motion segment and the TDI, while the artificial disc treated level was slightly stiffer than the intact segment. The Altia TDI allows for a magnitude of motion similar to that of the intact spine at the treated and adjacent levels in the in vitro setting.

  8. Adult Hip Flexion Contracture due to Neurological Disease: A New Treatment Protocol—Surgical Treatment of Neurological Hip Flexion Contracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Nicodemo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital, traumatic, or extrinsic causes can lead people to paraplegia; some of these are potentially; reversible and others are not. Paraplegia can couse hip flexion contracture and, consequently, pressure sores, scoliosis, and hyperlordosis; lumbar and groin pain are strictly correlated. Scientific literature contains many studies about children hip flexion related to neurological diseases, mainly caused by cerebral palsy; only few papers focus on this complication in adults. In this study we report our experience on surgical treatment of adult hip flexion contracture due to neurological diseases; we have tried to outline an algorithm to choose the best treatment avoiding useless or too aggressive therapies. We present 5 cases of adult hips flexion due to neurological conditions treated following our algorithm. At 1-year-follow-up all patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of hip range of motion, pain and recovery of walking if possible. In conclusion we think that this algorithm could be a good guideline to treat these complex cases even if we need to treat more patients to confirm this theory. We believe also that postoperation physiotherapy it is useful in hip motility preservation, improvement of muscular function, and walking ability recovery when possible.

  9. Upper airway obstruction after cervical spine fusion surgery: role of cervical fixation angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Hui; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Huang, Hui-Hsun; Chan, Kuang-Cheng

    2008-09-01

    Upper airway obstruction is one of the life-threatening events in cervical spine surgery. The risk is particularly great during the period immediately after operation. We present the case of a 56-year-old female with breast cancer and metastasis to the cervical spine. The surgical procedure involved C2-C3 laminectomy, posterior fixation (C0-C5), and C2 neurectomy. Tracheal extubation was carried out in the intensive care unit, and upper airway obstruction immediately followed. Emergency cricothyrotomy was performed under well-managed ventilation with a laryngeal mask after several failed intubation attempts. Over-flexion of the cervical spine fixation and severe prevertebral soft tissue swelling were the most probable causes of upper airway obstruction. With a well-adjusted angle for fixation of the cervical spine under fluoroscopic guidance before the procedure, such a surgical mishap could be avoided. Reintubation with a fiberscope might be considered first, and sustaining intubation for 2-3 days postoperatively could be safer in such high risk patients.

  10. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain ...

  11. Cervical range of motion and proprioception in rugby players versus non-rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Sally D; McCarthy, Peter W

    2007-06-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of number of years of playing rugby on neck function. Active cervical spine range of motion and proprioception were assessed in 14 non-rugby-playing but trained sportsmen (mean age 28 years, s = 7) and 46 rugby players (26 rugby forwards: mean age 26 years, s = 5; mean years played 14 years; 20 backs: mean age 24 years, s = 5; mean years played 14 years). Active cervical range of motion in flexion, extension, left and right lateral flexion, plus left and right rotation were measured using a cervical range of motion device. The ability to reposition the head in a central position with eyes closed was taken as a measure of proprioception. Results show that rugby forwards generally had the least active cervical range of motion, particularly neck extension (forwards, 43 degrees ; backs, 55 degrees ; controls, 58 degrees ), with the decrement correlating with the number of years played. In addition, repositioning was significantly worse in rugby players after neck extension than non-rugby players (6 degrees vs. 3 degrees ). The active cervical range of motion of rugby forwards is similar to that of whiplash patients, suggesting that participation in rugby can have an effect on neck range of motion that is equivalent to chronic disability. Reduced active cervical range of motion could also increase the likelihood of injury and exacerbate age-related neck problems.

  12. Dynamic function MR of the cervical vertebral column. Dynamische Funktions-MRT der Halswirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegele, M.; Woell, B.; Reiser, M. (Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany)); Koch, W. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany)); Kaden, B. (Neurochirurgische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany))

    1992-09-01

    To obtain functional studies of the cervical spine, a device has been developed which allows MRI examinations to be carried out in five different degrees of flexion. T[sub 1] and T[sub 2][sup *] weighted FFE sequences were used. Dynamic functional MRI was performed on 5 normals and 31 patients (5 disc herniation, 4 whiplash injuries, 6 spinal canal stenoses, 14 laminectomies and spinal fusions, 2 rheumatoid arthritis). The relationship of the spinal cord to the bony and ligamentous components in different degrees of flexion was particularly well shown in whiplash injury, spinal stenosis and postoperative situations. (orig.).

  13. Effect of hair and clothing on neck immobilization using a cervical collar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Fong-Gong; Tsai, Shu-Hui; Wang, Chun-Hsiang; Stern, Susan A

    2005-05-01

    An important step during spine immobilization is application of a cervical collar. Clothing or hair covering the neck may impinge on this process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of clothing and hair covering the neck on immobilization using a cervical collar. Study participants were 18 female volunteers with long hair aged 20 to 28 years. Cervical range of motion (ROM) was tested in 6 directions (flexion, extension, right and left lateral bending, right and left axial rotation) using a cervical ROM (CROM) device. After measuring unrestricted ROM (no cervical collar), a 1-piece rigid cervical collar was placed the neck (1) covered by hair and clothing; (2) covered by clothing; (3) covered by hair; or (4) uncovered. Range of motion was retested under all 4 conditions. Data were compared using crossover-design analysis of variance (Pcervical collar placement under all conditions. Unrestricted ROM in all directions ranged from 41.50 degrees (7.25 degrees) to 70.76 degrees (15.4 degrees). In contrast, ROM with a cervical collar under the 4 conditions in all directions ranged from 10.80 degrees (5.10 degrees) to 18.81 degrees (7.37 degrees). We were unable to detect any significant differences in ROM between the 4 conditions. Our data suggest that long hair and clothing, which cover the neck, do not alter the effectiveness of cervical collar immobilization as measured by the cervical ROM device.

  14. Imaging diagnosis of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To provide the experience in imaging diagnosis of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries in children.Methods: Imaging data of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries in 62 children were retrospectively reviewed.The routine radiography including the lateral,anteroposterior and open-mouth odontoid views were performed in all the patients. Tomography was available for 25 patients, and flexion-extension lateral views for 28patients, CT scanning for 21 patients, MRI for 26 patients.Results: Of these patients, 46 patients were identified with injuries of upper cervical spine (9 with atlantal arch fracture, seven with axial fracture, 21 with odontoid fracture, 1 with atlantal arch fracture combining with odontoid fracture, and 1 with atlantal transverse ligament disruption); 7 patients sustained injuries of lower cervical spine (3 fractures of vertebral body, 2 dislocations and 6fracture-dislocations ); 2 patients had multiple noncontiguous cervical injuries; and 3 had cervical spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormalities (SCIWORA).Conclusions: Imaging assessment is of great importance in the diagnosis of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries in children. Whenever cervical spine and spinal cord injuries are suspected for children patients, and the three-views should be routinely indicated. MRI should be routinely performed in all children with cervical SCIWORA.

  15. Biomechanical analysis of posterior cruciate ligament retaining high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; Zanden, van der A.C.; De Waal Malefijt, M.; Verdonschot, N.

    2009-01-01

    Background High-flexion knee replacements have been developed to accommodate a large range of flexion (>120°) after total knee arthroplasty. Both posterior cruciate ligament retaining and sacrificing high-flexion knee designs have been marketed. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the b

  16. Management of flexion distraction injuries to the thoracolumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Alejandro J; Scheer, Justin K; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2015-12-01

    We present an updated overview of the literature regarding the management of flexion distraction injuries (FDI). FDI are unstable fractures of the thoracolumbar spine, which require surgical management by long segment open fusion or minimally invasive posterior fixation with pedicle screws. While associated with concomitant intra-abdominal injuries that may delay operative stabilization, FDI frequently involve reversible spinal cord injuries and rapid correction is indicated. Modern biomechanical studies have identified valuable prognostic indicators that may be elucidated from determining the mechanism of injury, including the degree of flexion and presence of compression at the time of injury. An improved understanding of FDI will contribute to more appropriate diagnoses and treatment of these fractures.

  17. Neuromuscular disorders associated with static lumbar flexion: a feline model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonow, M; Zhou, B; Baratta, R V; Zhu, M; Lu, Y

    2002-04-01

    Static flexion of the lumbar spine with constant load applied to the viscoelastic structures for 20 minutes and for 50 minutes resulted in development of spasms and inhibition in the multifidus muscles (e.g., deep erector spinae) and in creep of the supraspinous ligament in the feline model. The development of spasms and inhibition was not dependent on load magnitude. It is suggested that occupational and sports activities which require prolonged static lumbar flexion within the physiological range can cause a "sprain"-like injury to the ligaments, which in turn reflexively induce spasms and inhibition in some erector spinae muscles. Such disorder may take a long time to recover, in the order of days to weeks, depending on the level of creep developed in the tissues.

  18. Gravitational Shear, Flexion and Strong Lensing in Abell 1689

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, A; Haaga, J L; Massey, R; Leonard, Adrienne; Goldberg, David M.; Haaga, Jason L.; Massey, Richard

    2007-01-01

    We present a gravitational lensing analysis of the galaxy cluster Abell 1689, incorporating measurements of the weak shear, flexion, and strong lensing induced in background galaxies. This is the first time that a shapelet technique has been used to reconstruct the distribution of mass in this cluster, and the first time that a flexion signal has been measured using cluster members as lenses. From weak shear measurements alone, we generate a non-parametric mass reconstruction, which shows significant substructure corresponding to groups of galaxies within the cluster. Additionally, our galaxy-galaxy flexion signal demonstrates that the cluster galaxies can be well-fit by a singular isothermal sphere model with a characteristic velocity dispersion of $\\sigma = 295\\pm 40 km/s $. We identify a major, distinct dark matter clump, offset by 40$h^{-1}$kpc from the central cluster members, which was not apparent from shear measurements alone. This secondary clump is present in both a non-parametric mass reconstructio...

  19. The effect of knee-flexion angle on wheelchair turning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, A H; Kirby, R L; Bell, A C; MacLeod, D A

    2001-05-01

    The increasingly popular hyperflexed knee-flexion angle was evaluated to determine its effects on wheelchair turning. Twenty able-bodied subjects were tested comparing the effect of full knee extension and full knee flexion on a number of parameters. We empirically measured the angular velocity of subjects spinning 720 degrees in place, subjects' perceived ease of wheelchair turning, the overall length of the wheelchair, the anteroposterior position of the center of mass (COM), rolling resistance, turning resistance and rear-wheel traction. The combined moment of inertia of the wheelchair and system was modeled. We found that, in comparison with full extension, fully flexing the knees increased angular velocity by 40% and was perceived to be 66% easier by subjects. Overall length decreased by 39%, COM moved rearward 38%, rolling and turning resistance decreased by 21% and 17% respectively, rear-wheel traction increased by 12% and moment of inertia decreased by 42%. All empirically tested parameters were statistically significant (pwheelchair turning. The implications of these findings for wheelchair design and prescription will need to be validated on actual wheelchair users and for smaller increments in knee-flexion range.

  20. Paw withdrawal thresholds and persistent hindlimb flexion in experimental mononeuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallas, Tanya R; Winterson, Barbara J; Ransil, Bernard J; Bove, Geoffrey M

    2003-05-01

    Hypersensitivity of the foot produced by a number of sciatic mononeuropathies was assessed and compared. A new tool was used, the strain-gauge algometer, that delivers a noxious stimulus and gives a direct measurement of the force for paw withdrawal. In addition, we report observations of another alteration of the flexion reflex, persistent hindlimb flexion. The mean mechanical threshold for naive rats was 5.9 +/- 0.97 centinewton (standard deviation). A superficial surgical procedure had no effect on mechanical sensitivity. Sham surgeries and a surgery in which a silicone pellet was glued to the sciatic nerve produced moderate increases in mechanical sensitivity. Interventions that produced the greatest reductions in thresholds were carrageenan neuritis, complete Freund's adjuvant neuritis, and the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Mechanical thresholds returned to baseline in 2 weeks in all groups. Neuropathic behaviors (licking and holding the paw after the stimulus) were observed more frequently in the CCI group. Persistent hindlimb flexion was only observed in the CCI group. The results support that midaxonal inflammation is sufficient to induce hyperalgesia. The strain-gauge algometer proved to be efficient and reliable, and calculations support that used as described in this report one can demonstrate changes in paw withdrawal thresholds as small as 15%.

  1. Investigation of the Differential Contributions of Superficial and Deep Muscles on Cervical Spinal Loads with Changing Head Postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Chien, Andy; Hsu, Wei-Li; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal loads are predominately influenced by activities of cervical muscles. However, the coordination between deep and superficial muscles and their influence on the spinal loads is not well understood. This study aims to document the changes of cervical spinal loads and the differential contributions of superficial and deep muscles with varying head postures. Electromyography (EMG) of cervical muscles from seventeen healthy adults were measured during maximal isometric exertions for lateral flexion (at 10°, 20° and terminal position) as well as flexion/extension (at 10°, 20°, 30°, and terminal position) neck postures. An EMG-assisted optimization approach was used to estimate the muscle forces and subsequent spinal loads. The results showed that compressive and anterior-posterior shear loads increased significantly with neck flexion. In particular, deep muscle forces increased significantly with increasing flexion. It was also determined that in all different static head postures, the deep muscle forces were greater than those of the superficial muscle forces, however, such pattern was reversed during peak efforts where greater superficial muscle forces were identified with increasing angle of inclination. In summary, the identification of significantly increased spinal loads associated with increased deep muscle activation during flexion postures, implies higher risks in predisposing the neck to occupationally related disorders. The results also explicitly supported that deep muscles play a greater role in maintaining stable head postures where superficial muscles are responsible for peak exertions and reinforcing the spinal stability at terminal head postures. This study provided quantitative data of normal cervical spinal loads and revealed motor control strategies in coordinating the superficial and deep muscles during physical tasks.

  2. Investigation of the Differential Contributions of Superficial and Deep Muscles on Cervical Spinal Loads with Changing Head Postures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsiu Cheng

    Full Text Available Cervical spinal loads are predominately influenced by activities of cervical muscles. However, the coordination between deep and superficial muscles and their influence on the spinal loads is not well understood. This study aims to document the changes of cervical spinal loads and the differential contributions of superficial and deep muscles with varying head postures. Electromyography (EMG of cervical muscles from seventeen healthy adults were measured during maximal isometric exertions for lateral flexion (at 10°, 20° and terminal position as well as flexion/extension (at 10°, 20°, 30°, and terminal position neck postures. An EMG-assisted optimization approach was used to estimate the muscle forces and subsequent spinal loads. The results showed that compressive and anterior-posterior shear loads increased significantly with neck flexion. In particular, deep muscle forces increased significantly with increasing flexion. It was also determined that in all different static head postures, the deep muscle forces were greater than those of the superficial muscle forces, however, such pattern was reversed during peak efforts where greater superficial muscle forces were identified with increasing angle of inclination. In summary, the identification of significantly increased spinal loads associated with increased deep muscle activation during flexion postures, implies higher risks in predisposing the neck to occupationally related disorders. The results also explicitly supported that deep muscles play a greater role in maintaining stable head postures where superficial muscles are responsible for peak exertions and reinforcing the spinal stability at terminal head postures. This study provided quantitative data of normal cervical spinal loads and revealed motor control strategies in coordinating the superficial and deep muscles during physical tasks.

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are at increased risk for HPV infections. Other risk factors for cervical cancer include: Giving birth to many children. Smoking cigarettes. Using oral contraceptives ("the Pill"). Having a weakened immune system . Cervical Cancer Screening ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body, such as the lymph nodes, lung, liver, intestine, or bone. Stage IVB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, ...

  6. Differential impact of visual feedback on plantar- and dorsi-flexion maximal torque output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumi, Anis; Jakobi, Jennifer M; Simoneau-Buessinger, Emilie

    2016-05-01

    The effect of visual feedback on enhancing isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) was evaluated. Twelve adults performed plantar-flexion and dorsi-flexion MVCs in 3 conditions (no visual feedback, visual feedback, and visual feedback with target). There was no significant effect of visual conditions on dorsi-flexion MVC but there was an effect on plantar-flexion. Irrespective of whether a target was evident, visual feedback increased plantar-flexion MVC by ∼15%. This study highlights the importance of optimal feedback to enhance MVC.

  7. The relationship between the active cervical range of motion and changes in head and neck posture after continuous VDT work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu; An, Duk-Hyun

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the active cervical range of motion (ROM) and changes in the head and neck posture after continuous visual display terminal (VDT) work. Twenty VDT workers were recruited from laboratories. The active cervical ROM of the participants was measured and videotaped to capture the craniocervical and cervicothoracic angles using a single video camera before and after VDT work. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quantify the linear relationship between active cervical ROM measurements and the changes in the craniocervical and cervicothoracic angles after continuous VDT work. Active neck extension (r=-0.84, p<0.01) was negatively correlated with the mean craniocervical angle, and active neck flexion (r=-0.82, p<0.01) and left lateral flexion (r=-0.67, p<0.01) were negatively correlated with the mean cervicothoracic angle.

  8. In vivo movement of femoral flexion axis of a single-radius total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Norimasa; Tomita, Tetsuya; Yamazaki, Takaharu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugamoto, Kazuomi

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate in vivo femoro-tibial motion using the movement of femoral flexion axis of a single-radius TKA. We examined 20 clinically successful knees with a single-radius posterior stabilized TKA to evaluate the kinematics of deep knee flexion using 2-3-dimensional registration techniques. The mean knee flexion range of motion was 117.8°. The mean rotation of the femoral component was 7.6° external rotation. The mean knee flexion angle at initial post-cam engagement was 55.2°. No paradoxical movement of femoral component was shown until 70° flexion, afterward the femoral component rolled back with flexion. The data showed that the design of this prosthesis might contribute to reduce the paradoxical anterior femoral movement and provide stability in mid-flexion ranges.

  9. Cervical artery dissection following a turbulent flight.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Colin

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Cervical artery dissection is a common cause of stroke in young patients without vascular risk factors and may affect the carotid or vertebral arteries. The risk of spontaneous dissection is higher in those with genetic predisposing factors while other cases may be precipitated by an event involving head or neck movement or associated with direct neck trauma. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a previously well young woman with a history of migraine who developed internal carotid artery dissection following a turbulent short-haul commercial flight while restrained using a seatbelt. DISCUSSION: We propose that repetitive flexion-hyperextension neck movements encountered during the flight were the most likely precipitant of carotid artery dissection in this case and review the therapeutic options available.

  10. Anterior cervical plating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonugunta V

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although anterior cervical instrumentation was initially used in cervical trauma, because of obvious benefits, indications for its use have been expanded over time to degenerative cases as well as tumor and infection of the cervical spine. Along with a threefold increase in incidence of cervical fusion surgery, implant designs have evolved over the last three decades. Observation of graft subsidence and phenomenon of stress shielding led to the development of the new generation dynamic anterior cervical plating systems. Anterior cervical plating does not conclusively improve clinical outcome of the patients, but certainly enhances the efficacy of autograft and allograft fusion and lessens the rate of pseudoarthrosis and kyphosis after multilevel discectomy and fusions. A review of biomechanics, surgical technique, indications, complications and results of various anterior cervical plating systems is presented here to enable clinicians to select the appropriate construct design.

  11. Range of motion and cervical myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, J; Niederer, D; Fleckenstein, J; Vogt, L; Banzer, W

    2016-01-01

    Several studies investigating myofascial pain syndrome include assessments of range of motion (ROM) as a diagnostic criterion. However, the value of ROM in this context has not yet been evaluated in controlled clinical studies. We aimed to examine whether patients with myofascial pain syndrome display alterations of ROM when compared to healthy subjects. Twenty-two individuals (13 females, 9 males; aged 33.4 ± 13.9 yrs) afflicted with active myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle as well as 22 age and sex matched healthy controls were included. All subjects underwent an examination of maximal active cervical ROM in flexion/extension assessed by means of a 3D ultrasonic movement analysis system (30 Hz; Zebris CMS 70). In the patients group, pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the trigger points was determined using a pressure algometer. Maximum range of motion in the sagittal plane did not differ between individuals with MTrP (125.9 ± 23.2°, 95% CI: 116.2-135.6°) and asymptomatic subjects (128.2 ± 20.4°, 95% CI: 119.7-136.7°; p > .05). In patients, PPT (1.7 ± .6, 95% CI: 1.5-1.9) was not correlated with cervical mobility (r = -.13; p > .05). Based on these pilot data, range of motion in flexion/extension is not a valid criterion for the detection of myofascial trigger points. Additional research incorporating movement amplitudes in other anatomical planes and additional afflicted muscles should be conducted in order to further delineate the relative impact of MTrP on range of motion.

  12. Correlation between head posture and proprioceptive function in the cervical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Min-Sik; Lee, Hae-Yong; Lee, Mi-Young

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate correlation between head posture and proprioceptive function in the cervical region. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-two subjects (35 males and 37 females) participated in this study. For measurement of head posture, the craniovertebral angle was calculated based on the angle between a horizontal line passing through C7 and a line extending from the tragus of the ear to C7. The joint position sense was evaluated using a dual digital inclinometer (Acumar, Lafayette Instrument, Lafayette, IN, USA), which was used to measure the joint position error for cervical flexion and extension. [Results] A significant negative correlation was observed between the craniovertebral angle and position sense error for flexion and extension. [Conclusion] Forward head posture is correlated with greater repositioning error than a more upright posture, and further research is needed to determine whether correction of forward head posture has any impact on repositioning error.

  13. The role of phonophoresis in dyshpagia due to cervical osteophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliha Unlu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Zeliha Unlu1, Sebnem Orguc2, Gorkem Eskiizmir3, Asim Aslan3, Saliha Tasci11Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; 2Department of Radiology; 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Celal Bayar University School of Medicine, Manisa, TurkeyObjective: Treatment of patients with anterior cervical osteophytes causing dysphagia includes conservative treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, antibiotics, and an appropriate soft diet. Physical therapy with its advantages may be an alternative method in the treatment, which was not reported previously.Case description: Phonophoresis therapy is applied in nine patients with dysphagia due to cervical osteophytes.Results: The symptom of dysphagia regressed in various degrees in all patients after phonophoresis therapy.Conclusions: Phonophoresis might be an alternative method for the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID treatment in patients with dysphagia due to cervical osteophytes.Keywords: cervical, osteophyte, dysphagia, physical therapy

  14. Computed tomography (CT) of traumatic injuries of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robotti, G.C.; Geissmann, A.; Steinsiepe, K.

    1986-02-01

    32 patients with traumatic injuries of the cervical spine were investigated by CT. All patients were initially examined by plain films. CT was definitely superior to conventional radiology in compressive fractures of vertebral bodies. In flexion-extension injuries CT was useful showing fractures of the posterior elements in great detail. Conventional tomography was superior to CT in patients with complex dislocations of vertebral bodies. In the absence of fracture CT failed to detect disruptions of ligaments, which were readily shown by functional examination.

  15. Differential diagnosis of cervical nerve compression syndrome of the external intervertebral foramen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinwu; NI Weifeng; LI Qi; XU Jianguang; ZHU Haibo; ZHAO Binghui; GUO Shangchun; ZENG Bingfang

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to study the mechanism of cervical nerve compression syndrome of the external intervertebral foramen and its difierential diagnosis with cervical spondylosis.Diagnostic treatment with muscle relaxant,vasodilator,neurotrophic medicine and celecoxib (COX)-2 inhibitor were performed in 20 patients with cervical nerve compression syndrome of the external intervertebral foramen and 20 patients with cervical spondylosis confirmed by operation.Diagnostic local block therapy was performed additionally in cases showing little effect after diagnostic treatment.All the patients were followed up postoperatively for more than one year.Fifteen cases with cervical nerve compression syndrome of the external intervertebral foramen were healed by the diagnostic treatment.The other five cases had a short-term remission and there was no recurrence after diagnostic local block therapy.Diagnostic treatment led to short-term alleviation of the symptom in 20 cases with cervical spondylosis confirmed by operation,the results of which was far from satisfactory and operation was undertaken finally in all the 20 cases.The etiology of cervical nerve compression syndrome of the extemal intervertebral foramen lies in the compression of the cervical plexus,brachial plexus and cervical dorsal rami by the tendinous decussating fibers of the scalenus anticus,medius,minimus and the posterior muscles of the neck.Diagnostic treatment was propitious to differentiate cervical nerve compression syndrome of the external intervertebral foramen from cervical spondylosis.

  16. Starting position of movement and perception of angle of trunk flexion while standing with eyes closed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, K; Miyaguchi, A; Toyama, H; Kunita, K; Asai, H

    1999-08-01

    The present study attempted to investigate the effect of position on the perception of angle of trunk flexion while standing. For this purpose, the range effect was factored out by setting the constant target angle at 10 degrees, with varied starting positions of trunk flexion. We found that subjects underestimated angle of trunk flexion when the starting position was close to a quiet standing posture, overestimated when close to maximum trunk flexion, and correctly perceived it when at the middle position. Less perceptual distortion was observed at the positions close to maximum trunk flexion in the present study than in our previous one, in which various target angles of trunk flexion were reproduced from a quiet standing posture. The reduced distortion in the present study was believed to have resulted from factoring out the range effect. The flexion angle of the hip joint changed in tandem with that of the trunk, while very little movement was observed in the ankle, knee, and neck joints. Judging from the changing pattern of hip-joint angle, the muscle activity of the erector spinae and biceps femoris increased gradually to 90 degrees trunk flexion. In contrast, the actual increment of muscle activity reached zero or a minimum value at the middle angles as the angle of trunk flexion increased. It was assumed that the abrupt change in kinesthetic information associated with muscle activity exerted a great influence on the perception of trunk flexion.

  17. Biomechanical analysis of the camelid cervical intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean K. Stolworthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (LBP is a prevalent global problem, which is often correlated with degenerative disc disease. The development and use of good, relevant animal models of the spine may improve treatment options for this condition. While no animal model is capable of reproducing the exact biology, anatomy, and biomechanics of the human spine, the quality of a particular animal model increases with the number of shared characteristics that are relevant to the human condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the camelid (specifically, alpaca and llama cervical spine as a model of the human lumbar spine. Cervical spines were obtained from four alpacas and four llamas and individual segments were used for segmental flexibility/biomechanics and/or morphology/anatomy studies. Qualitative and quantitative data were compared for the alpaca and llama cervical spines, and human lumbar specimens in addition to other published large animal data. Results indicate that a camelid cervical intervertebral disc (IVD closely approximates the human lumbar disc with regard to size, spinal posture, and biomechanical flexibility. Specifically, compared with the human lumbar disc, the alpaca and llama cervical disc size are approximately 62%, 83%, and 75% with regard to area, depth, and width, respectively, and the disc flexibility is approximately 133%, 173%, and 254%, with regard to range of motion (ROM in axial-rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral-bending, respectively. These results, combined with the clinical report of disc degeneration in the llama lower cervical spine, suggest that the camelid cervical spine is potentially well suited for use as an animal model in biomechanical studies of the human lumbar spine.

  18. Case Report: Nonoperative Treatment of an Unstable Jefferson Fracture Using a Cervical Collar

    OpenAIRE

    Haus, Brian M.; Harris, Mitchel B.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of unstable burst fractures of the atlas (Jefferson fractures) is controversial. Unstable Jefferson fractures have been managed successfully with either immobilization, typically halo traction or halo vest, or surgery. We report a patient with an unstable Jefferson fracture treated nonoperatively with a cervical collar, frequent clinical examinations, and flexion-extension radiographs. Twelve months after treatment, the patient achieved painless union of his fracture. The succes...

  19. Indentation load relaxation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannula, S.P.; Stone, D.; Li, C.Y. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    Most of the models that are used to describe the nonelastic behavior of materials utilize stress-strain rate relations which can be obtained by a load relaxation test. The conventional load relaxation test, however, cannot be performed if the volume of the material to be tested is very small. For such applications the indentation type of test offers an attractive means of obtaining data necessary for materials characterization. In this work the feasibility of the indentation load relaxation test is studied. Experimental techniques are described together with results on Al, Cu and 316 SS. These results are compared to those of conventional uniaxial load relaxation tests, and the conversion of the load-indentation rate data into the stress-strain rate data is discussed.

  20. Relaxation techniques for stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems such as high blood pressure, stomachaches, headaches, anxiety, and depression. Using relaxation techniques can help you feel calm. These exercises can also help you manage stress and ease the effects of stress on your body.

  1. Maximum Velocities in Flexion and Extension Actions for Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessop David M.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Speed of movement is fundamental to the outcome of many human actions. A variety of techniques can be implemented in order to maximise movement speed depending on the goal of the movement, constraints, and the time available. Knowing maximum movement velocities is therefore useful for developing movement strategies but also as input into muscle models. The aim of this study was to determine maximum flexion and extension velocities about the major joints in upper and lower limbs. Seven university to international level male competitors performed flexion/extension at each of the major joints in the upper and lower limbs under three conditions: isolated; isolated with a countermovement; involvement of proximal segments. 500 Hz planar high speed video was used to calculate velocities. The highest angular velocities in the upper and lower limb were 50.0 rad·s-1 and 28.4 rad·s-1, at the wrist and knee, respectively. As was true for most joints, these were achieved with the involvement of proximal segments, however, ANOVA analysis showed few significant differences (p<0.05 between conditions. Different segment masses, structures and locations produced differing results, in the upper and lower limbs, highlighting the requirement of segment specific strategies for maximal movements.

  2. Velocity of lordosis angle during spinal flexion and extension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Consmüller

    Full Text Available The importance of functional parameters for evaluating the severity of low back pain is gaining clinical recognition, with evidence suggesting that the angular velocity of lordosis is critical for identification of musculoskeletal deficits. However, there is a lack of data regarding the range of functional kinematics (RoKs, particularly which include the changing shape and curvature of the spine. We address this deficit by characterising the angular velocity of lordosis throughout the thoracolumbar spine according to age and gender. The velocity of lumbar back shape changes was measured using Epionics SPINE during maximum flexion and extension activities in 429 asymptomatic volunteers. The difference between maximum positive and negative velocities represented the RoKs. The mean RoKs for flexion decreased with age; 114°/s (20-35 years, 100°/s (36-50 years and 83°/s (51-75 years. For extension, the corresponding mean RoKs were 73°/s, 57°/s and 47°/s. ANCOVA analyses revealed that age and gender had the largest influence on the RoKs (p<0.05. The Epionics SPINE system allows the rapid assessment of functional kinematics in the lumbar spine. The results of this study now serve as normative data for comparison to patients with spinal pathology or after surgical treatment.

  3. Entretien sur la psychanalyse: réflexions en marge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Martini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available L’auteur propose ici un commentaire sur les points les plus importants de son entretien de février 2003 avec Paul Ricœur consacré aux rapports entre herméneutique et psychanalyse. Bien que le philosophe se situe dans une réelle continuité par rapport à sa contribution de 1965, il enrichit toutefois sa réflexion philosophique sur la psychanalyse en proposant plusieurs innovations, en ce qui concerne plus particulièrement les thèmes du récit, du soi et de l’éthique. Dans les conclusions de son commentaire, l’auteur souligne l’importance des concepts d’“irreprésentable” et d’“intraduisible”: non seulement, en effet, ces concepts sont dans la ligne de nombreuses contributions de la psychanalyse contemporaine, mais la profondeur de la réflexion ricœurienne augmente en outre leur potentiel théorique et même clinique.

  4. Perturbations and quantum relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Kandhadai, Adithya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate whether small perturbations can cause relaxation to quantum equilibrium over very long timescales. We consider in particular a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator, which can serve as a model of a field mode on expanding space. We assume an initial wave function with small perturbations to the ground state. We present evidence that the trajectories are highly confined so as to preclude relaxation to equilibrium even over very long timescales. Cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  5. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meydam, K.; Sehlen, S.; Schlenkhoff, D.; Kiricuta, J.C.; Beyer, H.K.

    1986-12-01

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed.

  6. Cervical insufficiency and cervical cerclage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard; Gagnon, Robert; Delisle, Marie-France; Gagnon, Robert; Bujold, Emmanuel; Basso, Melanie; Bos, Hayley; Brown, Richard; Cooper, Stephanie; Crane, Joan; Davies, Gregory; Gouin, Katy; Menticoglou, Savas; Mundle, William; Pylypjuk, Christy; Roggensack, Anne; Sanderson, Frank; Senikas, Vyta

    2013-12-01

    Objectif : La présente directive clinique a pour but de fournir un cadre de référence que les cliniciens pourront utiliser pour identifier les femmes qui sont exposées aux plus grands risques de connaître une insuffisance cervicale, ainsi que pour déterminer les circonstances en présence desquelles la mise en place d’un cerclage pourrait s’avérer souhaitable. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed ou MEDLINE, CINAHL et The Cochrane Library en 2012 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. « uterine cervical incompetence ») et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « cervical insufficiency », « cerclage », « Shirodkar », « cerclage », « MacDonald », « cerclage », « abdominal », « cervical length », « mid-trimester pregnancy loss »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Aucune restriction n’a été appliquée en matière de date ou de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en janvier 2011. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats est évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau). Recommandations 1. Les femmes qui sont enceintes ou qui planifient connaître une grossesse devraient faire l’objet d’une évaluation visant les facteurs de

  7. Reconstruction of small-scale galaxy cluster substructure with lensing flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Benjamin; Bradač, Maruša; Levinson, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    We present reconstructions of galaxy-cluster-scale mass distributions from simulated gravitational lensing data sets including strong lensing, weak lensing shear, and measurements of quadratic image distortions - flexion. The lensing data is constructed to make a direct comparison between mass reconstructions with and without flexion. We show that in the absence of flexion measurements, significant galaxy-group scale substructure can remain undetected in the reconstructed mass profiles, and that the resulting profiles underestimate the aperture mass in the substructure regions by ˜25 - 40%. When flexion is included, subhaloes down to a mass of ˜3 × 1012 M⊙ can be detected at an angular resolution smaller than 10″. Aperture masses from profiles reconstructed with flexion match the input distribution values to within an error of ˜13%, including both statistical error and scatter. This demonstrates the important constraint that flexion measurements place on substructure in galaxy clusters and its utility for producing high-fidelity mass reconstructions.

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery) depends on ...

  9. Therapeutic strategy for traumatic instability of subaxial cervical spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Peng; LIANG Yu; GONG Yao-cheng; ZHENG Tao; ZHANG Xin-kai; WU Wen-jian

    2008-01-01

    Background A simple, safe and effective therapeutic strategy for traumatic instability of the subaxial cervical spine, as well as its prognostic assessment, is still controversial.Methods The therapeutic options for 83 patients of traumatic instability of the subaxial cervical spine, whose average age was 35 years, were determined, according to the Allen-Ferguson classification, general health and concomitant traumatic conditions, neurological function, position of compression materials, concomitant traumatic disc herniation/damage, concomitant locked-facet dislocation, the involved numbers and position, and the patients' economic conditions. An anterior, posterior or combination approach was used to decompress and reconstruct the cervical spine. No operations with an anterior-posterior-anterior approach were performed.Results The average follow-up was three years and nine months. Distraction-flexion and compression-flexion were the most frequent injury subtypes. There were 46, 28 and 9 cases of anterior, posterior and combination operations, respectively. The average score of the Japanese Orthopaedics Association, visual analog scale and American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA) motor index improved from 11.2, 7.8 and 53.5, respectively, before operation, to 15.3, 2.6 and 67.8, respectively, at final follow-up. For incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), the average ASIA neurological function scale was improved by 1-2 levels. Patients with complete SCI had no neurological recovery, but recovery of nerve root function occurred to different extents. After surgery, radiological parameters improved to different extents. Fusion was achieved in all patients and 12 developed complications.Conclusions The best surgical strategy should be determined by the type of subaxial cervical injury, patients' general health, local pathological anatomy and neurological function.

  10. Proportional EMG control of ankle plantar flexion in a powered transtibial prosthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing; Kannape, Oliver; Herr, Hugh M.

    2013-01-01

    The human calf muscle generates 80% of the mechanical work to walk throughout stance-phase, powered plantar flexion. Powered plantar flexion is not only important for walking energetics, but also to minimize the impact on the leading leg at heel-strike. For unilateral transtibial amputees, it has recently been shown that knee load on the leading, intact limb decreases as powered plantar flexion in the trailing prosthetic ankle increases. Not surprisingly, excessive loads on the leading, intac...

  11. The Effects of Knee Joint and Hip Abduction Angles on the Activation of Cervical and Abdominal Muscles during Bridging Exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Su-Kyoung; Park, Du-Jin

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the flexion angle of the knee joint and the abduction angle of the hip joint on the activation of the cervical region and abdominal muscles. [Subjects] A total of 42 subjects were enrolled 9 males and 33 females. [Methods] The bridging exercise in this study was one form of exercise with a knee joint flexion angle of 90°. Based on this, a bridging exercise was conducted at the postures of abduction of the lower extremities at 0...

  12. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc...

  13. Acupoints for cervical spondylosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jihe; Arsovska, Blagica; Vasileva, Dance; Petkovska, Sofija; Kozovska, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a chronic degenerative condition of the cervical spine that affects the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disks of the neck, as well as the contents of the spinal canal. This is one of the most common degenerative disorders of the spine. The disease can be symptomatic and asymptomatic. Symptoms that are distinctive for cervical spondylosis are: tingling, numbness and weakness in the limbs, lack of coordination, stiff neck, shoulder pain, occipital pain, vertigo, poor...

  14. Influence of different prostaglandin applications on cervical rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spätling, L; Neuman, M R; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1985-10-01

    The softening effect of prostaglandin (PG) on cervical tissue prior to elective pregnancy termination is quantified by a new technique for the measurement of the elastance and relaxation of the cervix. The method is based on the pressure-volume relation of a compliant balloon placed in the cervical canal. These properties have been measured before and after different applications of prostaglandins in 58 patients electively terminating pregnancy. Application techniques used included high pressure jet application of PGE2 into the tissue of the portio uteri and the internal cervical os (120 micrograms), PGE2 and PGF2 alpha in Tylose gel (100 micrograms/0.5 ml); PGE2 as an intracervical tablet (150 micrograms) and PGE2 oral tablets placed into the posterior fornix of the vagina. Significant changes in cervical elastance were seen with the intracervically applied PGE2 in Tylose gel and the vaginally applied PGE2 tablets. The intracervically applied PGE2 gel also gave significant changes in cervical relaxation. No side effects other than mild cramping (2 patients) were seen with any of the applications in this study.

  15. Static and dynamic CT imaging of the cervical spine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederman, Tomas; Shalabi, Adel; Sundin, Anders [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Olerud, Claes; Alavi, Kamran [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-09-18

    To compare CR with CT (static and dynamic) to evaluate upper spine instability and to determine if CT in flexion adds value compared to MR imaging in neutral position to assess compression of the subarachnoid space and of the spinal cord. Twenty-one consecutive patients with atlantoaxial subluxation due to rheumatoid arthritis planned for atlantoaxial fusion were included. CT and MRI were performed with the neck in the neutral position and CT also in flexion. CR in neutral position and flexion were obtained in all patients except for one subject who underwent examination in flexion and extension. CR and CT measurements of atlantoaxial subluxation correlated but were larger by CR than CT in flexion, however, the degree of vertical dislocation was similar with both techniques irrespective of the position of the neck. Cervical motion was larger at CR than at CT. The spinal cord compression was significantly worse at CT obtained in the flexed position as compared to MR imaging in the neutral position. Functional CR remains the primary imaging method but CT in the flexed position might be useful in the preoperative imaging work-up, as subarachnoid space involvement may be an indicator for the development of neurologic dysfunction. (orig.)

  16. Preventing cervical cancer globally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeler, Kathleen M

    2012-11-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. More than 85% of cases and deaths occur in the developing world where the availability of effective screening is limited. In this issue of the journal, Pierce and colleagues (beginning on page 1273) describe a novel technique using a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) to diagnose cervical dysplasia. This perspective reviews the limitations of existing cervical cancer screening methods currently in use in low-resource settings and the potential for HRME imaging to contribute to cervical cancer prevention in the developing world.

  17. Cervical instability in Klippel-Feil syndrome:case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron Wessell; Peter DeRosa; Abraham Cherrick; Jonathan H.Sherman

    2015-01-01

    Background: The authors present a case of cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy in the setting of multiple Klippel-Feil syndrome abnormalities treated surgically with a single-level C3-C4 anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.We discuss the clinical presentation, radiographic findings, and various treatment options for cervical spine abnormalities in Klippel-Feil syndrome.Case Presentation: This 22-year-old female with Klippel-Feil syndrome presented with intermittent neck pain, left upper extremity weakness, and paresthesias.Preoperative MRI, CT, and X-rays of the cervical spine revealed anterolisthesis at C3/4 with unstable movement on flexion and extension imaging.In addition, there were multiple segmental fusion abnormalities including hemivertebrae and other congenital fusion abnormalities.A C3-C4 anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was performed with intervertebral disc spacer.Adequate decompression was achieved with postoperative resolution of the patient's symptoms and improvement in neurological exam.Conclusions: Single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion can be utilized for treatment of cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy in the setting of multiple congenital Klippel-Feil syndrome abnormalities.

  18. Motion analysis study on sensitivity of finite element model of the cervical spine to geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Ozer, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Numerous finite element models of the cervical spine have been proposed, with exact geometry or with symmetric approximation in the geometry. However, few researches have investigated the sensitivity of predicted motion responses to the geometry of the cervical spine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of symmetric assumption on the predicted motion by finite element model of the cervical spine. We developed two finite element models of the cervical spine C2-C7. One model was based on the exact geometry of the cervical spine (asymmetric model), whereas the other was symmetric (symmetric model) about the mid-sagittal plane. The predicted range of motion of both models-main and coupled motions-was compared with published experimental data for all motion planes under a full range of loads. The maximum differences between the asymmetric model and symmetric model predictions for the principal motion were 31%, 78%, and 126% for flexion-extension, right-left lateral bending, and right-left axial rotation, respectively. For flexion-extension and lateral bending, the minimum difference was 0%, whereas it was 2% for axial rotation. The maximum coupled motions predicted by the symmetric model were 1.5° axial rotation and 3.6° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. Those coupled motions predicted by the asymmetric model were 1.6° axial rotation and 4° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. In general, the predicted motion response of the cervical spine by the symmetric model was in the acceptable range and nonlinearity of the moment-rotation curve for the cervical spine was properly predicted.

  19. Mechanisms of cervical spine injuries for non-fatal motorcycle road crash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, S S; Wong, S V; Radin Umar, R S; Azhar, A A; Yeap, J S; Megat Ahmad, M M H

    2004-06-01

    Cervical spine injuries such as subluxation and fracture dislocation have long been known to result in severe consequences, as well as the trauma management itself. The injury to the region has been identified as one of the major causes of death in Malaysian motorcyclists involved in road crashes, besides head and chest injuries (Pang, 1999). Despite this, cervical spine injury in motorcyclists is not a well-studied injury, unlike the whiplash injury in motorcar accidents. The present study is a retrospective study on the mechanisms of injury in cervical spine sustained by Malaysian motorcyclists, who were involved in road crash using an established mechanistic classification system. This will serve as an initial step to look at the cervical injuries pattern. The information obtained gives engineer ideas to facilitate design and safety features to reduce injuries. All cervical spine injured motorcyclists admitted to Hospital Kuala Lumpur between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2001 were included in the present study. Based on the medical notes and radiological investigations (X-rays, CT and MRI scans), the mechanisms of injuries were formulated using the injury mechanics classification. The result shows that flexion of the cervical vertebrae is the most common vertebral kinematics in causing injury to motorcyclists. This indicates that the cervical vertebrae sustained a high-energy loading at flexion movement in road crash, and exceeded its tolerance level. The high frequency of injury at the C5 vertebra, C6 vertebra and C5-C6 intervertebral space are recorded. Classification based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) is made to give a view on injury severity, 9.1% of the study samples have been classified as AIS code 1, 51.5% with AIS 2 and 21.2% with AIS 3.

  20. Three Dimensional Movements Of The Upper Cervical Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, Manohar M.; Dvorak, Jiri; Duranceau, Joanne; Yamamoto, Isao

    1989-04-01

    Ten fresh cadaveric whole cervical spine specimens (occiput to C7) were studied using well established techniques to document the movements in flexion, extension, left and right lateral bending and left and right axial rotation. Pure moments of maximum 1.5 newton meters were applied incrementally and three dimensional movements of the bones were recorded using stereophotogrammetry. Each moment was applied individually and in a three load/unload cycles. The motion measurements were made on the third load cycle. Parameters of neutral zone, elastic zone and range of motion were computed. Neutral zones for flexion/extension, right/left lateral bending and right/left axial rotation were respectively: 1.1, 1.5 and 1.6 (occiput-C1); and 3.2, 1.2 and 29.6 degrees (C1-C2). Ranges of motion for flexion, extension, lateral bending (one side) and axial rotation (one side) were respectively: 3.5, 21.0, 5.5 and 7.2 degrees (occiput-Cl joint) and 11.5, 10.9, 6.7 and 38.9 degrees (CI-CZ joint). The highest intervertebral motion in the spine was the axial rotation at the Cl-C2 joint, neutral zone constituting 75% of this motion.

  1. Medium-term outcomes of artificial disc replacement for severe cervical disc narrowing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Hung Yeh; Che-Wei Hung; Cheng-Hsing Kao; Chien-Ming Chao

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine if theBryan cervical disc prosthesis could relieve objective neurological symptoms, signs, and restore mobility in patients with severe cervical disc narrowing. Methods:Clinical data of thirty-two patients underwentBryan cervical disc replacement has been collected fromApril2006 toFebruary2010.Severe cervical disc narrowing with gradeV disc degeneration were included in this study.Bryan cervical disc prostheses have been implanted through anterior approach.JapaneseOrthopedicsAssociation(JOA) score, visual analog scale, Odom’s scale, and flexion-extension radiological follow-ups were applied for evaluations. Results:A total of41Bryan disc prostheses from32 patients with an average follow-up duration of33.5 months(range23 to44 months) were evaluated.Clinical functions of patients were significantly improved.Preoperative averaged visual analog scale score of6.3±2.2 was decreased to1.3±1.2(at36 months,P<0.001), while preoperative averagedJOA score of14.4±1.2 was increased to16.3±0.9(at36 months,P<0.001).Thirty of32 patients received excellent to good outcomes inOdom’s scale.Averaged mobility was restored to(9.9±3.2)°at the last follow-up evaluation of36 months.No subsidence or migration of implant was identified. Conclusions:Acceptable clinical outcome for treatment of severe cervical disc narrowing with cervical disc replacement technique has been performed in current study.Most patients maintained good postoperative mobility and no significant adjacent level degeneration were found.Cervical disc replacement may be applicable in treatment of severe cervical disc narrowing; however, longer follow-ups are required for ensuring the long-term efficacy of cervical disc replacement.

  2. Application of the restoring force method for identification of lumbar spine flexion-extension motion under flexion-extension moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Sean L; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N; Masri, Sami F

    2014-04-01

    The restoring force method (RFM), a nonparametric identification technique established in applied mechanics, was used to maximize the information obtained from moment-rotation hysteresis curves under pure moment flexion-extension testing of human lumbar spines. Data from a previous study in which functional spine units were tested intact, following simulated disk injury, and following implantation with an interspinous process spacer device were used. The RFM was used to estimate a surface map to characterize the dependence of the flexion-extension rotation on applied moment and the resulting axial displacement. This described each spine response as a compact, reduced-order model of the complex underlying nonlinear biomechanical characteristics of the tested specimens. The RFM was applied to two datasets, and successfully estimated the flexion-extension rotation, with error ranging from 3 to 23%. First, one specimen, tested in the intact, injured, and implanted conditions, was analyzed to assess the differences between the three specimen conditions. Second, intact specimens (N = 12) were analyzed to determine the specimen variability under equivalent testing conditions. Due to the complexity and nonlinearity of the hysteretic responses, the mathematical fit of each surface was defined in terms of 16 coefficients, or a bicubic fit, to minimize the identified (estimated) surface fit error. The results of the first analysis indicated large differences in the coefficients for each of the three testing conditions. For example, the coefficient corresponding to the linear stiffness (a01) had varied magnitude among the three conditions. In the second analysis of the 12 intact specimens, there was a large variability in the 12 unique sets of coefficients. Four coefficients, including two interaction terms comprised of both axial displacement and moment, were different from zero (p < 0.05), and provided necessary quantitative information to describe the hysteresis in

  3. Molecular Relaxation in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Biman

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together many different relaxation phenomena in liquids under a common umbrella and provides a unified view of apparently diverse phenomena. It aligns recent experimental results obtained with modern techniques with recent theoretical developments. Such close interaction between experiment and theory in this area goes back to the works of Einstein, Smoluchowski, Kramers' and de Gennes. Development of ultrafast laser spectroscopy recently allowed study of various relaxation processes directly in the time domain, with time scales going down to picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs

  4. [Intact cervical pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habek, D; Bobic, M V; Dosen, L

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe a case of intact cervical pregnancy in a 24-year-old secundigravida. The patient was treated successfully with Methotrexate. Conservative treatment is the first choice in the therapy of uncomplicated cervical pregnancy. Conservative and operative therapeutic procedures are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of plantar flexion contracture contribution during the gait of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Gravel, Denis; Nadeau, Sylvie

    2009-06-01

    Because of extensor weakness, children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) maintain internal flexion moments at the joints of the lower extremities when they walk. We believe that at the ankle, the plantar flexion moments caused by contractures may contribute significantly to the production of the net ankle flexion moment during the gait in these children. The goal of the present study is to quantify ankle plantar flexion passive moments that may be associated with the presence of flexion contractures and to estimate their contribution to the net moment during the gait of children with DMD. Kinematic and kinetic parameters were collected during gait of eleven subjects with DMD. Ankle plantar flexion passive moments were also measured experimentally during the same session. Fourteen control children participated in the study in order to have normal reference values. The presence of ankle plantar flexion contractures in children with DMD was reflected by a rigidity coefficient obtained at a common moment of -7 Nm that was higher for these children (0.75 Nm/degrees vs. 0.48 Nm/degrees; p<0.05). The relative passive moment contribution to the net plantar flexion moments was higher for the children with DMD at the end of the lengthening phase of the plantar flexors (25% vs. 18%; p<0.05). We believe that the passive moments can compensate for the presence of progressive muscle weakness in the children with DMD and help these children with gait.

  6. The Effects of Psoas Major and Lumbar Lordosis on Hip Flexion and Sprint Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copaver, Karine; Hertogh, Claude; Hue, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the correlations between hip flexion power, sprint performance, lumbar lordosis (LL) and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the psoas muscle (PM). Ten young adults performed two sprint tests and isokinetic tests to determine hip flexion power. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine LL and PM CSA. There were…

  7. Characteristics of Cervical Position Sense in Subjects with Forward Head Posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Hae-Yong; Yong, Min-Sik

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of forward head posture (FHP) on proprioception by determining the cervical position-reposition error. [Subjects and Methods] A sample population was divided into two groups in accordance with the craniovertebral angle: the FHP group and the control group. We measured the craniovertebral angle, which is defined as the angle between a horizontal line passing through C7 and a line extending from the tragus of the ear to C7. The error value of the cervical position sense after cervical flexion, extension, and rotation was evaluated using the head repositioning accuracy test. [Results] There were significant differences in the error value of the joint position sense (cervical flexion, extension, and rotation) between the FHP and control groups. In addition, there was an inverse correlation between the craniovertebral angle and error value of the joint position sense. [Conclusion] FHP is associated with reduced proprioception. This result implies that the change in the muscle length caused by FHP decreases the joint position sense. Also, proprioception becomes worse as FHP becomes more severe. PMID:25435690

  8. Characteristics of cervical position sense in subjects with forward head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Hae-Yong; Yong, Min-Sik

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of forward head posture (FHP) on proprioception by determining the cervical position-reposition error. [Subjects and Methods] A sample population was divided into two groups in accordance with the craniovertebral angle: the FHP group and the control group. We measured the craniovertebral angle, which is defined as the angle between a horizontal line passing through C7 and a line extending from the tragus of the ear to C7. The error value of the cervical position sense after cervical flexion, extension, and rotation was evaluated using the head repositioning accuracy test. [Results] There were significant differences in the error value of the joint position sense (cervical flexion, extension, and rotation) between the FHP and control groups. In addition, there was an inverse correlation between the craniovertebral angle and error value of the joint position sense. [Conclusion] FHP is associated with reduced proprioception. This result implies that the change in the muscle length caused by FHP decreases the joint position sense. Also, proprioception becomes worse as FHP becomes more severe.

  9. Is there a difference in head posture and cervical spine movement in children with and without pediatric headache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budelmann, Kim; von Piekartz, Harry; Hall, Toby

    2013-10-01

    Pediatric headache is an increasingly reported phenomenon. Cervicogenic headache (CGH) is a subgroup of headache, but there is limited information about cervical spine physical examination signs in children with CGH. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was designed to investigate cervical spine physical examination signs including active range of motion (ROM), posture determined by the craniovertebral angle (CVA), and upper cervical ROM determined by the flexion-rotation test (FRT) in children aged between 6 and 12 years. An additional purpose was to determine the degree of pain provoked by the FRT. Thirty children (mean age 120.70 months [SD 15.14]) with features of CGH and 34 (mean age 125.38 months [13.14]) age-matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. When compared to asymptomatic controls, symptomatic children had a significantly smaller CVA (p upper cervical spine in children with CGH and provides evidence of the clinical utility of the FRT when examining children with CGH.

  10. Change of cervical balance following single to multi-level interbody fusion with cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Lin; Cho, Der-Yang; Liu, Yu-Fang; Lee, Wen-Yuan; Lee, Han-Chung; Chen, Chun-Chung

    2008-12-01

    Postoperative limitation of cervical movement and adjacent disc degeneration are major causes of postoperative neck pain after anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF). We present a retrospective study of dynamic radiographic change following ACDF with cages. We performed ACDF in 50 patients with cervical degenerative diseases, divided into three groups based on the level of interbody fusion (Group A: one-level; Group B: two-level; Group C: three-level). Preoperative and postoperative flexion-extension X-rays were acquired and cervical range of motion (ROM), lordosis, fusion rate, cage subsidence rate, postoperative neck pain as evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) and upper adjacent level segmental movement were evaluated. The average following time was 14.6 months. The mean change in lordotic curve was -2.31 +/- 9.53 degrees for Group A, 5.60 +/- 6.96 degrees for Group B, and 3.23 +/- 7.50 degrees for Group C (p value = 0.03). The mean change in flexion angle was -5.46 +/- 8.69 degrees for Group A, -10.2 +/- 7.38 degrees for Group B, and -13.86 +/- 10.33 degrees for Group C (p value = 0.039). The mean change in total cervical ROM was -3.85 +/- 18.74 degrees for Group A, -12.73 +/- 10.31 degrees for Group B, and -16.95 +/- 10.57 degrees for Group C (p value = 0.02). Follow-up cervical MRI for patients with persistent neck pain showed no evidence of adjacent level degeneration. There were no significant differences between the three groups with respect to postoperative change in cervical extension angle, upper adjacent level segmental movement, neck pain VAS, fusion rate or cage subsidence rate. The further decrease in total cervical ROM and flexion movement after multi-level ACDF was observed. However, a more long-term follow-up was needed to assess the actual aetiologies of upper adjacent level degeneration.

  11. Three-dimensional intervertebral kinematics in the healthy young adult cervical spine during dynamic functional loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderst, William J; Donaldson, William F; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the intervertebral kinematics of the young, healthy cervical spine during dynamic, three-dimensional, functional loading. Intervertebral motion was characterized by the range of motion (ROM) and the helical axis of motion (HAM). Biplane radiographs of the cervical spine were collected at 30 images/s as 29 participants (20-35 yr) performed dynamic flexion\\extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. Vertebral motion (C1-T1 in flexion\\extension, C3-T1 in lateral bending and axial rotation) was tracked with sub-millimeter accuracy using a validated volumetric model-based tracking process that matched subject-specific CT-based bone models to the radiographs. Flexion\\extension ROM was smallest at the C2-C3 motion segment (12.7±2.6°) and largest at the C5-C6 motion segment (19.7±3.7°). During head lateral bending and axial rotation, the intervertebral bending ROM was greater than the rotation ROM at every motion segment. The HAM demonstrated differences among motion segments and among movements. During flexion\\extension, the helical axis of motion was directed nearly perpendicular to the sagittal plane for the C2-C3 through C7-T1 motion segments. During lateral bending, the angle between the HAM and the transverse plane progressively increased from the C6-C7 motion segment (approximately ±22°) to the C3-C4 motion segment (approximately ±40°). During axial rotation, the angle between the transverse plane and the HAM was approximately ±42° at the C3-C4 through C5-C6 motion segments, and approximately ±32° at the C6-C7 motion segment. This study provides valuable reference data for evaluating the effects of age, degeneration, and surgical procedures on cervical spine kinematics during three-dimensional dynamic functional loading.

  12. Effect of cervical instability in sympathetic cervical spondylosis%颈椎不稳在交感型颈椎病发病中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于泽生; 刘忠军; 党耕町

    2002-01-01

    目的研究交感型颈椎病的病理因素及治疗方法.方法回顾分析了1988~2000年收治的20例手术治疗的交感型颈椎病患者.根据术前及术后颈椎伸屈侧位X光片判断有无颈椎不稳. 结果 20例患者术前均有颈椎不稳,颈椎不稳主要发生在C3-C4和C4-C5,颈椎高位硬膜外封闭对大部分患者有短期效果.每例患者均于不稳节段行颈前路融合术,手术有效率为90%. 结论颈椎不稳是导致交感型颈椎病发病的重要因素;颈椎高位硬膜外封闭可有短期疗效因此具有重要的诊断价值;颈椎前路植骨融合术是治疗交感型颈椎病的有效方法.%Objective To investigate the etiology and treatment of sympathetic cervical spondylosis (SCS).Methods Twenty patients who with SCS had undergone operations for sympathetic cervical spondylosis were reviewed retrospectively from 1988 to 2000. Lateral views in flexion and extension of pre- and postoperative cervical X-ray were analyzed to quantify cervical instability.Results Cervical instability was detected at one level in seven patients, two levels in ten patients, three levels in three. Cervical instability mainly occurred at C3-C4 and C4-C5. Cervical epidural block had a short time effect in the greater part of patients. Cervical discectomy and fusion at unstable segement was carried out in all 20 cases. The effective rate was 90%.Conclusions Cervical instability at C3-C4 or C4-C5 maybe an importmant factor in the etiology of sympathetic cervical spondylosis. Cervical epidural block may provide diagnostic information. Anterior cervical fusion were effective to treat sympathetic cervical spondylosis.

  13. Effect of visual display height on modelled upper and lower cervical gravitational moment, muscle capacity and relative strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straker, L; Skoss, R; Burnett, A; Burgess-Limerick, R

    2009-02-01

    Head and neck posture is an important factor in neck pain related to computer use; however, the evidence for an optimal posture is unconvincing. This study measured the 3-D postures of 36 young adults during use of three different display heights. Cervical extensor muscle strain was estimated using modelled gravitational load moments and muscle capacities. The influence of more or less upper vs. lower cervical movement was also explored across a broad range of potential postures. Overall cervical extensor muscle capacity diminished away from a neutral posture whilst gravity moment increased with flexion. Overall cervical extensor muscle strain increased with head flexion but remained stable into head extension. Individual differences in the amount of upper and lower cervical movement had an important effect on strain, particularly for some muscles. Computer display height guidelines are an important component of ergonomics practice, yet the relative strain on neck extensor muscles as a function of display height has not been examined. The current findings provide more detailed biomechanical evidence that ergonomists can incorporate with usability and other evidence to determine appropriate display height recommendations.

  14. Motion analysis of total cervical disc replacements using computed tomography: Preliminary experience with nine patients and a model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svedmark, Per (Div. of Orthopedics, Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Stockholm Spine Center, Lowenstromska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)), email: per.svedmark@spinecenter.se; Lundh, Fredrik; Olivecrona, Henrik (Div. of Orthopedics, Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)); Nemeth, Gunnar (Capio group, Stockholm (Sweden)); Noz, Marilyn E. (Dept. of Radiology, New York Univ. School of Medicine, New York (United States)); Maguire Jr, Gerald Q. (School of Information and Communication Technology, Royal Inst. of Technology, Kista (Sweden)); Zeleznik, Michael P. (Saya Systems Inc., Salt Lake City (United States))

    2011-12-15

    Background. Cervical total disc replacement (CTDR) is an alternative to anterior fusion. Therefore, it is desirable to have an accurate in vivo measurement of prosthetic kinematics and assessment of implant stability relative to the adjacent vertebrae. Purpose. To devise an in vivo CT-based method to analyze the kinematics of cervical total disc replacements (CTDR), specifically of two prosthetic components between two CT scans obtained under different conditions. Material and Methods. Nine patients with CTDR were scanned in flexion and extension of the cervical spine using a clinical CT scanner with a routine low-dose protocol. The flexion and extension CT volume data were spatially registered, and the prosthetic kinematics of two prosthetic components, an upper and a lower, was calculated and expressed in Euler angles and orthogonal linear translations relative to the upper component. For accuracy analysis, a cervical spine model incorporating the same disc replacement as used in the patients was also scanned and processed in the same manner. Results. Analysis of both the model and patients showed good repeatability, i.e. within 2 standard deviations of the mean using the 95% limits of agreement with no overlapping confidence intervals. The accuracy analysis showed that the median error was close to zero. Conclusion. The mobility of the cervical spine after total disc replacement can be effectively measured in vivo using CT. This method requires an appropriate patient positioning and scan parameters to achieve suitable image quality

  15. The Effects of Knee Joint and Hip Abduction Angles on the Activation of Cervical and Abdominal Muscles during Bridging Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Kyoung; Park, Du-Jin

    2013-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the flexion angle of the knee joint and the abduction angle of the hip joint on the activation of the cervical region and abdominal muscles. [Subjects] A total of 42 subjects were enrolled 9 males and 33 females. [Methods] The bridging exercise in this study was one form of exercise with a knee joint flexion angle of 90°. Based on this, a bridging exercise was conducted at the postures of abduction of the lower extremities at 0, 5, 10, and 15°. [Result] The changes in the knee joint angle and the hip abduction angle exhibited statistically significant effects on the cervical erector spinae, adductor magnus, and gluteus medius muscles. The abduction angles did not result in statistically significant effects on the upper trapezium, erector spinae, external oblique, and rectus abdominis muscles. However, in relation to the knee joint angles, during the bridging exercise, statistically significant results were exhibited. [Conclusion] When patients with both cervical and back pain do a bridging exercise, widening the knee joint angle would reduce cervical and shoulder muscle activity through minimal levels of abduction, permitting trunk muscle strengthening with reduced cervical muscle activity. This method would be helpful for strengthening trunk muscles in a selective manner.

  16. Kinematic MR imaging in surgical management of cervical disc disease, spondylosis and spondylotic myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C.; Metzner, J.; Brinkmann, G.; Heller, M. [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Weinert, D.; Schoen, R.; Rautenberg, E.; Mehdorn, H.M. [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Falliner, A. [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Orthopedics; Resnick, D. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1999-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate the clinical value and influence of kinematic MR imaging in patients with degenerative diseases of the cervical spine. Material and methods: Eighty-one patients were examined with a 1.5 T whole body magnet using a positioning device. Cervical disc disease was classified according to clinical and radiographic findings into 4 stages: stage I=cervical disc disease (n=13); stage II=spondylosis (n=42); stage III=spondylosis with restricted motion (n=11); and stage IV-cervical spondylotic myelopathy (n=15). Findings on kinematic MR images were compared to those on flexion and extension radiographs, myelography, CT-myelography and static MR imaging. Furthermore, the influence of kinematic MR imaging on surgical management and intra-operative patient positioning was determined. Results: Additional information obtained by kinematic MR imaging changed the therapeutic management in 7 of 11 (64%) patients with stage III disease, and in 13 of 15 (87%) patients with stage IV disease. Instead of an anterior approach, a posterior surgical approach was chosen in 3 of 11 patients (27%) with stage III disease and in 6 of 15 patients (40%) with stage IV disease. Hyperextension of the neck was avoided intra-operatively in 4 patients (27%) with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and in 1 patient with stage II (2%) and in 1 patient with stage III (9%) disease. Kinematic MR imaging provided additional information in all patients with stages III and IV disease except in 1 patient with stage III disease, when compared to flexion and extension radiographs, myelography, CT-myelography and static MR examination. Conclusion: Kinematic MR imaging adds additional information when compared to conventional imaging methods in patients with advanced stages of degenerative disease of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  17. MRI of acute cervical injury: correlation with neurologic deficit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Chang Dong; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lim, Seung Chul; Shin, Myung Jin; Han, Boo Kyung; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Man Soo; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Suh, Dae Chul [Asan Medical Center University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    To evaluate MRI findings of spinal cord according to mechanism in acute cervical spinal injury. 25 patients under went MRI within 1 month after acute cervical trauma. Axial T1Wl (TR/TE: 500/20), gradient-echo (TR/TE: 300/14), sagittal T1Wl (TR/TE: 500/20), proton (TR/TE: 2000. 20 msec), T2Wl (TR/TE: 2000/80) were performed. In 11 patients, post-enhancement T1Wl was done. Change of spinal cord signal intensity on MRI in addition to the presence of abnormal changes of vertebral body, intervertebral disc and paraspinal soft tissue were evaluated. 15 patients had flexion injury, seven had extension injury and three had injury of unknown mechanism. Twelve patients showed iso-signal intensity on T2Wl and high signal intensity on T2Wl. Three patients showed low signal intensity on T1Wl and high signal intensity on T2Wl. Spinal cord hemorrhage occured in 10 patients. We found cord swelling in nine patients and cord compression in 12 patients. In nine patients with cord swelling, extent of cord injury was more than one segment of vertebral body. Ligamentous injury, disc injury, soft tissue injury occurred in 16 (64%), 17 (68%), 15 (60%) patients respectively. Vertebral body fracture was found in 17 patients (68%). The levels of fracture were C6 (eight patients) and C5 (five patients). MRI is valuable in exaluetion of the spinal cord, intervertebral disc, and soft tissue lesions in acute cervical spinal injury. Prognosis is worse in flexion injury than in extension injury, and is well correlated with cord hemorrhage and lesion extent.

  18. THE ROLE OF ELECTROTHERAPY AND PHYSICAL THERAPY IN THE RECOVERY OF CERVICAL ARTHROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochiana Gabriela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study concerning the role of electrotherapy and of physical therapy in the recovery of cervical arthrosis is to maintain a high quality family, social and professional activity, by eliminating the pain and the muscle contractures. The hypothesis that was the starting point of this paper was that: if we associate electrotherapy techniques and cervical spine alignment techniques to the recovery programme, the pain and the paresthesias will diminish until they fade away for good. The study was conducted on a number of 24 subjects with the diagnosis of cervical arthrosis, over a period of 6 months. The subjects in the experimental group were 12 and they benefited from electrotherapy and physical therapy, while those in the control group had only medication. The methods, procedures and the techniques used in the recovery for the subjects included in the experimental group were: TENS currents, ultrasounds, tractions on an axis, facilitation techniques and the adjustment of the cervical spine. The results materialized in: the disappearance of pain, of paresthesias and of muscle contractions obtain in a relatively short period of time, allows us to notice the benefit of associating electrotherapy and physical therapy to the recovery of cervical arthroses. The conclusions underline the importance of the position adopted during all the activities that require head flexion in order to prevent the rectitude of the cervical spine and implicitly the pain, the paresthesias and the contractures.

  19. Multichannel somato sensory evoked potential study demonstrated abnormalities in cervical cord function in brachial monomelic amyotrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial monomelic amyotrophy (BMMA is known to affect the central cervical cord gray matter resulting in single upper limb atrophy and weakness. Settings and Design: Case series of BMMA patients who underwent somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP studies at a tertiary referral center. Aims: We proposed to record Multichannel Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (MCSSEP from median and ulnar nerves with neck in neutral and neck fully flexed position in 17 patients with classical BMMA seen over three years. Materials and Methods: Recordings were done from both median (MN and ulnar nerves (UN. N9, P9, N13, N20 potentials were recorded and amplitudes measured. SSEPs were performed in 22 age-matched healthy men. Amplitudes of cervical response were calculated by N13/P9 ratio and compared in both positions. Results: Among the controls N13 amplitude was always normal {MN: mean N13/P9 - 0.96 in neutral; 0.95 in flexed}{UN: mean N13/P9 - 0.82 in neutral; 0.83 in flexed}, and mean amplitudes did not reveal any difference in both conditions ( P >0.05. Among 17 patients N9, P9 and N20 responses were normal in neutral position. Flexion showed no change in latency or amplitude of N9 and N20 responses ( P -0.63 whereas the N13 response was abnormal in at least one tested nerve in the affected limb (MN: P < 0.01; UN: P < 0.01. During flexion, N13 response was abnormal in 14 (82% patients after MN stimulation and in all 17(100% after UN stimulation {MN: mean N13/P9 - 0.62 in neutral; 0.38 in flexed}{UN: mean N13/P9 - 0.55 in neutral; 0.31 in flexed}. Conclusion: MCSSEP in BMMA with neck flexion caused a significant reduction of the cervical N13 response indicating segmental cervical cord dysfunction.

  20. Kinetic Actviation Relaxation Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Béland, Laurent Karim; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si, self-interstitial diffusion in Fe and structural relaxation in amorphous silicon.

  1. Characteristics of the Motor Units during Sternocleidomastoid Isometric Flexion among Patients with Mechanical Neck Disorder and Asymptomatic Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chia-Chi; Su, Fong-Chin; Yang, Po-Ching; Lin, Hwai-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical neck disorder is a widespread and non-neurological musculoskeletal condition resulting from modern lifestyles. Presently, the fundamental electrophysiological properties of the motor units of the sternocleidomastoid muscles and the characteristics of the short-term synchronization of the motor unit in patients with neck pain are ambiguous. This study therefore aims to clarify the fundamental electrophysiological properties of the motor units of the sternocleidomastoid muscles in patients with mechanical neck disorder and in asymptomatic individuals. We further investigated whether alterations in the degree of motor unit short-term synchronization occur. The surface electrophysiological signals of the bilateral sternal heads of the sternocleidomastoid muscles of twelve patients with mechanical neck disorder and asymptomatic individuals were detected at 25% of the maximum voluntary contraction during cervical isometric flexion and then decomposed into individual motor unit action potential trains. We found that the patients with mechanical neck disorder showed significantly higher initial and mean firing rates of the sternocleidomastoid muscles and displayed substantially lower motor unit short-term synchronization values compared with the asymptomatic subjects. Consequently, these convincing findings support the assertion that patients with mechanical neck disorder display altered neuromuscular control strategies, such as the reinforcement of motor unit recruitment firing rates in the sternocleidomastoid muscles. The motor units of these patients also revealed neural recruitment strategies with relatively poor efficiency when executing the required motor tasks. PMID:27941995

  2. Nonlinear fractional relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Tofighi

    2012-04-01

    We define a nonlinear model for fractional relaxation phenomena. We use -expansion method to analyse this model. By studying the fundamental solutions of this model we find that when → 0 the model exhibits a fast decay rate and when → ∞ the model exhibits a power-law decay. By analysing the frequency response we find a logarithmic enhancement for the relative ratio of susceptibility.

  3. Flexion strength of the toes in the normal foot. An evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, S M; Briggs, P J

    2013-12-01

    Flexion of the toes may be active from muscle contraction or passive from the reversed windlass function of the plantar aponeurosis. The aim of this study was to estimate the flexion moments the muscles of the foot and long digital flexors may be capable of generating and compare these calculations with published data. Magnetic resonance images were used to measure the maximal cross-sectional area of the foot muscles and long digital flexors, along with the radius of curvature of the metatarsal heads. Using known physiological data the maximal flexion moments the muscles may be able to generate at the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints were calculated. The methodology overestimates muscle strength and flexion moments at the metatarsophalangeal joints. The calculated maximal flexion moment at the 1st MTP joint is 4.27-6.84 Nm, for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th MTP joints 3.06-4.91 Nm, and the 5th MTP joint 0.47-0.75 Nm. The flexion moments the muscles may generate at the MTP joints do not account for the flexion forces seen in normal walking. Given that maximal strength is not used in normal walking, we conclude that the reversed windlass mechanism of the plantar aponeurosis must be important in normal function of the toes.

  4. Biomechanical Considerations in the Design of High-Flexion Total Knee Replacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Kung Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Typically, joint arthroplasty is performed to relieve pain and improve functionality in a diseased or damaged joint. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA involves replacing the entire knee joint, both femoral and tibial surfaces, with anatomically shaped artificial components in the hope of regaining normal joint function and permitting a full range of knee flexion. In spite of the design of the prosthesis itself, the degree of flexion attainable following TKA depends on a variety of factors, such as the joint’s preoperative condition/flexion, muscle strength, and surgical technique. High-flexion knee prostheses have been developed to accommodate movements that require greater flexion than typically achievable with conventional TKA; such high flexion is especially prevalent in Asian cultures. Recently, computational techniques have been widely used for evaluating the functionality of knee prostheses and for improving biomechanical performance. To offer a better understanding of the development and evaluation techniques currently available, this paper aims to review some of the latest trends in the simulation of high-flexion knee prostheses.

  5. Notalgia paresthetica associated with cervical spinal stenosis and cervicothoracic disk disease at C4 through C7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alai, Nili N; Skinner, Harry B; Nabili, Siamak T; Jeffes, Edward; Shahrokni, Seyed; Saemi, Arash M

    2010-02-01

    Notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a common refractory, sensory, neuropathic syndrome with the hallmark symptom of localized pruritus of the unilateral infrascapular back. It generally is a chronic noncurable condition with periodic remissions and exacerbations. While the dermatologic syndrome may be multifactorial in etiology, a possible association with underlying cervical spine disease should be evaluated for proper treatment. Collaborative multispecialty evaluation by dermatology, radiology, orthopedic surgery, and neurology may be indicated for primary management of this condition. First-line therapy for NP with associated cervical disease may include nondermatologic noninvasive treatments such as spinal manipulation, physical therapy, massage, cervical traction, cervical muscle strengthening, and oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants. Notalgia paresthetica may in fact be a cutaneous sign of an underlying degenerative cervical spine disease. We report a case of a patient with cervical spinal stenosis that corresponded directly with the clinical findings of NP.

  6. Cervical spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects of the cervical spine Bone problems Fracture Osteoarthritis Disc herniation Risks Risks of CT scans include: ... Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  7. Cervical Radiculopathy (Pinched Nerve)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help relieve pain, strengthen neck muscles, and improve range of motion. In some cases, traction can be used to ... Learn more about surgery for radiculopathy online at Cervical ... a wide range of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries. All articles are ...

  8. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  9. The effect of multi-level laminoplasty and laminectomy on the biomechanics of the cervical spine: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kode, Swathi; Kallemeyn, Nicole A; Smucker, Joseph D; Fredericks, Douglas C; Grosland, Nicole M

    2014-01-01

    Laminectomy has been regarded as a standard treatment for multi-level cervical stenosis. Concern for complications such as kyphosis has limited the indication of multi-level laminectomy; hence it is often augmented with an instrumented fusion. Laminoplasty has emerged as a motion preserving alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the multidirectional flexibility of the cervical spine in response to a plate-only open door laminoplasty, double door laminoplasty, and laminectomy using a computational model. A validated three-dimensional finite element model of a specimen-specific intact cervical spine (C2-T1) was modified to simulate each surgical procedure at levels C3-C6. An additional goal of this work was to compare the instrumented computational model to our multi-specimen experimental findings to ensure similar trends in response to the surgical procedures. Model predictions indicate that mobility was retained following open and double door laminoplasty with a 5.4% and 20% increase in flexion, respectively, compared to the intact state. Laminectomy resulted in 57% increase in flexion as compared to the intact state, creating a concern for eventual kyphosis--a known risk/complication of multi-level laminectomy in the absence of fusion. Increased disc stresses were observed at the altered and adjacent segments post-laminectomy in flexion.

  10. Anthropometric characteristics, passive hip flexion, and spinal mobility in relation to back pain in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swärd, L; Eriksson, B; Peterson, L

    1990-05-01

    Anthropometric characteristics, passive hip flexion, and spinal mobility were examined and back pain was registered in 116 top Swedish male athletes representing four different sports (wrestling, gymnastics, soccer, tennis). Differences in stature, body weight, passive hip flexion, mobility of the spine in forward flexion, and asymmetry of the back were found when each group of athletes was compared with the rest of the athletes. These differences could be explained by a natural selection of individuals with the physical constitution required for the sport concerned, but they may also be a long-term effect of training. A small sacral inclination, defined as the sacrohorizontal angle, correlated significantly with back pain.

  11. Dolor cervical incoercible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián F Narváez-Muñoz

    2014-03-01

    Astrocytomas are relatively common glial neoplasm of the central nervous system, but only a small percentage of them are located in the spinal cord, with a predilection for the cervical and dorsal regions. In most cases, extend longitudinally, affecting several cord segments. Pain is a frequent symptom of local character bone segments involving the tumor, associated with sensory deficit and / or motor. The following is the case of a 60 year old woman with cervical cord astrocytoma extended to the brainstem.

  12. MRI diagnosis of Hirayama diseases under the conventional position and flexion position%平山病颈椎自然位及屈颈位的MR I诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈天忠; 李治; 唐建桥; 程旭坚

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析平山病(HD)的 MRI表现,探讨 MRI对平山病的诊断价值。方法对15例经临床及肌电图证实为 HD患者进行颈椎自然位和屈颈位MRI扫描并回顾性分析其表现。结果12例在颈椎自然位MRI见生理曲度变直或反弓,15例均有低位颈髓(C4~C7椎水平)不同程度变细、萎缩;曲颈位均可见背侧硬脊膜囊向前移位,硬膜外间隙增宽及弧形或梭形 T2 WI 异常信号,低位颈髓受压变扁;8例T2 WI后硬膜外间隙见流空信号。结论 HD自然位低位颈髓局限性变扁,萎缩;曲颈位硬脊膜后外间隙T2 WI的高信号及流空信号对本病诊断有重要意义。%Objective To analyze the MRI appearance of Hirayama disease,and to explore the diagnostic value of MRI in Hiraya-ma disease.Methods MRI data of 15 Hirayama patients confirmed by clinic and electromyogram were retrospectively analyzed.Re-sults The cervical manifestations including straight or kyphotic cervical curvature were found in 1 2 cases.Atrophy and flattering of the lower cervical cord (C4 to C7 level)were found in all 1 5 cases.At flexion position,the anterior shifting of cervical dorsal dural sac,the widened epidural space and abnormal signal intensity component were found in all 1 5 cases.Flow voids in posterior epidural space on T2 weighted images were found in 8 cases.Conclusion Cervical MRI with fully flexion position has significant values on di-agnosis of Hirayama disease.Atrophy and flattening of the lower cervical cord,the anterior shifting of cervical durai sac,the wid-ened epidural space and posterior epidural crescent-shaped component with flow voids on T2 weighted images are valuable in diagno-sis of Hirayama disease.

  13. The range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V: a comparison of active vs passive flexion mobilisation regimes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Panchal, J

    1997-10-01

    A number of early postoperative mobilisation regimes have been developed in an attempt to increase tendon excursion and gliding and thereby reduce formation of adhesions following repair of flexor tendons. Early active flexion mobilisation regimes are becoming more popular, and have replaced early passive flexion regimes in many centres. The aim of the present study was: (a) to determine the range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V, and (b) to compare the excursion ranges between active (Belfast) and passive (modified Duran) flexion mobilisation regimes postoperatively. This was done (a) in two cadavers, and (b) in two patients intraoperatively, and postoperatively at 10 days, 3 weeks and 6 weeks. With passive flexion, the mean tendon excursion in Zone V in cadavers was 1 mm for flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendons respectively. With simulated active flexion, the mean tendon excursion was 14 mm, 10 mm and 11 mm respectively. The mean tendon excursion in clinical cases intraoperatively following passive flexion was 2 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively; following simulated active flexion it was 10 mm, 11 mm and 11 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively. On the tenth day following repair, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL were 1 mm, 4 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 3 mm, 10 mm and 12 mm on active flexion respectively. Three weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 1 mm, 2 mm and 1 mm on passive flexion as compared to 5 mm, 15 mm on active flexion respectively. Six weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 9 mm, 7 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 12 mm, 33 mm and 20 mm on active flexion respectively. These results demonstrate an increased excursion of repaired flexor tendons in Zone V following an active flexion mobilisation regime as compared to a passive flexion mobilisation regime.

  14. Biomechanical stability of a bioabsorbable self-retaining polylactic acid/nano-sized β-tricalcium phosphate cervical spine interbody fusion device in single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion sheep models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Lu Cao,1 Ping-Guo Duan,1 Xi-Lei Li,1 Feng-Lai Yuan,3 Ming-Dong Zhao,2 Wu Che,1 Hui-Ren Wang,1 Jian Dong11Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital, State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; 3Affiliated Third Hospital of Nantong University, Wuxi, ChinaPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanical stability provided by a novel, polylactic acid/nano-sized, β-tricalcium phosphate, bioabsorbable, self-retaining cervical fusion cage (BCFC.Methods: Quasistatic nonconstraining torques (maximum 1.5 NM induced flexion, extension, lateral bending (±1.5 NM, and axial rotation (±1.5 NM on 32 sheep cervical spines (C2–C5. The motion segment C3–C4 was first tested intact; the following groups were tested after complete discectomy: autologous tricortical iliac crest bone graft, Medtronic–Wego polyetheretherketone (PEEK cage, Solis PEEK cage, and BCFC. The autologous bone graft group was tested with an anterior plate. The mean range of motion (ROM was calculated from the load-displacement curves.Results: BCFC significantly decreased ROM in lateral bending and axial rotation compared to other implants, and no significant difference in ROM between two types of PEEK cages and BCFC could be observed in flexion and extension. Anterior cervical plate (ACP significantly decreased ROM in flexion and extension, but no significant difference in ROM between BCFC and bone graft plus ACP could be determined in lateral bending and axial rotation.Conclusion: The BCFC device showed better stability to autologous tricortical iliac crest bone graft and PEEK cages in single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion models and thus may be a potential alternative to the current PEEK cages.Keywords: biomechanics, cervical spine, cages, bioabsorbable, sheep

  15. [The biomechanics of hyperextension injuries of the subaxial cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, G; Meyer, C; Ingenhoff, L; Bredow, J; Müller, L P; Eysel, P; Schiffer, G

    2016-05-24

    Hyperextension injuries of the subaxial cervical spine are potentially hazardous due to relevant destabilization. Depending on the clinical condition, neurologic or vascular damage may occur. Therefore an exact knowledge of the factors leading to destabilization is essential. In a biomechanical investigation, 10 fresh human cadaver cervical spine specimens were tested in a spine simulator. The tested segments were C4 to 7. In the first step, physiologic motion was investigated. Afterwards, the three steps of injury were dissection of the anterior longitudinal ligament, removal of the intervertebral disc/posterior longitudinal ligament, and dissection of the interspinous ligaments/ligamentum flavum. After each step, the mobility was determined. Regarding flexion and extension, an increase in motion of 8.36 % after the first step, 90.45 % after the second step, and 121.67 % after the last step was observed. Testing of lateral bending showed an increase of mobility of 7.88 %/27.48 %/33.23 %; axial rotation increased by 2.87 %/31.16 %/45.80 %. Isolated dissection of the anterior longitudinal ligament led to minor destabilization, whereas the intervertebral disc has to be seen as a major stabilizer of the cervical spine. Few finite-element studies showed comparable results. If a transfer to clinical use is undertaken, an isolated rupture of the anterior longitudinal ligament can be treated without surgical stabilization.

  16. Use of MRI in the diagnosis of cervical myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagase, Joji; Itahashi, Takashi; Yuyama, Takuo; Lee, Motohiro; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Inoue, Schun-ichi; Arimizu, Noboru; Uematsu, Sadao; Morita, Fuminori.

    1987-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 18 cases of cervical myelopathy. They were ''disc herniation'' 8 cases, ''canal stenosis'' 5 cases, and ''ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL)'' 5 cases. The midsagittal section was obtained in each cases. The pulse sequence was Spin Echo (SE) technique with both T/sub 1/-weighted SE (Tr = 400, Te = 40) and T/sub 2/-weighted SE (Tr = 2000, Te = 80). Cervical-cord compression by herniated disc, yellow ligament, OPLL, or osteophyte was shown very clealy on the T/sub 1/-weighted image. Cord compression was increased by cervical extension and decreased by flexion. MRI was very useful in detecting the involved levels and in selecting the operative procedures. T/sub 2/-weighted image was taken in 9 cases. High signal intensity area was noted at the cord which was compressed in 7 cases. The true mechanism of this phenomenon is unknown yet, but this might be a clue to solve the pathogenesis of myelopathy. MRI was performed in 9 cases in order to evaluate post-operative cord decompression. Cord decompression was confirmed in 8 cases except for one case. MRI was also useful for postoperative evaluation.

  17. New Constraints on the Complex Mass Substructure in Abell 1689 from Gravitational Flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Adrienne; Goldberg, David M

    2010-01-01

    In a recent publication, the flexion aperture mass statistic was found to provide a robust and effective method by which substructure in galaxy clusters might be mapped. Moreover, we suggested that constraints on the masses and mass profile of structures might be constrained using this method. In this paper, we apply the flexion aperture mass technique to HST ACS images of Abell 1689. We compare this measure to the weak lensing shear aperture mass statistic, and demonstrate that the flexion aperture mass statistic is more sensitive to structures on the scales considered, dramatically outperforming the shear aperture mass statistic on this dataset, which suffers from persistent systematic noise. While the central potential is not constrained by our method, due largely to missing data in the central 0.5$^\\prime$ of the cluster, we are able to place constraints on the masses and mass profiles of prominent substructures. Considering 16 flexion aperture mass reconstructions, we identify 4 separate mass peaks, and ...

  18. High Resolution Weak Lensing Mass-Mapping Combining Shear and Flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Lanusse, Francois; Leonard, Adrienne; Pires, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new mass-mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. In order to preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass-mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. We test our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures ...

  19. On the validity of the Born approximation for weak cosmic flexions

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Bjoern Malte; Kalovidouris, Angelos Fotios; Bacon, David J

    2011-01-01

    Weak lensing calculations are often made under the assumption of the Born approximation, where the ray path is approximated as a straight radial line. In addition, lens-lens couplings where there are several deflections along the light ray are often neglected. We examine the effect of dropping the Born approximation and taking lens-lens couplings into account, for weak lensing effects up to second order (cosmic flexion), by making a perturbative expansion in the light path. We present a diagrammatic representation of the resulting corrections to the lensing effects. The flexion signal, which measures the derivative of the density field, acquires correction terms proportional to the squared gravitational shear; we also find that by dropping the Born approximation, two further degrees of freedom of the lensing distortion can be excited (the twist components), in addition to the four standard flexion components. We derive angular power spectra of the flexion and twist, with and without the Born-approximation and...

  20. Activation of brain areas following ankle dorsiflexion versus plantar flexion Functional magnetic resonance imaging verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianyu Jiang; Weiping Wu; Xinglin Wang; Changshui Weng; Qiuhua Wang; Yanmei Guo

    2012-01-01

    Changes in activated areas of the brain during ankle active dorsiflexion and ankle active plantar flexion were observed in six healthy subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging.Excited areas of ankle active dorsiflexion involved the bilateral primary motor area and the primary somatosensory area, as well as the bilateral supplementary sensory area, the primary visual area, the right second visual area, and the vermis of cerebellum.Excited areas of ankle active plantar flexion included the ipsilateral supplementary motor area, the limbic system, and the contralateral corpus striatum.Fine movements of the cerebral cortex control the function of the ankle dorsiflexion to a larger extent than ankle plate flexion, and the function of ankle plate flexion is more controlled by the subcortical area.

  1. Development of a knee joint motion simulator to evaluate deep knee flexion of artificial knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Y; Ueno, M; Kiguchi, K; Ito, J; Mawatari, M; Hotokebuchi, T

    2008-01-01

    A purpose of this study is to examine the effect that quadriceps femoris force gives to rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis during deep knee flexion such as a unique sitting style called 'seiza' in Japanese. For the evaluation, we developed the knee motion simulator which could bend to 180 degrees continually simulating the passive flexion performed by clinicians. A total knee prosthesis, which is a specially-devised posterior stabilized type and capable of flexion up to 180 degrees, was inserted into bone model. And this prosthesis pulled by three kinds of quadriceps femoris forces to perform parameter study. The results obtained in this study were showed the same tendency with those in the past cadaveric experiment. It is suggested that the rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis are affected by shape of prosthesis, a vector of quadriceps femoris force, and bony aliments during deep knee flexion.

  2. Investigating the effects of movement speed on the lumbopelvic coordination during trunk flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Ning, Xiaopeng; Fathallah, Fadi

    2016-08-01

    Movement speed during trunk flexion has long been reported to affect task performance and biomechanical responses. The current study investigated how movement speed changed lumbopelvic coordination, especially lumbopelvic continuous relative phase and phase variability during trunk flexion. Eighteen subjects executed a paced trunk flexion routine over time periods of 3, 7, 11 and 15seconds. The results demonstrated that compared with the 3-s condition, lumbopelvic continuous relative phase was 98.8% greater in the 15-s condition, indicating a more anti-phase coordination pattern. This pattern is suggested to mitigate the increased spinal loading associated with the longer duration of muscle exertion. Additionally, phase variability was 18.8% greater in the 15-s trials than the 3-s trials, such an unstable coordination pattern is likely caused by the more active neuromuscular control. Findings of this study provide important information about the effects of movement speed on lumbopelvic coordination during trunk flexion.

  3. Constraining primordial non-Gaussianity with cosmological weak lensing: shear and flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Fedeli, C; Moscardini, L

    2012-01-01

    We examine the cosmological constraining power of future large-scale weak lensing surveys on the model of \\emph{Euclid}, with particular reference to primordial non-Gaussianity. Our analysis considers several different estimators of the projected matter power spectrum, based on both shear and flexion, for which we review the covariances and Fisher matrices. The bounds provided by cosmic shear alone for the local bispectrum shape, marginalized over $\\sigma_8$, are at the level of $\\Delta f_\\mathrm{NL} \\sim 100$. We consider three additional bispectrum shapes, for which the cosmic shear constraints range from $\\Delta f_\\mathrm{NL}\\sim 340$ (equilateral shape) up to $\\Delta f_\\mathrm{NL}\\sim 500$ (orthogonal shape). The competitiveness of cosmic flexion constraints against cosmic shear ones depends on the galaxy intrinsic flexion noise, that is still virtually unconstrained. Adopting the very high value that has been occasionally used in the literature results in the flexion contribution being basically negligib...

  4. Influence of flexion angle of files on the decentralization of oval canals during instrumentation

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Antonieta Veloso Carvalho OLIVEIRA; Letícia Duarte ALVES; Pereira,Analice Giovani; RAPOSO,Luís Henrique Araújo; João Carlos Gabrielli BIFFI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the flexion angle of files on the decentralization of root canals during instrumentation. Fifteen lower incisors were instrumented with Protaper Universal files and radiographed in two directions (mesiodistal and buccolingual) before and after instrumentation with a #15 K-file in position for evaluating the flexion angle of files. The specimens were also scanned before and after instrumentation using micro-computed tomography to obtain th...

  5. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20° to -12° (stiff ...

  6. Cervical perineural cyst masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

  7. Changes in saccadic reaction time while maintaining neck flexion in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunita, Kenji; Fujiwara, Katsuo

    2006-05-01

    We investigated changes in saccadic reaction time during maintenance of neck flexion in elderly individuals. Subjects comprised 49 volunteers, including 19 young adults and 30 elderly adults. Elderly subjects were separated into 2 groups (trained group: n=18; untrained group: n=12) based on responses to a questionnaire concerning activities of daily living. Saccadic reaction time was measured at angles of neck flexion of 0 degrees (resting position), 10 degrees and 20 degrees , with the chin either resting on a stand (chin-on) or not (chin-off). Reaction time was determined as the latency to the beginning of eye movement toward the lateral target, which was moved at random intervals in jumps of 20 degrees amplitude. In the chin-on posture, the angle of neck flexion had no significant effect on reaction time in any group. In the chin-off posture, the flexion angle significantly affected reaction time in both young and elderly trained groups. Significant shortenings of the reaction time were obtained at 10 degrees and 20 degrees neck flexion in the young group, and at 20 degrees neck flexion in the elderly trained group. No significant shortening of reaction time was noted in the elderly untrained group. These findings suggest that neural function associated with shortening of saccadic reaction time due to neck extensor activity decreases with age, and the decrements become more marked with inactivity in daily life.

  8. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are at increased risk for HPV infections. Other risk factors for cervical cancer include: Giving birth to many children. Smoking cigarettes. Using oral contraceptives ("the Pill"). Having a weakened immune system . Cervical Cancer Screening ...

  9. Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen-relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images non-radiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a micro-second-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. Owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter, when the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two co-located photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the non-radiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45 µm to 2.3 µm and at the same time slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63 µm to 0.41 µm. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration. PMID:25379919

  10. 平山病磁共振成像诊断价值%Natural position and flexion-extension MRI diagnostic value in Hirayama disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董悦; 王宏; 董玉茹; 钟心; 穆学涛

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cervical natural position and flexion-extension MRI diagnostic value in Hirayama disease. Methods 10 patients who were diagnosed Hirayama disease were performed cervical natural position MRI, and 7 of them were additionally performed contrast-enhancement MRI scan in natural position and flexion-extension. Results In the natural position MRI scan, the mild atrophy C5~C7 spinal cords and short tanteroposterior diameter of vertebral body were found in all 10 cases. In the flexion-extension MRI scan, shifted forward C-spinal and broadened epidural cavity were also found in the 10 cases, including one case of blood vessels with flow-void effect in the epidural cavity, one case of abnormal signal within fore horn of the gray matter in the cervical cord. In the contrast MRI scan, 7 cases showed different degrees enhancement in the back of epidural cavity. Conclusion The features of the C-spinal and epidural cavity reflect obvious in flexion-extension and contrast-enhancement MRI of Hirayama disease.%目的 探讨颈椎自然位及过屈位磁共振成像对平山病的诊断价值.方法 对10例临床证实的平山病患者行颈椎自然位和过屈位磁共振平扫及7例增强扫描.结果 自然位MR扫描,10例均有C5~C7段脊髓轻度萎缩,前后径变短,过屈位扫描,10例患者均累及颈5、6椎体平面;可见颈髓前移、变扁;硬脊膜向前移位,硬脊膜外腔增宽,硬脊膜后静脉丛扩张见新月形或梭形等T1等T2信号,1例患者可见硬膜外腔内流空血管影,1例患者见颈髓灰质内条状稍长T1、稍长T2异常信号影,横轴面示异常信号主要位于灰质前角.7例在增强扫描中均可见不同程度的硬膜后间隙内异常强化影.结论 平山病患者在过屈位时颈髓及硬膜外腔的异常表现极具特征性,因此MRI过屈位平扫及增强扫描对平山病诊断具有重要价值.

  11. Gait analysis of spastic walking in patients with cervical compressive myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezawa, Y; Uchida, K; Baba, H

    2001-01-01

    To assess neurological status and to evaluate the effect of surgical decompression in patients with cervical myelopathy, we performed computerized gait analysis in 24 patients with cervical compressive myelopathy who showed spastic walking. Gait analysis was repeated during neurological follow-up that averaged 32.4 months. The gait pattern in patients with severe myelopathy was characterized by hyperextension of the knee in the stance phase without plantar flexion of the ankle in the swing phase, significantly reduced walking speed and step length, prolonged stance phase duration and decreased single-stance phase duration, and increased step width. The angle of flexion of the knee joint in the stance phase was significantly correlated with the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Postoperative neurological improvement was associated with increased walking speed and decreased extension angle of the knee joint (single-stance phase and swing phase). Postoperatively, 12 patients had normalized extension of the knee in stance phase and their walking speed, cadence, stance phase duration, and single-stance phase duration, as well as step length and width, showed nonsignificant differences from these parameters in healthy controls. Our results show that kinesiological gait analysis is clinically useful for the functional assessment of the severity of spastic walking in cervical myelopathy.

  12. Functional MR imaging of the cervical spine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allmann, K.H.; Uhl, M.; Uhrmeister, P.; Neumann, K.; Langer, M. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Universitaetsklinik; Kempis, J. von [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Rheumatologie und Klinische Immunologie

    1998-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate functional MR imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involving the cervical spine. Material and Methods: We used a device that allows MR examination to be made of the cervical spine in infinitely variable degrees of flexion and extension. Dynamic functional MR imaging was performed on 25 patients with RA. Results: Functional MR imaging was able to show the degree of vertebral instability of the occipito-atlantal or atlanto-axial level as well as the subaxial level. By performing functional MR imaging, we were able to demonstrate the extent of synovial tissue around the dens, and the impingement and displacement of the spinal cord during flexion and extension. The basilar impression, the cord impingement into the foramen magnum, the cord compression, the slipping of vertebrae, and the angulation of the cord were all much more evident in functional than in static MR imaging. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging provided additional information in patients with RA, and is valuable in patients who have a normal MR study in the neutral position and yet have signs of a neurological deficit. Functional MR imaging is important in the planning of stabilizing operations of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  13. Invasive cervical resorption: treatment challenges

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is a relatively uncommon form of external root resorption. It is characterized by invasion of cervical region of the root by fibrovascular tissue derived from the periodontal ligament. This case presents an invasive cervical resorption occurring in maxillary lateral incisor, following damage in cervical cementum from avulsion and intracoronal bleaching procedure. Flap reflection, debridement and restoration with glass ionomer cement were performed in an attempt to...

  14. Case report: nonoperative treatment of an unstable Jefferson fracture using a cervical collar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, Brian M; Harris, Mitchel B

    2008-05-01

    The treatment of unstable burst fractures of the atlas (Jefferson fractures) is controversial. Unstable Jefferson fractures have been managed successfully with either immobilization, typically halo traction or halo vest, or surgery. We report a patient with an unstable Jefferson fracture treated nonoperatively with a cervical collar, frequent clinical examinations, and flexion-extension radiographs. Twelve months after treatment, the patient achieved painless union of his fracture. The successful treatment confirms prior studies reporting unstable Jefferson fractures have been treated nonoperatively. The outcome challenges the clinical relevance of treatment algorithms that rely on the "rules of Spence" to guide treatment of unstable Jefferson fractures and illustrates instability may not necessarily be present in patients with considerable lateral mass widening. Additionally, it emphasizes a more reliable way of assessing C1-C2 stability in unstable Jefferson fractures is by measuring the presence and extent of anterior subluxation on lateral flexion and extension views.

  15. Deep cervical infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inflammatory cervical swelling may have several causes. The jugular vein thrombosis is a rare entity, often forgotten. Most frequently arises due to a cervical sepsis by the use of a central venous catheter or intravenous drug abuse (drug addicts. Rarely, is secondary to a hypercoagulability state associated with a visceral carcinoma (Trousseau Syndrome. Material and Methods: The authors present the case of a 65 years old male, who used the ENT Emergency Service due to a painful left cervical swelling with local and systemic inflammatory signs of 3 days duration. Results: An cervical ultrasound suggested a neck abscess. CT was performed and confirmed the ultrasound results. Because of its location in the path of the internal jugular vein, we requested re-evaluation by CT with intravenous contrast and doppler ultrasound, obtaining the diagnosis of thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Further studies were conduct to clarify the hypercoagulability state, since the patient had no known predisposing factor. Finally the diagnosis of unresectable gastric carcinoma was made. Discussion and Conclusion: The ENT must be aware and be able to understand any cervical imagiologic studies. A deep knowledge of the anatomical imagiología is important for the diagnosis of jugular thrombosis. When we have a case of spontaneous jugular thrombosis, we must look for possible visceral carcinoma.

  16. Syringomyelia associated with cervical spondylosis: A rare condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Alessandro; Nigro, Lorenzo; Marotta, Nicola; Mancarella, Cristina; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Delfini, Roberto

    2013-06-16

    Spinal spondylosis is an extremely common condition that has only rarely been described as a cause of syringomyelia. We describe a case of syringomyelia associated with cervical spondylosis admitted at our division and treated by our institute. It is the case of a 66-year-old woman. At our observation she was affected by moderate-severe spastic tetraparesis. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an hyperintense signal within spinal cord from C3 to T1 with a more sharply defined process in the inferior cervical spinal cord. At the same level bulging discs, facets and ligamenta flava hypertrophy determined a compression towards subarachnoid space and spinal cord. Spinal cord compression was more evident in hyperextension rather than flexion. A 4-level laminectomy and subsequent posterior stabilization with intra-articular screws was executed. At 3-mo follow up there was a regression of tetraparesis but motor deficits of the lower limbs residuated. At the same follow up postoperative MRI was executed. It suggested enlargement of the syrinx. Perhaps hyperintensity within spinal cord appeared "bounded" from C3 to C7 with clearer margins. At the level of surgical decompression, subarachnoid space and spinal cord enlargement were also evident. A review of the literature was executed using PubMed database. The objective of the research was to find an etiopathological theory able to relate syringomyelia with cervical spondylosis. Only 6 articles have been found. At the origin of syringomyelia the mechanisms of compression and instability are proposed. Perhaps other studies assert the importance of subarachnoid space regard cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamic. We postulate that cervical spine instability may be the cause of multiple microtrauma towards spinal cord and consequently may damage spinal cord parenchyma generating myelomalacia and consequently syrinx. Otherwise the hemorrhage within spinal cord central canal can cause an obstruction of CSF outflow

  17. Prognostic factors in cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, P.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery is the standard of care for women with early stage cervical cancer; radiotherapy is the cornerstone in patients with advanced stages of disease. Recent changes in the treatment of cervical cancer involve less radical surgery in early stage cervical cancer, concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy

  18. Magnetoviscosity and relaxation in ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhof

    2000-09-01

    The increase in viscosity of a ferrofluid due to an applied magnetic field is discussed on the basis of a phenomenological relaxation equation for the magnetization. The relaxation equation was derived earlier from irreversible thermodynamics, and differs from that postulated by Shliomis. The two relaxation equations lead to a different dependence of viscosity on magnetic field, unless the relaxation rates are related in a specific field-dependent way. Both planar Couette flow and Poiseuille pipe flow in parallel and perpendicular magnetic field are discussed. The entropy production for these situations is calculated and related to the magnetoviscosity.

  19. [Death in a relaxation tank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Wolf; Simon, Karl-Heinz; Bohnert, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Complete relaxation can be achieved by floating in a darkened, sound-proof relaxation tank filled with salinated water kept at body temperature. Under these conditions, meditation exercises up to self-hypnosis may lead to deep relaxation with physical and mental revitalization. A user manipulated his tank, presumably to completely cut off all optical and acoustic stimuli and accidentally also covered the ventilation hole. The man was found dead in his relaxation tank. The findings suggested lack of oxygen as the cause of death.

  20. Cervical deciduosis imitating dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Diederik Anthony; Hellebrekers, Bart; van Haaften, Anne-Marie; Natté, Remco

    2015-09-22

    Ectopic cervical deciduosis is generally an accidental finding during pregnancy, and usually presents without any symptoms or need for therapeutic intervention. However, it can sometimes imitate dysplasia or carcinoma. We report a case of a 34-year-old G2P0, with a history of cervical dysplasia, presenting at 11 weeks of gestation, with vaginal blood loss. During examination, lesions mimicking dysplasia were found on the cervix. Histological examination reported cervical deciduosis. Deciduosis is a benign change during pregnancy and will resolve spontaneously. With the increasing use of cytology and colposcopy, the reported incidence is growing. When it is hard to differentiate between dysplasia and deciduosis, histological confirmation should be considered.

  1. Effects of Lateral Mass Screw Rod Fixation to the Stability of Cervical Spine after Laminectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Ruwaida; Kashani, Jamal; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    There are many cases of injury in the cervical spine due to degenerative disorder, trauma or instability. This condition may produce pressure on the spinal cord or on the nerve coming from the spine. The aim of this study was, to analyze the stabilization of the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy via computational simulation. For that purpose, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the multilevel cervical spine segment (C1-C7) was developed using computed tomography (CT) data. There are various decompression techniques that can be applied to overcome the injury. Usually, decompression procedures will create an unstable spine. Therefore, in these situations, the spine is often surgically restabilized by using fusion and instrumentation. In this study, a lateral mass screw-rod fixation was created to stabilize the cervical spine after laminectomy. Material properties of the titanium alloy were assigned on the implants. The requirements moments and boundary conditions were applied on simulated implanted bone. Result showed that the bone without implant has a higher flexion and extension angle in comparison to the bone with implant under applied 1Nm moment. The bone without implant has maximum stress distribution at the vertebrae and ligaments. However, the bone with implant has maximum stress distribution at the screws and rods. Overall, the lateral mass screw-rod fixation provides stability to the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy.

  2. 下颈椎单侧小关节脱位的研究进展%Current research on unilateral cervical facet dislocation of the lower cervical spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江晨; 宋文慧

    2016-01-01

    单侧小关节脱位是较为常见的颈椎损伤,且以C5-6最常发生,这与其解剖及形态学特征密切相关.该损伤由屈曲和旋转暴力协同作用所致,但主要因素尚不明确.治疗分为非手术治疗和手术治疗,但仍未确定最佳的治疗方案.现在被普遍接受的方案是首先行闭合复位,再根据闭合复位成功与否及有无出现创伤性椎间盘突出决定下一步治疗.%Unilateral facet dislocation of the lower cervical spine is an important subgroup of cervical spine injuries,accounting for from 12% to 16% of all cervical spine injuries.Unilateral facet dislocation occurs the most commonly at the C5-6 level,and is closely related to the anatomic and morphometric features of the cervical facet.This injury has been attributed to combined flexion and rotation,but it remains unclear whether flexion or rotation is the component of greater importance.Its treatment includes nonoperative and operative measures but optimal treatment has not been established.It is generally accepted that a recommendable treatment protocol begins with closed reduction and proceeds depending on whether the closed reduction succeeds and traumatic disc herniation is present or not.

  3. Neuromuscular Activation of the Vastus Intermedius Muscle during Isometric Hip Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira; Akima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Although activity of the rectus femoris (RF) differs from that of the other synergists in quadriceps femoris muscle group during physical activities in humans, it has been suggested that the activation pattern of the vastus intermedius (VI) is similar to that of the RF. The purpose of present study was to examine activation of the VI during isometric hip flexion. Ten healthy men performed isometric hip flexion contractions at 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction at hip joint angles of 90°, 110° and 130°. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record activity of the four quadriceps femoris muscles and EMG signals were root mean square processed and normalized to EMG amplitude during an isometric knee extension with maximal voluntary contraction. The normalized EMG was significantly higher for the VI than for the vastus medialis during hip flexion at 100% of maximal voluntary contraction at hip joint angles of 110° and 130° (P < 0.05). The onset of VI activation was 230-240 ms later than the onset of RF activation during hip flexion at each hip joint angle, which was significantly later than during knee extension at 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the VI is activated later than the RF during hip flexion. Activity of the VI during hip flexion might contribute to stabilize the knee joint as an antagonist and might help to smooth knee joint motion, such as in the transition from hip flexion to knee extension during walking, running and pedaling.

  4. Novel technique for evaluation of knee function continuously through the range of flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Kevin M; Arilla, Fabio V; Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Fu, Freddie H; Musahl, Volker; Debski, Richard E

    2015-10-15

    Previous research has utilized robots to examine joint kinematics and in situ forces in response to loads applied at discrete flexion angles (static method). Recently, studies have applied loads continuously throughout flexion (continuous flexion method). However, the joint kinematics resulting from each of these methods have not been directly compared. Therefore, the objective of this study was to utilize a robotic testing system to compare kinematics and in situ forces of porcine knees in response to 89 N of anterior tibial load and 4 Nm of internal tibial torque between the static method (loads applied at 30°, 45°, 60°, and 75° of flexion) and the continuous flexion method (measured continuously from 30-75° of flexion) for both the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) intact and ACL deficient (ACLD) knees. When anterior tibial load was applied the average differences in anterior tibial translation between the two methods for the intact state was 0.5±0.0 mm and for the ACLD state was 0.3±0.2 mm. The difference in the in situ forces in the ACL was 1.6±0.9 N. When internal tibial torque was applied the average differences in the resultant internal tibial rotation for the intact state was 0.9±0.4° and for the ACLD state was 1.0±0.5°. The difference in the in situ forces in the ACL was 3.3±2.0 N. Both methods are equally efficient in detecting significant differences (pknee states. The continuous flexion method was also shown to be more efficient than the static method and provides continuous data on knee function throughout the range of motion.

  5. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse or...

  6. Corrective surgery for deformity of the upper cervical spine due to ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotational and flexion deformity of C1-C2 due to ankylosing spondylitis is rare. We did surgical correction in one such case by lateral release, resection of the posterior arch of C1 and mobilization of the vertebral arteries, wedge osteotomy of the lateral masses of C1 and internal fixation under general anesthesia. There were no vascular and neurological complications during the surgery. After operation the atlantoaxial rotational deformity was corrected and the normal cervical lordosis was restored. At 1 year followup his visual field and feeding became normal and internal fixation was stable.

  7. On the validity of the Born approximation for weak cosmic flexions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Björn Malte; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kalovidouris, Angelos F.; Bacon, David J.

    2012-02-01

    Weak lensing calculations are often made under the assumption of the Born approximation, where the ray path is approximated as a straight radial line. In addition, lens-lens couplings where there are several deflections along the light ray are often neglected. We examine the effect of dropping the Born approximation and taking lens-lens couplings into account, for weak lensing effects up to second order (cosmic flexion), by making a perturbative expansion in the light path. We present a diagrammatic representation of the resulting corrections to the lensing effects. The flexion signal, which measures the derivative of the density field, acquires correction terms proportional to the squared gravitational shear; we also find that by dropping the Born approximation, two further degrees of freedom of the lensing distortion can be excited (the twist components), in addition to the four standard flexion components. We derive angular power spectra of the flexion and twist, with and without the Born approximation and lens-lens couplings and confirm that the Born approximation is an excellent approximation for weak cosmic flexions, but may fail in the strong lensing regime.

  8. Proportional EMG control of ankle plantar flexion in a powered transtibial prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Kannape, Oliver A; Herr, Hugh M

    2013-06-01

    The human calf muscle generates 80% of the mechanical work to walk throughout stance-phase, powered plantar flexion. Powered plantar flexion is not only important for walking energetics, but also to minimize the impact on the leading leg at heel-strike. For unilateral transtibial amputees, it has recently been shown that knee load on the leading, intact limb decreases as powered plantar flexion in the trailing prosthetic ankle increases. Not surprisingly, excessive loads on the leading, intact knee are believed to be causative of knee osteoarthritis, a leading secondary impairment in lower-extremity amputees. In this study, we hypothesize that a transtibial amputee can learn how to control a powered ankle-foot prosthesis using a volitional electromyographic (EMG) control to directly modulate ankle powered plantar flexion. We here present preliminary data, and find that an amputee participant is able to modulate toe-off angle, net ankle work and peak power across a broad range of walking speeds by volitionally modulating calf EMG activity. The modulation of these key gait parameters is shown to be comparable to the dynamical response of the same powered prosthesis controlled intrinsically (No EMG), suggesting that transtibial amputees can achieve an adequate level of powered plantar flexion controllability using direct volitional EMG control.

  9. Cervical Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infected with HPV, those who have used oral contraceptives ("the Pill") for 5 to 9 years have a risk of cervical cancer that is 3 times greater than that of women who have never used oral contraceptives. The risk is 4 times greater after 10 ...

  10. Diabetes and cervical myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houten, John K; Lenart, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes may affect the typical physical findings associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, as coexisting diabetic neuropathy may dampen expected hyperreflexia and also produce non-dermatomal extremity numbness. Most large studies of surgically treated diabetic patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy have focused upon infection rates rather than exploring any differences in the presenting physical signs. We conducted a retrospective study of the pattern of presenting neurological signs and symptoms and of the clinical outcomes in 438 patients surgically treated for cervical spondylotic myelopathy, 79 of whom had diabetes. Compared with non-diabetic patients, those with diabetes were slightly older and had lower preoperative modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scores. Those with diabetes also had a significantly higher incidence of hyporeflexia and a higher incidence of a positive Babinski sign, but there was no difference in the appearance of the Hoffman sign. The magnitude of mJOA improvement after surgery was comparable. We conclude that diabetes may alter the typical signs and symptoms of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and suggest that knowledge of the differences may aid in securing a prompt and accurate diagnosis.

  11. Prevent Cervical Cancer!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-08

    Cervical cancer can be prevented. Listen as two friends—one a doctor—talk about screening tests and early detection. Learn what test you might need.  Created: 1/8/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/8/2015.

  12. Quantifying cervical-spine curvature using Bézier splines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinich, Kathleen D; Ebert, Sheila M; Reed, Matthew P

    2012-11-01

    Knowledge of the distributions of cervical-spine curvature is needed for computational studies of cervical-spine injury in motor-vehicle crashes. Many methods of specifying spinal curvature have been proposed, but they often involve qualitative assessment or a large number of parameters. The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative method of characterizing cervical-spine curvature using a small number of parameters. 180 sagittal X-rays of subjects seated in automotive posture with their necks in neutral, flexed, and extended postures were collected in the early 1970s. Subjects were selected to represent a range of statures and ages for each gender. X-rays were reanalyzed using advanced technology and statistical methods. Coordinates of the posterior margins of the vertebral bodies and dens were digitized. Bézier splines were fit through the coordinates of these points. The interior control points that define the spline curvature were parameterized as a vector angle and length. By defining the length as a function of the angle, cervical-spine curvature was defined with just two parameters: superior and inferior Bézier angles. A classification scheme was derived to sort each curvature by magnitude and type of curvature (lordosis versus S-shaped versus kyphosis; inferior or superior location). Cervical-spine curvature in an automotive seated posture varies with gender and age but not stature. Average values of superior and inferior Bézier angles for cervical spines in flexion, neutral, and extension automotive postures are presented for each gender and age group. Use of Bézier splines fit through posterior margins offers a quantitative method of characterizing cervical-spine curvature using two parameters: superior and inferior Bézier angles.

  13. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Secondary to Dropped Head Syndrome: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Rahimizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dropped head syndrome (DHS is a disabling condition caused by severe weakness of the neck extensor muscles causing progressive reducible kyphosis of the cervical spine and the inability to hold the head up. Weakness can occur in isolation or in association with a generalized neuromuscular disorder. Isolated cases are owed to the late onset of noninflammatory myopathy designated as INEM, where persistent chin to chest deformity may gradually cause or aggravate preexisting degenerative changes of the cervical spine and ultimately result in myelopathy. In review of the literature, we could find only 5 cases, with no unique guidelines to address the management of these two concomitant pathologies. Herein, a 69-year-old man who had developed cervical myelopathy 2 years after being affected by isolated dropped head syndrome is presented. Chin to chest deformity and cervical myelopathy were managed through three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF combined with decompressive cervical laminectomy and stabilization with C2 to C7 pedicle screw-rod construct. At 4-month follow-up, despite recovery in patient’s neurological status, flexion deformity reappeared with recurrence of dropped head due to C7 pedicle screws pull-out. However, this was successfully managed with extension of the construct to the upper thoracic levels.

  14. Acute neck pain: cervical spine range of motion and position sense prior to and after joint mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Peter J; Portero, Pierre; Chiquet, Christophe; Mawston, Grant; Lavaste, Francois

    2007-11-01

    Despite the relatively high prevalence of cervical spine pain, the efficacy of treatment procedures is limited. In the current study, range of motion and proprioception was assessed prior to and after specific cervical spine mobilisation techniques. A 44-year-old male office worker presented with a history of cervical pain of 1 day duration. He had woken with pain, stiffness and a loss of range of motion. Examination findings indicated pain to be at C5-6 on the left side. Measurement of maximal three-dimensional cervical motion was undertaken using a Zebris system. A position matching task tested the individual's ability to actively reposition their head and neck. The treatment undertaken involved grade III down-slope mobilisations on the left side at C5-6 and C6-7 in supine lying. This technique was then progressed by placing the subject in an upright sitting position, and sustained natural apophyseal glides were performed at C6. Immediately following the treatment, the patient reported a considerable decrease in pain, less difficulty in movement and reduced stiffness. Motion analyses showed the most marked percentage improvements in range of motion after treatment were in flexion (55%), extension (35%), left rotation (56%), and left lateral flexion (22%). Ipsilateral lateral flexion with axial rotation was also notably improved following treatment. No change in proprioceptive ability was found following the treatment. The findings showed that the application of standardised specific mobilisation techniques led to substantial improvements in the range of motion and the restitution of normal coupled motion.

  15. A new tool to determine masses and mass profiles using gravitational flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Adrienne

    2009-01-01

    In a recent publication, an aperture mass statistic for gravitational flexion was derived and shown to be effective, at least with simulated data, in detecting massive structures and substructures within clusters of galaxies. Further, it was suggested that the radius at which the flexion aperture mass signal falls to zero might allow for estimation of the mass or density profile of the structures detected. In this paper, we more fully explore this possibility, considering the behaviour both of the peak signal and the zero-signal contours for two mass models--the singular isothermal sphere and Navarro-Frenk-White profiles--under varying aperture size, filter shape and mass concentration parameter. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the flexion aperture mass statistic in discriminating between mass profiles and concentration parameters, and in providing an accurate estimate of the mass of the lens, to within a factor of 2 or better.

  16. Modelling and Analysis on Biomechanical Dynamic Characteristics of Knee Flexion Movement under Squatting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The model of three-dimensional (3D geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR and knee prosthesis design.

  17. Stroke due to a fusiform aneurysm of the cervical vertebral artery: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)]|[Department of Neurosurgery, Kyushu University Hospital 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-82 (Japan); Inoue, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Research Institute, National Kyushu Medical Center, Fukuoka (Japan); Haga, S.; Nishio, S.; Fukui, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Kono, S. [First Department of Pathology, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Department of Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Aneurysms of the cervical vertebral artery (VA) are uncommon; they are often caused by trauma or spontaneous dissection. A fusiform aneurysm without evidence of atherosclerosis or dissection has not been reported previously. A 46-year-old man presented with a pontine infarct. Imaging revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the left VA at the C5-6 level, with occlusion of the basilar artery. Associated minor anomalies included fusion of the vertebral bodies of C5 and C6, cervical rib and platybasia. The left VA arose directly from the aortic arch and entered the transverse foramen at the C4 level. Hyperextension and left lateral flexion of the neck caused kinking of the VA proximal to the aneurysm. Turbulent flow in the aneurysm lumen was noted on angiography. (orig.) With 4 figs., 10 refs.

  18. Influence of neck pain on cervical movement in the sagittal plane during smartphone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Smartphone use reportedly changes posture. However, how neck posture is altered in smartphone users with neck pain is unknown. This study examined changes in the posture of young adults with and without mild neck pain (MNP) when using a smartphone. [Subjects] Thirteen control subjects and 14 subjects with MNP who used smartphones were recruited. [Methods] The upper cervical (UC) and lower cervical (LC) angles in the sagittal plane were measured using an ultrasound-based motion analysis system while the seated subjects used a smartphone for 5 min. [Results] During smartphone use, the MNP group exhibited greater UC and LC flexion angles than the control group. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that young adults with MNP are more careful and more frequently utilize a neutral neck posture than young adults without MNP when using a smartphone while sitting.

  19. Effect of compressive follower preload on the flexion-extension response of the human lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Avinash G; Havey, Robert M; Carandang, Gerard; Simonds, James; Voronov, Leonard I; Ghanayem, Alexander J; Meade, Kevin P; Gavin, Thomas M; Paxinos, Odysseas

    2003-05-01

    Traditional experimental methods are unable to study the kinematics of whole lumbar spine specimens under physiologic compressive preloads because the spine without active musculature buckles under just 120 N of vertical load. However, the lumbar spine can support a compressive load of physiologic magnitude (up to 1200 N) without collapsing if the load is applied along a follower load path. This study tested the hypothesis that the load-displacement response of the lumbar spine in flexion-extension is affected by the magnitude of the follower preload and the follower preload path. Twenty-one fresh human cadaveric lumbar spines were tested in flexion-extension under increasing compressive follower preload applied along two distinctly different optimized preload paths. The first (neutral) preload path was considered optimum if the specimen underwent the least angular change in its lordosis when the full range of preload (0-1200 N) was applied in its neutral posture. The second (flexed) preload path was optimized for an intermediate specimen posture between neutral and full flexion. A twofold increase in flexion stiffness occurred around the neutral posture as the preload was increased from 0 to 1200 N. The preload magnitude (400 N and larger) significantly affected the range of motion (ROM), with a 25% decrease at 1200 N preload applied along the neutral path. When the preload was applied along a path optimized for an intermediate forward-flexed posture, only a 15% decrease in ROM occurred at 1200 N. The results demonstrate that whole lumbar spine specimens can be subjected to compressive follower preloads of in vivo magnitudes while allowing physiologic mobility under flexion-extension moments. The optimized follower preload provides a method to simulate the resultant vector of the muscles that allow the spine to support physiologic compressive loads induced during flexion-extension activities.

  20. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  1. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  2. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodukhin, S. N.

    2005-03-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  3. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    CERN Document Server

    Solodukhin, S N

    2004-01-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  4. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  5. A new hybrid spring brake orthosis for controlling hip and knee flexion in the swing phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharooni, S; Heller, B; Tokhi, M O

    2001-03-01

    In this study it is proposed that active contraction of muscles might be artificially replaced by a spring brake orthosis (SBO) to provide near-natural knee and hip swing phase trajectories for gait in spinal cord injured subjects. The SBO is a new gait restoration system in which stored spring elastic energy and potential energy of limb segments are utilized to aid gait. It is also shown that hip flexion can be produced without the need for withdrawal reflex, hip flexor stimulus or any mechanical actuator at the hip. A hip flexion angle of 21 degrees was achieved by a nonimpaired subject wearing a prototype orthosis.

  6. Bilateral Distal Femoral Flexion Deformity After Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Chan Chun-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune systemic disease with predominant peripheral polyarthritis, often leading to severe joint destruction. This is a case report of an 81-year-old woman with long-standing severe rheumatoid arthritis requiring multiple orthopaedic operations for joint destruction since 2000. These operated joints improved her functional mobility until recently, when she found that her knees were fixed at around 70° of flexion with limited motion. There was chronic progressive flexion deformity of bilateral distal femurs, which was an extremely rare complication of total knee arthroplasty.

  7. The role of cervical instability in sympathetic cervical spondylosis%颈椎不稳致交感型颈椎病的诊断和治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于泽生; 刘忠军; 党耕町

    2001-01-01

    目的 探讨交感型颈椎病的发病机制及有效的治疗方法。 方法 回顾了1989~1998年应用颈前路间盘切除加植骨融合术治疗的交感型颈椎病患者18例;分析了患者术前及术后颈椎伸、屈侧位X光片。 结果 18例患者术前均有颈椎不稳,不稳定节段为1个者6例,2个者9例,3个者3例;颈椎不稳主要发生于C3~C4和C4~C5,偶见于C5~C6和C6~C7。14例患者术前行颈椎高位硬膜外封闭,11例有效;于不稳定节段行颈前路间盘切除加植骨融合术,18例均获随访,平均随访时间为1年9个月,术后有效率为88.9%。 结论 颈椎不稳定是交感型颈椎病发病的重要因素;颈椎高位硬膜外封闭具有重要的诊断价值;颈前路间盘切除加植骨融合术是治疗交感型颈椎病的有效方法。%Objective To investigate the etiology and treatment ofsympathetic cervical spondylosis. Methods Eighteen patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for sympathetic cervical spondylosis were reviewed retrospectively. Lateral views in flexion and extension of the pre- and postoperative cervical roentgenograms were analyzed to quantify cervical instability. Results Cervical instability was found at one level in 6 patients, two levels in 9 patients, and three levels in 3 patients. Cervical instability mainly took place at C3-C4 and C4-C5, occasionally at C5-C6 or C6-C7. Cervical epidural block was performed in 14 patients and it was effective in 11 patients. Cervical discectomy and fusion at unstable segement was carried out in all 18 patients. The effective rate was 88.9%. Conclusions Cervical instability in the upper cervical spine was an importmant factor in the etiology of sympathetic cervical spondylosis.Cervical epidural block may provide diagnostic information. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are effective to treat sympathetic cervical spondylosis.

  8. Assessment of the cervical range of motion over time, differences between results of the Flock of Birds and the EDI-320: a comparison between an electromagnetic tracking system and an electronic inclinometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assink, Nienke; Bergman, Gert J D; Knoester, Bianca; Winters, Jan C; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse cervical range of motion, assessed over time by means of a digital inclinometer (EDI-320) and a three-dimensional electromagnetic tracking device (Flock of Birds). The maximum active cervical range of motion was assessed with two measurement devices in three sessions over time, with 6-week intervals. In total, 26 women and 24 men (mean age: 44.4, SD: 9.9) without known pathology of the cervical spine participated. Four movements were measured axial rotation with the cervical spine in a flexed and in an extended position, flexion-extension, and lateral bending. The results showed that the factor time was significant for rotation in extension and rotation in flexion. The factor device was significant for all movements measured, and the interaction term between time and device was significant for all movements except rotation in extension. The Flock of Birds measured significantly higher ranges of motion on all motions except for lateral bending. A substantial variation in cervical range of motion was observed over time (ranging from -5.6 to 8.1) as well as between devices (ranging from -13.1 to 29.9). Substantial and significant differences in cervical range of motion were found over time as well as differences between the Flock of Birds and the EDI-320.

  9. Clinical outcomes in high flexion total knee arthroplasty were not superior to standard posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. A multicenter, prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, George N; Labib, Sameh A

    2014-03-01

    High flexion prostheses have been introduced to achieve high flexion and improve clinical outcomes. Controversy exists in the literature regarding outcomes of high flexion vs. standard implants. This multicenter study compares outcomes in patients receiving a high flexion prosthesis vs. standard prosthesis. 278 high flexion and standard knee prostheses were used. Patients were followed for two years and evaluated prospectively. The mean HSS was 87.3 for the standard group and 88.9 for the flexion group. At two-year follow up the standard prosthesis group had mean flexion of 121° and the high flexion group had mean flexion 120°. No knee had aseptic loosening, infection, or osteolysis. At two-year follow up, there were no significant differences in range of motion, clinical outcome, or radiographic evaluation. Pre-operative motion and functional status have greater impact on clinical outcome than implant alone.

  10. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrara, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture ...

  11. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet Kumar Meher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms.

  12. Mucopurulent cervicitis: a clinical entity?

    OpenAIRE

    Willmott, F E

    1988-01-01

    Of 297 women attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic who were examined for the presence of mucopurulent cervicitis, 96 (32%) satisfied the diagnostic criteria. Mucopurulent cervicitis was strongly associated with the isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. It was also associated with bacterial vaginosis, the use of oral contraceptives, and sexual contact with men who had non-gonococcal urethritis. Conversely, the presence of opaque cervical secretions did not sho...

  13. An Exact Relaxation of Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2009-01-01

    of clustering problems such as the K-means objective and pairwise clustering as well as graph partition problems, e.g., for community detection in complex networks. In particular we show that a relaxation to the simplex can be given for which the extreme solutions are stable hard assignment solutions and vice......Continuous relaxation of hard assignment clustering problems can lead to better solutions than greedy iterative refinement algorithms. However, the validity of existing relaxations is contingent on problem specific fuzzy parameters that quantify the level of similarity between the original...... versa. Based on the new relaxation we derive the SR-clustering algorithm that has the same complexity as traditional greedy iterative refinement algorithms but leading to significantly better partitions of the data. A Matlab implementation of the SR-clustering algorithm is available for download....

  14. Cervical spinal cord injury without radiological abnormality in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatoe H

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury occurring without concomitant radiologically demonstrable trauma to the skeletal elements of the spinal canal rim, or compromise of the spinal canal rim without fracture, is a rare event. Though documented in children, the injury is not very well reported in adults. We present seventeen adult patients with spinal cord injury without accompanying fracture of the spinal canal rim, or vertebral dislocation, seen over seven years. None had preexisting spinal canal stenosis or cervical spondylosis. Following trauma, these patients had weakness of all four limbs. They were evaluated by MRI (CT scan in one patient, which showed hypo / isointense lesion in the cord on T1 weighted images, and hyperintensity on T2 weighted images, suggesting cord contusion or oedema. MRI was normal in two patients. With conservative management, fifteen patients showed neurological improvement, one remained quadriplegic and one died. With increasing use of MRI in the evaluation of traumatic myelopathy, such injuries will be diagnosed more often. The mechanism of injury is probably acute stretching of the cord as in flexion and torsional strain. Management is essentially conservative and prognosis is better than that seen in patients with fracture or dislocation of cervical spine.

  15. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  16. An occult cervical spine fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, R

    1997-12-01

    A 16-year-old athlete developed neck pain after being dropped on his head with his neck flexed while recreationally wrestling. Initial cervical spine radiographs were negative, but he continued to have neck and arm pain, especially after heading a wet soccer ball. Two months after the initial injury, he had a positive Spurling test; cervical spine CT then revealed a parasagittal linear fracture through the body of C-7. The patient avoided contact and collision activities and had no further physical problems. For patients who suffer cervical spine trauma, adequate visualization of the cervical spine can help prevent catastrophic outcomes.

  17. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine Drugs Approved to Treat Cervical Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Blenoxane (Bleomycin) Bleomycin Hycamtin (Topotecan ...

  18. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  19. Future Directions - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about possible changes in cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  20. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  1. Preinduction cervical ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, M

    1983-01-01

    This work reviews the evolution of cervical ripening procedures and discusses the most effective current techniques. Current knowledge of the process of spontaneous ripening of the cervix is briefly assessed, but the review concentrates on methodological aspects and the clinical results of preinduction cervical ripening. The historical development of mechanical and pharmacologic ripening procedures is examined, including enzymes, oxytocin, relaxin, corticosteriods, estrogens administered parenterally or locally, and prostaglandins (PGs) administered intravenously, orally, locally, and intravaginally. 3 effective procedures for preinduction cervical ripening are identified and described in greater detail: the catheter technique and local and vaginal administration of PGs. The extraamniotic catheter technique is simple, effective, and safe and is recommended for patients with not totally unripe cervixes and for whom PGs are unavailable or contraindicated. Single-dose extraamniotic instillation of PGE2 in Tylose gel was found to be highly effective for priming the unfavorable cervix before conventional labor induction. In some patients the procedure induces labor. The technique is easy to use, well accepted by the woman, and safe when applied appropriately to carefully selected patients. PGF2alpha gel has been less thoroughly studied. Electronic monitoring at the ripening stage is recommended for patients at risk, and even in low-risk cases much larger series will require study before conclusions can be reached about safety. Injection of PG gel into the cervical canal is less invasive than extraamniotic instillation, but no definite conclusions about its safety are possible due to small series and dissimilar clinical protocols. Pericervical administration of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha and intracervical and intraamniotic tablets of PGE2 are briefly assessed. Adoption of the intravaginal route has been a major step in the development of ripening techniques. 3 types of media

  2. [Preventing cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, P; Noël, J-C

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer has hopefully been dropping down in our industrialized countries since the introduction of both primary and secondary prevention. Nevertheless, it is still lethal in one out of two affected women though the introduction of cytological screening has dramatically reduced the mortality. Progressive diffusion of anti-HPV vaccination, the broadening of the viral types concerned, its association with existing screening measures and finally the introduction of viral detection as a screening tool must optimize the results already obtained.

  3. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  4. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurological injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling; CHEN Hai-bin; WANG Yi; ZHANG Li-ying; LIU Jing-cheng; WANG Zheng-guo

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms including neck pain,headache,weakness and parasthesisas.According to previous and recent clinical researches,we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio.The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C1 to C7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm,the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96.With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal,the following charaterstics are found:firstly,extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly,females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males;finally,the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C4 for all ethnicity,but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis(≤ 14 mm in Whites,≤12 mm in Japanese,≤ 13.7 mm in Chinese).Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic,degenerative and inflammatory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine,gender,as well as ethnicity.It is hoped that this review will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neurological injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future.

  5. Effects of myofascial release leg pull and sagittal plane isometric contract-relax techniques on passive straight-leg raise angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanten, W P; Chandler, S D

    1994-09-01

    Experimental evidence does not currently exist to support the claims of clinical effectiveness for myofascial release techniques. This presents an obvious need to document the effects of myofascial release. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two techniques, sagittal plane isometric contract-relax and myofascial release leg pull for increasing hip flexion range of motion (ROM) as measured by the angle of passive straight-leg raise. Seventy-five nondisabled, female subjects 18-29 years of age were randomly assigned to contract-relax, leg pull, or control groups. Pretest hip flexion ROM was measured for each subject's right hip with a passive straight-leg raise test using a fluid-filled goniometer. Subjects in the treatment groups received either contract-relax or leg pull treatment applied to the right lower extremity; subjects in the control group remained supine quietly for 5 minutes. Following treatment, posttest straight-leg raise measurements were performed. A one-way analysis of variance followed by a Newman-Keuls post hoc comparison of mean gain scores showed that subjects receiving contract-relax treatment increased their ROM significantly more than those who received leg pull treatment, and the increase in ROM of subjects in both treatment groups was significantly higher than those of the control group. The results suggest that while both contract-relax and leg pull techniques can significantly increase hip flexion ROM in normal subjects, contract-relax treatment may be more effective and efficient than leg pull treatment.

  6. Direction-Specific Impairments in Cervical Range of Motion in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: Influence of Head Posture and Gravitationally Induced Torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Martin; Svedmark, Åsa; Srinivasan, Divya; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical range of motion (ROM) is commonly assessed in clinical practice and research. In a previous study we decomposed active cervical sagittal ROM into contributions from lower and upper levels of the cervical spine and found level- and direction-specific impairments in women with chronic non-specific neck pain. The present study aimed to validate these results and investigate if the specific impairments can be explained by the neutral posture (defining zero flexion/extension) or a movement strategy to avoid large gravitationally induced torques on the cervical spine. Methods Kinematics of the head and thorax was assessed in sitting during maximal sagittal cervical flexion/extension (high torque condition) and maximal protraction (low torque condition) in 120 women with chronic non-specific neck pain and 40 controls. We derived the lower and upper cervical angles, and the head centre of mass (HCM), from a 3-segment kinematic model. Neutral head posture was assessed using a standardized procedure. Findings Previous findings of level- and direction-specific impairments in neck pain were confirmed. Neutral head posture was equal between groups and did not explain the direction-specific impairments. The relative magnitude of group difference in HCM migration did not differ between high and low torques conditions, lending no support for our hypothesis that impairments in sagittal ROM are due to torque avoidance behaviour. Interpretation The direction- and level-specific impairments in cervical sagittal ROM can be generalised to the population of women with non-specific neck pain. Further research is necessary to clarify if torque avoidance behaviour can explain the impairments. PMID:28099504

  7. Detecting Mass Substructure in Galaxy Clusters: An Aperture Mass Statistic for Gravitational Flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Adrienne; Wilkins, Stephen M

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational flexion has recently been introduced as a technique by which one can map out and study substructure in clusters of galaxies. Previous analyses involving flexion have measured the individual galaxy-galaxy flexion signal, or used either parametric techniques or a KSB-type inversion to reconstruct the mass distribution in Abell 1689. In this paper, we present an aperture mass statistic for flexion, and apply it to the lensed images of background galaxies obtained by ray-tracing simulations through a simple analytic mass distribution and through a galaxy cluster from the Millennium simulation. We show that this method is effective at detecting and accurately tracing structure within clusters of galaxies on sub-arcminute scales with high signal-to-noise even using a moderate background source number density and image resolution. In addition, the method provides much more information about both the overall shape and the small-scale structure of a cluster of galaxies than can be achieved through a weak...

  8. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenti Erica E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old. We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers.

  9. Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, N; Hirata, K; Kanehisa, H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles' stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion.

  10. Reliability of Subjective Pain Ratings and Nociceptive Flexion Reflex Responses as Measures of Conditioned Pain Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Jurth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endogenous modulation of pain can be assessed through conditioned pain modulation (CPM, which can be quantified using subjective pain ratings or nociceptive flexion reflexes. However, to date, the test-retest reliability has only been investigated for subjective pain ratings.

  11. Post-traumatic flexion contractures of the elbow: Operative treatment via the limited lateral approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carr Andrew J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Varying surgical techniques, patient groups and results have been described regards the surgical treatment of post traumatic flexion contracture of the elbow. We present our experience using the limited lateral approach on patients with carefully defined contracture types. Surgical release of post-traumatic flexion contracture of the elbow was performed in 23 patients via a limited lateral approach. All patients had an established flexion contracture with significant functional deficit. Contracture types were classified as either extrinsic if the contracture was not associated with damage to the joint surface or as intrinsic if it was. Overall, the mean pre-operative deformity was 55 degrees (95%CI 48 – 61 which was corrected at the time of surgery to 17 degrees (95%CI 12 – 22. At short-term follow-up (7.5 months the mean residual deformity was 25 degrees (95%CI 19 – 30 and at medium-term follow-up (43 months it was 32 degrees (95%CI 25 – 39. This deformity correction was significant (p Surgical release of post-traumatic flexion contracture of the elbow via a limited lateral approach is a safe technique, which reliably improves extension especially for extrinsic contractures. In this series all patients with an extrinsic contracture regained a functional range of movement and were satisfied with their surgery.

  12. In vivo knee laxity in flexion and extension: a radiographic study in 30 older healthy subjects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesterbeek, P.J.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Wymenga, A.B.

    2008-01-01

    In order to determine how "tight" a total knee prosthesis should be implanted, it is important to know the amount of laxity in a healthy knee. The objective of this study was to determine knee laxity in extension and flexion in healthy, non-arthritic knees of subjects similar in age to patients unde

  13. Retrospective comparison of functional and radiological outcome, between two contemporary high flexion knee designs

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    Kapoor Vikash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction after total knee replacement (TKR depends on the amount of pain relief and the functional activities achieved. An important criterion of good functional outcome is the amount of flexion achieved and whether the patient can manage high flexion activities. In order to increase the amount of safe flexion, various implant designs have been developed. This study aims to compare the outcome after TKR using two contemporary high flexion knee designs: Sigma CR150 High Flex Knee prosthesis (Depuy, Warsaw, Indiana and NexGen High Flex Knee prosthesis (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana. Material: A retrospective study was conducted with 100 cases of each design and their functional and radiological outcome was assessed after two years of follow-up. Results: The two groups had comparable results in terms of subjective satisfaction, range of motion achieved and radiological outcome. Depuy group fared better than Zimmer in terms of functional outcome (modified Oxford knee score. Conclusion: Depuy group was found to have fared better than Zimmer in terms of functional outcome. However, it is very difficult to rate one design above the other based on our small sample size and short duration of follow-up.

  14. Retrospective comparison of functional and radiological outcome, between two contemporary high flexion knee designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vikash; Chatterjee, Daipayan; Hazra, Sutanu; Chatterjee, Anirban; Garg, Parag; Debnath, Kaustav; Mandal, Soham; Sarkar, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patient satisfaction after total knee replacement (TKR) depends on the amount of pain relief and the functional activities achieved. An important criterion of good functional outcome is the amount of flexion achieved and whether the patient can manage high flexion activities. In order to increase the amount of safe flexion, various implant designs have been developed. This study aims to compare the outcome after TKR using two contemporary high flexion knee designs: Sigma CR150 High Flex Knee prosthesis (Depuy, Warsaw, Indiana) and NexGen High Flex Knee prosthesis (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana). Material: A retrospective study was conducted with 100 cases of each design and their functional and radiological outcome was assessed after two years of follow-up. Results: The two groups had comparable results in terms of subjective satisfaction, range of motion achieved and radiological outcome. Depuy group fared better than Zimmer in terms of functional outcome (modified Oxford knee score). Conclusion: Depuy group was found to have fared better than Zimmer in terms of functional outcome. However, it is very difficult to rate one design above the other based on our small sample size and short duration of follow-up. PMID:27748254

  15. Scaphoid dislocation associated with axial carpal dissociation during volar flexion of the wrist: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Kohei; Wada, Takuro; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    We present the first report of a patient with an isolated scaphoid dislocation with axial carpal dissociation sustained during volar flexion of the wrist. The scaphoid was dislocated to the radial side of the radial styloid process and was slightly shifted to the dorsal side. It was shown that the position of the wrist played an irrelevant role for occurring scaphoid dislocation.

  16. Hirayama′s disease: The importance of flexion magnetic resonance imaging

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    S Jakhere

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hirayama′s disease is a form of juvenile muscular atrophy affecting young individulas in their second to third decade. The underlying pathogenetic mechanism is believed to be an imbalanced growth between the individuals′ vertebral column and the spinal canal contents, which causes abutment of the anterior spinal cord against the vertebral column and detachment of the posterior dura, leading to microcirculatory disturbances and ischemic changes in the cord. This mechanism is exiquisitely demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, but requires additional imaging, with the neck in the flexed position. Neurphysiological imaging studies have provided supporting evidence by demonstrating changes in the N13 potential, with neck flexion. Nonetheless, few studies have also reported contradictory findings with MRI and somatosensory evoked potentials, in Hirayamas Disease. This condition is underdiagnosed because most clinicians are not familiar with this disorder and do not request a flexion MRI. Early recognition of this entity and differentiation from other causes of focal cord atrophy is important, because limitation of neck flexion by using a simple neck collar can prevent its further progression. We report the classical MRI findings in a young patient with Hirayama′s disease with neutral and flexion MRI.

  17. Muscular coordination of biceps brachii and brachioradialis in elbow flexion with respect to hand position

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    Tim eKleiber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Contribution of synergistic muscles towards specific movements over multi joint systems may change with varying position of distal or proximal joints. Purpose of this study is to reveal the relationship of muscular coordination of brachioradialis and biceps brachii during elbow flexion with respect to hand position and biomechanical advantages and disadvantages of biceps brachii. A group of 16 healthy subjects has been advised to perform 20 repetitions of single elbow flexion movements in different hand positions (pronated, neutral and supinated. With a speed of 20°/s, simultaneously sEMG of biceps brachii and brachioradialis and kinematics of the movement were recorded in a motion analysis laboratory. Normalized to MVC the sEMG amplitudes of both muscles contributing to elbow flexion movements were compared in pronated, supinated and neutral hand position over elbow joint angle. Significant differences in the contribution of brachioradialis were found in pronated hand position compared to supinated and neutral hand position while the muscular activity of biceps brachii shows no significant changes in any hand position.In conclusion, a statistical significant dependency of the inter-muscular coordination between biceps brachii and brachioradialis during elbow flexion with respect to hand position has been observed depending on a biomechanical disadvantage of biceps brachii.

  18. Isokinetic Leg Flexion and Extension Strength of Elite Adolescent Female Track and Field Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housh, Terry J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Adolescent female track-and-field athletes were measured to compare isokinetic strength of leg flexion and extension movements. Throwers, jumpers, middle-distance runners, and sprinters participated in the study. Throwers were found to be stronger in absolute strength, but there were no significant differences in relative strength. Results are…

  19. Influences of trunk flexion on mechanical energy flow in the lower extremities during gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takuya; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Ogata, Yuta; Tanimoto, Kenji; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The time-series waveforms of mechanical energy generation, absorption, and transfer through the joints indicate how movements are produced and controlled. Previous studies have used these waveforms to evaluate and describe the efficiency of human movements. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of trunk flexion on mechanical energy flow in the lower extremities during gait. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 healthy young males (mean age, 21.8 ± 1.3 years, mean height, 170.5 ± 6.8 cm, and mean weight, 60.2 ± 6.8 kg). Subjects walked at a self-selected gait speed under 2 conditions: normal gait (condition N), and gait with trunk flexion formed with a brace to simulate spinal curvature (condition TF). The data collected from initial contact to the mid-stance of gait was analyzed. [Results] There were no significant differences between the 2 conditions in the mechanical energy flow in the knee joint and negative mechanical work in the knee joint. However, the positive mechanical work of the knee joint under condition TF was significantly less than that under condition N. [Conclusion] Trunk flexion led to knee flexion in a standing posture. Thus, a strategy of moving of center of mass upward by knee extension using less mechanical energy was selected during gait in the trunk flexed posture. PMID:27313351

  20. Variable and Asymmetric Range of Enslaving: Fingers Can Act Independently over Small Range of Flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, J.C. van den; Beek, N. van; Kraan, T. van der; Veeger, D.H.; Stegeman, D.F.; Veltink, P.H.; Maas, H.

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving (movement in non-instr

  1. Variable and asymmetric range of enslaving: fingers can act independently over small range of flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van den Josien C.; Beek, van Nathalie; Kraan, van der Thomas; Veeger, DirkJan H.E.J.; Stegeman, Dick F.; Veltink, Peter H.; Maas, Huub; Cymbalyuk, G.

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving movement in non-instru

  2. Influences of trunk flexion on mechanical energy flow in the lower extremities during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takuya; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Ogata, Yuta; Tanimoto, Kenji; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The time-series waveforms of mechanical energy generation, absorption, and transfer through the joints indicate how movements are produced and controlled. Previous studies have used these waveforms to evaluate and describe the efficiency of human movements. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of trunk flexion on mechanical energy flow in the lower extremities during gait. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 healthy young males (mean age, 21.8 ± 1.3 years, mean height, 170.5 ± 6.8 cm, and mean weight, 60.2 ± 6.8 kg). Subjects walked at a self-selected gait speed under 2 conditions: normal gait (condition N), and gait with trunk flexion formed with a brace to simulate spinal curvature (condition TF). The data collected from initial contact to the mid-stance of gait was analyzed. [Results] There were no significant differences between the 2 conditions in the mechanical energy flow in the knee joint and negative mechanical work in the knee joint. However, the positive mechanical work of the knee joint under condition TF was significantly less than that under condition N. [Conclusion] Trunk flexion led to knee flexion in a standing posture. Thus, a strategy of moving of center of mass upward by knee extension using less mechanical energy was selected during gait in the trunk flexed posture.

  3. PEMBERIAN TEKNIK MULLIGAN DAN SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION LEBIH BAIK DARIPADA HANYA SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION DALAM MENINGKATKAN LINGKUP GERAK SENDI EKSTENSI, ROTASI, LATERAL FLEKSI CERVICAL PADA MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sudaryanto -

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical neck pain has the same high prevalence with low back pain, and commonly found in many of physiotherapy practice. Combination of Mulligan technique and Soft Tissue Mobilization are one of manual therapy technique highly effective and efficient to care the case of mechanical neck pain but still very rarely used by physiotherapist in fields of practice. This study aimed to know the effectiveness between Mulligan technique – Soft Tissue Mobilization and only Soft Tissue Mobilization to the increasing range of motion extension, rotation and side flexion cervical on the mechanical neck pain. The study design was a pre test – post test control group design using two group of samples are control groups that given intervention Soft Tissue Mobilization and treatment groups that given a combination of Mulligan technique and Soft Tissue Mobilization. Measuring instrument used for data collection was goniometer, that the goniometer was used to measure the range of motion extension, rotation and lateral flexion of the cervical either before the intervention and after the intervention. Sample of this study was 32 people who divided into 2 groups of samples were 16 people in the control group and 16 people in the treatment group. Samples in the control group had a mean age of 35,69 with male of 7 people (43,8% and female of 9 people (56,2% as well as limitations of the right direction were 12 people (75% and left direction were 4 people (25%. Whereas in the treatment group had e mean age of 35,94 with male of 10 people (62,5% and female of 6 people (37,5% as well as limitations of the right direction were 11 people (62,5% and left direction were 5 people (31,2%. The results of hypothesis testing using independent sampel t-test showed a significant difference between the mean post-intervention ROM extension, rotation, lateral flexion of the control groups and the mean post-intervention ROM extension, rotation, lateral flexion of the treatment

  4. Decoding subtle forearm flexions using fractal features of surface electromyogram from single and multiple sensors

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    Kumar Dinesh

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying finger and wrist flexion based actions using a single channel surface electromyogram (sEMG can lead to a number of applications such as sEMG based controllers for near elbow amputees, human computer interface (HCI devices for elderly and for defence personnel. These are currently infeasible because classification of sEMG is unreliable when the level of muscle contraction is low and there are multiple active muscles. The presence of noise and cross-talk from closely located and simultaneously active muscles is exaggerated when muscles are weakly active such as during sustained wrist and finger flexion. This paper reports the use of fractal properties of sEMG to reliably identify individual wrist and finger flexion, overcoming the earlier shortcomings. Methods SEMG signal was recorded when the participant maintained pre-specified wrist and finger flexion movements for a period of time. Various established sEMG signal parameters such as root mean square (RMS, Mean absolute value (MAV, Variance (VAR and Waveform length (WL and the proposed fractal features: fractal dimension (FD and maximum fractal length (MFL were computed. Multi-variant analysis of variance (MANOVA was conducted to determine the p value, indicative of the significance of the relationships between each of these parameters with the wrist and finger flexions. Classification accuracy was also computed using the trained artificial neural network (ANN classifier to decode the desired subtle movements. Results The results indicate that the p value for the proposed feature set consisting of FD and MFL of single channel sEMG was 0.0001 while that of various combinations of the five established features ranged between 0.009 - 0.0172. From the accuracy of classification by the ANN, the average accuracy in identifying the wrist and finger flexions using the proposed feature set of single channel sEMG was 90%, while the average accuracy when using a combination

  5. Significance of cervical length and cervical gland area in cervical maturation

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    Channaveeregowda Savitha

    2016-08-01

    Results: Amongst 160 pregnant women who were induced (20 women were excluded has they underwent LSCS for some other reasons during latent phase cervical length by sonography 4. Cervical length 4. Conclusions: Sonographically detected cervical gland area and cervical length was evaluated in predicting response to induction. Absent CGA and CL < 2cm was associated with greater incidence of successful labor induction. This results show the CL and CGA has significant role in predicting outcome of labor. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(8.000: 2634-2639

  6. Spondilitis Tuberkulosa Cervical

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    Roni Eka Saputra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Spondilitis tuberkulosa servikalis adalah penyakit yang cukup jarang dijumpai, hanya berkisar 2-3% dariseluruh kasus spondilitis tuberkulosa. Gambaran klinis sangat bervariasi, mulai dari gejala ringan dan tidak spesifikhingga komplikasi neurologis yang berat. Seorang wanita berusia 29 tahun datang dengan keluhan lemah keempatanggota gerak yang semakin memberat dalam 10 hari terakhir yang didahului oleh nyeri leher yang menjalar ke bahudan lengan sejak 6 bulan sebelumnya. Nyeri awalnya dirasakan sebagai keterbatasan gerakan leher saat menolehkesamping kiri dan kanan serta menundukkan kepala. Nyeri dirasakan semakin berat dengan pergerakan danberkurang jika istirahat. Pasien mengalami penurunan berat badan sejak 2 bulan terakhir. Tidak dijumpai riwayat batukatau nyeri dada. Pemeriksaan neurologis menunjukkan kelemahan  pada keempat ekstremitas. Hasil laboratoriumditemukan peningkatan Laju Endap Darah (LED. Rontgen foto toraks dalam batas normal. Roentgen foto cervicalmenunjukkan destruksi setinggi C5. MRI cervical menunjukkan destruksi pada korpus C5-6 dengan penyempitan padadiscus intervertebrae C5-6 disertai dengan  massa/abses paravertebral dengan penekanan ke posterior. MRI Thorakaltampak destruksi corpus verebre T4,5 dengan diskus intervertebralis yang menyempit. Sugestif suatu spondilitistuberkulosa. Pasien dilakukan tindakan pembedahan anterior corpectomi melalui microscopic surgery dengan graftdari iliac sinistra, serta insersi anterior plate 1 level. Hasil pemeriksaan patologi anatomi menunjukkan spodilitis TBCkaseosa. Pada spondilitis vertebre T4,5 dilakukan laminectomi, debridement costotrasversektomi, dan stabilisasidengan pedicle screw T2, T3, dan T5. Pasien diterapi dengan obat antituberkulosis. Keadaan pasien saat ini, pasiensudah bisa beraktifitas normal dengan motorik dan sensorik baik. Spondilitis tuberkulosa merupakan bentuktuberkulosa tulang yang paling sering dijumpai. Spondilitis tuberkulosa cervical berkisar 2

  7. Biomechanical evaluation of Caspar cervical screws: comparative stability under cyclical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, M R; Maiman, D J; Reinartz, J; Pintar, F; Yoganandan, N

    1993-12-01

    Anterior cervical instrumentation is used as an adjunct to bone fusion; however, definitive biomechanical data to support some applications and techniques are lacking. In the absence of supportive experimental data, posterior cortical penetration has been recommended with the Caspar system. Previously, we compared the axial pull-out strength of Caspar screws with and without posterior cortical penetration. This study compares the stability of unicortical versus bicortical screw penetration groups under cyclical loading simulating physiological flexion-extension. Caspar screws were placed in human cadaveric vertebrae with or without posterior cortical purchase. Each screw was separately tested, simulating flexion-extension to 200 cycles. Deformation time data allowed a direct comparison of screw "wobble" with and without posterior cortical purchase. The mean deformation differences between subcortical and bicortical groups were statistically significant and increased over time within both groups. Enhanced stability was noted with bicortical purchase throughout most of the examined range, becoming more pronounced over longer periods of cyclical loading. Significant (P < 0.05) increases in deformation over time were noted for both groups, suggesting potentially significant deterioration at the screw-bone interface, despite bicortical purchase. Such deterioration with repeated flexion-extension loading may be of concern in the use of Caspar plates in the presence of multicolumn instability.

  8. THE EFFECT OF WEARING HEADSCARVES ON CERVICAL SPINE PROPRIOCEPTION

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    Samiah F. Alqabbani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proprioception plays an important role in sensorimotor control of posture and movement. Impairments in cervical proprioception have been demonstrated in subjects with whiplash-associated disorder, patients with age-related degeneration, and patients with articular diseases or spondylosis. The joint position error test is widely used to measure head repositioning accuracy. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to compare cervical spine joint position error in females who routinely wear headscarves to females that do not wear headscarves. Methods: Twelve females with mean age 27.5±4.0 years were divided into two groups: females who routinely wear headscarves (n=6, and females who never wear headscarves (n=6. Joint position error was measured using a head-mounted laser while subjects were seated. The tasks involved relocating the head to neutral after flexion, extension, right rotation, and left rotation. A total of six trials were done for each direction. Results: The joint position error was higher in females wearing headscarves compared to females who do not wear them in the cumulative joint position error score (8.2±1.0 vs. 4.4±1.0, p=0.06 as well as during head rotation to the right (9.3±1.6 vs. 3.1±1.6, p=0.06. Conclusion: Wearing headscarves may increase the cervical joint position error and can negatively impact postural control. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  9. Postnatal temporal, spatial and modality tuning of nociceptive cutaneous flexion reflexes in human infants.

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    Laura Cornelissen

    Full Text Available Cutaneous flexion reflexes are amongst the first behavioural responses to develop and are essential for the protection and survival of the newborn organism. Despite this, there has been no detailed, quantitative study of their maturation in human neonates. Here we use surface electromyographic (EMG recording of biceps femoris activity in preterm (4 seconds to a single noxious skin lance which decreases significantly with gestational age. This reflex is not restricted to the stimulated limb: heel lance evokes equal ipsilateral and contralateral reflexes in preterm and term infants. We further show that infant flexion withdrawal reflexes are not always nociceptive specific: in 29% of preterm infants, tactile stimulation evokes EMG activity that is indistinguishable from noxious stimulation. In 40% of term infants, tactile responses are also present but significantly smaller than nociceptive reflexes. Infant flexion reflexes are also evoked by application of calibrated punctate von Frey hairs (vFh, 0.8-17.2 g, to the heel. Von Frey hair thresholds increase significantly with gestational age and the magnitude of vFh evoked reflexes are significantly greater in preterm than term infants. Furthermore flexion reflexes in both groups are sensitized by repeated vFh stimulation. Thus human infant flexion reflexes differ in temporal, modality and spatial characteristics from those in adults. Reflex magnitude and tactile sensitivity decreases and nociceptive specificity and spatial organisation increases with gestational age. Strong, relatively non-specific, reflex sensitivity in early life may be important for driving postnatal activity dependent maturation of targeted spinal cord sensory circuits.

  10. Changes in saccadic reaction time while maintaining neck flexion in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, K; Kunita, K; Toyama, H

    2000-03-01

    We investigated changes in saccadic reaction time in relation to the degree of increase in activity of neck extensor muscles when neck flexion occurred, and assessed the reliability of the measurements. Saccadic reaction time was measured firstly, during neck flexion angles set at 5 degrees increments from 0 degrees (resting position) to 25 degrees, with the chin either resting on a stand or not, and secondly, during shoulder girdle elevator muscles providing a relative muscle force of 30%, with the neck flexion angle maintained at 0 degrees by having the subjects rest their chins on a stand. Saccadic reaction time was evaluated by the latency to the beginning of eye movement toward the lateral target, which was moved at random intervals in 20 degrees amplitude jumps. Muscle activity in the trapezius muscle was evaluated using the mean amplitude of electromyogram recordings. Very high coefficients of reliability in muscle activity and saccadic reaction time were observed between the two sets of tests at 1-h intervals and also among the three trials with a 1-min rest. When their necks were flexed and the subjects rested their chins on a stand, muscle activity increased slightly in accordance with the enlargement of this angle, with no significant change in saccadic reaction time. With the chin not resting on the stand, muscle activity increased gradually, while the saccadic reaction time decreased to that obtained at an average neck flexion angle of 20 degrees. However, the angle where the shortest reaction time was obtained showed considerable individual variation (5-25 degrees ). Activity in the trapezius muscle at a 20 degrees neck flexion angle, with the chin not resting on the stand, was far less than that for 30% maximal voluntary contraction in shoulder girdle elevator muscles. Nevertheless, the saccadic reaction times were roughly equivalent under the two different sets of conditions. No sex differences were observed in terms of saccadic reaction time under

  11. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  12. [Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, Mario H; Sánchez-Corona, José; García-Ortiz, José E; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory O; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; García-Cruz, Diana

    2016-10-01

    The non-syndromic anterior cervical hypertrichosis (OMIM N° 600457) is a genetic disorder characterized by a patch of hair at the level of the laryngeal prominence. We present a 12-year-old boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mild generalized hypertrichosis. He has no neurological, ophthalmological or skeletal anomalies. The clinical follow up is 10 years.

  13. Extreme cervical elongation after sacrohysteropexy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, M.E.; Futterer, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of extreme cervical elongation with a cervix of 12 cm after an unusual operation in which the uterine corpus was directly fixed to the promontory, and which became symptomatic after 8 years. The possible pathophysiology of cervical elongation is discussed. Diagnosing a case of seve

  14. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

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    Lisa A. Ferrara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression.

  15. The biomechanics of cervical spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression.

  16. Fractures of the cervical spine

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    Raphael Martus Marcon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2 and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7, according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification, which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative.

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Cervical Cancer is Preventable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV vaccine can reduce risk of cervical cancer. HPV causes most cervical cancers. Only 1 in 3 girls and 1 in ... Signs – Cervical Cancer [PSA - 0:60 seconds] Cervical Cancer Preteen and Teen Vaccines Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Associated Cancers What Should I Know About ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine A A A What's ... columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  19. Electrodiagnosis of cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Kevin; Spanier, David

    2013-02-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common diagnosis with a peak onset in the fifth decade. The most commonly affected nerve root is C7, C6, and C8. The etiology is often compressive, but may arise from noncompressive sources. Patients commonly complain of pain, weakness, numbness, and/or tingling. Examination may reveal sensory or motor disturbance in a dermatomal/myotomal distribution. Neural compression and tension signs may be positive. Diagnostic tests include imaging and electrodiagnostic study. Electrodiagnostic study serves as an extension of the neurologic examination. Electrodiagnostic findings can be useful for patients with atypical symptoms, potential pain-mediated weakness, and nonfocal imaging findings.

  20. A mixed relaxed clock model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  1. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  2. Thermal relaxation and mechanical relaxation of rice gel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁玉琴; 赵思明; 熊善柏

    2008-01-01

    Rice gel was prepared by simulating the production processes of Chinese local rice noodles,and the properties of thermal relaxation and mechanical relaxation during gelatinization were studied by differential scanning calorimetry(DSC) measurement and dynamic rheometer.The results show that during gelatinization,the molecular chains of rice starch undergo the thermal relaxation and mechanical relaxation.During the first heating and high temperature holding processes,the starch crystallites in the rice slurry melt,and the polymer chains stretch and interact,then viscoelastic gel forms.The cooling and low temperatures holding processes result in reinforced networks and decrease the viscoelasticity of the gel.During the second heating,the remaining starch crystallites further melt,the network is reinforced,and the viscoelasticity increases.The viscoelasticity,the molecular conformation and texture of the gel are adjusted by changing the temperature,and finally construct the gel with the textural characteristics of Chinese local rice noodle.

  3. Statistical mechanics of violent relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spergel, David N.; Hernquist, Lars

    1992-01-01

    We propose a functional that is extremized through violent relaxation. It is based on the Ansatz that the wave-particle scattering during violent dynamical processes can be approximated as a sequence of discrete scattering events that occur near a particle's perigalacticon. This functional has an extremum whose structure closely resembles that of spheroidal stellar systems such as elliptical galaxies. The results described here, therefore, provide a simple framework for understanding the physical nature of violent relaxation and support the view that galaxies are structured in accord with fundamental statistical principles.

  4. LAVENDER AROMATERAPHY AS A RELAXANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGA Prima Dewi AP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aromatherapy is a kind of treatment that used aroma with aromatherapy essential oil. Extraction process from essential oil generally doing in three methods, there are distilling with water (boiled, distilling with water and steam, and distilling with steam. One of the most favorite aroma is lavender. The main content from lavender is linalyl acetate and linalool (C10H18O. Linalool is main active contents in lavender which can use for anti-anxiety (relaxation. Based on some research, the conclusion indicates that essential oil from lavender can give relaxation (carminative, sedative, reduce anxiety level and increasing mood.

  5. Cervical extravasation of bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dréanic, Johann; Coriat, Romain; Mir, Olivier; Perkins, Géraldine; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Brezault, Catherine; Dhooge, Marion; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab are widely used in medical oncology, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. No specific recommendations on the management of monoclonal antibodies extravasation exist. Incidence rates vary considerably. Estimates of 0.5-6% have been reported in the literature. Also, patient-associated and procedure-associated risk factors of extravasation are multiple, such as bolus injections or poorly implanted central venous access. We report on an 86-year-old woman with colon cancer with liver metastasis who was treated with 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid, and bevacizumab. Extravasation occurred during chemotherapy infusion because of a catheter migration of the port outside of the superior vena cava, causing cervical pain without skin modifications. Diagnosis was confirmed with the appearance of clinical right cervical tumefaction and cervicothoracic computed tomography scan indicated a perijugular hypodense collection, corresponding to the extravasation. Conservative management was proposed. The patient recovered within 3 weeks from all symptoms. Physicians should be aware that in cases of bevacizumab extravasation, a nonsurgical approach might be effective.

  6. Effect of intermittent, supine cervical traction on the myoelectric activity of the upper trapezius muscle in subjects with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, D U; Falkel, J E; Trombly, C

    1985-08-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the myoelectric activity of the upper trapezius muscle before, during, and after intermittent, supine cervical traction. Twelve people with diagnosed disease or injury of the cervical spine served as subjects. Electromyographic recordings were taken from the upper trapezius muscle with bipolar surface electrodes. The subjects were treated with 20 minutes of intermittent, cervical traction at a force of 8% of their body weight. Recordings were taken with the subjects in the supine position before the traction, during one pull and release phase of the 10th and 20th minutes of traction, and after completion of the traction treatment. An analysis of variance with repeated measures showed no significant differences in the myoelectrical activity during the six time periods measured. The results of this study do not support the clinical use of intermittent, supine traction to produce cervical muscle relaxation.

  7. GENETIC INSTABILITY IN CERVICAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵旻; 伍欣星; 邱小萍; 李晖; 戴天力; 谭云

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the development of cervical carcinoma has been clearly established but other factors could be involved in cervical tumorigenesis such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetic instability in cervical carcinoma tissues and provide evidence for discoveringnew tumor suppressor genes and screening diagnostic molecular marker of cervical carcinoma. Methods: Fifty primary cervical carcinoma samples from high-incidence area were analyzed by PCR for HPV16 infection, LOH and microsatellite instability. Results: HPV16 was detected in 88% of the cases. Sixty-six percent of total cases showed LOH with no more than 3 different loci per case. The highest frequency of the allelic loss was found in D18S474 (18q21, 40.5%). MI was detected in 4 cases (8%) only. Conclusion: Different percentages of LOH on specific chromosomal regions were found and MI was very infrequent in cervical carcinoma. The putative suppressor gene(s) could be located on specific chromosome regions such as 18q, and genetic instability could be involved in cervical tumorigenesis.

  8. Tuina treatment in cervical spondylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Mihai Hinoveanu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylosis is a common, chronic degenerative condition of the cervical spine that affects the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disks of the neck as well as the contents of the spinal canal. Common clinical syndromes associated with cervical spondylosis include cervical pain, cervical radiculopathy and/or mielopathy. This study show the main principles, indication and side effects of tuina in cervical spondylosis´ treatment; tuina is one of the external methods based on the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM, especially suitable for use on the elderly population and on infants. While performing Tuina, the therapist concentrates his mind, regulates his breathing, and actuates the Qi and power of his entire body towards his hands. For a better result is recommended to try to combine acupuncture with tuina treatment. Tuina can help relieve the pain associated with spondylosis. After this kind of treatment, the symptomes produced by irritated nerves and sore muscles can find some relief. Tuina helps patients with cervical spondylosis regain muscle control, nerve function and flexibility, all through the restoration of the life force flow.

  9. Distraction correction for flexion contractures of the fingers: A minimally invasive technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravishanker R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Burns injuries account for over 2 million cases in our country. With over 75% of the patients sustaining injuries to the hands, post burn contractures of the finger are a very common condition presenting for treatment. Similarly trauma to the upper limbs, accounting for about a third of all injuries to the body also result in flexion deformities of the fingers. Standard treatment for these deformities is by way of surgical release of the contractures, skin cover with split skin grafting or full thickness grafts followed by prolonged immobilization and splintage. The relatively minimally invasive technique of distraction has been used in this small but representative series to correct flexion deformities caused by burns and other injuries. Results have been very gratifying.

  10. Decoding Finger Flexion using amplitude modulation from band-specific ECoG

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Nanying

    2009-01-01

    EEG-BCIs have been well studied in the past decades and implemented into several famous applications, like P300 speller and wheelchair controller. However, these interfaces are indirect due to low spatial resolution of EEG. Recently, direct ECoG-BCIs attract intensive attention because ECoG provides a higher spatial resolution and signal quality. This makes possible localization of the source of neural signals with respect to certain brain functions. In this article, we present a realization of ECoG-BCIs for finger flexion prediction provided by BCI competition IV. Methods for finger flexion prediction including feature extraction and selection are provided in this article. Results show that the predicted finger movement is highly correlated with the true movement when we use band-specific amplitude modulation.

  11. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  12. Dielectric relaxation of samarium aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhya, Anup Pradhan; Dutta, Alo; Sinha, T.P. [Bose Institute, Department of Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2014-03-15

    A ceramic SmAlO{sub 3} (SAO) sample is synthesized by the solid-state reaction technique. The Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction pattern has been done to find the crystal symmetry of the sample at room temperature. An impedance spectroscopy study of the sample has been performed in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 1 MHz and in the temperature range from 313 K to 573 K. Dielectric relaxation peaks are observed in the imaginary parts of the spectra. The Cole-Cole model is used to analyze the dielectric relaxation mechanism in SAO. The temperature-dependent relaxation times are found to obey the Arrhenius law having an activation energy of 0.29 eV, which indicates that polaron hopping is responsible for conduction or dielectric relaxation in this material. The complex impedance plane plot of the sample indicates the presence of both grain and grain-boundary effects and is analyzed by an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of a resistance and a constant-phase element. The frequency-dependent conductivity spectra follow a double-power law due to the presence of two plateaus. (orig.)

  13. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author). 36 refs.

  14. Choosing a skeletal muscle relaxant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Sharon; Ginzburg, Regina

    2008-08-01

    Skeletal muscle relaxants are widely used in treating musculoskeletal conditions. However, evidence of their effectiveness consists mainly of studies with poor methodologic design. In addition, these drugs have not been proven to be superior to acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses support using skeletal muscle relaxants for short-term relief of acute low back pain when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or acetaminophen are not effective or tolerated. Comparison studies have not shown one skeletal muscle relaxant to be superior to another. Cyclobenzaprine is the most heavily studied and has been shown to be effective for various musculoskeletal conditions. The sedative properties of tizanidine and cyclobenzaprine may benefit patients with insomnia caused by severe muscle spasms. Methocarbamol and metaxalone are less sedating, although effectiveness evidence is limited. Adverse effects, particularly dizziness and drowsiness, are consistently reported with all skeletal muscle relaxants. The potential adverse effects should be communicated clearly to the patient. Because of limited comparable effectiveness data, choice of agent should be based on side-effect profile, patient preference, abuse potential, and possible drug interactions.

  15. Clinical report of cervical arthroplasty in management of spondylotic myelopathy in Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Ning

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To investigate clinical effects and manual operational point of Bryan cervical disc prosthesis in Chinese, to observe the stability and range of movement (ROM post-operatively. Methods and materials From 2003,12 to 2005,12, Bryan disc prosthesis replacement applied in 83 cases (102 levels of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM after anterior decompression in our hospital. Clinical (JOA grade and Odom's scale and radiological (X-ray of flexion, extension; left and right bending position follow-up was performed. Systemic radiographic study about stability and ROM of replaced level post operationally were measured. CT or MRI scans were applied in all cases to evaluate the signs of the prosthesis deflexion and hetero-ossification in the replaced levels. Results At least 12 months follow-up were done in 65/83 of these paients. All of 83 patients were improved according to Odsm's scale. JOA score increased from average 8.7 to 15.5. There was no prosthesis subsidence. Replaced segment achieved stability and restored partial of normal ROM 4.73°(3.7°–5.9° early postoperation and 8.12°(5.8°–13.6° more than 12 months postoperation in flex and extension position. No obvious loss of lordosis was found. CT or MRI follow-up shows position deflexion of the prosthesis metal endplates ( Conclusion Byran cervical disc prosthesis restored motion to the level of the intact segment in flexion-extension and lateral bending in post-operative images. At the same time, it can achieve good anterior decompression treatment effect and immediate stability in replaced 1 or 2 levels, and which is a new choice for the treatment of CSM.

  16. Soft tissue distraction using pentagonal frame for long-standing traumatic flexion deformity of interphalangeal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazerani Shahram

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Interphalangeal joint con-tracture is a challenging complication of hand trauma, which reduces the functional capacity of the entire hand. In this study we evaluated the results of soft tissue distraction with no collateral ligament transection or volar plate removal in comparison with traditional operation of contracture re-lease and partial ligament transection and volar plate removal. Methods: In this prospective study, a total of 40 pa-tients in two equal groups (A and B were studied. Patients suffering from chronic flexion contracture of abrasive trau-matic nature were included. Group A were treated by soft tissue distraction using pentagonal frame technique and in Group B the contracture release was followed by finger splinting. Results: Analyzed data revealed a significant differ-ence between the two groups for range of motion in the proximal interphalangeal joints (P<0.05, while it was not meaningful in the distal interphalangeal joints (P>0.05. There was not a significant difference in the degrees of flexion contracture between groups (P>0.05. Regression analysis showed that using pentagonal frame technique significantly increased the mean improvement in range of motion of proxi-mal interphalangeal joints (P<0.001, while the higher the preoperative flexion contracture was observed in proximal interphalangeal joints, the lower improvement was achieved in range of motion of proximal interphalangeal joints after intervention (P<0.001. Conclusion: Soft tissue distraction using pentagonal frame technique with gradual and continuous collateral liga-ment and surrounding joint tissues distraction combined with skin Z-plasty significantly improves the range of mo-tion in patients with chronic traumatic flexion deformity of proximal and/or distal interphalangeal joints. Key words: Osteogenesis, distraction; Finger joint; Hand deformities

  17. Posterior Vertebral Injury; Is This a Burst Fracture or a Flexion-Distraction Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In thoracolumbar spinal fractures with posterior column injury for applying proper management, it is important to distinguish a flexion-distraction injury (FDI from a three column burst fracture (BF as in clinical examination, both may have a similar significant tenderness on direct spinal palpation. Careful attention to the comprehensive clinical examination and detailed imaging features are essential in making an accurate diagnosis and thus appropriate treatment.    

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF BODY POSITION ON LOAD RANGE DURING ISOKINETIC KNEE EXTENSION/FLEXION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. Findley

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Isokinetic range of motion (ROM has three distinct phases: rate of velocity development (RVD, load range (LR, and deceleration (DCC. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in isokinetic knee extension/flexion LR exist between body positions. Ten subjects (4 males and 6 females, age 29.3 ± 5.4 yrs, ht 1.71 ± 0.10 m, wt 71.9 ± 12.9 kg volunteered to participate in the seated vs. prone investigation and nine different subjects (4 males and 5 females, age 29.5 ± 6.9 yrs, ht 1.72 ± 0.09 m, wt 69.0 ± 13.8 kg volunteered to participate in the seated vs. supine study. Each subject completed 3 maximal reciprocal concentric/concentric repetitions of dominant knee extension/flexion on a Biodex System 2 isokinetic dynamometer at 60, 120, 180, 240 and 360 deg·sec-1 in the supine or prone and seated positions. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed that only seated flexion at 360 deg·sec-1 (57.6 ± 1.7 degrees elicited significantly (p < 0.05 greater LR than prone (49.2 ± 2.8 degrees. No significant differences in LR extension or flexion existed at any velocity between the supine vs. seated positions. ANOVA also demonstrated differences between seated vs. prone torque, work and power at most velocities while there was no difference between seated vs. supine. LR is the only phase of an isokinetic repetition where quantifiable resistance is maintained and this data appears to support that it may not be position-dependent but position may alter traditional performance variables

  19. Low incidence of flexion-type supracondylar humerus fractures but high rate of complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuoppala, Eira; Parviainen, Roope; Pokka, Tytti; Sirviö, Minna; Serlo, Willy; Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Supracondylar humerus fractures are the most common type of elbow fracture in children. A small proportion of them are flexion-type fractures. We analyzed their current incidence, injury history, clinical and radiographic findings, treatment, and outcomes. Patients and methods - We performed a population-based study, including all children <16 years of age. Radiographs were re-analyzed to include only flexion-type supracondylar fractures. Medical records were reviewed and outcomes were evaluated at a mean of 9 years after the injury. In addition, we performed a systematic literature review of all papers published on the topic since 1990 and compared the results with the findings of the current study. Results - During the study period, the rate of flexion-type fractures was 1.2% (7 out of 606 supracondylar humeral fractures). The mean annual incidence was 0.8 per 105. 4 fractures were multidirectionally unstable, according to the Gartland-Wilkins classification. All but 1 were operatively treated. Reduced range of motion, changed carrying angle, and ulnar nerve irritation were the most frequent short-term complications. Finally, in the long-term follow-up, mean carrying angle was 50% more in injured elbows (21°) than in uninjured elbows (14°). 4 patients of the 7 achieved a satisfactory long-term outcome according to Flynn's criteria. Interpretation - Supracondylar humeral flexion-type fractures are rare. They are usually severe injuries, often resulting in short-term and long-term complications regardless of the original surgical fixation used.

  20. Airway Management in Fixed Flexion Deformity using an Alternative Method of ILMA Insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir K Singh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fixed flexion deformity is a sequel of burns and their release under anaesthesia pose difficulty during intubation. Various modalities are used for airway management in such cases. Here we present the successful airway manage-ment in a patient with post burn contracture who was managed with use of intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA introduced in reverse direction with 180 0 rotation for insertion.

  1. Treatment of knee flexion contracture in patients with chronic juvenile arthritis: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Matijević Radmila; Stanković Milan; Ninković Srđan; Savić Dragan; Milankov Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Knee flexion contractures are common after-effects of juvenile arthritis. Treatment is usually conservative and may include physical therapy and kinesitherapy. Surgical treatment, particularly of the soft parts, indicated for contractures resistant to conservative treatment, helps to correct the deformity, maintain movements, and relieves pain. Intensive postoperative physiotherapy is of special importance. Case report. A 23-year-old female patient with chronic juvenile arthriti...

  2. The effects of stabilization exercises using a sling and stretching on the range of motion and cervical alignment of straight neck patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Hyean; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess how stretching exercise training and sling exercise training for stabilization influences the cervical spine angles and cervical range of motion of straight neck patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty straight neck patients were selected as subjects and they were randomly divided into two groups, the stretching and sling stabilization exercise groups which 60 minutes of exercise three times a week for 6weeks. All the subjects in each of the two respective study groups received an X-ray and had their cervical range of motion measured, both before and after the exercise. [Results] When differences in the cervical spine angle between the pre- and the post-test were checked, it was found that only the stretching exercise group showed statistically significant decreases in the craniovertebral angle and the cranial rotation angle. When differences in the range of motion between pre- and post-test were checked, the sling stabilization exercise group showed a significant change in flexion, right rotation, left lateral bending, right lateral bending, and the stretching exercise group showed a significant change in left rotation, left lateral bending, and right lateral bending. [Conclusion] These results indicate that both types of exercises are effective at improving the cervical range of motion of straight neck patients, and that the stretching exercise was more effective than the sling stabilization exercise at improving cervical spine angles.

  3. Investigating the Effects of Knee Flexion during the Eccentric Heel-Drop Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Weinert-Aplin, Anthony M.J. Bull, Alison H. McGregor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterise the biomechanics of the widely practiced eccentric heel-drop exercises used in the management of Achilles tendinosis. Specifically, the aim was to quantify changes in lower limb kinematics, muscle lengths and Achilles tendon force, when performing the exercise with a flexed knee instead of an extended knee. A musculoskeletal modelling approach was used to quantify any differences between these versions of the eccentric heel drop exercises used to treat Achilles tendinosis. 19 healthy volunteers provided a group from which optical motion, forceplate and plantar pressure data were recorded while performing both the extended and flexed knee eccentric heel-drop exercises over a wooden step when barefoot or wearing running shoes. This data was used as inputs into a scaled musculoskeletal model of the lower limb. Range of ankle motion was unaffected by knee flexion. However, knee flexion was found to significantly affect lower limb kinematics, inter-segmental loads and triceps muscle lengths. Peak Achilles load was not influenced despite significantly reduced peak ankle plantarflexion moments (p < 0.001. The combination of reduced triceps lengths and greater ankle dorsiflexion, coupled with reduced ankle plantarflexion moments were used to provide a basis for previously unexplained observations regarding the effect of knee flexion on the relative loading of the triceps muscles during the eccentric heel drop exercises. This finding questions the role of the flexed knee heel drop exercise when specifically treating Achilles tendinosis.

  4. Segmental lumbar spine instability at flexion-extension radiography can be predicted by conventional radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, M.T.; Manninen, H.I.; Lindgren, K.-A.J.; Sihvonen, T.A.; Airaksinen, O.; Soimakallio, S

    2002-07-01

    AIM: To identify plain radiographic findings that predict segmental lumbar spine instability as shown by functional flexion-extension radiography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Plain radiographs and flexion-extension radiographs of 215 patients with clinically suspected lumbar spine instability were analysed. Instability was classified into anterior or posterior sliding instability. The registered plain radiographic findings were traction spur, spondylarthrosis, arthrosis of facet joints, disc degeneration, retrolisthesis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis and vacuum phenomena. Factors reaching statistical significance in univariate analyses (P < 0.05) were included in stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Degenerative spondylolisthesis (P = 0.004 at L3-4 level and P = 0.017 at L4-5 level in univariate analysis and odds ratio 16.92 at L4-5 level in multiple logistic regression analyses) and spondylolytic spondylolisthesis (P = 0.003 at L5-S1 level in univariate analyses) were the strongest independent determinants of anterior sliding instability. Retrolisthesis (odds ratio 10.97), traction spur (odds ratio 4.45) and spondylarthrosis (odds ratio 3.20) at L3-4 level were statistically significant determinants of posterior sliding instability in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Sliding instability is strongly associated with various plain radiographic findings. In mechanical back pain, functional flexion-extension radiographs should be limited to situations when symptoms are not explained by findings of plain radiographs and/or when they are likely to alter therapy. Pitkaenen, M.T. et al. (2002)

  5. Relationship between retention of the posterior cruciate ligament and postoperative flexion in total knee arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama,Yoshiki

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to retrospectively analyzed the outcome of 192 total knee arthroplasties in 132 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (118 women, 14 men. The Okayama Mark II prosthesis, which requires the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL to be resected, was used in 83 knees (group I, the Mark II prosthesis, which allows the PCL to be retained, was used in 68 knees (group II, and the new Okayama PCL-R prosthesis, which also allows the PCL to be retained, was used in 41 (group III. According to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association knee scoring system, the clinical outcome of groups I, II and III at 1 year after the operation were 64.9, 71.2 and 72.3 points, respectively, and the average flexion angles in each group at 1 year were 78.4, 92.6 and 101.3 degrees. Postoperative flexion in groups III was significantly greater than in groups I and II. These results suggest that postoperative flexion is greater when the posterior cruciate ligament is retained.

  6. DOES RECTUS FEMORIS TRANSFER INCREASE KNEE FLEXION DURING STANCE PHASE IN CEREBRAL PALSY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Mauro César; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Kawamura, Cátia Miyuki; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Neves, Daniella Lins; Cardoso, Michelle de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate whether distal rectus femoris transfer (DRFT) is related to postoperative increase of knee flexion during the stance phase in cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: The inclusion criteria were Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I-III, kinematic criteria for stiff-knee gait at baseline, and individuals who underwent orthopaedic surgery and had gait analyses performed before and after intervention. The patients included were divided into the following two groups: NO-DRFT (133 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery without DRFT, and DRFT (83 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery that included DRFT. The primary outcome was to evaluate in each group if minimum knee flexion in stance phase (FMJFA) changed after treatment. Results: The mean FMJFA increased from 13.19° to 16.74° (p=0.003) and from 10.60° to 14.80° (p=0.001) in Groups NO-DRFT and DRFT, respectively. The post-operative FMJFA was similar between groups NO-DRFT and DRFT (p=0.534). The increase of FMJFA during the second exam (from 13.01° to 22.51°) was higher among the GMFCS III patients in the DRFT group (p<0.001). Conclusion: In this study, DRFT did not generate additional increase of knee flexion during stance phase when compared to the control group. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study. PMID:26997910

  7. Decoding Finger Flexion From Band-specific ECoG Signals in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanying eLiang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the method that won the BCI competition IV addressed to the pre- diction of the finger flexion from ECoG signals. ECoG-based BCIs have recently drawn the attention from the community. Indeed, ECoG can provide a higher spatial resolution, a higher signal quality and is more suitable for long-term use than classical EEG recordings. These characteristics allow to decode precise brain activities and to realize efficient ECoG-based neu- roprostheses. Signal processing is a very important task in BCIs research for translating brain signals into commands. Here, we present a linear regression method based on the amplitude modulation of band-specific ECoG including a short term memory for individual finger flexion prediction. The effectiveness of the method was proven by achieving the highest value of corre- lation coefficient between the predicted and recorded finger flexion values on data set 4 during the BCI competition IV.

  8. 上颈椎融合对颈椎活动度的影响%The impact of the upper cervical spine fusion on cervical range of motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁伟; 朱悦; 崔璀

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨上颈椎融合对颈椎活动功能的影响,并评估颈椎活动度测量仪(cervical range of motion device,CROM)的可靠性.方法 我科于2010年7月至2011年10月对收治的14例上颈椎疾病患者使用CROM仪测量,其中5例为颈枕融合,2例寰枢椎融合,7例采用Halo架非融合治疗后2个月及6个月左右颈椎前屈、后伸、左右侧弯、左右旋转主动活动度,并与15例健康志愿者颈椎活动度进行比较,分析术后颈椎活动度丢失情况;使用CROM仪重复测量健康志愿者颈椎活动度并采用组间相关系数(intraclass correlation coefficients,ICC)来评价CROM仪的测量者内可靠性.结果 术后6个月随访时颈椎活动度六个方向中的三个方向:颈椎前屈、左旋转及右旋转,融合组与非融合组相比有显著降低(P<0.05),与正常组相比则在六个方向均有显著性差异(P<0.05).融合组中颈枕融合较寰枢椎融合在颈椎前屈、左右旋转活动上有显著性降低(P<0.05),术后第6个月随访各组颈椎活动度较3个月随访时均有一定程度的增加.CROM仪测量颈椎六个方向的活动度测量者内ICC均在0.91以上,有较高的可靠性.结论 上颈椎融合使颈椎活动范围显著性减小,对颈椎前屈、旋转功能影响最大.此外,CROM仪是一种可靠的颈椎活动度测量工具.%Objective To investigate the impact of the upper cervical spine fusion on cervical range of motion (CROM) and to evaluate the reliability of the CROM device. Methods From July 2010 to October 2011, 14 patients with upper cervical disease were adopted by our department and treated with cervical spine fusion or non-fusion, among whom there were 5 cases of cervicooccipital fusion, 2 cases of atlantoaxial fusion and 7 cases of Halo-vest treatment. The cervical flexion, backward extension, left and right lateral bending and rotation of all patients were measured by the CROM device about 2 months and 6 months after surgery

  9. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  10. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  11. Wipe and flexion reflexes of the frog. II. Response to perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotland, J L; Rymer, W Z

    1993-05-01

    1. To evaluate the hypothesis that the neural control of sensorimotor transformations may be simplified by using a single control variable, we compared the movement kinematics and muscle activity patterns [electromyograms (EMGs)] of the frog during flexion withdrawal and the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex before and after adding an external load. In addition, the flexibility of spinal cord circuitry underlying the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex was evaluated by comparing wipes before and after removal of one of the contributing muscles by cutting a muscle nerve. 2. The kinematics of the movements were recorded using a WATSMART infrared emitter-detector system and quantified using principal-components analysis to provide a measure of the shape (eigenvalues) and orientation (eigenvector coefficients) of the movement trajectories. The neural pattern coordinating the movements was characterized by the latencies and magnitudes of EMGs of seven muscles acting at the hip, knee, and ankle. These variables were compared 1) during flexion withdrawal and the initial movement segment of the limb during the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex in both unrestrained movements and in movements executed when a load equal to approximately 10% of the animal's body weight was attached to a distal limb segment and 2) during the initial movement segment of the wipe reflex before and after cutting the nerve to the knee flexor-hip extensor, iliofibularis. 3. Addition of the load had no discernible effect on the end-point position of the foot during either reflex. However, during the loaded flexion reflex, the ankle joint did not move until after the hip and knee joints had moved to their normal positions. This delayed flexion of the ankle was accompanied by large increases in the magnitude of EMG activity in two ankle muscles that exceeded the levels found during unrestrained movements. Significant changes in the temporal organization of the EMG pattern accompanied the change in joint angle

  12. Cervical cancer screening at crossroads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Rygaard, Carsten; Baillet, Miguel Vazquez-Prada;

    2014-01-01

    Cervical screening has been one of the most successful public health prevention programmes. For 50 years, cytology formed the basis for screening, and detected cervical intraepithelial lesions (CIN) were treated surgically to prevent progression to cancer. In a high-risk country as Denmark......, screening decreased the incidence of cervical cancer from 34 to 11 per 100,000, age-standardized rate (World Standard Population). Screening is, however, also expensive; Denmark (population: 5.6 million) undertakes close to half a million tests per year, and has 6-8 CIN-treated women for each prevented...... cancer case. The discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the cause of cervical cancer dramatically changed perspectives for disease control. Screening with HPV testing was launched around 1990, and preventive HPV vaccination was licensed in 2006. Long-term randomized controlled trials (RCT...

  13. Hemangiopericytoma of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra V Ramdasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old male presented with neck pain and dysesthesias in the right upper limb. On examination, he had a firm, well-defined midline posterior cervical mass discernible on palpation at the mid-cervical level. He had no neurological deficit. Neuroradiology revealed a variegated enhancing cervical mass is arising from C3 lamina. The mass extended into the right extradural space eroding the C3 lamina and posteriorly into the intermuscular plane. The tumor was excised totally. Histopathology of the tumor showed features of hemangiopericytoma (HPC. The patient underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Primary osseous spinal HPC are rare malignant extra-axial tumors that tend to recur and metastasize. Only two cases of primary osseous HPC have been reported earlier to involve the cervical spine. The clinical presentation and management of the present case with a review of the literature is presented.

  14. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisel, R H; Karlen, R

    1994-07-01

    Nine cases of cervical necrotizing faciitis are presented. Five were odontogenic, three were pharyngeal in origin, and one developed from a soft-tissue spider bite. The bacteriology represented a polyculture of gram-positive, gram-negative, as well as anaerobic bacteria, and initial medical treatment by third-generation cephalosporin and metronidazole or clindamycin was successful and is recommended. Airway control is necessary early, as is a wide exploration of the fascial spaces of the neck, with frequent reexploration in either the operating room or at the bedside to evaluate the effects of treatment and to prevent further progression of the disease. Intensive medical support is crucial, and hyperbaric oxygen is advised for patients who are deteriorating under standard therapy.

  15. Tuberculosis ganglionar cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmany Leonel Mendoza Cruz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis es una enfermedad reemergente en la actual sociedad globalizada y puede presentarse prácticamente ante cualquier especialista. Las formas extrapulmonares pueden representar hasta la cuarta parte de los casos, y entre ellos la afectación ganglionar se ubica entre las más frecuentes. Se reportan dos pacientes estudiados y tratados en el Servicio de Otorrinolaringología del Hospital General de Bata, Litoral de Guinea Ecuatorial, África Central, afectados por tumoraciones laterocervicales subagudas, con escasos síntomas y excelente evolución, tras su diagnóstico de tuberculosis ganglionar cervical y terapéutica antibiótica. Aunque la punción y aspiración con aguja fina no fue concluyente, ambos casos resultaron positivos por medio de la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen

  16. The bilateral leg strength deficit is present in old, young and adolescent females during isokinetic knee extension and flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruganti, Usha; Seaman, Kenneth

    2006-06-01

    The bilateral limb deficit (BLD) describes the difference in maximal or near maximal force generating capacity of muscles when they are contracted alone or in combination with the contralateral muscles. A deficit occurs when the summed unilateral force is greater than the bilateral force. This study examined the presence of the BLD during isokinetic knee extensions and flexions in a group of adolescent females (n=8, mean of 15+/-1 years) and compared with previously reported data by this researcher of adult and older females. Data were collected from subjects during slow (45 deg/s) isokinetic knee extensions and flexions and it was found that a BLD exists during both extension and flexion regardless of age. Furthermore, this study is the first to examine the presence of the deficit in an adolescent population. Myoelectric signal (MES) data showed that there is no difference between bilateral and unilateral isokinetic knee extensions and flexions regardless of age group.

  17. Radiculopatía cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Murillo Calderón

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available La patología cervical traumática y su relación con el quehacer de la medicina legal tiene gran importancia y vigencia, principalmente cuando se hace necesario realizar valoraciones a pacientes con alteraciones cervicales y se debe definir si estas están en relación a un trauma determinado o repetitivo en el tiempo como puede ocurrir en algunos casos de riesgos de trabajo. El médico forense debe estar muy bien preparado, conocer la anatomía cervical y de los miembros superiores, realizar un interrogatorio y un examen físico neurológico exhaustivo para orientar las posibilidades diagnósticas; es fundamental además el análisis de los estudios diagnósticos. En este caso en particular se realizará una revisión de la radiculopatía cervical, su fisiopatología, mecanismos de producción y las implicaciones médico legales al realizar la valoración en pacientes con cervicobraquialgiaTraumatic cervical pathology and its relationship to the work of forensic medicine is of great importance and relevance, especially when it is necessary to make assessments in patients with cervical changes and must be defined if they are in relation to a specific trauma or repetitive in time as may occur in some cases of occupational hazards. The medical examiner must be very well prepared, know the anatomy of the cervical and upper limbs, perform an examination and a thorough neurological physical examination to guide the diagnostic possibilities, it is also fundamental analysis of diagnostic studies. In this particular case there will be a review of cervical radiculopathy, pathophysiology, mechanisms of production and the medico-legal implications when doing the assessment in patients with cervical braquial pain

  18. A possible etiology for the dilaceration and flexion of permanent tooth roots relative to bone remodeling gradients in alveolar bone

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Trauma, altered tooth germ position and delayed tooth eruption have been hypothesized as possible causes of tooth root dilacerations and flexion, however these anatomical variations appear more commonly associated with posterior teeth and absence of traumatic history. The Hypothesis: Postulated is that tooth root dilaceration or flexion may be a result of tooth root sheath displacement due to gradients of bone remodeling present within alveolar bone. Evaluation of the Hypothesis...

  19. Quantitative analysis of the reversibility of knee flexion contractures with time: an experimental study using the rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Trudel, Guy; Uhthoff, Hans K.; Goudreau, Louis; Laneuville, Odette

    2014-01-01

    Background Knee flexion contractures prevent the full extension of the knee joint and cause disability. The etiology is not well defined. Extended periods of immobilization of joints lead to contractures difficult to completely reverse by rehabilitation treatments. Recovery of the complete range of motion without intervention has not been studied but is of importance to optimize clinical management. This study was designed to quantify the spontaneous reversibility of knee flexion contractures...

  20. Effects of neck pain on reaching overhead and reading: a case–control study of long and short neck flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Constand, Marissa K; MacDermid, Joy C

    2013-01-01

    Background Reaching overhead and reading are tasks that many individuals encounter daily. The level of difficulty of these tasks increases if an individual has neck pain. This study determined the neck movement patterns during these two tasks by comparing neck flexion of individuals with and without neck pain. Methods This case control study used the portable video technology, Dartfish ProSuite 5.5 Video Software, to analyse neck flexion movement patterns. Healthy individuals and individuals ...

  1. CAN A SPECIFIC NECK STRENGTHENING PROGRAM DECREASE CERVICAL SPINE INJURIES IN A MEN'S PROFESSIONAL RUGBY UNION TEAM? A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Naish

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spine injuries in Rugby Union are a concerning issue at all levels of the game. The primary aim of this retrospective analysis conducted in a professional Rugby Union squad was to determine whether a 26-week isometric neck strengthening intervention program (13-week strengthening phase and 13-week maintenance phase was effective in reducing the number and severity of cervical spine injuries. The secondary aim was to determine whether at week five, where the program had been the similar for all players, there was increased isometric neck strength. All 27 players who were common to both the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons were included in this analysis and data was extracted from a Sports Medicine/Sports Science database which included the squad's injury records. Primary outcome variables included; the number of cervical spine injuries and the severity of these injuries as determined by the total number of days lost from training and competition. Secondary outcome variables included isometric neck strength in flexion, extension and left and right lateral flexion. Using non-parametric statistical methods, no significant differences were evident for the total number of cervical spine injuries (n = 8 in 2007-2008, n = 6 in 2008-2009 or time loss due to these injuries (100 days in 2007-2008, 40 days in 2008-2009. However, a significant (p = 0.03 reduction in the number of match injuries was evident from 2007-2008 (n = 11 to 2008-09 (n = 2. Non-significant increases in isometric neck strength were found in all directions examined. A significant reduction in the number of match injuries was evident in this study. However, no other significant changes to primary outcome variables were achieved. Further, no significant increases in isometric neck strength were found in this well-trained group of professional athletes

  2. Cervical spine movement during intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Swain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been growing concerns following documented instances of neurological deterioration in patients with cervical spine injury as a result of intubation. A significant body of evidence has since evolved with the primary objective of ascertaining the safest way of securing the endotracheal tube in patients with suspected and proven cervical injury. The search for a mode of intubation producing the least movement at the cervical spine is an ongoing process and is limited by logistic and ethical issues. The ensuing review is an attempt to review available evidence on cervical movements during intubation and to comprehensively outline the movement at the cervical spine with a wide plethora of intubation aids. Literature search was sourced from digital libraries including PubMed, Medline and Google Scholar in addition to the standard textbooks of Anaesthesiology. The keywords used in literature search included 'cervical spine motion,' 'neurological deterioration,' 'intubation biomechanics,' 'direct laryngoscopy,' 'flexible fibreoptic intubation,' 'video laryngoscopes' and 'craniocervical motion.' The scientific information in this review is expected to assist neuroanaesthesiologists for planning airway management in patients with neurological injury as well as to direct further research into this topic which has significant clinical and patient safety implications.

  3. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, D. K. [School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5706 (United States); Somphonsane, R. [Department of Physics, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology, Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-1500 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  4. Collisionless Relaxation of Stellar Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kandrup, H E

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the work summarised here has been to exploit and extend ideas from plasma physics and accelerator dynamics to formulate a unified description of collisionless relaxation that views violent relaxation, Landau damping, and phase mixing as (manifestations of) a single phenomenon. This approach embraces the fact that the collisionless Boltzmann equation (CBE), the basic object of the theory, is an infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian system, with the distribution function f playing the role of the fundamental dynamical variable, and that, interpreted appropriately, an evolution described by the other Hamiltonian system. Equilibrium solutions correspond to extremal points of the Hamiltonian subject to the constraints associated with Liouville's Theorem. Stable equilibria correspond to energy minima. The evolution of a system out of equilibrium involves (in general nonlinear) phase space oscillations which may -- or may not -- interfere destructively so as to damp away.

  5. Collisionless Relaxation of Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandrup, Henry E.

    1999-08-01

    The objective of the work summarized here has been to exploit and extend ideas from plasma physics and accelerator dynamics to formulate a unified description of collisionless relaxation of stellar systems that views violent relaxation, Landau damping, and phase mixing as (manifestations of) a single phenomenon. This approach embraces the fact that the collisionless Boltzmann equation (CBE), the basic object of the theory, is an infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian system, with the distribution function f playing the role of the fundamental dynamical variable, and that, interpreted appropriately, an evolution described by the CBE is no different fundamentally from an evolution described by any other Hamiltonian system. Equilibrium solutions f0 correspond to extremal points of the Hamiltonian subject to the constraints associated with Liouville's Theorem. Stable equilibria correspond to energy minima. The evolution of a system out of equilibrium involves (in general nonlinear) phase space oscillations which may - or may not - interfere destructively so as to damp away.

  6. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  7. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  8. Knee Flexion and Daily Activities in Patients following Total Knee Replacement: A Comparison with ISO Standard 14243

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A. Wimmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Walking is only one of many daily activities performed by patients following total knee replacement (TKR. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypotheses (a that subject activity characteristics are correlated with knee flexion range of motion (ROM and (b that there is a significant difference between the subject’s flexion/extension excursion throughout the day and the ISO specified input for knee wear testing. In order to characterize activity, the number of walking and stair stepping cycles, the time spent with dynamic and stationary activities, the number of activity sequences, and the knee flexion/extension excursion of 32 TKR subjects were collected during daily activity. Flexion/extension profiles were compared with the ISO 14243 simulator input profile using a level crossing classification algorithm. Subjects took an average of 3102 (range: 343–5857 walking cycles including 65 (range: 0–319 stair stepping cycles. Active and passive ROMs were positively correlated with stair walking time, stair step counts, and stair walking sequences. Simulated knee motion according to ISO showed significantly fewer level crossings at the flexion angles 20–40° and beyond 50° than those measured with the monitor. This suggests that implant wear testing protocols should contain more cycles and a variety of activities requiring higher knee flexion angles with incorporated resting/transition periods to account for the many activity sequences.

  9. Cardiovascular and respiratory alterations in dogs during cervical myelography using ioversol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R.A. Melo e Silva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid infusion of most contrast mediums and the steps involved in performing a cervical myelography have adverse affects that can discourage its use in the radiographic diagnosis of spinal cord diseases. Thus, the cardiovascular and respiratory alterations associated with neck flexion, subarachnoid puncture, and cerebrospinal fluid drainage during subarachnoid infusion of ioversol (320mgI/mL in dogs under general anesthesia using isoflurane were evaluated. The dogs received subarachnoid infusion of autologous cerebrospinal fluid kept at 38°C - control group (GC; ioversol 0.3mL/kg at 25°C (GI25 and ioversol 0.3mL/kg heated to 38°C (GI38. Each dog had its heart rate (HR, systolic arterial pressure (SAP, diastolic arterial pressure (DAP, respiratory rate (RR, oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2 and electrocardiography readings (PR and QT intervals recorded. Group comparisons showed no statistical difference regarding neck positioning, subarachnoid puncture, and subarachnoid infusion of contrast medium on HR, RR and SaO2, cardiac rhythm or conduction. However, isoflurane significantly increased PR and QT intervals. Based on these findings, it is concluded that the steps involved in cervical myelography and the use of ioversol 320mgI/mL at 0.3mL/kg (25ºC and 38ºC during cervical myelography did not result in relevant cardiovascular and respiratory alterations, except for an elevation in arterial pressure after injection of ioversol.

  10. Management of neglected cervical spine dislocation: a study of six cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goni Vijay

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To report a case series of six neglected cervical spine dislocations without neurological deficit, which were managed operatively. Methods: The study was conducted from August 2010 to December 2011 and cases were selected from the out-patient department of Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, India. The patients were in the age group of 30 to 50 years. All patients were operated via both anterior and posterior approaches. Results: During the immediate postoperative period, five (83.33% patients had normal neurological status. One (16.67% patient who had C 5 -C 6 subluxation developed neu-rological deficit with sensory loss below C 6 level and motor power of 2/5 in the lower limb and 3/5 in the upper limb below C 6 level. Conclusion: There is no role of skull traction in ne-glected distractive flexion injuries to cervical spine delayed for more than 3 weeks. Posterior followed by anterior ap-proach saves much time. If both approaches are to be done in the same sitting, there is no need for instrumentation posteriorly. But if staged procedure is planed, posterior sta-bilization is recommended, as there is a risk of deterioration in neurological status. Key words: Cervical vertebrae; Neck; Postoperative complications

  11. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  12. Hyperextension Song X-ray Photography Applications in the Diagnosis of Cervical Spondylosis%过伸过曲位X线摄影在颈椎病诊断中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关国定; 郭麦军; 薛慧丹

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨过伸过曲功能位检查在颈椎病诊断中对颈椎不稳的价值。方法:回顾性对比分析248例颈椎病患者常规体位摄影和特殊体位摄影的影像资料。结果:为常规侧位片发现颈椎不稳48例过伸过曲位发现颈椎不稳者158例。结论:过伸过曲功能位检查能有效发现颈椎病患者颈椎不稳现象,为临床及时干预提供重要有效参考。%Objective:To investigate the function of parity had held out the song in the diagnosis of cervical spondylosis of the cervical spine instability value .Methods:A retrospective comparative analysis of image data 248 cases of cervical spondylosis conventional pho-tography and special postural orthostatic photography .Results:conventional radiographs had found 48 cases of cervical instability flexion position found 158 cases of cervical instability .Conclusion:hyperextension song features parity can effectively find cervical spondylosis cervical instability phenomenon is an important and effective clinical interventions timely reference .

  13. Time of relaxation in dusty plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Dust particles in plasma may have different values of average kinetic energy for vertical and horizontal motion. The partial equilibrium of the subsystems and the relaxation processes leading to this asymmetry are under consideration. A method for the relaxation time estimation in nonideal dusty plasma is suggested. The characteristic relaxation times of vertical and horizontal motion of dust particles in gas discharge are estimated by analytical approach and by analysis of simulation results. These relaxation times for vertical and horizontal subsystems appear to be different. A single hierarchy of relaxation times is proposed.

  14. Analysis of digitized cervical images to detect cervical neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Daron G.

    2004-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. If diagnosed in the premalignant stage, cure is invariably assured. Although the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear has significantly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer where implemented, the test is only moderately sensitive, highly subjective and skilled-labor intensive. Newer optical screening tests (cervicography, direct visual inspection and speculoscopy), including fluorescent and reflective spectroscopy, are fraught with certain weaknesses. Yet, the integration of optical probes for the detection and discrimination of cervical neoplasia with automated image analysis methods may provide an effective screening tool for early detection of cervical cancer, particularly in resource poor nations. Investigative studies are needed to validate the potential for automated classification and recognition algorithms. By applying image analysis techniques for registration, segmentation, pattern recognition, and classification, cervical neoplasia may be reliably discriminated from normal epithelium. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in cooperation with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has embarked on a program to begin this and other similar investigative studies.

  15. Comparison of tracheal intubation using the Airtraq® and Mc Coy laryngoscope in the presence of rigid cervical collar simulating cervical immobilisation for traumatic cervical spine injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Durga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is difficult to visualise the larynx using conventional laryngoscopy in the presence of cervical spine immobilisation. Airtraq® provides for easy and successful intubation in the neutral neck position. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Airtraq in comparison with the Mc Coy laryngoscope, when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilisation using hard cervical collar and manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilisation. Methods: A randomised, cross-over, open-labelled study was undertaken in 60 ASA I and II patients aged between 20 and 50 years, belonging to either gender, scheduled to undergo elective surgical procedures. Following induction and adequate muscle relaxation, they were intubated using either of the techniques first, followed by the other. Intubation time and Intubation Difficulty Score (IDS were noted using Mc Coy laryngoscope and Airtraq. The anaesthesiologist was asked to grade the ease of intubation on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS of 1-10. Chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between the groups and paired sample t-test for comparison of continuous data. IDS score and VAS were compared using Wilcoxon Signed ranked test. Results: The mean intubation time was 33.27 sec (13.25 for laryngoscopy and 28.95 sec (18.53 for Airtraq (P=0.32. The median IDS values were 4 (interquartile range (IQR 1-6 and 0 (IQR 0-1 for laryngoscopy and Airtraq, respectively (P=0.007. The median Cormack Lehane glottic view grade was 3 (IQR 2-4 and 1 (IQR 1-1 for laryngoscopy and Airtraq, respectively (P=0.003. The ease of intubation on VAS was graded as 4 (IQR 3-5 for laryngoscopy and 2 (IQR 2-2 for Airtraq (P=0.033. There were two failures to intubate with the Airtraq. Conclusion: Airtraq improves the ease of intubation significantly when compared to Mc Coy blade in patients immobilised with cervical collar and manual in-line stabilisation simulating cervical spine injury.

  16. [Therapy of cervical rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, R; Wiesner, L; Rüther, W

    2004-08-01

    The rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine can be divided into three phases. In the early stage of the disease there is an isolated atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS), followed by vertical instability and subaxial instability. If patients show clear symptoms of cervical myelopathy, which can occur during any stage of the disease, the progression cannot be stopped by conservative treatment, which is of great importance at the beginning of the cervical manifestation. Patient education, physiotherapy and immobilization with a stiff collar can significantly reduce pain. Early and effective DMARD therapy can have a positive effect on the natural history of the disease. In case of progressive instability, cervical myelopathy or severe pain operative treatment is indicated. If there is an isolated AAS, fusion can be restricted to the C1/C2 segment. The Magerl transarticular screw fixation is the preferred technique for stabilization. If there is evidence for vertical instability or severe destruction of the C0/C1 joints, occipital cervical fusion has to be performed. Durin the preoperative planning it is necessary to look for signs of subaxial instability. If this is the case, fusion should include the entire cervical spine. Transoral decompression may be necessary when there is persistent anterior compression of the myelon, typically seen in fixed AAS. Non-ambulatory myelopathic patients are more likely to develop severe surgical complications. Therefore, it is important to avoid the development of severe cervical instability by early surgical intervention. The right timing for surgery is still a matter of controversy. Future prospective randomized trials should address this topic to improve the treatment concept for the rheumatoid patient.

  17. Cervical disc arthroplasty with ProDisc-C artificial disc: 5-year radiographic follow-up results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-bin; SUN Yu; ZHOU Fei-fei; LIU ZHONG-jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty is an alternative surgery to standard cervical decompression and fusion for disc degeneration.Different types of cervical disc prosthesis are used in China.The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiographic outcomes of cervical arthroplasty using the ProDisc-C prosthesis.Methods Radiographic evaluation,including static and dynamic flexion-extension lateral images,was performed at baseline and at final follow-up.Results Twenty six patients who had single-level ProDisc-C arthroplasty were followed up for a mean period of 63 months (56-76 months).The range of motion at the operated level was 9.3°±3.7° at baseline and 7.3°±3.5° at final follow-up,with a significant difference (P <0.05).Seventeen of 26 levels (65.4%) developed heterotopic ossification:three were classified as grade Ⅱ,13 were classified as grade Ⅲ,and 1 as grade Ⅳ,according to McAfee's classification.Forty nine adjacent segments were evaluated by lateral Ⅹ-ray and 18 (36.7%) segments developed adjacent segment degenerations.Conclusions ProDisc-C arthroplasty had acceptable radiographic results at 5-year follow-up.The range of motion was preserved.However,more than 60% of the patients developed heterotopic ossification.

  18. Injury Prevention and Performance Enhancement in 101st Airbourne Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    IN) to assess cervical flexion , extension, right lateral flexion , and left lateral flexion . Subjects were positioned and stabilized utilizing...Variables included peak force normalized to body weight in cervical flexion , extension, right lateral flexion , and left lateral flexion . Flexibility Data...American Medical Association guidelines. Cervical spine flexion , extension, and lateral flexion ROM were measured with the inclinometer on the top of head

  19. ANALYSIS OF ISOKINETIC KNEE EXTENSION / FLEXION IN MALE ELITE ADOLESCENT WRESTLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanli Sadi Kurdak

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Wrestling requires strength of the upper and lower body musculature which is critical for the athletic performance. Evaluation of the adolescent's skeletal muscle is important to understand body movement, especially including those involved in sports. Strength, power and endurance capacity are defined as parameters of skeletal muscle biomechanical properties. The isokinetic dynamometer is an important toll for making this type of evaluation. However, load range phase of range of motion has to be considered to interpret the data correctly. With this in mind we aimed to investigate the lover body musculature contractile characteristics of adolescent wrestlers together with detailed analyses of load range phase of motion. Thirteen boys aged 12 - 14 years participated to this study. Concentric load range torque, work and power of knee extension and flexion were measured by a Cybex Norm dynamometer at angular velocities from 450°/sec to 30°/sec with 30°/sec decrements for each set. None of the wrestlers were able to attain load range for angular velocities above 390°/sec and 420°/sec for extension and flexion respectively. Detailed analyses of the load range resulted in statistically significant differences in the normalized load range peak torque for extension at 270°/sec (1.44 ± 0.28 Nm·kg-1 and 1.14 ± 0.28 Nm·kg-1 for total and load range peak torque respectively, p < 0.05, and for flexion at 300°/sec (1.26 ± 0.28 Nm·kg-1 and 1.03 ± 0.23 Nm·kg-1 for total and load range peak torque respectively, p < 0.05, compared to total peak torque data. Similarly, the significant difference was found for the work values at 90°/sec (1.91 ± 0.23 Nm·kg-1 and 1.59 ± 0.24 Nm·kg-1 for total and load range work respectively for extension and 1.73 ± 0.21 Nm·kg-1 and 1.49 ± 0.19 Nm·kg-1 for total and load range work respectively for flexion, p < 0.05, and was evident at higher angular velocities (p < 0.001 for both extension and flexion. At

  20. Neural Adaptations Associated with Interlimb Transfer in a Ballistic Wrist Flexion Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Kathy L; Rudolf, Anne K; Kalkman, Barbara; King, Maedbh; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Carroll, Timothy J; Carson, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to increases in the subsequent performance of its opposite counterpart. The execution of many unilateral tasks is associated with increased excitability of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex (M1) to the opposite limb. It has been proposed that these effects are causally related. Our aim was to establish whether changes in corticospinal excitability (CSE) arising from prior training of the opposite limb determine levels of interlimb transfer. We used three vision conditions shown previously to modulate the excitability of corticospinal projections to the inactive (right) limb during wrist flexion movements performed by the training (left) limb. These were: (1) mirrored visual feedback of the training limb; (2) no visual feedback of either limb; and (3) visual feedback of the inactive limb. Training comprised 300 discrete, ballistic wrist flexion movements executed as rapidly as possible. Performance of the right limb on the same task was assessed prior to, at the mid point of, and following left limb training. There was no evidence that variations in the excitability of corticospinal projections (assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)) to the inactive limb were associated with, or predictive of, the extent of interlimb transfer that was expressed. There were however associations between alterations in muscle activation dynamics observed for the untrained limb, and the degree of positive transfer that arose from training of the opposite limb. The results suggest that the acute adaptations that mediate the bilateral performance gains realized through unilateral practice of this ballistic wrist flexion task are mediated by neural elements other than those within M1 that are recruited at rest by single-pulse TMS.

  1. Does the wrist flexion affect on the electrophysiological studies in the healthy voluntaries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Doruk

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects on the median nerve distal sensory latencies (dsl, first digit median vs. radial sensory latency difference, fourth digit median vs. ulnar sensory latency difference which are repeated after performing the provocative wrist flexion for about five minutes in the healhty voluntaries. MATERIALS-METHODS: In this study, 20 women, 5 men voluntaries (total 46 hands were investigated. The median nerve dsl, the first digit median vs. radial sensory latency differences, the fourth digit median vs. ulnar sensory latency differences were recorded. After performing the provocative wrist flexion (bilaterally 90 degree for about five minutes, above mentioned studies were repeated. RESULTS: The mean age of the voluntaries in the study was 32.8±8.4 years. Before and after provocation, the mean dsl of median nerve was 2.71±0.19 msc, and 2.73±0.17 msc, and the mean amplitude of median nerve was 35.8±21.8, and 40.2±22.2 microvolt, the mean of fourth digit median vs. ulnar sensory latency differences was 0.12±0.18 msc, and 0.15±0.19 msc, the mean of first digit median vs. radial sensory latency differences was 0.13±0.23 msc and 0.24±0.47 msc, respectively. Statistically, there were no significance between before and after the provocation at the mean value of amplitude and dsl, the median vs. radial first digit and the median vs. ulnar fourth digit sensory latency differences measurements (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: The provocative wrist flexion in the healthy voluntaries has no effect on the electrophysiological studies. [Cukurova Med J 2011; 36(1.000: 24-28

  2. Neural adaptations associated with interlimb transfer in a ballistic wrist flexion task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy L Ruddy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to increases in the subsequent performance of its opposite counterpart. The execution of many unilateral tasks is associated with increased excitability of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex (M1 to the opposite limb. It has been proposed that these effects are causally related. Our aim was to establish whether changes in corticospinal excitability arising from prior training of the opposite limb determine levels of interlimb transfer. We used three vision conditions shown previously to modulate the excitability of corticospinal projections to the inactive (right limb during wrist flexion movements performed by the training (left limb. These were: mirrored visual feedback of the training limb; no visual feedback of either limb; and visual feedback of the inactive limb. Training comprised 300 discrete, ballistic wrist flexion movements executed as rapidly as possible. Performance of the right limb on the same task was assessed prior to, at the mid point of, and following left limb training. There was no evidence that variations in the excitability of corticospinal projections (assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to the inactive limb were associated with, or predictive of, the extent of interlimb transfer that was expressed. There were however associations between alterations in muscle activation dynamics observed for the untrained limb, and the degree of positive transfer that arose from training of the opposite limb. The results suggest that the acute adaptations that mediate the bilateral performance gains realised through unilateral practice of this ballistic wrist flexion task are mediated by neural elements other than those within M1 that are recruited at rest by single-pulse TMS.

  3. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  4. A Combined Therapy for Cervical Spondylopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佳

    2004-01-01

    @@ Cervical spondylopathy is a common disease frequently encountered in the middle-aged and old people. It is a consequence of degeneration, strain or deformation of the physiological curvature of the cervical vertebral body.

  5. Post laminoplasty cervical kyphosis—Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E. Dugoni

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The anterior approach is a good surgical option in flexible cervical kyphosis. It is of primary importance the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine in order to decompress the nervous structures and to guarantee a long-term stability.

  6. Three-level cervical disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St. Iencean Andrei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease is well known in the cervical spine pathology, with radicular syndromes or cervical myelopathy. One or two level cervical herniated disc is common in adult and multilevel cervical degenerative disc herniation is common in the elderly, with spinal stenosis, and have the same cause: the gradual degeneration of the disc. We report the case of a patient with two level cervical disc herniation (C4 – C5 and C5 – C6 treated by anterior cervical microdiscectomy both levels and fusion at C5 – C6; after five years the patient returned with left C7 radiculopathy and MRI provided the image of a left C6 – C7 disc herniation, he underwent an anterior microsurgical discectomy with rapid relief of symptoms. Three-level cervical herniated disc are rare in adults, and the anterior microdiscectomy with or without fusion solve this pathology.

  7. Age-related decreases in motor unit discharge rate and force control during isometric plantar flexion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallio, J; Søgaard, Karen; Avela, J

    2012-01-01

    Aging is related to multiple changes in muscle physiology and function. Previous findings concerning the effects of aging on motor unit discharge rate (DR) and fluctuations in DR and force are somewhat contradictory. Eight YOUNG and nine OLD physically active males performed isometric ramp (RECR)......) and isotonic (ISO) plantar flexions at 10 and 20% of surface EMG at MVC. Motor unit (MU) action potentials were recorded with intramuscular fine-wire electrodes and decomposed with custom build software "Daisy". DR was lower in OLD in RECR-10% (17.9%, p...

  8. Variability of ischiofemoral space dimensions with changes in hip flexion: an MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Adam C.; Howe, Benjamin M. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Hollman, John H.; Finnoff, Jonathan T. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2017-01-15

    The primary aim of this study was to determine if ischiofemoral space (IFS) dimensions vary with changes in hip flexion as a result of placing a bolster behind the knees during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A secondary aim was to determine if IFS dimensions vary between supine and prone hip neutral positions. The study employed a prospective design. Sports medicine center within a tertiary care institution. Five male and five female adult subjects (age mean = 29.2, range = 23-35; body mass index [BMI] mean = 23.5, range = 19.5-26.6) were recruited to participate in the study. An axial, T1-weighted MRI sequence of the pelvis was obtained of each subject in a supine position with their hips in neutral and flexed positions, and in a prone position with their hips in neutral position. Supine hip flexion was induced by placing a standard, 9-cm-diameter MRI knee bolster under the subject's knees. The order of image acquisition (supine hip neutral, supine hip flexed, prone hip neutral) was randomized. The IFS dimensions were then measured on a separate workstation. The investigator performing the IFS measurements was blinded to the subject position for each image. The main outcome measurements were the IFS dimensions acquired with MRI. The mean IFS dimensions in the prone position were 28.25 mm (SD 5.91 mm, standard error mean 1.32 mm). In the supine hip neutral position, the IFS dimensions were 25.1 (SD 5.6) mm. The mean difference between the two positions of 3.15 (3.6) mm was statistically significant (95 % CI of the difference = 1.4 to 4.8 mm, t{sub 19} = 3.911, p =.001). The mean IFS dimensions in the hip flexed position were 36.9 (SD 5.7) mm. The mean difference between the two supine positions of 11.8 (4.1) mm was statistically significant (95 % CI of the difference = 9.9 to 13.7 mm, t{sub 19} = 12.716, p <.001). Our findings demonstrate that the IFS measurements obtained with MRI are dependent upon patient positioning with respect to hip flexion and

  9. Correlation of non-traumatic neck pain with cervical angle and shoulder retractor power in adult clerical population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isha Avadhut Godbole

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A forward head posture (or chin poking is perhaps the most common abnormality associated with NP and is commonly defined as the protrusion of the head in the sagittal plane so that the head is placed anterior to the trunk. Forward head posture can occur because of an anterior translation of the head, lower cervical flexion, or both, and it is claimed to be associated with an increase in upper-cervical extension. It is suggested that forward head posture leads to an increase in the compressive forces on the cervical apophyseal joints and posterior part of the vertebra and to changes in connective tissue length and strength (because of stretching of the anterior structures of the neck and shortening of the posterior muscles resulting in pain. The objective of the study was to correlate neck pain with cervical angle and shoulder retractor power in non-traumatic neck pain patients. Methods: 50 clerical workers having non traumatic neck pain were included. Neck pain was measured on VAS, cervical angle was measured using photometric method and shoulder retractor power was measured. Results: VAS showed moderate positive correlation with cervical angles (0.63 and 0.72 and moderate negative correlation with shoulder retractor power (-0.59 and -0.71. A moderate positive correlation of craniocervical angle to VAS seen (0.66 whereas there was negative correlation with shoulder retractors I and II (-0.59 and -0.61 A positive correlation was seen between VAS and craniocervical angle but is moderately negative with shoulder retractors I (Rhomboids and II (Middle trapezius (0.78, 0.04, -0.69 and -0.64. Conclusion: A moderate increase in cranio vertebral and craniocervical angle showed plausible weakness in lower Trapezius and rhomboids among clerks` having Non-traumatic neck pain. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 859-862

  10. Anterior cervical fusion and Caspar plate stabilization for cervical trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspar, W; Barbier, D D; Klara, P M

    1989-10-01

    A technique for anterior cervical iliac graft fusion with standardized, commercially available screw and plate fixation (Caspar plating) has been developed. The step-by-step procedure, as well as the instruments designed to facilitate the procedure, are described in this report. Sixty cases of cervical trauma (fractures, subluxations, ligamentous instability, or a combination of these problems) were treated with Caspar plating. All patients obtained fusion, and stability was achieved immediately after surgery without external stabilization. No unusual surgical complications occurred, and the most dreaded complication of dural penetration by drilling or screw placement was not observed. This report details the neurological presentation, anatomical lesions, surgical therapy, and outcome of these patients. Caspar plating combines the advantage of an anterior surgical approach with immediate postoperative stabilization without external stabilization. This advantage persists even in the presence of posterior ligamentous instability. The technique is an important addition to the surgical treatment of cervical trauma.

  11. Task-dependent modulation of primary afferent depolarization in cervical spinal cord of monkeys performing an instructed delay task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Perlmutter, Steve I; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2009-07-01

    Task-dependent modulation of primary afferent depolarization (PAD) was studied in the cervical spinal cord of two monkeys performing a wrist flexion and extension task with an instructed delay period. We implanted two nerve cuff electrodes on proximal and distal parts of the superficial radial nerve (SR) and a recording chamber over a hemi-laminectomy in the lower cervical vertebrae. Antidromic volleys (ADVs) in the SR were evoked by intraspinal microstimuli (ISMS, 3-10 Hz, 3-30 microA) applied through a tungsten microelectrode, and the area of each ADV was measured. In total, 434 ADVs were evoked by ISMS in two monkeys, with onset latency consistently shorter in the proximal than distal cuffs. Estimated conduction velocity suggest that most ADVs were caused by action potentials in cutaneous fibers originating from low-threshold tactile receptors. Modulation of the size of ADVs as a function of the task was examined in 281 ADVs induced by ISMS applied at 78 different intraspinal sites. The ADVs were significantly facilitated during active movement in both flexion and extension (Pmodulation of PAD. This facilitation started 400-900 ms before the onset of EMG activity. Such pre-EMG modulation is hard to explain by movement-induced reafference and probably is associated with descending motor commands.

  12. Tourette's syndrome with cervical disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Wong, Mun-Ching; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Lin, Kuang-Lin

    2007-03-01

    Tourette's syndrome is manifested in a broad spectrum of motor, vocal, and behavioral disturbances. Movement disorders, such as tics, may contribute to the development of cervical myelopathy owing to the effects of involuntary movements on the neck. However, the association of cervical myelopathy with motor tics of the head and neck is rare. We report here a case of a violent, repetitive neck extension due to Tourette's syndrome that developed cervical myelopathy caused by cervical disc herniation.

  13. Course prognosis of cervical osteochondrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesov V.N.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Today we can state that in spite of a considerable number of cervical osteochondrosis studies, there is a lack of research devoted to analysis of its course. There is no correlation between initial expert evaluations of cervical osteo-chondrosis cases and further course of pathological process. Goal of the research is to develop system of course prognosis of cervical osteochondrosis taking into account environmental infuence, heredity, living conditions, psychological profle of patient’s personality. Materials and methods. Dynamics of degenerative-dystrophic changes progressing of cervical vertebrae in 236 patients was analyzed. Results. Received data demonstrated that probability of stage I changing to stage II, III and IV depended on patients’ sex, age and type of labour activity, frequent supercooling and stress. Probability of fast progression of cervical osteochondrosis (5-year cycle of stage I changing to stage III and IV was to a great extent associated with heredity, urban living, presence of endocrine system diseases, syndrome of nonspecifc dysplasia of connective tissue and low indices of quality of life. Conclusion. Proposed system allows making prognosis of morphologic changes in spinal cord, and is based on radiation methods of verifcation without taking into consideration dynamics of neurological symptomatology.

  14. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  15. Spectral Estimation of NMR Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugler, David G.; Cushley, Robert J.

    2000-08-01

    In this paper, spectral estimation of NMR relaxation is constructed as an extension of Fourier Transform (FT) theory as it is practiced in NMR or MRI, where multidimensional FT theory is used. nD NMR strives to separate overlapping resonances, so the treatment given here deals primarily with monoexponential decay. In the domain of real error, it is shown how optimal estimation based on prior knowledge can be derived. Assuming small Gaussian error, the estimation variance and bias are derived. Minimum bias and minimum variance are shown to be contradictory experimental design objectives. The analytical continuation of spectral estimation is constructed in an optimal manner. An important property of spectral estimation is that it is phase invariant. Hence, hypercomplex data storage is unnecessary. It is shown that, under reasonable assumptions, spectral estimation is unbiased in the context of complex error and its variance is reduced because the modulus of the whole signal is used. Because of phase invariance, the labor of phasing and any error due to imperfect phase can be avoided. A comparison of spectral estimation with nonlinear least squares (NLS) estimation is made analytically and with numerical examples. Compared to conventional sampling for NLS estimation, spectral estimation would typically provide estimation values of comparable precision in one-quarter to one-tenth of the spectrometer time when S/N is high. When S/N is low, the time saved can be used for signal averaging at the sampled points to give better precision. NLS typically provides one estimate at a time, whereas spectral estimation is inherently parallel. The frequency dimensions of conventional nD FT NMR may be denoted D1, D2, etc. As an extension of nD FT NMR, one can view spectral estimation of NMR relaxation as an extension into the zeroth dimension. In nD NMR, the information content of a spectrum can be extracted as a set of n-tuples (ω1, … ωn), corresponding to the peak maxima

  16. Use of Cervical Pessary in the Management of Cervical Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Prevention of spontaneous preterm birth is an important public health priority. Pessary may be a potential therapy in cases of cervical insufficiency, in singleton and multiple gestations. Availability of transvaginal sonography for accurate assessment of cervical length is allowing for the tailoring of therapy to a more specific subset of patients who may benefit from this treatment. Pessary therapy is attractive given the favorable side effect profile, low cost, and ease of placement and removal. Large randomized trials are ongoing to validate initial favorable findings.

  17. Application of head flexion detection for enhancing eye gaze direction classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rahayfeh, Amer; Faezipour, Miad

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on the tracking and detection of the eye gaze and head movement detection as these aspects of technology can be applied as alternative approaches for various interfacing devices. This paper proposes enhancements to the classification of the eye gaze direction. Viola Jones face detector is applied to first declare the region of the eye. Circular Hough Transform is then used to detect the iris location. Support Vector Machine (SVM) is applied to classify the eye gaze direction. Accuracy of the system is enhanced by calculating the flexion angle of the head through the utilization of a microcontroller and flex sensors. In case of rotated face images, the face can be rotated back to zero degrees through the flexion angle calculation. This is while Viola Jones face detector is limited to face images with very little or no rotation angle. Accuracy is initiated by enhancing the effectiveness of the system in the overall procedure of classifying the direction of the eye gaze. Therefore, the head direction is a main determinant in enhancing the control method. Different control signals are enhanced by the eye gaze direction classification and the head direction detection.

  18. Human soleus sarcomere lengths measured using in vivo microendoscopy at two ankle flexion angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuefeng; Delp, Scott L

    2016-12-08

    The forces generated by the soleus muscle play an important role in standing and locomotion. The lengths of the sarcomeres of the soleus affect its force-generating capacity, yet it is unknown how sarcomere lengths in the soleus change as a function of ankle flexion angle. In this study, we used microendoscopy to measure resting sarcomere lengths at 10° plantarflexion and 20° dorsiflexion in 7 healthy individuals. Mean sarcomere lengths at 10° plantarflexion were 2.84±0.09µm (mean±S.E.M.), near the optimal length for sarcomere force generation. Sarcomere lengths were 3.43±0.09µm at 20° dorsiflexion, indicating that they were longer than optimal length when the ankle was in dorsiflexion and the muscle was inactive. Our results indicate a smaller sarcomere length difference between two ankle flexion angles compared to estimates from musculoskeletal models and suggest why these models frequently underestimate the force-generating capacity of the soleus.

  19. Peak triceps surae muscle activity is not specific to knee flexion angles during MVIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Schneiders, Anthony G; García, José A; Sullivan, S John; Simoneau, Guy G

    2011-10-01

    There is limited research on peak activity of the separate triceps surae muscles in select knee flexion (KF) positions during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) used to normalize EMG signals. The aim of this study was to determine how frequent peak activity occurred during an MVIC for soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) in select KF positions, and if these peaks were recorded in similar KF positions. Forty-eight healthy individuals performed unilateral plantar-flexion MVIC in standing with 0°KF and 45°KF, and in sitting with 90°KF. Surface EMG of SOL, GM, and GL were collected and processed in 250 ms epochs to determine peak root-mean-square amplitude. Peak activity was most frequently captured in standing and rarely in sitting, with no position selective to SOL, GM or GL activity. Peak GM and GL activity was more frequent in 0°KF than 45°KF, and more often in similar KF positions than not. Peak SOL activity was just as likely in 45°KF as 0°KF, and more in positions similar to GM, but not GL. The EMG amplitudes were at least 20% greater in positions that captured peak activity over those that did not. The overall findings support performing an MVIC in more than one KF position to normalize triceps surae EMG. It is emphasized that no KF position is selective to SOL, GM, or GL alone.

  20. The role of biceps brachii and brachioradialis for the control of elbow flexion and extension movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Werder, Sylvie Charlotte Frieda Anneliese; Disselhorst-Klug, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    How do synergistic muscles interact, when their contraction aims at stabilizing and fine-tuning a movement, which is induced by the antagonistic muscle? The aim of the study was to analyze the interaction of biceps and brachioradialis during fine-tuning control tasks in comparison to load bearing ones. The surface electromyogram of biceps, brachioradialis and triceps were examined in 15 healthy subjects in dynamic flexion and extension movements with different combinations of contraction levels, joint angles and angular velocities. The measurements were conducted in two configurations, where the torque due to an external load opposes the rotational direction of the elbow flexion (load bearing tasks) or the elbow extension (fine-tuning tasks). Whereas during load bearing control tasks, similar muscular activation of biceps and brachioradialis was observed for all joint angles, angular velocities and external loads, during fine-tuning control tasks a significant difference of the muscular activation of both flexors was observed for 1kg, F(3.639,47.305)=2.864, p=0.037, and 5kg of external load, F(1.570,21.976)=6.834, p=0.008. The results confirm the synergistic muscular activation of both flexors during load bearing tasks, but suggest different control strategies for both flexors when they comprise a fine-tuning control task.

  1. Modulation of motor variability related to experimental muscle pain during elbow-flexion contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mista, Christian A; Christensen, Steffan W; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Experimental muscle pain typically reorganizes the motor control. The pain effects may decrease when the three-dimensional force components are voluntarily adjusted, but it is not known if this could have negative consequences on other structures of the motor system. The present study assessed the effects of acute pain on the force variability during sustained elbow flexion when controlling task-related (one-dimensional) and all (three-dimensional) contraction force components via visual feedback. Experimental muscle pain was induced by bolus injection of hypertonic saline into m. biceps brachii, and isotonic saline was used as control. Twelve subjects performed sustained elbow flexion at different levels of the maximal voluntary contraction (5-30% MVC) before, during, and after the injections. Three-dimensional force components were measured simultaneously with surface electromyography (EMG) from elbow flexors and auxiliary muscles. Results showed that force variability was increased during pain compared to baseline for contractions using one-dimensional feedback (PEMG activity from m. trapezius was increased during contractions using both one-dimensional and three-dimensional feedback (PEMG from m. triceps brachii and m. deltoid was higher for the three-dimensional feedback (P<.05). In conclusion, the three-dimensional feedback reduced the pain-related functional distortion at the cost of a more complex control of synergistic muscles.

  2. Extraction of average neck flexion angle during swallowing in neutral and chin-tuck positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejdić Ervin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common but debated technique in the management of swallowing difficulties is the chin tuck swallow, where the neck is flexed forward prior to swallowing. Natural variations in chin tuck angles across individuals may contribute to the differential effectiveness of the technique. Methodology To facilitate the study of chin tuck angle variations, we present a template tracking algorithm that automatically extracts neck angles from sagittal videos of individuals performing chin tuck swallows. Three yellow markers geometrically arranged on a pair of dark visors were used as tracking cues. Results The algorithm was applied to data collected from 178 healthy participants during neutral and chin tuck position swallows. Our analyses revealed no major influences of body mass index and age on neck flexion angles during swallowing, while gender influenced the average neck angle only during wet swallows in the neutral position. Chin tuck angles seem to be independent of anthropometry and gender in healthy adults, but deserve further study in pathological populations. Conclusion The proposed neck flexion angle extraction algorithm may be useful in future studies where strict participant compliance to swallowing task protocol can be assured.

  3. Rites thérapeutiques : réflexion sur le terrain et les archives

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    Chantal Radimilahy

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Rites thérapeutiques : réflexion sur le terrain et les archives. En comparant la façon dont l’écrit sert à noter et à fixer des pratiques de guérissage, d’une part dans les archives de L. Vig et d’autre part dans les carnets d’un guérisseur malgache contemporain, l’auteur esquisse une réflexion sur la stabilité apparente des formes du langage et des pratiques rituelles dans un contexte social transformé.Therapeutic rituals: consideration on fieldwork and archives. By comparing the way in which writing is used to record and establish traditional healing practices, on the one hand in the archives of L. Vig and on the other, in the notes of a contemporary Madagascan traditional healer, the author outlines her reflections on the apparent stability of language forms and ritual practices in a transformed social context.

  4. flexions sur les fondements éthiques de l'acte clinique

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    Florence Gautier

    Full Text Available Dans le domaine de la prise en charge psychothérapeutique la réflexion éthique est aujourd’hui reléguée à un second plan par le discours de l’efficacité et de l’évaluation. Or cette réflexion reste essentielle même si on peut considérer qu’elle a parfois été réduite à une rhétorique. Partant de la description d’un suivi psychothérapeutique référé à la psychanalyse, les auteurs proposent une démarche de recherche susceptible de mettre en évidence de manière rigoureuse la dimension éthique des actes cliniques. Dans une situation d’inceste la catégorie éthique de l’intime apparaît comme une valeur fondant l’ensemble de l’attitude du clinicien, ce qui interroge la validité d’une approche strictement évaluatrice et qui donc ne prendrait pas en compte cette dimension de l’acte clinique.

  5. Effect of Neck Muscle Strength and Anticipatory Cervical Muscle Activation on the Kinematic Response of the Head to Impulsive Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckner, James T.; Oh, Youkeun K.; Joshi, Monica S.; Richardson, James K.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Greater neck strength and activating the neck muscles to brace for impact are both thought to reduce an athlete's risk of concussion during a collision by attenuating the head's kinematic response after impact. However, the literature reporting the neck's role in controlling postimpact head kinematics is mixed. Furthermore, these relationships have not been examined in the coronal or transverse planes or in pediatric athletes. Hypotheses In each anatomic plane, peak linear velocity (DV) and peak angular velocity (Dv) of the head are inversely related to maximal isometric cervical muscle strength in the opposing direction (H1). Under impulsive loading, DV and Dv will be decreased during anticipatory cervical muscle activation compared with the baseline state (H2). Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods Maximum isometric neck strength was measured in each anatomic plane in 46 male and female contact sport athletes aged 8 to 30 years. A loading apparatus applied impulsive test forces to athletes' heads in flexion, extension, lateral flexion, and axial rotation during baseline and anticipatory cervical muscle activation conditions. Multivariate linear mixed models were used to determine the effects of neck strength and cervical muscle activation on head DV and Dv. Results Greater isometric neck strength and anticipatory activation were independently associated with decreased head DV and Dv after impulsive loading across all planes of motion (all P\\.001). Inverse relationships between neck strength and head DV and Dv presented moderately strong effect sizes (r = 0.417 to r = 0.657), varying by direction of motion and cervical muscle activation. Conclusion In male and female athletes across the age spectrum, greater neck strength and anticipatory cervical muscle activation (“bracing for impact”) can reduce the magnitude of the head's kinematic response. Future studies should determine whether neck strength contributes to the observed sex and

  6. Treatment of cervical dislocation with locked facets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ze-sheng; James J.Yue; WEI Feng; LIU Zhong-jun; CHEN Zhong-qiang; DANG Geng-ting

    2007-01-01

    Background Lower cervical dislocation with locked facets is common in cervical injury. The locked facets include unilateral and bilateral types. Different successful closed reduction rates has been achieved between unilateral and bilateral types by using rapid skull traction, which was commonly used to reduce the cervical dislocation. It is important to investigate a suitable management specific to patients with different types of cervical locked facets.Methods A total of 38 patients with cervical dislocation with locked facet due to cervical injury treated by rapid skull traction and operation from 1988 to 2005 were reviewed. Rapid skull traction was used in all the patients. Successful closed reduction rate was 88.0% in patients with bilateral cervical locked facets and that was 15.4% in those with unilateral cervical locked facets. These data were then statistically compared by Chi-square test. Patients who were reduced successfully underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion at the injured level, and those who failed in closed reduction received posterior open reduction and fixation.Results In this series, there was statistically significant difference (P<0.05) in the rate of successful closed skull traction reduction between unilateral and bilateral locked facets dislocation. Unilateral cervical locked facets dislocation was not easily reduced by skull traction which was suitable for reduction of bilateral cervical locked facets dislocation. However,unilateral cervical locked facets dislocation can be reduced by posterior open reduction.Conclusions Unilateral cervical locked facets dislocation should be treated immediately with posterior open reduction and instrumentation. Bilateral cervical locked facets dislocation can be reduced by rapid skull traction firstly and anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion later.

  7. Effects of neck flexion on contingent negative variation and anticipatory postural control during arm movement while standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Tomita, Hidehito; Maeda, Kaoru; Kunita, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the effects of neck flexion on contingent negative variation (CNV) and anticipatory postural control using an arm flexion task in standing. CNV was adopted to evaluate the state of activation of brain areas related to anticipatory postural control. Subjects were required to flex the arms in response to a sound stimulus preceded by a warning sound stimulus. Two different intervals (2.0 and 3.5s) between these two stimuli were used in neck position in quiet standing (neck resting) and neck position at 80% angle of maximal neck flexion. The mean amplitude of CNV 100-ms before the response stimulus, recorded from a Cz electrode, was calculated. Onset timing of activation of the postural muscles (lumbar paraspinal, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius) with respect to the anterior deltoid was analyzed. Reaction time at the anterior deltoid was significantly shorter in the 2.0s period than in the 3.5s period, and in the neck flexion than in the neck resting in both periods. In the 2.0s, but not in the 3.5s period, neck flexion resulted in an increased CNV amplitude and an increased duration of preceding activation of the postural muscles, and the correlation between these increases was significant.

  8. Effects of neck flexion on discriminative and cognitive processing in anticipatory postural control during bilateral arm movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Yaguchi, Chie; Kunita, Kenji; Mammadova, Aida

    2012-06-19

    We investigated the effect of neck flexion on discriminative and cognitive processing in postural control during bilateral arm movement while standing, using event-related potential (ERP) and electromyogram. Fourteen healthy subjects flexed their arms to the target stimuli with a 20% probability in neck resting and flexion positions. Amplitude and latency of N2 and P3, anterior deltoid (AD) reaction time, onset time of postural muscles with respect to AD activation, and peak amplitude and latency of all muscles were measured. With neck flexion, N2 and P3 amplitudes increased, N2 and P3 latencies and AD reaction time shortened, and onset times of all postural muscles became earlier. No significant differences in peak amplitude and latency of each muscle were found between neck positions. Significant positive correlations were found in changes with neck flexion between P3 latency and AD reaction time, and between N2 latency and onset time of erector spinae. These suggest that with neck flexion, attention allocation to discriminative and cognitive processing increased, and the processing speed increased with shortening of reaction time in focal muscles. In addition, the onset time of postural muscles became earlier without changing the activation pattern, which was associated with the hastened discriminative processing.

  9. Analysis for Sit-to-Stand Performance According to the Angle of Knee Flexion in Individuals with Hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Young; Lee, Hae Yong

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] Sit-to-stand (STS) is one of the important functional tasks people perform throughout the day. This study investigated whether varying angles of knee flexion affect STS patterns in individuals with hemiparesis by using a foot plantar pressure measurement system. [Methods] Fifteen stroke patients with hemiparesis participated for this study. They performed sit-to-stand with three angles of knee flexion (70°, 90°, and 110°). We measured the trajectory of the center of pressure, peak plantar pressure, and symmetry index using a Mat-scan system (Tekscan, South Boston, MA, USA). [Results] As a result, we found that there were significant differences among the three angle conditions (trajectory of center of pressure, peak plantar pressure on the affected side, and symmetry index). However, there was no significant difference in peak pressure according to the knee flexion on the unaffected side. [Conclusion] In the current study, we found that stroke patients with hemiparesis had a compensated STS pattern according to knee flexion angles. This indicates that the peak value of plantar pressure increased and that the trajectory of the center of pressure widened as the angle of knee flexion increased. We also suggest that hemiparesis patients should be more concerned about proper knee angle for symmetrical STS pattern.

  10. Effects of knee joint angle on the fascicle behavior of the gastrocnemius muscle during eccentric plantar flexions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakahara, Taku; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Yasuo; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2009-10-01

    The present study aimed to clarify the effects of knee joint angle on the behavior of the medial gastrocnemius muscle (MG) fascicles during eccentric plantar flexions. Eight male subjects performed maximal eccentric plantar flexions at two knee positions [fully extended (K0) and 90 degrees flexed (K90)]. The eccentric actions were preceded by static plantar flexion at a 30 degrees plantar flexed position and then the ankle joint was forcibly dorsiflexed to 15 degrees of dorsiflexion with an isokinetic dynamometer at 30 degrees /s and 150 degrees /s. Tendon force was calculated by dividing the plantar flexion torque by the estimated moment arm of the Achilles tendon. The MG fascicle length was determined with ultrasonography. The tendon forces during eccentric plantar flexions were influenced by the knee joint angle, but not by the angular velocity. The MG fascicle lengths were elongated as the ankle was dorsiflexed in K0, but in K90 they were almost constant despite the identical range of ankle joint motion. These results suggested that MG fascicle behavior during eccentric actions was markedly affected by the knee joint angle. The difference in the fascicle behavior between K0 and K90 could be attributed to the non-linear force-length relations and/or to the slackness of tendinous tissues.

  11. Déficit bilateral nos movimentos de flexão e extensão de perna e flexão do cotovelo Déficit bilateral en los movimientos de flexion y extension de la pierna y flexion del codo Bilateral deficit in leg flexion and extension and elbow flexion movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianne Pereira Giesbrecht Chaves

    2004-12-01

    áxima (CM en la flexión y extensión de pierna e flexión del de codo aisladamente y entre la suma de esos dos resultados con aquel desarrollado simultaneamente por las dos piernas y los dos brazos, respectivamente. Sometemos a 60 indivíduos al ejercicio de flexión y extensión de pierna y a flexión de codo a un test de 1RM. Los resultados para los movimientos de flexión y extensión de pierna y flexión de codo izquierdos y derechos en la CM fueron de 31,6 (± 7,9, 32,0 (± 8,0, 20,2 (± 9,2, 20,2 (± 9,8, 29,3 (± 13,9 e 29,8 (± 14,1 kg respectivamente, y se mostraron similares (p > 0,05 y fuertemente asociados (r = 0,96, 0,96 e 0,98. Comparando la suma de los valores unilaterales con los de ejecución bilateral, la CM presentó una diferencia significativa para los movimientos de extensión de pierna (p = 0,04 y flexión de codo (p = 0,03, el mismo no fué observado en el movimiento de flexión de pierna (p = 0,75. Este resultado puede ser explicado por el menor incremento de carga - dos kilos y medio en este último movimiento en relación a los dos movimientos anteriores - cinco kilos. A pesar de la mayoría de los sujetos sean diestros, no hubo diferencias unilaterales en la CM a pesar de no todos estar entrenados. La suma de los resultados unilaterales fué mayor en 9,8% y 4,0% para los movimientos de extensión de la pierna y flexión del codo, respectivamente, de aquel obtenido bilateralmente, mostrando, probablemente una limitación central en la coordenación motora de un movimiento complejo hecho en máxima velocidad y con carga elevada. Por otro lado, en el movimiento de flexión de pierna, la suma de los resultados unilaterales fué inferior a la bilateral (-0,6%, presentando un posible aprendizage del movimiento y adaptación al entrenamiento con pesos a partir de las doce semanas.Endurance exercises (EE may be performed unilaterally and bilaterally. The objective was to compare the maximum load (ML in leg flexion and extension and elbow flexion alone

  12. Pediatric cervical spine fracture caused by an adult 3-point seatbelt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Robert Jay; Badawy, Mohamed K

    2008-02-01

    The development and use of seatbelts has saved numerous lives and prevented serious injuries in the setting of automobile crashes. However, restraints designed for adults are not necessarily effective in preventing injury to small children and may actually be harmful. Here, we present a case of upper cervical spine fracture in a 5-year-old female patient caused by neck flexion over an inappropriately applied adult 3-point seatbelt during a motor vehicle collision. The American Academy of Pediatrics currently advises against the use of vehicle safety belts until the shoulder belt can be positioned across the chest with the lap belt snug across the thighs. As clinicians who care for children, it is imperative that we continue to educate parents about proper use of age-appropriate child safety restraints.

  13. Course of atlanto-axial involvement and disc narrowing of the cervical spine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Carvalho, A.; Graudal, H.

    1981-07-01

    In 188 patients with rheumatoid arthritis 585 radiological examinations of the cervical spine were performed. Subluxation of C1-2 was found more often than expected; it was often the only radiological change in that segment, and its degree was not related to the duration of the disease. Lateral radiographs taken in full flexion were important for the diagnosis. Age over 40 years at the onset of RA, increased ESR at least on one occasion and seropositivity were related to more severe degrees of involvement. The presence of subcutaneous nodules, high titres of the Rose-Waaler reaction and the presence of antinuclear antibodies had no definite relation to the degree of involvement.

  14. The design of a cervical vertebra titanium plate-interbody fusion cage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the biomechanical feature of a newly designed cervical vertebra internal fixation device and its clinical applications Methods: Some functional spinal units were fixed respectively with titanium plate, fusion cage and new device designed by ourselves, then a controlled biomechanical study including flexion, extension, torsion and lateral bending was performed and the results were analyzed. Results: As to the mechanical performance, fusion cage showed poor performance in extension test and so did the titanium plate in the distortion test. However, the new device showed good performance in every test. Conclusion: Both simple titanium plate fixation and simple fusion cage fixation have biomechanical defaults, but they are complementary. The titanium plate-interbody fusion cage avoids the defaults and has specific advantages.

  15. Cervical spine in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Amy Hoi-Ying; Clark, Bruce Eric; David, David John; Anderson, Peter John

    2012-05-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a congenital syndrome with characteristic craniofacial malformations, which are well described in the literature. However, the presence of cervical spine dysmorphology in this syndrome has been minimally described. This study reviews cervical spine radiographs of 40 patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. In this sample, 7 of 40 patients displayed cervical spine anomalies, with 3 of these patients displaying multiple cervical spine anomalies. The patterns of spinal anomalies were variable, suggesting that the underlying genetic mutation has variable expressivity in cervical spine development as it does elsewhere in the craniofacial skeleton.

  16. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  17. Result of the arc of movement of lower cervical spine after seven years of arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Claudio de Velleca e Lima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the mobility of the lower cervical spine after seven years of total cervical disc replacement at two levels. METHOD: This clinical study was designed randomly and prospectively at the spine surgery center at the Hospital Nossa Senhora das Graças, in Canoas, RS-Brazil and at the Hospital Don João Becker, in Gravataí, RS-Brazil. Seventeen patients were included in the study that was designed to compare the data obtained from annual and sequential manner until the end of seven years. A comparison was made with the prior range of motion (ROM of each patient. All patients were diagnosed with not tractable symptomatic cervical degenerative disc disease with two adjacent levels between C-3 and C-7. RESULTS: A total of patients underwent TDR in two levels and at the end of seven years, only one patient was lost to follow-up. The pre and postoperative ROM was the same in the first three years however after the fourth year there was a gradual decline with a loss of 12% of preoperative ROM in flexion, 21% in extension and 23% in the right and left lateral bending at the end of seven years. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical outcome of this study is evidence level IV in evaluating the ROM for Moby-C(r for TDR in two adjacent levels at the lower cervical spine. These results show that the ROM is maintained during the first three years, gradually declining after that.

  18. EFFECT OF THE CERVICAL ENDURANCE TRAINING PROGRAMME IN MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

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    Pranjal Gogoi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical neck pain commonly arises insidiously and is generally multifactorial in origin. Regardless of the primary source of pain, the prognosis for individual experiencing chronic neck pain is poor. Exercise interventions are important for effective management of patients with neck pain.the objective of the study is to compare the efficacy of cervical endurance training programme with cervical isometric exercise in alleviating symptoms of mechanical neck pain. Methods: 40 subjects were assessed and identified with Mechanical Neck Pain and recruited for the study and were randomly divided into two groups. In one group endurance training for cervical muscles and in another group resisted isometric had been given for 3 weeks. The post treatment scores regarding endurance, pain intensity, disability, Range of motion and muscle power were compared with the pre treatment scores. Results: Paired‘t’ test was done to compare the pretreatment scores with the post treatment scores .Unpaired ‘t’ test was done to compare the post treatment scores of both the groups. The pain intensity, disability were found to be significantly decreased in experimental group than the control group (p<0.001. While the endurance was found to be significantly increased in experimental group than the control group (p < 0.001. The muscle power was found to be slightly increased in the control group than the experimental group .The post treatment cervical range of motion does not have significant difference in between the groups (Flexion- p=0.35 and Extension-p=0.40. Conclusion: This study showed that the progressive endurance exercise is beneficial in alleviating mechanical neck pain and should be incorporated along with the conventional physiotherapy treatment for mechanical neck pain.

  19. Estudo experimental da influência da altura do enxerto ósseo intersomático na estabilidade da fixação monossegmentar anterior da coluna cervical Experimental study of the impact of intersomatic bone graft height on the stability of anterior monosegmental fixation of the cervical spine

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    Jorge Alfredo Léo

    2008-06-01

    of stability achieved and the fixation of the vertebral segment. Group I: removal of the intervertebral disc and placement of intersomatic graft. Group II: removal of the intervertebral disc, placement of the intersomatic graft, and anterior fixation with plate. Group III: removal of the intervertebral disc, bilateral section of posterior ligaments and joint capsules, placement of intersomatic graft, and anterior fixation with plate. Each experimental group was divided into two subgroups, according to the height of the bone graft used (3.0 mm or 6.0 mm. Vertebral segments were submitted to mechanical assays of flexion, lateral flexion, and torsion in a universal assay machine. The parameters analyzed were maximum strength (N and the time (Nm to produce a predetermined deflection. RESULTS: Considering all experimental groups, the authors did not observe a statistical difference among the maximum strength (N and time (Nm between the different heights (3.0 mm and 6.0 mm of the intersomatic bone graft. CONCLUSIONS: Immediate mechanical stability of anterior monosegmental cervical arthrodesis was not impacted by the intersomatic graft height in the flexion, lateral flexion, and torsion assays.

  20. Relaxation of liquid bridge after droplets coalescence

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    Jiangen Zheng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the relaxation of liquid bridge after the coalescence of two sessile droplets resting on an organic glass substrate both experimentally and theoretically. The liquid bridge is found to relax to its equilibrium shape via two distinct approaches: damped oscillation relaxation and underdamped relaxation. When the viscosity is low, damped oscillation shows up, in this approach, the liquid bridge undergoes a damped oscillation process until it reaches its stable shape. However, if the viscous effects become significant, underdamped relaxation occurs. In this case, the liquid bridge relaxes to its equilibrium state in a non-periodic decay mode. In depth analysis indicates that the damping rate and oscillation period of damped oscillation are related to an inertial-capillary time scale τc. These experimental results are also testified by our numerical simulations with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  1. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI -dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We , are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We , the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI -dependent.

  2. Double Balloon Cervical Ripening Catheter for Control of Massive Hemorrhage in a Cervical Ectopic Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Nabila; Reilly, James; Moretti, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cervical pregnancy can be complicated by perfuse vaginal bleeding. Mechanical compression directed at tamponing the cervical vessels can control hemostasis. There are several types of balloon catheters that have been described for cervical compression. However use of a double balloon catheter is a novel approach for cervical tamponade, as one balloon is positioned below the external cervical os and the second balloon is situated above in the internal cervical os. This compresses the cervix from internal os to external os between the two balloons, forming a “cervical sandwich.” We describe this method of cervical tamponade using a silicone double balloon cervical ripening catheter that rapidly controlled hemorrhage in a patient that failed conservative management with methotrexate. PMID:28261511

  3. Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Yan, Deng-lu; Zhang, Zai-Heng

    2008-12-01

    Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of 2002 to June of 2005, 126 consecutive patients with contained cervical disc herniations have presented at the authors' clinic and treated by PCN. The patients' gender distribution for PCN was 65 male, 61 female. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 66 years (mean 51.9 +/- 10.2 years). The levels of involvement were 21 cases at C3-4, 30 cases at C4-5, 40 cases at C5-6, and 35 cases at C6-7. The clinical outcomes, pain reduction and the segment stability were all recorded during this study. A clinical outcome was quantified by the Macnab standard and using VAS. The angular displacement (AD) > or =11 degrees or horizontal displacement (HD) > or =3 mm was considered to be radiographically unstable. In the results of this study, puncture of the needle into the disc space was accurately performed under X-ray guidance in all cases. There was one case where the Perc-D Spine Wand had broken in the disc space during the procedure. The partial Perc-D Spine Wand, which had broken in the disc space could not be removed by the percutaneous cervical discectomy and thus remained there. There were no recurrent cases or complications in our series. Macnab standard results were excellent in 62 cases, good in 41 cases and fair in 23 cases. The rate of excellent and good was 83.73%. The VAS scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement in PCN at the 2-week, 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up visits when compared to preoperational values (P PCN procedure. There was no significant difference in stability either preoperatively or

  4. Dynamic' MR imaging of the cervical cord in patients with cervical spondylosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament; Significance of dynamic cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Tetsuo; Itoh, Takayuki; Takahashi, Akira (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Yanagi, Tsutomu; Yamamura, Akiko

    1992-01-01

    This investigation was designed to assess the influence of dynamic cord compression on severity and course of myelopathy. Sixty-seven patients consisted of 54 cases of cervical spondylosis and 13 cases of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. These patients underwent 'dynamic' MRI imaging of the cervical spine. MR images in the sagittal view were obtained in three different neck positions: flexion, neutral, and extension. MR imaging was performed with a 0.15 T resistive unit. For technical reasons, the body coil was used. The pulse sequence was 500/30 (Tr msec/echo time msec) for T1 images. The spinal cord compression was accelerated in 32 cases when extended, in 2 cases when flexsed, and in 4 cases when both extended and flexed. In 21 cases, we compared myelograms with MR images in the same neck position. Findings of myelograms well corresponded with those of MR images on 83 percent of intervertebral levels. The patients with dynamic cord compression were proved to have severer long tract signs, and their disability was regressive or progressive case by case for an average of 21-month follow-up. The 'dynamic' MR imaging can provide dynamic nature of spinal cord compression, and prognostic clues. (author).

  5. Utilizing RELAX NG Schemas in XML Editors

    OpenAIRE

    Schmied, Martin

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the possibilities of utilizing RELAX NG schemata in the process of editing XML documents. The ultimate goal of this thesis is to prototype a system supporting user while editing XML document with bound RELAX NG schema inside the Eclipse IDE. Such a system comprises two major components -- an integration of RELAX NG validator and an autocompletion engine. Design of the autocompletion engine represents the main contribution of this thesis, because similar systems are almost...

  6. Temperature relaxation in dense plasma mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We present a model to calculate temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasma mixtures. The electron-ion relaxation rates are calculated using an average-atom model and the ion-ion relaxation rates by the Landau-Spitzer approach. This method allows the study of the temperature relaxation in many-temperature electron-ion and ion-ion systems such as those encountered in inertial confinement fusion simulations. It is of interest for general nonequilibrium thermodynamics dealing with energy flows between various systems and should find broad use in present high energy density experiments.

  7. Baryogenesis via Elementary Goldstone Higgs Relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Gertov, Helene; Pearce, Lauren; Yang, Louis

    2016-01-01

    We extend the relaxation mechanism to the Elementary Goldstone Higgs frame- work. Besides studying the allowed parameter space of the theory we add the minimal ingredients needed for the framework to be phenomenologically viable. The very nature of the extended Higgs sector allows to consider very flat scalar potential directions along which the relaxation mechanism can be implemented. This fact translates into wider regions of applicability of the relaxation mechanism when compared to the Standard Model Higgs case. Our results show that, if the electroweak scale is not fundamental but radiatively generated, it is possible to generate the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry via the relaxation mechanism.

  8. Relaxation and Visualization Strategies for Story Telling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯灵林

    2012-01-01

    The importance of training students to tell or retell story is self - evident for mastering English language. The following activity introduces relaxation and visualization strategies for story telling.

  9. Dielectric relaxation studies in polyvinyl butyral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehendru, P. C.; Kumar, Naresh; Arora, V. P.; Gupta, N. P.

    1982-10-01

    Dielectric measurements have been made in thick films (˜100 μm) of polyvinyl butyral (PVB) having degree of polymerization n=1600, in the frequency range 100 Hz-100 KHz and temperature range 300-373 K. The results indicated that PVB was in the amorphous phase and observed dielectric dispersion has been assigned as the β-relaxation process. The β relaxation is of Debye type with symmetrical distribution of relaxation times. The dielectric relaxation strength Δɛ and the distribution parameters β¯ increase with temperature. The results can be qualitatively explained by assuming the hindered rotation of the side groups involving hydroxyl/acetate groups.

  10. Effect of a suspension seat support chair on the trunk flexion angle and gluteal pressure during computer work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] We assessed the effects of a suspension seat support chair on the trunk flexion angle and gluteal pressure during computer work. [Subjects] Ten males were recruited. [Methods] The suspension seat support was developed to prevent abnormal gluteal pressure and a slumped sitting posture during computer work. The gluteal pressure was measured with a TekScan system and the trunk flexion angle was measured with a video camera, to compare the differences between a general chair and the suspension seat support. [Results] The gluteal peak pressures were decreased significantly in the suspension seat support versus the general chair. The trunk flexion angle was also decreased significantly in the suspension seat support compared with the general chair. [Conclusions] This study suggests that the suspension seat support chair contributes to preventing abnormal gluteal pressure and a slumped sitting posture.

  11. HAVE RECENT CHANGES TO THE RUGBY UNION LAWS OF SCRUMMAGE REDUCED SERIOUS CERVICAL SPINE INJURIES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence F. McLoughlin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available All areas of play in rugby union are acknowledged to be potentially dangerous but it is in the scrum where the most frequent and serious spinal injuries occur (McIntosh & McCrory, 2005. This letter addresses the questions: what is it about the scrum which accounts for the alleged increased frequency of scrummage associated spinal cord injury (particular in the cervical region and what has the Rugby Football Union [RFU] done to minimise the chance of cervical cord damage by changes to the Laws? Scrums are used to restart play after infringement of Law 20.1. The team which is successful in winning the ball from the scrum can provide quality possession and space to their attacking backs (IRB, 2005.The three front row players are especially vulnerable to serious cervical spine injury. The majority of neck injuries are caused by heads not being properly aligned when opposing front row players make initial contact as the scrum is being formed. If the scrum collapses then excessive forward flexion/rotation of the cervical spine can occur and by wheeling the scrum this can result in increased abnormal lateral flexion/rotation. Added to these possible abnormal increases in directional movement of the cervical spine is the force generated at engagement. It has been calculated that in the front row a static weight of up to 1600kg is placed on each player's neck. Fracture dislocation (usually between C4/C6 of the spine can be the resulting injury which if the cord is involved can cause tetra paresis.In response to this evidence the IRB amended the law of scrummage which was put into effect 2007 in the hope of reducing the incidence of serious cervical spine injury. This is summarised as a 4 step Law of engagement which is: "crouch, touch, pause, engage". The distance between the front rows must now be less than arms length before making contact. Prior to the introduction of this Law with the stipulated distance apart before engagement, the front row

  12. Relaxing Chosen-Ciphertext Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canetti, Ran; Krawczyk, Hugo; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2003-01-01

    Security against adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks (or, CCA security) has been accepted as the standard requirement from encryption schemes that need to withstand active attacks. In particular, it is regarded as the appropriate security notion for encryption schemes used as components within...... general protocols and applications. Indeed, CCA security was shown to suffice in a large variety of contexts. However, CCA security often appears to be somewhat too strong: there exist encryption schemes (some of which come up naturally in practice) that are not CCA secure, but seem sufficiently secure...... “for most practical purposes.” We propose a relaxed variant of CCA security, called Replayable CCA (RCCA) security. RCCA security accepts as secure the non-CCA (yet arguably secure) schemes mentioned above; furthermore, it suffices for most existing applications of CCA security. We provide three...

  13. Larger plantar flexion torque variability implies less stable balance in the young: an association affected by knee position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Emanuele Moraes; Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Kohn, André Fabio

    2013-12-01

    The present study examined the association between plantar flexion torque variability during isolated isometric contractions and during quiet bipedal standing. For plantar flexion torque measurements in quiet stance (QS), subjects stood still over a force plate. The mean plantar flexion torque level exerted by each subject in QS (divided by 2 to give the torque due to a single leg) served as the target torque level for right leg force-matching tasks in extended knee (KE) and flexed knee (KF) conditions. Muscle activation levels (EMG amplitudes) of the triceps surae and mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation of plantar flexion torque were computed from signals acquired during periods with and without visual feedback. No significant correlations were found between EMG amplitudes and torque variability, regardless of the condition and muscle being analyzed. A significant correlation was found between torque variability in QS and KE, whereas no significant correlation was found between torque variability in QS and KF, regardless of vision availability. Therefore, torque variability measured in a controlled extended knee plantar flexion contraction is a predictor of torque variability in the anterior-posterior direction when the subjects are in quiet standing. In other words, larger plantar flexion torque variability in KE (but not in KF) implies less stable balance. The mechanisms underlying the findings above are probably associated with the similar proprioceptive feedback from the triceps surae in QS and KE and poorer proprioceptive feedback from the triceps surae in KF due to the slackening of the gastrocnemii. An additional putative mechanism includes the different torque contributions of each component of the triceps surae in the two knee angles. From a clinical and research standpoint, it would be advantageous to be able to estimate changes in balance ability by means of simple measurements of torque variability in a force matching task.

  14. Effect of leg support on muscle cross-correlation of bilateral erector spinae during trunk flexion-extension performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xinhai; Wei, Yugang; Chen, Zhentao; Fan, Lixia; Shi, Weifei; Yang, Shulong

    2014-01-01

    Investigations corresponding to the affected factors of the cross-correlation of pair muscles are limited though muscle activation patterns of bilateral erector spinae (ES) during trunk flexion-extension performance in standing have been utilized as an indicator in the evaluation of low back pain condition. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of leg support on the cross-correlation of bilateral ES, and to test if the average of bilateral ES could weaken this effect. Twenty male university students volunteered for this study. Each performed the trunk flexion-extension in three leg support conditions randomly with the condition of single left leg support, double leg support and single right leg support, respectively. Each condition included three trials of trunk flexion-extension with the cycle of 5s flexion and 5s extension in standing. Surface electromyography from the right ES muscle as well as from the left one was recorded. The cross-correlation both in pair muscle of right-left ES and in pair muscle of right-average of bilateral ES was calculated in the flexion as well as extension period. A one-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used. The results showed that leg support has some effect on cross-correlation of bilateral ES, which causes the absolute value of phase lag to be significantly larger in flexion period. It is suggested that this effect could be weakened by the average of bilateral ES through significantly increasing the cross-correlation coefficient, and decreasing the absolute value of phase lag.

  15. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  16. Treatment protocols for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujkov Tamara

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide and the second cause of cancer death among women. About 95% (90% in developed countries of invasive carcinomas are of sqamous types, and 5% (10% in developed countries are adenocarcinomas. FIGO classification of cervical carcinomas, based on clinical staging and prognostic factor dictate therapeutic procedures and help in designing treatment protocols. Therapeutic modalities Surgical therapy includes conization, radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy and palliative operation urinary diversion and colostomy. Radiotherapy, brachytherapy and teletherapy are most recently combined with chemotherapy as concurrent chemoradiation. Discussion and conclusion No change in therapeutic modalities will ever decrease mortality rate of cervical carcinoma as much as education, prevention and early screening. The 5-year survival for locally advanced disease has not improved during the last 40 years as a result of failure to deliver therapy to the paraaortic region. Paraaortic lymph nodes should be evaluated before therapy planning by different imaging procedures, or more exactly by surgical staging: laparoscopy or laparotomy. Radical operations of cervical carcinoma should be performed by experienced surgeons, educated for this type of operation, with sufficient number of cases.

  17. Cervical stenosis following electrosurgical conization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida Cristina Sampaio Monteiro

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Cervical stenosis is a postoperative complication of procedures for treating preinvasive lesions of the cervix and takes on particular importance due to the clinical repercussions associated with it. Furthermore, it causes limitations in relation to cytological and colposcopic follow-up. The aim here was to assess the incidence of cervical stenosis among a cohort of patients who underwent electrosurgical conization and to identify possible prognostic factors associated with its occurrence. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective study at Gynecology and Obstetrics Department, Instituto Fernandes Figueira, Rio de Janeiro. METHODS:This was an observational study among a cohort of patients who underwent electrosurgical conization of the uterine cervix. The possible predictive variables were analyzed as bivariate means between the groups with and without stenosis. We also calculated the incidence density rate ratio for cervical stenosis in relation to each possible predictive variable and the respective confidence intervals (95%. Levels of 5% were considered significant. RESULTS: 274 patients who underwent electrosurgical conization of the uterine cervix with a minimum follow-up period of six months were included. The crude incidence of cervical stenosis was 7.66% and the incidence density was 3.3/1,000 patients-month. CONCLUSIONS: We did not find associations between the variables for stenosis. However, we observed borderline significance levels relating to hemorrhagic complications before and after the operation (p = 0.089.

  18. Quadriceps and patellar tendon pie-crusting as a treatment for limited flexion in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, J Ross; Sanchez, Hugo B; Wagner, Russell A

    2014-04-01

    The pie-crusting method of ligament and tendon lengthening has been used successfully in various tissues but is not reported in the literature as an option for patellar or quadriceps tendons to address flexion limitation. Our case report discusses a patient with longstanding flexion limitation who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty. The report reviews the literature on intraoperative treatments, which primarily pertains to the condition of patella baja, and demonstrates that the pie-crusting technique should be included as a treatment option for a tight extensor mechanism while having some advantages over tibial tubercle osteotomy or Z-plasty.

  19. 3D motion analysis comparison of left handers’ wrist flexion and cutting accuracy according to scissors type

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to research the difference in wrist flexion and accuracy of left-handers when using regular scissors made for right-handed persons versus scissors made for left-handers. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen left-handers participated in the experiment. There were ten males and eight females subjects. The degree of wrist flexion of 18 left-handers was analyzed when using scissors designed for left-handers and when using scissors designed for right-handers. [Re...

  20. flexion sur l’origine du processus de segmentation du marche du travail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attia Nicole

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available (francuski Ce travail propose une réflexion sur l'origine du processus de segmentation du marché du travail par rapport à l'entreprise. Se situe-t-elle au sein même de l'entreprise ou en amont, c'est à dire entre les entreprises? Cela revient à se demander si on peut avoir une approche microéconomique ou macroéconomique de la segmentation et, à s'interroger sur le rôle réel tenu par les firmes dans le processus. Déterminant pour la théorie, ce rôle est à repenser selon la réponse apportée à notre question.

  1. A restrained-torque-based motion instructor: forearm flexion/extension-driving exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takuya; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Ryota

    2013-01-01

    When learning complicated movements by ourselves, we encounter such problems as a self-rightness. The self-rightness results in a lack of detail and objectivity, and it may cause to miss essences and even twist the essences. Thus, we sometimes fall into the habits of doing inappropriate motions. To solve these problems or to alleviate the problems as could as possible, we have been developed mechanical man-machine human interfaces to support us learning such motions as cultural gestures and sports form. One of the promising interfaces is a wearable exoskeleton mechanical system. As of the first try, we have made a prototype of a 2-link 1-DOF rotational elbow joint interface that is applied for teaching extension-flexion operations with forearms and have found its potential abilities for teaching the initiating and continuing flection motion of the elbow.

  2. Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Mobile Bearing Type Knee Prosthesis under Deep Flexional Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Afzan Mohd Anuar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study is to distinguish between mobile bearing and fixed bearing posterior stabilized knee prostheses in the mechanics performance using the finite element simulation. Quantifying the relative mechanics attributes and survivorship between the mobile bearing and the fixed bearing prosthesis remains in investigation among researchers. In the present study, 3-dimensional computational model of a clinically used mobile bearing PS type knee prosthesis was utilized to develop a finite element and dynamic simulation model. Combination of displacement and force driven knee motion was adapted to simulate a flexion motion from 0° to 135° with neutral, 10°, and 20° internal tibial rotation to represent deep knee bending. Introduction of the secondary moving articulation in the mobile bearing knee prosthesis has been found to maintain relatively low shear stress during deep knee motion with tibial rotation.

  3. Evaluation experimentale et theorique du comportement a la flexion de nouveaux poteaux en materiaux composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metiche, Slimane

    La demande croissante en poteaux pour les differents reseaux d'electricite et de telecommunications a rendu necessaire l'utilisation de materiaux innovants, qui preservent l'environnement. La majorite des poteaux electriques existants au Canada ainsi qu'a travers le monde, sont fabriques a partir de materiaux traditionnels tel que le bois, le beton ou l'acier. Les motivations des industriels et des chercheurs a penser a d'autres solutions sont diverses, citons entre autre: La limitation en longueur des poteaux en bois ainsi que la vulnerabilite des poteaux fabriques en beton ou en acier aux agressions climatiques. Les nouveaux poteaux en materiaux composites se presentent comme de bons candidats a cet effet, cependant; leur comportement structural n'est pas connu et des etudes theoriques et experimentales approfondies sont necessaires avant leur mise en marche a grande echelle. Un programme de recherche intensif comportant plusieurs projets experimentaux, analytiques et numeriques est en cours a l'Universite de Sherbrooke afin d'evaluer le comportement a court et a long termes de ces nouveaux poteaux en Polymeres Renforces de Fibres (PRF). C'est dans ce contexte que s'inscrit la presente these, et notre recherche vise a evaluer le comportement a la flexion de nouveaux poteaux tubulaires coniques fabriques en materiaux composites par enroulement filamentaire et ce, a travers une etude theorique, ainsi qu'a travers une serie d'essais de flexion en "grandeur reelle" afin de comprendre le comportement structural de ces poteaux, d'optimiser la conception et de proposer une procedure de dimensionnement pour les utilisateurs. Les poteaux en Polymeres Renforces de Fibres (PRF) etudies dans cette these sont fabriques avec une resine epoxyde renforcee de fibres de verre type E. Chaque type poteaux est constitue principalement de trois zones ou les proprietes geometriques (epaisseur, diametre) et les proprietes mecaniques sont differentes d'une zone a l'autre. La difference

  4. Severe Bilateral Fixed Flexion Deformity-Simultaneous or Staged Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wu Chean; Kwan, Yu Heng; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of 29 simultaneous (SimBTKA) and 38 staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty (StaBTKA) subjects with severe (≥16°) bilateral fixed flexion deformity (FFD) were retrospectively investigated. SimBTKA patients were significantly younger (63 ± 8 vs 68 ± 7, P > .01). At 2 years, SimBTKA subjects had significantly better residual FFD (2.5° ± 5.1° vs 5.4° ± 6.6°, P = .02) and Knee Society function score (75.7 ± 25.7 vs 69.3 ± 24.1, P = .02). However, Knee Society knee scores, Oxford Knee Scores, and Short Form-36 scores were similar. These suggest no large clinical advantage of SimBTKA over StaBTKA. We feel that severe bilateral FFD is not an absolute indication for SimBTKA.

  5. The effect of image alterations on identification using palmar flexion creases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Tom; Sutton, Raul; Buckley, Kevan

    2013-11-01

    Palmprints are identified using matching of minutia points, which can be time consuming for fingerprint experts and in database searches. This article analyzes the operational characteristics of a palmar flexion crease (PFC) identification software tool, using a dataset of 10 replicates of 100 palms, where the user can label and match palmar line features. Results show that 100 palmprint images modified 10 times each using rotation, translation, and additive noise, mimicking some of the characteristics found in crime scene palmar marks, can be identified with a 99.2% genuine acceptance rate and 0% false acceptance rate when labeled within 3.5 mm of the PFC. Partial palmprint images can also be identified using the same method to filter the dataset prior to traditional matching, while maintaining an effective genuine acceptance rate. The work shows that identification using PFCs can improve palmprint identification through integration with existing systems, and through dedicated palmprint identification applications.

  6. Comparison between {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EMG Mapping for Identifying Dystonic Superficial Muscles in Primary Cervical Dystonia: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Su Jin [Seoul National University School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Young; Sung, Duk Hyun; Park, Kwang Hong; Lee, Ji Young; Cho, Sook Kyung; Yu, Jang; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae [Sungkyunkawn University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    This study was conducted to compare {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and electromyography (EMG) mapping in patients with primary cervical dystonia (PCD) to find dystonic superficial cervical muscles. Ten consecutive patients with PCD (M:F=5:5, age 44{+-}13 years) whose dystonic posture was not relieved with conventional muscle relaxant therapy were included. Target cervical muscles for the comparison between {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EMG mapping were four representative superficial bilateral cervical muscles: splenius capitis muscle, sternocleidomstoid muscle, upper trapeziums muscle, and levitator scapulae muscle. The diagnostic efficacy was compared between {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EMG mapping using physical exam and measurement of rotation angle as the gold standard. Among 80 muscles evaluated, there were 21 (26%) dystonic superficial cervical muscles assessed with physical exam and motion analysis. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for localizing dystonic muscles were 76, 92, and 88% for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, and 95, 66, and 74% for EMG mapping, respectively. The sensitivity of EMG mapping was significantly higher than that of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. In contrast, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is more specific and accurate than EMG mapping for finding superficial dystonic cervical muscles. The high sensitivity of EMG mapping suggests that {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EMG mapping are complementary for finding dystonic superficial cervical muscles.

  7. Treatment of knee flexion contracture in patients with chronic juvenile arthritis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matijević Radmila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Knee flexion contractures are common after-effects of juvenile arthritis. Treatment is usually conservative and may include physical therapy and kinesitherapy. Surgical treatment, particularly of the soft parts, indicated for contractures resistant to conservative treatment, helps to correct the deformity, maintain movements, and relieves pain. Intensive postoperative physiotherapy is of special importance. Case report. A 23-year-old female patient with chronic juvenile arthritis since the age of one was admitted for treatment of flexion con­tractures in both knees, muscle hypotrophy, loss of strength and gait disability. The patient underwent arthroscopic synovectomy. The operation was first performed on the right and after 3 mouths on the left knee. The pre operative range of motion in the rigth knee was 30°-70° and in the left 40°-80°. The patient underwent intensive physical therapy to reduce postoperative swelling of knees and firstly passive and then active kinesitherapy. Nine months after the first surgery and six months after the second, the range of motion in the right knee was 0°-100° and in the left 0°-105°. The strength of tested muscles was increased and gait was improved. Conclusion. Management and rehabilitation of patients with chronic juvenile arthritis include maintenance or improvement in position and function of joints that is achieved with synovectomy. The results depend on combined interdisciplinary rehabilitation, well-experienced staff, and pre- and post-operative physiotherapy as well as kinesitherapy. Arthroscopic synovectomy has many advantages and we believe that it was a better solution than open capsulosynovectomy in this patient with chronic juvenile arthritis of the knee. .

  8. Unilateral static and dynamic hamstrings stretching increases contralateral hip flexion range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouachi, Anis; Padulo, Johnny; Kasmi, Sofien; Othmen, Aymen Ben; Chatra, Moktar; Behm, David G

    2017-01-01

    Static (SS) and dynamic stretching (DS) can lead to subsequent performance impairments or enhancement with the stretched limb. Crossover or non-local muscle fatigue (NLMF) refers to unilateral fatigue-induced impairments in a contralateral or non-exercised muscle. Whereas there are conflicting findings in the NLMF literature, there are few studies examining the effect of an acute bout of SS or DS on contralateral flexibility, torque or power. Fourteen highly trained subjects (means ± standard deviations: 18 ± 2 years; 179·4 ± 4·6 cm; 70·5 ± 6·3 kg; %body fat: 10·7 ± 2·5%) were tested before and following separate sessions of eight repetitions of 30 s of unilateral hip flexion SS or DS. Pre- and postintervention testing at 1 and 10 min included hip flexor range of motion (ROM), isokinetic leg flexion torque and power at 60°.s(-1) and 300°.s(-1) of the stretched and contralateral limbs. The stretched limb had a 6·3% (P = 0·01; ES: 0·91) ROM increase with DS at 10 min. The contralateral non-stretched hip flexors experienced ROM increases with SS of 5·7% (P = 0·02; ES: 0·68) from pretest to 1 min post-test, whereas DS showed 7·1% (P<0·0001; ES: 1·09) and 8·4% (P = 0·005; ES: 0·89) increases, respectively. There were no relative differences in ROM changes between conditions or limbs nor any stretch-induced changes in isokinetic torque or power. In conclusion, unilateral SS and DS augment contralateral limb ROM likely through an increased stretch tolerance.

  9. The flexion synergy, mother of all synergies and father of new models of gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques eDuysens

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a growing interest in the modular organization of leg movements, in particular those related to locomotion. One of the basic modules involves the flexion of the leg during swing and it was shown that this module is already present in neonates (Dominici, et al. 2011. In this paper, we question how these finding build upon the original work by Sherrington, who proposed that the flexor reflex is the basic building block of the flexion during swing phase. Similarly, the relation between the flexor reflex and the withdrawal reflex modules of Schouenborg et al. (1994 will be discussed. It will be argued that there is large overlap between these notions on modules and the older concepts of reflexes. In addition, it will be shown that there is a great flexibility in the expression of some of these modules during gait, thereby allowing for a phase-dependent modulation of the appropriate responses. In particular, the end of the stance phase is a period when the flexor synergy is facilitated. It is proposed that this is linked to the activation of circuitry that is responsible for the generation of locomotor patterns (CPG, central pattern generator. More specifically, it is suggested that the responses in that period relate to the activation of a flexor burst generator. The latter structure forms the core of a new asymmetric model of the CPG. This activation is controlled by afferent input (facilitation by a broad range of afferents, suppression by load afferent input. Meanwhile, many of these physiologic features have found their way in the control of very flexible walking bipedal robots.

  10. Comparison of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements from standing CT and fixed flexion radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Neil A; Frick, Eric; Duryea, Jeffrey; Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Torner, James C; Felson, David T; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-08-09

    The objective of this project was to determine the relationship between medial tibiofemoral joint space width measured on fixed-flexion radiographs and the three-dimensional joint space width distribution on low-dose, standing CT (SCT) imaging. At the 84-month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, 20 participants were recruited. A commercial SCT scanner for the foot and ankle was modified to image knees while standing. Medial tibiofemoral joint space width was assessed on radiographs at fixed locations from 15-30% of compartment width using validated software and on SCT by mapping the distances between three-dimensional subchondral bone surfaces. Individual joint space width values from radiographs were compared with three-dimensional joint space width values from corresponding sagittal plane locations using paired t-tests and correlation coefficients. For the 4 medial-most tibiofemoral locations, radiographic joint space width values exceeded the minimal joint space width on SCT by a mean of 2.0mm and were approximately equal to the 61st percentile value of the joint space width distribution at each respective sagittal-plane location. Correlation coefficients at these locations were 0.91-0.97 and the offsets between joint space width values from radiographs and SCT measurements were consistent. There were greater offsets and variability in the offsets between modalities closer to the tibial spine. Joint space width measurements on fixed-flexion radiographs are highly correlated with three-dimensional joint space width from SCT. In addition to avoiding bony overlap obscuring the joint, a limitation of radiographs, the current study supports a role for SCT in the evaluation of tibiofemoral OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yin

    Full Text Available This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles.The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured.The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002, but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076. The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001, but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16.The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis.

  12. Cervical cancer: screening, diagnosis and staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Manav, Bachar; Tomara, Eirini; Iatrakis, George; Romanidis, Constantinos; Bothou, Anastasia; Galazios, George

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread screening programs, cervical cancer remains the third most common cancer in developing countries. Based on the implementation of cervical screening programs with the referred adoption of improved screening methods in cervical cytology with the knowledge of the important role of the human papilloma virus (HPV) it's incidence is decreased in the developed world. Even if cervical HPV infection is incredibly common, cervical cancer is relatively rare. Depending on the rarity of invasive disease and the improvement of detection of pre-cancerous lesions due to the participation in screening programs, the goal of screening is to detect the cervical lesions early in order to be treated before cancer is developed. In populations with many preventive screening programs, a decrease in cervical cancer mortality of 50-75% is mentioned over the past 50 years. The preventive examination of vagina and cervix smear, Pap test, and the HPV DNA test are remarkable diagnostic tools according to the American Cancer Association guidelines, in the investigation of asymptomatic women and in the follow up of women after the treatment of pre-invasive cervical cancer. The treatment of cervical cancer is based on the FIGO 2009 cervical cancer staging.

  13. Superparamagnetic relaxation of weakly interacting particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Tronc, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    The influence of particle interactions on the superparamagnetic relaxation time has been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy in samples of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) particles with different particle sizes and particle separations. It is found that the relaxation time decreases with decreasing particl...

  14. Postextrasystolic relaxation in the dog heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijer, P.J.P.; Heethaar, R.M.; Herbschleb, J.N.; Zimmerman, A.N.E.; Meijler, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    Left ventricular relaxation was studied in 8 dogs using parameters derived from the left ventricular pressure: the fastest pressure fall and the time constant of pressure decline. Effects of extrasystolic rhythm interventions were examined on the relaxation parameters of the post-relative to the pre

  15. Windowing Waveform Relaxation of Initial Value Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao-lin Jiang

    2006-01-01

    We present a windowing technique of waveform relaxation for dynamic systems. An effective estimation on window length is derived by an iterative error expression provided here. Relaxation processes can be speeded up if one takes the windowing technique in advance. Numerical experiments are given to further illustrate the theoretical analysis.

  16. Superparamagnetic relaxation in alpha-Fe particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Pedersen, Michael Stanley;

    1998-01-01

    The superparamagnetic relaxation time of carbon-supported alpha-Fe particles with an average size of 3.0 Mm has been studied over a large temperature range by the use of Mossbauer spectroscopy combined with AC and DC magnetization measurements. It is found that the relaxation time varies with tem...

  17. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    -label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We, the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from...

  18. Stress and Relaxation in Relation to Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Kumar Sharma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Relaxation plays a significant role in facing stress. The aim of the present study is to see whether personality patterns determine an individual’s ability to relax. As a reaction to stress, coping is the best way to handle stress, which requires rational and conscious thinking. Does this ability to relax anyway facilitate coping reactions? A study was conducted on 100 college students. Results revealed that extraverts relax easily than introverts. In addition, if intelligence level is average or above average, relaxation does play a role in facilitating coping reactions. It suggests that in designing techniques of stress management, the personality and intelligence level must be taken into consideration to make techniques effective.

  19. Vibrational and Rotational Energy Relaxation in Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jakob

    Vibrational and rotational energy relaxation in liquids are studied by means of computer simulations. As a precursor for studying vibrational energy relaxation of a solute molecule subsequent to the formation of a chemical bond, the validity of the classical Bersohn-Zewail model for describing......, the vibrational energy relaxation of I2 subsequent to photodissociation and recombination in CCl4 is studied using classical Molecular Dynamics simulations. The vibrational relaxation times and the time-dependent I-I pair distribution function are compared to new experimental results, and a qualitative agreement...... is found in both cases. Furthermore, the rotational energy relaxation of H2O in liquid water is studied via simulations and a power-and-work analysis. The mechanism of the energy transfer from the rotationally excited H2O molecule to its water neighbors is elucidated, i.e. the energy-accepting degrees...

  20. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Qizhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM is a special degenerative disease because of the intermediate normal level or levels between supra and infraabnormal levels. Some controversy exists over the optimal procedure for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. The study was to evaluate the outcomes of the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF with zero-profile devices for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. Materials and Methods: 17 consecutive patients with two noncontiguous levels of CSM operated between December 2009 and August 2012 were included in the study. There were 12 men and 5 women with a mean age of 60.7 years (range 45-75 years. Involved disc levels were C3/4 and C5/6 in 11 patients and C4/5 and C6/7 in six patients. Preoperative plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT with 3-D reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the cervical spine were taken in all patients. All radiographs were independently evaluated by 2 spine surgeons and 1 radiologist. The outcomes were assessed by the average operative time, blood loss, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA score, improvement rate, neck dysfunction index (NDI, swallowing quality of life (SWAL-QOL score, the cervical lordosis and complications. Results: The mean followup was 48.59 months (range 24-56 months. The average operative time and blood loss was 105.29 min and 136.47 ml, respectively. The preoperative JOA score was 8.35, which significantly increased to 13.7 at the final followup ( P 0.05. Cerebrospinal fluid leak, dysphagia and radiological adjacent segment degeneration occurred in one patient, respectively. Conclusion: The ACDF with zero-profile devices is generally effective and safe in treating two noncontiguous levels of CSM.

  1. Clinical value of kinematic MR imaging in the evaluation of patients with exacerbated pain in cervical spine motion; Stellenwert der kinematischen MRT der Halswirbelsaeule bei bewegungsabhaengigen Radikulopathien im Vergleich zur statischen MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Brossmann, J.; Biederer, J.; Grimm, J.; Mohr, A.; Heller, M. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2001-02-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of kinematic MR imaging in patients with cervical radiculopathy and increasing symptoms after provocative maneuvers at flexion, extension, axial rotation and coupled motion of the cervical spine. Methods: Thirty-five patients with cervical disc herniation or cervical spondylosis in whom symptoms were elicited at flexion, extension, axial rotation and coupled motion were studied inside a positioning device using T{sub 2}-weighted TSE, 2D-FLASH, and reformatted 3D DESS and 3D-FISP sequences. The images were evaluated for the size of disc herniations, the foraminal size and cervical cord displacement at provocative position compared with neutral position (0 ). In addition, the value of kinematic MR images were interpretated with regard to changes in the therapeutic procedure and intraoperative patient positioning. Results: Compared with the neutral position (0 ) a change in disc herniations was not found in any (0%) of the provocative positions. In five patients (14%) cervical cord displacement was noted at axial rotation. The foraminal size varied depending on the provocative position, increasing at flexion and decreasing at extension. Conclusion: Kinematic MR imaging in patients with cervical radiculopathy and increasing symptoms at provocative maneuvers provides no additional information for the therapeutic decision-making process. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Bewertung des klinischen Stellenwertes der kinematischen MRT im Vergleich zur statischen MRT Untersuchung in der Abklaerung von Patienten mit bewegungsabhaengigen, zervikalen Radikulopathien. Methode: 35 Patienten mit bewegungsabhaengigen Zervikobrachialgien wurden innerhalb eines Positionsgestells in der Neutralnullstellung (0 ) sowie in der Schmerzprovokationsstellung unter Verwendung einer sagittalen T{sub 2}-gewichteten TSE Sequenz, einer axialen T{sub 2}-gewichteten 2D-FLASH Sequenz sowie einer schraeg-koronar rekonstruierten 3D-FISP- und 3D-DESS Sequenz bei 1,5 Tesla

  2. An Inquiry into Acupuncture Treatment on Cervical Vertebral Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction: The cervical vertebral diseases are the diseases of cervical osteoarticular and ligament hypertrophy that cause stenosis of vertebral canals and intervertebral foraminae and compression of nerve roots or cervical segments.

  3. Simulated Pain and Cervical Motion in Patients with Chronic Disorders of the Cervical Spine

    OpenAIRE

    Zeevi Dvir; Noga Gal-Eshel; Boaz Shamir; Evgeny Pevzner; Chava Peretz; Nachshon Knoller

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to determine how simulated severe cervical pain affects cervical motion in patients suffering from two distinct chronic cervical disorders: whiplash (n=25) and degenerative changes (n=25). The second objective was to derive an index that would allow the differentiation of maximal from submaximal performances of cervical range of motion. Patients first performed maximal movement of the head (maximal effort) in each of the six primary directions an...

  4. 3D motion analysis comparison of left handers' wrist flexion and cutting accuracy according to scissors type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo-Young; Park, Soohee

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to research the difference in wrist flexion and accuracy of left-handers when using regular scissors made for right-handed persons versus scissors made for left-handers. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen left-handers participated in the experiment. There were ten males and eight females subjects. The degree of wrist flexion of 18 left-handers was analyzed when using scissors designed for left-handers and when using scissors designed for right-handers. [Results] When left-handers used left-handed scissors, they carried out the task while extending the wrist at 4.67±14.60°, but when they used right-handed scissors, they carried out the task while flexing the wrist at 1.19±12.41°. When left-handers used left-handed scissors, the error rate was 1.39±1.29 times on average, but when they used right-handed scissors, the rate was 0.72±0.67 times on average. [Conclusion] When left-hand dominant persons used left-handed scissors rather than right-handed scissors, the degree of wrist flexion decreased, which created more functionality, and the accuracy of the cutting increased. For improved cutting accuracy and wrist stability and to protect the wrist from extensive flexion, it is necessary for left-handers to use scissors that are made for left-handed people.

  5. 3D motion analysis comparison of left handers’ wrist flexion and cutting accuracy according to scissors type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo-Young; Park, Soohee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to research the difference in wrist flexion and accuracy of left-handers when using regular scissors made for right-handed persons versus scissors made for left-handers. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen left-handers participated in the experiment. There were ten males and eight females subjects. The degree of wrist flexion of 18 left-handers was analyzed when using scissors designed for left-handers and when using scissors designed for right-handers. [Results] When left-handers used left-handed scissors, they carried out the task while extending the wrist at 4.67±14.60°, but when they used right-handed scissors, they carried out the task while flexing the wrist at 1.19±12.41°. When left-handers used left-handed scissors, the error rate was 1.39±1.29 times on average, but when they used right-handed scissors, the rate was 0.72±0.67 times on average. [Conclusion] When left-hand dominant persons used left-handed scissors rather than right-handed scissors, the degree of wrist flexion decreased, which created more functionality, and the accuracy of the cutting increased. For improved cutting accuracy and wrist stability and to protect the wrist from extensive flexion, it is necessary for left-handers to use scissors that are made for left-handed people. PMID:25931762

  6. Measurement of angular and linear segmental lumbar spine flexion-extension motion by means of image registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, L; Irwan, R; Oudkerk, M

    2005-01-01

    Background The presently available method of measuring segmental lumbar spine mobility by means of superimposition of lumbar spine radiographs in flexion and extension lacks precision due to differences in the cortical outline of the vertebral bodies in flexed and extended position. The introduction

  7. Obliteration of Intercondylar Notch Mimicking Flexion-Extension Gap Imbalance in a Cruciate Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Resit Gungor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Following total knee arthroplasty (TKA, the most frequent cause of extension deficit and limitation of range of motion in early postoperative period is related to improper tensioning of soft tissues and failure to balance extension and flexion gaps. If a cruciate retaining (CR prosthesis is the planned implant, then attention should be given to balancing the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL, and any factor that alters this balance may also cause deterioration of knee balance in postoperative period. Here, we report on an unusual case referred from another hospital because of continuous pain and restriction of knee motion in early postoperative period following CR-designed TKA that was initially thought to be due to flexion-extension imbalance. However, during the revision procedure, extruded cement to the intercondylar notch was found to be both mechanically blocking terminal extension and limiting flexion by possible mechanism of irritation of the synovial nerve endings around the stretched anterior fibers of PCL during flexion. This case was successfully treated by removal of extruded cement from intercondylar notch to decompress PCL, polyethylene exchange, and secondary patellar resurfacing.

  8. The effect of increasing resistance on trunk muscle activity during extension and flexion exercises on training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Veerle K; Parlevliet, Thierry G; Coorevits, Pascal L; Mahieu, Nele N; Bouche, Katie G; Vanderstraeten, Guy G; Danneels, Lieven A

    2008-06-01

    Although progressive resistance training of trunk muscles on devices is very common, today, the effects of increasing resistance on trunk muscle activity during dynamic extension and flexion movements on training devices have not been reported yet. Thirty healthy subjects participated in maximal isometric and submaximal dynamic (at 30%, 50% and 70% of maximum mean torque (MMT)) extension and flexion exercises on Tergumed lumbar training devices. The normalized (as a percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC)) electromyographic activity of 16 abdominal and back muscles was investigated. The results of the present study indicated that in general, with increasing resistance from 30% MMT to 50% MMT and 70% MMT, the activity of all back muscles during the extension exercises and the activity of all abdominal muscles during the flexion exercises increased significantly. To train strength (>60% of MVIC), low intensities (30% and 50% MMT) appeared sufficient to affect the back muscles, but for the abdominals higher resistance (70% MMT) was required. In contrast to the other back muscles, the lumbar multifidus demonstrated high activity levels during both the extension and the flexion exercises. As the lumbar multifidus is demonstrated to be an important muscle in segmental stabilization of the lumbar spine, this finding may help in understanding the efficacy of rehabilitation programs using specific training devices.

  9. Defining the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis: an evaluation of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schache, Anthony G; Baker, Richard; Lamoreux, Larry W

    2006-08-01

    Minimising measurement variability associated with hip axial rotation and avoiding knee joint angle cross-talk are two fundamental objectives of any method used to define the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis. The aim of this experiment was to compare three different methods of defining this axis: the knee alignment device (KAD) method, a method based on the transepicondylar axis (TEA) and an alternative numerical method (Dynamic). The former two methods are common approaches that have been applied clinically in many quantitative gait analysis laboratories; the latter is an optimisation procedure. A cohort of 20 subjects performed three different functional tasks (normal gait; squat; non-weight bearing knee flexion) on repeated occasions. Three-dimensional hip and knee angles were computed using the three alternative methods of defining the knee joint flexion-extension axis. The repeatability of hip axial rotation measurements during normal gait was found to be significantly better for the Dynamic method (pknee varus-valgus kinematic profile and the degree of knee joint angle cross-talk were smallest for the Dynamic method across all functional tasks. The Dynamic method therefore provided superior results in comparison to the KAD and TEA-based methods and thus represents an attractive solution for orientating the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis.

  10. Cervical spondylosis anatomy: pathophysiology and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedid, Daniel; Benzel, Edward C

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is the most common progressive disorder in the aging cervical spine. It results from the process of degeneration of the intervertebral discs and facet joints of the cervical spine. Biomechanically, the disc and the facets are the connecting structures between the vertebrae for the transmission of external forces. They also facilitate cervical spine mobility. Symptoms related to myelopathy and radiculopathy are caused by the formation of osteophytes, which compromise the diameter of the spinal canal. This compromise may also be partially developmental. The developmental process, together with the degenerative process, may cause mechanical pressure on the spinal cord at one or multiple levels. This pressure may produce direct neurological damage or ischemic changes and, thus, lead to spinal cord disturbances. A thorough understanding of the biomechanics, the pathology, the clinical presentation, the radiological evaluation, as well as the surgical indications of cervical spondylosis, is essential for the management of patients with cervical spondylosis.

  11. Supervised Discrete Hashing With Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Jie; Liu, Tongliang; Sun, Zhenan; Tao, Dacheng; Tan, Tieniu

    2016-12-29

    Data-dependent hashing has recently attracted attention due to being able to support efficient retrieval and storage of high-dimensional data, such as documents, images, and videos. In this paper, we propose a novel learning-based hashing method called ''supervised discrete hashing with relaxation'' (SDHR) based on ''supervised discrete hashing'' (SDH). SDH uses ordinary least squares regression and traditional zero-one matrix encoding of class label information as the regression target (code words), thus fixing the regression target. In SDHR, the regression target is instead optimized. The optimized regression target matrix satisfies a large margin constraint for correct classification of each example. Compared with SDH, which uses the traditional zero-one matrix, SDHR utilizes the learned regression target matrix and, therefore, more accurately measures the classification error of the regression model and is more flexible. As expected, SDHR generally outperforms SDH. Experimental results on two large-scale image data sets (CIFAR-10 and MNIST) and a large-scale and challenging face data set (FRGC) demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of SDHR.

  12. Detecting cervical cancer by quantitative promoter hypermethylation assay on cervical scrapings : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink-Peters, N; Wisman, G.B.A.; Jeronimo, C; Tokumaru, CY; Cohen, Y; Dong, SM; Klip, HG; Buikema, HJ; Suurmeijer, AJH; Hollema, H; Boezen, HM; Sidransky, D; van der Zee, AGJ

    2004-01-01

    Current morphology-based cervical cancer screening is associated with significant false-positive and false-negative results. Tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation is frequently present in cervical cancer. It is unknown whether a cervical scraping reflects the methylation status of the underlying ep

  13. Telomerase activity in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淑珍; 孙建衡; 张伟; 金顺钱; 王洪平; 金玉生; 曲萍; 刘毅; 李茉

    2004-01-01

    Background It was reported that telomerase expression is closely associated with cellular immortality and cancer. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between telomerase expression and the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer, the possible use of telomerase as a marker of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) progression or regression, and the natural history of CIN. Methods Telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay was used to measure telomerase activity in cervical scrapings and biopsy samples obtained from 105 cases affected with various cervical conditions, including chronic cervicitis (n=20), CIN (n=64, 16 cases of CIN Ⅰ , 20 cases of CIN Ⅱ, and 28 cases of CIN Ⅲ ), and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (n =21 ).Results In exfoliated cell samples, telomerase activity was detected in 5 of 20 (25. 0% ) cases of cervicitis, 10 of 16 (62.5%) cases of CIN Ⅰ , 11 of 20 (55.0%) cases of CIN Ⅱ, 23 of 28 (82.1%) cases of CIN Ⅲ, and 13 of 21 (61.9%) cases of carcinoma. In cervical biopsy samples, telomerase activity was detected in 6 of 20 (30. 0%) cases of cervicitis, 8 of 16 (50. 0%) cases of CIN Ⅰ , 9 of 20 (45.0%) cases of (CIN Ⅱ, 27 of 28 (96. 4%) cases of CIN Ⅲ, and 20 of 21 (95. 2%) cases of carcinoma. Telomerase activation was significantly higher in CIN samples than in cervicitis samples. Telomerase activity was detected at similar frequency in samples from cervical scrapings and cervical biopsies.Conclusion These results seem to suggest that telomerase expression may be associated with carcinogenesis of the cervix. TRAP assay of cervical scraping samples could be used to monitor and predict the development of CIN in clinical practice.

  14. Cervical Rib causing Thrombosis of Subclavian Atery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe here an unusual case of thrombosis of left subclavian artery in a patient with cervical rib. The patient presented with features of ischaemia of left upper limb. X-ray chest revealed bilateral cervical ribs, longer on the left side. Color Doppler studies showed echogenic thrombus within the left subclavian artery. Angiography revealed complete occlusion of left subclavian artery. Embolectomy was done. She was planned for excision of rib. KEYWORDS: cervical rib, thrombosis of subclavian artery.

  15. Destructive spondyloarthropathy of the cervical spine in long-term hemodialyzed patients: a five-year clinical radiological prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, A.; Marano, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Cattolica, Rome (Italy); Sundaram, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Cerase, A. [Unit of Neuroradiology, Policlinico ' ' Le Scotte' ' , Siena (Italy); Magnavita, N. [Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Univ. Cattolica, Rome (Italy); Tazza, L. [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Cattolica, Rome (Italy)

    2001-08-01

    To describe the radiographic features and progression of cervical spine destructive spondyloarthropathy (DSA) in hemodialyzed patients, and to evaluate the relationship between this disease and patient characteristics, biochemical values, and hemodialysis duration. Design and patients: Standard radiographs, and lateral flexion and extension views of the cervical spine, were performed annually for 5 years in 31 hemodialyzed patients who were divided into three groups at the commencement of the study: those showing (I) DSA, (II) vertebral rim erosions (VRE) without DSA, and (III) absence of DSA and VRE. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) were performed in seven and two patients respectively. The imaging features were evaluated for the presence and progression of spondyloarthropathy and correlated with clinical and biochemical variables. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance. The duration of hemodialysis appeared to be the main predictive factor (P=0.0003) for DSA, which was found in six patients (19%). DSA was found to correlate with higher levels of beta2-microglobulin (P<0.00001), parathyroid hormone (P<0.05), and alkaline phosphatase (P<0.05). Clinical symptoms were minimal. In two patients, MR imaging revealed changes mimicking spondylodiscitis. In another patient, CT of the craniocervical junction showed bone resorption due to a pseudotumor, and basilar invagination. DSA of the cervical spine is often clinically silent. Pathogenesis of DSA may be multifactorial but its progression is most influenced by the duration of hemodialysis. On MR imaging, DSA may mimic spondylodiscitis. (orig.)

  16. Three-dimensional intervertebral range of motion in the cervical spine: Does the method of calculation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderst, William J; Aucie, Yashar

    2017-03-01

    Intervertebral range of motion (ROM) is commonly calculated using ordered rotations or projection angles. Ordered rotations are sequence-dependent, and projection angles are dependent upon on which orientation vectors are projected. This study assessed the effect of calculation method on intervertebral ROM in the subaxial cervical spine (C3-C7) during in vivo dynamic, three-dimensional, functional movement. Biplane radiographs were collected at 30 images per second while 29 participants performed full ROM flexion/extension, axial rotation and lateral bending movements of their cervical spine. In vivo bone motion was tracked with sub-millimeter accuracy using a validated volumetric model-based tracking technique. Intervertebral rotations were calculated using six Cardan angle sequences and two projection angle combinations. Within-subject comparisons revealed significant differences in intervertebral ROM among calculation methods (all p<0.002). Group mean ROM differences were small, but significantly different among calculation methods (p<0.001). A resampling technique demonstrated that as group size increases, the differences between calculation methods decreases substantially. It is concluded that the method used to calculate intervertebral rotations of the sub-axial cervical spine can significantly affect within-subject and between group comparisons of intervertebral ROM.

  17. Working capacity and cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martikainen, Kirsti K; Luukkaala, Tiina H; Marttila, Reijo J

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this questionnaire study was to assess the effect of cervical dystonia on patients' working capacity. Of the 303 working-aged members of the Finnish Dystonia Association (N = 433) who participated in the study 247 (82%) had cervical dystonia. Their median age was 50 years, the median duration of CD symptoms was 12.3 years. Most (78%) subjects were on botulinum toxin treatment. Ninety-seven (39%) had retired because of CD at a median age of 48 years; 96 (39%) of the subjects were working: 87 full-time and 9 part-time. The remaining participants were on sick leave, unemployed, studying or retired of other reasons. Retirement occurred more than ten years earlier compared with the general Finnish population. All possibilities to help CD patients to continue longer in work should be considered early.

  18. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN CERVICAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路平; 梁秋冬; 魏磊; 郑全庆

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate factors for prognosis of cervical carcinoma. Methods: Expressions of mn23- HI, erbB3 and erbB4 were examined by immunohistochemical staining. The apoptosis was detected in situ by the TdT mediated duip-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) technique. Mitotic cell were counted by HE dyeing. Results: FIGO stage and lymph node metastasis were the most important factors for evaluating prognosis in adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma. AI/MI was positively correlated with 5-year survival of cervical carcinoma. Positive expression of nm23-H1 combed with negative expression of erbB4 [nm23-H1(+)/erbB4(-)] predicted good prognosis for adeno-carcinoma. In multivariable Cox regression analysis, only FIGO stage and AI/MI were into equation. Conclusion: FIGO stage and AI/MI were independent evaluating parameter for adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma.

  19. CRYOTHERAPY IN CERVICAL INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naina Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryotherapy is a time proven ablative method of treating lower grades of cervical dysplasia. It  is done using compressed CO2 or N2O refrigerant with the aim of creating an ice ball with a depth of freeze denoted by a peripheral margin of 4-5 mm of frost. It is performed using a double freeze or single freeze technique. Currently the double freeze technique of cryotherapy is an accepted treatment for mild and focal moderate dysplasia of the uterine cervix. The success of cryotherapy is determined by five factors : patient anatomy, pathology, equipment, technique and physician skill. Here we have a brief review of cryotherapy as an effective modality in treatment of lower grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias.

  20. [Investigation of the compliance of cervical collar therapy in 73 patients with Hirayama disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y; Qin, W; Sun, Q L; Fan, D S

    2016-11-22

    Objective: To summarize the therapeutic approaches of patients with Hirayama disease and investigate the patient's compliance to cervical collar therapy and its influencing factors. Methods: This was a retrospectively study.The clinical data of 73 patients was collected from Peking university 3(rd) hospital between 2010 and 2014. Results: (1)Of the 73 patients, 10 patients received surgery, 36 patients received collar therapy , and 27 patients received other conservative therapy at first visit.(2)The mean collar wearing time was from 0.3 to 36 months (means was 7±11 months). 28 patients (77.8%) wore less than 6 months, only 8 patients (22.2%) wore for more than 1 year. (3)The influencing factors were affecting appearance (33.3%), inconvenience to work (22.2%), surgical treatment performed after the exacerbation of symptoms(14.3%), illness stabilization (9.5%), choosing other conservative therapy (9.5%), personally feeling not seriously (8%) and discomfort while wearing (3.2%). (4)The patients with younger age of onset and treatment were more likely to choose neck care, while patients with older age of onset and treatment tended to choose more conservative treatment(Pcervical collar to minimize neck flexion can prevent progressive muscular weakness in the early stages of the disease. But from our study, the compliance to cervical collar therapy is unsatisfactory.Multiple factors influence the compliance.Education for patients must be enhanced, and other methods to promote the therapeutic compliance should also be developed.