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Sample records for cerrada parte ii

  1. Workshop 96. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part II of the seminar proceedings contains contributions in various areas of science and technology, among them materials science in mechanical engineering, materials science in electrical, chemical and civil engineering, and electronics, measuring and communication engineering. In those areas, 6 contributions have been selected for INIS. (P.A.)

  2. Rockets -- Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    If two rockets are identical except that one engine burns in one-tenth the time of the other (total impulse and initial fuel mass of the two engines being the same), which rocket will rise higher? Why? The answer to this question (part 1 response in v20 n6, p410, Sep 1982) is provided. (Author/JN)

  3. Stiffnites. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Pareschi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The dynamics of a stiffnite are here inferred. A stiffnite is a sheet-shaped, gravity-driven submarine sediment flow, with a fabric made up of marine ooze. To infer stiffnite dynamics, order of magnitude estimations are used. Field deposits and experiments on materials taken from the literature are also used. Stiffnites can be tens or hundreds of kilometers wide, and a few centimeters/ meters thick. They move on the sea slopes over hundreds of kilometers, reaching submarine velocities as high as 100 m/s. Hard grain friction favors grain fragmentation and formation of triboelectrically electrified particles and triboplasma (i.e., ions + electrons. Marine lipids favor isolation of electrical charges. At first, two basic assumptions are introduced, and checked a posteriori: (a in a flowing stiffnite, magnetic dipole moments develop, with the magnetization proportional to the shear rate. I have named those dipoles as Ambigua. (b Ambigua are ‘vertically frozen’ along stiffnite streamlines. From (a and (b, it follows that: (i Ambigua create a magnetic field (at peak, >1 T. (ii Lorentz forces sort stiffnite particles into two superimposed sheets. The lower sheet, L+, has a sandy granulometry and a net positive electrical charge density. The upper sheet, L–, has a silty muddy granulometry and a net negative electrical charge density; the grains of sheet L– become finer upwards. (iii Faraday forces push ferromagnetic grains towards the base of a stiffnite, so that a peak of magnetic susceptibility characterizes a stiffnite deposit. (iv Stiffnites harden considerably during their motion, due to magnetic confinement. Stiffnite deposits and inferred stiffnite characteristics are compatible with a stable flow behavior against bending, pinch, or other macro instabilities. In the present report, a consistent hypothesis about the nature of Ambigua is provided.

  4. Contraste sucesivo negativo consumatorio en un programa de economia cerrada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bentosela

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un experimento donde se estudia el efecto de contraste sucesivo negativo consumatorio (CSNC en un paradigma de economía cerrada. En estos diseños los animales no están privados de alimento, viven en las cajas de condicionamiento o en sus jaulas-vivienda y son expuestos al tratamiento experimental durante días. Un grupo de ratones recibió en sus jaulas vivienda agua azucarada al 32% las 24 horas durante trece días (fase precambio y al 4% dos días (fase post-cambio, G 32-4. El grupo control recibió siempre la solución al 4% (G 4-4. Como variable dependiente se registró el consumo (en mi diario. Para analizar los resultados se usó Análisis de Variancia (dos grupos independientes con medidas repetidas. Los animales del G 32-4 mostraron un descenso en su consumo cuando se devaluó la sustancia a 4% en comparación con un grupo que siempre recibió 4%. Este efecto se expresó a las 4 horas del cambio del reforzador y se mantuvo al menos hasta 6 horas posteriores al cambio. Este resultado indica que el efecto se presenta aún en presencia del agua y la comida, con animales saciados y en sus jaulas vivienda. Apoya el predominio de las asociaciones entre la representación interna del reforzador y el que se presenta y se minimiza el efecto de asociaciones entre el contexto y el reforzador. Por otra parte estos resultados su- gieren la potencia del fenómeno estudiado y aumenta su validez ecológica.

  5. Exploring Water Pollution. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1975-01-01

    This is part two of a three part article related to the science activity of exploring environmental problems. Part one dealt with background information for the classroom teacher. Presented here is a suggested lesson plan on water pollution. Objectives, important concepts and instructional procedures are suggested. (EB)

  6. Fountains of sand part II

    OpenAIRE

    Hubert, Steven Mark

    2012-01-01

    Comprised of five large format oil paintings and one sculpture made of stucco, Fountains of Sand II: Pictures Not As Windows But Display Windows, or Barriers is the latest iteration of my interest in pictorial structures as they relate to subject matter and its relationship to real matter, paint. FoS II not only affects this struggle as one of thinking through the act of doing, but also attempts to manifest this through the continual obfuscation of a paradigmatic framework: the work displays...

  7. Bomb reduction of uranium tetrafluoride. Part II: Influence of the addition elements in the reduction process; Reduccion del tetrafluoruro de uranio en bomba cerrada. Parte II: Influencia de elementos de adicion en la reducion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anca Abati, R.; Lopez Rodriguez, M.

    1962-07-01

    This work shows the influence of uranium oxide and uranyl fluoride in the reduction of uranium with Ca and Mg. These additions are more harmful when using smaller bombs. The uranyl fluoride has influence in the reduction process; the curves yield-concentration shows two regions depending upon the salt concentration. The behaviour of this addition in these regions can be explained following the different decompositions that can take place during the reduction process. (Author) 9 refs.

  8. Disjunctive kriging revisited. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to find distributions other than infinitely divisible distributions which are suitable for disjunctive kriging, infinitesimal generators are used. In addition to distributions developed in Part I, this leads to development of suitable models for the beta (β), hypergeometric, and binomial distributions

  9. Nuclear medicine and thyroid disease - part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part 1 of this article discussed the anatomy, physiology and basic pathology of the thyroid gland. Techniques of thyroid scanning and a few clinical examples are shown part II Copyright (2005) The Australian and New Zealand Society Of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  10. CISG Part II in Nordic Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lookofsky, Joseph

    formation rules in NCA Chapter I – which for nearly 100 years applied by default to all contracts – no longer apply to contracts for the international sale of goods. As regards this latter significant contract category, Chapter I of the NCA has (except for inter-Nordic sales) been pre-empted, i.e. replaced......, by Part II of the 1980 United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG)....

  11. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nishant; Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-07-01

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases have a broad differential diagnosis. A wide variety of pathophysiological processes spanning the spectrum from airway obstruction to lung remodeling can lead to multifocal cyst development in the lung. Although lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis are perhaps more frequently seen in the clinic, disorders such as Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, follicular bronchiolitis, and light-chain deposition disease are increasingly being recognized. Obtaining an accurate diagnosis can be challenging, and management approaches are highly disease dependent. Unique imaging features, genetic tests, serum studies, and clinical features provide invaluable clues that help clinicians distinguish among the various etiologies, but biopsy is often required for definitive diagnosis. In part II of this review, we present an overview of the diffuse cystic lung diseases caused by lymphoproliferative disorders, genetic mutations, or aberrant lung development and provide an approach to aid in their diagnosis and management. PMID:25906201

  12. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  13. Water Pollution: Part I, Municipal Wastewaters; Part II, Industrial Wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, K. E. M.

    This publication is an annotated bibliography of municipal and industrial wastewater literature. This publication consists of two parts plus appendices. Part one is entitled Municipal Wastewaters and includes publications in such areas as health effects of polluted waters, federal policy and legislation, biology and chemistry of polluted water,…

  14. Coal-fired power materials - Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, V.; Purgert, R.; Rawls, P. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2008-09-15

    Part 1 discussed some general consideration in selection of alloys for advanced ultra supercritical (USC) coal-fired power plant boilers. This second part covers results reported by the US project consortium, which has extensively evaluated the steamside oxidation, fireside corrosion, and fabricability of the alloys selected for USC plants. 3 figs.

  15. Hypertension in Women—Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Pemu, Priscilla Igho; Ofili, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    In Part I, we reviewed the pathophysiology of hypertension in women This section focuses on the treatment of hypertension in special circumstances and special populations: pregnancy, preeclampsia, and lactation; hypertension in black women; and hypertension in the elderly.

  16. FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA - PART II

    OpenAIRE

    Pandya, Vaidya Navnitlal B.

    1983-01-01

    In this second part, the diagnostic principles and the principles of treatment are explained in the maintenance of health through a balanced and harmonius function of the TRIDOSAS through an understanding of the factors involved in the function of TRIDOSAS.

  17. Education, Employment and Economic Performance: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankhurst, Kenneth V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Part I (published in Vol. 9 1997 reviewed the weaknesses of public education and training policies and programmes for dealing with problems of the economy and the labour market. This Part discusses some of the findings of research about how workers learn. Learning-by-doing during production links education, employment and production methods and is one source of economic progress. The challenge to education and labour market policies is to harness the ability of human beings to think independently, to recognize and resolve problems, and not to instruct workers in specific ways of doing their jobs.

  18. Searching LEXIS and WESTLAW: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Carl

    1986-01-01

    This second of a three-part series compares search features (i.e., truncation symbols, boolean operators, proximity operators, phrase searching, save searches) of two databases providing legal information. Search tips concerning charges and effective searching and tables listing functions of commands and proximity operators for both databases are…

  19. Moroccan Arabic Intermediate Reader, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alami, Wali A.; Hodge, Carlton T., Ed.

    The first section of this companion volume to "Moroccan Arabic Intermediate Reader, Part I" (AL 002 041) presents the Arabic script version of the pre-drills in Lessons IA-IIB in that volume. The second and major section comprises 20 lessons consisting of pre-drills, texts, notes, and questions. All material in this volume appears in Arabic script…

  20. Shalom Sefarad: Una "erensya" envenenada (Parte II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARINA VARGAS GÓMEZ-URRUTIA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focus the regulation established in the Law 12/2015, June 24 for granting the Spanish nationality to the Sephardic originating from Spain. The second part analyzes the amendments made to the bill during the parliamentary process and critically examines the most important aspects of the final text of the law. En este trabajo se da cuenta de la regulación establecida en la Ley 12/2015, de 24 de junio para la concesión de la nacionalidad española a los sefardíes originarios de España. Esta segunda parte analiza las enmiendas introducidas al Proyecto de Ley durante el proceso parlamentario y examina críticamente los aspectos más relevantes del texto final de la ley.

  1. Treatment of superficial mycoses: review - part II*

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes-Filho, Fred; Quaresma-Santos, Maria Victória Pinto; Amorim, Adriana Gutstein da Fonseca; Schechtman, Regina Casz; Azulay, David Rubem

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections of the hair, skin and nails are a major cause of morbidity in the world. Choosing the right treatment is not always simple because of the possibility of drug interactions and side effects. The first part of the article discusses the main treatments for superficial mycoses - keratophytoses, dermatophytosis, candidiasis, with a practical approach to the most commonly-used topical and systemic drugs , referring also to their dosage and duration of use. Promising new...

  2. ENFOQUE TEÓRICO Y CONCEPTUAL PARA EL ESTUDIO DE LAS URBANIZACIONES CERRADAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Malizia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta un enfoque teórico-conceptual para el estudio de las urbanizaciones cerradas en ciudades intermedias. En América Latina la investigación urbana fue, en primer lugar, investigación sobre la gr ciudad y los fenómenos resultantes del actual proceso de urbanización. Por lo tanto es escasa la información disponible para el estudio de estos emprendimientos en ciudades de menor tamaño. A través de la bibliografía se puede observar que las ur ciones cerradas adquieren una especificidad propia en las ciudades intermedias. ubican en la periferia de las ciudades, cercanas a espacios verdes con buenas condiciones ambientales y paisajísticas. Impulsan el desarrollo y/o mejora de l infraestructura de servicios. Modifican los procesos de segregación social y fragmentación espacial, acorde a los actuales procesos urbanos. Las barreras físicas se convierten en barreras sociales y marcan profundas diferencias entre quienes viven adent y quienes viven afuera. Finalmente, estas urbanizaciones ocupan superficies pe ueñas en comparación con las extensiones ocupadas por los emprendimientos construidos en las grandes ciudades, situación que, a su vez, limita el tamaño de los espacios ofrecidos.

  3. Short history of PACS (Part II: Europe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the concept of picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) was developed in Europe during the latter part of the 1970s, no working system was completed at that time. The first PACS implementations took place in the United States in the early 1980s, e.g. at Pennsylvania University, UCLA, and Kansas City University. Some more or less successful PACS developments also took place in Europe in the 1980s, particularly in the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Scandinavia, and Germany. Most systems could be characterized by their focus on a single department, such as radiology or nuclear medicine. European hospital-wide PACS with high visibility evolved in the early 1990s in London (Hammersmith Hospital) and Vienna (SMZO). These were followed during the latter part of the 1990s by approximately 10-20 PACS installations in each of the major industrialized countries of Europe. Wide-area PACS covering several health care institutions in a region are now in the process of being implemented in a number of European countries. Because of limitations of space some countries, for example, Denmark, Finland, Spain, Greece, as well as Eastern European countries, etc. could not be appropriately represented in this paper.

  4. Biosimilars in Dermatology: Current Situation (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, L; Carretero, G; Daudén, E; Ferrándiz, C; Marrón, S E; Martorell, A; Pérez-Suárez, B; Rodriguez-Cerdeira, C; Ruiz-Villaverde, R; Sánchez-Carazo, J L; Velasco, M

    2015-09-01

    The first biosimilar version of a biologic agent used to treat psoriasis (infliximab) entered the Spanish market on February 16 of this year, and more biosimilars can be expected to follow in the coming months and years. Logically, this new situation will have economic repercussions and alter prescribing patterns among dermatologists. In this second part of the review, we will look at several somewhat contentious issues, such as the extrapolation of indications, interchangeability, and automatic substitution. We will also review the biosimilars with indications for psoriasis currently in the clinical development pipeline and assess their potential to offer comparable efficacy and safety to the reference product while contributing to the sustainability of the public health care system. PMID:26049964

  5. Compressor Part II: Volute Flow Predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tai Lee

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical method that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is used to study an inefficient component of a shipboard air-conditioning HCFC-124 compressor system. This high-loss component of the centrifugal compressor was identified as the volute through a series of measurements given in Part I of the paper. The predictions were made using three grid topologies. The first grid closes the connection between the cutwater and the discharge diffuser. The other two grids connect the cutwater area with the discharge diffuser. Experiments were performed to simulate both the cutwater conditions used in the predictions. Surface pressures along the outer wall and near the inlet of the volute were surveyed for comparisons with the predictions. Good agreements between the predicted results and the measurements validate the calculations. Total pressure distributions and flow stream traces from the prediction results support the loss distribution through the volute. A modified volute configuration is examined numerically for further loss comparison.

  6. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  7. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches: PART II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournoyer, M. E. (Cournoyer, Michael E.); Andrade, R.M. (Rose M.); Taylor, D. J. (David J.); Stimmel, J. J. (Jay J.); Zaelke, R. L. (Robyn L.); Balkey, J. J. (James J.)

    2005-01-01

    As a matter of good business practices, a team of glovebox experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been assembled to proactively investigate processes and procedures that minimize unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures. A major part of this effort involves the review of glovebox glove failures that have occurred at the Plutonium Facility and at the Chemical and Metallurgy Research Facility. Information dating back to 1993 has been compiled from formal records. This data has been combined with information obtained from a baseline inventory of about 9,000 glovebox gloves. The key attributes tracked include those related to location, the glovebox glove, type and location of breaches, the worker, and the consequences resulting from breaches. This glovebox glove failure analysis yielded results in the areas of the ease of collecting this type of data, the causes of most glove failures that have occurred, the effectiveness of current controls, and recommendations to improve hazard control systems. As expected, a significant number of breaches involve high-risk operations such as grinding, hammering, using sharps (especially screwdrivers), and assembling equipment. Surprisingly, tasks such as the movement of equipment and material between gloveboxes and the opening of cans are also major contributions of breaches. Almost half the gloves fail within a year of their install date. The greatest consequence for over 90% of glovebox glove failures is alpha contamination of protective clothing. Personnel self-monitoring at the gloveboxes continues to be the most effective way of detecting glovebox glove failures. Glove failures from these tasks can be reduced through changes in procedures and the design of remote-handling apparatus. The Nuclear Materials Technology Division management uses this information to improve hazard control systems to reduce the number of unplanned breaches in the glovebox further. As a result, excursions of contaminants

  8. Visual Odometry: Part II - Matching, Robustness, and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fraundorfer, Friedrich; Scaramuzza, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Part II of the tutorial has summarized the remaining building blocks of the VO pipeline: specifically, how to detect and match salient and repeatable features across frames and robust estimation in the presence of outliers and bundle adjustment. In addition, error propagation, applications, and links to publicly available code are included. VO is a well understood and established part of robotics. VO has reached a maturity that has allowed us to successfully use it for certain classes of appl...

  9. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... citations affecting Table II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... naphtha Coconut oil, fatty acid Copper salt of long chain alkanoic acids Cottonseed oil, fatty acid... acetate n-Octyl acetate Octyl decyl adipate Oil, edible: Beechnut Castor Cocoa butter Coconut 2 Cod...

  10. The Value of Imaging Part II: Value beyond Image Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Phuong-Anh T; Pastel, David A; Sadigh, Gelareh; Ballard, David; Sullivan, Joseph C; Bresnahan, Brian; Buch, Karen; Duszak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Although image interpretation is an essential part of radiologists' value, there are other ways in which we contribute to patient care. Part II of the value of imaging series reviews current initiatives that demonstrate value beyond the image interpretation. Standardizing processes, reducing the radiation dose of our examinations, clarifying written reports, improving communications with patients and providers, and promoting appropriate imaging through decision support are all ways we can provide safer, more consistent, and higher quality care. As payers and policy makers push to drive value, research that demonstrates the value of these endeavors, or lack thereof, will become increasingly sought after and supported. PMID:26683509

  11. Pharmacokinetic interactions with calcium channel antagonists (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlanz, K D; Myre, S A; Bottorff, M B

    1991-12-01

    Since calcium channel antagonists are a diverse class of drugs frequently administered in combination with other agents, the potential for clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug interactions exists. These interactions occur most frequently via altered hepatic blood flow and impaired hepatic enzyme activity. Part I of the article, which appeared in the previous issue of the Journal, dealt with interactions between calcium antagonists and marker compounds, theophylline, midazolam, lithium, doxorubicin, oral hypoglycaemics and cardiac drugs. Part II examines interactions with cyclosporin, anaesthetics, carbamazepine and cardiovascular agents. PMID:1782739

  12. Viscoelastic response of anisotropic biological membranes. Part II: Constitutive models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubarda Vlado A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Part I of this series [7] we described the structure of the biopolymer interlayers found in the shell of the mollusk Haliotis rufescens (the red abalone. There we described how the layers can be viewed as a viscoelastic composite reinforced by a network of chitin fibrils arranged in an often nearly unidirectional architecture. Mechanical testing documented the response to tensile testing of layers removed via demineralization. Herein in Part II we describe a general viscoelastic constitutive model for such layers that may be both transversely isotropic or orthotropic as would follow from the network of nearly aligned chitin fibrils described by Bezares et al. in Part I [7]. Part III of this series will be concerned with applying the models to more fully describing the response of these types of biological membranes to mechanical loading.

  13. Intelligent location of simultaneously active acoustic emission sources: Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Kosel, T

    2007-01-01

    Part I describes an intelligent acoustic emission locator, while Part II discusses blind source separation, time delay estimation and location of two continuous acoustic emission sources. Acoustic emission (AE) analysis is used for characterization and location of developing defects in materials. AE sources often generate a mixture of various statistically independent signals. A difficult problem of AE analysis is separation and characterization of signal components when the signals from various sources and the mode of mixing are unknown. Recently, blind source separation (BSS) by independent component analysis (ICA) has been used to solve these problems. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of ICA to locate two independent simultaneously active acoustic emission sources on an aluminum band specimen. The method is promising for non-destructive testing of aircraft frame structures by acoustic emission analysis.

  14. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, Deepjyoti [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-13

    Limited placement of real-time monitoring devices in the distribution grid, recent trends notwithstanding, has prevented the easy implementation of demand-response and other smart grid applications. Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the grid from nodal voltage measurements. In this work (Part II), the learning of the operational radial structure is coupled with the problem of estimating nodal consumption statistics and inferring the line parameters in the grid. Based on a Linear-Coupled(LC) approximation of AC power flows equations, polynomial time algorithms are designed to identify the structure and estimate nodal load characteristics and/or line parameters in the grid using the available nodal voltage measurements. Then the structure learning algorithm is extended to cases with missing data, where available observations are limited to a fraction of the grid nodes. The efficacy of the presented algorithms are demonstrated through simulations on several distribution test cases.

  15. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its

  16. 29 CFR Appendix II to Part 1918 - Tables for Selected Miscellaneous Auxiliary Gear (Mandatory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables for Selected Miscellaneous Auxiliary Gear (Mandatory) II Appendix II to Part 1918 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND.... 1918, App. II Appendix II to Part 1918—Tables for Selected Miscellaneous Auxiliary Gear...

  17. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns: Part II: Licensure and Practice Establishment Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of Part II of a two-volume study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry is presented. Part II includes the analysis of the graduates' licensure and practice establishment experiences. (MLW)

  18. Hysterosalpingographic Appearances of Female Genital Tract Tuberculosis: Part II: Uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Ahmadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Female genital tuberculosis remains as a major cause of tubal obstruction leading to infertility, especially in developing countries. The global prevalence of genital tuberculosis has increased during the past two decades due to increasing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Genital tuberculosis (TB is commonly asymptomatic and it is diagnosed during infertility investigations. Despite of recent advances in imaging tools such as computed tomography (CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and ultrasongraphy, hysterosalpingography has been considered as the standard screening test for evaluation of tubal infertility and as a valuable tool for diagnosis of female genital tuberculosis. Tuberculosis gives rise to various appearances on hysterosalpingography (HSG from non-specific changes to specific findings. The present pictorial review illustrates and describes specific and non-specific radiographic features of female genital tuberculosis in two parts. Part I presents specific findings of tuberculosis related to tubes such as "beaded tube", "golf club tube", "pipestem tube", "cobble stone tube" and the "leopard skin tube". Part II will describe adverse effects of tuberculosis on structure of endometrium and radiological specific findings, such as "T-shaped" tuberculosis uterus, "pseudo-unicornuate "uterus, "collar-stud abscess" and "dwarfed" uterus with lymphatic intravasation and occluded tubes which have not been encountered in the majority of non-tuberculosis cases.

  19. Generalized Interference Alignment—Part II: Application to Wireless Secrecy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Liangzhong; Lau, Vincent K. N.; Win, Moe Z.

    2016-05-01

    In contrast to its wired counterpart, wireless communication is highly susceptible to eavesdropping due to the broadcast nature of the wireless propagation medium. Recent works have proposed the use of interference to reduce eavesdropping capabilities in wireless wiretap networks. However, the concurrent effect of interference on both eavesdropping receivers (ERs) and legitimate receivers (LRs) has not been thoroughly investigated, and carefully engineering the network interference is required to harness the full potential of interference for wireless secrecy. This two part paper addresses this issue by proposing a generalized interference alignment (GIA) technique, which jointly designs the transceivers at the legitimate partners to impede the ERs without interfering with LRs. In Part I, we have established a theoretical framework for the GIA technique. In Part II, we will first propose an efficient GIA algorithm that is applicable to large-scale networks and then evaluate the performance of this algorithm in stochastic wireless wiretap network via both analysis and simulation. These results reveal insights into when and how GIA contributes to wireless secrecy.

  20. Transición demográfica en economías cerradas y abiertas: historia de dos regiones

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni L. Violante; Orazio P. Attanasio

    2000-01-01

    (Disponible en idioma inglés únicamente) En este trabajo se elabora un modelo general de equilibrio generacional sobrepuesto para evaluar cuantitativamente la manera en que la transición demográfica (disminución de las tasas de mortalidad y fertilidad) inciden en las variables agregadas (salarios, tasa de interés, producción) y en el bienestar intergeneracional en economías cerradas y abiertas. Realizamos este análisis en dos economías calibradas para asemejarse al Norte (EE. UU. y Europa) y ...

  1. Impedance-Source Networks for Electric Power Conversion Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwakoti, Yam P.; Peng, Fang Zheng; Blaabjerg, Frede;

    2015-01-01

    -source-network-based power converters has been covered in a previous paper and main topologies were discussed from an application point of view. Now Part II provides a comprehensive review of the most popular control and modulation strategies for impedance-source network-based power converters/inverters. These methods are......Impedance-source networks cover the entire spectrum of electric power conversion applications (dc-dc, dc-ac, ac-dc, ac-ac) controlled and modulated by different modulation strategies to generate the desired dc or ac voltage and current at the output. A comprehensive review of various impedance...... topology at a certain power level, switching frequency and demanded dynamic response....

  2. Eventos cardiovasculares en una población cerrada. Seguimiento a 10 años

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro M. Goldstraj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroducciónEn estudios epidemiológicos previos se observó que poblaciones con igual riesgo por suma de factores clásicos poseían una incidencia y tipos de expresión de enfermedades cardiovasculares diferentes.ObjetivoDeterminar la incidencia de MACE, compuesta por infarto agudo de miocardio, angina inestable, accidente cerebrovascular, angioplastia transluminal coronaria, cirugía de revascularización miocárdica o muerte cardiovascular, y su asociación con los factores de riesgo en una población cerrada. Material y métodosEl presente es un estudio de cohorte prospectivo en el que fueron relevados hombres, de profesión policías, durante el año 1997. Luego se ingresaron en la base de datos hospitalaria aquellos que presentaron eventos en los 10 años posteriores. Se empleó la prueba de la t de Student para variables cuantitativas y regresión logística para las cualitativas. ResultadosSe incluyeron 2.379 personas de sexo masculino. La edad promedio fue de 39,5 ± 9,25 años. La prevalencia de factores de riesgo conocidos por las personas fue: HTA 11,1%, dislipidemia 20,3%, diabetes 2,4%, tabaquismo 43,3%. Noventa pacientes presentaron algún tipo de MACE. El odds ratio para diabetes fue 4,54 (IC 95% 2,1-9,81, HTA 2,3 (IC 95% 1,38-3,85, dislipidemia 2,74 (IC 95% 1,77-4,25 y para tabaquismo 1,48 (IC 95% 0,97-2,28. La edad, el LDL, el fibrinógeno y las horas trabajo diarias mostraron asociaciones significativas. El área bajo la curva ROC del puntaje de Framingham fue de 0,72 y para el puntaje europeo fue de 0,71. ConclusiónLos factores de riesgo de enfermedad cardiovascular clásicos tuvieron una importancia similar a los ya comunicados por los estudios epidemiológicos; es importante destacar algunos no clásicos como el fibrinógeno. Los puntajes de riesgo fueron predictores regulares en esta población. Las características especiales de la población analizada permiten la ejecución de programas de prevención acordes.

  3. Bedside ultrasonography-Applications in critical care: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Chacko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Point of care ultrasonography, performed by acute care physicians, has developed into an invaluable bedside tool providing important clinical information with a major impact on patient care. In Part II of this narrative review, we describe ultrasound guided central venous cannulation, which has become standard of care with internal jugular vein cannulation. Besides improving success rates, real-time guidance also significantly reduces the incidence of complications. We also discuss compression ultrasonography - a quick and effective bedside screening tool for deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity. Abdominal ultrasound offers vital clues in the emergency setting; in the unstable trauma victim, a focused examination may provide immediate answers and has largely superseded diagnostic peritoneal lavage in diagnosing intraperitoneal bleed. From estimation of intracranial pressure to transcranial Doppler studies, ultrasound is becoming increasingly relevant to neurocritical care. Ultrasound may also help with airway management in several situations, including percutaneous tracheostomy. Clearly, bedside ultrasonography has become an indispensable part of intensive care practice - in the rapid assessment of critically ill-patients as well as in enhancing the safety of invasive procedures.

  4. Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-04-01

    This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific “philosophy” of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with disparate “visions” tied to competing research programs as well as school-based curricular paradigms. The impasse in the goals of science education and thereto, the contending views of science literacy, were themselves associated with three underlying fundamental aims of education (knowledge-itself; personal development; socialization) which, it was argued, usually undercut the potential of each other. During periods of “crisis-talk” and throughout science educational history these three aims have repeatedly attempted to assert themselves. The inability of science education research to affect long-term change in classrooms was correlated not only to the failure to reach a consensus on the aims (due to competing programs and to the educational ideologies of their social groups), but especially to the failure of developing true educational theories (largely neglected since Hirst). Such theories, especially metatheories, could serve to reinforce science education’s growing sense of academic autonomy and independence from socio-economic demands. In Part II, I offer as a suggestion Egan’s cultural-linguistic theory as a metatheory to help resolve the impasse. I hope to make reformers familiar with his important ideas in general, and more specifically, to show how they can complement HPS rationales and reinforce the work of those researchers who have emphasized the value of narrative in learning science.

  5. IPCC Working Group II: Impacts and Adaptation Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2007-12-01

    The IPCC (as opposed to the UN Framework Convention) defines climate change as" any change in climate over time, whether due to natural variability or as a result of human activity". The IPCC Working Group II (Impacts, Adaptation, Vulnerability) was charged with assessing the scientific, technical, environmental, economic, and social aspects of vulnerability to climate change, and, the negative and positive consequences for ecological systems, socio-economic sectors, and human health. The Working Group II report focused on the following issues for different sectors and regions (e.g. water, agriculture, biodiversity) and communities (coastal, island, etc.): · The role of adaptation in reducing vulnerability and impacts, · Assessment of adaptation capacity, options and constraints, and · Enhancing adaptation practice and operations. This presentation will address the following questions in the context of the results of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report WG II: · What are the barriers, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for impacts assessments? · How are decisions about adaptation being made, and what types of adaptation strategies are being undertaken? · What are good adaptation practices and how are they learned over time? Examples will be drawn from the freshwater resources, small islands and adaptation chapters to which the presenter contributed. Many lessons have been identified but few have been implemented or evaluated over time. Adaptation occurs in the context of multiple stresses. Adaptation will be important in coping with early impacts in the near-term and continue to be important as our climate changes, regardless of how that change is derived. It is important to note that unmitigated climate change could, in the long term, exceed the capacity of different natural, managed and human systems to adapt. The assessment leads to the following conclusions: · Adaptation to climate change is already taking place, but on a limited basis · Adaptation measures

  6. Discovery of Quantum structure and A Theory of Everything Part I and Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meggie

    2012-10-01

    (Part I) During my research I discovered logical errors in the logic of science and in mathematics. These errors caused scientists missed out important information when interpreting data. This led me to revisit the method of science and the existing results and able to find new information, which lead to the discovery of photon's structure. A ``particle collision illumination'' experiment then provided direct evidence supported the structure. Analysis of the properties of the structure suggested an organized but not-continuous multi-dimension (n-D) space within. Therefore I formed a hypothesis of a not-continuous n-D space structure. In search for evidence, I turned into crystal technology, and found direct evidence supported the hypotesis, then further particle collision found more evidence support this finding. (Part II) Analysis of single electron buildup revealed star and galaxy formation is from a single particle following a predictable pattern. This pattern is also common in matter formation. Analysis of the quantum structure suggested the formation of a larger structure through the space expansion within the structure. Further experiment results support the finding and result revealed the expansion is through space folding. Result also suggested a violation of energy conservation law that energy is created during the formation of matter, and matter itself is moving from a lower energy state to a higher energy state. When putting all information together, I arrived to a theory of everything which gives explanations to all existing phenomenon in the universe including black hole, dark energy, star formation, consciousness.

  7. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  8. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad GHOFRANI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Ghofrani M. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART II. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Autumn; 7(4:1-5.Abstract The approach to a child who has experienced a first unprovoked generalized tonic-clonic seizure is challenging and at the same time controversial.How to establish the diagnosis, ways and means of investigation and whether treatment is appropriate, are different aspects of this subject. In this writing the above mentioned matters are discussed. References31.Berg AT, Testa FM., Levy SR, Shinnar S. Neuroimaging in children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A community based study. Pediatrics 2000;106:527-532.32.Shinnar S, Odell C. Treating childhood seizure; when and for how long. In: Shinnar S, Amir N, Branski D (Eds. Childhood seizure. S Karger Basel. 1995. P.100-110.33.Shinnar S, Berg AT, Moshe Sl, et al. Risk of Seizure recurrence following a first unprovoked seizure in childhood; A prospective study. Pediatrics 1990;85:1076-2085.34.Shinnar S, Berg At, Moshe SL, et al. The risk of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked febrile seizure in childhood: An extended follow up. Pediatrics 1996:98:216-225.35.Hauser WA, Rich SS, Annegers JF, Anderson VE. Seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure: An extended follow up. Neurology 1990;40:1163-1170.36.Stroink H, Brouwer O F, Arts WF, Greets AT, Peter AC, Van Donselaar CA. The First unprovoked, untreated seizure in childhood: A hospital based study of the accuracy of diagnosis, rate of recurrence, and long term outcome after recurrence. Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998;64:595-600. 37.Shinnar S, Berg AT, O’Dell C. Newstein D, et al. Predictors of multiple seizure in a cohort of children prospectively followed from the time of their first unprovoked seizure, Ann Neurol 2000; 48:140-147.38.Martinovie Z, Jovic N. Seizure recurrence after a first generalized tonic-clonic seizure in children

  9. Conscious Intelligent Systems - Part II - Mind, Thought, Language and Understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Gayathree, U.

    2006-01-01

    This is the second part of a paper on Conscious Intelligent Systems. We use the understanding gained in the first part (Conscious Intelligent Systems Part 1: IXI (arxiv id cs.AI/0612056)) to look at understanding. We see how the presence of mind affects understanding and intelligent systems; we see that the presence of mind necessitates language. The rise of language in turn has important effects on understanding. We discuss the humanoid question and how the question of self-consciousness (an...

  10. Mesenchymal tumours of the mediastinum—part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. den Bakker (Michael); A. Marx (Alexander); K. Mukai (Kiyoshi); P. Ströbel (Philipp)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis is the second part of a two-part review on soft tissue tumours which may be encountered in the mediastinum. This review is based on the 2013 WHO classification of soft tissue tumours and the 2015 WHO classification of tumours of the lung, pleura, thymus and heart and provides an upd

  11. Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific "philosophy" of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with…

  12. Philosophy of climate science part II: modelling climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Frigg, Roman; Thompson, Erica; Werndl, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of three parts of an introduction to the philosophy of climate science. In this second part about modelling climate change, the topics of climate modelling, confirmation of climate models, the limits of climate projections, uncertainty and finally model ensembles will be discussed.

  13. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  14. Bi-capacities -- Part II: the Choquet integral

    OpenAIRE

    GRABISCH, Michel; Labreuche, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    International audience Bi-capacities arise as a natural generalization of capacities (or fuzzy measures) in a context of decision making where underlying scales are bipolar. They are able to capture a wide variety of decision behaviours, encompassing models such as Cumulative Prospect Theory (CPT). The aim of this paper in two parts is to present the machinery behind bi-capacities, and thus remains on a rather theoretical level, although some parts are firmly rooted in decision theory, not...

  15. Karst geomorphology: From hydrological functioning to palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jo; Gutierrez, Francisco; Audra, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    In January 2015, the first part of the special issue on karst, entitled "Karst geomorphology: From hydrological functioning to palaeoenvironmental reconstructions" was published (Geomorphology, Vol. 229). This second part of the special issue comprises seven research papers covering a broad geographical canvas including Japan, Slovenia, France, Spain, Croatia, and Poland-Ukraine. Both issues mainly emanate from the contributions presented in the Karst session of the 8th International Conference of Geomorphology (International Association of Geomorphologists), held in Paris in August 2013, enriched with some invited papers.

  16. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  17. Kids in Mental Institutions. Part II. Program 131.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    The second of a two-part radio program on children in mental institutions presents transcripts of interviews with psychiatrists and emotionally disturbed adolescents. Subjects addressed include use of drugs, behavior modification, music, and theatre therapy in institutions. The transcript concludes with a narrated tour of Sheppard-Pratt, an…

  18. Topics in Finance: Part II--Financial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    The second article in a series designed to supplement the introductory financial management course, this essay addresses financial statement analysis, including its impact on stock valuation, disclosure, and managerial behavior. [For "Topics in Finance Part I--Introduction and Stockholder Wealth Maximization," see EJ1060345.

  19. Gender Issues in the GCSE Oral English Examination: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, Jenny; Jenkins, Nancy

    1991-01-01

    A stage of research is reported in which teachers assessed the performance of 15 boys and girls who participated in group discussions as part of the General Certificate of Secondary Education English oral examination. Teachers were found to use different criteria to evaluate the contributions of boys compared to girls. (nine references) (Author/LB)

  20. Entrepreneurship Education and Training: Can Entrepreneurship Be Taught? Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Colette; Hill, Frances; Leitch, Claire

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - Despite a growing body of literature in the field, there is still considerable uncertainty as to whether entrepreneurs are born are made, which has led to an ongoing debate in the entrepreneurship academy about whether we can actually teach individuals to be entrepreneurs. With this in mind, this two-part paper aims to address the…

  1. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1048 - Large Spark-ignition (SI) Composite Transient Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Large Spark-ignition (SI) Composite... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW, LARGE NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Pt. 1048, App. II Appendix II to Part 1048—Large Spark-ignition (SI) Composite Transient Cycle...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. II Appendix II to Part 266—Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine Terrain-adjusted effective stack height (m) Noncomplex Terrain Urban...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix II to Part 805 - Employees Required To Submit Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employees Required To Submit Statements II Appendix II to Part 805 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL...—Employees Required To Submit Statements Statements of employment and financial interests are required of...

  4. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy: Part II. Advantages of FT-IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    This is Part II in a series on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Described are various advantages of FT-IR spectroscopy including energy advantages, wavenumber accuracy, constant resolution, polarization effects, and stepping at grating changes. (RH)

  5. GSTARS computer models and their applications, Part II: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, F.J.M.; Yang, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    In part 1 of this two-paper series, a brief summary of the basic concepts and theories used in developing the Generalized Stream Tube model for Alluvial River Simulation (GSTARS) computer models was presented. Part 2 provides examples that illustrate some of the capabilities of the GSTARS models and how they can be applied to solve a wide range of river and reservoir sedimentation problems. Laboratory and field case studies are used and the examples show representative applications of the earlier and of the more recent versions of GSTARS. Some of the more recent capabilities implemented in GSTARS3, one of the latest versions of the series, are also discussed here with more detail. ?? 2008 International Research and Training Centre on Erosion and Sedimentation and the World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research.

  6. Operation of industrial electrical substations. Part II: practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Jimenez, Juan J; Zerquera Izquierdo, Mariano D; Beltran Leon, Jose S; Garcia Martinez, Juan M; Alvarez Urena, Maria V; Meza Diaz, Guillermo [Universidad de Guadalajara (Mexico)]. E-mails: cheosj@yahoo.com; mdzi@hotmail.com; beltran5601@yahoo.com.mx; jmargarmtz@yahoo.com; victory_alvarez@telmexmail.com; depmec@cucei.udg.mx

    2013-03-15

    The practical application of the methodology explained in Part 1 in a Cuban industry is the principal objective of this paper. The calculus of the economical operation of the principal transformers of the industrial plant is shown of the one very easy form, as well as the determination of the equations of the losses when the transformers operate under a given load diagram. It is calculated the state load which will be passed to the operation in parallel. [Spanish] El objetivo principal de este trabajo es la aplicacion practica de la metodologia, en una industria cubana, que se explico en la Parte 1. El calculo de la operacion economica de los principales transformadores de la planta industrial se muestra de una forma muy facil, asi como la determinacion de las ecuaciones de las perdidas cuando los transformadores operan bajo un diagrama de carga dado. Se calcula la carga de estado que se pasa a la operacion en paralelo.

  7. Design of multiphysics actuators using topology optimization - Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole

    2001-01-01

    -material structures. The application in mind is the design of thermally and electro thermally driven micro actuators for use in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). MEMS are microscopic mechanical systems coupled with electrical circuits. MEMS are fabricated using techniques known from the semi-conductor industry......This is the second part of a two-paper description of the topology optimization method applied to the design of multiphysics actuators and electrothermomechanical systems in particular. The first paper is focussed on one-material structures, the second on two-material structures. The extensions...... of the topology optimization method in this part include design descriptions for two-material structures, constitutive modelling of elements with mixtures of two materials, formulation of optimization problems with multiple constraints and multiple materials and a mesh-independency scheme for two...

  8. DOBD Algorithm for Training Neural Network:Part II. Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建昱; 何小荣

    2002-01-01

    In the first part of the article, a new algorithm for pruning network?Dynamic Optimal Brain Damage(DOBD) is introduced. In this part, two cases and an industrial application are worked out to test the new algorithm. It is verified that the algorithm can obtain good generalization through deleting weight parameters with low sensitivities dynamically and get better result than the Marquardt algorithm or the cross-validation method. Although the initial construction of network may be different, the finial number of free weights pruned by the DOBD algorithm is similar and the number is just close to the optimal number of free weights. The algorithm is also helpful to design the optimal structure of network.

  9. Common ECG Lead Placement Errors. Part II: Precordial Misplacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison V. Rosen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electrocardiography is a very useful diagnostic tool. However, errors in placement of ECG leads can create artifacts, mimic pathologies, and hinder proper ECG interpretation. This is the second of a two-part series discussing how to recognize and avoid these errors. Methods: 12-lead ECGs were recorded in a single male healthy subject in his mid 20s. Various precordial lead misplacements were compared to ECG recordings from correct lead placement. Results: Precordial misplacements caused classical changes in ECG patterns. Techniques of differentiating these ECG patterns from true pathological findings were described. Conclusion: As in Part I of this series, recognition and interpretation of common ECG placement errors is critical in providing optimal patient care.

  10. Escapes in Hamiltonian systems with multiple exit channels: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the escape dynamics in open Hamiltonian systems with multiple channels of escape continuing the work initiated in Part I. A thorough numerical investigation is conducted distinguishing between trapped (ordered and chaotic) and escaping orbits. The determination of the location of the basins of escape towards the different escape channels and their correlations with the corresponding escape periods of the orbits is undoubtedly an issue of paramount importance. We consider four diffe...

  11. SnapShot: SMC Protein Complexes Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haering, Christian H; Gruber, Stephan

    2016-02-11

    This second of two SnapShots on SMC proteins depicts their roles at different stages of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The composition and architecture of SMC protein complexes and their regulators appear in SMC Protein Complexes Part I (available at http://www.cell.com/cell/pdf/S0092-8674%2815%2901690-6.pdf). To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26871638

  12. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, P S; Brabrand, K; Cantisani, V; Correas, J M; Cui, X W; D'Onofrio, M; Essig, M; Freeman, S; Gilja, O H; Gritzmann, N; Havre, R F; Ignee, A; Jenssen, C; Kabaalioğlu, A; Lorentzen, T; Mohaupt, M; Nicolau, C; Nolsøe, C P; Nürnberg, D; Radzina, M; Saftoiu, A; Serra, C; Spârchez, Z; Sporea, I; Dietrich, C F

    2015-12-01

    This is the second part of the series on interventional ultrasound guidelines of the Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB). It deals with the diagnostic interventional procedure. General points are discussed which are pertinent to all patients, followed by organ-specific imaging that will allow the correct pathway and planning for the interventional procedure. This will allow for the appropriate imaging workup for each individual interventional procedure (Long version). PMID:26669871

  13. Neutron detection with imaging plates Part II. Detector characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Thoms, M

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the physical processes described in Neutron detection with imaging plates - part I: image storage and readout [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 424 (1999) 26-33] detector characteristics, such as quantum efficiency, detective quantum efficiency, sensitivity to neutron- and gamma-radiation, readout time and dynamic range are predicted. It is estimated that quantum efficiencies and detective quantum efficiencies close to 100% can be reached making these kind of detectors interesting for a wide range of applications.

  14. Oral health in Brazil - Part II: Dental Specialty Centers (CEOs)

    OpenAIRE

    Vinícius Pedrazzi; Katia Regina Hostilio Cervantes Dias; Sigmar de Mello Rode

    2008-01-01

    The concepts of health promotion, self-care and community participation emerged during the 1970s and, since then, their application has grown rapidly in the developed world, showing evidence of effectiveness. In spite of this, a major part of the population in the developing countries still has no access to specialized dental care such as endodontic treatment, dental care for patients with special needs, minor oral surgery, periodontal treatment and oral diagnosis. This review focuses on a pr...

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part II

    OpenAIRE

    Biglands John D; Radjenovic Aleksandra; Ridgway John P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This is the second of two reviews that is intended to cover the essential aspects of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. Starting with the basic pulse sequences and contrast mechanisms described in part I, it briefly discusses further approaches to accelerate image acquisition. It then continues by showing in detail how the contrast behaviour of black blood fast spin echo and bri...

  16. Neutron detection with imaging plates Part II. Detector characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the physical processes described in Neutron detection with imaging plates - part I: image storage and readout [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 424 (1999) 26-33] detector characteristics, such as quantum efficiency, detective quantum efficiency, sensitivity to neutron- and γ-radiation, readout time and dynamic range are predicted. It is estimated that quantum efficiencies and detective quantum efficiencies close to 100% can be reached making these kind of detectors interesting for a wide range of applications

  17. Variance analysis. Part II, The use of computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, S A

    1991-09-01

    This is the second in a two-part series on variance analysis. In the first article (JONA, July/August 1991), the author discussed flexible budgeting, including the calculation of price, quantity, volume, and acuity variances. In this second article, the author focuses on the use of computers by nurse managers to aid in the process of calculating, understanding, and justifying variances. PMID:1919788

  18. ABOUT ABRASION RESISTANCE OF FABRICS WITH STRATEGIC DESTINATION PART II

    OpenAIRE

    Adina Bucevschi; Alexandru Popa; Monica Pustianu; Erzsebet Airinei; Ionel Barbu

    2011-01-01

    This paper is part of a research agreement between "Aurel Vlaicu" University and The National Research - Development Institute for Textile and Leather, Bucharest, about the relationship of interdependence between the yarns' characteristics and fabric's characteristics for the installation of ventilation and heating pipesof the military helicopter[5]. Fabrics for strategic areas must have certain characteristics such resistance at high temperatures, breaking and tearing strength, shock resista...

  19. Prevention of Dealloying in Manganese Aluminium Bronze Propeller: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Napachat Tareelap; Kaysinee Sriraksasin; Nakorn Srisukhumbowornchai; Swieng Thuanboon; Choochat Nitipanyawong

    2014-01-01

    Due to the failure of manganese aluminium bronze (MAB) propeller caused by dealloying corrosion as described in Part I [1], this work aims to study the prevention of dealloying corrosion using aluminium and zinc sacrificial anodes. The results indicated that both of the sacrificial anodes could prevent the propeller from dealloying. Moreover, the dealloying in seawater was less than that found in brackish water. It was possible that hydroxide ions, from cathodic reaction, reacted with calcium...

  20. Common ECG Lead Placement Errors. Part II: Precordial Misplacements

    OpenAIRE

    Allison V. Rosen; Sahil Koppikar; Catherine Shaw; Adrian Baranchuk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Electrocardiography is a very useful diagnostic tool. However, errors in placement of ECG leads can create artifacts, mimic pathologies, and hinder proper ECG interpretation. This is the second of a two-part series discussing how to recognize and avoid these errors. Methods: 12-lead ECGs were recorded in a single male healthy subject in his mid 20s. Various precordial lead misplacements were compared to ECG recordings from correct lead placement. Results: Precordial mispla...

  1. Global thermohaline circulation. Part II: Sensitivity with interactive atmospheric transports

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.; Stone, P.; Marotzke, J.

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere model is used to investigate the stability of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to an increase in the surface freshwater forcing in the presence of interactive meridional transports in the atmosphere. The ocean component is the idealized global general circulation model used in Part I. The atmospheric model assumes fixed latitudinal structure of the heat and moisture transports, and the amplitudes are calculated separately for each hemisphere from the large-...

  2. Hermeneutics as an approach to science: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, Martin

    1993-12-01

    This paper continues the hermeneutic-phenomenological investigation of natural science, in which understanding plays a role comparable to creative construction (see ‘Hermeneutics as an Approach to Science: Part I’ in Science & Education 2(1)). The first issue treated is that of language: Is the language of science part of the equipment of the scientist, the subject, or part of the object itself — nature already linguistically encased? This issue, arising from the so-called argument of ‘the double hermeneutic’, relates the general question of the role of the subject in natural science to the role of interpretation. Examples of major interpretative developments in physics are discussed. The inquiry suggests that the role of interpretation and hermeneutics is tied to the educative or ‘study-mode’ of science; and that this mode can, apparently, be found at all levels and stages of science. The nature of this interpretive mode, and its relation to the creative mode, is then analyzed on the model of Gadamer's description of the interpretation of art.

  3. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  4. Two-World Background of Special Relativity. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekugbe A. O. J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-world background of the Special Theory of Relativity started in part one of this article is continued in this second part. Four-dimensional inversion is shown to be a special Lorentz transformation that transforms the positive spacetime coordinates of a frame of reference in the positive universe into the negative spacetime coordinates of the symmetry-partner frame of reference in the negative universe in the two-world picture, contrary to the conclusion that four-dimensional inversion is impossible as actual trans- formation of the coordinates of a frame of reference in the existing one-world picture. By starting with the negative spacetime dimensions in the negative universe derived in part one, the signs of mass and other physical parameters and physical constants in the negative universe are derived by application of the symmetry of laws between the pos- itive and negative universes. The invariance of natural laws in the negative universe is demonstrated. The derived negative sign of mass in the negative universe is a conclu- sion of over a century-old effort towards the development of the concept of negative mass in physics.

  5. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  6. A tutorial survey of topics in wireless networking: Part II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anurag Kumar; D Manjunath

    2007-12-01

    This is the second part of the survey of recent and emerging topics in wireless networking. We provide an overview of the area of wireless networking as that of dealing with problems of resource allocation so that the various connections that utilise the network achieve their desired performance objectives. In Part I we provided a taxonomy of wireless networks as they have been deployed. We then provided a quick survey of the main issues in the wireless 'physical' layer. We then discussed some resource allocation formulations in CDMA (code division multiple access) cellular networks and OFDMA (orthogonal frequency division multiple access) networks. In this part we begin with a discussion of random access wireless networks. We first provide an overview of the evolution of random access networks from Aloha to the currently popular 802·11 (Wi-Fi) networks. We then analyse the performance of the 802·11 random access protocol. We briefly discuss the problem of optimal association of nodes to Wi-Fi access points. Next, we consider topics in ad hoc multihop wireless networks. We first discuss topology and cross layer control. For the latter, we describe the important maximum weight link scheduling algorithm. The connectivity and capacity of randomly deployed networks are then analysed. Finally, we provide an overview of the technical issues in the emerging area of wireless sensor networks.

  7. Designing carbon markets, Part II: Carbon markets in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in space (i.e., geographically). It is part of a twin set of papers that, starting from first principles, ask what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of spatial design to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including key design issues in linking national and regional carbon markets together to create a global carbon market.

  8. Prevention of Dealloying in Manganese Aluminium Bronze Propeller: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napachat Tareelap

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the failure of manganese aluminium bronze (MAB propeller caused by dealloying corrosion as described in Part I [1], this work aims to study the prevention of dealloying corrosion using aluminium and zinc sacrificial anodes. The results indicated that both of the sacrificial anodes could prevent the propeller from dealloying. Moreover, the dealloying in seawater was less than that found in brackish water. It was possible that hydroxide ions, from cathodic reaction, reacted with calcium in seawater to form calcium carbonate film protecting the propeller from corrosion.

  9. The museum maze in oral pathology demystifed: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Ganavi, Bs

    2013-01-01

    Museum technology is perpetually changing due to current requirements and added inventions for our comfort and furbished display of specimens. Hence numerous methods of specimen preservation have been put on trial by diverse people in the medical feld as are the inventions. But only few have caught people's interest and are popularized today. This part provides unique insights into specialized custom-made techniques, evolution of recent advances like plastination and virtual museum that have popularized as visual delights. Plastination gives handy, perennial life-like acrylic specimens, whereas virtual museum takes museum feld to the electronic era making use of computers and virtual environment. PMID:24685810

  10. The career plateau--the differential diagnosis: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, L E

    1990-08-01

    This is the second article in a three-part series. The first article defined the problem of career plateauing and the heightened awareness of hospital administrators of a long-term concern for nurses and other health care professional. Career plateauing is the point in an organizational career where an individual is unlikely to experience additional hierarchical mobility. This article presents strategies for change for the organization, the manager, and the employee. The third article will summarize a research study the author is currently completing on the development of an inventory to measure the career needs of hospital nurses. PMID:2388173

  11. Two-World Background of Special Relativity. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekugbe A. O. J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-world background of the Special Theory of Relativity started in part one of this article is continued in this secondpart. Four-dimensional inversion is shown to be a special Lorentz transformation that transforms the positive spacetime coordinates of a frame of reference in the positive universe into the negative spacetime coordinates of the symmetry-partner frame of reference in the negative universe in the two-world picture, contrary to the conclusion that four-dimensional inversion is impossible as actual transformation of the coordinates of a frame of reference in the existing one-world picture. By starting with the negative spacetime dimensions in the negative universe derived in part one, the signs of mass and other physical parameters and physical constants in the negative universe are derived by application of the symmetry of laws between the positive and negative universes. The invariance of natural laws in the negative universe is demonstrated. The derived negative sign of mass in the negative universe is a conclusion of over a century-old effort towards the development of the concept of negative mass in physics.

  12. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions. PMID:25756068

  13. Responsive Persistence Part II. Practices of Postmodern Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Olga; Dienhart, Anna; Turner, Jean

    2013-10-01

    This article, a companion to Part I of this series of articles, discusses how therapists informed by social constructionist and postmodern ideas enact persistence in their work with families. Transcripts and video-recordings of therapy interaction facilitated by selected major champions for three postmodern (collaborative) therapies: Michael White (narrative therapy), Harlene Anderson (collaborative language systems approach), and Bill O'Hanlon (solution-oriented therapy) were examined for persistence practices. The article offers a range of possible ways in which postmodern therapists may enact their influence in facilitating generative and helpful conversations with families and remain responsive to clients' preferences and understandings. Implications for family therapy practice, training, and supervision are discussed. PMID:25800424

  14. Surface grafted chitosan gels. Part II. Gel formation and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M.;

    2014-01-01

    Responsive biomaterial hydrogels attract significant attention due to their biocompatibility and degradability. In order to make chitosan based gels, we first graft one layer of chitosan to silica, and then build a chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) multilayer using the layer-by-layer approach. After...... cross-linking the chitosan present in the polyelectrolyte multilayer, poly(acrylic acid) is partly removed by exposing the multilayer structure to a concentrated carbonate buffer solution at a high pH, leaving a surface-grafted cross-linked gel. Chemical cross-linking enhances the gel stability against...... detachment and decomposition. The chemical reaction between gluteraldehyde, the cross-linking agent, and chitosan was followed in situ using total internal reflection Raman (TIRR) spectroscopy, which provided a molecular insight into the complex reaction mechanism, as well as the means to quantify the cross...

  15. Planar LTCC transformers for high voltage flyback converters: Part II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schofield, Daryl (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD); Schare, Joshua M., Ph.D.; Slama, George (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD); Abel, David (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD)

    2009-02-01

    This paper is a continuation of the work presented in SAND2007-2591 'Planar LTCC Transformers for High Voltage Flyback Converters'. The designs in that SAND report were all based on a ferrite tape/dielectric paste system originally developed by NASCENTechnoloy, Inc, who collaborated in the design and manufacturing of the planar LTCC flyback converters. The output/volume requirements were targeted to DoD application for hard target/mini fuzing at around 1500 V for reasonable primary peak currents. High voltages could be obtained but with considerable higher current. Work had begun on higher voltage systems and is where this report begins. Limits in material properties and processing capabilities show that the state-of-the-art has limited our practical output voltage from such a small part volume. In other words, the technology is currently limited within the allowable funding and interest.

  16. Cogeneration from Poultry Industry Wastes -- Part II: Economic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, M.; Cherubini, F.; Pascale, A. D.;

    2003-01-01

    existing poultry industry as fuel. Different plant configurations have been considered in order to make use of the oil and of the meat and bone meal, which are the by-products of the chicken cooking process. In particular, the process plant can be integrated with an energy supply plant which can consist of...... a Indirectly Fired Gas Turbine (Part I). Moreover a Steam Turbine Plant or a simplified system for the supply of the only technological steam are investigated and compared. Thermodynamic and economic analysis have been carried out for the examined configurations in order to outline the basic......The availability of wet biomass as waste from a lot of industrial processes, from agriculture and farms and the need to meet the environmental standards force to investigate all options in order to dispose this waste. The possible treatments usually strongly depend on the biomass characteristics...

  17. Sequencing of contents and learning objects - part II

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Zapata Ros; Nora Lizenberg

    2006-01-01

    Esta es la segunda parte del artículo del mismo nombre publicado en el número anterior de RED. En él planteamos una visión de la selección y de la secuenciación de contenidos de enseñanza, en el contexto de la planificación curricular, desde la perspectiva de las corrientes del pensamiento constructivista. Señalamos la importancia de contar, en el campo de la formación apoyada en redes, con herramientas y criterios autónomos que guíen este proceso desde unas bases propias, externas y con pree...

  18. Fundamental Limits of Wideband Localization - Part II: Cooperative Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yuan; Win, Moe Z

    2010-01-01

    The availability of positional information is of great importance in many commercial, governmental, and military applications. Localization is commonly accomplished through the use of radio communication between mobile devices (agents) and fixed infrastructure (anchors). However, precise determination of agent positions is a challenging task, especially in harsh environments due to radio blockage or limited anchor deployment. In these situations, cooperation among agents can significantly improve localization accuracy and reduce localization outage probabilities. A general framework of analyzing the fundamental limits of wideband localization has been developed in Part I of the paper. Here, we build on this framework and establish the fundamental limits of wideband cooperative location-aware networks. Our analysis is based on the waveforms received at the nodes, in conjunction with Fisher information inequality. We provide a geometrical interpretation of equivalent Fisher information for cooperative networks....

  19. Stars in Photographic Emulsions Initiated by Deuterons Part II. Theoretical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horning, W.; Baumhoff, L.

    1948-09-07

    The theory of high energy nuclear stars depends on a theory of nuclear transparency and on a theory of nuclear evaporation. The transparency can be computed on the basis of a model proposed by R. Serber as soon as the interactions between the nucleons and the incident particle are known. The evaporation can be computed on the basis of the statistical model of the nucleus as soon as the nuclear entropy and binding energies of the evaporated particles are known. With approximate values for the above interactions, entropies, and binding energies, a probability distribution has been computed for the number of prongs per star. The results are in qualitative agreement with the observations on photographic emulsions described in Part 1.

  20. El impacto socio-espacial de las urbanizaciones cerradas: el caso de la Región Metropolitana de Buenos Aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Thuillier

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo trata sobre las urbanizaciones cerradas en la Región Metropolitana de Buenos Aires (RMBA. El objetivo es entender el impacto socio-territorial de esos barrios a nivel local, metropolitano y nacional. Después de exponer algunos elementos básicos sobre la historia de esas urbanizaciones y su importante desarrollo reciente en la RMBA, se analiza esta mutación de acuerdo con tres categorías: las formas arquitectónicas y urbanas; las funciones de los espacios y las prácticas sociales que permiten o suscitan; y el tipo de relaciones sociales que se crean en esos lugares. Para cada uno de estos tres aspectos se adoptan sucesivamente dos puntos de vista: por una parte, se contempla la situación dentro del barrio cerrado, y por otra, se estudian los cambios que esos barrios implican para sus alrededores y para el resto de la ciudad. En conclusión, nos acercamos a la idea de que esos emprendimientos traducen una profunda mutación de las representaciones de la ciudad para sus residentes: el éxito de los barrios cerrados significa un cambio importante en la idea que se hace la gente de lo que son y deben ser la ciudad y la vida urbanaThis paper deals with gated communities in the Metropolitan Region of Buenos Aires (RMBA. It objective is understanding the socio-territorial impact of these developments at local, metropolitan and national levels. After some basics elements about the history of these communities and their important and recent growth in the RMBA, this mutation is analyzed according to three categories: the architectural and urban forms; the functions of this spaces and the practices they allow or provoke; and the kind of social relationships they create. For each of these three aspects, two different points of view are successively adopted: a look at the situation inside the gated community, and secondly, the changes that it creates for its surroundings and for the rest of the metropolis. Finally, the paper comes to

  1. Stochastic dynamics of Arctic sea ice Part II: Multiplicative noise

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Woosok

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the numerical solutions of a stochastic Arctic sea ice model with multiplicative noise over a wide range of external heat-fluxes, $\\Delta F_0$, which correspond to greenhouse gas forcing. When the noise is multiplicative, the noise-magnitude depends on the state-variable, and this will influence the statistical moments in a manner that differs from the additive case, which we analyzed in Part I of this study. The state variable describing the deterministic backbone of our model is the energy, $E(t)$, contained in the ice or the ocean and for a thorough comparison and contrast we choose the simplest form of multiplicative noise $\\sigma E(t) \\xi(t)$, where $\\sigma$ is the noise amplitude and $\\xi(t)$ is the noise process. The case of constant additive noise (CA) we write as $\\sigma\\overline{E_S}\\xi(t)$, in which $\\overline{E_S}$ is the seasonally averaged value of the periodic deterministic steady-state solution $E_S(t)$, or the deterministic seasonal cycle. We then treat the case of seasonally-varyi...

  2. Polymers Based on Renewable Raw Materials – Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović, S.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A short review of biopolymers based on starch (starch derivatives, thermoplastic starch, lignin and hemicelluloses, chitin (chitosan and products obtained by degradation of starch and other polysaccharides and sugars (poly(lactic acid, poly(hydroxyalkanoates, as well as some of their basic properties and application area, are given in this part. The problem of environmental and economic feasibility of biopolymers based on renewable raw materials and their competitiveness with polymers based on fossil raw materials is discussed. Also pointed out are the problems that appear due to the increasing use of agricultural land for the production of raw materials for the chemical industry and energy, instead for the production of food for humans and animals. The optimistic assessments of experts considering the development perspectives of biopolymers based on renewable raw materials in the next ten years have also been pointed out.At the end of the paper, the success of a team of researchers gathered around the experts from the company Bayer is indicated. They were the first in the world to develop a catalyst by which they managed to effectively activate CO - and incorporate it into polyols, used for the synthesis of polyurethanes in semi-industrial scale. By applying this process, for the first time a pollutant will be used as a basic raw material for the synthesis of organic compounds, which will have significant consequences on the development of the chemical industry, and therefore the production of polymers.

  3. LONG TERM FILE MIGRATION - PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay Smith, Alan

    1978-10-01

    The steady increase in the power and complexity of modern computer systems has encouraged the implementation of automatic file migration systems which move files dynamically between mass storage devices and disk in response to user reference patterns. Using information describing thirteen months of text editor data set file references, (analyzed in detail in the first part of this paper), they develop and evaluation algorithms for the selection of files to be moved from disk to mass storage. They find that algorithms based on both the file size and the time since the file was last used work well. The best realizable algorithms tested condition on the empirical distribution of the times between file references. Acceptable results are also obtained by selecting for replacement that file whose size times time to last reference is maximal. Comparisons are made with a number of standard algorithms developed for paging, such as Working Set. Sufficient information (parameter values, fitted equations) is provided that our algorithms may be easily implemented on other systems.

  4. Cosmology In Terms Of The Deceleration Parameter. Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Bolotin, Yu L; Lemets, O A; Yerokhin, D A; Zazunov, L G

    2015-01-01

    In the early seventies, Alan Sandage defined cosmology as the search for two numbers: Hubble parameter ${{H}_{0}}$ and deceleration parameter ${{q}_{0}}$. The first of the two basic cosmological parameters (the Hubble parameter) describes the linear part of the time dependence of the scale factor. Treating the Universe as a dynamical system it is natural to assume that it is non-linear: indeed, linearity is nothing more than approximation, while non-linearity represents the generic case. It is evident that future models of the Universe must take into account different aspects of its evolution. As soon as the scale factor is the only dynamical variable, the quantities which determine its time dependence must be essentially present in all aspects of the Universe' evolution. Basic characteristics of the cosmological evolution, both static and dynamical, can be expressed in terms of the parameters ${{H}_{0}}$ and ${{q}_{0}}$. The very parameters (and higher time derivatives of the scale factor) enable us to const...

  5. Medicine at the crossroads. Part II. Summary of completed project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Medicine at the crossroads (a.k.a. The Future of Medicine) is an 8-part series of one-hour documentaries which examines the scientific and social forces that have shaped the practice of medicine around the world. The series was developed and produced over a five-year period and in eleven countries. Among the major issues examined in the series are the education of medical practitioners and the communication of medical issues. The series also considers the dilemmas of modern medicine, including the treatment of the elderly and the dying, the myth of the quick fix in the face of chronic and incurable diseases such as HIV, and the far-reaching implications of genetic treatments. Finally, the series examines the global progress made in medical research and application, as well as the questions remaining to be answered. These include not only scientific treatment, but accessibility and other critical topics affecting the overall success of medical advances. Medicine at the crossroads is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET and BBC-TV in association with Television Espafiola SA (RTVE) and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Stefan Moore of Thirteen/WNET and Martin Freeth of BBC-TV are series producers. George Page is executive in charge of medicine at the crossroads. A list of scholarly advisors and a program synopses is attached.

  6. Oral health in Brazil - Part II: Dental Specialty Centers (CEOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Pedrazzi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of health promotion, self-care and community participation emerged during the 1970s and, since then, their application has grown rapidly in the developed world, showing evidence of effectiveness. In spite of this, a major part of the population in the developing countries still has no access to specialized dental care such as endodontic treatment, dental care for patients with special needs, minor oral surgery, periodontal treatment and oral diagnosis. This review focuses on a program of the Brazilian Federal Government named CEOs (Dental Specialty Centers, which is an attempt to solve the dental care deficit of a population that is suffering from oral diseases and whose oral health care needs have not been addressed by the regular programs offered by the SUS (Unified National Health System. Literature published from 2000 to the present day, using electronic searches by Medline, Scielo, Google and hand-searching was considered. The descriptors used were Brazil, Oral health, Health policy, Health programs, and Dental Specialty Centers. There are currently 640 CEOs in Brazil, distributed in 545 municipal districts, carrying out dental procedures with major complexity. Based on this data, it was possible to conclude that public actions on oral health must involve both preventive and curative procedures aiming to minimize the oral health distortions still prevailing in developing countries like Brazil.

  7. Modeling multibody systems with uncertainties. Part II: Numerical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study applies generalized polynomial chaos theory to model complex nonlinear multibody dynamic systems operating in the presence of parametric and external uncertainty. Theoretical and computational aspects of this methodology are discussed in the companion paper 'Modeling Multibody Dynamic Systems With Uncertainties. Part I: Theoretical and Computational Aspects .In this paper we illustrate the methodology on selected test cases. The combined effects of parametric and forcing uncertainties are studied for a quarter car model. The uncertainty distributions in the system response in both time and frequency domains are validated against Monte-Carlo simulations. Results indicate that polynomial chaos is more efficient than Monte Carlo and more accurate than statistical linearization. The results of the direct collocation approach are similar to the ones obtained with the Galerkin approach. A stochastic terrain model is constructed using a truncated Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The application of polynomial chaos to differential-algebraic systems is illustrated using the constrained pendulum problem. Limitations of the polynomial chaos approach are studied on two different test problems, one with multiple attractor points, and the second with a chaotic evolution and a nonlinear attractor set. The overall conclusion is that, despite its limitations, generalized polynomial chaos is a powerful approach for the simulation of multibody dynamic systems with uncertainties

  8. 48 CFR 15.204-3 - Part II-Contract Clauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Part II-Contract Clauses... Information 15.204-3 Part II—Contract Clauses. Section I, Contract clauses. The contracting officer shall... uniform contract format. An index may be inserted if this section's format is particularly complex....

  9. Charting the Course for a Nursing Online Journal Club: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonan, Marilyn; Bukoye, Bola; Clapp, Alison; Shermont, Herminia; O'Sullivan Oliveira, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    In a pediatric inpatient setting, an interdisciplinary team designed and implemented an online journal club to discuss current nursing trends and research, as well as to foster evidence-based practice. This article is Part II of a two-part series in which the implementation process is described. PMID:26790492

  10. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  11. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Joshua A; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26864793

  12. Synopsis Of The subfamily Spiranthoideae (Orchidaceae) In Colombia, Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As second and last contribution to the synoptic treatment of the Spiranthoideae for Colombia, the synopsis of the tribes Spirantheae (subtribes Cyclopogoninae: 3 genera, 41 species and Stenorrhynchidinae: 9 genera, 15 species) and Cranichideae (5 genera, 53 species), is presented. The most diverse genera in these tribes are: Cranichis (20 species), Cyclopogon (17), Ponthieva (15) and Pelexia (14). As part of the results of this study: a)- The transfer of Cybebus from the subtribe Spiranthinae (where it was commonly placed) to the subtribe Stenorhinchidinae, is proposed, based on the floral morphology (the rostellum and viscidium structure). b)- two genera are reported for Colombia as new records, each one with one species: Lyroglossa (L. grisebachii) and Helonoma; for the latter the new combination Helonoma peruviana (Szlach.) Salazar, Duenas and Fern. Alonso is proposed. c) New records in the previously known list of Colombian orchids are presented: Coccineorchis (C. cristata, C. navarrensis), Cyclopogon (C. maldonadoanus, C. olivaceus, C. rimbachii), Pelexia (P. hirta, P. palmorchidis), Ponthieva (P. venusta), and Sarcoglottis (S. grandiflora, S. maasorum, S. neglecta, S. stergiosii). d)- And additional 19 new records of species belonging to Aspidogyne and Microchilus, not reported in Duenas and Fernandez-Alonso (2007), are also included. e)- Finally an analysis of the distribution and diversity of the genera of this subfamily, according to altitude ranges in Colombia is presented. This group has predominant Andean distribution, being found mainly between 1300 and 3600 m of altitude. Genera broadly distributed as Microchilus, Gomphichis, Cyclopogon, Pelexia, Sarcoglottis, Coccineorchis, Stenorrhynchos, Cranichis and Ponthieva, are found almost from the level up to 3000 m, in all the regions of the country. In contrast, Beloglottis, Brachystele, Cybebus, Eltroplectris, Hapalorchis, Helonoma, Lankesterella, Lyroglossa, Kreodanthus, Pteroglossa and Sauroglossum

  13. FNR demonstration experiments Part II: Subcadmium neutron flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FNR HEU-LEU Demonstration Experiments include a comprehensive set of experiments to identify and quantify significant operational differences between two nuclear fuel enrichments. One aspect of these measurements, the subcadmium flux profiling, is the subject of this paper. The flux profiling effort has been accomplished through foil and wire activations, and by rhodium self-powered neutron detector (SPND) mappings. Within the experimental limitations discussed, the program to measure subcadmium flux profiles, lead to the following conclusions: (1) Replacement of a single fresh HEU element by a fresh LEU element at the center of an equilibrium HEU core produces a local flux depression. The ratio of HEU to LEU local flux is 1.19 ± .036, which is, well within experimental uncertainty, equal to the inverse of the U-235 masses for the two elements. (2) Whole core replacement of a large 38 element equilibrium HEU core by a fresh or nearly unburned LEU core reduces the core flux and raises the flux in both D2O and H2O reflectors. The reduction in the central core region is 40% to 10.0% for the small fresh 29 element LEU core, and 16% to 18% for a 31 element LEU core 482) with low average burnup 2O reflector fluxes relative to core fluxes as measured by SPND with a fixed value of sensitivity, are in gross disagreement with the same flux ratios measured by Fe and Rh wire activations. Space dependent refinements of S are calculated to give some improvement in the discrepancy but the major part of the correction remains to be resolved

  14. Eponyms related to genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement; part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Mohammed Al-Aboud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement. In our part I, we reviewed the eponyms linked to Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis (HGF [1]. Historical Article How to cite this article: Al Aboud A, Al-Aboud NM, Barnawi H, Al Hakami A. Eponyms related to genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement: Part II. Our Dermatol Online. 2015;6(1:114-117. Submission: 27.05.2013; Acceptance: 21.09.2014 DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20151.32 In this part II of this review, we are going to shed some light on eponyms linked to groups of genetic disorders which may feature gingival enlargement.

  15. Eponyms related to genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement; part II

    OpenAIRE

    Nora Mohammed Al-Aboud; Hanan Barnawi; Ahlam Al Hakami

    2015-01-01

    There are genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement. In our part I, we reviewed the eponyms linked to Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis (HGF) [1]. Historical Article How to cite this article: Al Aboud A, Al-Aboud NM, Barnawi H, Al Hakami A. Eponyms related to genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement: Part II. Our Dermatol Online. 2015;6(1):114-117. Submission: 27.05.2013; Acceptance: 21.09.2014 DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20151.32 In this part II of thi...

  16. Addressing future challenges for cancer services: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jane; Radford, Gina

    2016-02-01

    Jane Maher & Gina Radford speak to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor Jane Maher has been Macmillan's Chief Medical Officer since 1999 and now shares the role as Joint Chief Medical Officer with general practitioner Rosie Loftus, reflecting the growing need for specialists and generalists to work more effectively together. She has been an National Health Service (NHS) improvement clinical leader for over 10 years and is a Consultant Clinical Oncologist at Mount Vernon Cancer Centre and Hillingdon Hospital where she has worked for more than 20 years, during which she helped develop nonsurgical oncology services in five district general hospitals. She is a senior Clinical Lecturer at University College London and Visiting Professor in Cancer and Supportive Care at the Centre for Complexity Management at the University of Hertfordshire. Jane chaired the Maher Committee for the Department of Health in 1995, led the UK National Audit of Late Effects Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in 2000 and, most recently, chaired the National Cancer Survivorship Initiative Consequences of Treatment work stream. She co-founded one of the first Cancer Support and Information services in the UK, winning the Nye Bevan award in 1992 and there are now more than 60 units based on this model. She is a member of the Older People and Cancer Clinical Advisory Group. She has written more than 100 published articles and is a UK representative for cancer survivorship in Europe and advises on cancer survivorship programs in Denmark and Canada. Gina Radford is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, a post she took up in January 2015. Prior to that, she has held a number of roles in public health, at local and regional level. Most recently she was Centre Director for Anglia and Essex for Public Health England, and as a part of that role helped lead nationally on the public health response to Ebola. She was until very recently Chair of one of the NICE public health

  17. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  18. Music in the exercise domain: a review and synthesis (Part II)

    OpenAIRE

    Karageorghis, Costas I.; Priest, David-Lee

    2011-01-01

    Since a 1997 review by Karageorghis and Terry, which highlighted the state of knowledge and methodological weaknesses, the number of studies investigating musical reactivity in relation to exercise has swelled considerably. In this two-part review paper, the development of conceptual approaches and mechanisms underlying the effects of music are explicated (Part I), followed by a critical review and synthesis of empirical work (spread over Parts I and II). Pre-task music has been shown to opti...

  19. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts. PMID:27359151

  20. Cuantificacion de la radiacion de la estructura en sistemas de caja cerrada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura Alcaraz, Jorge G.

    In the present work a contribution to the study of the quantification of the radiation of the structure walls in systems of closed box has been made, establishing a relation of the vibroacustic response of this type of radiating systems with the characteristics of the material used, such as the Young modulus, the damping, or the density. From a general point of view, the object of the work fits within the problems of dynamic fluid-structure interaction, so the presented foundations of the procedures and models, are similar to the used in other dominions of application, like the construction, aeronautics, naval construction, Biology, etc. In order to approach the problem, a mecano-acoustic couple between the different elements from the radiating system is considered. Ideally, in the radiating systems composed of loudspeakers mounted on an acoustic enclosure or box, the walls of the box are considerated infinitely rigid with null movement. In the reality, the experience demonstrates that the walls behave like vibrant plates under the action of the inner pressures, and contribute to the final radiation of sound of the system, mainly in the low frequencies range. To obtain the proposed objective, first a series of experimental measures has been made on models of closed box with and without loudspeaker. In the experimental procedure the vibracional behavior of the walls of the structure has been studied by means of modal analysis and measures of vibration. The acoustic response of the systems is evaluated by means of measures of acoustic pressure and intensity. Next, numerical models of the loudspeaker, inner air and structure have been implemented. The implemented numerical models are mechanical-acoustic, the electrical part of the loudspeaker has been replaced by a harmonic excitation force. The first numerical model is three-dimensional, looking for obtaining a simulation of the simultaneous interaction of the three main elements of the system: the inner air of the

  1. Charged NUT field : [Part] I. Motion of test particles and [Part] II. Cosmic censorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some properties of the charged NUT field are studied. In the first part of the paper, some general aspects of the charged NUT field have been investigated using uncharged and charged particles. The behaviour of the particles near the singularity has also been considered. In the second part of the paper, the charged NUT sources in the context of cosmic censorship hypothesis are studied. Motion of charged particles in the equatorial plane and along the axis is considered. From this investigation the interesting result is discovered that by such a bombardment of charged test particles, the existing event horizons cannot be destroyed but, in contrast to the Reissner-Nordstrom field, naked singularities do not get enveloped by event horizons. (author)

  2. Constituents of the Egyptian Centaurea scoparia; Part II. Guaianolides of the Aerial Parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, D; Frahm, A W

    1994-12-01

    Aerial parts of CENTAUREA SCOPARIA Sieb. afforded a new chlorinated guaianolide with an unusual isobutyl structural feature, diain ( 1), together with three known guaianolides, janerin ( 2), cynaropicrin ( 3), and deacylcynaropicrin ( 4). Structural assignments of the isolated compounds are based on spectroscopic methods including 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy as well as mass spectroscopy. New and revised (1)H- and (13)C-NMR data are reported. PMID:17236083

  3. Understanding Medicines: Conceptual Analysis of Nurses' Needs for Knowledge and Understanding of Pharmacology (Part I). Understanding Medicines: Extending Pharmacology Education for Dependent and Independent Prescribing (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathard, Helen L.

    2001-01-01

    Part I reviews what nurses need to know about the administration and prescription of medicines. Part II addresses drug classifications, actions and effects, and interactions. Also discussed are the challenges pharmacological issues pose for nursing education. (SK)

  4. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME II Appendix II to Part 11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Pt. 11, App. II Appendix II to Part 11—Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME...

  5. Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

  6. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

  7. cerradas en Tijuana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Ángel Enríquez Acosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years the dominating urbanization way implemented in Tijuana and in border cities is the gated communities. The city tends to enclose itself arguing unsafety beyond the protective walls and fences. But, at the same time, it is a social distinction strategy. This work is about a spatial segregation process for the socioeconomic condition in Tijuana, the socialization levels reached inside the neighborhoods, and the urban scenario like simulation.

  8. Student Performance on the NBME Part II Subtest and Subject Examination in Obstetrics-Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metheny, William P.; Holzman, Gerald B.

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of the scores of 342 third-year medical students on the National Board of Medical Examiners subject examination and the Part II subtest on obstetrics-gynecology found significantly better performance on the former, suggesting a need to interpret the scores differently. (Author/MSE)

  9. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1979. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 2 of 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume II, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-O; Part 2 contains Appendices P-FF. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  10. Urbanizaciones cerradas en áreas inundables del municipio de Tigre: ¿producción de espacio urbano de alta calidad ambiental?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ríos

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Desde la última década del siglo XX, los actores económicos privados comenzaron a producir urbanizaciones cerradas sobre áreas inundables de la periferia del Aglomerado Gran Buenos Aires, a partir de la incorporación de trabajo, grandes capitales y tecnologías especializadas. Este proceso de producción privada de espacio urbano, en el que convergen intereses tanto públicos como privados, ha sido legitimado a través de discursos referidos a las nociones de "desarrollo sustentable" y "recuperación ambiental", viabiÜzando el avance de grandes "negocios urbanos" que, contradictoriamente a lo que se sostiene, tienden a una alteración de las funciones ambientales sin precedentes. En este trabajo se abordan las contradicciones que surgen de los procesos asociados a la producción de espacio urbano de "alta calidad ambiental" en términos de la confrontación entre los discursos y las prácticas de los actores sociales in te rvin lentes, a partir del caso paradigmático de las urbanizaciones cerradas del municipio de Tigre

  11. COPING STRATEGIES ADOPTED BY UNIVERSITY STUDENTS - PART II: ROLE CONFLICT AND AGE

    OpenAIRE

    NATOVOVÁ, Ludmila; CHÝLOVÁ, Hana

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the particularities of various stress coping strategies (measured by standardized stress coping strategies questionnaire SVF 78) used by undergraduate university students (N=177). The first part was focused on gender differences. Part II compares groups differing in age and level of family-school-work conflict, drawing on the division according to the type of study: Part-time (N=102) and Full-time (N=75) students as well as on the age distinction (age24: N=82). The finding...

  12. Modelo de cálculo y aplicación informática para la fase cerrada de un motor alternativo de combustión interna de ciclo Otto

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer Díaz, Marcos; Viscarro Torralba, Juan B.

    2006-01-01

    El presente proyecto tiene como objetivo desarrollar un modelo de cálculo basado en una simulación termodinámica cero-dimensional de la fase cerrada – compresión, combustión y expansión de la mezcla aire-combustible – de un motor alternativo de combustión interna (MACI) de ciclo Otto – encendido con chispa trabajando con gasolina –. Para conseguir el modelo de cálculo será necesario tener en cuenta todos los parámetros que influyen en las diferentes etapas de la fase cerrada del cicl...

  13. Rail and multimodal freight: a problem-oriented survey (part II-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin MARINOV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper includes the Part II-2 of the series of problem-oriented surveys on rail and multimodal freight transportation services, which aim is to reveal the current situation in this sector and raises looming questions for discussion. The particular objective of Part II-2 is to discuss recently published works and documents dedicated to Multi-actor chain management and control, Mode choice and pricing strategies, Intermodal transportation policy and planning as well as Miscellaneous. It should be noted that this paper is a problem oriented survey and does not explicitly focus on the available scientific instrumental that has been applied in dealing with rail and multimodal freight. However, throughout the description methods and concepts are addressed, where it is of interest.

  14. The structure and interpretation of cosmology: Part II - The concept of creation in inflation and quantum cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the paper, of which this is part II, is to review, clarify, and critically analyse modern mathematical cosmology. The emphasis is upon mathematical objects and structures, rather than numerical computations. Part II provides a critical analysis of inflationary cosmology and quantum cosmology, with particular attention to the claims made that these theories can explain the creation of the universe.

  15. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  16. Managing the care of health and the cure of disease--Part II: Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glouberman, S; Mintzberg, H

    2001-01-01

    The development of appropriate levels of integration in the system of health care and disease cure will require stronger collective cultures and enhanced communication among the key actors. Part II of this paper uses this line of argument to reframe four major issues in this system: coordination of acute cure and of community care, and collaboration in institutions and in the system at large. PMID:11233356

  17. Seasonal changes in cyclists' performance. Part II. The British Olympic track squad.

    OpenAIRE

    White, J. A.; Quinn, G; Al-Dawalibi, M.; Mulhall, J.

    1982-01-01

    In Part II of the study, the British Olympic track (sprint) squad cyclists demonstrated reductions in body fat index, % body fat and endomorphy (p greater than .05), increased Hb and PCV % (p greater than .05), and lowered HR at rest and in warm-up exercise (p greater than .05), but no change in leg power. Repeated interval sprints of short duration, maximal exercise on an "ergowheel" ergometer, at standardised power output, showed increased anaerobic index (p greater than .05) and accelerato...

  18. A Historical Timeline of Doping in the Olympics (Part II 1970-1988)

    OpenAIRE

    Kremenik, Michael; Onodera, Sho; Nagao, Mitsushiro; Yuzuki, Osamu; Yonetani, Shozo

    2007-01-01

    This article is part II of A Historical Timeline of Doping in the Olympics. The timeline is divided into three sections for analysis: Section 1 timelines the science of doping with special emphasis on the East German doping program. Section 2 timelines drug testing. Section 3 timelines positive drug tests and the sanctioning of athletes. The science of doping highlights the development of scientific awareness of the effectiveness of performance enhancing drugs when used by highly trained Olym...

  19. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Summary Report - Part II of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - includes reports on development of fast reactors in France from 1977 to 1978; review of the activities related to fast reactors in Germany; status of fast breeder reactors development in Belgium and Netherlands; status of activities related to fast reactors in USSR, Japan USA, UK and Italy

  20. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation and Topological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-06-01

    A comprehensive numerical model has been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details of the model and results from the analysis of General Motors' prototype TEG were described in part I of the study. In part II of this study, parametric evaluations are considered to assess the influence of heat exchanger, geometry, and thermoelectric module configurations to achieve optimization of the baseline model. The computational tool is also adapted to model other topologies such as transverse and circular configurations (hexagonal and cylindrical) maintaining the same volume as the baseline TEG. Performance analysis of these different topologies and parameters is presented and compared with the baseline design.

  1. Advances in explosives analysis--part II: photon and neutron methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathryn E; Greenfield, Margo T; McGrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S

    2016-01-01

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased dramatically since publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis [Moore DS, Goodpaster JV, Anal Bioanal Chem 395:245-246, 2009]. Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. The review consists of two parts. Part I discussed methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers, electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. This part, Part II, will review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons. PMID:26446898

  2. Necrosis isquémica después de reducción cerrada en displasia del desarrollo de la cadera

    OpenAIRE

    Cassis, N.; De Castro, S.(INFN Sezione di Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy)

    1997-01-01

    Se presenta una revisión retrospectiva de 81 pacientes con 121 caderas con displasia del desarrollo tratados mediante reducción cerrada, miotomía de los aductores, tenotomía del psoas e inmovilización en una espica de yeso sin tracción previa a la reducción. Setenta y un pacientes del sexo femenino y 10 del masculino. El período de inmovilización fue en promedio de 3,6 meses. El seguimiento fue de 3 años mínimo y 20 años como máximo, con un promedio de 9,8 años. Los pacientes t...

  3. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinga, K.R. (ed.)

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  4. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1979. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1 of 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-O; Part 2 contains Appendices P-FF. Separate abstracts have been prepared of each Appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  5. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  6. Cooperation in Carrier Sense Based Wireless Ad Hoc Networks - Part II: Proactive Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Munari, Andrea; Zorzi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This work is the second of a two-part series of papers on the effectiveness of cooperative techniques in non-centralized carrier sense-based ad hoc wireless networks. While Part I extensively discussed reactive cooperation, characterized by relayed transmissions triggered by failure events at the intended receiver, Part II investigates in depth proactive solutions, in which the source of a packet exploits channel state information to preemptively coordinate with relays in order to achieve the optimal overall rate to the destination. In particular, this work shows by means of both analysis and simulation that the performance of reactive cooperation is reduced by the intrinsic nature of the considered medium access policy, which biases the distribution of the available relays, locating them in unfavorable positions for rate optimization. Moreover, the highly dynamic nature of interference that characterizes non-infrastructured ad hoc networks is proved to hamper the efficacy and the reliability of preemptively ...

  7. Zn(II, Mn(II and Sr(II Behavior in a Natural Carbonate Reservoir System. Part II: Impact of Geological CO2 Storage Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auffray B.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Some key points still prevent the full development of geological carbon sequestration in underground formations, especially concerning the assessment of the integrity of such storage. Indeed, the consequences of gas injection on chemistry and petrophysical properties are still much discussed in the scientific community, and are still not well known at either laboratory or field scale. In this article, the results of an experimental study about the mobilization of Trace Elements (TE during CO2 injection in a reservoir are presented. The experimental conditions range from typical storage formation conditions (90 bar, supercritical CO2 to shallower conditions (60 and 30 bar, CO2 as gas phase, and consider the dissolution of the two carbonates, coupled with the sorption of an initial concentration of 10−5 M of Zn(II, and the consequent release in solution of Mn(II and Sr(II. The investigation goes beyond the sole behavior of TE in the storage conditions: it presents the specific behavior of each element with respect to the pressure and the natural carbonate considered, showing that different equilibrium concentrations are to be expected if a fluid with a given concentration of TE leaks to an upper formation. Even though sorption is evidenced, it does not balance the amount of TE released by the dissolution process. The increase in porosity is clearly evidenced as a linear function of the CO2 pressure imposed for the St-Emilion carbonate. For the Lavoux carbonate, this trend is not confirmed by the 90 bar experiment. A preferential dissolution of the bigger family of pores from the preexisting porosity is observed in one of the samples (Lavoux carbonate while the second one (St-Emilion carbonate presents a newly-formed family of pores. Both reacted samples evidence that the pore network evolves toward a tubular network type.

  8. Optimal recombination in genetic algorithms for combinatorial optimization problems: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremeev Anton V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper surveys results on complexity of the optimal recombination problem (ORP, which consists in finding the best possible offspring as a result of a recombination operator in a genetic algorithm, given two parent solutions. In Part II, we consider the computational complexity of ORPs arising in genetic algorithms for problems on permutations: the Travelling Salesman Problem, the Shortest Hamilton Path Problem and the Makespan Minimization on Single Machine and some other related problems. The analysis indicates that the corresponding ORPs are NP-hard, but solvable by faster algorithms, compared to the problems they are derived from.

  9. Social class, political power, and the state: their implications in medicine--parts I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, V

    1976-01-01

    This three part article presents an anlysis of the distribution of power and of the nature of the state in Western industrialized societies and details their implications in medicine. Part I presents a critique of contemporary theories of the Western system of power; discusses the countervailing pluralist and power elite theories, as well as those of bureaucratic and professional control; and concludes with an examination of the Marxist theories of economic determinism, structural determinism, and corporate statism. Part II presents a Marxist theory of the role, nature, and characteristics of state intervention. Part III (which will appear in the next issue of this journal) focuses on the mode of that intervention and the reasons for its growth, with an added analysis of the attributes of state intervention in the health sector, and of the dialectical relationship between its growth and the current fiscal crisis of the state. In all three parts, the focus is on Western European countries and on North America, with many examples and categories from the area of medicine. PMID:1022803

  10. Part I: Sound color in the music of Gyorgy Kurtag, Part II: "Leopard's Path," thirteen visions for chamber ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachimciuc, Igor

    The dissertation is in two parts, a theoretical study and a musical composition. In Part I the music of Gyorgy Kurtag is analyzed from the point of view of sound color. A brief description of what is understood by the term sound color, and various ways of achieving specific coloristic effects, are presented in the Introduction. An examination of Kurtag's approaches to the domain of sound color occupies the chapters that follow. The musical examples that are analyzed are selected from Kurtag's different compositional periods, showing a certain consistency in sound color techniques, the most important of which are already present in the String Quartet, Op. 1. The compositions selected for analysis are written for different ensembles, but regardless of the instrumentation, certain principles of the formation and organization of sound color remain the same. Rather than relying on extended instrumental techniques, Kurtag creates a large variety of sound colors using traditional means such as pitch material, register, density, rhythm, timbral combinations, dynamics, texture, spatial displacement of the instruments, and the overall musical context. Each sound color unit in Kurtag's music is a separate entity, conceived as a complete microcosm. Sound color units can either be juxtaposed as contrasting elements, forming sound color variations, or superimposed, often resulting in a Klangfarbenmelodie effect. Some of the same gestural figures (objets trouves) appear in different compositions, but with significant coloristic modifications. Thus, the principle of sound color variations is not only a strong organizational tool, but also a characteristic stylistic feature of the music of Gyorgy Kurtag. Part II, Leopard's Path (2010), for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, cimbalom, and piano, is an original composition inspired by the painting of Jesse Allen, a San Francisco based artist. The composition is conceived as a cycle of thirteen short movements. Ten of these movements are

  11. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part II - size estimations for selected markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    In a series of two contributions, decisive business-related aspects of the current process status to transfer research results on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) into commercial solutions are discussed. In part I, the focus was on the patent landscape. Here, in part II, market estimations concerning DOEs for selected applications are presented, comprising classical spectroscopic gratings, security features on banknotes, DOEs for high-end applications, e.g., for the semiconductor manufacturing market and diffractive intra-ocular lenses. The derived market sizes are referred to the optical elements, itself, rather than to the enabled instruments. The estimated market volumes are mainly addressed to scientifically and technologically oriented optical engineers to serve as a rough classification of the commercial dimensions of DOEs in the different market segments and do not claim to be exhaustive.

  12. A thermoelectric power generating heat exchanger: Part II – Numerical modeling and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Bjørk, Rasmus; Lindeburg, N.;

    2016-01-01

    In Part I of this study, the performance of an experimental integrated thermoelectric generator (TEG)-heat exchanger was presented. In the current study, Part II, the obtained experimental results are compared with those predicted by a finite element (FE) model. In the simulation of the integrated...... TEG-heat exchanger, the thermal contact resistance between the TEG and the heat exchanger is modeled assuming either an ideal thermal contact or using a combined Cooper–Mikic–Yovanovich (CMY) and parallel plate gap formulation, which takes into account the contact pressure, roughness and hardness of...... the interface surfaces as well as the air gap thermal resistance at the interface. The combined CMY and parallel plate gap model is then further developed to simulate the thermal contact resistance for the case of an interface material. The numerical results show good agreement with the experimental...

  13. Biology and Mechanics of Blood Flows Part II: Mechanics and Medical Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Biology and Mechanics of Blood Flows presents the basic knowledge and state-of-the-art techniques necessary to carry out investigations of the cardiovascular system using modeling and simulation. Part II of this two-volume sequence, Mechanics and Medical Aspects, refers to the extraction of input data at the macroscopic scale for modeling the cardiovascular system, and complements Part I, which focuses on nanoscopic and microscopic components and processes. This volume contains chapters on anatomy, physiology, continuum mechanics, as well as pathological changes in the vasculature walls including the heart and their treatments. Methods of numerical simulations are given and illustrated in particular by application to wall diseases. This authoritative book will appeal to any biologist, chemist, physicist, or applied mathematician interested in the functioning of the cardiovascular system.

  14. Time Synchronization Attack in Smart Grid-Part II: Cross Layer Detection Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhenghao; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Li, Husheng

    2012-01-01

    A novel time synchronization attack (TSA) on wide area monitoring systems in smart grid has been identified in the first part of this paper. A cross layer detection mechanism is proposed to combat TSA in part II of this paper. In the physical layer, we propose a GPS carrier signal noise ratio (C/No) based spoofing detection technique. In addition, a patch-monopole hybrid antenna is applied to receive GPS signal. By computing the standard deviation of the C/No difference from two GPS receivers, a priori probability of spoofing detection is fed to the upper layer, where power system state is estimated and controlled. A trustworthiness based evaluation method is applied to identify the PMU being under TSA. Both the physical layer and upper layer algorithms are integrated to detect the TSA, thus forming a cross layer mechanism. Experiment is carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed TSA detection algorithm.

  15. A US perspective on fast reactor fuel fabrication technology and experience. Part II: Ceramic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is Part II of a review focusing on the United States experience with oxide, carbide, and nitride fast reactor fuel fabrication. Over 60 years of research in fuel fabrication by government, national laboratories, industry, and academia has culminated in a foundation of research and resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate these fuel types. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies in the United States for each of these fuel types, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  16. Large deformation of magnesium sheet at room temperature by preform annealing, part II: “Bending”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automotive magnesium sheets are typically difficult to deform up to large strains at room temperature for stamping applications. This paper is part II of a study to assess the effect of multi-step bending and annealing (MBA) on cumulative bendability of AZ31 magnesium alloy at room temperature. The deformation mechanisms during the MBA process are studied by V-bending and Electron Backscattered Diffraction study. The MBA process is shown to improve the cumulative bendability of AZ31 at room temperature by grain refinement and texture modification. The results are also compared with part I of the study where the effect of multi-step uniaxial stretching and annealing is studied on the uniaxial tensile ductility of AZ31 at room temperature

  17. Guidelines for the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (including bronchopulmonary and thymic neoplasms). Part II-specific NE tumour types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberg, Kjell; Astrup, Lone Bording; Eriksson, Barbro;

    2004-01-01

    Part II of the guidelines contains a description of epidemiology, histopathology, clinical presentation, diagnostic procedure, treatment, and survival for each type of neuroendocrine tumour. We are not only including gastroenteropancreatic tumours but also bronchopulmonary and thymic neuroendocri...

  18. Delivery systems for biopharmaceuticals. Part II: Liposomes, Micelles, Microemulsions and Dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana C; Lopes, Carla M; Lobo, José M S; Amaral, Maria H

    2015-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are a generation of drugs that include peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and cell products. According to their particular molecular characteristics (e.g. high molecular size, susceptibility to enzymatic activity), these products present some limitations for administration and usually parenteral routes are the only option. To avoid these limitations, different colloidal carriers (e.g. liposomes, micelles, microemulsions and dendrimers) have been proposed to improve biopharmaceuticals delivery. Liposomes are promising drug delivery systems, despite some limitations have been reported (e.g. in vivo failure, poor long-term stability and low transfection efficiency), and only a limited number of formulations have reached the market. Micelles and microemulsions require more studies to exclude some of the observed drawbacks and guarantee their potential for use in clinic. According to their peculiar structures, dendrimers have been showing good results for nucleic acids delivery and a great development of these systems during next years is expected. This is the Part II of two review articles, which provides the state of the art of biopharmaceuticals delivery systems. Part II deals with liposomes, micelles, microemulsions and dendrimers. PMID:26278524

  19. Analysis of Radionuclide Releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achim, Pascal; Monfort, Marguerite; Le Petit, Gilbert; Gross, Philippe; Douysset, Guilhem; Taffary, Thomas; Blanchard, Xavier; Moulin, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    The present part of the publication (Part II) deals with long range dispersion of radionuclides emitted into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident that occurred after the March 11, 2011 tsunami. The first part (Part I) is dedicated to the accident features relying on radionuclide detections performed by monitoring stations of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization network. In this study, the emissions of the three fission products Cs-137, I-131 and Xe-133 are investigated. Regarding Xe-133, the total release is estimated to be of the order of 6 × 1018 Bq emitted during the explosions of units 1, 2 and 3. The total source term estimated gives a fraction of core inventory of about 8 × 1018 Bq at the time of reactors shutdown. This result suggests that at least 80 % of the core inventory has been released into the atmosphere and indicates a broad meltdown of reactor cores. Total atmospheric releases of Cs-137 and I-131 aerosols are estimated to be 1016 and 1017 Bq, respectively. By neglecting gas/particulate conversion phenomena, the total release of I-131 (gas + aerosol) could be estimated to be 4 × 1017 Bq. Atmospheric transport simulations suggest that the main air emissions have occurred during the events of March 14, 2011 (UTC) and that no major release occurred after March 23. The radioactivity emitted into the atmosphere could represent 10 % of the Chernobyl accident releases for I-131 and Cs-137.

  20. Seismic risk analysis for General Electric Plutonium Facility, Pleasanton, California. Final report, part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-27

    This report is the second of a two part study addressing the seismic risk or hazard of the special nuclear materials (SNM) facility of the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center at Pleasanton, California. The Part I companion to this report, dated July 31, 1978, presented the seismic hazard at the site that resulted from exposure to earthquakes on the Calaveras, Hayward, San Andreas and, additionally, from smaller unassociated earthquakes that could not be attributed to these specific faults. However, while this study was in progress, certain additional geologic information became available that could be interpreted in terms of the existance of a nearby fault. Although substantial geologic investigations were subsequently deployed, the existance of this postulated fault, called the Verona Fault, remained very controversial. The purpose of the Part II study was to assume the existance of such a capable fault and, under this assumption, to examine the loads that the fault could impose on the SNM facility. This report first reviews the geologic setting with a focus on specifying sufficient geologic parameters to characterize the postulated fault. The report next presents the methodology used to calculate the vibratory ground motion hazard. Because of the complexity of the fault geometry, a slightly different methodology is used here compared to the Part I report. This section ends with the results of the calculation applied to the SNM facility. Finally, the report presents the methodology and results of the rupture hazard calculation.

  1. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part II. Renormalization procedures and computational techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In part I general aspects of the renormalization of a spontaneously broken gauge theory have been introduced. Here, in part II, two-loop renormalization is introduced and discussed within the context of the minimal Standard Model. Therefore, this paper deals with the transition between bare parameters and fields to renormalized ones. The full list of one- and two-loop counterterms is shown and it is proven that, by a suitable extension of the formalism already introduced at the one-loop level, two-point functions suffice in renormalizing the model. The problem of overlapping ultraviolet divergencies is analyzed and it is shown that all counterterms are local and of polynomial nature. The original program of 't Hooft and Veltman is at work. Finite parts are written in a way that allows for a fast and reliable numerical integration with all collinear logarithms extracted analytically. Finite renormalization, the transition between renormalized parameters and physical (pseudo-)observables, are discussed in part III where numerical results, e.g. for the complex poles of the unstable gauge bosons, are shown. An attempt is made to define the running of the electromagnetic coupling constant at the two-loop level. (orig.)

  2. La transición de la manzana cerrada al bloque abierto en la ciudad de Madrid durante la primera mitad del siglo XX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Cristobal Araujo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLa motivación que impulsa la investigación es profundizar en el cambio de paradigma que se produce en la construcción de la vivienda colectiva en Madrid durante la primera mitad del siglo XX. El trabajo estudia aquellas obras de vivienda residencial colectiva, que en su diseño, muestran una evolución de la manzana cerrada decimonónica al bloque abierto, como referencia de los postulados del Movimiento Moderno. La metodología empleada limita las obras de estudio según su localización geográfica, año de construcción y tipología constructiva. El estudio y los datos del trabajo se obtienen del levantamiento digital realizado por la Comunidad de Madrid en 2004 y la visita in situ a las obras, durante el periodo de realización del trabajo (enero/junio 2013. Más allá de las aportaciones numéricas del estudio, las conclusiones aportan la división en tres fases de esta transición; la primera en la que el solar es producto de la subdivisión de una manzana cerrada. En la segunda fase, el edificio ocupa la totalidad de la manzana, pero los espacios públicos no son accesibles al peatón. Y en tercer lugar, el solar pierde la condición geométrica cuadrangular de la manzana cerrada y los espacios públicos son libremente accesibles.Palabras claveMovimiento Moderno, vivienda residencial colectiva.AbstractThe motivation behind the research is to deepen the paradigm shift that occurs in the construction of collective housing in Madrid during the first half of the twentieth century. The paper examines those works of collective residential housing , which in its design, show an evolution of the city block to open block, by reference to the principles of the Modern Movement. The methodology used to study the works, was limited by geographic location, year of construction and type of construction. The study and work data obtained from digital survey conducted by the Community of Madrid in 2004 and the site visit to the works, during the

  3. Open and closed penalty kick strategies in intermediate soccer player Estrategias abierta y cerrada del penalti en jugadores de nivel intermedio de fútbol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Castillo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    This study investigates the efficacy of intermediate penalty kickers by comparing the effect of applying an automated WiFi (Wireless Fidelity  system on the field of play to simulate a strategy that takes account of goalkeeper action (open with another for which goalkeeper strategy is irrelevant (closed. Intermediate penalty kickers (n=12 took a pretreatment test of 32 kicks in a “real-play” situation with intermediate goalkeepers (n=3. We established two groups of kickers who underwent 11 treatment sessions using different strategies and then conducted a posttreatment test. The variables we measured were the number of goals scored, whether the direction of the shot was the same or different from the direction of the goalkeeper’s move (DDG, ball speed and the duration of the kicking movement. The results suggest the goalkeepers demonstrated a greater capacity to identify advance cues when faced with CG (closed strategy group kickers and that OG (open strategy group kickers achieved lower ball speeds when modifying the contact surface of the kick.
    Key Words:  penalty kick, anticipation, decision-making, field, training.

     

    Este estudio compara el efecto en la aplicación de un sistema automatizado inalámbrico en el terreno de juego para simular una estrategia que tiene en cuanta la actuación del portero (abierta frente a otra estrategia que la ignora (cerrada sobre la eficacia de lanzadores intermedios de penalti. Lanzadores (n=12 intermedios de penalti realizaron un test pre-tratamiento de 32 tiros en “situación real” con porteros (n=3 intermedios. A continuación se establecieron dos grupos de lanzadores que completaron 11 sesiones de tratamiento utilizando estrategias distintas y por último repitieron un test post-postratamiento. Como variables medimos el número de goles conseguidos, la dirección del chut en la misma o en dirección no

  4. Noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part II: spectrum of imaging findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Ronan P

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has evolved into an effective imaging technique for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in selected patients. Two distinct advantages over other noninvasive cardiac imaging methods include its ability to directly evaluate the coronary arteries and to provide a unique opportunity to evaluate for alternative diagnoses by assessing the extracardiac structures, such as the lungs and mediastinum, particularly in patients presenting with the chief symptom of acute chest pain. Some centers reconstruct a small field of view (FOV) cropped around the heart but a full FOV (from skin to skin in the area irradiated) is obtainable in the raw data of every scan so that clinically relevant noncardiac findings are identifiable. Debate in the scientific community has centered on the necessity for this large FOV. A review of noncardiac structures provides the opportunity to make alternative diagnoses that may account for the patient\\'s presentation or to detect important but clinically silent problems such as lung cancer. Critics argue that the yield of biopsy-proven cancers is low and that the follow-up of incidental noncardiac findings is expensive, resulting in increased radiation exposure and possibly unnecessary further testing. In this 2-part review we outline the issues surrounding the concept of the noncardiac read, looking for noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part I focused on the pros and cons for and against the practice of identifying noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part II illustrates the imaging spectrum of cardiac CT appearances of benign and malignant noncardiac pathology.

  5. Constructions of Optical Queues With a Limited Number of Recirculations--Part II: Optimal Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xuan-Chao

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in all-optical packet-switched networks is the lack of optical buffers, and one feasible technology for the constructions of optical buffers is to use optical crossbar Switches and fiber Delay Lines (SDL). In this two-part paper, we consider SDL constructions of optical queues with a limited number of recirculations through the optical switches and the fiber delay lines. Such a problem arises from practical feasibility considerations. In Part I, we have proposed a class of greedy constructions for certain types of optical queues, including linear compressors, linear decompressors, and 2-to-1 FIFO multiplexers, and have shown that every optimal construction among our previous constructions of these types of optical queues under the constraint of a limited number of recirculations must be a greedy construction. In Part II, the present paper, we further show that there are at most two optimal constructions and give a simple algorithm to obtain the optimal construction(s). The main idea i...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part II: Abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Tuite, Michael; Sanford, Matthew [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Part II of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the soft tissue structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the ulnar collateral ligament and lateral collateral ligament of the elbow with high sensitivity and specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging can determine the extent of tendon pathology in patients with medial epicondylitis and lateral epicondylitis. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the biceps tendon and triceps tendon and can distinguishing between partial and complete tendon rupture. Magnetic resonance imaging is also helpful in evaluating patients with nerve disorders at the elbow. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part II: Abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part II of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the soft tissue structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the ulnar collateral ligament and lateral collateral ligament of the elbow with high sensitivity and specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging can determine the extent of tendon pathology in patients with medial epicondylitis and lateral epicondylitis. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the biceps tendon and triceps tendon and can distinguishing between partial and complete tendon rupture. Magnetic resonance imaging is also helpful in evaluating patients with nerve disorders at the elbow. (orig.)

  8. Societal Planning: Identifying a New Role for the Transport Planner-Part II: Planning Guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khisty, C. Jotin; Leleur, Steen

    1997-01-01

    The paper seeks to formulate planning guidelines based on Habermas's theory of communicative action. Specifically, this has led to the formulation of a set of four planning validity claims concerned to four types of planning guidelines concerning adequacy, dependency, suitability and adaptability....... The guidelines serve to frame the right considerations and questions when dealing with planning problems of a certain complexity. They can then facilitate the structuring and interpretation of empirical study. Emphasis is paid to describe the planning process as one of self-organizing dynamics vis......-a-vis the planning validity claims. Among other things the contingency of this process is outlined. It is concluded (part I & II) that transport planners can conveniently utilize the guidelines in their professional practice, tailored to their particular settings....

  9. Reciprocity-enhanced optical communication through atmospheric turbulence - part II: communication architectures and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puryear, Andrew L.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Parenti, Ronald R.

    2012-10-01

    Free-space optical communication provides rapidly deployable, dynamic communication links that are capable of very high data rates compared with those of radio-frequency systems. As such, free-space optical communication is ideal for mobile platforms, for platforms that require the additional security afforded by the narrow divergence of a laser beam, and for systems that must be deployed in a relatively short time frame. In clear-weather conditions the data rate and utility of free-space optical communication links are primarily limited by fading caused by micro-scale atmospheric temperature variations that create parts-per-million refractive-index fluctuations known as atmospheric turbulence. Typical communication techniques to overcome turbulence-induced fading, such as interleavers with sophisticated codes, lose viability as the data rate is driven higher or the delay requirement is driven lower. This paper, along with its companion [J. H. Shapiro and A. Puryear, "Reciprocity-Enhanced Optical Communication through Atmospheric Turbulence-Part I: Reciprocity Proofs and Far-Field Power Transfer"], present communication systems and techniques that exploit atmospheric reciprocity to overcome turbulence which are viable for high data rate and low delay requirement systems. Part I proves that reciprocity is exhibited under rather general conditions, and derives the optimal power-transfer phase compensation for far-field operation. The Part II paper presents capacity-achieving architectures that exploit reciprocity to overcome the complexity and delay issues that limit state-of-the art free-space optical communications. Further, this paper uses theoretical turbulence models to determine the performance—delay, throughput, and complexity—of the proposed architectures.

  10. Derivados organometálicos de estanho(II - Parte 1. Compostos ciclopentadienílicos Organometallic tin(II derivatives - Part 1. Cyclopentadienyl compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo M. de Lima

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief review of the chemistry of cyclopentadienyl Sn(II derivatives which includes the preparation, the molecular structure and reactivity associated with such bis-sandwich tin(II species. It is compared structural and spectroscopic results and it is also discussed how the nature of the cyclopentadienyl ring bonded to the Sn centre plays an important role in the structural and stability features of the derivatives. Bulk rings such as C5HPr i4- , C5Bz5-, C5Me4SiMe2Bu t- and C5Ph5- render air-stable and parallel ring-bonded compounds.

  11. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Eight Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Eighth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Past Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 15 to 18 April 1975. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMPBR’s and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  12. Evaluation and prediction of reinforced concrete durability by means of durability indicators. Part II : Multi-level predictive modelling

    OpenAIRE

    BAROGHEL BOUNY, V; Nguyen, TQ; Thiery, M.; DANGLA, P; Belin, P

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new performance-based approach devoted to the evaluation and the predition of the durability of reinforced concrete structures. It is based upon durability indicators DIs and monitoring parameters. This paper is separated in two parts. In Part I, the selected panel of "universal" DIs, along with performance-based specifications with regards to protection against reinforcement corrosion, have been presented. In this Part II, within the framework of the prediction of the s...

  13. Interactions between DNA and gemini surfactant: impact on gene therapy: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Taksim; Kamel, Amany O; Wettig, Shawn D

    2016-02-01

    Nonviral gene delivery, provides distinct treatment modalities for the inherited and acquired diseases, relies upon the encapsulation of a gene of interest, which is then ideally delivered to the target cells. Variations in the chemical structure of gemini surfactants and subsequent physicochemical characteristics of the gemini-based lipoplexes and their impact on efficient gene transfection were assessed in part I, which was published in first March 2016 issue of Nanomedicine (1103). In order to design an efficient vector using gemini surfactants, the interaction of the surfactant with DNA and other components of the delivery system must be characterized, and more critically, well understood. Such studies will help to understand how nonviral transfection complexes, in general, overcome various cellular barriers. The Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer studies, atomic force microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry, small-angle x-ray scattering, are extensively used to evaluate the interaction behavior of gemini surfactants with DNA and other vector components. Part II of this review focuses on the use of these unique techniques to understand their interaction with DNA. PMID:26784450

  14. Tobacco control and gender in south-east Asia. Part II: Singapore and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Martha; Barraclough, Simon

    2003-12-01

    In the World Health Organization's Western Pacific Region, being born male is the single greatest risk marker for tobacco use. While the literature demonstrates that risks associated with tobacco use may vary according to sex, gender refers to the socially determined roles and responsibilities of men and women, who initiate, continue and quit using tobacco for complex and often different reasons. Cigarette advertising frequently appeals to gender roles. Yet tobacco control policy tends to be gender-blind. Using a broad, gender-sensitivity framework, this contradiction is explored in four Western Pacific countries. Part I of the study presented the rationale, methodology and design of the study, discussed issues surrounding gender and tobacco, and analysed developments in Malaysia and the Philippines (see the previous issue of this journal). Part II deals with Singapore and Vietnam. In all four countries gender was salient for the initiation and maintenance of smoking. Yet, with a few exceptions, gender was largely unrecognized in control policy. Suggestions for overcoming this weakness in order to enhance tobacco control are made. PMID:14695368

  15. Investigational drug tracking: phases I-III and NDA submissions--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, K L

    1994-10-01

    The author catalogs over 800 investigational drugs/biologicals currently in Phase I, II or III clinical trials or drugs/biologicals submitted to the FDA as new drug applications. Part I of this article appeared in the September issue of Hospital Pharmacy. The list assists in predicting when new drugs will be marketed. The entries include generic/chemical name, investigational drug number, synonyms, trade names, manufacturers, clinical trial status, predicted approval year, indications or drug class, whether the drug has been developed through biotechnology, and references. Entries were gleaned from medical journals, stock market analysis publications, and the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association's Medicines in Development Series. The list is alphabetized by the generic/chemical name or investigational drug number and cross-indexed by the trade name and synonyms. The list reflects those drugs which were not FDA approved as of April 15, 1994. Part I concludes with the remaining alphabetical listing by generic/chemical name or investigational drug number. PMID:10137850

  16. Discover Health Services Near You! The North Dakota Story: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safratowich, Michael; Markland, Mary J; Rieke, Judith L

    2009-07-01

    Since the 2003 launch of NC Health Info, the National Library of Medicine has encouraged the development of Go Local databases. A team of Go Local enthusiasts at North Dakota's only medical school library wanted to obtain NLM funding and build a resource for their rural state. Although short on staff, money, and time, the team found a way to realize a Go Local database that serves the state's residents and helps them "Discover Health Services Near You!" A team approach and collaboration with health providers and organizations worked well in this small rural state. North Dakota's Go Local project offers a low-cost model that stresses collaboration, teamwork and technology. Part I which appeared in the last issue describes the rural setting, explains how the project was conceived, and the processes necessary to begin building the database. Part II which appears in this issue details how records were created including developing the input style guide and indexing decisions, the NLM testing and review process, the maintenance and auditing process, and publicity and promotion of the project. PMID:20436944

  17. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death. PMID:17721164

  18. Rare or remarkable microfungi from Oaxaca (south Mexico)--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale-Agha, N; Jensen, M; Brassmann, M; Kautz, S; Eilmus, S; Ballhorn, D J

    2008-01-01

    Microfungi were collected in southern Mexico in the vicinity of Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca in 2007. In 2006, samples were gathered from Acacia myrmecophytes [(Remarkable microfungi from Oaxaca of Acacia species) Part I]. In the present investigation [Part II], we collected microfungi from different parts of a variety of wild and cultivated higher plants belonging to the families Anacardiaceae, Caricaceae, Fabaceae, Moraceae, and Nyctaginacae. The microfungi found here live as parasites or saprophytes. Interestingly, the species Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. and Magn.) Briosi and Cavara has repeatedly been used to cause fungal infections of Phaseolus lunatus leaves in laboratory experiments. We could now find the same fungus as parasite on the same host plants under field conditions showing that results obtained in the laboratory are also relevant in nature. Most of the fungal species collected belong to the classes Ascomycotina, Basidiomycotina and Deuteromycotina. Until now, some of the microfungi identified in this study have been rarely observed before or have been reported for the first time in Mexico, for example: Pestalotia acaciae Thüm. on Acacia collinsii Safford; Corynespora cassiicola (Berk. and M.A. Curtis) C.T. Wei on Carica papaya L.; Botryosphaeria ribis Grossenb. and Duggar and Cercosporella leucaenae (Raghu Ram and Mallaiah) U. Braun (new for Mexico) and Camptomeris leucaenae (F. Stevens and Dalbey) Syd. (new for Mexico) on Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit.; Oidium clitoriae Narayanas. and K. Ramakr. and Phakopsora cf. pachyrhizi Sydow and Sydow (new for Mexico) on Clitoria ternatea L.; Botryosphaeria obtusa (Schw.) Shoemaker on Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC.; Cylindrocladium scoparium Morg. on Ficus benjamina L.; Acremonium sp. on Bougainvillea sp. All specimens are located in the herbarium ESS. Mycotheca Parva collection G.B. Feige and N. Ale-Agha. PMID:19226752

  19. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  20. Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries--Part II: Gaseous pollutants' assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, P T B S; Nunes, R A O; Alvim-Ferraz, M C M; Martins, F G; Sousa, S I V

    2015-10-01

    This study, Part II of the larger study "Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries", aimed to: (i) evaluate nursery schools' indoor concentrations of several air pollutants in class and lunch rooms; and (ii) analyse them according to guidelines and references. Indoor continuous measurements were performed, and outdoor concentrations were obtained to determine indoor/outdoor ratios. The influence of outdoor air seemed to be determinant on carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) indoor concentrations. The peak concentrations of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOC) registered (highest concentrations of 204 and 2320 µg m(-3) respectively), indicated the presence of specific indoor sources of these pollutants, namely materials emitting formaldehyde and products emitting VOC associated to cleaning and children's specific activities (like paints and glues). For formaldehyde, baseline constant concentrations along the day were also found in some of the studied rooms, which enhances the importance of detailing the study of children's short and long-term exposure to this indoor air pollutant. While CO, NO2 and O3 never exceeded the national and international reference values for IAQ and health protection, exceedances were found for formaldehyde and VOC. For this reason, a health risk assessment approach could be interesting for future research to assess children's health risks of exposure to formaldehyde and to VOC concentrations in nursery schools. Changing cleaning schedules and materials emitting formaldehyde, and more efficient ventilation while using products emitting VOC, with the correct amount and distribution of fresh air, would decrease children's exposure. PMID:26342590

  1. Sludge in the pulp and paper industry in Sweden, part II[Combustion of]; Slam fraan skogsindustrin, fas II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyllenhammar, Marianne; Herstad Svaerd, Solvie; Kjoerk, Anders; Larsson, Sara; Wennberg, Olle [S.E.P. Scandinavian Energy Project AB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Aamand, Lars-Erik [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Eskilsson, David [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2003-11-01

    During part II of this research program combustible sludge from the pulp and paper industry has been studied in detail. 560,000 tonnes of sludge per year (calculated as dry sludge) are produced in Sweden. The energy potential in the produced sludge is about 2 TWh/year. Today 1 TWh/year is produced in the pulp and paper mill's own boilers. This means that additional energy can be utilized from this material. An objective of this program has been to decide whether or not there are sludge types which are favourable respectively difficult to combust. By mixing different sludge types, or other waste products, emissions and/or problems during combustion can be minimized. These possibilities have been studied thoroughly in this program. A lot of sludge samples have been studied in laboratory scale at SP and in full-scale at Chalmers 12 MW CFB boiler. As a complement to the practical tests S.E.P. has done research regarding different aspects of sludge as a fuel; for example handling of sludge and regional drying. The results of 40 sintering tests at SP showed that the sintering temperature during combustion of sludge in a fluidised bed, with silica sand as bed material, varied between <850 deg C and >1100 deg C. The evaluation showed that the alkali content in the ash had the largest influence on the sintering temperature. Other factors were less important. During the tests at Chalmers eleven different sludge samples have been combusted together with wood pellets. Initially there were problems with the feeding to the boiler for some of the sludge samples. When the fuel feeding problems were solved the combustion took place without any problems. When sludge is co-combusted together with a 'clean' base fuel such as wood pellets the sulphur-, nitrogen- and chloride contents in the sludge have a large impact on the emissions. The normal way to reduce sulphur dioxide but also hydrogen chloride is to add lime in different positions into and after the boiler. In

  2. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II; Analisis neutronico y termohidraulico del reactor C.E.N.E. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R.

    1976-07-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs.

  3. De los sistemas de prefabricación cerrada a la industrialización sutil de la edifi cación: algunas claves del cambio tecnológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salas, J.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article discusses facts as well as possible assumptions relating to the evolution of building in Europe in general and Spain in particular, and the development of the technologies used in the industrialization of construction over a long period: essentially from 1970 to date. It is, then, an overview of the events that have occasioned or affected housing construction, ranging from closed system precasting, consisting primarily in large concrete panels, to the new design and building methods that entail the use of construction components and subsystems of different origins. The paper is organized around fi ve subjects that at least partially refl ect and update contributions previously published by the author on the following: chronological evolution of the most common construction technologies used in the last three decades; changes in precast and prefabricated member production; joints as invariants in industrialized construction; the new approach to modular coordination; and the economic impact of functional elements on housing construction budgets.El trabajo que sigue pretende aportar hechos y posibles supuestos razonados sobre la evolución del sector de la edifi cación europea, con especial énfasis en el caso español, de la trayectoria de las tecnologías empleadas en el proceso de industrialización de la construcción en un período sufi cientemente amplio, –básicamente de 1970 a la fecha– lo que supone una panorámica de los hechos que han motivado o infl uido en el proceso de evolución de la construcción de viviendas a base de sistemas de prefabricación cerrada mayoritariamente mediante grandes paneles de hormigón a las nuevas formas de proyectar y construir que conlleva la utilización de componentes y subsistemas constructivos de diferentes procedencias. El trabajo se estructura básicamente en forma de cinco temas que, en parte, recogen y actualizan aportaciones ya publicadas por el autor sobre los

  4. Critical Illness in Pregnancy: Part II: Common Medical Conditions Complicating Pregnancy and Puerperium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K; Karnad, Dilip R; Bandi, Venkata; Hall, Nicole; Belfort, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The first of this two-part series on critical illness in pregnancy dealt with obstetric disorders. In Part II, medical conditions that commonly affect pregnant women or worsen during pregnancy are discussed. ARDS occurs more frequently in pregnancy. Strategies commonly used in nonpregnant patients, including permissive hypercapnia, limits for plateau pressure, and prone positioning, may not be acceptable, especially in late pregnancy. Genital tract infections unique to pregnancy include chorioamnionitis, group A streptococcal infection causing toxic shock syndrome, and polymicrobial infection with streptococci, staphylococci, and Clostridium perfringens causing necrotizing vulvitis or fasciitis. Pregnancy predisposes to VTE; D-dimer levels have low specificity in pregnancy. A ventilation-perfusion scan is preferred over CT pulmonary angiography in some situations to reduce radiation to the mother's breasts. Low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparins form the mainstay of treatment; vitamin K antagonists, oral factor Xa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors are not recommended in pregnancy. The physiologic hyperdynamic circulation in pregnancy worsens many cardiovascular disorders. It increases risk of pulmonary edema or arrhythmias in mitral stenosis, heart failure in pulmonary hypertension or aortic stenosis, aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome, or valve thrombosis in mechanical heart valves. Common neurologic problems in pregnancy include seizures, altered mental status, visual symptoms, and strokes. Other common conditions discussed are aspiration of gastric contents, OSA, thyroid disorders, diabetic ketoacidosis, and cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy. Studies confined to pregnant women are available for only a few of these conditions. We have, therefore, reviewed pregnancy-specific adjustments in the management of these disorders. PMID:26020727

  5. Thermoeconomic optimization of three trigeneration systems using organic Rankine cycles: Part II – Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Three new trigeneration systems (SOFC-trigeneration, biomass-trigeneration, and solar-trigeneration systems) are thermodynamically examined and assessed. ► The overall exergy efficiency for the SOFC-trigeneration system becomes the highest. ► The maximum costs per exergy unit for the SOFC-trigeneration system is approximately 38 $/GJ. ► The solar-trigeneration system offers the best thermoeconomic performance. - Abstract: In this part II of the study, three new trigeneration systems are examined. These systems are SOFC-trigeneration, biomass-trigeneration, and solar-trigeneration systems. This study reveals that the maximum trigeneration-exergy efficiencies are about 38% for the SOFC-trigeneration system, 28% for the biomass-trigeneration system and 18% for the solar-trigeneration system. Moreover, the maximum cost per exergy unit for the SOFC-trigeneration system is approximately 38 $/GJ, for the biomass-trigeneration system is 26 $/GJ, and for the solar-trigeneration system is 24 $/GJ. This study reveals that the solar-trigeneration system offers the best thermoeconomic performance among the three systems. This is because the solar-trigeneration system has the lowest cost per exergy unit. Furthermore, the solar-trigeneration system has zero CO2 emissions and it is based on a free renewable energy source

  6. The Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma, Part II: Reparative Adaptational Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Yael; Norris, Fran H; Lindert, Jutta; Paisner, Vera; Kronenberg, Sefi; Engdahl, Brian; Richter, Julia

    2015-05-01

    The impacts of the Holocaust on children of survivors have been widely investigated. However, consensus is limited, and no validated measures have been tailored with or to them. We aimed to develop and validate a scale that measures these specific impacts (Part II of the Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma). We studied 484 adult children of survivors who participated in a cross-sectional web-based survey in English or Hebrew; of these, 191 participated in a clinical interview. Exploratory factor analyses of 58 items to reduce and refine the measure yielded a 36-item scale, Reparative Adaptational Impacts, that had excellent internal consistency (α = .91) and congruence between English and Hebrew versions (φ ≥ .95). Associations between impacts and SCID-based diagnoses of major depressive episode, posttraumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder were moderate to strong (ds = 0.48-0.89). Strong associations also emerged between severity of offspring's reparative adaptational impacts and intensity of their parents' posttrauma adaptational styles (Multiple R = .72), with intensity of victim style, especially the mother's, having the strongest effect (β = .31-.33). Having both research and clinical relevance for assessing Holocaust survivors' offspring, future studies might investigate the scale's generalizability to other populations affected by mass trauma. PMID:25985110

  7. Stochastic theory of nonequilibrium steady states. Part II: Applications in chemical biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical theory of nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) has a natural application in open biochemical systems which have sustained source(s) and sink(s) in terms of a difference in their chemical potentials. After a brief introduction in Section , in Part II of this review, we present the widely studied biochemical enzyme kinetics, the workhorse of biochemical dynamic modeling, in terms of the theory of NESS (Section ). We then show that several phenomena in enzyme kinetics, including a newly discovered activation–inhibition switching (Section ) and the well-known non-Michaelis–Menten-cooperativity (Section ) and kinetic proofreading (Section ), are all consequences of the NESS of driven biochemical systems with associated cycle fluxes. Section is focused on nonlinear and nonequilibrium systems of biochemical reactions. We use the phosphorylation–dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC), one of the most important biochemical signaling networks, as an example (Section ). It starts with a brief introduction of the Delbrück–Gillespie process approach to mesoscopic biochemical kinetics (Sections ). We shall discuss the zeroth-order ultrasensitivity of PdPC in terms of a new concept — the temporal cooperativity (Sections ), as well as PdPC with feedback which leads to biochemical nonlinear bistability (Section ). Also, both are nonequilibrium phenomena. PdPC with a nonlinear feedback is kinetically isomorphic to a self-regulating gene expression network, hence the theory of NESS discussed here could have wide applications to many other biochemical systems.

  8. Reproduction in the space environment: Part II. Concerns for human reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, R. T.; Santy, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Long-duration space flight and eventual colonization of our solar system will require successful control of reproductive function and a thorough understanding of factors unique to space flight and their impact on gynecologic and obstetric parameters. Part II of this paper examines the specific environmental factors associated with space flight and the implications for human reproduction. Space environmental hazards discussed include radiation, alteration in atmospheric pressure and breathing gas partial pressures, prolonged toxicological exposure, and microgravity. The effects of countermeasures necessary to reduce cardiovascular deconditioning, calcium loss, muscle wasting, and neurovestibular problems are also considered. In addition, the impact of microgravity on male fertility and gamete quality is explored. Due to current constraints, human pregnancy is now contraindicated for space flight. However, a program to explore effective countermeasures to current constraints and develop the required health care delivery capability for extended-duration space flight is suggested. A program of Earth- and space-based research to provide further answers to reproductive questions is suggested.

  9. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.

  10. Physiotherapy and low back pain - part ii: outcomes research utilising the biopsychosocial model: biological outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Bardin

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is an acknowledged major health problem that is associated with high recurrence rates and increased chronic incapacity. It is one of the most common and costly conditions treated  by physiotherapists and therefore the physiotherapy profession has a responsibility to provide evidence of effectiveness of interventions for LBP.The quality and rigour of published research on LBP has been found lacking and has predominately utilised a biomedical model of health that focuses on disease and system pathology rather than on illness. Outcomes research has the potential to advance the quest for evidence of effective management of LBP. Patients with CLBP and disability face complex biopsychosocial problems, hence a multifactorial model of illness is particularly pertinent and is addressed by the outcomes research model. Outcome measures that are valid, reliable and responsive are necessary to determine effective interventions for LBP. Biological, psychological and social variables shape the experience and outcome of an episode of LBP and outcome measures reflecting all three aspects of the biopsychosocial model are important to the study of LBP. Outcome measures reflecting the biological component of the biopsychosocial model are discussed in part II: measures of pain and aspects of movement dysfunction.

  11. Coordinator(a) de Servicios Clinicos. Parte I (Unidad I-IV). Parte II (Unidad V-VI). Guia. Documento de Trabajo (Clinical Services Coordinator. Part I. Units I-IV. Part II. Units V-VI. Guide. Working Document).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey. Area for Vocational and Technical Education.

    This guide is intended for instructing secondary students in the occupation of clinical services coordinator in a hospital. The first part contains four units on the following subjects: the occupation of clinical services coordinator; interpersonal relationships; ethical/legal aspects; and communications (telephone, intercom, and others). For each…

  12. Towards multi-resolution global climate modeling with ECHAM6-FESOM. Part II: climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackow, T.; Goessling, H. F.; Jung, T.; Sidorenko, D.; Semmler, T.; Barbi, D.; Handorf, D.

    2016-06-01

    This study forms part II of two papers describing ECHAM6-FESOM, a newly established global climate model with a unique multi-resolution sea ice-ocean component. While part I deals with the model description and the mean climate state, here we examine the internal climate variability of the model under constant present-day (1990) conditions. We (1) assess the internal variations in the model in terms of objective variability performance indices, (2) analyze variations in global mean surface temperature and put them in context to variations in the observed record, with particular emphasis on the recent warming slowdown, (3) analyze and validate the most common atmospheric and oceanic variability patterns, (4) diagnose the potential predictability of various climate indices, and (5) put the multi-resolution approach to the test by comparing two setups that differ only in oceanic resolution in the equatorial belt, where one ocean mesh keeps the coarse ~1° resolution applied in the adjacent open-ocean regions and the other mesh is gradually refined to ~0.25°. Objective variability performance indices show that, in the considered setups, ECHAM6-FESOM performs overall favourably compared to five well-established climate models. Internal variations of the global mean surface temperature in the model are consistent with observed fluctuations and suggest that the recent warming slowdown can be explained as a once-in-one-hundred-years event caused by internal climate variability; periods of strong cooling in the model (`hiatus' analogs) are mainly associated with ENSO-related variability and to a lesser degree also to PDO shifts, with the AMO playing a minor role. Common atmospheric and oceanic variability patterns are simulated largely consistent with their real counterparts. Typical deficits also found in other models at similar resolutions remain, in particular too weak non-seasonal variability of SSTs over large parts of the ocean and episodic periods of almost absent

  13. CHAPA, BEEF COW/CALF HEALTH AND PRODUCTIVITY AUDIT, PART II: BEEF COW/CALF REPRODUCTIVE AND NUTRITIONAL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    OpenAIRE

    Dargatz, David

    1994-01-01

    As part of the National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS ), USDA:APHIS:Veterinary Services conducted a national study of beef production, the Beef Cow/Calf Health and Productivity Audit (CHAPA). This study was designed to provide both participants and the industry with information on cow/calf health, productivity, and management practices. Data for Part II: Nutritional & Reproductive Management Practices, were collected by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) from beef pr...

  14. Low carbon products to design innovative leather processes. Part II: determination of the optimal physical modification of tara

    OpenAIRE

    Ollé Otero, Lluís; Casas, Concepció; Diaz, Jorge; Sorolla, Sílvia; Bacardit Dalmases, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the fruit of the tara bush as a sustainable source for tanning agents and proposes alternatives to chromium and other mineral salts and vegetable extracts. Specifically, physical modifications have been developed in part II of the study to obtain a modified tara with a higher percentage of tannins and with a better level of penetration (see Low carbon products to design innovative leather processes. Part I: determination of the optimal chemical modification of...

  15. Developing guidelines for economic evaluation of environmental impacts in EIAs. Part II: Case studies and dose-response literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Part II of the report contains full versions of the case studies for air, water and land (Chapters 2-4), which were only summarised in Part I. In addition, during the work the research team has collected a large amount of literature and information on dose response relationships for air and water pollution relevant to China. This information is included as Chapters 5 and 6

  16. Traumatic injuries of brachial plexus: present methods of surgical treatment Part II. Treatment policy for brachial plexus injuries

    OpenAIRE

    M. L. Novikov; T. E. Torno

    2015-01-01

    The task of this paper is to familiarize practicing neurologists, neurosurgeons, traumatologists, and orthopedists with the current principles of diagnosis and treatment of different brachial plexus (BP) injuries. Part I describes the anatomy of BP in detail, considers the main mechanisms of its injuries, and gives their current classification (Nervno-Myshechnye Bolezni (Neuromuscular Diseases) 2012;4:19–27).Part II presents the author's approach to treatment of brachial plexus injuries accor...

  17. Developing guidelines for economic evaluation of environmental impacts in EIAs. Part II: Case studies and dose-response literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This Part II of the report contains full versions of the case studies for air, water and land (Chapters 2-4), which were only summarised in Part I. In addition, during the work the research team has collected a large amount of literature and information on dose response relationships for air and water pollution relevant to China. This information is included as Chapters 5 and 6.

  18. A microencapsulation process of liquid mercury by sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification technology. Part II: Durability of materials

    OpenAIRE

    López-Delgado, A.; Guerrero, A; López, F. A.; Pérez, C.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    Under the European LIFE Program a microencapsulation process was developed for liquid mercury using Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) technology, obtaining a stable concrete-like sulfur matrix that allows the immobilization of mercury for long-term storage. The process description and characterization of the materials obtained were detailed in Part I. The present document, Part II, reports the results of different tests carried out to determine the durability of Hg-S concrete...

  19. Industry Wage Surveys: Banking and Life Insurance, December 1976. Part I--Banking. Part II--Life Insurance. Bulletin 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Carl

    This report presents the results of a survey conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics to determine wages and related benefits in (1) the banking industry and (2) for employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance carriers. Part 1 discusses banking industry characteristics and presents data for tellers and selected…

  20. The Design of Research Laboratories. Part I: A General Assessment. Part II: Air Conditioning and Conditioned Rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legget, R. F.; Hutcheon, N. B.

    Design factors in the planning of research laboratories are described which include--(1) location, (2) future expansion, (3) internal flexibility, (4) provision of services, (5) laboratory furnishing, (6) internal traffic, (7) space requirements, and (8) building costs. A second part discusses air-conditioning and conditioned rooms--(1)…

  1. Quality control of outpatient imaging examinations in North Rhine-Westphalia. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW), Germany, a survey was conducted on radiologic examinations ordered by general practitioners (GPs). Part II of this study aims to determine the quality of the process and outcome. The reference standard is the assessment of both radiologists and physicians without board certification in radiology working at a university hospital and in outpatient facilities. Materials and Methods: All GPs in NRW were asked to cooperate. Participating GPs filled out a questionnaire for each patient. The patients recorded the symptoms prompting the imaging examinations. The radiologists or other physicians performing the examinations were asked to provide the images and written reports and to complete a questionnaire. A file was created for each of the 394 patients with image documentation of at least one examination. Each file, which included medical history, physical findings, imaging documentation and written report, was sequentially forwarded to a board-certified radiologist and to a physician without board certification in radiology working in a university hospital and in an outpatient facility. All physicians were requested to complete a structured questionnaire for each file. Results: The referral diagnoses were rated as medically plausible in 81%, the indications for imaging found correct in 76%, the examination techniques considered appropriate in 69%, the clinical question answered in 63%, the interpretation judged medically correct in 50% and all incidental findings documented in 49%. In retrospect, 32% of the examinations were judged superfluous. The sequence of multiple examinations performed on a particular patient was rated as appropriate in 51%. The interpretation revealed specialty-related differences. The plausibility of the referral diagnoses had a significant impact on the appropriateness of subsequent diagnostic investigations. Marked deficits showed sonography, performance by non-radiologists, self

  2. The 183-WSL Fast Rain Rate Retrieval Algorithm. Part II: Validation Using Ground Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviola, Sante; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The Water vapour Strong Lines at 183 GHz (183-WSL) algorithm is a method for the retrieval of rain rates and precipitation type classification (convectivestratiform), that makes use of the water vapor absorption lines centered at 183.31 GHz of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit module B (AMSU-B) and of the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) flying on NOAA-15-18 and NOAA-19Metop-A satellite series, respectively. The characteristics of this algorithm were described in Part I of this paper together with comparisons against analogous precipitation products. The focus of Part II is the analysis of the performance of the 183-WSL technique based on surface radar measurements. The ground truth dataset consists of 2.5 years of rainfall intensity fields from the NIMROD European radar network which covers North-Western Europe. The investigation of the 183-WSL retrieval performance is based on a twofold approach: 1) the dichotomous statistic is used to evaluate the capabilities of the method to identify rain and no-rain clouds; 2) the accuracy statistic is applied to quantify the errors in the estimation of rain rates.The results reveal that the 183-WSL technique shows good skills in the detection of rainno-rain areas and in the quantification of rain rate intensities. The categorical analysis shows annual values of the POD, FAR and HK indices varying in the range 0.80-0.82, 0.330.36 and 0.39-0.46, respectively. The RMSE value is 2.8 millimeters per hour for the whole period despite an overestimation in the retrieved rain rates. Of note is the distribution of the 183-WSL monthly mean rain rate with respect to radar: the seasonal fluctuations of the average rainfalls measured by radar are reproduced by the 183-WSL. However, the retrieval method appears to suffer for the winter seasonal conditions especially when the soil is partially frozen and the surface emissivity drastically changes. This fact is verified observing the discrepancy distribution diagrams where2the 183-WSL

  3. Neutronic Analysis of the 3 MW TRIGA MARK II Research Reactor, Part II: Benchmark Analysis of TRIGA Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP4C was used to develop a versatile and accurate full-core model of the TRIGA MARK II research reactor at AERE, Savar. Thr consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics was established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Analysis of neutron flux and reactivity experiments comprising control rod worths, critical rod height, excess reactivity and shutdown margin were used in the validation process. Calculations of fast neutron flux, and fuel and graphite element worths distribution are also presented. Good agreement between the experiments and MCNP calculations indicate that the simulation of TRIGA reactor is treated adequately. (author)

  4. Neuro-Oftalmologia: sistema sensorial -- Parte II Revisão 1997 -- 1999 Neuro-Ophthalmology: sensorial system - Part II. Review 1997 - 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Lana-Peixoto

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Esta é a segunda parte de uma revisão da literatura do sistema visual sensorial. O autor seleciona artigos publicados na literatura entre os anos de 1997 e 1999 relacionados a neurorretinites, neuropatia óptica compressiva, tumores do nervo óptico, pseudotumor cerebral, neuropatias ópticas hereditárias, hipoplasia do nervo óptico, drusas do disco óptico, neuropatia óptica tóxica, neuropatia óptica traumática, outras neuropatias ópticas e doenças retinianas, doenças do quiasma óptico e do trato óptico, assim como alterações geniculares e retrogeniculares, incluindo os distúrbios visuais corticais. Os artigos são apresentados e comentados quanto às suas conclusões, alcance e relações com o conhecimento previamente estabelecido.This is the second part of a review of papers on the visual afferent system published from 1997 to 1999. In this part the author presents the most important contributions made to areas such as neuroretinitis, optic nerve tumors, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hereditary optic neuropathies, optic disc drusen, optic nerve hypoplasia, traumatic and toxic optic neuropathy as well as geniculate and retrogeniculate visual disorders. Selected papers are considered in relation to their results and previously established concepts.

  5. Evaluation and Treatment of Acne Patients – Part II: Topical, Systemic and Surgical Treatments, Acne Treatment in Pregnancy, Treatment Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    A. Figueiredo; Massa, A; Picoto, A; Soares, AP; Lopes, C; Resende, C; Rebelo, C; Brandão, FM; Marques-Pinto, G; Schonenberger de Oliveira, H; Selores, M.; Gonçalo, M; Bello, RT

    2011-01-01

    O Portuguese Acne Advisory Board (PAAB), grupo de dermatologistas portugueses que, à semelhança de grupos congéneres internacionais, tem dedicado particular atenção à definição de linhas de orientação para o tratamento da acne, pretende que o presente documento constitua uma ferramenta útil na abordagem dos doentes com esta patologia. Elaborou-se um dossier, para educação médica contínua, subdividido em 2 partes: Parte I – etiopatogenia e clínica; Parte II – abordagem terapêutica. Nesta P...

  6. The new production theory for health care through clinical reengineering: a study of clinical guidelines--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, J R

    1995-01-01

    In Part I of this two-part article, in the December 1994 issue of the journal, the author discussed the manufacturing theories of Peter Drucker in terms of their applicability for the health care field. He concluded that Drucker's four principles and practices of manufacturing--statistical quality control, manufacturing accounting, modular organization, and systems approach--do have application to the health care system. Clinical guidelines, a variation on the Drucker theory, are a specific example of the manufacturing process in health. The performance to date of some guidelines and their implications for the health care reform debate are discussed in Part II of the article. PMID:10139603

  7. Neuro-Oftalmologia: sistema sensorial -- Parte II Revisão 1997 -- 1999 Neuro-Ophthalmology: sensorial system - Part II. Review 1997 - 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Aurélio Lana-Peixoto

    2002-01-01

    Esta é a segunda parte de uma revisão da literatura do sistema visual sensorial. O autor seleciona artigos publicados na literatura entre os anos de 1997 e 1999 relacionados a neurorretinites, neuropatia óptica compressiva, tumores do nervo óptico, pseudotumor cerebral, neuropatias ópticas hereditárias, hipoplasia do nervo óptico, drusas do disco óptico, neuropatia óptica tóxica, neuropatia óptica traumática, outras neuropatias ópticas e doenças retinianas, doenças do quiasma óptico e do trat...

  8. Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

  9. Intervención de salud sobre infecciones de transmisión sexual en una institución cerrada, 2005-2006 Health intervention on sexually transmitted infections in a closed institution, 2005-2006

    OpenAIRE

    Mailyn Nápoles Pérez; Miriam Belkis Díaz de la Hoz; Osvaldo Miranda Gómez

    2008-01-01

    Por el alza en la incidencia de casos de infecciones de transmisión sexual en una institución cerrada, se realizó un ensayo comunitario de intervención educativa a un grupo de adolescentes, con el objetivo de evaluar el impacto de esta sobre las infecciones de transmisión sexual en el nivel de conocimientos y conducta. Se aplicó una encuesta inicial, se realizaron actividades de educación para la salud y se repitió la encuesta; ambos resultados fueron comparados. La conducta sexual "buena" se...

  10. Reactive polymers: part I - Novel polystyrene-anchored copper (II), nickel (II), cobalt (II), iron (III), zinc (II), cadmium (II), molybdenum (VI) and uranium (VI) complexes of the chelating resin containing thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new chelating resin containing thiosemicarbazone has been synthesized by the reaction of aldehydopolystyrene and thiosemicarbazide. The polystyrene bound thiosemicarbazone reacts with salicylaldehyde leading to the formation of a new Schiff base chelating resin which reacts with sodium monochloroacetate and gives the polymer bound S-acetatothiosemicarbazone. The new chelating resin forms complexes of the types PS-LCuX·S, PS-LNiX·3S, PS-LHNi(acac)2, PS-LCoX·3S, PS-LFeX2·2S, PS-LZnX·S, PS-LCdX·S, PS-LMoO2(acac) and PS-LUO2X·S (where PS-LH = polymeranchored ligand; S = DMF or CH3OH; X=Cl or CH3COO- and acacH = acetylacetone). The chelating resins and complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR and electronic spectra and magnetic measurements. The Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Fe(III) complexes are paramagnetic while the Zn(II), Cd(II), Mo(VI) and U(VI) complexes are diamagnetic. The IR data indicate the thioenolization of the ligand in the complexes (except in PS-LHNi(acac)2 where it behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand). (author). 24 refs., 2 tabs

  11. Evaluación neurofuncional del tallo cerebral Parte II: Reflejo mandibular = Neurofunctional evaluation of brain stem. II. Mandibular reflex

    OpenAIRE

    Leon Sarmiento, Fidias E.; Pabón Porras, María Angélica; Granadillo Deluqu, Elías David

    2011-01-01

    El reflejo mandibular o maseterino posee conexiones nerviosas únicas, diferentes de las exhi­bidas por otros reflejos monosinápticos humanos, y permite evaluar, de forma fácil y eficien­te, el tallo cerebral por medio de la estimulación mecánica, eléctrica o magnética. Diversos estudios han demostrado la participación en este reflejo de las interneuronas del tallo cerebral y su modulación por estructuras supraespinales, que hacen parte fundamental de su integra­ción motora. El reflejo mandibu...

  12. Peak-summer East Asian rainfall predictability and prediction part II: extratropical East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, So-Young; Wang, Bin; Xing, Wen

    2015-10-01

    The part II of the present study focuses on northern East Asia (NEA: 26°N-50°N, 100°-140°E), exploring the source and limit of the predictability of the peak summer (July-August) rainfall. Prediction of NEA peak summer rainfall is extremely challenging because of the exposure of the NEA to midlatitude influence. By examining four coupled climate models' multi-model ensemble (MME) hindcast during 1979-2010, we found that the domain-averaged MME temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) skill is only 0.13. It is unclear whether the dynamical models' poor skills are due to limited predictability of the peak-summer NEA rainfall. In the present study we attempted to address this issue by applying predictable mode analysis method using 35-year observations (1979-2013). Four empirical orthogonal modes of variability and associated major potential sources of variability are identified: (a) an equatorial western Pacific (EWP)-NEA teleconnection driven by EWP sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, (b) a western Pacific subtropical high and Indo-Pacific dipole SST feedback mode, (c) a central Pacific-El Nino-Southern Oscillation mode, and (d) a Eurasian wave train pattern. Physically meaningful predictors for each principal component (PC) were selected based on analysis of the lead-lag correlations with the persistent and tendency fields of SST and sea-level pressure from March to June. A suite of physical-empirical (P-E) models is established to predict the four leading PCs. The peak summer rainfall anomaly pattern is then objectively predicted by using the predicted PCs and the corresponding observed spatial patterns. A 35-year cross-validated hindcast over the NEA yields a domain-averaged TCC skill of 0.36, which is significantly higher than the MME dynamical hindcast (0.13). The estimated maximum potential attainable TCC skill averaged over the entire domain is around 0.61, suggesting that the current dynamical prediction models may have large rooms to improve

  13. Peak-summer East Asian rainfall predictability and prediction part II: extratropical East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, So-Young; Wang, Bin; Xing, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The part II of the present study focuses on northern East Asia (NEA: 26°N-50°N, 100°-140°E), exploring the source and limit of the predictability of the peak summer (July-August) rainfall. Prediction of NEA peak summer rainfall is extremely challenging because of the exposure of the NEA to midlatitude influence. By examining four coupled climate models' multi-model ensemble (MME) hindcast during 1979-2010, we found that the domain-averaged MME temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) skill is only 0.13. It is unclear whether the dynamical models' poor skills are due to limited predictability of the peak-summer NEA rainfall. In the present study we attempted to address this issue by applying predictable mode analysis method using 35-year observations (1979-2013). Four empirical orthogonal modes of variability and associated major potential sources of variability are identified: (a) an equatorial western Pacific (EWP)-NEA teleconnection driven by EWP sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, (b) a western Pacific subtropical high and Indo-Pacific dipole SST feedback mode, (c) a central Pacific-El Nino-Southern Oscillation mode, and (d) a Eurasian wave train pattern. Physically meaningful predictors for each principal component (PC) were selected based on analysis of the lead-lag correlations with the persistent and tendency fields of SST and sea-level pressure from March to June. A suite of physical-empirical (P-E) models is established to predict the four leading PCs. The peak summer rainfall anomaly pattern is then objectively predicted by using the predicted PCs and the corresponding observed spatial patterns. A 35-year cross-validated hindcast over the NEA yields a domain-averaged TCC skill of 0.36, which is significantly higher than the MME dynamical hindcast (0.13). The estimated maximum potential attainable TCC skill averaged over the entire domain is around 0.61, suggesting that the current dynamical prediction models may have large rooms to improve

  14. Toward resolution of singularities over a field of positive characteristic (The Idealistic Filtration Program) Part II. Basic invariants associated to the idealistic filtration and their properties

    OpenAIRE

    Kawanoue, Hiraku; Matsuki, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    This is Part II of the series of our papers under the title "Toward resolution of singularities over a field of positive characteristic (The Idealistic Filtration Program)". See http://arxiv.org/abs/math/0607009 for Part I.

  15. Espacio urbano y riesgo de desastres: la expansión de las urbanizaciones cerradas sobre áreas inundables de Tigre (Argentina Urban space and risk of disasters: the expansions of gated communities on Tigre's flood-prone areas (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ríos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El crecimiento espacial de las ciudades y de los llamados desastres "naturales" son dos temas que adquieren cada vez mayor notoriedad a nivel mundial. El trabajo parte de considerar a ambos fenómenos como productos sociales, por lo que intenta avanzar en el conocimiento sobre la articulación entre producción social del espacio urbano y de riesgo de desastres, a partir de un estudio de caso: la expansión de las urbanizaciones cerradas ocurrida desde fines del siglo XX sobre áreas inundables de Tigre (Argentina.Urban growth and the increase of so-called "natural" disasters are two topics which are getting more and more notorious worldwide. This work considers both phenomena as social outcomes, advancing the knowledge about the articulation between the social production of urban space and the risk of disasters from a case study: the expansions of gated communities since the end of the XX century on the flood prone areas of the River Tigre in Argentina.

  16. Bauxitas refratárias: composição química, fases e propriedades - parte II Refractory bauxites: chemical composition, phases and properties - part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pascoal

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A bauxita apresenta uma ampla faixa de aplicações industriais, de acordo com sua composição química e mineralógica. No setor de refratários, esta matéria-prima tem adquirido grande importância, uma vez que pode substituir parcial ou totalmente agregados de alumina eletrofundida em formados e monolíticos, devido a sua alta refratariedade e custo inferior. Entre os maiores produtores mundiais encontram-se a China, a Guiana e o Brasil. Embora seja um dos maiores produtores mundiais de bauxita refratária, no Brasil pouco se conhece de suas características químicas e mineralógicas, bem como suas propriedades em serviço a altas temperaturas. Esta seqüência de artigos apresenta uma revisão sobre as aplicações, fases cristalinas, características e propriedades a alta temperatura de bauxitas refratárias chinesas e sul-americanas. Nesta segunda parte serão consideradas suas propriedades mecânicas a alta temperatura e um problema freqüente na utilização de bauxitas refratárias, a expansão térmica secundária.Bauxite shows a wide range of applications, according to its chemical and mineralogical composition. In the refractory industry, this raw material has partially or totally substituted fused alumina in bricks and castables, due to its high refractoriness and low cost. The major producers of refractory grade bauxite are, in this order, China, Guyana and Brazil. Although Brazil is one of the major suppliers of this raw material, very few studies have been carried out to understand its chemical, mineralogical and high-temperature properties. These papers present a review regarding the applications of South American and Chinese refractory grade bauxites, including the microchemistry of their crystalline phases and their hot properties. This second part will focus mechanical properties at high temperatures, and a common problem in refractory bauxites, the secondary thermal expansion.

  17. Zircônia tetragonal policristalina. Parte II: Microestrutura e resistividade elétrica Tetragonal zirconia polycrystals. Part II: Microstructure and electrical resistivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Tadokoro

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Nesta segunda parte são mostrados os resultados obtidos em cerâmicas densas de ZrO2: 3% mol Y2O3 (Y-TZP e 12% mol CeO2 (Ce-TZP, analisadas por espectroscopia Raman, microscopia eletrônica de varredura, e por espectroscopia de impedância. Os resultados mostram que, para ambos tipos de amostras, é possível obter cerâmicas densas (> 95% da densidade teórica para temperaturas de sinterização inferiores a 0,45 T F (T F = temperatura de fusão. A taxa de crescimento de grãos é dependente do cátion estabilizante, sendo maior para a Ce-TZP do que para a Y-TZP. Os espectros Raman de cerâmicas sinterizadas mostram as bandas típicas associadas aos modos ativos da fase cristalográfica tetragonal. Os resultados de espectroscopia de impedância são similares aos obtidos por outros pesquisadores tanto para cerâmicas convencionais quanto nanofásicas no caso da Y-TZP. Para a Ce-TZP foi observada uma redução na condutividade extrínseca em conseqüência da maior pureza do precursor cristalizado.Results on dense ZrO2: 3 mol% Y2O3 (Y-TZP and 12 mol% CeO2 (Ce-TZP ceramics are shown in this second part. Sintered specimens were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy. The main results show that both types of solid solutions may attain a high densification (> 95% of the theoretical density for sintering temperatures lower than 0.45 T F (T F = melting temperature. The rate of grain growth is governed by the stabilizing cation and is faster for Ce-TZP than for Y-TZP. Raman spectra exhibit the six characteristic bands of the tetragonal phase for both specimens. Impedance spectroscopy results for Y-TZP do not differ from those obtained for nanophase ceramics. A reduction in the extrinsic conductivity due to the high purity of the crystallized precursor was observed for Ce-TZP specimens.

  18. Characterization of sugar cane bagasse: part II: fluid dynamic characteristics; Caracterizacion del bagazo de la cana de azucar: parte II: caracteristicas fluidodinamicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Guillermo A. Roca [Universidad de Oriente (CEEFE/UO), Santiago de Cuba (Cuba). Centro de Estudios de Eficiencia Energetica], Emails: roca@ceefe.uo.edu.cu, grocabayamon@hotmail.com; Sanchez, Caio Glauco [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica], Email: caio@fem.unicamp.br; Gomez, Edgardo Olivares [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (NIPE/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico], Emails: gomez@bioware.com.br, egomez@energiabr.org.br; Cortez, Luis Augusto Barbosa [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (NIPE/FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola. Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico], Email: cortez@reitoria.unicamp.br

    2006-07-01

    This paper is the second part of a general study about physic-geometrical and fluid-dynamics characteristic of the sugarcane bagasse particles. These properties has relevant importance on the dimensions and operation of the equipment for transport and treatment of solid particles. Was used the transport column method for the determination of the drag velocity and later on the drag coefficient of the sugarcane bagasse particles was calculated. Both, the installation and experimental technique used for materials of these characteristics are simple and innovations tools, but rigorous conceptually, thus the results obtained are reliable. Were used several sugarcane bagasse fractions of particles of known mean diameter. The properties determined were expressed as a function of Reynolds and Archimedes a dimensional criteria. The best considered model from statistical analysis (model from equation 8) was statistically validated for determined ranges of Reynolds and Archimedes. These empirical equations can be used to determine these properties in the range and conditions specified and also for modeling some processes where these fractions are employed. (author)

  19. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  20. THE FOOTWEAR DESIGNING SESSION USING CRISPIN DYNAMICS ENGINEER. PART II: Creating the parts, Estimating the material consumption, Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOVAN-DRAGOMIR Alina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The diversification and customization of products are important characteristic of the modern economy and especially of the fashion industry. Because of this, the lifetime of the footwear product is very short and result the necessity to cut the design and production time. By classic methodology, designing footwear is a very complex and laborious activity. That is because classic methodology requires many graphic executions using manual means, which consume a lot of the producer’s time. With CRISPIN Dynamics, one can visualize a range of designs on-screen; work out the costs of a new style and even cut out sample shoe components. Reliance on manual skills is largely eliminated, so the staff can work creatively, but with increased accuracy and productivity. One can even send designs to a distant office or manufacturing centre in a matter of minutes. This paper presents the basic function of CRISPIN Dynamics CAD Suite Engineer for footwear design. The process of new product development has six stapes: digitized form of the medium copy, last flatting, model drawing, creation and management of individual parts, estimation of material consumption, multiplying the designed footwear product’s pattern. This product has been developed for shoemakers who wish to ensure that their business remains competitive by increasing the efficiency, speed and accuracy of pattern development and grading.

  1. Critical thinking and accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. Part II: Application of cognitive skills and guidelines for self-development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunney, Margaret

    2003-09-01

    Part I of this article, the author explained the difficulties of achieving accuracy of nurses' diagnoses, the relevance of critical thinking to the achievement of accuracy, and newer views of critical thinking. In Part II, the critical thinking dimensions identified as important for nursing practice are applied in the diagnostic process using a case study of a 16 year old girl with type 1 diabetes. Application of seven cognitive skills and ten habits of mind illustrate the importance of using critical thinking for accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. Ten strategies are proposed for self-development of critical thinking abilities. PMID:14686054

  2. Programming an interim report on the SETL project. Part I: generalities. Part II: the SETL language and examples of its use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, J T

    1975-06-01

    A summary of work during the past several years on SETL, a new programming language drawing its dictions and basic concepts from the mathematical theory of sets, is presented. The work was started with the idea that a programming language modeled after an appropriate version of the formal language of mathematics might allow a programming style with some of the succinctness of mathematics, and that this might ultimately enable one to express and experiment with more complex algorithms than are now within reach. Part I discusses the general approach followed in the work. Part II focuses directly on the details of the SETL language as it is now defined. It describes the facilities of SETL, includes short libraries of miscellaneous and of code optimization algorithms illustrating the use of SETL, and gives a detailed description of the manner in which the set-theoretic primitives provided by SETL are currently implemented. (RWR)

  3. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

  4. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase II), I-V, Part III, Reactor poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This phase is dealing with influence of all the fission products except Xe135 on the reactivity of a reactor, usually named as reactor poisoning. The first part of the report is a review of methods for calculation of reactor poisoning. The second part shows the most frequently used method for calculation of cross sections and yields of pseudo products (for thermal neutrons). The system of equations was adopted dependent on the conditions of the available computer system. It is described in part three. Detailed method for their application is described in part four and results obtained are presented in part five

  5. Evaluación neurofuncional del tallo cerebral Parte II: Reflejo mandibular = Neurofunctional evaluation of brain stem. II. Mandibular reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Sarmiento, Fidias E.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El reflejo mandibular o maseterino posee conexiones nerviosas únicas, diferentes de las exhi­bidas por otros reflejos monosinápticos humanos, y permite evaluar, de forma fácil y eficien­te, el tallo cerebral por medio de la estimulación mecánica, eléctrica o magnética. Diversos estudios han demostrado la participación en este reflejo de las interneuronas del tallo cerebral y su modulación por estructuras supraespinales, que hacen parte fundamental de su integra­ción motora. El reflejo mandibular es útil para evaluar la afectación trigémino-trigeminal en polineuropatías como la diabetes, neuromiopatías como la esclerosis múltiple y en pacientes con trastornos del movimiento, con o sin disfunción oromandibular. La evaluación neuro­funcional de este reflejo craneofacial ayuda a identificar la integración sensorimotora del tallo cerebral y las posibles alteraciones de estas vías reflejas, debidas a anormalidades del sistema nervioso central o del periférico. Su apropiada ejecución e interpretación, clínica y neurológica, permite aplicar de manera más personalizada diversos protocolos de neurorre­habilitación, con el fin de ayudar a mejorar la calidad de vida de los individuos con afectación de estas vías neurales.

  6. Geothermal energy in the United States; Part II, Assessment of resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    Geothermal energy-from heat deep inside the Earth- is a vast potential source of power. This article is the second part of a series on geothermal energy, the first part of which was in volume 8, number 1, of the Earthquake Information Bulletin (January-February 1976). Part 1 of this series described the categories of the geothermal resource base. 

  7. Empirically Supported Interventions and School Psychology: Rationale and Methodological Issues--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Stoiber, Karen Callan

    2000-01-01

    This paper, part two of a two-part article, presents conceptual and practice issues on the use of empirically supported interventions in school and community settings. Discusses the essential practice issues, given the dual goal of advancing research in empirically supported interventions and of producing a knowledge base that has direct meaning…

  8. Instrumentation: Photodiode Array Detectors in UV-VIS Spectroscopy. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dianna G.

    1985-01-01

    A previous part (Analytical Chemistry; v57 n9 p1057A) discussed the theoretical aspects of diode ultraviolet-visual (UV-VIS) spectroscopy. This part describes the applications of diode arrays in analytical chemistry, also considering spectroelectrochemistry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), HPLC data processing, stopped flow, and…

  9. The Lesson of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Part II: The Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, George B.

    1985-01-01

    Part I (SE 537 587) briefly reviewed the scientific discoveries underlying the atomic bomb and its technological development. This part examines the implications of these events for science education. Areas considered include the nuclear arms race, nuclear winter, the Strategic Defense Initiative, and others. (DH)

  10. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics. Part II: two-dimensional scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, Juan-José; Bingöl, Ferhat; Larsen, Gunner Chr.;

    2011-01-01

    expands the results of one-dimensional measurements already presented in the first part of this paper. Consequently, it is now possible to separate the deterministic and turbulent parts of the wake wind field, thus enabling capturing the wake in the meandering frame of reference. The results correspond...

  11. Empirical Psycho-Aesthetics and Her Sisters: Substantive and Methodological Issues--Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecni, Vladimir J.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical psycho-aesthetics is approached in this two-part article from two directions. Part I, which appeared in the Winter 2012 issue of "JAE," addressed definitional and organizational issues, including the field's origins, its relation to "sister" disciplines (experimental philosophy, cognitive neuroscience of art, and neuroaesthetics), and…

  12. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs

  13. Choque cardiogénico: Historia, fisiopatología e implicaciones terapeúticas. Parte II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Zeledón S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El choque cardiogénico es la principal causa de muerte entre los pacientes que presentan un síndrome coronario agudo. Después de la revisión histórica y de los conceptos fisiológicos y fisiopatológicos de esta condición clínica expuesta en la primera parte, se revisa su abordaje terapéutico, principalmente la revascularización de emergencia con angioplastía o cirugía.Cardiogenic shock: History, pathophysiology and therapeutical implications. Part II. Cardiogenic shock is the first cause of death among patients with acute coronary syndromes. After a previous discussion of the history and the physiologic and pathophysiologic aspects of this clinical condition in part 1, we review the therapeutic management which predominantly involves urgent angioplasty with stenting or coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

  14. The flipped classroom for professional development: part II. making podcasts and videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charlene M; McDonald, Katie

    2013-11-01

    As described in Part I, podcasts and videos are educational technologies used to flip the classroom. This column describes the technology options for creating podcasts and videos and offers tips on developing podcasts and videos. PMID:24199640

  15. Home on the Big River, Part II: Great River Habitat Quality Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    USEPA’s EMAP sampled the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers from 2004 through 2006 as part of an integrated assessment of ecological condition. These Great Rivers are important human recreational destinations and transportation corridors, and represent significant wild...

  16. Input-Output Parametric Models for Nonlinear Systems. Part ii Stochastic Nonlinear Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Leontaritis, I.J.; Billings, S A

    1984-01-01

    In the first part of this paper (Leontaritis and Billings 1984)recursive input-output models for deterministic nonlinear multivariable discrete-time systems were derived and sufficient conditions for their existence were defined. In this second part, the nonlinear model is compared with other system representations, several examples are introduced and the results are extended to create prediction error input-output models for multivariable nonlinear stochastic systems.

  17. Large-Signal Model of Graphene Field-Effect Transistors -- Part II: Circuit Performance Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Pasadas, Francisco; Jiménez, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a circuit performance benchmarking using the large-signal model of graphene field effect transistor reported in Part I of this two-part paper. To test the model, it has been implemented in a circuit simulator. Specifically we have simulated a high-frequency performance amplifier, together with other circuits that take advantage of the ambipolarity of graphene, such as a frequency doubler, a radio-frequency subharmonic mixer and a multiplier phase detector. A variety of sim...

  18. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we revi...

  19. Project Monitor: Part II. Conservation in small business: an exploratory study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, P Y

    1979-08-01

    Project Monitor examined the energy conservation attitude and behavior of small samples of small business owners/operators in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, focusing on manufacturing concerns and retailers. Section I reports the findings on the energy conserving behavior of 92 smaller manufacturers and Section II identifies the factors which affect decision making concerning energy consuming activities by the owners/operators of 94 small retail establishments. In each, the impact of Project Pacesetter and of the coal strike and the general energy situation is considered. (MCW)

  20. Modelling reversibility of central European mountain lakes from acidification: Part II - the Tatra Mountains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopáček, Jiří; Cosby, B. J.; Majer, V.; Stuchlík, E.; Veselý, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2003), s. 510-524. ISSN 1027-5606 Grant ostatní: EC(XE) AL PE II EV5V-CT92-0205 - PECO; EU(XE) MOLAR ENV4-CT95-0007; EC(XE) EMERGE EVK1-CT-1999-00032; EC(XE) RECOVER 2010 EVK1-CT-1999-00018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6017912 Keywords : atmospheric deposition * water chemistry * recovery Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 0.948, year: 2003

  1. Jamming in Fixed-Rate Wireless Systems with Power Constraints - Part II: Parallel Slow Fading Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Amariucai, George T; Kannan, Rajgopal

    2008-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part paper that studies the problem of jamming in a fixed-rate transmission system with fading. In the first part, we studied the scenario with a fast fading channel, and found Nash equilibria of mixed strategies for short term power constraints, and for average power constraints with and without channel state information (CSI) feedback. We also solved the equally important maximin and minimax problems with pure strategies. Whenever we dealt with average power constraints, we decomposed the problem into two levels of power control, which we solved individually. In this second part of the paper, we study the scenario with a parallel, slow fading channel, which usually models multi-carrier transmissions, such as OFDM. Although the framework is similar as the one in Part I \\cite{myself3}, dealing with the slow fading requires more intricate techniques. Unlike in the fast fading scenario, where the frames supporting the transmission of the codewords were equivalent and completely ...

  2. Hodgkins disease - Part II: Management of advanced - stage disease, relapsed disease and long-term complications of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part II of the refresher course on Hodgkin's disease (HD) will: 1. Update chemotherapy principles and new regimens for HD. 2. Discuss the role and practice of radiation therapy in the management of stage III-IV disease. 3. Review the treatment of relapsed Hodgkin's disease after radiotherapy alone and the salvage approach to failures of primary chemotherapy and combined modality therapy. 4. Examine the role of radiation therapy in high-dose salvage programs with stem cell rescue. 5. Review the long-term complications of all modalities with an emphasis on secondary breast cancer and coronary heart disease

  3. Hodgkin's disease - Part II: Management of advanced-stage disease, relapsed disease and long-term complications of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part II of the refresher course on Hodgkin's disease (HD) will: 1. Update chemotherapy principles and new regimens for HD. 2. Discuss the role and practice of radiation therapy in the management of stage III-IV disease. 3. Review the treatment of relapsed Hodgkin's disease after radiotherapy alone and the salvage approach to failures of primary chemotherapy and combined modality therapy. 4. Examine the role of radiation therapy in high-dose salvage programs with stem cell rescue. 5. Review the long-term complications of all modalities with an emphasis on secondary breast cancer and coronary heart disease

  4. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  5. Global optimization of truss topology with discrete bar areas-Part II: Implementation and numerical results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achtziger, Wolfgang; Stolpe, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    we use the theory developed in Part I to design a convergent nonlinear branch-and-bound method tailored to solve large-scale instances of the original discrete problem. The problem formulation and the needed theoretical results from Part I are repeated such that this paper is self-contained. We focus...... on the implementation details but also establish finite convergence of the branch-and-bound method. The algorithm is based on solving a sequence of continuous non-convex relaxations which can be formulated as quadratic programs according to the theory in Part I. The quadratic programs to be treated...... within the branch-and-bound search all have the same feasible set and differ from each other only in the objective function. This is one reason for making the resulting branch-and-bound method very efficient. The paper closes with several large-scale numerical examples. These examples are, to the...

  6. An improved methodology for erosion hazard mapping, Part II: Application to Lesotho

    OpenAIRE

    Chakela, Q.; Stocking, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    This is the second part of a paper on an improved technique for erosion hazard mapping. In this part, the authors apply the new methodology to Lesotho, where erosion has been the most important factor in the decline in crop yields since the 1930s. The authors assess each factor in erosion and produce a composite map in order to measure the degree, distribution, and principal causative factors of erosion hazard. This map will serve as a guide to resource planning and as a promotion for strateg...

  7. FROM ZERO-DIMENSIONAL TO 2-DIMENSIONAL CARBON NANOMATERIALS - part II: GRAPHENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin IANCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available As was presented in the first part of this review paper, lately, many theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out to develop one of the most interesting aspects of the science and nanotechnology which is called carbon-related nanomaterials. In this review paper are presented some of the most exciting and important developments in the synthesis, properties, and applications of low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials. In this part of the paper are presented the synthesis techniques used to produce the two-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (including graphene, and also the most important properties and potential applications of graphene.

  8. Interface fatigue crack propagation in sandwich X-joints – Part II: Finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the second and final part of this study is to simulate fatigue crack growth in the tested Sandwich Tear Test specimens, described in Part I, using the finite element method. To accelerate the simulation, a cycle jump method is utilized and implemented in the finite element routine. The...... proposed method is based on conducting finite element analysis for a set of cycles to establish a trend line, extrapolating the trend line spanning many cycles, and use the extrapolated state as initial state for additional finite element simulations. The measured da/dN relations of the face/core interface...

  9. Optimisation of energy absorbing liner for equestrian helmets. Part II: Functionally graded foam liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy absorbing liner of safety helmets was optimised using finite element modelling. In this present paper, a functionally graded foam (FGF) liner was modelled, while keeping the average liner density the same as in a corresponding reference single uniform density liner model. Use of a functionally graded foam liner would eliminate issues regarding delamination and crack propagation between interfaces of different density layers which could arise in liners with discrete density variations. As in our companion Part I paper [Forero Rueda MA, Cui L, Gilchrist MD. Optimisation of energy absorbing liner for equestrian helmets. Part I: Layered foam liner. Mater Des [submitted for publication

  10. The decision to extract: part II. Analysis of clinicians' stated reasons for extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Boyd, R L; Maxwell, R

    1996-04-01

    In a recently reported study, the pretreatment records of each subject in a randomized clinical trial of 148 patients with Class I and Class II malocclusions presenting for orthodontic treatment were evaluated independently by five experienced clinicians (drawn from a panel of 14). The clinicians displayed a higher incidence of agreement with each other than had been expected with respect to the decision as to whether extraction was indicated in each specific case. To improve our understanding of how clinicians made their decisions on whether to extract or not, the records of a subset of 72 subjects randomly selected from the full sample of 148, have now been examined in greater detail. In 21 of these cases, all five clinicians decided to treat without extraction. Among the remaining 51 cases, there were 202 decisions to extract (31 unanimous decision cases and 20 split decision cases). The clinicians cited a total of 469 reasons to support these decisions. Crowding was cited as the first reason in 49% of decisions to extract, followed by incisor protrusion (14%), need for profile correction (8%), Class II severity (5%), and achievement of a stable result (5%). When all the reasons for extraction in each clinician's decision were considered as a group, crowding was cited in 73% of decisions, incisor protrusion in 35%, need for profile correction in 27%, Class II severity in 15% and posttreatment stability in 9%. Tooth size anomalies, midline deviations, reduced growth potential, severity of overjet, maintenance of existing profile, desire to close the bite, periodontal problems, and anticipation of poor cooperation accounted collectively for 12% of the first reasons and were mentioned in 54% of the decisions, implying that these considerations play a consequential, if secondary, role in the decision-making process. All other reasons taken together were mentioned in fewer than 20% of cases. In this sample at least, clinicians focused heavily on appearance

  11. Relation between the diffusion curve and the roughness of a tilting diffuser: part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollo, M. A.; Perez Quintian, F.; Landau, Monica R.; Hogert, Elsa N.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.

    1996-02-01

    We have studied the diffusion curve evolution in variable translucent rough surfaces. In order to carry on these studies, we used cells having an internal diffuser face. Inside these cells, we place a liquid of controllable refraction index. In this way, we are able to obtain a great range of roughness values without changing the correlation length. In this paper we extend the results obtained in another work presented in the II Iberoamerican Optical Meeting. We verify the existence of a similar phenomenon and its relation with the surface roughness. Moreover, we must note that this work has been done with coherent, but we think that we deal with a predominantly geometric phenomenon, not quite in agreement with most of the authors that are studying this subject.

  12. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume VI. Data documentation. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J

    1979-02-01

    This documentation describes the PIES Integrating Model as it existed on January 1, 1978. This Volume VI of six volumes is data documentation, containing the standard table data used for the Administrator's Report at the beginning of 1978, along with the primary data sources and the office responsible. It also contains a copy of a PIES Integrating Model Report with a description of its content. Following an overview chapter, Chapter II, Supply and Demand Data Tables and Sources for the Mid-range Scenario for Target Years 1985 and 1990, data on demand, price, and elasticity; coal; imports; oil and gas; refineries; synthetics, shale, and solar/geothermal; transportation; and utilities are presented. The following data on alternate scenarios are discussed: low and high demand; low and high oil and gas supply; refinery and oil and gas data assuming a 5% annual increase in real world oil prices. Chapter IV describes the solution output obtained from an execution of PIES.

  13. Dynamics of professional burnout - a comparative analysis considering the selected sectors in Poland, part II

    OpenAIRE

    Witkowski Stanisław A.; Ślazyk-Sobol Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Dynamika wypalenia zawodowego - analiza porównawcza z uwzględnieniem głównych branż w Polsce, część II Artykuł stanowi kontynuację pracy przedstawionej w tekście „Professional burnout - a comparative analysis considering the selected sectors in Poland”. Management. Universtity of Zielona Góra, Faculty of Economics and Management, Vol. 16, No.2., (p. 87 - 102). Autorzy prezentują wyniki drugiej części badań poświęconych analizie zjawiska wypalenia wśród pracowników głównych branż w Polsce. Nin...

  14. MATLAB-based Applications for Image Processing and Image Quality Assessment – Part II: Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Krasula

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an overview of some possible usage of the software described in the Part I. It contains the real examples of image quality improvement, distortion simulations, objective and subjective quality assessment and other ways of image processing that can be obtained by the individual applications.

  15. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part II Diagnostic Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidhu, P. S.; Brabrand, K.; Cantisani, V.;

    2015-01-01

    This is the second part of the series on interventional ultrasound guidelines of the Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB). It deals with the diagnostic interventional procedure. General points are discussed which are pertinent to all patients, followed by organ...

  16. Resource Allocation for Downlink Cellular OFDMA Systems: Part II - Asymptotic Analysis and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ksairi, Nassar; ciblat, Phiippe; Hachem, Walid

    2008-01-01

    In a companion paper (see Resource Allocation for Downlink Cellular OFDMA systems: Part I - Optimal Allocation), we characterized the optimal resource allocation in terms of power control and sub-carrier assignment, for a downlink OFDMA system impaired by multicell interference. In our model, the network is assumed to be one dimensional (linear) for the sake of analysis. We also assume that a certain part of the available bandwidth is likely to be reused by different base stations and that the other part of the bandwidth is shared in an orthogonal way between the different base stations. The optimal resource allocation characterized in Part I is obtained by minimizing the total power spent by the network under the constraint that all users rate requirements in nats/s/Hz are satisfied. It is worth noting that when optimal resource allocation is used, any user receives data either in the reused bandwidth or in the protected bandwidth, but not in both (except for at most one pivot user in each cell). In the pres...

  17. Biological results of the snellius expedition XXII. Octocorallia from the Malay Archipelago (Part II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verseveldt, J.

    1966-01-01

    The material dealt with in this second part of "Octocorallia from the Malay Archipelago" comprises mainly specimens belonging to the family Nephtheidae. Most of these nephtheids were obtained during the cruise of the "Willebrord Snellius". In addition to this material I examined some specimens colle

  18. President's Task Force on Communications Policy. Staff Paper Five. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    President's Task Force on Communications Policy, Washington, DC.

    The second part of a staff paper to the President's Task Force on Communications Policy dealing with the domestic telecommunications carrier industry consists of the final two appendices. In the first, the history, structure, present services, and future plans of the Western Union Telegraph Company are discussed. Evidence is given that by allowing…

  19. Acrylic resins. Part II. Methacrylate polymers (citations from NTIS data base). Report for 1964--Mar 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymethyl methacrylate, polymethacrylic acid, and all other methacrylate and methacrylic polymers, copolymers, and resins are covered in Part 2 of this bibliography. The citations include references concerning physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, synthesis, polymerization and processing. (This updated bibliography contains 172 abstracts, 25 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  20. Towards a Postmodern Theory of Moral Education. Part II: Mapping the Terrain (Zygmunt Bauman's Postmodern Ethics).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesta, Gert J. J.; Stams, Geert-Jan J. M.

    The project of which this paper is a part consists of three steps. The first step (an American Educational Research Association (AERA) Conference 2000 paper subtitled "Clearing the Terrain") provided a critical overview of current debates on moral development and education, focusing on the relationship between empirical and theoretical research.…

  1. On the whole spectrum of Timoshenko beams. Part II: further applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzani, Antonio; Stochino, Flavio; Turco, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    The problem of free vibrations of the Timoshenko beam model has been addressed in the first part of this paper. A careful analysis of the governing equations has shown that the vibration spectrum consists of two parts, separated by a transition frequency, which, depending on the applied boundary conditions, might be itself part of the spectrum. Here, as an extension, the case of a doubly clamped beam is considered. For both parts of the spectrum, the values of natural frequencies are computed and the expressions of eigenmodes are provided: this allows to acknowledge that the nature of vibration modes changes when moving across the transition frequency. This case is a meaningful example of more general ones, where the wave-numbers equation cannot be written in a factorized form and hence must be solved by general root-finding methods for nonlinear transcendental equations. These theoretical results can be used as further benchmarks for assessing the correctness of the numerical values provided by several numerical techniques, e.g. finite element models.

  2. Numerical optimization of nitrogen application to rice. Part II. Field evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Berge, H.F.M.; Qinghua, S.; Zhiming, Z.; Rao, K.S.; Riethoven, J.J.M.; Zhong, X.

    1997-01-01

    The MANAGE-N model (Part I; Ten Berge et al., this issue) was tested by comparing predicted and measured final crop biomass production for 48 rice cultivars under application of 0, 30–40, 60–80 and 90 to 120 kg urea-N per ha at Cuttack, India, during seven consecutive wet seasons. The overall coeffi

  3. The Concept of Time in Rehabilitation and Psychosocial Adaptation to Chronic Illness and Disability: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Hanoch

    2013-01-01

    The first part of this article focused on providing the reader with a general overview of the concept of time with special emphasis on understanding time's role in the structure of personality theories and their associated therapeutic approaches, as well as linking the discussion to the understanding of time in the context of psychosocial…

  4. AN ENGLISH-AMHARIC DICTIONARY OF EVERYDAY USAGE, PART II, (L-Z).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LESLAU, WOLF

    THIS VOLUME, (L-Z), COMPRISES THE SECOND HALF OF THE FIRST MODERN ENGLISH-AMHARIC DICTIONARY. THIS TWO-PART DICTIONARY HAS BEEN PREPARED FOR THE STUDENT FAMILIAR WITH THE SCRIPT AND GRAMMAR OF AMHARIC, THE NATIONAL LANGUAGE OF ETHIOPIA. THE SELECTIONS, LIMITED IN SCOPE, ARE BASED ON EDUCATED COLLOQUIAL AND ARE PRESENTED IN CONTEXTUAL SENTENCES.…

  5. Introduction to Psychology and Leadership. Part Ten; Discipline. Segments I & II, Volume X, Script.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., Annapolis, MD.

    The tenth volume of the introduction to psychology and leadership course (see the final reports which summarize the development project, EM 010 418, EM 010 419, and EM 010 484) concentrates on discipline and is presented in two parts. This document is a self-instructional text with a tape script and intrinsically programed sections. EM 010 442 is…

  6. The Controversy Goes On--"Can Computers Think?" Part II: What Is Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, Peter

    1985-01-01

    The nature of thinking is the subject of this second part in a series which is examining various topics and issues related to the controversy of whether or not computers can think. Suggests that intelligence is the ability to develop general ideas and not the ability to apply those ideas. (JN)

  7. Imaging polar and dipolar sources of geophysical anomalies by probability tomography. Part II: Application to the Vesuvius volcanic area

    CERN Document Server

    Mauriello, P; Mauriello, Paolo; Patella, Domenico

    2006-01-01

    In the previous part I, we have developed the generalized theory of the probability tomography method to image polar and dipolar sources of a vector or scalar geophysical anomaly field. The purpose of the new method was to improve the core-and-boundary resolution of the most probable buried sources of the anomalies detected in a datum domain. In this paper, which constitutes the part II of the same study, an application of the new approach to the Vesuvius volcano (Naples, Italy) is illustrated in detail by analyzing geoelectrical, self-potential and gravity datasets collected over the whole volcanic area. The purpose is to get new insights into the shallow structure and hydrothermal system of Vesuvius, and the deep geometry of the tectonic depression within which the volcano grew.

  8. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2, chapter I: introduction, and chapter II: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report corresponds to Chapters I and II of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2. The major objectives of the INTOR workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2 are to study critical technical issues, and to assess scientific and technical data bases, and to finally upgrade the INTOR design concept. To study critical technical issues that affect the feasibility or practicability of the INTOR design concept, the following five groups are organized; (A) Impurity control, (B) RF heating and current drive, (C) Transient electromagnetics, (D) Maintainability, (E) Technical benefit. In addition to those groups, the three disciplinary groups are organized to assess the worldiode scientific and technical data bases that exist now and that will exist 4-5 years to support the detailed design and construction of an INTOR-like machine, and to identify additional R D that is required; (F) Physics, (G) Engineering, (H) Nuclear. (author)

  9. The effect of Reynolds number on inertial particle dynamics in isotropic turbulence. Part II: Simulations with gravitational effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, Peter J; Collins, Lance R

    2015-01-01

    In Part I of this study, we analyzed the motion of inertial particles in isotropic turbulence in the absence of gravity using direct numerical simulation (DNS). Here, in Part II, we introduce gravity and study its effect over a wide range of flow Reynolds numbers, Froude numbers, and particle Stokes numbers. We see that gravity causes particles to sample the flow more uniformly and reduces the time particles can spend interacting with the underlying turbulence. We also find that gravity tends to increase inertial particle accelerations, and we introduce a model to explain that effect. We then analyze the particle relative velocities and radial distribution functions (RDFs), which are generally seen to be independent of Reynolds number for low and moderate Kolmogorov-scale Stokes numbers $St$. We see that gravity causes particle relative velocities to decrease, and that the relative velocities have higher scaling exponents with gravity. We observe that gravity has a non-trivial effect on clustering, acting to ...

  10. Traumatic injuries of brachial plexus: present methods of surgical treatment Part II. Treatment policy for brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Novikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The task of this paper is to familiarize practicing neurologists, neurosurgeons, traumatologists, and orthopedists with the current principles of diagnosis and treatment of different brachial plexus (BP injuries. Part I describes the anatomy of BP in detail, considers the main mechanisms of its injuries, and gives their current classification (Nervno-Myshechnye Bolezni (Neuromuscular Diseases 2012;4:19–27.Part II presents the author's approach to treatment of brachial plexus injuries according to the type of lesion and period of denervation: nonoperative methods; rehabilitation; preoperative management; indications for surgical treatment. The tactics and techniques of primary brachial plexus reconstructions are discussed in detail.

  11. Mixed ligand complexes of alkaline earth metals: Part XII. Mg(II, Ca(II, Sr(II and Ba(II complexes with 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and salicylaldehyde or hydroxyaromatic ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MITHLESH AGRAWAL

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of alkaline earth metal chlorides with 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and salicylaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone or 2-hydroxypropiophenone have been carried out in 1 : 1 : 1 mole ratio and the mixed ligand complexes of the type MLL’(H2O2 (where M = Mg(II, Ca(II, Sr(II and Ba(II, HL = 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and HL’ = salicylaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone or 2-hydroxypropiophenone have been isolated. These complexes were characterized by TLC, conductance measurements, IR and 1H-NMR spectra.

  12. Part I: In-situ fluorometric quantification of microalgal neutral lipids. Part II: Thermal degradation behavior of investment casting polymer patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongfang

    Research described in this dissertation covers two topics. Part-I is focused on in-situ determination of neutral lipid content of microalgae using a lipophilic fluorescent dye. The traditional Nile red stain-based method for detecting microalgal intracellular lipids is limited due to varying composition and thickness of rigid cell walls. In this study, the addition of dilute acid and heating of solution, were found to greatly enhance staining efficiency of Nile red for microalgal species evaluated. Oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion stabilized by a non-ionic surfactant was employed as a pseudo-standard that mimics lipid-bearing microalgal cells suspended in water. The average neutral lipid contents determined were very close to the results obtained by traditional gravimetric method and solid phase extraction. Part II of the dissertation explores thermo-physico-chemical properties of polymeric pattern materials, including expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam, polyurethane foam, and epoxy stereolithography (SLA) patterns, that are used in investment casting. Density, elastic modulus, expansion coefficient, thermal degradation behavior, etc. were experimentally investigated for their effects on metal casting quality. The reduction in toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) generated during thermal decomposition of polyurethane pattern was achieved by increasing either oxidant level or residence time in heated zone. Thermal degradation kinetics of the pattern materials were examined with a thermogravimetric analysis and activation energies were determined by Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods.

  13. Nanotechnology and its relationship to interventional radiology. Part II: Drug Delivery, Thermotherapy, and Vascular Intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Nanotechnology can be defined as the design, creation, and manipulation of structures on the nanometer scale. This two-part review is intended to acquaint the interventionalist with the field of nanotechnology, and provide an overview of potential applications, while highlighting advances relevant to interventional radiology. Part 2 of the article concentrates on drug delivery, thermotherapy, and vascular intervention. In oncology, advances in drug delivery allow for improved efficacy, decreased toxicity, and greater potential for targeted therapy. Magnetic nanoparticles show potential for use in thermotherapy treatments of various tumours, and the effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation can be enhanced with nanoparticle chemotherapy agents. In vascular intervention, much work is focused on prevention of restenosis through developments in stent technology and systems for localised drug delivery to vessel walls. Further areas of interest include applications for thrombolysis and haemostasis.

  14. Sintering of Multilayered Porous Structures: Part II – Experiments and Model Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, De Wei; Olevsky, Eugene; Esposito, Vincenzo; Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Bjørk, Rasmus; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Aleksandrova, Elena; Pryds, Nini

    2013-01-01

    Experimental analyses of shrinkage and distortion kinetics during sintering of bilayered porous and dense gadolinium-doped ceria Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95d structures are carried out, and compared with the theoretical models developed in Part I of this work. A novel approach is developed for the determinat......Experimental analyses of shrinkage and distortion kinetics during sintering of bilayered porous and dense gadolinium-doped ceria Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95d structures are carried out, and compared with the theoretical models developed in Part I of this work. A novel approach is developed for the......, the layers’ relative sintering intensity, and the shear viscosities ratio of the layer fully dense materials. These optical dilatometry measurements are conducted simultaneously for each individual layer and for a symmetric trilayered porous structure based on the two layers utilized in the bilayered...

  15. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part II: Non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section of a two-part series on musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS reviews the non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions. In the first part, the infectious conditions were reviewed. The non-infectious conditions include polymyositis, drug-induced myopathy, myositis ossificans, adhesive capsulitis, avascular necrosis, bone marrow abnormalities, and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Inflammatory and reactive arthropathies are more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals, and a separate section is dedicated to these conditions, including Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, HIV-associated arthritis, painful articular syndrome, and acute symmetric polyarthritis. Lastly, we include a discussion of HIV-related neoplastic processes that affect the musculoskeletal system, namely Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (orig.)

  16. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss Part II: Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Therapeutic Options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    The great majority of hearing disorders generates from pathologies in the inner ear, mainly the outer hair cells, as mentioned in the first part of this review. Very often, however, hearing loss appears suddenly and even without external causes like noise exposure. This sudden hearing loss is mostly unilateral, recovers very often spontaneously and should be treated, if persisting. Only in this acute stage there are therapeutic options available. If the inner ear hearing loss is chronic there is no curative therapy, an effective management of the hearing disorder is only possible through rehabilitation. This is due to the fact, that hair cells of all mammals, incl. humans, have no regenerative capacity and neither pharmaceutic agents nor other means can induce regeneration and recovery of hair cells. Even a gen-therapy is not available yet. In the second part of this review the main focus lies in sudden hearing loss and general therapeutic options for inner ear hearing loss. PMID:27392187

  17. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part II: Non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States); Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R. [College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, San Francisco (United States)

    2004-06-01

    This section of a two-part series on musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS reviews the non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions. In the first part, the infectious conditions were reviewed. The non-infectious conditions include polymyositis, drug-induced myopathy, myositis ossificans, adhesive capsulitis, avascular necrosis, bone marrow abnormalities, and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Inflammatory and reactive arthropathies are more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals, and a separate section is dedicated to these conditions, including Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, HIV-associated arthritis, painful articular syndrome, and acute symmetric polyarthritis. Lastly, we include a discussion of HIV-related neoplastic processes that affect the musculoskeletal system, namely Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (orig.)

  18. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed. PMID:26691180

  19. Nanotechnology and its Relationship to Interventional Radiology. Part II: Drug Delivery, Thermotherapy, and Vascular Intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Sarah

    2010-09-16

    Nanotechnology can be defined as the design, creation, and manipulation of structures on the nanometer scale. This two-part review is intended to acquaint the interventionalist with the field of nanotechnology, and provide an overview of potential applications, while highlighting advances relevant to interventional radiology. Part 2 of the article concentrates on drug delivery, thermotherapy, and vascular intervention. In oncology, advances in drug delivery allow for improved efficacy, decreased toxicity, and greater potential for targeted therapy. Magnetic nanoparticles show potential for use in thermotherapy treatments of various tumours, and the effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation can be enhanced with nanoparticle chemotherapy agents. In vascular intervention, much work is focused on prevention of restenosis through developments in stent technology and systems for localised drug delivery to vessel walls. Further areas of interest include applications for thrombolysis and haemostasis.

  20. Computational and experimental prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors, Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Custom-built high temperature, high pressure tribometer is designed. • Two different wear phenomena at high temperatures are observed. • Experimental wear results for graphite are presented. • The graphite wear dust production in a typical Pebble Bed Reactor is predicted. -- Abstract: This paper is the continuation of Part I, which describes the high temperature and high pressure helium environment wear tests of graphite–graphite in frictional contact. In the present work, it has been attempted to simulate a Pebble Bed Reactor core environment as compared to Part I. The experimental apparatus, which is a custom-designed tribometer, is capable of performing wear tests at PBR relevant higher temperatures and pressures under a helium environment. This environment facilitates prediction of wear mass loss of graphite as dust particulates from the pebble bed. The experimental results of high temperature helium environment are used to anticipate the amount of wear mass produced in a pebble bed nuclear reactor

  1. An 18680 dwt Multipurpose/Heavy Lift Cargo Vessel, Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Grubišić, Rajko; Grubiša, Robert; Rimanić, Radojka; Vlah, Radivoj; Kučan, Edi; Štokić, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    In the article the second part of the signifi cant design features of an 18680 dwt multipurpose/ heavy lift cargo vessel is presented. The specifi c features of the ship structure design are fi rst dealt with. Then, the propulsion assembly, including the main engine, the gearbox/coupling and the controllable pitch propeller system, is described. Also, features of the electrical system are given, with special emphasis laid on the supply, driving and controlling system of the heavy cargo dec...

  2. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is frequently used for imaging peripheral nerves. It serves to supplement the physical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive, well-tolerated by patients, and relatively inexpensive. Part I of this article series described in detail the characteristic USG picture of peripheral nerves and the proper examination technique, following the examp...

  3. Affine symmetry in mechanics of collective and internal modes. Part II. Quantum models

    OpenAIRE

    Sławianowski, J. J.; Kovalchuk, V.; Sławianowska, A.; Gołubowska, B.; Martens, A; Rożko, E. E.; Zawistowski, Z. J.

    2008-01-01

    Discussed is the quantized version of the classical description of collective and internal affine modes as developed in Part I. We perform the Schr\\"odinger quantization and reduce effectively the quantized problem from $n^{2}$ to $n$ degrees of freedom. Some possible applications in nuclear physics and other quantum many-body problems are suggested. Discussed is also the possibility of half-integer angular momentum in composed systems of spin-less particles.

  4. A Review of the Prevention and Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars: Part II. Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Karagoz

    2013-02-01

    We analyzed the researches for new hopeful treatment modalities as well as the substances that are important to wound healing in the second part of this extensive review. The researchers have tried to find a way to scarless wound healing, and it seems likely that new therapies will be available within the next few years. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(1.000: 49-58

  5. Performance Evaluation of an Air-Conditioning Compressor Part II: Volute Flow Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Tai Lee; Thomas W. Bein

    1999-01-01

    A numerical method that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is used to study an inefficient component of a shipboard air-conditioning HCFC-124 compressor system. This high-loss component of the centrifugal compressor was identified as the volute through a series of measurements given in Part I of the paper. The predictions were made using three grid topologies. The first grid closes the connection between the cutwater and the discharge diffuser. The other two grids connect th...

  6. Analysis of pipe flow with free surface. Part II. Theoretical analysis and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Amane; Takaki, Ryuji

    1994-05-01

    Flow field near the front of an incompressible viscous fluid pushed into a circular pipe is analyzed theoretically and observed experimentally. In the theory, an approximated stream function for a steady state near the axis of the pipe is obtained by use of the Stokes equation. In the experiment, the shape of the surface was observed by a video camera. The theoretical velocity profile and the surface shape near the axis coincide with those from computation (Part I) and experiment.

  7. Mediation theory and the problem of psychological discourse on 'inner' events: part II

    OpenAIRE

    Seebaß, Gottfried

    1982-01-01

    The present article attempts to investigate the 'philosophical foundations' of psychology and thereby of the social sciences in general with regard to a central problem, viz. the question of the 'inner'. It does this with special critical reference to an authoritative psychological theory, viz. the so-called 'mediation theory', and tries to show the necessity of interdisciplinary clarification. In the first part mediation theory was introduced as a variant of psychological behaviorism which a...

  8. Managing Returnable Containers Logistics - A Case Study Part II - Improving Visibility through Using Automatic Identification Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Gretchen Meiser; Maleki, Reza A.

    2011-01-01

    This case study is the result of a project conducted on behalf of a company that uses its own returnable containers to transport purchased parts from suppliers. The objective of this project was to develop a proposal to enable the company to more effectively track and manage its returnable containers. The research activities in support of this project included (1) the analysis and documentation of the physical flow and the information flow associated with the container...

  9. Modeling crosshatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers. Part II: Periodic boundary conditions and dislocation groups

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, A M; LeSar, R.; Kerner, M A; Speck, J.S.; Romanov, A E; Kolesnikova, A. L.; Bobeth, M; Pompe, W

    2004-01-01

    We present further developments and understanding of the commonly observed crosshatch surface morphology in strain-relaxed heteroepitaxial films. We have previously proposed that the crosshatch morphology is directly related with strain relaxation via threading dislocation glide which results in both surface step and misfit dislocation (MD) formation [see Andrews , J. Appl. Phys. 91, 1933 (2002)-now referred to as Part I]. In this article, we have used solutions for the stress fields and disp...

  10. Linear stability analysis in fluid-structure interaction with transpiration. Part II: numerical analysis and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Miguel Angel; Le Tallec, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    We address the problem of flutter analysis of a coupled fluid-structure system involving an incompressible Newtonian fluid and a reduced structure. We use the Linearization Principle approach developed in Part I, particularly suited for fluid-structure problems involving moving boundaries. Thus, the stability analysis is reduced to the computation of the leftmost eigenvalu- es of a coupled eigenproblem of minimal complexity. The coupling is realized through specific transpiration interface co...

  11. How to succeed in science: a concise guide for young biomedical scientists. Part II: making discoveries

    OpenAIRE

    Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    Making discoveries is the most important part of being a scientist, and also the most fun. Young scientists need to develop the experimental and mental skill sets that enable them to make discoveries, including how to recognize and exploit serendipity when it strikes. Here, I provide practical advice to young scientists on choosing a research topic, designing, performing and interpreting experiments and, last but not least, on maintaining your sanity in the process.

  12. Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles - Part II: Prediction and suppression of resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this series, experimental data were presented which suggest that the acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles is tied to periodic vortex shedding from the tubes. In this paper, a semiempirical model for predicting the onset of resonance is developed. This model is compared with experimental data and other models from the literature. Methods of suppressing the resonance are developed and experimental data on their effectiveness are presented

  13. Periodontal Research: Basics and beyond – Part II (Ethical issues, sampling, outcome measures and bias)

    OpenAIRE

    Haritha Avula

    2013-01-01

    A good research beginning refers to formulating a well-defined research question, developing a hypothesis and choosing an appropriate study design. The first part of the review series has discussed these issues in depth and this paper intends to throw light on other issues pertaining to the implementation of research. These include the various ethical norms and standards in human experimentation, the eligibility criteria for the participants, sampling methods and sample size calculation, vari...

  14. Anti-Hypertensive Herbs and Their Mechanisms of Action: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M Akhtar; Al Disi, Sara S; Eid, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    Traditional medicine has a history extending back to thousands of years, and during the intervening time, man has identified the healing properties of a very broad range of plants. Globally, the use of herbal therapies to treat and manage cardiovascular disease (CVD) is on the rise. This is the second part of our comprehensive review where we discuss the mechanisms of plants and herbs used for the treatment and management of high blood pressure. Similar to the first part, PubMed and ScienceDirect databases were utilized, and the following keywords and phrases were used as inclusion criteria: hypertension, high blood pressure, herbal medicine, complementary and alternative medicine, endothelial cells, nitric oxide (NO), vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, hydrogen sulfide, nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB), oxidative stress, and epigenetics/epigenomics. Each of the aforementioned keywords was co-joined with plant or herb in question, and where possible with its constituent molecule(s). This part deals in particular with plants that are used, albeit less frequently, for the treatment and management of hypertension. We then discuss the interplay between herbs/prescription drugs and herbs/epigenetics in the context of this disease. The review then concludes with a recommendation for more rigorous, well-developed clinical trials to concretely determine the beneficial impact of herbs and plants on hypertension and a disease-free living. PMID:27014064

  15. Model‐Based Assessment of Alternative Study Designs in Pediatric Trials. Part II: Bayesian Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smania, G; Baiardi, P; Ceci, A; Magni, P

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a pharmacokinetic‐pharmacodynamic based clinical trial simulation framework for evaluating the performance of a fixed‐sample Bayesian design (BD) and two alternative Bayesian sequential designs (BSDs) (i.e., a non‐hierarchical (NON‐H) and a semi‐hierarchical (SEMI‐H) one). Prior information was elicited from adult trials and weighted based on the expected similarity of response to treatment between the pediatric and adult populations. Study designs were evaluated in terms of: type I and II errors, sample size per arm (SS), trial duration (TD), and estimate precision. No substantial differences were observed between NON‐H and SEMI‐H. BSDs require, on average, smaller SS and TD compared to the BD, which, on the other hand, guarantees higher estimate precision. When large differences between children and adults are expected, BSDs can return very large SS. Bayesian approaches appear to outperform their frequentist counterparts in the design of pediatric trials even when little weight is given to prior information from adults. PMID:27530374

  16. Neutronic Analysis of the 3 MW TRIGA MARK II Research Reactor, Part I: Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the current core configuration of a 3 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh and validation of the results by benchmarking with the experimental, operational and available Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) values. The three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP4C was used to develop a versatile and accurate full-core model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detail all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. All fresh fuel and control elements as well as the vicinity of the core were precisely described. Continuous energy cross-section data from ENDF/B-VI and S(α, β) scattering functions from the ENDF/B-V library were used. The validation of the model against benchmark experimental results is presented. The MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values are found to be in very good agreement, which indicates that the Monte Carlo model is correctly simulating the TRIGA reactor. (author)

  17. Arguments for Csr-Based Sustainable Competitiveness of Multinationals in Emerging Markets (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The (two parts of the paper aims to bring into discussion the case of CSR-based sustainable competitiveness of multinationals in emerging market economies, through an interdisciplinary approach (international business and strategic management applied to a multilevel analysis (country and company. The main conclusion of the paper is that, despite the circumstances that nowadays characterize international business in general and the emerging market economies in particular, such a transformation in business models is not only desirable, but mandatory. Key arguments in favor of this assumption are found (both theoretically and empirically at global/general level and, as well, at the emerging market economies’ level.

  18. Transonic Airfoil Flow Simulation. Part II: Inviscid-Viscous Coupling Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir CARDOŞ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A calculation method for the subsonic and transonic viscous flow over airfoil using the displacement surface concept is described. This modelling technique uses a finite volume method for the time-dependent Euler equations and laminar and turbulent boundary-layer integral methods. In additional special models for transition, laminar or turbulent separation bubbles and trailing edge treatment have been selected. However, the flow is limited to small parts of trailing edge-type separation. Comparisons with experimental data and other methods are shown.

  19. Reduced and Generalized Stokes Resolvent Equations in Asymptotically Flat Layers, Part II: H∞-Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Helmut

    2005-05-01

    We study the generalized Stokes equations in asymptotically flat layers, which can be considered as compact perturbations of an infinite (flat) layer Ω _0 = mathbb{R}^{n - 1} × ( - 1,1). Besides standard non-slip boundary conditions, we consider a mixture of slip and non-slip boundary conditions on the upper and lower boundary, respectively. In this second part, we use pseudodifferential operator techniques to construct a parametrix to the reduced Stokes equations, which solves the system in Lq-Sobolev spaces, 1 calculus of the (reduced) Stokes operator.

  20. Extracranial diffusion-weighted imaging. Clinical applications - abdomen, thorax, soft tissue and bone marrow Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of the article the basic physical principles of DWI were considered together with sequence optimization in the extracranial applications of this imaging technic. Clinical application of DWI in general were discussed. A more detailed review of the application of DWI in focal and diffuse liver diseases was offered. This article will focus in detail on the application of DWI and the changes in DWI images in the pathological processes involving the gallbladder and bile ducts, pancreas, kidneys, adrenals, spleen, lymph nodes, large blood vessels, Gl tract, thorax, musculo-skeletal system and soft tissues. Key words: EXTRACRANIAL DIFFUSION. DWI. MRI

  1. Experimental investigation and numerical modeling of carbonation process in reinforced concrete structures Part II. Practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical-numerical method developed by the authors to predict the corrosion initiation time of reinforced concrete structures due to carbonation process, recalled in Part I of this work, is here applied to some real cases. The final aim is to develop and test a practical method for determining the durability characteristics of existing buildings liable to carbonation, as well as estimating the corrosion initiation time of a building at the design stage. Two industrial sheds with different ages and located in different areas have been analyzed performing both experimental tests and numerical analyses. Finally, a case of carbonation-induced failure in a prestressed r.c. beam is presented

  2. Nutrition of preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia after hospital discharge – Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercília Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia often present with severe growth failure at discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. Catch-up growth accelerates after hospital discharge, nevertheless, feeding problems may need a specialized approach. Following the revision of the scientific literature on the most relevant aspects on nutrition of patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia after hospital discharge in Part I, in this article the Authors present and discuss important issues such as catch up growth, swallow dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux, and how to improve feeding competences.

  3. Ageing behaviour of electrochemical double layer capacitors. Part II. Lifetime simulation model for dynamic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlen, Oliver; Kowal, Julia; Dirk Uwe Sauer [Institute for Power Electronics and Electrical Drives ISEA, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-11-08

    Based on the results of the experimental study in Part I, a holistic simulation model that combines electrical and thermal simulation of electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC) modules with an ageing model is presented. This simulation model allows analysing self-accelerating degradation effects caused by elevated voltages and temperatures. Furthermore, the divergence of cell performance in a stack of cells can be investigated which makes the model a valuable tool for cell and stack design as well as for testing operating strategies and cooling systems. (author)

  4. Investigation of novel propulsion systems – the exoskeletal engine concept. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian JUHASZ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The exoskeletal engine represents a relatively new concept in the world of propulsion systems. It is a drum-rotor engine concept in which conventionally heavy shafts and discs are eliminated and replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in span wise compression. Thus the rotating blades are in compression rather than in tension. The resulting open channel at the engine centerline has immense potential for jet noise reduction and can also accommodate an inner combined-cycle thruster such as a ramjet. This is the second part of the article.

  5. Coupled Vibration of Unshrouded Centrifugal Compressor Impellers. Part II: Computation of Vibration Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Hagelstein

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased use of small gas turbines and turbochargers in different technical fields has led to the development of highly-loaded centrifugal compressors with extremely thin blades. Due to high rotational speed and the correspondingly high centrifugal loads, the shape of the impeller hub must also be optimized. This has led to a reduction of the thickness of the impeller disc in the outlet region. The thin parts of the impeller are very sensitive and may be damaged by the excitation of dangerous blade vibrations.

  6. Air Navigation Systems: Chapter 6. Navigation and the Pioneering Flights Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Philip

    Part I of this chapter was included in the January 1997 issue of the Journal, Vol. 50, p. 65.The Smith Brothers, 1919. Captain Ross M. Smith, of the Australian Flying Corps based in Palestine, flew a Handley Page 0/400 late in 1918 on a special flight to Baghdad and beyond, carrying as passenger Major General W. G. H. Salmond, the RAF's Middle East Commander. Flying as co-pilot was Brigadier-General Borton, Commander of the Palestine Brigade. Smith had been flying, in support of Lawrence's forces, another 0/00 which Borton had brought from England.

  7. Neuro-Oftalmologia: sistema sensorial ¾ Parte II Revisão 1997 ¾ 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Lana-Peixoto Marco Aurélio

    2002-01-01

    Esta é a segunda parte de uma revisão da literatura do sistema visual sensorial. O autor seleciona artigos publicados na literatura entre os anos de 1997 e 1999 relacionados a neurorretinites, neuropatia óptica compressiva, tumores do nervo óptico, pseudotumor cerebral, neuropatias ópticas hereditárias, hipoplasia do nervo óptico, drusas do disco óptico, neuropatia óptica tóxica, neuropatia óptica traumática, outras neuropatias ópticas e doenças retinianas, doenças do quiasma óptico e do trat...

  8. π+p, π+n, and π+d interactions. A compilation. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A listing is presented of the 297 articles from which the data in Part I were abstracted. These listings contain additional information on each of these articles: authors, title, abstract, closely related references, beam, momenta of experiment, target, etc. One also gives tables of the data as they appeared in the original articles. Systematic comments are made specifying how the final data were obtained; for example, mass cuts for resonance production cross sections, spectator momentum cuts, corrections for systematic biases, etc. This information, extracted from the papers, is given to aid the reader in his evaluation of the results and in any comparison with other experiments

  9. Stress of anisotropic structure vaults consisting of cylindrical shells. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the method is shown on an example of vaults constructed from slabs. An algorithm and numerical results are given showing that building a vault using slabs of identical dimensions and thus also of identical weight of material used, axial rigidity significantly increases. This is especially important for designing nuclear reactors in which the structural parts of the core in the shape of a vault with higher axial rigidity have lower weight and are thus more advantageous than those of the slab type. (J.P.)

  10. The multigene families of actinoporins (part II): Strategies for heterologous production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, A; Hervis, Y P; Socas, L B P; Canet, L; Faheem, M; Barbosa, J A R G; Lanio, M E; Pazos, I F

    2016-08-01

    The sea anemone venom contains pore-forming proteins (PFP) named actinoporins, due to their purification from organisms belonging to Actiniaria order and its ability to form pores in sphingomyelin-containing membranes. Actinoporins are generally basic, monomeric and single-domain small proteins (∼20 kDa) that are classified as α-type PFP since the pore formation in membranes occur through α-helical elements. Different actinoporin isoforms have been isolated from most of the anemones species, as was analyzed in the first part of this review. Several actinoporin full-length genes have been identified from genomic-DNA libraries or messenger RNA. Since the actinoporins lack carbohydrates and disulfide bridges, their expression in bacterial systems is suitable. The actinoporins heterologous expression in Escherichia coli simplifies their production, replaces the natural source reducing the ecological damage in anemone populations, and allows the production of site-specific mutants for the study of the structure-function relationship. In this second part of the review, the strategies for heterologous production of actinoporins in Escherichia coli are analyzed, as well as the different approaches used for their purification. The activity of the recombinant proteins with respect to the wild-type is also reviewed. PMID:27080349

  11. The available-enthalpy (flow-exergy) cycle. Part-II: applications to idealized baroclinic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The local available-enthalpy cycle proposed in Part I of this paper is applied to document energetics of three numerical simulations, representing life cycles of idealized baroclinic waves. An improved temporal numerical scheme defined in Part I is used in this study, together with the Arpege-IFS model using a T42 triangular truncation. A 45{\\deg}N and 200 hPa dry unstable jet is constructed with the most unstable mode at zonal wave number 8. Energetic impacts of both horizontal and vertical diffusion schemes are determined separately. The role of ageostrophic winds within the Ekman layer is investigated, leading to an explanation for large observed values for the dissipation terms and to a new formulation of the potential-energy conversions. The magnitudes of these new conversion terms are compared with those of the usual barotropic and baroclinic conversions. A new version for the available-enthalpy cycle is proposed. It is suitable for open systems and it includes explicitly the potential-energy component ...

  12. Genetic and epigenetic features in radiation sensitivity. Part II: implications for clinical practice and radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourguignon, Michel H. [Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, Paris Cedex 12 (France); CEA-DSV-DRM Hopital, Service de Recherches en Hemato-Immunologie, Saint Louis, Paris (France); Gisone, Pablo A.; Perez, Maria R.; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Giorgio, Marina di [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Laboratorio de Radiopatologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Carosella, Edgardo D. [CEA-DSV-DRM Hopital, Service de Recherches en Hemato-Immunologie, Saint Louis, Paris (France)

    2005-03-01

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression has attracted greater attention to the genetic and epigenetic susceptibility to cancer, possibly enhanced by ionising radiation. This issue is especially important for radiation therapists since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following standard radiation therapy, while normally sensitive patients could receive higher doses of radiation, offering a better likelihood of cure for malignant tumours. Although only a small percentage of individuals are ''hypersensitive'' to radiation effects, all medical specialists using ionising radiation should be aware of the aforementioned progress in medical knowledge. The present paper, the second of two parts, reviews human disorders known or strongly suspected to be associated with hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. The main tests capable of detecting such pathologies in advance are analysed, and ethical issues regarding genetic testing are considered. The implications for radiation protection of possible hypersensitivity to radiation in a part of the population are discussed, and some guidelines for nuclear medicine professionals are proposed. (orig.)

  13. Genetic and epigenetic features in radiation sensitivity. Part II: implications for clinical practice and radiation protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguignon, Michel H; Gisone, Pablo A; Perez, Maria R; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Giorgio, Marina Di; Carosella, Edgardo D

    2005-03-01

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression has attracted greater attention to the genetic and epigenetic susceptibility to cancer, possibly enhanced by ionising radiation. This issue is especially important for radiation therapists since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following standard radiation therapy, while normally sensitive patients could receive higher doses of radiation, offering a better likelihood of cure for malignant tumours. Although only a small percentage of individuals are "hypersensitive" to radiation effects, all medical specialists using ionising radiation should be aware of the aforementioned progress in medical knowledge. The present paper, the second of two parts, reviews human disorders known or strongly suspected to be associated with hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. The main tests capable of detecting such pathologies in advance are analysed, and ethical issues regarding genetic testing are considered. The implications for radiation protection of possible hypersensitivity to radiation in a part of the population are discussed, and some guidelines for nuclear medicine professionals are proposed. PMID:15692806

  14. 2012 in review - part II: overcoming the obstacles in the pharma/biotech industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasseda, X; Dulsat, C; Navarro, D; Cruces, E; Graul, A I; Jago, C; Tracy, M

    2013-02-01

    As highlighted in the first part of this review published last month, the year 2012 saw the approval of a remarkable number of new drugs, and among the new drugs reaching the market, a significant proportion were orphan drugs developed for treating less prevalent diseases. These drugs are certainly not expected to become blockbusters, but are of high interest because of their efficacy in a narrow spectrum of patients. This trend aligns with the general tendency of staying away from fit-for-all blockbusters into personalized medicine as one of the strategies for overcoming the patent cliff that resulted in a long list of drugs going off patent and being approved as generics also during last year. The emerging scenario resulting from new developments in the form of new drugs and biosimilars and newly available generic medications paralleled by strategic movements within the pharmaceutical industry to reinforce their position in the market, as reflected by merger and acquisition deals accompanied by significant efforts into prioritization resulting in spin-off and split transactions, is reviewed in this second part. This paper includes a significant amount of data in tables for quick review and to profile the new strategic movements in drug pipelines. Further information, including details on mechanisms of action, current status, itemized pharmacology, pharmacokinetic and clinical trial research findings and updated information can be found in the proprietary databases Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM) and Thomson Reuters Cortellis™. PMID:23462626

  15. Stratigraphic sections of the Phosphoria Formation in Montana, 1949-50: part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, R.W.; Cressman, E.R.; Jones, R. S.; Replogle, B.K.

    1953-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has recently measured and sampled the Phosphoria formation at many localities in Montana and other western states. These data will not be fully synthesized and analyzed for several years, but segments of the data, accompanied by little or no interpretation, are published as preliminary reports as they are assembled. This report, which contains abstracts of many of the sections in southwestern Montana (fig. 1), is one of this series and is the fourth Montana report; it includes the second half of the data gathered in Montana during 1949 and 1950. The field and laboratory procedures adopted in these investigations are described rather fully in a previous report (McKelvey and others, 1953). Many people have taken part in this investigation. The program of which this work is a part was organized by V. E. McKelvey. J. L. Elliott, W. J. Garmoe, R. F. Gosman, C. W. Tandy, and W. H. Wilson participated in the description of strata and the collection of samples referred to in this report. Crushing and splitting of the samples in the field was done by T. K. Rigby. The laboratory preparation of samples for chemical analysis was done in Denver, Colo., under the direction of W. P. Huleatt.

  16. Numerical developments for short-pulsed Near Infra-Red laser spectroscopy. Part II: inverse treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indirect optical spectroscopy or tomography, that is, mapping of optical properties in scattering and absorption inside a medium given a set of measurements at the boundaries, is highly dependent on the radiative transfer model used to track radiative energy propagation in semi-transparent materials. In the first part of this study, a numerical tool adapted for treating radiative transfer in the frame of short-pulsed laser beam interaction with non-homogeneous matter has been presented. In this paper, it is intended to show how such numerical tools can undergo inversion through adjoint treatment or reverse differentiation. Adjoint models, as well as reverse differentiation, are used in order to allow an efficient computation of the gradient, in the unknown optical parameters space, of an objective or cost function estimating the residual between data obtained at the boundary and predictions by numerical simulations. This gradient is a crucial indication as to update, through line minimization, the set of internal optical properties of the medium. First, the theoretical background of the inverse treatments, both reverse differentiation and adjoint model, for the transient radiative transfer equation model introduced in Part I is developed. Second, different reconstruction configurations are presented. Time-dependent sampling and time filtering effects of the measurements are addressed. Image reconstructions from simulated data are achieved for material phantoms of simple geometry

  17. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircrfaft Field Mill Data: Part II: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Mach, D. M.; Christian H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman M. G.

    2006-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory developed in Part I of this study is applied to complete a relative calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the Lagrange multiplier method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -1) and a 5 V m(sup -1) error in the mean fair-weather field function, the 3D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair-weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -l), the method retrieves the 3D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair-weather field estimate is typically within 1 V m(sup -1) of the true fair-weather field. Using this type of side constraint and data from fair-weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. Absolute calibration was completed using the pitch down method developed in Part I, and conventional analyses. The resulting calibration matrices were then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably in many respects with results derived from earlier (iterative) techniques of calibration.

  18. Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

    2012-02-08

    A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

  19. Prediction of 222 Rn exhalation rates from phosphogypsum based stacks. Part II: preliminary numerical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this paper proposes a steady-state 2-D model for 222 Rn transport in phosphogypsum stacks. In this second part, the dimensionless model equations are solved numerically with the help of an existing finite-volume simulator that has been successfully used to solve heat and mass transfer problems in porous media. As a test case, a rectangular shaped stack is considered in order to verify the ability of the proposed parametric approach to account for concurrent effects on the 222 Rn exhalation into the local atmosphere. Air flow is supposed to be strictly buoyancy driven and the ground is assumed to be impermeable to 222 Rn and at a higher temperature under the stack base. Dimensionless controlling parameters are set to representative values and results are presented for Grashof number in the range 106 ≤Gr≤ 108, corresponding to very small to small temperature differences between incoming air and ground underneath the stack base. For the particular set of parameters and inasmuch as Gr increases, streamlines presented basically the same pattern while internal isotherms and iso concentration lines remained almost unchanged. Total average Sherwood number proved to be rather insensitive to Gr while total average Nusselt increased slightly with Gr. (author)

  20. A new linear transfer theory and characterization method for image detectors. Part II: Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubk, Axel, E-mail: Axel.Lubk@triebenberg.de [CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig B.P. 94347 F-31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy, CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Roeder, Falk [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Niermann, Tore [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Gatel, Christophe; Joulie, Sebastien; Houdellier, Florent [CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig B.P. 94347 F-31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy, CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Magen, Cesar [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA) - ARAID, and Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy, CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Hyetch, Martin J. [CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig B.P. 94347 F-31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy, CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    A novel generalized linear transfer theory describing the signal and noise transfer in image detectors has been developed in Part I (Niermann, this issue, ) of this paper. Similar to the existing notion of a point spread function (PSF) describing the transfer of the first statistical moment (the average), a noise spread function (NSF) was introduced to characterize the spatially resolved transfer of noise (central second moment, covariance). Following the theoretic results developed in Part I (Niermann, this issue, ), a new experimental method based on single spot illumination has been developed and applied to measure 2D point and 4D noise spread functions of CCD cameras used in TEM. A dedicated oversampling method has been used to suppress aliasing in the measured quantities. We analyze the 4D noise spread with respect to electronic and photonic noise contributions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a new detector characterization method based on single spot illumination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly accurate MTFs comparable to the knife-edge method are determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4D noise spread functions have been successfully measured for the first time.

  1. Modeling heart rate regulation--part II: parameter identification and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, K R; Gray, G A; Olufsen, M S

    2008-06-01

    In part I of this study we introduced a 17-parameter model that can predict heart rate regulation during postural change from sitting to standing. In this subsequent study, we focus on the 17 model parameters needed to adequately represent the observed heart rate response. In part I and in previous work (Olufsen et al. 2006), we estimated the 17 model parameters by minimizing the least squares error between computed and measured values of the heart rate using the Nelder-Mead method (a simplex algorithm). In this study, we compare the Nelder-Mead optimization method to two sampling methods: the implicit filtering method and a genetic algorithm. We show that these off-the-shelf optimization methods can work in conjunction with the heart rate model and provide reasonable parameter estimates with little algorithm tuning. In addition, we make use of the thousands of points sampled by the optimizers in the course of the minimization to perform an overall analysis of the model itself. Our findings show that the resulting least-squares problem has multiple local minima and that the non-linear-least squares error can vary over two orders of magnitude due to the complex interaction between the model parameters, even when provided with reasonable bound constraints. PMID:18172764

  2. Genetic and epigenetic features in radiation sensitivity. Part II: implications for clinical practice and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression has attracted greater attention to the genetic and epigenetic susceptibility to cancer, possibly enhanced by ionising radiation. This issue is especially important for radiation therapists since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following standard radiation therapy, while normally sensitive patients could receive higher doses of radiation, offering a better likelihood of cure for malignant tumours. Although only a small percentage of individuals are ''hypersensitive'' to radiation effects, all medical specialists using ionising radiation should be aware of the aforementioned progress in medical knowledge. The present paper, the second of two parts, reviews human disorders known or strongly suspected to be associated with hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. The main tests capable of detecting such pathologies in advance are analysed, and ethical issues regarding genetic testing are considered. The implications for radiation protection of possible hypersensitivity to radiation in a part of the population are discussed, and some guidelines for nuclear medicine professionals are proposed. (orig.)

  3. Open-Source MFIX-DEM Software for Gas-Solids Flows: Part II - Validation Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tingwen

    2012-04-01

    With rapid advancements in computer hardware and numerical algorithms, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been increasingly employed as a useful tool for investigating the complex hydrodynamics inherent in multiphase flows. An important step during the development of a CFD model and prior to its application is conducting careful and comprehensive verification and validation studies. Accordingly, efforts to verify and validate the open-source MFIX-DEM software, which can be used for simulating the gas–solids flow using an Eulerian reference frame for the continuum fluid and a Lagrangian discrete framework (Discrete Element Method) for the particles, have been made at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In part I of this paper, extensive verification studies were presented and in this part, detailed validation studies of MFIX-DEM are presented. A series of test cases covering a range of gas–solids flow applications were conducted. In particular the numerical results for the random packing of a binary particle mixture, the repose angle of a sandpile formed during a side charge process, velocity, granular temperature, and voidage profiles from a bounded granular shear flow, lateral voidage and velocity profiles from a monodisperse bubbling fluidized bed, lateral velocity profiles from a spouted bed, and the dynamics of segregation of a binary mixture in a bubbling bed were compared with available experimental data, and in some instances with empirical correlations. In addition, sensitivity studies were conducted for various parameters to quantify the error in the numerical simulation.

  4. Open-source MFIX-DEM software for gas-solids flows: Part II Validation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tingwen [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Garg, Rahul [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Galvin, Janine [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    With rapid advancements in computer hardware and numerical algorithms, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been increasingly employed as a useful tool for investigating the complex hydrodynamics inherent in multiphase flows. An important step during the development of a CFD model and prior to its application is conducting careful and comprehensive verification and validation studies. Accordingly, efforts to verify and validate the open-source MFIX-DEM software, which can be used for simulating the gas solids flow using an Eulerian reference frame for the continuum fluid and a Lagrangian discrete framework (Discrete Element Method) for the particles, have been made at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In part I of this paper, extensive verification studies were presented and in this part, detailed validation studies of MFIX-DEM are presented. A series of test cases covering a range of gas solids flow applications were conducted. In particular the numerical results for the random packing of a binary particle mixture, the repose angle of a sandpile formed during a side charge process, velocity, granular temperature, and voidage profiles from a bounded granular shear flow, lateral voidage and velocity profiles from a monodisperse bubbling fluidized bed, lateral velocity profiles from a spouted bed, and the dynamics of segregation of a binary mixture in a bubbling bed were compared with available experimental data, and in some instances with empirical correlations. In addition, sensitivity studies were conducted for various parameters to quantify the error in the numerical simulation.

  5. Graph Theoretic Foundations of Multibody Dynamics Part II: Analysis and Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Abhinandan

    2011-10-01

    This second, of a two part paper, uses concepts from graph theory to obtain a deeper understanding of the mathematical foundations of multibody dynamics. The first part [7] established the block-weighted adjacency (BWA) matrix structure of spatial operators associated with serial and tree topology multibody system dynamics, and introduced the notions of spatial kernel operators (SKO) and spatial propagation operators (SPO). This paper builds upon these connections to show that key analytical results and computational algorithms are a direct consequence of these structural properties and require minimal assumptions about the specific nature of the underlying multibody system. We formalize this notion by introducing the notion of SKO models for general tree-topology multibody systems. We show that key analytical results, including mass matrix factorization, inversion, and decomposition hold for all SKO models. It is also shown that key low-order scatter/gather recursive computational algorithms follow directly from these abstract-level analytical results. Application examples to illustrate the concrete application of these general results are provided. The paper also describes a general recipe for developing SKO models. The abstract nature of SKO models allows the application of these techniques to a very broad class of multibody systems. PMID:22102791

  6. Toward a molecular understanding of adaptive immunity:A chronology, Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall A Smith

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available By 1980 it was obvious that to more fully understand adaptive immunity, one needed to somehow reduce the tremendous complexity of antigen recognition by T cell populations. Thus, there were two developments that resulted in a paradigm shift in immunology, one being the generation of monoclonal antibodies, and the other the development of monoclonal functional antigen-specific T cell lines. For the first time, the cellular reagents became available to ask new questions as to how individual cells comprising the complex cell populations recognize and respond to changes in their molecular environments. The first successful generation of monoclonal T cells depended upon the understanding that antigen renders cells responsive to the antigen non-specific T cell growth factor that came to be termed interleukin-2 (IL-2, which could then be used in propagating large numbers of the progeny of single cells, which in turn could then be used for molecular analyses. Monoclonal functional human T cells were used to immunize mice to generate clone-specific (clonotypic monoclonal antibodies, which then permitted the first biochemical characterizations of the antigen recognition elements of the T cell antigen receptor complex. Moreover, the use of monoclonal cytolytic and helper/inducer human T cell clones essentially proved that the T cell-specific molecules T4 and T8 functioned as accessory molecules in antigen recognition by defining MHC class II or class I restriction respectively. As well, the expression of the T3 molecules, found to be common to all T cells, were shown further to be obligatory for functional antigen-specific T cell signaling. The monoclonal IL-2-dependent T cells were also instrumental in the isolation and purification of the IL-2 molecule to homogeneity, the first interleukin molecule to be identified and characterized. These advances then led to the generation of pure radiolabeled IL-2 molecules that were used to identify the first

  7. Nuclear fission, today and tomorrow. From renaissance to technological breakthrough (generation IV) - Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an overview of the current Euratom FP-7 research and training actions in innovative nuclear fission reactors and fuel cycle technologies, including partitioning and transmutation. It is based on the more than 40 invited lectures that were delivered by research project coordinators and by keynote speakers at the FISA-2009 Conference, organised by the European Commission DG Research/Euratom. The education and training programmes in nuclear fission and radiation protection are also discussed, aiming at continuously increasing the level of nuclear competences across the EU. It is necessary to consider the most recent nuclear fission technologies (Generations of Nuclear Power Plants): - GEN II: safety and reliability of nuclear facilities and energy independence; - GEN III: continuous improvement of safety and reliability, and increased industrial competitiveness in a growing energy market; - GEN IV: for increased sustainability, and proliferation resistance. The focus in this paper is on the design objectives and research issues associated to Generations IV systems that have been agreed upon internationally. Their benefits are discussed according to a series of ambitious criteria or technology goals established at the international level. One will have to produce not only electricity at lower costs but also heat at very high temperatures, while exploiting a maximum of fissile and fertile matters, and recycling all actinides, under safe and reliable conditions. Scientific viability studies and technological performance tests for each Generation IV system are now being carried out in many laboratories world-wide, in line with the intergovernmental GIF agreement. The ultimate phase of commercial deployment is foreseen for 2040. (orig.)

  8. High-temperature turbine technology program hot-gas path development test. Part II. Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, M.W.

    1982-03-01

    This topical report of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) Phase II program presents the results of testing full-scale water-cooled first-stage and second-stage turbine nozzles at design temperature and pressure to verify that the designs are adequate for operation in a full-scale turbine environment. Low-cycle fatigue life of the nozzles was demonstrated by subjecting cascade assemblies to several hundred simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycles. This testing was accomplished in the Hot-Gas Path Development Test Stand (HGPDTS), which is capable of evaluating full-scale combustion and turbine nozzle components. A three-throat cascade of the first-stage turbine nozzle was successfully tested at a nozzle inlet gas temperature of 2630/sup 0/F and a nozzle inlet pressure of 11.3 atmospheres. In addition to steady-state operation at the design firing temperature, the nozzle cascade was exposed to a simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycle by varying the firing temperature. A total of 42 h at the design point and 617 thermal cycles were accumulated during the test periods. First-stage nozzle test results show that measured metal and coolant temperatures correspond well to the predicted design values. This nozzle design has been shown to be fully satisfactory for the application (2600/sup 0/F), with growth capability to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature. A post-test metallurgical examination of sectioned portions of the tested nozzles shows a totally bonded structure, confirming the test results and attesting to the successful performance of water-cooled composite nozzle hardware.

  9. Engaging and empowering patients to manage their type 2 diabetes, Part II: Initiatives for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Stephan; Serrano-Gil, Manuel

    2010-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has reached pandemic proportions. The impact of it and its long-term sequelae represent a significant burden for many healthcare systems around the world, and a significant number of patients struggle to achieve the internationally recommended targets for the modifiable risk factors that optimize healthy outcomes. In the first part of this two-part review, the scene was set showing that there seems to be a knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) gap hindering successful management of T2D. Although theoretical knowledge about how T2D should be managed exists, the attitude of patients and healthcare professionals seems to influence the practicalities of implementing life-enhancing changes for patients living with diabetes. Following the chronic care model, macro-level initiatives such as Finland's national diabetes program, "The Development Programme for the Prevention and Care of Diabetes" (DEHKO), encourage a coordinated, supportive policy and financial environment for healthcare system change, and are advocated by the International Diabetes Federation. Over a 10-year period, the DEHKO program aims to demonstrate that a top-down population approach to prevention, focusing on reducing obesity, increasing physical activity, and encouraging healthier eating habits, may improve the overall health of the nation. However, the patient is the focus of day-to-day management of T2D, and innovative strategies that use a community (meso-level) approach to encourage self-management, or that embrace new technologies to access diabetes self-management education or support networks, are likely to be the way forward. Such measures may close the apparent KAP gap and bring about real and measurable benefits in quality of life and life expectancy. The second part of this review describes some of the many and varied initiatives designed to engage and empower patients to self-manage their T2D, with the aim of increasing the proportion of patients reaching health

  10. Waveform cross correlation for seismic monitoring of underground nuclear explosions. Part II: Synthetic master events

    CERN Document Server

    Bobrov, Dmitry; Rozhkov, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Waveform cross correlation is an efficient tool for detection and characterization of seismic signals. The efficiency critically depends on the availability of master events. For the purposes of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, cross correlation can globally reduce the threshold monitoring by 0.3 to 0.4 magnitude units. In seismically active regions, the optimal choice of master events is straightforward. There are two approaches to populate the global grid in aseismic areas: the replication of real masters and synthetic seismograms calculated for seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System. Synthetic templates depend on the accuracy of shape and amplitude predictions controlled by focal depth and mechanism, source function, velocity structure and attenuation along the master/station path. As in Part I, we test three focal mechanisms (explosion, thrust fault, and actual Harvard CMT solution for one of the April 11, 2012 Sumatera aftershocks) and two velocity structures (ak135 and CRUST 2.0...

  11. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid applications. Part II. Test proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A.O. [BMW Group, 80788 Muenchen (Germany); Albers, J. [Johnson Controls Power Solutions EMEA, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Weirather-Koestner, D. [ZSW Ulm, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Kabza, H. [Universitaet Ulm, Institut fuer Energiewandlung und -speicherung, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    In the first part of this work selected key parameters for applying lead-acid (LA) batteries in micro-hybrid power systems (MHPS) were investigated. Main results are integrated in an accelerated, comprehensive test proposal presented here. The test proposal aims at a realistic representation of the pSoC operation regime, which is described in Refs. The test is designed to be sensitive with respect to dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) at partially discharged state (critical for regenerative braking) and the internal resistance at high-rate discharge (critical for idling stop applications). First results are presented for up-to-date valve-regulated LA batteries with absorbent glass mat (AGM) separators. The batteries are close to the limits of the first proposal of pass/fail-criteria. Also flooded batteries were tested; the first out of ten units failed already. (author)

  12. Temperature lapse rates at restricted thermodynamic equilibrium. Part II: Saturated air and further discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnbom, Pehr

    2016-03-01

    In the first part of this work equilibrium temperature profiles in fluid columns with ideal gas or ideal liquid were obtained by numerically minimizing the column energy at constant entropy, equivalent to maximizing column entropy at constant energy. A minimum in internal plus potential energy for an isothermal temperature profile was obtained in line with Gibbs' classical equilibrium criterion. However, a minimum in internal energy alone for adiabatic temperature profiles was also obtained. This led to a hypothesis that the adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state, a type of state in fact discussed already by Gibbs. In this paper similar numerical results for a fluid column with saturated air suggest that also the saturated adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state. The proposed hypothesis is further discussed and amended based on the previous and the present numerical results and a theoretical analysis based on Gibbs' equilibrium theory.

  13. OH-initiated oxidation of benzene - Part II. Influence of elevated NOx concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klotz, B; Volkamer, R; Hurley, MD;

    2002-01-01

    The present work represents a continuation of part I of this series of papers, in which we investigated the phenol yields in the OH-initiated oxidation of benzene under conditions of low to moderate concentrations of NOx, to elevated NOx levels. The products of the OH-initiated oxidation of benzene...... in 700 760 Torr of N-2/O-2 diluent at 297 +/- 4 K were investigated in 3 different photochemical reaction chambers. In situ spectroscopic techniques were employed for the detection of products, and the initial concentrations of benzene, NOx, and O-2 were widely varied (by factors of 6300, 1500, and...... 13, respectively). In contrast to results from previous studies, a pronounced dependence of the product distribution on the NOx concentration was observed. The phenol yield decreases from approximately 50-60% in the presence of low concentrations (10 000 ppb) NOx concentrations. In the presence of...

  14. Nanodiamond in tellurite glass Part II: practical nanodiamond-doped fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Yinlan; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; Greentree, Andrew D; Gibson, Brant C; Monro, Tanya M; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Tellurite glass fibers with embedded nanodiamond are attractive materials for quantum photonics applications. Reducing the loss of these fibers in the 600-800 nm wavelength range of nanodiamond fluorescence is essential to exploit the unique properties of nanodiamond in the new hybrid material. The first part of this study reported the origin of loss in nanodiamond-doped glass and impact of glass fabrication conditions. Here, we report the fabrication of nanodiamond-doped tellurite fibers with significantly reduced loss in the visible through further understanding of the impact of glass fabrication conditions on the interaction of the glass melt with the embedded nanodiamond. We fabricated tellurite fibers containing nanodiamond in concentrations up to 0.7 ppm-weight, while reducing the loss by more than an order of magnitude down to 10 dB/m at 600-800 nm.

  15. Managing Returnable Containers Logistics - A Case Study Part II - Improving Visibility through Using Automatic Identification Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Meiser

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This case study is the result of a project conducted on behalf of a company that uses its own returnable containers to transport purchased parts from suppliers. The objective of this project was to develop a proposal to enable the company to more effectively track and manage its returnable containers. The research activities in support of this project included (1 the analysis and documentation of the physical flow and the information flow associated with the containers and (2 the investigation of new technologies to improve the automatic identification and tracking of containers. This paper explains the automatic identification technologies and important criteria for selection. A companion paper details the flow of information and containers within the logistics chain, and it identifies areas for improving the management of the containers.

  16. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid applications. Part II. Test proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Albers, J.; Weirather-Koestner, D.; Kabza, H.

    In the first part of this work [1] selected key parameters for applying lead-acid (LA) batteries in micro-hybrid power systems (MHPS) were investigated. Main results are integrated in an accelerated, comprehensive test proposal presented here. The test proposal aims at a realistic representation of the pSoC operation regime, which is described in Refs. [1,6]. The test is designed to be sensitive with respect to dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) at partially discharged state (critical for regenerative braking) and the internal resistance at high-rate discharge (critical for idling stop applications). First results are presented for up-to-date valve-regulated LA batteries with absorbent glass mat (AGM) separators. The batteries are close to the limits of the first proposal of pass/fail-criteria. Also flooded batteries were tested; the first out of ten units failed already.

  17. A Stochastic Closure for Two-Moment Bulk Microphysics of Warm Clouds: Part II, Validation

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, David

    2016-01-01

    The representation of clouds and associated processes of rain and snow formation remains one of the major uncertainties in climate and weather prediction models. In a companion paper (Part I), we systematically derived a two moment bulk cloud microphysics model for collision and coalescence in warm rain based on the kinetic coalescence equation (KCE) and used stochastic approximations to close the higher order moment terms, and do so independently of the collision kernel. Conservation of mass and consistency of droplet number concentration of the evolving cloud properties were combined with numerical simulations to reduce the parametrization problem to three key parameters. Here, we constrain these three parameters based on the physics of collision and coalescence resulting in a "region of validity." Furthermore, we theoretically validate the new bulk model by deriving a subset of the "region of validity" that contains stochastic parameters that skillfully reproduces an existing model based on an a priori dro...

  18. Radiobiologic risk estimation from dental radiology. Part II. Cancer incidence and fatality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the use of the measured absorbed doses from part I of this article, the specific radiobiologic risk to the patient from (1) five different panoramic machines with rare-earth screens, (2) a 20-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long round cone, (3) a 20-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, (4) a 4-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long round cone, and (5) a 4-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, was calculated. The estimated risks are expressed in two ways: the probability of radiation-induced cancer in specific organs per million examinations and the probability of expression of a fatal cancer per million examinations. The highest risks calculated were from the complete-mouth survey with the use of round collimation. The lowest risks calculated were from panoramic radiography and four interproximal radiographs with rectangular collimation

  19. Thermohaline circulation stability: a box model study - Part II: coupled atmosphere-ocean model

    CERN Document Server

    Lucarini, V; Lucarini, Valerio; Stone, Peter H.

    2004-01-01

    A thorough analysis of the stability of a coupled version of an inter-hemispheric 3-box model of Thermohaline Circulation (THC) is presented. This study follows a similarly structured analysis on an uncoupled version of the same model presented in Part I. We study how the strength of THC changes when the system undergoes forcings representing global warming conditions. Each perturbation to the initial equilibrium is characterized by the total radiative forcing realized, by the rate of increase, and by the North-South asymmetry. The choice of suitably defined metrics allows us to determine the boundary dividing the set of radiative forcing scenarios that lead the system to equilibria characterized by a THC pattern similar to the present one, from those that drive the system to equilibria where the THC is reversed. We also consider different choices for the atmospheric transport parameterizations and for the ratio between the high latitude to tropical radiative forcing. We generally find that fast forcings are ...

  20. Exhaust Gas Temperature Measurements in Diagnostics of Turbocharged Marine Internal Combustion Engines Part II Dynamic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczewski Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The second part of the article describes the technology of marine engine diagnostics making use of dynamic measurements of the exhaust gas temperature. Little-known achievements of Prof. S. Rutkowski of the Naval College in Gdynia (now: Polish Naval Academy in this area are presented. A novel approach is proposed which consists in the use of the measured exhaust gas temperature dynamics for qualitative and quantitative assessment of the enthalpy flux of successive pressure pulses of the exhaust gas supplying the marine engine turbocompressor. General design assumptions are presented for the measuring and diagnostic system which makes use of a sheathed thermocouple installed in the engine exhaust gas manifold. The corrected thermal inertia of the thermocouple enables to reproduce a real time-history of exhaust gas temperature changes.

  1. The Systemic Products as a Source of Competitive Advantage on Healthcare Sector Example. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela SZTANGRET

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the healthcare sector, different healthcare providers, such as home care, primary care, pharmacies and hospital clinics but also a financial institution, collaborate in order to increase values for patients, such as better health state, more complex services, high quality of services, and increased feeling of safety. By creating a value, flexible networks health care providers and additional actors create value through collaboration. The purpose of this article is to identify the specific character of systemic healthcare product, created in synergy relations of medical enntities in the area of new way of meeting customers’ needs. Critical analysis of literature in the field of studied category is conducted in the article; furthermore qualitative method of empirical studies (case study and quantitative (online questionnaire is applied for practical illustration of described processes and phenomena. The article is a second part of the stud.

  2. EFFECT OF DENTIN TUBULES TO THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DENTIN.PART II:EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huo Bo; Zheng Quanshui; Zhang Qing; Wang Jiade

    2000-01-01

    To verify the theoretical models of varying transversely isotropic stress-strain relations of dentin established in the preceding work(Part I),we perform a set of experiments.Because of the very fine tooth size,it usually seems to be difficult to directly measure the inhomogeneons and anisotropic parameters of dentin.In this paper,by the digital speckle correlation method,tensile experiments are made on the small dentin samples either parallel or perpendicular to the dentin tubules.With the theoretically predicted elastic stress-strain relations,an optimization method is proposed to fit the strain curve adapted to the experimental data.The results show that the theoretical elastic stress-strain relations coincides very well with the experimental observations.The determined Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of dentin matrix are 29.5GPa and 0.44,respectively,in the optimization sense.

  3. Periodic nonlinear Fourier transform for fiber-optic communications, Part II: eigenvalue communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalian, Morteza; Prilepsky, Jaroslaw E; Le, Son Thai; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we propose the design of communication systems based on using periodic nonlinear Fourier transform (PNFT), following the introduction of the method in the Part I. We show that the famous "eigenvalue communication" idea [A. Hasegawa and T. Nyu, J. Lightwave Technol. 11, 395 (1993)] can also be generalized for the PNFT application: In this case, the main spectrum attributed to the PNFT signal decomposition remains constant with the propagation down the optical fiber link. Therefore, the main PNFT spectrum can be encoded with data in the same way as soliton eigenvalues in the original proposal. The results are presented in terms of the bit-error rate (BER) values for different modulation techniques and different constellation sizes vs. the propagation distance, showing a good potential of the technique. PMID:27505800

  4. The nuclear engineering programmes at the Royal Military College of Canada. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coverage of the activities within the nuclear science and engineering programmes at RMC reveals the dynamism of the College which is still growing at a fast rate. Being the only completely bilingual university in Canada and a true national institution gathering students and staff from all parts of the country. RMC continues in its mission to support the Canadian Forces, the Department of National Defence, the people of Canada and Canadian Industry that includes the nuclear sector. It is in this spirit that the staff has been actively involved with organizations such as the Canadian Nuclear Society and the Canadian Nuclear Association, having hosted four of the Student conferences and three major topical conferences of the CNS

  5. Biocompatibility evaluation in vitro. Part II: Functional expression of human and animal osteoblasts on the biomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    DNA synthesis and collagen formations on the implant material by cell culture in vitro are the most important phenotypical expression to estimate the biocompatibility. In this part, DNA synthesis and collagen formation on implant materials were quantitatively and qualitatively estimated by radioactive isotope H+-thymidine to incorporate into DNA chains, H+-proline to incorporate into type I collagen proteins followed by scin-tillation counting and antibody-antigen immunocytochemistry staining, respectively. Research results demonstrate that hydroxyapatite (HA) stimulates DNA synthesis and collagen formation on the material whereas this stimulation is restricted by adding spinel to the materials. There are statistical differences between the influences of material components on both DNA synthesis and collagen formation. It is supposed that porous materials can supply more platforms for cell anchoring, and more DNA and collagen are synthesised on the porous materials. Immersion in culture medium results in new HA crystal formation on the porous HA materials.

  6. Spin and pseudospin in monolayer graphene: Part II. Competition between exchange and spin–orbit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin and pseudospin properties of monolayer graphene, when both the exchange and extrinsic spin–orbit (SO) interactions are taken into account, are analyzed within a framework of geometric algebra. The rotor equations for even and odd parts of electron bispinor are constructed in three-dimensional (3D) Euclidean space thus providing clear geometrical interpretation to the problem. It is shown that in the presence of combined action of exchange and SO interactions the spin and pseudospin fields in a monolayer graphene from two-dimensional become 3D, with spin and pseudospin components pointing out of the graphene plane. Also, the effect of both interactions on the Berry phase is considered analytically. (paper)

  7. Mathematical modeling of materially nonlinear problems in structural analyses, Part II: Application in contemporary software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonić Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents application of nonlinear material models in the software package Ansys. The development of the model theory is presented in the paper of the mathematical modeling of material nonlinear problems in structural analysis (part I - theoretical foundations, and here is described incremental-iterative procedure for solving problems of nonlinear material used by this package and an example of modeling of spread footing by using Bilinear-kinematics and Drucker-Prager mode was given. A comparative analysis of the results obtained by these modeling and experimental research of the author was made. Occurrence of the load level that corresponds to plastic deformation was noted, development of deformations with increasing load, as well as the distribution of dilatation in the footing was observed. Comparison of calculated and measured values of reinforcement dilatation shows their very good agreement.

  8. Radioactivity measurements in Europe after the Chernobyl accident. Part II: Fallout and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection of deposition measurements, presented in this report and included in the floppy disk in the back cover has been put together as part of the REM programme (Radioactivity environmental Monitoring). This follows the compilation of air measurements (part 1) published previously (Raes, 1989). The objective of these compilations is to promote the integration of Chernobyl data on a European-wide basis to make them widely available in a coherent form for scientific study. Deposition measurements come in many forms (fallout, rain, soil) but all reflect the phenomena by which radionuclides in the air reach the surface. Depending on the manner of sampling, measurements can reflect integral values (e.g. from surface soil) or some fraction of the deposition (e.g. daily deposition using fallout or rain collectors). The latter can also be expressed as wet or dry according to the sampling apparatus used. The original sources of information from which this compilation was made vary widely : some of the data were obtained directly from floppy disks or tapes; others were copied manually from tables found in reports or papers in the scientific literature. The sets of measurements presented in this report were selected from this large patrimony of data in the REM data bank. Specific criteria were used to make this selection. Overall, only those data were used which had fully defined records. For daily deposition data actually sampled over 24 hourly periods were selected. With cumulative deposition care was taken to select data which covered the whole period of deposition marked by the passage of the cloud. The resulting data are presented on a unified format and as far as possible keep to individual measured values. In this manner the greatest flexibility is given to the user of this data

  9. Planning structural inspection and maintenance policies via dynamic programming and Markov processes. Part II: POMDP implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this two part study is to highlight the advanced attributes, capabilities and use of stochastic control techniques, and especially Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDPs), that can address the conundrum of planning optimum inspection/monitoring and maintenance policies based on stochastic models and uncertain structural data in real time. In this second part of the study a distinct, advanced, infinite horizon POMDP formulation with 332 states is cast and solved, related to a corroding reinforced concrete structure and its minimum life-cycle cost. The formation and solution of the problem modernize and extend relevant approaches and motivate the use of POMDP methods in challenging practical applications. Apart from uncertain observations the presented framework can also support uncertain action outcomes, non-periodic inspections and choice availability of inspection/monitoring types and intervals, as well as maintenance actions and action times. It is thus no surprise that the estimated optimum policy consists of a complex combination of a variety of actions, which cannot be achieved by any other method. To be able to solve the problem we resort to a point-based value iteration solver and we evaluate its performance and solution quality for this type of applications. Simpler approximate solvers based on MDPs are also used and compared and the important notions of observation gathering actions and the value of information are briefly discussed. - Highlights: • An advanced, non-stationary, 332 state, infinite horizon POMDP formulation is solved. • The cost-benefit of information is naturally incorporated in the methodology. • The formation and solution of the problem modernize and extend relevant approaches. • The estimated complex optimum policy cannot be achieved by any other method. • The suggested framework is compared with simpler techniques based on MDPs (MLS, QMPD)

  10. Atmospheric corrosion tests along the Norwegian-Russian border. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, J.F.; Mikhailov, A.A.

    1997-12-31

    A bilateral exposure programme was carried out along the Norwegian-Russian border in 1990-1991, 1992-1993 and 1993-1994 to evaluate quantitatively the effect of sulphur pollutants on the atmospheric corrosion of important materials in sub-arctic climate. The first part of the programme demonstrated that also in subarctic climate do metals corrode depending on the atmospheric corrosivity, and dose-response functions were derived which combined the effects of SO{sub 2} and time of wetness. The second part of the programme, which is described in this report, involved exposures of carbon steel, zinc and copper at two sites in Norway and three sites in Russia. It is concluded that the accelerated atmospheric corrosion of metals in regions along the border is mainly due to dry deposition of sulphur. At some sites, dry deposition of Cl contributes because of sea-salt aerosols. The corrosivity of acid precipitation is certain but could not be represented as a function because of the small differences observed in the pH values at the different sites. At all test sites the kinetics of corrosion of steel, zinc and copper are characterized by a reduced corrosion rate after one year of exposure. Time of wetness is an important parameter in predicting atmospheric corrosion of metals even on a regional scale. Hence, for monitoring and for trend-effect analysis, it is very important to determine the corrosivity of SO{sub 2} with time of wetness. In accordance with dose-response functions obtained, the yearly corrosion rate for steel and zinc are higher for the areas with higher amounts of dry deposition of Cl than for areas with analogous but only SO{sub 2}-containing atmosphere. 6 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Dendritic Growth Morphologies in Al-Zn Alloys—Part II: Phase-Field Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantzig, J. A.; Di Napoli, Paolo; Friedli, J.; Rappaz, M.

    2013-12-01

    In Part I of this article, the role of the Zn content in the development of solidification microstructures in Al-Zn alloys was investigated experimentally using X-ray tomographic microscopy. The transition region between dendrites found at low Zn content and dendrites found at high Zn content was characterized by textured seaweed-type structures. This Dendrite Orientation Transition (DOT) was explained by the effect of the Zn content on the weak anisotropy of the solid-liquid interfacial energy of Al. In order to further support this interpretation and to elucidate the growth mechanisms of the complex structures that form in the DOT region, a detailed phase-field study exploring anisotropy parameters' space is presented in this paper. For equiaxed growth, our results essentially recapitulate those of Haxhimali et al.[1] in simulations for pure materials. We find distinct regions of the parameter space associated with and dendrites, separated by a region where hyperbranched dendrites are observed. In simulations of directional solidification, we find similar behavior at the extrema, but in this case, the anisotropy parameters corresponding to the hyperbranched region produce textured seaweeds. As noted in the experimental work reported in Part I, these structures are actually dendrites that prefer to grow misaligned with respect to the thermal gradient direction. We also show that in this region, the dendrites grow with a blunted tip that oscillates and splits, resulting in an oriented trunk that continuously emits side branches in other directions. We conclude by making a correlation between the alloy composition and surface energy anisotropy parameters.

  12. Terrorismo, barbárie e desordem: parte II Terrorism, barbarity and disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie de Mijolla-Mellor

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir de uma interrogação sobre as representações dos atos terroristas na imprensa e na televisão, examinaremos as noções de barbárie, de crueldade e de sadismo de um ponto de vista simultaneamente individual e coletivo. As novas formas do conflito e da destrutividade que marcam quotidianamente a atualidade incitam a uma reflexão ampla sobre a natureza, as relações e mesmo os paradoxos da oposição entre ordem e desordem. A ordem responde a uma necessidade de domínio sobre o mundo e constitui uma parte inerente à busca do sentido da vida própria a cada um. Entretanto, longe de atingir uma harmonia, ela produz contestações, revoltas e, necessita ser "mantida", confundindo-se, por sua vez, com uma violência "legítima".From an interrogation on the representation of the terrorist acts in the press and the television, we examine the notions of barbarity, cruelty and sadism, both in the individual and collective field, from a psychoanalytic point of view. The new forms of the conflict and the destructiveness which marks the quotidian of our epoch, evoke an ample reflection on the nature, the relations, and even the paradoxes of the opposition between order and clutter. Order results from the necessity of domination over the world, and constitutes an inherent part of the search for a meaning for life. However, far from leading to harmony, it produces contestations, revolts and it needs to be "maintained", being confused with a "legitimate" violence.

  13. Renewable energy in pakistan: part-II mini/micro hydropower plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part-1 of this series dealt with Wind-Energy Prospects in Pakistan. This second part gives a brief account Mini/Micro Hydro-Power Plants in Pakistan. Hydropower is well-known throughout the world and currently contributes 6-7% of total world energy-production and 20% of total world electricity generation. Most of the hydro-plants are usually designed for higher generation capacity than that which could be needed to utilize the average water-flows. Small hydro-plants are another potential source of energy among the non-conventional energy sources, which can reduce the load on conventional-energy production. Small hydropower technology is today a mature and proven technology. Civil works and installation of equipment involve simple process, which offer good opportunity to local people for employment and use locally available materials Nevertheless a small decentralized hydel plant, based on natural waterfalls is a very desirable option for geographically remote, but naturally suitable locations which are otherwise far from the national physical infrastructure. The development of Mini/Micro hydel stations in these areas, with isolated, thinly clustered, population, is a very appropriate solution to meet power-needs of such areas for lighting as well as cottage industry. The unique feature of these installations is the participation of local community to the optimum extent. The entire civil works, the intake system, power channel, forebay, penstock and power house building, as well as labour is provided by the inhabitants voluntarily. While maximum use is made of stone, with minimum use of cement, the generator, distribution wires, etc., need to be arranged from the market. The turbine is manufactured using indigenous materials. The installation-cost per KW is relatively low i.e. Rs. 25,000/- as compared to large-scale installations. There could of course be variations, in the installation-cost, depending on the market prices of the material. (author)

  14. Modelo computacional para suporte à decisão em áreas irrigadas. Parte II: testes e aplicação Computer model for decision support in irrigated areas. Part II: tests and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A. Ferreira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Apresentou-se, na Parte I desta pesquisa, o desenvolvimento de um modelo computacional denominado MCID, para suporte à tomada de decisão quanto ao planejamento e manejo de projetos de irrigação e/ou drenagem. Objetivou-se, na Parte II, testar e aplicar o MCID. No teste comparativo com o programa DRAINMOD, espaçamentos entre drenos, obtidos com o MCID, foram ligeiramente maiores ou idênticos. Os espaçamentos advindos com o MCID e o DRAINMOD foram consideravelmente maiores que os obtidos por meio de metodologias tradicionais de dimensionamento de sistemas de drenagem. A produtividade relativa total, YRT, obtida com o MCID foi, em geral, inferior à conseguida com o DRAINMOD, devido a diferenças de metodologia ao se estimar a produtividade da cultura em resposta ao déficit hídrico. Na comparação com o programa CROPWAT, obtiveram-se resultados muito próximos para (YRT e evapotranspiração real. O modelo desenvolvido foi aplicado para as condições do Projeto Jaíba, MG, para culturas perenes e anuais cultivadas em diferentes épocas. Os resultados dos testes e aplicações indicaram a potencialidade do MCID como ferramenta de apoio à decisão em projetos de irrigação e/ou drenagem.Part I of this research presented the development of a decision support model, called MCID, for planning and managing irrigation and/or drainage projects. Part II is aimed at testing and applying MCID. In a comparative test with the DRAINMOD model, drain spacings obtained with MCID were slightly larger or identical. The spacings obtained with MCID and DRAINMOD were considerably larger than those obtained through traditional methodologies of design of drainage systems. The relative crop yield (YRT obtained with MCID was, in general, lower than the one obtained with DRAINMOD due to differences in the estimate of crop response to water deficit. In comparison with CROPWAT, very close results for YRT and for actual evapotranspiration were obtained. The

  15. Part I. Student success in intensive versus traditional introductory chemistry courses. Part II. Synthesis of salts of the weakly coordinating trisphat anion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mildred V.

    Part I. Intensive courses have been shown to be associated with equal or greater student success than traditional-length courses in a wide variety of disciplines and education levels. Student records from intensive and traditional-length introductory general chemistry courses were analyzed to determine the effects, of the course format, the level of academic experience, life experience (age), GPA, academic major and gender on student success in the course. Pretest scores, GPA and ACT composite scores were used as measures of academic ability and prior knowledge; t-tests comparing the means of these variables were used to establish that the populations were comparable prior to the course. Final exam scores, total course points and pretest-posttest differences were used as measures of student success; t-tests were used to determine if differences existed between the populations. ANCOVA analyses revealed that student GPA, pretest scores and course format were the only variables tested that were significant in accounting for the variance of the academic success measures. In general, the results indicate that students achieved greater academic success in the intensive-format course, regardless of the level of academic experience, life experience, academic major or gender. Part II. Weakly coordinating anions have many important applications, one of which is to function as co-catalysts in the polymerization of olefins by zirconocene. The structure of tris(tetrachlorobenzenedialato) phosphate(V) or "trisphat" anion suggests that it might be an outstanding example of a weakly coordinating anion. Trisphat acid was synthesized and immediately used to prepare the stable tributylammonium trisphat, which was further reacted to produce trisphat salts of Group I metal cations in high yields. Results of the 35Cl NQR analysis of these trisphat salts indicate only very weak coordination between the metal cations and the chlorine atoms of the trisphat anion.

  16. Transition metal complexes with pyrazole-based ligands.Part 29. Reactions of zinc(II) and mercury(II) thiocyanate with 4-acetyl-3-amino-5-methylpyrazole

    OpenAIRE

    KATALIN MÉSZÁROS SZÉCSÉNYI; BERTA HOLLÓ; VUKADIN M. LEOVAC; Bogdanović, Goran A.; Jaćimović, Željko K.

    2009-01-01

    The work is concerned with the crystal and molecular structures of zinc(II) and mercury(II) complexes with 4-acetyl-3-amino-5-methyl-pyrazole (aamp) of the coordination formulae [Zn(NCS)2(aamp)2] and (Haamp)2[Hg(SCN)4]. The zinc(II) complex was obtained by the reaction of a warm methanolic solution of aamp with a mixture of zinc(II) nitrate and ammonium thiocyanate, whereas the mercury(II) complex was prepared by the reaction of a warm ethanolic solution of aamp and a warm, slightly acidified...

  17. Failure analysis of leakage on titanium tubes within heat exchangers in a nuclear power plant. Part II: Mechanical degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serious failure incidents like clogging, quick thinning, and leakage frequently occurred on lots of titanium tubes of heat exchangers in a nuclear power plant in China. In the Part I of the whole failure analysis study with totally two parts, factors mainly involving three kinds of electrochemical corrosions were investigated, including galvanic corrosion, crevice corrosion, and hydrogen-assisted corrosion. In the current Part II, through microscopically analyzing the ruptures on the leaked tubes by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), another four causes dominantly lying in the aspect of mechanical degradation were determined - clogging, erosion, mechanical damaging, and fretting. Among them, the erosion effect was the primary one, thus the stresses it exerted on the tube wall were also supplementarily evaluated by finite element method (FEM). Based on the analysis results, the different degradation extents and morphologies by erosion on the tubes when they were clogged by different substances such as seashell, rubber debris, and sediments were compared, and relevant mechanisms were discussed. Finally, countermeasures were put forward as well. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. On fathering (the nature and functions of the father role). Part II: Conceptualization of fathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J

    1980-08-01

    The scientific study of fathering has been somewhat neglected, perhaps because the father role is hardly constant even within a particular culture and is subject to very great fluctuations indeed from culture to culture. In that respect the study of fathering is much more difficult than the study of mothering. Work often subsumed under the heading of "attachment theory" has shown that the mother-infant and mother-child relationships have some cross-cultural constancy and may even be described as a bio-social "given". Four methods of data collection are described and reviewed: studies of adults partially or fully deprived of adequate fathering during their childhoods; direct studies of father-infant and father-child interaction; "in-depth" psychoanalytic studies of individual psychopathology in relation to that individual's relationship to a father; and introspection and personal observation. Each of these four avenues of data collection offers certain advantages as well as certain disadvantages which are reviewed with examples from available literature. In studying the importance of the father role there is a tendency to study the importance of fathering to children, ignoring that fathering is clearly important to the psychological development and further growth of the father. That there is a psychopathology of the process of fatherhood seems obvious on reflection, and data bearing on that psychopathology are reviewed. The importance of fathering to infants and children can be reviewed according to the three areas of psychic activity: primary creativity, the basic fault, and the Oedipus conflict. In the area of primary creativity we can study the importance of fathering to infants in terms of fantasied fathers and part-time fathers, and the prenatal role of father as mother facilitator. In the area of the basic fault (two-person psychology) we can study the postnatal role of father as mother facilitator, the role of father as mother-surrogate, the pre-oedipal role

  19. An Ansatz Regarding Relativistic Space Travel Part II-Propulsion Realities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travel to the stars can involve a perilous journey in an unfriendly space-time continuum that can include singularities, nonlinear events, gravity as a function of both position and vehicle velocity, and extra dimensional effects discussed in Part I. Such a device may possibly use field propulsion technology. Although several field propulsion schemes exist, a proposed candidate is based upon using an electromagnetic drive that uses a rotating magnetic field superimposed on the spacecraft's stationary or static electric field. This is comparable to a Searl generator and the field interaction would generate an electromagnetic vortex to create nonlinear gravitational effects possibly due to an inverse Gertsenshtein relationship to push against the intrinsic gravitational field of a planet. Moreover, changing alignment of the magnetic field axis with the electric field will induce a margin of lateral controllability. Issues such as assessing this combined effect of using both electric and magnetic fields are discussed. Finally, the need for experimental data is stressed to validate these otherwise very speculative theoretical notions

  20. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part II: Optimisation of imaging conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Part I of this series of two papers, we demonstrated the formation of a high efficiency phase-contrast image at atomic resolution using a pixelated detector in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with ptychography. In this paper we explore the technique more quantitatively using theory and simulations. Compared to other STEM phase contrast modes including annular bright field (ABF) and differential phase contrast (DPC), we show that the ptychographic phase reconstruction method using pixelated detectors offers the highest contrast transfer efficiency and superior low dose performance. Applying the ptychographic reconstruction method to DPC segmented detectors also improves the detector contrast transfer and results in less noisy images than DPC images formed using difference signals. We also find that using a minimum array of 16×16 pixels is sufficient to provide the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for imaging beam sensitive weak phase objects. Finally, the convergence angle can be adjusted to enhance the contrast transfer based on the spatial frequencies of the specimen under study. - Highlights: • High efficiency phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) can be achieved using pixelated detectors followed by a ptychographic reconstruction. • Ptychographic reconstruction offers the highest PCTF across the entire spatial frequency range compared to DPC and ABF. • Image simulations show that a ptychographic reconstruction using pixelated detectors offers a superior low dose performance for imaging weak phase objects. • Optimisation of imaging conditions using pixelated detectors are discussed by considering the contrast transfer function for various cases

  1. Managing emergencies and abnormal situations in air traffic control (part II): teamwork strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakis, Stathis; Kontogiannis, Tom; Kirwan, Barry

    2010-07-01

    Team performance has been studied in many safety-critical organizations including aviation, nuclear power plant, offshore oil platforms and health organizations. This study looks into teamwork strategies that air traffic controllers employ to manage emergencies and abnormal situations. Two field studies were carried out in the form of observations of simulator training in emergency and unusual scenarios of novices and experienced controllers. Teamwork strategies covered aspects of team orientation and coordination, information exchange, change management and error handling. Several performance metrics were used to rate the efficiency of teamwork and test the construct validity of a prototype model of teamwork. This is a companion study to an earlier investigation of taskwork strategies in the same field (part I) and contributes to the development of a generic model for Taskwork and Teamwork strategies in Emergencies in Air traffic Management (T(2)EAM). Suggestions are made on how to use T(2)EAM to develop training programs, assess team performance and improve mishap investigations. PMID:20116780

  2. Seabed Disposal Program. Annual report, January--December 1976. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the first two years of the program, studies were made of the water column extending from the seabed to the surface in mid-gyre regions. It was concluded that this water column is unsuitable for consideration as the disposal medium. Studies were shifted to characterization of the mid-plate, mid-gyre sediments, natural processes in the sediments, and how these natural processes are altered or impacted by the presence of high-level radioactive wastes. These activities continued in the third year of the Program and include (1) development of a number of analytical models as part of the overall systems analysis effort; (2) an extensive program to evaluate the sorption properties of the sediments with respect to single species ions and the competition provided by other waste constituents; (3) an assessment of thermal problems associated with the radiogenic heat produced by the waste and its impact upon the physical and chemical properties of the sediments; (4) continued studies to characterize the sediments; (5) development of capabilities to investigate waste canister emplacement techniques; (6) corrosion studies to evaluate potential canister materials; (7) biological investigations in support of assessment studies addressing accident scenarios and environmental impact; and (8) development of an international program of scientific investigations and information exchange. At the end of the third year, available data indicate that studies should be continued on the concept of disposal in the seabed

  3. Lean and Virginia's wood industry - Part II: Results and need for support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian F. Fricke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This two-part publication about Lean practices by Viriginia’s wood products and furniture manufacturing industries reports results from researching the awareness, the implementation status, the business results, and the need for external implementation support of Virginian companies. This second manuscript focuses on business results and the need for external implementation support. Except for “sales per employee,” where less than half of respondents reported an improvement due to the implementation of Lean in their operation, a majority of respondents indicated improved business results for “lead time,” “on-time delivery,” “inventory turnover,” and “cost per unit.” With respect to the need for external Lean implementation support, only 23 percent of respondents answered in the affirmative. “Training management,” “training shop floor employees,” and “implementing [Lean] with extensive employee involvement” were, with 67, 58, and 48 percent frequencies, the most often named forms of Lean implementation support requested. Results from this study seem to indicate an opportunity to support the well-being of Virginia’s wood products and furniture manufacturing industries through improved communication of the benefits of Lean and offering specific types of training to companies.

  4. Developing a software for removable partial denture design: Part II: Introduction of RPD graph software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejatidanesh F

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Designing removable partial dentures is one of the most important phases of prosthetic treatments. Computer can be used to facilitate and increase accuracy of removable partial denture design. The aim of this study was to develop a software for removable partial denture design.Materials and Methods: A questionnaire (discussed in part I and major textbooks, were used to determine the design rules.  The software (RPD Graph was developed using Visual C++ and Maryam program. The RPD Graph can determine the classification of partial edentulous arch. With defining the missing teeth and providing data about prognosis and conditions of abutment teeth, the removable partial design will be developed by RPD Graph. This software is a knowledge-based system which has specific characteristics. It can be used as an educational tool for teaching RPD design and as a clinical tool for supporting clinician's decision. In addition it can be developed to more complete softwares.

  5. Part II: Utilization of the methodology for irradiation of ethnic ready-to-eat meals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiparameter hazard analysis and critical control point methodology for foods under development has been described in Part I. It focused on a systematic fourfold assessment of safety hazards, sensorial failures, economic adversities and radiation specific pitfalls, and the critical control points for their early detection and/or mitigation. It attempted also at combining these four parameters to form a qualitative prioritization of the numerous control points, to screen the most cost effective ones for implementation. The further development of the methodology described in this report demonstrates its application for ethnic foods. These foods are often characterized with multi-ingredient recipes and multiple preparation steps, subtle ensemble of specific flavours, as well as relatively high bacterial loads. A group treatment of these ingredients has been demonstrated on several ready-to-eat foods investigated by Indonesian researchers. This approach has been found greatly effective in pinpointing the primary control points of the prepared ethnic meals. The primary achievement resulting from this approach is the insight that a two stage irradiation is apparently the best solution to attain both bacteria eradication and taste/flavour conservation or, in other words, the desired combination of high levels of safety and high quality. (author)

  6. The exponentiated Hencky-logarithmic strain energy. Part II: Coercivity, planar polyconvexity and existence of minimizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Patrizio; Lankeit, Johannes; Ghiba, Ionel-Dumitrel; Martin, Robert; Steigmann, David

    2015-08-01

    We consider a family of isotropic volumetric-isochoric decoupled strain energies based on the Hencky-logarithmic (true, natural) strain tensor log U, where μ > 0 is the infinitesimal shear modulus, is the infinitesimal bulk modulus with the first Lamé constant, are dimensionless parameters, is the gradient of deformation, is the right stretch tensor and is the deviatoric part (the projection onto the traceless tensors) of the strain tensor log U. For small elastic strains, the energies reduce to first order to the classical quadratic Hencky energy which is known to be not rank-one convex. The main result in this paper is that in plane elastostatics the energies of the family are polyconvex for , extending a previous finding on its rank-one convexity. Our method uses a judicious application of Steigmann's polyconvexity criteria based on the representation of the energy in terms of the principal invariants of the stretch tensor U. These energies also satisfy suitable growth and coercivity conditions. We formulate the equilibrium equations, and we prove the existence of minimizers by the direct methods of the calculus of variations.

  7. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part II: Optimisation of imaging conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hao, E-mail: hao.yang@materials.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Materials. Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Pennycook, Timothy J.; Nellist, Peter D. [University of Oxford, Department of Materials. Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    In Part I of this series of two papers, we demonstrated the formation of a high efficiency phase-contrast image at atomic resolution using a pixelated detector in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with ptychography. In this paper we explore the technique more quantitatively using theory and simulations. Compared to other STEM phase contrast modes including annular bright field (ABF) and differential phase contrast (DPC), we show that the ptychographic phase reconstruction method using pixelated detectors offers the highest contrast transfer efficiency and superior low dose performance. Applying the ptychographic reconstruction method to DPC segmented detectors also improves the detector contrast transfer and results in less noisy images than DPC images formed using difference signals. We also find that using a minimum array of 16×16 pixels is sufficient to provide the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for imaging beam sensitive weak phase objects. Finally, the convergence angle can be adjusted to enhance the contrast transfer based on the spatial frequencies of the specimen under study. - Highlights: • High efficiency phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) can be achieved using pixelated detectors followed by a ptychographic reconstruction. • Ptychographic reconstruction offers the highest PCTF across the entire spatial frequency range compared to DPC and ABF. • Image simulations show that a ptychographic reconstruction using pixelated detectors offers a superior low dose performance for imaging weak phase objects. • Optimisation of imaging conditions using pixelated detectors are discussed by considering the contrast transfer function for various cases.

  8. INTEGRACIÓN ESTRATÉGICA: EL PROYECTO DE CAMBIO. PARTE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colectivo de autores

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo constituye la segunda parte de "Dirección estratégica integrada Conceptualización". Ambos describen la experiencia realizada en la Empresa Astilleros del Caribe (Asticar por un equipo de profesores del Instituto Superior Politécnico José Antonio Echeverría, junto a dirigentes y trabajadores de la empresa, en la introducción de una iniciativa de perfeccionamiento de la gestión empresarial denominada por el grupo de consultores norteamericanos como integración estratégica. El primer artículo trata el diagnóstico del nivel de integración estratégica LIF, conteniendo el procedimiento general de diagnóstico, los instrumentos, la plataforma para gestionar integralmente el proceso de cambio y los resultados de su aplicación en la empresa. En este segundo artículo, se presenta el proyecto de cambio para elevar el nivel de integración estratégica LIF en Asticar.

  9. Stratigraphic sections of the Phosphoria Formation in Idaho, 1949: part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, D.F.; Smart, R.A.; Peirce, H.W.; Weiser, J.D.

    1953-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has recently measured and sampled the Phosphoria formation at many localities in Idaho and other western states. These data will not be fully synthesized and analyzed for several years, but segments of the data, accompanied by little or no interpretation, are published as preliminary reports as they are assembled. This is the fifth report of data containing abstracts of sections measured in southeastern Idaho; it includes about half of the data gathered in Idaho in 1949. The field and laboratory procedures adopted in these investigations are described rather fully in a previous report (McKelvey and others, 1953a). Many people have taken part in this investigation, which was organized and supervised by V. E. McKelvey. F. J. Anderson, A. L. Bush, R. S. Jones, K. B. Krauskopf, K. Lutz, M. E. Thompson, R. G. Waring, and M. A. Warner participated in the description of strata and the collection of samples referred to in this report. T. K. Rigby assisted in the preparation of trenches and the collection, crushing, and splitting of samples in the field. The laboratory preparation of samples for chemical analysis was done in Denver, Colo., under the direction of W. P. Huleatt.

  10. A review of research on the problem of aggression inhibitors (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalashnikova A.S.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers in the genesis of the formation of aggressive behavior inextricably consider proagressive and constraining, or inhibiting, aggressive manifestations of structure. The second part of the article deals with a theoretical overview of the problem of aggression inhibitors, which covers the latest Russian and foreign research aimed at studying the individual manifestations of factors deterring aggression. For basis for the analysis we chose classification of personality structures inhibiting aggressive manifestations, proposed by F.S. Safuanov, which includes values, socio-normative, dispositional, emotional, communicative, intellectual restraining structure and psychological protective mechanisms. We made conclusion that the problem of aggression inhibitors currently stands on the threshold of a new phase of the study, that is to provide a holistic model, including illegal aggressive behavior, taking into account not only the socio-psychological characteristics of "aggressor" and his victims, and personality structures that promote and inhibiting aggression, but also covering a wide range of inhibitors of aggression, acting through different psychological mechanisms.

  11. Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Machining of Metal Bond Diamond Wheels- Part II: Wheel Wear Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-22

    The use of stereo scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to investigate the wear mechanism of the wire EDM true metal bond diamond wheel for ceramic grinding is presented. On the grinding wheel, a wedge-shape removal part was machined to enable the examination and measurement of the worn wheel surfaces using the stereo SEM. The stereo SEM was calibrated by comparing results of depth profile of a wear groove with the profilometer measurements. On the surface of the grinding wheel after wire EDM truing and before grinding, the diamond protruding heights were measured in the level of 35 {micro}m, comparing to the 54 {micro}m average size of the diamond in the grinding wheel. The gap between the EDM wire and rotating grinding wheel is estimated to be about 35 to 40 {micro}m. This observation indicates that, during the wire EDM, electrical sparks occur between the metal bond and EDM wire, which leaves the diamond protruding in the gap between the wire and wheel. The protruding diamond is immediately fractured at the start of the grinding process, even under a light grinding condition. After heavy grinding, the grinding wheel surface and the diamond protrusion heights are also investigated using the stereo SEM. The height of diamond protrusion was estimated in the 5 to 15 {micro}m range. This study has demonstrated the use of stereo SEM as a metrology tool to study the grinding wheel surface.

  12. Optically pumped planar waveguide lasers: Part II: Gain media, laser systems, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The field of optically pumped planar waveguide lasers has seen a rapid development over the last two decades driven by the requirements of a range of applications. This sustained research effort has led to the demonstration of a large variety of miniature highly efficient laser sources by combining different gain media and resonator geometries. One of the most attractive features of waveguide lasers is the broad range of regimes that they can operate, spanning from continuous wave and single frequency through to the generation of femtosecond pulses. Furthermore, their technology has experienced considerable advances to provide increased output power levels, deriving benefits from the relative immunity from the heat generated in the gain medium during laser operation and the use of cladding-pumped architectures. This second part of the review on optically pumped planar waveguide lasers provides a snapshot of the state-of-the-art research in this field in terms of gain materials, laser system designs, and as well as a perspective on the status of their application as real devices in various research areas.

  13. Cayley Configuration Spaces of 1-dof Tree-decomposable Linkages, Part II: Combinatorial Characterization of Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Sitharam, Meera; Gao, Heping

    2011-01-01

    We continue the study of Cayley complexity of generic 1-dof linkages, i.e, the algebraic complexity of describing interval endpoints of the Cayley configuration space. Using the properties of these endpoints, we define in Part I a class of graphs G whose generic linkages have low Cayley complexity on a given non-edge f: i.e, all interval endpoints are QRS. Consider any non-edge f of a 1-dof linkage's underlying graph G for which G \\cup f is tree-decomposable. Does the Cayley complexity depend on the choice of f? We answer this question in the negative. Specifically, we show that if the graph has low Cayley complexity over some choice of f, then it has low Cayley complexity for any choice of f. This shows that low Cayley complexity is a property of G (independent of non-edge f). Then, we give an combinatorial algorithmic characterization of graphs with low Cayley complexity. Next, we show a surprising result that (graph) planarity is equivalent to low Cayley complexity for a natural subclass of 1-dof triangle-...

  14. The seisniicity of Iran. The Silakhor (Luristan earthquake of 23rd Ianuary, 1909 (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. AMBRASEYS

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows t h a t given certain conditions it is perfectly feasible to study an earthquake that occurred three-quarters of a century ago in a remote part of the world. Also, it shows that there are many large earthquakes which, because of lack of interdisciplinary efforts to study such events, have remained hitherto little known or totally unknown. The case of the Silakhor earthquake revealed deficiencies in the determination of epicentres by ISS and Gutenberg; the difference between macroseismic and instrumental position for the Silakhor earthquake is 380 kilometres, a difference which lias caused a serious problem in the assessment of seisniicity of Iran. Accurate macroseismic d a t a may be used to minimize bias in t h e instrumental relocation of the larger events and to study source mechanisms. Untili this study was undertaken, the faulting associated with the Silakhor earthquake was totally unknown. Even more important t h a n the value of recent faulting for its significance in resolving ambiguities in t h e choice of the t r u e source parametres, is the information that can be gleaned from evidence for the mechanism of earthquakes that occurred long before t h e advent of modern seismology and in particular, for the pattern of recent tectonic activity.

  15. Ammonia emissions in Europe, part II: How ammonia emission abatement strategies affect secondary aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Anna M.; Aulinger, Armin; Bieser, Johannes; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2016-02-01

    In central Europe, ammonium sulphate and ammonium nitrate make up a large fraction of fine particles which pose a threat to human health. Most studies on air pollution through particulate matter investigate the influence of emission reductions of sulphur- and nitrogen oxides on aerosol concentration. Here, we focus on the influence of ammonia (NH3) emissions. Emission scenarios have been created on the basis of the improved ammonia emission parameterization implemented in the SMOKE for Europe and CMAQ model systems described in part I of this study. This includes emissions based on future European legislation (the National Emission Ceilings) as well as a dynamic evaluation of the influence of different agricultural sectors (e.g. animal husbandry) on particle formation. The study compares the concentrations of NH3, NH4+, NO3 -, sulphur compounds and the total concentration of particles in winter and summer for a political-, technical- and behavioural scenario. It was found that a reduction of ammonia emissions by 50% lead to a 24% reduction of the total PM2.5 concentrations in northwest Europe. The observed reduction was mainly driven by reduced formation of ammonium nitrate. Moreover, emission reductions during winter had a larger impact than during the rest of the year. This leads to the conclusion that a reduction of the ammonia emissions from the agricultural sector related to animal husbandry could be more efficient than the reduction from other sectors due to its larger share in winter ammonia emissions.

  16. Adaptive learning via selectionism and Bayesianism, Part II: the sequential case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Animals increase or decrease their future tendency of emitting an action based on whether performing such action has, in the past, resulted in positive or negative reinforcement. An analysis in the companion paper [Zhang, J. (2009). Adaptive learning via selectionism and Bayesianism. Part I: Connection between the two. Neural Networks, 22(3), 220-228] of such selectionist style of learning reveals a resemblance between its ensemble-level dynamics governing the change of action probability and Bayesian learning where evidence (in this case, reward) is distributively applied to all action alternatives. Here, this equivalence is further explored in solving the temporal credit-assignment problem during the learning of an action sequence ("operant chain"). Naturally emerging are the notion of secondary (conditioned) reinforcement predicting the average reward associated with a stimulus, and the notion of actor-critic architecture involving concurrent learning of both action probability and reward prediction. While both are consistent with solutions provided by contemporary reinforcement learning theory (Sutton & Barto, 1998) for optimizing sequential decision-making under stationary Markov environments, we investigate the effect of action learning on reward prediction when both are carried out concurrently in any on-line scheme. PMID:19395235

  17. Growth theory after Keynes, part II: 75 years of obstruction by the mainstream economics culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Van den Berg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Part I of this essay explained the sequence of events that enabled the neoclassical paradigm to regain its dominant position in mainstream economics following serious challenges by ‘Keynesian’ economists. This second essay seeks to answer the question of why the economics profession was so willing to sustain the neoclassical paradigm in the face of the reality-based challenges by ‘Keynesian’ economists like Harrod and Domar. The answer is sought in the culture of economics, the history of science in general, and the study of power in the field of political economy. This article draws heavily on the work of the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, who divides culture into habitus (procedures and dispositions and doxa (more abstract beliefs and philosophies, in order to provide insight into how culture affects economic thinking. Bourdieu’s concept of symbolic violence helps to explain how a narrower neoclassical growth model was enthusiastically accepted as a replacement for the ‘Keynesian’ Harrod-Domar growth model. Financial and business interests clearly understood the power of culture and they used their accumulated wealth to support the neoliberal doxa and neoclassical habitus that would induce economists to willingly provide intellectual cover for policies that benefitted those financial and business interests. We conclude with a discussion on how the history of thought on economic development might have evolved if the Keynesian paradigm, and its dynamic Harrod-Domar model, had prevailed

  18. Extraction of correlated count rates using various gate generation techniques: Part II Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an experimental comparison of different neutron pulse train analysis methods developed to extract correlated count rates from the detected neutron arrival times. This work comprises a sequel to the previous paper (Part I Theory) , where the complete formalism of different analysis methods was presented. In the current paper, the signal triggered inspection (STI), randomly triggered inspection (RTI) and MIXED techniques (implemented in current shift register hardware) are compared using list mode data acquired from series of 252Cf sources. In addition, three techniques of randomly triggered inspection are investigated: gates generated at fixed clock frequency, i.e., consecutive (non-overlapping) gates and overlapping gates (known as fast accidentals sampling (FAS)), as well as gates generated after a long delay following each trigger pulse (delayed-signal gates). The average correlated count rates (singles (S), doubles (D) and triples (T)) are extracted using the STI, RTI and MIXED analysis techniques and compared to demonstrate their equivalence. In addition, an influence of different gate generation and pulse train analysis techniques on the precision of the measured S, D and T rates is investigated.

  19. Effect of stride length on overarm throwing delivery: Part II: An angular momentum response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Dan K; Crotin, Ryan L

    2016-04-01

    This is the second component of a two-part series investigating 3D momentum profiles specific to overhand throwing, where altering stride reportedly influences throwing mechanics resulting in significantly different physiologic outcomes and linear momentum profiles. Using a randomized cross-over design, nineteen pitchers (15 collegiate and 4 high school) were assigned to pitch two simulated 80-pitch games at ±25% of their desired stride length. An 8-camera motion capture system (240Hz) integrated with two force plates (960Hz) and radar gun tracked each overhand throw. Segmental angular momentums were summed yielding throwing arm and total body momentums, from which compensation ratio's (relative contribution between the two) were derived. Pairwise comparisons at hallmark events and phases identified significantly different angular momentum profiles, in particular total body, throwing arm, and momentum compensation ratios (P⩽0.05) as a result of manipulating stride length. Sagittal, frontal, and transverse angular momentums were affected by stride length changes. Transverse magnitudes showed greatest effects for total body, throwing arm, and momentum compensation ratios. Since the trunk is the main contributor to linear and angular momentum, longer strides appear to better regulate transverse trunk momentum in double support, whereas shorter strides show increased momentum prior to throwing arm acceleration. PMID:26707678

  20. Involvement of l(-)-rhamnose in sea urchin gastrulation. Part II: α-l-Rhamnosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jing; Aleksanyan, Heghush; Metzenberg, Stan; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2016-06-01

    The sea urchin embryo is recognized as a model system to reveal developmental mechanisms involved in human health and disease. In Part I of this series, six carbohydrates were tested for their effects on gastrulation in embryos of the sea urchin Lytechinus pictus. Only l-rhamnose caused dramatic increases in the numbers of unattached archenterons and exogastrulated archenterons in living, swimming embryos. It was found that at 30 h post-fertilization the l-rhamnose had an unusual inverse dose-dependent effect, with low concentrations (1-3 mM) interfering with development and higher concentrations (30 mM) having little to no effect on normal development. In this study, embryos were examined for inhibition of archenteron development after treatment with α-l-rhamnosidase, an endoglycosidase that removes terminal l-rhamnose sugars from glycans. It was observed that the enzyme had profound effects on gastrulation, an effect that could be suppressed by addition of l-rhamnose as a competitive inhibitor. The involvement of l-rhamnose-containing glycans in sea urchin gastrulation was unexpected, since there are no characterized biosynthetic pathways for rhamnose utilization in animals. It is possible there exists a novel l-rhamnose-containing glycan in sea urchins, or that the enzyme and sugar interfere with the function of rhamnose-binding lectins, which are components of the innate immune system in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. PMID:26168775

  1. Rich methane laminar flames doped with light unsaturated hydrocarbons. Part II: 1,3butadiene

    CERN Document Server

    Gueniche, Hadj-Ali; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2007-01-01

    In line with the study presented in the part I of this paper, the structure of a laminar rich premixed methane flame doped with 1,3-butadiene has been investigated. The flame contains 20.7% (molar) of methane, 31.4% of oxygen and 3.3% of 1,3-butadiene, corresponding to an equivalence ratio of 1.8, and a ratio C4H6 / CH4 of 16 %. The flame has been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa using argon as dilutant, with a gas velocity at the burner of 36 cm/s at 333 K. The temperature ranged from 600 K close to the burner up to 2150 K. Quantified species included usual methane C0-C2 combustion products and 1,3-butadiene, but also propyne, allene, propene, propane, 1,2-butadiene, butynes, vinylacetylene, diacetylene, 1,3-pentadiene, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene (isoprene), 1-pentene, 3-methyl-1-butene, benzene and toluene. In order to model these new results, some improvements have been made to a mechanism previously developed in our laboratory for the reactions of C3-C4 unsaturated hydrocarbons. The main reacti...

  2. Friction Stir Welding of Al Alloy 2219-T8: Part II-Mechanical and Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju; Feng, Zhi-Cao; Li, Ji-Chao; Frankel, G. S.; Wang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Ai-Ping

    2016-07-01

    In Part I of this series, abnormal agglomerations of θ particles with size of about 100 to 1000 µm were observed in friction stir welded AA2219-T8 joints. In this work, the effects of these agglomerated θ particles on the mechanical and corrosion properties of the joints are studied. Tensile testing with in situ SEM imaging was utilized to monitor crack initiation and propagation in base metal and weld nugget zone (WNZ) samples. These tests showed that cracks initiated in the θ particles and at the θ/matrix interfaces, but not in the matrix. The WNZ samples containing abnormal agglomerated θ particles had a similar ultimate tensile stress but 3 pct less elongation than other WNZ samples with only normal θ particles. Measurements using the microcell technique indicated that the agglomerated θ particles acted as a cathode causing the dissolution of adjacent matrix. The abnormal θ particle agglomerations led to more severe localized attack due to the large cathode/anode ratio. Al preferential dissolution occurred in the abnormal θ particle agglomerations, which was different from the corrosion behavior of normal size θ particles.

  3. Friction Stir Welding of Al Alloy 2219-T8: Part II-Mechanical and Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju; Feng, Zhi-Cao; Li, Ji-Chao; Frankel, G. S.; Wang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Ai-Ping

    2016-09-01

    In Part I of this series, abnormal agglomerations of θ particles with size of about 100 to 1000 µm were observed in friction stir welded AA2219-T8 joints. In this work, the effects of these agglomerated θ particles on the mechanical and corrosion properties of the joints are studied. Tensile testing with in situ SEM imaging was utilized to monitor crack initiation and propagation in base metal and weld nugget zone (WNZ) samples. These tests showed that cracks initiated in the θ particles and at the θ/matrix interfaces, but not in the matrix. The WNZ samples containing abnormal agglomerated θ particles had a similar ultimate tensile stress but 3 pct less elongation than other WNZ samples with only normal θ particles. Measurements using the microcell technique indicated that the agglomerated θ particles acted as a cathode causing the dissolution of adjacent matrix. The abnormal θ particle agglomerations led to more severe localized attack due to the large cathode/anode ratio. Al preferential dissolution occurred in the abnormal θ particle agglomerations, which was different from the corrosion behavior of normal size θ particles.

  4. Weighed scalar averaging in LTB dust models, part II: a formalism of exact perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Sussman, Roberto A

    2013-01-01

    We examine the exact perturbations that arise from the q-average formalism that was applied in the preceding article (part I) to Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. By introducing an initial value parametrization, we show that all LTB scalars that take a FLRW "look alike" form (frequently used in the literature dealing with LTB models) follow as q-averages of covariant scalars that are common to FLRW models. These q--scalars determine for every averaging domain a unique FLRW background state through Darmois matching conditions at the domain boundary, though the definition of this background does not require an actual matching with a FLRW region (Swiss cheese type models). Local perturbations describe the deviation from the FLRW background state through the local gradients of covariant scalars at the boundary of every comoving domain, while non-local perturbations do so in terms of the intuitive notion of a "contrast" of local scalars with respect to FLRW reference values that emerge from q-averages assigned t...

  5. Interspecies allometric scaling: prediction of clearance in large animal species: part II: mathematical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M; Mahmood, I; Hunter, R P

    2006-10-01

    Interspecies scaling is a useful tool for the prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters from animals to humans, and it is often used for estimating a first-time in human dose. However, it is important to appreciate the mathematical underpinnings of this scaling procedure when using it to predict pharmacokinetic parameter values across animal species. When cautiously applied, allometry can be a tool for estimating clearance in veterinary species for the purpose of dosage selection. It is particularly valuable during the selection of dosages in large zoo animal species, such as elephants, large cats and camels, for which pharmacokinetic data are scant. In Part I, allometric predictions of clearance in large animal species were found to pose substantially greater risks of inaccuracies when compared with that observed for humans. In this report, we examine the factors influencing the accuracy of our clearance estimates from the perspective of the relationship between prediction error and such variables as the distribution of body weight values used in the regression analysis, the influence of a particular observation on the clearance estimate, and the 'goodness of fit' (R(2)) of the regression line. Ultimately, these considerations are used to generate recommendations regarding the data to be included in the allometric prediction of clearance in large animal species. PMID:16958788

  6. MEDSLIK-II, a Lagrangian marine oil spill model for short-term forecasting – Part 1: Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. De Dominicis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The processes of transport, diffusion and transformation of surface oil in seawater can be simulated using a Lagrangian model formalism coupled with Eulerian circulation models. This paper describes the formalism and the conceptual assumptions of a Lagrangian marine oil slick numerical model and re-writes the constitutive equations in a modern mathematical framework. The Lagrangian numerical representation of the oil slick requires three different state variables: the slick, the particle and the structural state variables. Transformation processes (evaporation, spreading, dispersion and coastal adhesion act on the slick state variables, while particles variables are used to model the transport and diffusion processes. The slick and particle variables are recombined together to compute the oil concentration in water, a structural state variable. The mathematical and numerical formulation of oil transport, diffusion and transformation processes described in this paper, together with the many simplifying hypothesis and parameterizations, form the basis of a new, open source Lagrangian surface oil spill model, so-called MEDSLIK-II. Part 2 of this paper describes the applications of MEDSLIK-II to oil spill simulations that allow the validation of the model results and the study of the sensitivity of the simulated oil slick to different model numerical parameterizations.

  7. Preliminary Guideline for the High Temperature Structure Integrity Assessment Procedure Part II. High Temperature Structural Integrity Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Kim, J. B.; Lee, H. Y.; Park, C. G.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, G. H.; Kim, S. H

    2007-02-15

    A high temperature structural integrity assessment belongs to the Part II of a whole preliminary guideline for the high temperature structure. The main contents of this guideline are the evaluation procedures of the creep-fatigue crack initiation and growth in high temperature condition, the high temperature LBB evaluation procedure, and the inelastic evaluations of the welded joints in SFR structures. The methodologies for the proper inelastic analysis of an SFR structures in high temperatures are explained and the guidelines of inelastic analysis options using ANSYS and ABAQUS are suggested. In addition, user guidelines for the developed NONSTA code are included. This guidelines need to be continuously revised to improve the applicability to the design and analysis of the SFR structures.

  8. The Role of Formal and Informal Forces in Shaping Consumption and Implications for Sustainable Society: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Mont

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Looking at consumption from a societal perspective, we can see that purchasing and behavior decisions are influenced by many factors, not the least which are what the people around us and in the media are doing. Other factors include economic influences, the marketing of products and technological innovations, and regulations governing consumption. This article, Part II, argues that in order to understand consumption, we need to move beyond the dominant (economic understanding of consumers and consumer behavior, and think about the origins of our preferences, needs, and desires. A thorough understanding of consumption is informed by the contributions of sociologists, psychologists, anthropologists, and behavioral scientists, who study the socio-cultural, social, and psychological contexts in which consumer behavior is embedded. These disciplines offer rich and complex explanations of human behavior, which in turn illuminate the discussion on how consumer behavior can be made more sustainable.

  9. Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part II. Dual-energy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Mainprize, James G. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Carton, Ann-Katherine; Saab-Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, Răzvan; Muller, Serge [GE Healthcare, 283 rue de la Minière, Buc 78530 (France); Jong, Roberta A. [Breast Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Dromain, Clarisse [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulin, Villejuif 94805 (France)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy (DE) contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) uses an iodinated contrast agent in combination with digital mammography (DM) to evaluate lesions on the basis of tumor angiogenesis. In DE imaging, low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) images are acquired after contrast administration and their logarithms are subtracted to cancel the appearance of normal breast tissue. Often there is incomplete signal cancellation in the subtracted images, creating a background “clutter” that can impair lesion detection. This is the second component of a two-part report on anatomical noise in CEDM. In Part I the authors characterized the anatomical noise for single-energy (SE) temporal subtraction CEDM by a power law, with model parameters α and β. In this work the authors quantify the anatomical noise in DE CEDM clinical images and compare this with the noise in SE CEDM. The influence on the anatomical noise of the presence of iodine in the breast, the timing of imaging postcontrast administration, and the x-ray energy used for acquisition are each evaluated.Methods: The power law parameters, α and β, were measured from unprocessed LE and HE images and from DE subtracted images to quantify the anatomical noise. A total of 98 DE CEDM cases acquired in a previous clinical pilot study were assessed. Conventional DM images from 75 of the women were evaluated for comparison with DE CEDM. The influence of the imaging technique on anatomical noise was determined from an analysis of differences between the power law parameters as measured in DM, LE, HE, and DE subtracted images for each subject.Results: In DE CEDM, weighted image subtraction lowers β to about 1.1 from 3.2 and 3.1 in LE and HE unprocessed images, respectively. The presence of iodine has a small but significant effect in LE images, reducing β by about 0.07 compared to DM, with α unchanged. Increasing the x-ray energy, from that typical in DM to a HE beam, significantly decreases α by about 2

  10. Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part II: Solid tumors, 1958-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents, for the first time, comprehensive data on the incidence of solid cancer and risk estimates for A-bomb survivors in the extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) cohort. Among 79,972 individuals, 8613 first primary solid cancers were diagnosed between 1958 and 1987. As part of the standard registration process of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, cancer cases occurring among members of the LSS-E85 cohort were identified using a computer linkage system supplemented by manual searches. Special efforts were made to ensure complete case ascertainment, data quality and data consistency in the two cities. For all sites combined, 75% of the cancers were verified histologically, 6% were diagnosed by direct observation, 8% were based on a clinical diagnosis, and 12.6% were ascertained by death certificate only. A standard set of analyses was carried out for each of the organs and organ systems considered. Depending on the cancer site, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) organ or kerma doses were used for computing risk estimates. Analyses were based on a general excess relative risk model (the background rate times one plus the excess relative risk). Analyses carried out for each site involved fitting the background model with no dose effect, a linear dose-response model with no effect modifiers, a linear-quadratic dose-response model with no effect modifiers, and a series of linear dose-response models that included each of the covariates (sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and city) individually as effect modifiers. Because the tumor registries ascertain cancers in the registry catchment areas only, an adjustment was made for the effects of migration. In agreement with prior LSS findings, a statistically significant excess risk for all solid cancers was demonstrated. 116 refs., 8 figs., 78 tabs

  11. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part II: Inverse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian network model has been developed to simulate a relatively simple problem of wave propagation in the surf zone (detailed in Part I). Here, we demonstrate that this Bayesian model can provide both inverse modeling and data-assimilation solutions for predicting offshore wave heights and depth estimates given limited wave-height and depth information from an onshore location. The inverse method is extended to allow data assimilation using observational inputs that are not compatible with deterministic solutions of the problem. These inputs include sand bar positions (instead of bathymetry) and estimates of the intensity of wave breaking (instead of wave-height observations). Our results indicate that wave breaking information is essential to reduce prediction errors. In many practical situations, this information could be provided from a shore-based observer or from remote-sensing systems. We show that various combinations of the assimilated inputs significantly reduce the uncertainty in the estimates of water depths and wave heights in the model domain. Application of the Bayesian network model to new field data demonstrated significant predictive skill (R2 = 0.7) for the inverse estimate of a month-long time series of offshore wave heights. The Bayesian inverse results include uncertainty estimates that were shown to be most accurate when given uncertainty in the inputs (e.g., depth and tuning parameters). Furthermore, the inverse modeling was extended to directly estimate tuning parameters associated with the underlying wave-process model. The inverse estimates of the model parameters not only showed an offshore wave height dependence consistent with results of previous studies but the uncertainty estimates of the tuning parameters also explain previously reported variations in the model parameters.

  12. Online sorting of recovered wood waste by automated XRF-technology: part II. Sorting efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A Rasem; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Townsend, Timothy

    2011-04-01

    Sorting of waste wood is an important process practiced at recycling facilities in order to detect and divert contaminants from recycled wood products. Contaminants of concern include arsenic, chromium and copper found in chemically preserved wood. The objective of this research was to evaluate the sorting efficiencies of both treated and untreated parts of the wood waste stream, and metal (As, Cr and Cu) mass recoveries by the use of automated X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. A full-scale system was used for experimentation. This unit consisted of an XRF-detection chamber mounted on the top of a conveyor and a pneumatic slide-way diverter which sorted wood into presumed treated and presumed untreated piles. A randomized block design was used to evaluate the operational conveyance parameters of the system, including wood feed rate and conveyor belt speed. Results indicated that online sorting efficiencies of waste wood by XRF technology were high based on number and weight of pieces (70-87% and 75-92% for treated wood and 66-97% and 68-96% for untreated wood, respectively). These sorting efficiencies achieved mass recovery for metals of 81-99% for As, 75-95% for Cu and 82-99% of Cr. The incorrect sorting of wood was attributed almost equally to deficiencies in the detection and conveyance/diversion systems. Even with its deficiencies, the system was capable of producing a recyclable portion that met residential soil quality levels established for Florida, for an infeed that contained 5% of treated wood. PMID:21194917

  13. Quasi-direct numerical simulation of a pebble bed configuration, Part-II: Temperature field analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Quasi direct numerical simulations (q-DNSs) of a pebble bed configuration have been performed. ► This q-DNS database may serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches. ► A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data throughout the computational domain has been generated. ► Results for mean, RMS of temperature and respective turbulent heat fluxes are extensively reported in this paper. -- Abstract: Good prediction of the flow and heat transfer phenomena in the pebble bed core of a high temperature reactor (HTR) is a challenge for available turbulence models, which still require to be validated. While experimental data are generally desirable in this validation process, due to the complex geometric configuration and measurement difficulties, a very limited amount of data is currently available. On the other hand, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is considered an accurate simulation technique, which may serve as an alternative for validating turbulence models. In the framework of the present study, quasi-direct numerical simulation (q-DNS) of a single face cubic centered pebble bed is performed, which will serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches in order to perform calculations for a randomly arranged pebble bed. These simulations were performed at a Reynolds number of 3088, based on pebble diameter, with a porosity level of 0.42. Results related to flow field (mean, RMS and covariance of velocity) have been presented in Part-I, whereas, in the present article, we focus our attention to the analysis of the temperature field. A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data for the thermal field (mean, RMS and turbulent heat flux) has been generated

  14. A microencapsulation process of liquid mercury by sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification technology. Part II: Durability of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Delgado, A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Under the European LIFE Program a microencapsulation process was developed for liquid mercury using Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS technology, obtaining a stable concrete-like sulfur matrix that allows the immobilization of mercury for long-term storage. The process description and characterization of the materials obtained were detailed in Part I. The present document, Part II, reports the results of different tests carried out to determine the durability of Hg-S concrete samples with very high mercury content (up to 30 % w/w. Different UNE and RILEM standard test methods were applied, such as capillary water absorption, low pressure water permeability, alkali/acid resistance, salt mist aging, freeze-thaw resistance and fire performance. The samples exhibited no capillarity and their resistance in both alkaline and acid media was very high. They also showed good resistance to very aggressive environments such as spray salt mist, freeze-thaw and dry-wet. The fire hazard of samples at low heat output was negligible.

    Dentro del Programa Europeo LIFE, se ha desarrollado un proceso de microencapsulación de mercurio liquido, utilizando la tecnología de estabilización/solidificación con azufre polimérico (SPSS. Como resultado se ha obtenido un material estable tipo concreto que permite la inmovilización de mercurio y su almacenamiento a largo plazo. La descripción del proceso y la caracterización de los materiales obtenidos, denominados concretos Hg-S, se detallan en la Parte I. El presente trabajo, Parte II, incluye los resultados de los diferentes ensayos realizados para determinar la durabilidad de las muestras de concreto Hg-S con un contenido de mercurio de hasta el 30 %. Se han utilizado diferentes métodos de ensayo estándar, UNE y RILEM, para determinar propiedades como la absorción de agua por capilaridad, la permeabilidad de agua a baja presión, la resistencia a álcali y ácido, el comportamiento en

  15. Treatment of atrial fibrillation. Part II. Current realities and future prospects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockeria L.A.

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is one of the most common arrhythmias in the world. It causes serious disturbances in cardiac hemodynamics and is dangerous because of its life-threatening consequences. The problem of treatment of AF is one the main and discussed problems in contemporary arrhythmology and cardiac surgery. Nowadays there are a lot of methods of treatment of atrial fibrillation, but their effectiveness and indications to them need a detailed analysis. Strategies of conservative therapy of AF help us to achieve sinus rhythm only in 50% cases. That's why the question of searching more effective surgical methods was obvious. First attempts in surgical treatment were made in 1980s. Such operations as left atrial isolation, His-bundle’s ablation and the “corridor” procedure were performed. But these operations were trying to isolate AF or to localize it in the certain part of atrium to minimize its negative effects on the ventricles, but the fibrillation was preserved. Fist operation eliminating AF was named Maze operation and was made in 1987 year. The conception of this operation is to create surgical incisions with cut and sew technique that helps us to divide atrial myocardium into the small segments that doesn’t allow macro-reentrant circuits to sustain. That's why the ability to fibrillate or to flutter is excluded. Later this operation had undergone several modifications what helped to correct its main disadvantages. Eventually Maze III operation became gold standard in AF treatment. But this operation was technically difficult and was not possible to be made by average surgeons. That’s why the necessity to search alternative energy sources to make ablation lines instead of surgical incisions and simplify the operation appeared. The main types of ablation used in this operation are cryoablation, radiofrequency, ultrasound and microwave ablation. In many investigations alternative energy sources are compared to each other to

  16. Japanese encephalitis (JE) part II: 14 years' follow-up of survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkari, N B S; Thacker, A K; Barthwal, S P; Mishra, V K; Prapann, Shiv; Srivastava, Deepak; Sarkari, M

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis, the commonest Arbovirus encephalitis, has been endemic in many parts of Asia, the Pacific Islands, and India; also, there have been many epidemics. Most of the post JE cases have been associated with neurological and neuropsychiatric deficits but have not been properly classified and followed. Practically all the previous studies were in children or young adults. The aim of this study, involving only adult cases, the largest ever being reported, has been to follow the 688/1,199 survivors of JE patients out of 1,282 of acute cases admitted during four epidemics for a period of 14 years after properly classifying the sequelae. This prospective study was conducted in B.R.D. Medical College Gorakhpur (India), involving 665/688 post JE cases with neuropsychiatric deficits from four epidemics of 1978, 1980, 1988 and 1989 which were properly classified in nine groups. While the first epidemic of 1978 was being studied, more disastrous episodes flared up and the patients were subsequently added. Hence, the total duration of this prospective study was from November 1978 to December 2003. There were 14 defaulted initially from 688 followed (23/688 without sequelae and 665/688 with neuropsychiatric deficits), and later 130 were lost from time to time at various stages of follow up. Four out of 23/688 discharged without any deficit had to be readmitted for bizarre movements, assaultative behaviour and euphoria without fever and altered sensorium. All of them improved by symptomatic treatment. Progressive improvement occurred in all the parameters consisting of psychological disturbances, higher cerebral dysfunction, speech disorders (dysphonia, dysarthria, dysphasias, apraxia and agnosia), extra pyramidal, pyramidal features, and hypothalamic disturbances, cranial nerves including pupils and fundi and seizures. Maximum cases improved between 6 months (55%) to 1 year (78%). Only some features improved between 5 to 14 years. Four patients of hemiplegia

  17. Carbon Management In the Post-Cap-and-Trade Carbon Economy-Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroff, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    This is the second installment in our search for a comprehensive economic model to mitigate climate change due to anthropogenic activity. Last year we presented how the unique features of our economic model measure changes in carbon flux due to anthropogenic activity, referred to as carbon quality or CQ, and how the model is used to value such changes in the climate system. This year, our paper focuses on how carbon quality can be implemented to capture the effect of economic activity and international trade on the climate system, thus allowing us to calculate a Return on Climate System (RoCS) for all economic assets and activity. The result is that the RoCS for each public and private economic activity and entity can be calculated by summing up the RoCS for each individual economic asset and activity in which an entity is engaged. Such a macro-level scale is used to rank public and private entities including corporations, governments, and even entire nations, as well as human adaptation and carbon storage activities, providing status and trending insights to evaluate policies on both a micro- and macro-economic level. With international trade, RoCS measures the embodied effects on climate change that will be needed to assess border fees to insure carbon parity on all imports and exports. At the core of our vision is a comprehensive, 'open-source' construct of which our carbon quality metric is the first element. One goal is to recognize each country's endemic resources and infrastructure that affect their ability to manage carbon, while preventing spatial and temporal shifting of carbon emissions that reduce or reverse efforts to mitigate climate change. The standards for calculating the RoCS can be promulgated as part of the Generally Accepted Accounted Principles (GAAP) and the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to ensure standard and consistent reporting. The value of such insights on the climate system at all levels will be crucial to managing

  18. Muerte súbita de origen neuropatológicos: (II parte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maikel Vargas Sanabria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available En la primera parte del presente artículo, en el número anterior de esta Revista, se discutió ampliamente el concepto de muerte súbita de origen neuropatológico. Tomando en cuenta el mismo, se realizó este análisis de las autopsias y reportes de neuropatología de 1998 al 2006 de la Sección de Patología Forense del Departamento de Medicina Legal para establecer las causas de muerte más frecuentes y el perfil epidemiológico de los fallecidos. Esto para recomendar aspectos útiles para el manejo este tipo de casos para el personal directamente involucrado. Después de revisar las causas de muerte de 23099 autopsias que se efectuaron en el período en estudio, 338 casos coincidieron con la definición propuesta de muerte súbita de origen neuropatológico y en términos generales hubo concordancia entre lo que se anota en la literatura mundial y lo que se ha presentado en nuestro país en el intervalo analizado.In the first section of these report, on the previous edition of these magazine, it was discussed widely the concept of the neuropathological origen of the sudden death. Taking that preview this analysis was made from the autopsies and the neuropathological reports from 1998 to 2006 from the "Sección de Patología Forense" of costarican "Departamento de Medicina Legal" to establish the most frequent causes of death and the epidemiologic profile of the deceased. These to advice usefull aspects for the management of those cases by the involved staff. After reviewing the causes of death of 23099 autopsies made on the chosen period, 338 cases achived the definition of neuropathological sudden death proposed. In general there was found agreement between the findings on worldwide literature and the findings of our country during these period.

  19. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-08-01

    choice decision-making process at each medical trainee level to determine best recruitment strategies. Educational debt is an unexpectedly minor determinant for pediatric residents and subspecialty fellows. A two-year fellowship training option may retain the mandatory scholarship component and attract an increasing number of candidate trainees. Diversity, work-life balance, scheduling flexibility to accommodate part-time employment, and reform of conditions for academic promotion all need to be addressed to ensure future growth of the pediatric rheumatology workforce.

  20. Zn(II, Mn(II and Sr(II Behavior in a Natural Carbonate Reservoir System. Part I: Impact of Salinity, Initial pH and Initial Zn(II Concentration in Atmospheric Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auffray B.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of inorganic elements on carbonate minerals is well known in strictly controlled conditions which limit the impact of other phenomena such as dissolution and/or precipitation. In this study, we evidence the behavior of Zn(II (initially in solution and two trace elements, Mn(II and Sr(II (released by carbonate dissolution in the context of a leakage from a CO2 storage site. The initial pH chosen are either equal to the pH of the water-CO2 equilibrium (~ 2.98 or equal to the pH of the water-CO2-calcite system (~ 4.8 in CO2 storage conditions. From this initial influx of liquid, saturated or not with respect to calcite, the batch experiments evolve freely to their equilibrium, as it would occur in a natural context after a perturbation. The batch experiments are carried out on two natural carbonates (from Lavoux and St-Emilion with PCO2 = 10−3.5 bar, with different initial conditions ([Zn(II]i from 10−4 to 10−6 M, either with pure water or 100 g/L NaCl brine. The equilibrium regarding calcite dissolution is confirmed in all experiments, while the zinc sorption evidenced does not always correspond to the two-step mechanism described in the literature. A preferential sorption of about 10% of the concentration is evidenced for Mn(II in aqueous experiments, while Sr(II is more sorbed in saline conditions. This study also shows that this preferential sorption, depending on the salinity, is independent of the natural carbonate considered. Then, the simulations carried out with PHREEQC show that experiments and simulations match well concerning the equilibrium of dissolution and the sole zinc sorption, with log KZn(II ~ 2 in pure water and close to 4 in high salinity conditions. When the simulations were possible, the log K values for Mn(II and Sr(II were much different from those in the literature obtained by sorption in controlled conditions. It is shown that a new conceptual model regarding multiple Trace Elements (TE sorption is

  1. Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part II: Solid tumors, 1958-1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D E; Mabuchi, K; Ron, E; Soda, M; Tokunaga, M; Ochikubo, S; Sugimoto, S; Ikeda, T; Terasaki, M; Izumi, S

    1994-02-01

    This report presents, for the first time, comprehensive data on the incidence of solid cancer and risk estimates for A-bomb survivors in the extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) cohort. Among 79,972 individuals, 8613 first primary solid cancers were diagnosed between 1958 and 1987. As part of the standard registration process of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, cancer cases occurring among members of the LSS-E85 cohort were identified using a computer linkage system supplemented by manual searches. Special efforts were made to ensure complete case ascertainment, data quality and data consistency in the two cities. For all sites combined, 75% of the cancers were verified histologically, 6% were diagnosed by direct observation, 8% were based on a clinical diagnosis, and 12.6% were ascertained by death certificate only. A standard set of analyses was carried out for each of the organs and organ systems considered. Depending on the cancer site, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) organ or kerma doses were used for computing risk estimates. Analyses were based on a general excess relative risk model (the background rate times one plus the excess relative risk). Analyses carried out for each site involved fitting the background model with no dose effect, a linear dose-response model with no effect modifiers, a linear-quadratic dose-response model with no effect modifiers, and a series of linear dose-response models that included each of the covariates (sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and city) individually as effect modifiers. Because the tumor registries ascertain cancers in the registry catchment areas only, an adjustment was made for the effects of migration. In agreement with prior LSS findings, a statistically significant excess risk for all solid cancers was demonstrated [excess relative risk at 1 Sv (ERR1Sv) = 0.63; excess absolute risk (EAR) per 10(4) person-year sievert (PY Sv) = 29.7]. For cancers of the stomach (ERR1SV = 0.32), colon

  2. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part II. Science, research, development, higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    important role of ET is combined with the existence in the society of an adequate infrastructure which recreates the full development cycle of high technology embracing: people, institutions, finances and logistics, in this also science, higher education, education, continuous training, dissemination and outreach, professional social environment, legal basis, political support and lobbying, innovation structures, applications, industry and economy. The digest of chosen development tendencies in ET was made here from the academic perspective, in a wider scale and on this background the national one, trying to situate this branch in the society, determine its changing role to build a new technical infrastructure of a society based on knowledge, a role of builder of many practical gadgets facilitating life, a role of a big future integrator of today's single bricks into certain more useful unity. This digest does not have a character of a systematic analysis of ET. It is a kind of an arbitrary utterance of the authors inside their field of competence. The aim of this paper is to take an active part in the discussion of the academic community in this country on the development strategy of ET, choice of priorities for cyclically rebuilding economy, in competitive environments. The review paper was initiated by the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunications of Polish Academy of Sciences and was published in Polish as introductory chapter of a dedicated expertise, printed in a book format. This version makes the included opinions available for a wider community.

  3. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma - Part II: Management of primary extranodal lymphomas, generalized disease and salvage treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To review the approach to the diagnosis, classification, assessment, treatment and continuing management of patients with primary extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the management of generalized disease with the emphasis on the current role of salvage treatment with high dose chemotherapy and stem cell/bone marrow support strategies. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma may involve any part of the body. Many lymphomas, such as MALT, angiocentric T-cell, etc., commonly present in extranodal sites. Lymphomas presenting in the GI tract, and head and neck, are most common with the single most common site being the stomach. Gastric lymphoma is associated with Helicobacter pylorii and is most common in areas endemic for Helicobacter pylorii infection. Recent advances in the understanding of the etiology of gastric MALT, thyroid, and intestinal lymphomas present new opportunities for the application of novel therapeutic approaches e.g. antibiotic therapy for Helicobacter pylori and early stage IPSID. Lymphomas presenting in the orbit, thyroid, breast, bone, extradural and skin are of interest because of the importance of expert RT in securing local control. Primary brain lymphomas present a particular challenge to the radiation oncologist. Although localized, primary brain lymphomas are extremely difficult to control. Rare sites of extranodal lymphoma include testis, female genital tract, and lung. Extranodal lymphomas are often localized and cure with RT or CMT is possible. They represent a assorted group of diseases with diverse presentations, prognosis, sensitivity to RT and expected outcome. They are of particular importance to radiation oncologists as they require special attention to patterns of spread and treatment planning. The principles of management of primary extranodal lymphoma, however, follow those applicable to localized nodal presentations. Although primary extranodal lymphomas are highly curable, a proportion of patients will fail with disseminated

  4. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part II: Current practice and new horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This course is designed for residents in radiation oncology, preparing for their boards. The principles described in Part I are used to explain current practices in radiation oncology and as a basis for new initiatives. The multifraction regimens used in conventional radiotherapy were developed empirically, but can be understood in terms of radiobiological principles. Dividing the dose into many fractions reduces biological effectiveness due to repair of sublethal damage; this occurs in both tumors and normal tissues. Fractionation allows re-oxygenation to occur in tumors and so increases the effectiveness of a given total dose. Fractionation also leads to sensitization by reassortment of cycling tumor cells into radiosensitive phases of the cycle. Laboratory research also provides a rationale for modifications of existing fractionation protocols. The dose response relationship for late responding tissues is more 'curved' than for acute or early effects. Consequently the use of multiple fractions allows a greater separation of early and late effects in normal tissues. This has led to the introduction of hyperfractionation and accelerated treatment. Both involve two treatments per day (BID) but based on quite different rationales. The limitation of protraction is cell proliferation in the tumor, which may be accelerated as the tumor shrinks. Measurements of cell kinetics can identify fast growing tumors that may benefit from accelerated treatment. Hypoxia was early identified as a cause of resistance to cell killing by x-rays. This led to the development of electron affinic compounds as radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells. The new trend is the development of bioreductive drugs that are specifically cytotoxic to hypoxic cells i.e. hypoxic cytotoxins, but which still need to be combined with radiation. Fast neutrons were initially introduced, too, in an attempt to overcome the perceived problems of hypoxia, but clinical trials now are based on the premise

  5. Contamination smoke: a simulation of heavy metal containing aerosols from fires in plutonium glove boxes: part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the dispersion of plutonium bearing aerosols during glove box fires on a laboratory scale has been, in part I of this work, focussed on fires of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA - the major glove box construction material) whose surfaces were contaminated with cerium-europium oxide powder as a substitute for plutonium-uranium oxide. The present part II completes the study with comparative fire experiments involving contaminated samples of various glove box materials burning in or exposed to the flames of the standardized 0.6 MW fire source previously developed. Beyond spreading of the Ce-Eu-oxide powder as mentioned above, the other important surface contamination process is used, i.e. deposition and subsequent drying of droplets from acid cerium-europium solutions. It is shown that, among the tested materials, and with the exception of synthetic glove rubber, burning PMMA spreads the most radioactive contamination. On the other hand, this potential risk is much lower for fires involving materials contaminated from solution deposition than from powder or pellets. Attempts to measure the airborne contaminant particle sizes did not yield conclusive results. They suggest, however, that contamination from solutions leads to smaller heavy-metal containing aerosol particles than contamination with powder

  6. A microencapsulation process of liquid mercury by sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification technology. Part II: Durability of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the European LIFE Program a microencapsulation process was developed for liquid mercury using Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) technology, obtaining a stable concrete-like sulfur matrix that allows the immobilization of mercury for long-term storage. The process description and characterization of the materials obtained were detailed in Part I. The present document, Part II, reports the results of different tests carried out to determine the durability of Hg-S concrete samples with very high mercury content (up to 30 % w/w). Different UNE and RILEM standard test methods were applied, such as capillary water absorption, low pressure water permeability, alkali/acid resistance, salt mist aging, freeze-thaw resistance and fire performance. The samples exhibited no capillarity and their resistance in both alkaline and acid media was very high. They also showed good resistance to very aggressive environments such as spray salt mist, freeze-thaw and dry-wet. The fire hazard of samples at low heat output was negligible. (Author)

  7. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THE EFFECT ON CHINESE REGIONAL CLIMATE DUE TO SEASONAL VARIATION OF LAND SURFACE PARAMETERS (PART II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙健; 李维亮; 周秀骥

    2001-01-01

    The effect on climate due to seasonal variation of vegetation and roughness length was simulated in Part I of this essay. In Part II, the individual effect of albedo and the joint effect of all those factors (vegetation, roughness length and albedo) were calculated by numerical sensitivity experiments. The results showed that: (1) There is no significant effect on precipitation if the albedo of 4 seasons is used to replace the CRCM's climate average data, but the effect on land surface temperature can be seen clearly. And the effect also can be seen in adjacent regions. (2) If all these three factors are used to replace the CRCM's climate average data at the same time, the effect on precipitation is significant, the most variation value is 300 mm. And the effect on temperature is similar to what we can see if only one of these factors in CRCM is replaced by monthly or seasonal data. (3) Seasonal variation of land surface parameters has important effect not only on regional climate, but also on global environment.

  8. A microencapsulation process of liquid mercury by sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification technology. Part II: Durability of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Delgado, A.; Guerrero, A.; Lopez, F. A.; Perez, C.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    Under the European LIFE Program a microencapsulation process was developed for liquid mercury using Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) technology, obtaining a stable concrete-like sulfur matrix that allows the immobilization of mercury for long-term storage. The process description and characterization of the materials obtained were detailed in Part I. The present document, Part II, reports the results of different tests carried out to determine the durability of Hg-S concrete samples with very high mercury content (up to 30 % w/w). Different UNE and RILEM standard test methods were applied, such as capillary water absorption, low pressure water permeability, alkali/acid resistance, salt mist aging, freeze-thaw resistance and fire performance. The samples exhibited no capillarity and their resistance in both alkaline and acid media was very high. They also showed good resistance to very aggressive environments such as spray salt mist, freeze-thaw and dry-wet. The fire hazard of samples at low heat output was negligible. (Author)

  9. Theory and Implementation of Nuclear Safety System Codes - Part II: System Code Closure Relations, Validation, and Limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn A Roth; Fatih Aydogan

    2014-09-01

    This is Part II of two articles describing the details of thermal-hydraulic sys- tem codes. In this second part of the article series, the system code closure relationships (used to model thermal and mechanical non-equilibrium and the coupling of the phases) for the governing equations are discussed and evaluated. These include several thermal and hydraulic models, such as heat transfer coefficients for various flow regimes, two phase pressure correlations, two phase friction correlations, drag coefficients and interfacial models be- tween the fields. These models are often developed from experimental data. The experiment conditions should be understood to evaluate the efficacy of the closure models. Code verification and validation, including Separate Effects Tests (SETs) and Integral effects tests (IETs) is also assessed. It can be shown from the assessments that the test cases cover a significant section of the system code capabilities, but some of the more advanced reactor designs will push the limits of validation for the codes. Lastly, the limitations of the codes are discussed by considering next generation power plants, such as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), analyz- ing not only existing nuclear power plants, but also next generation nuclear power plants. The nuclear industry is developing new, innovative reactor designs, such as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) and others. Sub-types of these reactor designs utilize pebbles, prismatic graphite moderators, helical steam generators, in- novative fuel types, and many other design features that may not be fully analyzed by current system codes. This second part completes the series on the comparison and evaluation of the selected reactor system codes by discussing the closure relations, val- idation and limitations. These two articles indicate areas where the models can be improved to adequately address issues with new reactor design and development.

  10. Effect of Sea Breeze on Air Pollution in the Greater Athens Area. Part II: Analysis of Different Emission Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Paola; Thunis, Philippe; Martilli, Alberto; Clappier, Alain

    2000-04-01

    The Mediterranean Campaign of Photochemical Tracers-Transport and Chemical Evolution that took place in the greater Athens area from 20 August to 20 September 1994 has confirmed the role of sea-breeze circulation in photochemical smog episodes that had been suggested already by a number of experiments and numerical studies.The meteorological and photochemical modeling of this campaign were discussed in Part I. Part II focuses on the study of the 14 September photochemical smog event associated with a sea-breeze circulation. The objective of the study is to identify and to understand better the nonlinear processes that produce high ozone concentrations. In particular, the effect of land and sea breezes is investigated by isolating the effect of nighttime and daytime emissions on ozone concentrations. The same principle then is used to isolate the effect on ozone concentrations of the two main sources of emissions in the greater Athens area: the industrial area around Elefsis and the Athens urban area. Last, the buildup of ozone from one day to another is investigated.From this study, it comes out that ozone production in the Athens area is mainly a 1-day phenomenon. The increased values of photochemical pollutant (up to 130 ppb at ground level) reached during summertime late afternoons on mountain slopes to the north and northeast of the city are related mainly to the current-day emissions. Nevertheless, the recirculation of old pollutants can have an important effect on ozone concentrations in downtown Athens, the southern part of the peninsula, and over the sea, especially near Aigina Island.

  11. Final environmental statement. Final addendum to Part II: Manufacture of floating nuclear power plants by Offshore Power Systems. DOCKET-STN--50-437

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Addendum to Part II of the Final Environmental Statement related to manufacture of floating nuclear power plants by Offshore Power Systems (OPS), NUREG-0056, issued September 1976, was prepared by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The staff's basic evaluation is presented in NUREG-0056. The current Addendum provides further consideration of a number of topics discussed in NUREG-0056, particularly additional consideration of shore zone siting at estuarine and ocean regions. This Summary and Conclusions recapitulates and is cumulative for Part II of the FES and the current Addendum. Augmentations to the Summary and Conclusions presented in Part II of the FES and arising from the evaluations contained in this Addendum are italicized

  12. Final environmental statement. Final addendum to Part II: Manufacture of floating nuclear power plants by Offshore Power Systems. DOCKET-STN--50-437

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    This Addendum to Part II of the Final Environmental Statement related to manufacture of floating nuclear power plants by Offshore Power Systems (OPS), NUREG-0056, issued September 1976, was prepared by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The staff's basic evaluation is presented in NUREG-0056. The current Addendum provides further consideration of a number of topics discussed in NUREG-0056, particularly additional consideration of shore zone siting at estuarine and ocean regions. This Summary and Conclusions recapitulates and is cumulative for Part II of the FES and the current Addendum. Augmentations to the Summary and Conclusions presented in Part II of the FES and arising from the evaluations contained in this Addendum are italicized.

  13. Research on the marine food chain. Progress report, July 1974--June 1975. Part I. Introduction and account of work in progress. Part II. Manuscript reports of work concluded. Part III. Cruise summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The all-group field program during 1971-74 was on plankton dynamics in the central gyre of the North Pacific. Cruises to this area were completed, and the resultant manuscripts for the 1974-75 period are included in Part II of the report. During the past year the major field program was a series of four quarterly cruises in the Southern California Bight designed to evaluate the possible local and far-field effects of the cooling water system and thermal plume of the San Onofre Nuclear Power plant. Additional field programs included a cruise to the Gulf of California (R/V Alpha Helix) concerned with problems in marine photobiology, a cruise in Antarctic waters south of Buenos Aires (Islas Orcadas, formerly U.S.N.S. Eltanin) concerned with phytoplankton productivity, and a cruise in the Atlantic off northwestern Africa (F. S. Meteor) concerned with sediment microbiology. (auth)

  14. Occlusion effects, Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    The present report studies the mechanism of the occlusion effect by means of literature studies, experiments and model estimates. A mathematical model of the occlusion effect is developed. The model includes the mechanical properties of the earmould and the airborne sound as well as the body...

  15. Part II Example Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王威; 尚秀葵; 胡明海; 徐莉

    2000-01-01

    Male, age of 27 years. History of the present disease: In the recent three weeks, the patient has the symptoms including tiredness, difficult falling in sleep even sleeplessness during whole night, accompanied with restlessness,palpitation, poor appetite, amnesia.

  16. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  17. Introduction to Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banalieva, Elitsa R.; Tihanyi, Laszlo; Devinney, Timothy M.;

    2015-01-01

    Do multinational enterprises evolve differently in emerging and developed economies? Although one camp argues that emerging economy multinationals are different from their developed country counterparts owing to the underdeveloped institutions in their home countries, another camp counters that t...

  18. Glycopeptide dendrimers. Part II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederhafner, Petr; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2008), s. 44-65. ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/1362; GA ČR GA203/06/1272; GA MZe QF3115; GA AV ČR KAN200520703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : artificial virus * cascade-release dendrimers * glycopeptide dendrimers * glycoconjugate * glycopeptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.654, year: 2008

  19. Appendices. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on LMFBR research activities is presented concerning reactor core kinetics and heat transfer characteristics; heat transfer and hydraulic reactions to transient conditions; fuel assembly power distribution and temperature gradients; and heat transfer and hydraulics associated with the recirculation experiment

  20. Emission factors of air pollutants from CNG-gasoline bi-fuel vehicles: Part II. CO, HC and NOx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yang; Xing, Zhenyu; Du, Ke

    2016-09-15

    The estimation of emission factors (EFs) is the basis of accurate emission inventory. However, the EFs of air pollutants for motor vehicles vary under different operating conditions, which will cause uncertainty in developing emission inventory. Natural gas (NG), considered as a "cleaner" fuel than gasoline, is increasingly being used to reduce combustion emissions. However, information is scarce about how much emission reduction can be achieved by motor vehicles burning NG (NGVs) under real road driving conditions, which is necessary for evaluating the environmental benefits for NGVs. Here, online, in situ measurements of the emissions from nine bi-fuel vehicles were conducted under different operating conditions on the real road. A comparative study was performed for the EFs of black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) for each operating condition when the vehicles using gasoline and compressed NG (CNG) as fuel. BC EFs were reported in part I. The part II in this paper series reports the influence of operating conditions and fuel types on the EFs of CO, HC and NOx. Fuel-based EFs of CO showed good correlations with speed when burning CNG and gasoline. The correlation between fuel-based HC EFs and speed was relatively weak whether burning CNG or gasoline. The fuel-based NOx EFs moderately correlated with speed when burning CNG, but weakly correlated with gasoline. As for HC, the mileage-based EFs of gasoline vehicles are 2.39-12.59 times higher than those of CNG vehicles. The mileage-based NOx EFs of CNG vehicles are slightly higher than those of gasoline vehicles. These results would facilitate a detailed analysis of the environmental benefits for replacing gasoline with CNG in light duty vehicles. PMID:27219504

  1. Providing all global energy with wind, water, and solar power, Part II: Reliability, system and transmission costs, and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is Part II of two papers evaluating the feasibility of providing all energy for all purposes (electric power, transportation, and heating/cooling), everywhere in the world, from wind, water, and the sun (WWS). In Part I, we described the prominent renewable energy plans that have been proposed and discussed the characteristics of WWS energy systems, the global demand for and availability of WWS energy, quantities and areas required for WWS infrastructure, and supplies of critical materials. Here, we discuss methods of addressing the variability of WWS energy to ensure that power supply reliably matches demand (including interconnecting geographically dispersed resources, using hydroelectricity, using demand-response management, storing electric power on site, over-sizing peak generation capacity and producing hydrogen with the excess, storing electric power in vehicle batteries, and forecasting weather to project energy supplies), the economics of WWS generation and transmission, the economics of WWS use in transportation, and policy measures needed to enhance the viability of a WWS system. We find that the cost of energy in a 100% WWS will be similar to the cost today. We conclude that barriers to a 100% conversion to WWS power worldwide are primarily social and political, not technological or even economic. - Research highlights: → We evaluate the feasibility of global energy supply from wind, water, and solar energy. → WWS energy can be supplied reliably and economically to all energy-use sectors. → The social cost of WWS energy generally is less than the cost of fossil-fuel energy. → Barriers to 100% WWS power worldwide are socio-political, not techno-economic.

  2. Determination of pre-impact occupant postures and analysis of consequences on injury outcome--part II: biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hault-Dubrulle, Audrey; Robache, Frederic; Drazetic, Pascal; Guillemot, Herve; Morvan, Herve

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers pre-impact vehicle maneuvers and analyzes the resulting driver motion from their comfort seating position. Part I of this work consisted of analyzing the driver behavior during a simulated crash in a car driving simulator. The configuration of the virtual accident led to an unavoidable frontal crash with a truck. The typical response to this type of emergency event was to brace rearward into the seat and to straighten the arms against the steering wheel, or, to swerve to attempt to avoid the impacting vehicle. In a turn crossover maneuvers, the forearm is directly positioned on the airbag module at time of crash. This position represents a potential injurious situation and is investigated in this Part II. Static airbag-deployment tests were realized in collaboration with Zodiac using conventional airbag (sewn cushion, pyrotechnical system and open event) and a Hybrid III 50th Male Dummy seated with the left arm positioned in the path of the deploying airbag. These experiments were numerically reproduced with Madymo and the ellipsoid Hybrid III dummy model. The dummy arm interaction with airbag was correlated with experiments. Then, a numerical simulation of a frontal collision at 56 km/h was realized. The results of the computational runs put forward injurious situations when the driver's arm was in front of the steering wheel. Indeed, in this case, the arm could hit the head under airbag deployment and induced serious neck bending and violent head launching. To mitigate head and neck trauma in this out-of-position situation, an airbag prototype (bonded cushion, two pure helium cold gas generators allowing mono- or multi-stage inflating, patented silicone membrane) was proposed by Zodiac. The results of static airbag-deployment tests with conventional and prototype airbags showed a significant reduction of the maximum linear head acceleration and neck bending with airbag prototype when a dual stage inflating was ignited, due to a reduced

  3. Getting to the Source: a Survey of Quantitative Data Sources Available to the Everyday Librarian: Part II: Data Sources from Specific Library Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Goddard

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of a two-part article that provides a survey of data sources which are likely to be immediately available to the typical practitioner who wishes to engage in statistical analysis of collections and services within his or her own library. Part I outlines the data elements which can be extracted from web server logs, and discusses web log analysis tools. Part II looks at logs, reports, and data sources from proxy servers, resource vendors, link resolvers, federated search engines, institutional repositories, electronic reference services, and the integrated library system.

  4. Getting to the Source: a Survey of Quantitative Data Sources Available to the Everyday Librarian: Part II: Data Sources from Specific Library Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Goddard

    2007-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part article that provides a survey of data sources which are likely to be immediately available to the typical practitioner who wishes to engage in statistical analysis of collections and services within his or her own library. Part I outlines the data elements which can be extracted from web server logs, and discusses web log analysis tools. Part II looks at logs, reports, and data sources from proxy servers, resource vendors, link resolvers, federated searc...

  5. Sludge-grown algae for culturing aquatic organisms: Part II. Sludge-grown algae as feeds for aquatic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M. H.; Hung, K. M.; Chiu, S. T.

    1996-05-01

    This project investigated the feasibility of using sewage sludge to culture microalgae ( Chlorella-HKBU) and their subsequent usage as feeds for rearing different organisms. Part II of the project evaluated the results of applying the sludge-grown algae to feed Oreochromis mossambicus (fish), Macrobrachium hainenese (shrimp), and Moina macrocopa (cladocera). In general, the yields of the cultivated organisms were unsatisfactory when they were fed the sludge-grown algae directly. The body weights of O. mossambicus and M. macrocopa dropped 21% and 37%, respectively, although there was a slight increase (4.4%) in M. hainenese. However, when feeding the algal-fed cladocerans to fish and shrimp, the body weights of the fish and shrimp were increased 7% and 11% accordingly. Protein contents of the cultivated organisms were comparable to the control diet, although they contained a rather high amount of heavy metals. When comparing absolute heavy metal contents in the cultivated organisms, the following order was observed: alga > cladocera > shrimp, fish > sludge extracts. Bioelimination of heavy metals may account for the decreasing heavy metal concentrations in higher trophic organisms.

  6. Image quality assessment in digital mammography: part II. NPWE as a validated alternative for contrast detail analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of image quality for digital x-ray mammography systems used in European screening programs relies mainly on contrast-detail CDMAM phantom scoring and requires the acquisition and analysis of many images in order to reduce variability in threshold detectability. Part II of this study proposes an alternative method based on the detectability index (d') calculated for a non-prewhitened model observer with an eye filter (NPWE). The detectability index was calculated from the normalized noise power spectrum and image contrast, both measured from an image of a 5 cm poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom containing a 0.2 mm thick aluminium square, and the pre-sampling modulation transfer function. This was performed as a function of air kerma at the detector for 11 different digital mammography systems. These calculated d' values were compared against threshold gold thickness (T) results measured with the CDMAM test object and against derived theoretical relationships. A simple relationship was found between T and d', as a function of detector air kerma; a linear relationship was found between d' and contrast-to-noise ratio. The values of threshold thickness used to specify acceptable performance in the European Guidelines for 0.10 and 0.25 mm diameter discs were equivalent to threshold calculated detectability indices of 1.05 and 6.30, respectively. The NPWE method is a validated alternative to CDMAM scoring for use in the image quality specification, quality control and optimization of digital x-ray systems for screening mammography.

  7. Conference on the Trend in Income Inequality in the U.S. Part I, Trends in Inequality of Well-Offness in the United States since World War II. Part 2, Conference Overview: Conceptual Issues, Data Issues, and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, Michael K.; Danziger, Sheldon

    The first part of this document summarizes the current state of knowledge on trends in inequality of economic well-being in the United States since World War II. It surveys alternative answers to the often asked question: Has inequality in the U.S. increased, decreased, or remained roughly the same over a period of time? Intelligent laymen, and…

  8. CFD analysis of a regular sector of the ITER vacuum vessel. Part II: Thermal-hydraulic effects of the nuclear heat load

    OpenAIRE

    Zanino, Roberto; Subba, Fabio; Savoldi, Laura; Corpino, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    The 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) steady state analysis of the regular sector #5 of the ITER vacuum vessel (VV) is presented in these two companion papers using the commercial software ANSYS-FLUENT®. The pure hydraulic analysis, concentrating on flow field and pressure drop, is presented in Part I. This Part II focuses on the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the effects of the nuclear heat load. Being the VV classified as safety important component, an accurate thermal-hydraulic analysis ...

  9. Stability Improvement of High-Pressure-Ratio Turbocharger Centrifugal Compressor by Asymmetrical Flow Control—Part II: Nonaxisymmetrical Self-Recirculation Casing Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Xinqian; Zhang, Yangjun; Yang, Mingyang; Bamba, Takahiro; Tamaki, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    This is part II of a two-part paper involving the development of an asymmetrical flow control method to widen the operating range of a turbocharger centrifugal compressor with high-pressure ratio. A nonaxisymmetrical self-recirculation casing treatment (SRCT) as an instance of asymmetrical flow control method is presented. Experimental and numerical methods were used to investigate the impact of nonaxisymmetrical SRCT on the surge point of the centrifugal compressor. First, the influence of t...

  10. Lisímetro de pesagem de grande porte. parte II: consumo hídrico do coqueiro anão verde irrigado Large-scale weighing lysimeter. part II: water requirements of the irrigated dwarf-green coconut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inajá F. Sousa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho, como segunda parte de uma pesquisa realizada no Estado de Sergipe, objetiva determinar a evapotranspiração e o coeficiente de cultura na fase de crescimento do coqueiro anão-verde (Cocos nucifera L., com base em medições lisimétricas e no modelo do balanço de energia, segundo a razão de Bowen. Obteve-se a evapotranspiração de referência pelo método de Penman-Monteith, na escala diária em todo o período experimental. O sistema de aquisição de dados foi programado para a automação da coleta de todos os sensores necessários à obtenção dos componentes do balanço de energia. O consumo hídrico do coqueiro durante a fase de crescimento é de 1.263,30 mm, com média diária de 3,90 mm d-1. O coeficiente de cultura nessa fase fenológica da palmeira varia entre 0,50 e 1,80, com média de 0,96.This paper, as Part II of a research carried out in Sergipe state, aims to determine evapotranspiration and crop coefficient of dwarf-green coconut (Cocos nucifera L. based on lysimeter measurements and Bowen ratio-energy balance method. The reference evapotranspiration was obtained by the Penman-Monteith approach on daily-scale during the experimental period. The data acquisition system was used to obtain all data from the sensors necessary to determine the energy balance components. The water requirements of coconut palm during the phenological growth stage is 1263.30 mm, with daily average of 3.90 mm d-1. The crop coefficient during this phenological growth stage varies between 0.50 and 1.80, with daily mean of 0.96.

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (83rd, Phoenix, Arizona, August 9-12, 2000). Miscellaneous, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous, Part II Section of the proceedings contains the following eight papers: "Academic Letters of Recommendation: Perceived Ethical Implications and Harmful Effects of Exaggeration" (David L. Martinson and Michael Ryan); "It's All about the Information Salience Effects on the Perceptions of News Exemplification" (Francesca Dillman…

  12. Quality control of outpatient imaging examinations in North Rhine-Westphalia. Part II; Qualitaetskontrolle der ambulanten bildgebenden Diagnostik in Nordrhein-Westfalen. Teil II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, B.; Boettge, M.; Zaehringer, M. [Univ. Koeln (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Reinecke, T.; Coburger, S. [Univ. Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik, Informatik und Epidemiologie; Harnischmacher, U.; Luengen, M. [Univ. Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Gesundheitsoekonomie und Klinische Epidemiologie; Lauterbach, K.W. [Univ. Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Gesundheitsoekonomie und Klinische Epidemiologie; Lehmacher, W. [Univ. Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik, Informatik und Epidemiologie; Lackner, K. [Univ. Koeln (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: In the state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW), Germany, a survey was conducted on radiologic examinations ordered by general practitioners (GPs). Part II of this study aims to determine the quality of the process and outcome. The reference standard is the assessment of both radiologists and physicians without board certification in radiology working at a university hospital and in outpatient facilities. Materials and Methods: All GPs in NRW were asked to cooperate. Participating GPs filled out a questionnaire for each patient. The patients recorded the symptoms prompting the imaging examinations. The radiologists or other physicians performing the examinations were asked to provide the images and written reports and to complete a questionnaire. A file was created for each of the 394 patients with image documentation of at least one examination. Each file, which included medical history, physical findings, imaging documentation and written report, was sequentially forwarded to a board-certified radiologist and to a physician without board certification in radiology working in a university hospital and in an outpatient facility. All physicians were requested to complete a structured questionnaire for each file. Results: The referral diagnoses were rated as medically plausible in 81%, the indications for imaging found correct in 76%, the examination techniques considered appropriate in 69%, the clinical question answered in 63%, the interpretation judged medically correct in 50% and all incidental findings documented in 49%. In retrospect, 32% of the examinations were judged superfluous. The sequence of multiple examinations performed on a particular patient was rated as appropriate in 51%. The interpretation revealed specialty-related differences. The plausibility of the referral diagnoses had a significant impact on the appropriateness of subsequent diagnostic investigations. Marked deficits showed sonography, performance by non-radiologists, self

  13. Part I. Bacteriorhodopsin-related materials work for molecular electronics. Part II. Volumetric optical memory based on the branched photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin. Part III. The role of calcium in the bacteriorhodopsin binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jeffrey Alan

    Part I. A protocol for the routine isolation and purification of purple membrane sheets containing the integral membrane protein, bacteriorhodopsin, was developed based upon modifications of protocols already in the literature. This simplified protocol is geared toward the facile isolation of protein for use in molecular electronic devices. Methods for the incorporation of bacteriorhodopsin into various polymeric supports were also developed, primarily in the form of dried films and hydrated cubes. This work also represents the first reported production of dried films of the deionized protein, or blue membrane. Part II. An architecture for a volumetric optical memory based on the branched-photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin is presented. The branching reaction circumvents problems associated with destructive reading and writing processes and allows access to a stable, long-lived state, separated both temporally and energetically from the main photocycle, thereby making long-term data storage possible. The state, denoted as Q, can only be accessed by exposing the protein to two different wavelengths of light in the proper sequence, with the appropriate temporal separation (roughly 2 ms between the light pulses). The Q-state (assigned as a binary one) is transparent to both writing and reading processes, making them rigorously non-destructive. Bacteriorhodopsin in its resting state is assigned as a binary zero. A differential absorption reading process is used to determine the state of each volumetric binary element. Preliminary results are reported. Part III. The nature of the chromophore binding site of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin is analyzed by using all-valence electron MNDO and MNDO-PSDCI molecular orbital theory to interpret previously reported linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopic measurements. It is concluded that the unique two-photon properties of the chromophore are due in part to the electrostatic field associated with a Casp{2+} ion near the

  14. Review of ultrasound image guidance in external beam radiotherapy part II: intra-fraction motion management and novel applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Tuathan; Bamber, Jeffrey; Fontanarosa, Davide; van der Meer, Skadi; Verhaegen, Frank; Harris, Emma

    2016-04-21

    Imaging has become an essential tool in modern radiotherapy (RT), being used to plan dose delivery prior to treatment and verify target position before and during treatment. Ultrasound (US) imaging is cost-effective in providing excellent contrast at high resolution for depicting soft tissue targets apart from those shielded by the lungs or cranium. As a result, it is increasingly used in RT setup verification for the measurement of inter-fraction motion, the subject of Part I of this review (Fontanarosa et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 R77-114). The combination of rapid imaging and zero ionising radiation dose makes US highly suitable for estimating intra-fraction motion. The current paper (Part II of the review) covers this topic. The basic technology for US motion estimation, and its current clinical application to the prostate, is described here, along with recent developments in robust motion-estimation algorithms, and three dimensional (3D) imaging. Together, these are likely to drive an increase in the number of future clinical studies and the range of cancer sites in which US motion management is applied. Also reviewed are selections of existing and proposed novel applications of US imaging to RT. These are driven by exciting developments in structural, functional and molecular US imaging and analytical techniques such as backscatter tissue analysis, elastography, photoacoustography, contrast-specific imaging, dynamic contrast analysis, microvascular and super-resolution imaging, and targeted microbubbles. Such techniques show promise for predicting and measuring the outcome of RT, quantifying normal tissue toxicity, improving tumour definition and defining a biological target volume that describes radiation sensitive regions of the tumour. US offers easy, low cost and efficient integration of these techniques into the RT workflow. US contrast technology also has potential to be used actively to assist RT by manipulating the tumour cell environment and by

  15. Review of ultrasound image guidance in external beam radiotherapy part II: intra-fraction motion management and novel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Tuathan; Bamber, Jeffrey; Fontanarosa, Davide; van der Meer, Skadi; Verhaegen, Frank; Harris, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Imaging has become an essential tool in modern radiotherapy (RT), being used to plan dose delivery prior to treatment and verify target position before and during treatment. Ultrasound (US) imaging is cost-effective in providing excellent contrast at high resolution for depicting soft tissue targets apart from those shielded by the lungs or cranium. As a result, it is increasingly used in RT setup verification for the measurement of inter-fraction motion, the subject of Part I of this review (Fontanarosa et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 R77-114). The combination of rapid imaging and zero ionising radiation dose makes US highly suitable for estimating intra-fraction motion. The current paper (Part II of the review) covers this topic. The basic technology for US motion estimation, and its current clinical application to the prostate, is described here, along with recent developments in robust motion-estimation algorithms, and three dimensional (3D) imaging. Together, these are likely to drive an increase in the number of future clinical studies and the range of cancer sites in which US motion management is applied. Also reviewed are selections of existing and proposed novel applications of US imaging to RT. These are driven by exciting developments in structural, functional and molecular US imaging and analytical techniques such as backscatter tissue analysis, elastography, photoacoustography, contrast-specific imaging, dynamic contrast analysis, microvascular and super-resolution imaging, and targeted microbubbles. Such techniques show promise for predicting and measuring the outcome of RT, quantifying normal tissue toxicity, improving tumour definition and defining a biological target volume that describes radiation sensitive regions of the tumour. US offers easy, low cost and efficient integration of these techniques into the RT workflow. US contrast technology also has potential to be used actively to assist RT by manipulating the tumour cell environment and by

  16. Unraveling uranium induced oxidative stress related responses in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Part II: responses in the leaves and general conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular redox balance seems an important modulator under heavy metal stress. While for other heavy metals these processes are well studied, oxidative stress related responses are also known to be triggered under uranium stress but information remains limited. This study aimed to further unravel the mechanisms by which plants respond to uranium stress. Seventeen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown on a modified Hoagland solution under controlled conditions, were exposed to 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μM uranium for 1, 3 and 7 days. While in Part I of this study oxidative stress related responses in the roots were discussed, this second Part II discusses oxidative stress related responses in the leaves and general conclusions drawn from the results of the roots and the leaves will be presented. As several responses were already visible following 1 day exposure, when uranium concentrations in the leaves were negligible, a root-to-shoot signaling system was suggested in which plastids could be important sensing sites. While lipid peroxidation, based on the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive compounds, was observed after exposure to 100 μM uranium, affecting membrane structure and function, a transient concentration dependent response pattern was visible for lipoxygenase initiated lipid peroxidation. This transient character of uranium stress responses in leaves was emphasized by results of lipoxygenase (LOX2) and antioxidative enzyme transcript levels, enzyme capacities and glutathione concentrations both in time as with concentration. The ascorbate redox balance seemed an important modulator of uranium stress responses in the leaves as in addition to the previous transient responses, the total ascorbate concentration and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate redox balance increased in a concentration and time dependent manner. This could represent either a slow transient response or a stable increase with regard to plant acclimation to uranium stress. - Highlights

  17. Preconditioning is hormesis part II: How the conditioning dose mediates protection: Dose optimization within temporal and mechanistic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2016-08-01

    In Part I, hormetic doses of a variety of agents stimulated adaptive responses that conditioned and protected cells against the subsequent toxicity resulting from a second, higher dose (called a challenging dose) of the same or different agents. Herein (Part II), the optimal conditioning (hormetic) doses of many agents are documented, cellular mechanisms and temporal profiles are examined from which the conditioning (hormetic) responses are elicited, and the optimal conditioning doses are compared to the levels at which optimal protection occurs in response to the toxic challenge dose. Entry criteria for study evaluation required a conditioning mechanism-induced endpoint response, an hormetic/biphasic dose response for the protective response following the challenging dose, and a mechanistic assessment of how the conditioning dose afforded protection against a toxic challenging dose. The conditioning dose that demonstrated the largest increase in a mechanism-related conditioning (hormetic) response (i.e., prior to administration of the challenging dose) was the same dose that was optimally protective following the challenging dose. Specific receptor antagonists and/or inhibitors of cell signaling pathways which blocked the induction of conditioning (hormetic) effects during the conditioning period abolished the protective effects following the application of a challenge dose, thus identifying a specific and essential component of the hormetic mechanism. Conditioning responses often had sufficient doses to assess the nature of the dose response. In each of the cases these mechanism-based endpoints displayed an hormetic dose response. The present analysis reveals that hormetic biphasic dose responses were associated with both the conditioning process and the protective effects elicited following the challenging dose. Furthermore, based on optimal dosage, temporal relationships and the known mediating actions of receptor-based and/or cell signaling-based mechanisms

  18. High conversion Th–U233 fuel for current generation of PWRs: Part II – 3D full core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Three-dimensional full core analysis of high conversion Th–U233 PWR was performed. • Thermal–hydraulic safety margins were evaluated. • Feasibility of achieving conversion ratio close to unity was demonstrated. • The major tradeoffs are lower power output and shorter fuel cycle. - Abstract: This study explores a possibility of designing a high conversion (HC) Th–U233 core for current generation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Increasing the conversion ratio in existing PWRs can potentially improve the utilization of natural resources, through the exploitation of vast thorium reserves and reduction in natural uranium demand. HC can be achieved through the use of heterogeneous seed-blanket (SB) Th–U233 fuel assembly design, where the supercritical seed works as a neutron supplier, while the subcritical blanket acts as U233 breeder. One of the main challenges associated with the heterogeneous SB fuel assembly designs is significant power imbalance between the seed and blanket regions caused by the high concentration of fissile material in the seed region and consequently requiring a substantial reduction in the core average power density. The main objectives of the current work are: (1) to design a high conversion SB Th–U233 fuel assembly which is directly retrofittable into existing PWRs without introducing significant modifications into the core and plant design; (2) to estimate the reasonably achievable core power density level at which reactor safety is not compromised by performing 3D coupled neutronic and thermal–hydraulic (T–H) analysis of a typical PWR core fully loaded with HC Th–U233 SB fuel. Part II of the two-part paper reports on the steady-state whole core analysis of 100% Th–U233 fueled PWR. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility in principle of achieving conversion ratio close to unity for a Th–U233 PWR core operating at power density of 60 W/cc, in three-batch annual fuel cycle and without

  19. Unraveling uranium induced oxidative stress related responses in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Part II: responses in the leaves and general conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie, E-mail: nvanhoud@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Cuypers, Ann [Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Horemans, Nele [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Remans, Tony; Opdenakker, Kelly; Smeets, Karen [Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Bello, Daniel Martinez [Hasselt University, Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Havaux, Michel [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA)/Cadarache, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, Departement d' Ecophysiologie Vegetale et de Microbiologie, Laboratoire d' Ecophysiologie de la Photosynthese, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vangronsveld, Jaco [Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Vandenhove, Hildegarde [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    The cellular redox balance seems an important modulator under heavy metal stress. While for other heavy metals these processes are well studied, oxidative stress related responses are also known to be triggered under uranium stress but information remains limited. This study aimed to further unravel the mechanisms by which plants respond to uranium stress. Seventeen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown on a modified Hoagland solution under controlled conditions, were exposed to 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 {mu}M uranium for 1, 3 and 7 days. While in Part I of this study oxidative stress related responses in the roots were discussed, this second Part II discusses oxidative stress related responses in the leaves and general conclusions drawn from the results of the roots and the leaves will be presented. As several responses were already visible following 1 day exposure, when uranium concentrations in the leaves were negligible, a root-to-shoot signaling system was suggested in which plastids could be important sensing sites. While lipid peroxidation, based on the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive compounds, was observed after exposure to 100 {mu}M uranium, affecting membrane structure and function, a transient concentration dependent response pattern was visible for lipoxygenase initiated lipid peroxidation. This transient character of uranium stress responses in leaves was emphasized by results of lipoxygenase (LOX2) and antioxidative enzyme transcript levels, enzyme capacities and glutathione concentrations both in time as with concentration. The ascorbate redox balance seemed an important modulator of uranium stress responses in the leaves as in addition to the previous transient responses, the total ascorbate concentration and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate redox balance increased in a concentration and time dependent manner. This could represent either a slow transient response or a stable increase with regard to plant acclimation to uranium stress

  20. Characterization of cDNA for human tripeptidyl peptidase II: The N-terminal part of the enzyme is similar to subtilisin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II is a high molecular weight serine exopeptidase, which has been purified from rat liver and human erythrocytes. Four clones, representing 4453 bp, or 90% of the mRNA of the human enzyme, have been isolated from two different cDNA libraries. One clone, designated A2, was obtained after screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with a degenerated oligonucleotide mixture. The B-lymphocyte cDNA library, obtained from human fibroblasts, were rescreened with a 147 bp fragment from the 5' part of the A2 clone, whereby three different overlapping cDNA clones could be isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence, 1196 amino acid residues, corresponding to the longest open rading frame of the assembled nucleotide sequence, was compared to sequences of current databases. This revealed a 56% similarity between the bacterial enzyme subtilisin and the N-terminal part of tripeptidyl peptidase II. The enzyme was found to be represented by two different mRNAs of 4.2 and 5.0 kilobases, respectively, which probably result from the utilziation of two different polyadenylation sites. Futhermore, cDNA corresponding to both the N-terminal and C-terminal part of tripeptidyl peptidase II hybridized with genomic DNA from mouse, horse, calf, and hen, even under fairly high stringency conditions, indicating that tripeptidyl peptidase II is highly conserved

  1. SEBAL-A: A Remote Sensing ET Algorithm that Accounts for Advection with Limited Data. Part II: Test for Transferability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mcebisi Mkhwanazi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Because the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL tends to underestimate ET when there is advection, the model was modified by incorporating an advection component as part of the energy usable for crop evapotranspiration (ET. The modification involved the estimation of advected energy, which required the development of a wind function. In Part I, the modified SEBAL model (SEBAL-A was developed and validated on well-watered alfalfa of a standard height of 40–60 cm. In this Part II, SEBAL-A was tested on different crops and irrigation treatments in order to determine its performance under varying conditions. The crops used for the transferability test were beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and corn (Zea mays L.. The estimated ET using SEBAL-A was compared to actual ET measured using a Bowen Ratio Energy Balance (BREB system. Results indicated that SEBAL-A estimated ET fairly well for beans and wheat, only showing some slight underestimation of a Mean Bias Error (MBE of −0.7 mm·d−1 (−11.3%, a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE of 0.82 mm·d−1 (13.9% and a Nash Sutcliffe Coefficient of Efficiency (NSCE of 0.64. On corn, SEBAL-A resulted in an ET estimation error MBE of −0.7 mm·d−1 (−9.9%, a RMSE of 1.59 mm·d−1 (23.1% and NSCE = 0.24. This result shows an improvement on the original SEBAL model, which for the same data resulted in an ET MBE of −1.4 mm·d−1 (−20.4%, a RMSE of 1.97 mm·d−1 (28.8% and a NSCE of −0.18. When SEBAL-A was tested on only fully irrigated corn, it performed well, resulting in no bias, i.e., MBE of 0.0 mm·d−1; RMSE of 0.78 mm·d−1 (10.7% and NSCE of 0.82. The SEBAL-A model showed less or no improvement on corn that was either water-stressed or at early stages of growth. The errors incurred under these conditions were not due to advection not accounted for but rather were due to the nature of SEBAL and SEBAL-A being single-source energy balance models and

  2. Evaluación en nave cerrada de los riesgos para la salud en tecnosoles procedentes de residuos de minería polimetálica

    OpenAIRE

    González Ciudad, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Las zonas mineras que han quedado abandonadas, muy frecuentemente ocupan grandes extensiones, y en la actualidad, debido al gran crecimiento urbanístico quedan dentro de espacios de uso residencial o muy próximas, con el consiguiente riesgo que eso conlleva para la salud de las personas. La investigación de esta Tesis Doctoral, se centra en el entorno de la Sierra minera de Cartagena- La Unión (Murcia) en la Bahía de Portmán, y forma parte del “Proyecto Piloto para la recuperación de los s...

  3. Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Volume I. Part I. Overview and current program plans; Part II. Information required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Misson Plan is divided into two parts. Part I describes the overall goals, objectives, and strategy for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It explains that, to meet the directives of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the DOE intends to site, design, construct, and start operating a mined geologic repository by January 31, 1998. The Act specifies that the costs of these activities will be borne by the owners and generators of the waste received at the repository. Part I further describes the other components of the waste-management program - monitored retrievable storage, Federal interim storage, and transportation - as well as systems integration activities. Also discussed are institutional plans and activities as well as the program-management system being implemented by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. Part II of the Mission Plan presents the detailed information required by Section 301(a) of the Act - key issues and information needs; plans for obtaining the necessary information; potential financial, institutional, and legal issues; plans for the test and evaluation facility; the principal results obtained to date from site investigations; information on the site-characterization programs; information on the waste package; schedules; costs; and socioeconomic impacts. In accordance with Section 301(a) of the Act, Part II is concerned primarily with the repository program

  4. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part II: cadmium(II/ sulphate/Lewatit TP260

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of cadmium (II, from aqueous sulphate solutions, on Lewatit TP260 resin has been investigated in batch equilibrium experiments. The influence of pH and temperature on metal adsorption capacity have also been examined. The kinetic performance of the resin has been assesed and the results have been correlated by the pore diffusion model. The resin has been used in mini-columns to study its performance under dynamics conditions. The desorption of metal ion is achieved using sulphuric acid (0.25M and 0.5M.

    Se estudia la adsorción de cadmio(II, de disoluciones en medio sulfato, sobre la resina Lewatit TP260. La adsorción del metal se ha investigado en función del pH, la temperatura y el tiempo de contacto con la resina. Los estudios cinéticos permiten correlacionar el proceso de intercambio iónico con el modelo de difusión en poro. Se ha empleado el sistema en mini columnas para evaluar el comportamiento de la resina bajo condiciones dinámicas. La desorción del metal se lleva a cabo con disoluciones de ácido sulfúrico (0,25M y 0,5M.

  5. Which toolkit for durability evaluation as regards chloride ingress into concrete ? Part II : Development of a performance approach based on durability indicators and monitoring parameters

    OpenAIRE

    BAROGHEL BOUNY, V

    2002-01-01

    This paper series includes two parts : I - Comparison between various methods for assessing the chloride diffusion coefficient of concrete in saturated conditions, and II - Development of a performance approach based on durability indicators and monitoring parameters. The chloride diffusion coefficient appears as a key-parameter in the theorical laws involved in transfer-related durability of concrete, an hence in the prediction of the service lifetime of reinforced structures. Consequently, ...

  6. Stroke Statistics in Korea: Part II Stroke Awareness and Acute Stroke Care, A Report from the Korean Stroke Society and Clinical Research Center For Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Jong S.; Heo, Ji Hoe; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Bae, Hee-Joon; Kang, Dong-Wha; Lee, Jin Soo; Kwon, Sun U.; Oh, Chang Wan; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current Part II of Stroke Statistics in Korea is to summarize nationally representative data on public awareness, pre-hospital delay, thrombolysis, and quality of acute stroke care in a single document. The public's knowledge of stroke definition, risk factors, warning signs, and act on stroke generally remains low. According to studies using open-ended questions, the correct definition of stroke was recognized in less than 50%, hypertension as a stroke risk factor in less than...

  7. Proposed changes in personality and personality disorder assessment and diagnosis for DSM-5 part II: clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Skodol; D.S. Bender; J.M. Oldham; L.A. Clark; L.C. Morey; R. Verheul; R.F. Krueger; L.J. Siever

    2011-01-01

    The four-part assessment of personality psychopathology proposed for DSM-5 focuses attention on identifying personality psychopathology with increasing degrees of specificity, based on a clinician's available time, information, and expertise. In Part I of this two-part article, we described the comp

  8. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral(®)), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed. PMID:25715096

  9. Hydrocarbons and Air Pollution: An Annotated Bibliography. Part I., Categories A to E and Part II., Categories F to M and Indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Raleigh, NC.

    This two-part bibliography represents an effort to collect, condense, and organize the literature on the hydrocarbons in relation to air pollution. The approximately 2,300 documents abstracted are all included in the information storage and retrieval system of the National Air Pollution Control Administration's (NAPCA) Air Pollution Technical…

  10. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Models for Change in Quantitative Variables, Part I Deterministic Models. Part II, Chapter 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Michael T.

    This document is part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759. Addressing the question of effective models to measure change and the change process, the author suggests that linear structural equation systems may be viewed as steady state outcomes of continuous-change models and have rich sociological grounding. Two interpretations of the…

  11. Part I: Virtual Laboratory versus Traditional Laboratory: Which Is More Effective for Teaching Electrochemistry? Part II: The Green Synthesis of Aurones Using a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the teaching laboratory in science education has been debated over the last century. The goals and purposes of the laboratory are still debated and while most science educators consider laboratory a vital part of the education process, they differ widely on the purposes for laboratory and what methods should be used to teach…

  12. Matematicas Para El Primer Ciclo Secundario, Volumen II (Parte 1). Traduccion Preliminar de la Edicion en Ingles Revisada. (Mathematics for Junior High School, Volume II, Part 1. Preliminary Translation of the Revised English Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This is part one of a two-part SMSG mathematics text for junior high school students. Key ideas emphasized are structure of arithmetic from an algebraic viewpoint, the real number system as a progressing development, and metric and non-metric relations in geometry. Chapter topics include number line and coordinates, equations, scientific notation,…

  13. Matematicas Para El Primer Ciclo Secundario, Volumen II (Parte 2). Traduccion Preliminar de la Edicion en Ingles Revisada. (Mathematics for Junior High School, Volume II, Part 2. Preliminary Translation of the Revised English Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This is part two of a two-part SMSG mathematics text for junior high school students. Key ideas emphasized are structure of arithmetic from an algebraic viewpoint, the real number system as a progressing development, and metric and non-metric relations in geometry. Chapter topics include real numbers, similar triangles, variation, polyhedrons,…

  14. The oscillatory behavior of heated channels: an analysis of the density effect. Part I. The mechanism (non linear analysis). Part II. The oscillations thresholds (linearized analysis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the oscillatory behavior of heated channels is presented in terms of delay-times and a density effect model is proposed to explain the behavior. The density effect is the consequence of the physical relationship between enthalpy and density of the fluid. In the first part non-linear equations are derived from the model in a dimensionless form. A description of the mechanism of oscillations is given, based on the analysis of the equations. An inventory of the governing parameters is established. At this point of the study, some facts in agreement with the experiments can be pointed out. In the second part the start of the oscillatory behavior of heated channels is studied in terms of the density effect. The threshold equations are derived, after linearization of the equations obtained in Part I. They can be solved rigorously by numerical methods to yield: -1) a relation between the describing parameters at the onset of oscillations, and -2) the frequency of the oscillations. By comparing the results predicted by the model to the experimental behavior of actual systems, the density effect is very often shown to be the actual cause of oscillatory behaviors. (author)

  15. Estimation of energetic efficiency of heat supply in front of the aircraft at supersonic accelerated flight. Part II. Mathematical model of the trajectory boost part and computational results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latypov, A. F.

    2009-03-01

    The fuel economy was estimated at boost trajectory of aerospace plane during energy supply to the free stream. Initial and final velocities of the flight were given. A model of planning flight above cold air in infinite isobaric thermal wake was used. The comparison of fuel consumption was done at optimal trajectories. The calculations were done using a combined power plant consisting of ramjet and liquid-propellant engine. An exergy model was constructed in the first part of the paper for estimating the ramjet thrust and specific impulse. To estimate the aerodynamic drag of aircraft a quadratic dependence on aerodynamic lift is used. The energy for flow heating is obtained at the sacrifice of an equivalent decrease of exergy of combustion products. The dependencies are obtained for increasing the range coefficient of cruise flight at different Mach numbers. In the second part of the paper, a mathematical model is presented for the boost part of the flight trajectory of the flying vehicle and computational results for reducing the fuel expenses at the boost trajectory at a given value of the energy supplied in front of the aircraft.

  16. Study of High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Plutonium. Part I. Contribution to the Classification of the Arc Spectrum. Part II. Determination of the Magnetic Moment of 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the hyperfine structure and isotope shift enabled the positions of the first five levels of the multiplet 7F0-6 belonging to the fundamental configuration 5f67s2 to be determined. The classification of the arc spectrum begun in this way led to 25 odd levels, the number of classified lines (70) representing about 30 p. 100 of the light emitted by this hollow cathode in the visible. In addition, the isotope shifts of many lines and the data given by the King furnace show that the first levels of the configuration 5f56d7s2 are also low less than 8000 cm-1 above the fundamental level 7F0. The proximity of the configuration f6s2 and f5ds2 shows that the bonding energies of the 5f and 6d electrons are of the same order of magnitude and this fact must be responsible for the multiple valences belonging to plutonium. From the hyperfine structure of spark lines (Pu II) the interval factor a7 for the electron was deduced giving for the calculated nuclear moment of 239Pu a value of +0.21 ±0.06 μN. The position of the hyperfine components show that the nuclear moment is positive, although the theoretical value given by B. R. Mottelson and S. Nillson is negative and equal to -0.1 μN. (author)

  17. Um exame dos modelos de redes de filas abertas aplicados a sistemas de manufatura discretos: parte II A survey on open queueing network models applied to discrete manufacturing systems: part II

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel R. Bitran; Reinaldo Morabito

    1995-01-01

    Este artigo apresenta a segunda (e última) parte do nosso exame dos modelos de redes de filas abertas aplicados a sistemas de manufatura discretos. Nosso enfoque é em modelos de projeto e planejamento de job-shops. Na primeira parte (BITRAN & MORABITO, 1995b) revisamos métodos de decomposição exatos e aproximados para modelos de avaliação de desempenho em sistemas com múltiplas classes de produtos e diversas estações de trabalho. Nesta segunda parte examinamos modelos de otimização de três ca...

  18. A Special Issue (Part-II): Mafic-ultramafic rocks and alkaline-carbonatitic magmatism and associated hydrothermal mineralization - dedication to Lia Nikolaevna Kogarko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogarko, Lia N.; Gwalani, Lalchand G.; Downes, Peter J.; Randive, Kirtikumar R.

    2015-10-01

    This is the second part of a two-volumespecial issue of Open Geoscience (formerly Central European Journal of Geosciences) that aims to be instrumental in providing an update of Mafic-Ultramafic Rocks and Alkaline- Carbonatitic Magmatism and Associated Hydrothermal Mineralization. Together, these two volumes provide a detailed and comprehensive coverage of the subjects that are relevant to the research work of P.Comin-Chiaramonti (Italy) and LiaN. Kogarko (Russia) towhomPart-I and Part- II have been respectively dedicated. To a significant extent, the development of advanced sampling technologies related to alkaline and carbonatitic magmatism by Lia N. Kogarko, has allowed geoscientists to measure and sample the deep crust of the planet not only for the exploration for the mineral deposits, but also to answer basic scientific questions about the origin and evolution of alkaline rocks (kimberlites, lamproites and related rocks associated with carbonatites). The papers presented in this Part-II of the special issue cover the petrology and geochemistry of the rocks collected from the surface and penetrated by drilling. Lia Kogarko proposed a new theory for the evolution of alkaline magmatism in the geological history of the Earth - that the appearance of alkaline magmatism at the Archaean-Proterozoic boundary (~2.5 - 2.7 Ga), and its growing intensity, was related to changes in the geodynamic regime of the Earth and oxidation of the mantle due to mantle-crust interaction.

  19. Full-scale vibration tests of Atucha II N.P.P. Part II: interpretation of test results for steady state harmonic forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the results obtained from forced vibration tests on the nuclear reactor building Atucha-II constructed on Quaternary deposits in Argentina. The reactor building has an inner concrete structure (I/C) encased by doubled spherical containment vessels comprising a steel inner wall (PCV) and a reinforced concrete outer wall (R/B). The building is 60 m high and the diameter of its base-mat is 60 m. The depth of embedment is circa of 20 m. The fundamental frequency of soil-structure interaction is considered to be circa of 3.5 Hz from vibration mode shapes and phase lag curves. The fundamental resonance curves show the features of buildings on Quaternary deposits, that is, a large damping factor caused by the Quaternary deposits softer than rock and deep embedment. The fundamental frequency of the PCV is 5.9 Hz, and 7.3 Hz is the coupling frequency where the R/B and PCV vibrate in the same phase and the I/C vibrates in the opposite phase. (author). 12 figs

  20. Assessment of color quality and energy effciency : new insights for modern lighting. Part I : color quality in general lighting applications. Part II : mesopic photometry and street lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    Cotutela Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya i Institut de Recerca en Energia de Catalunya. La consulta íntegra de la tesi, inclosos els articles no comunicats públicament per drets d'autor, es pot realitzar, prèvia petició, a l'Arxiu de la UPC This dissertation is divided in two parts: The first one deal with two main characteristics of the light sources for general lighting: Color quality and luminous efficacy. The second one deals with technical aspects of the mesopic photometry appli...

  1. Human Trafficking in the United States. Part II. Survey of U.S. Government Web Resources for Publications and Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigabutra-Roberts, Anchalee

    2012-01-01

    This second part of a two-part series is a survey of U.S. government web resources on human trafficking in the United States, particularly of the online publications and data included on agencies' websites. Overall, the goal is to provide an introduction, an overview, and a guide on this topic for library staff to use in their research and…

  2. Konstantin Sigov, «Pravda» nel contesto del vocabolario europeo degli «intraducibili». II parte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Sini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Presentiamo in prima traduzione italiana dal russo la seconda parte dello studio di Konstantin Sigov dedicato al termine pravda, al suo complesso spettro semantico e alla storia del concetto nei suoi usi, effetti e valori molteplici e interdipendenti: filosofici, teologici, giuridici e politici. La prima parte del saggio è stata pubblicata nello scorso numero di Enthymema (7, 2012: 15-25

  3. Sleep duration and sleep disturbances partly explain the association between depressive symptoms and cardiovascular mortality: the Whitehall II cohort study.

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo Da Silva, Marine; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Shipley, Martin; Vahtera, Jussi; Brunner, Eric; Ferrie, Jane; Kivimäki, Mika; Nabi, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    International audience Depressive symptoms are associated with an increased risk of death, but most of this association remains unexplained. Our aim was to explore the contribution of sleep duration and disturbances to the association between depressive symptoms, all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality. A total of 5813 (4220 men and 1593 women) aged 50-74 years at baseline, participants of the British Whitehall II prospective cohort study, were included. Depressive symptoms, sleep d...

  4. Un modello di sviluppo di sistemi informativi : Fase I, parte II: La relazione causale e il calcolo degli eventi

    OpenAIRE

    Meghini, Carlo; Venerosi, Paola

    2003-01-01

    La nota intende indagare sull'applicabilit` del formalismo del calcolo degli eventi al modello di sistema informativo ipotizzato in una precedente nota [1]. La procedura adottata e diretta (i) ad acquisire la conoscenza delle capacita espressive del formalismo e (ii) verificare la loro rispondenza alle esigenze poste dalla tipologia dei sistemi informativi precedentemente indicata. La verifica viene condotta per esemplificazione. Il focus della nota punta inoltre a sondare, in linea teorica, ...

  5. Mathematical Model of a pH-gradient Creation at Isoelectrofocusing. Part II. Numerical Solution of the Stationary Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Sakharova, L V; Zhukov, M Yu

    2013-01-01

    The mathematical model describing the natural textrm{pH}-gradient arising under the action of an electric field in an aqueous solution of ampholytes (amino acids) is constructed and investigated. This paper is the second part of the series papers \\cite{Part1,Part3,Part4} that are devoted to pH-gradient creation problem. We present the numerical solution of the stationary problem. The equations system has a small parameter at higher derivatives and the turning points, so called stiff problem. To solve this problem numerically we use the shooting method: transformation of the boundary value problem to the Cauchy problem. At large voltage or electric current density we compare the numerical solution with weak solution presented in Part 1.

  6. Malpositioned implants in the anterior maxilla: a novel restorative approach to reestablish peri-implant tissue health and acceptable esthetics. Part II: Case report and discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moráguez, Osvaldo D; Vailati, Francesca; Belser, Urs C

    2015-01-01

    This two-part case presentation describes the prosthetic challenge of managing complications in a 50-year-old female patient after inadequate esthetic risk assessment, treatment planning, and implant placement in the anterior maxilla. In Part I, the clinical situation was described, and different restorative solutions were proposed to correct the extreme facial inclination of the implants, excluding major surgical procedures, namely implant removal. In Part II, different prosthetic options are discussed, and the final treatment is revealed. A noninvasive treatment protocol was applied to transform a severely compromised postsurgical situation into an esthetically acceptable result. An unconventional prosthesis design was implemented, including the use of ceramic veneers bonded to the CAD/CAM-generated screw-retained zirconia- based fixed dental prosthesis (FDP), to correct major axis-related problems and spatial discrepancies. PMID:26794049

  7. Environmental monitoring recovery of solid wastes in Muribeca (Brasil). 2 part; Monitoreo ambiental de la recuperacion del vertedero de residuos solidos de Muribeca, Brasil-II parte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juca, J. F. T.; Monteiro, V. E. D.; Melo, M. C.

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive program of studying and monitoring the in situ performance of Muribeca Landfill, Physical, chemical and biological properties of the solid waste were analyzing in order to understand the mechanics of the landfill, the waste biodegradation process and the contamination level of air, liquids and subsoil. the parameters monitored in this investigation involve from leachate and gases generation to salts variations and the evolution of bacteria growth. Climate variation, among several others environment parameters, that affects solid waste degradation in sanitary landfills, were also controlled. Temperature, settlement, physical-chemical parameters, pathogenic microorganisms determination (quantitative and qualitative) and phyto toxicity are also part of this study. Secondary determinations as: moisture content, volatile solids, pH, grains density, and metals evaluation in different depths were also investigated. (Author) 23 refs.

  8. Developing a voltage-stability-constrained security assessment system part II : Structure and function design and technology used

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, YX; Wu, FF; Shi, LB; Zhou, HF; Tam, PTC; Chang, NC; Su, JF; Du, ZB

    2005-01-01

    This is the second part in a two-part paper on the development of a voltage stability constrained security assessment system (VSC-SAS). In this part, overall VSC-SAS structure and function design and technology used will be presented. The system is expected to be used in both on-line and off-line modes. In on-line mode, on-line SCADA/EMS data will be used for VSC-SAS use; while in off-line mode (usually day-ahead calculation), historical data can be used for VSC-SAS. Both results (i.e. system...

  9. Compósitos de borracha natural ou policloropreno e celulose II: influência do tamanho de partícula Natural rubber or chloroprene rubber and cellulose II composites: influence of particle size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno de A. Napolitano

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi o desenvolvimento de compósitos claros com propriedades de interesse tecnológico utilizando elastômeros com diferentes polaridades. Para que este objetivo fosse atingido, celulose II em pó foi usada como carga, em borracha natural (NR ou policloropreno (CR. A celulose II foi obtida por coagulação da solução de xantato de celulose em meio ácido, sob agitação constante e à temperatura ambiente, constituindo uma nova forma de obtenção deste tipo de carga. Compósitos com 10 phr de celulose II com NR e CR, respectivamente, foram desenvolvidos tendo como variável o tamanho de partícula da carga. As propriedades mecânicas e os aspectos microscópicos dos diferentes compósitos foram avaliados e comparados com aqueles das formulações sem carga. Os resultados permitiram identificar o compósito como o de melhor resultado, influenciado pela polaridade da matriz elastomérica e pelo tamanho de partícula da carga, conseqüência das condições de moagem usadas.The aim of this work was to develop light composites with properties of technological interest by using elastomers of different polarities. This was achieved by employing cellulose II, in the powder form, as filler in natural rubber (NR and chloroprene (CR. Cellulose II was obtained by coagulation of cellulose xanthate solution, in acid medium, under stirring and at room temperature, which represents, to our knowledge, a new way of obtaining this type of filler. Composites with 10phr of cellulose II and NR or CR were prepared having the particle size as variable. The mechanical properties and the microscopic aspect of the different composites were evaluated and compared with compounds without filler. The results indicated best results for the CR composite, influenced by the polarity of the elastomeric matrix and by the particle size, as a consequence of the milling conditions of the filler used.

  10. Um exame dos modelos de redes de filas abertas aplicados a sistemas de manufatura discretos: parte II A survey on open queueing network models applied to discrete manufacturing systems: part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R. Bitran

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta a segunda (e última parte do nosso exame dos modelos de redes de filas abertas aplicados a sistemas de manufatura discretos. Nosso enfoque é em modelos de projeto e planejamento de job-shops. Na primeira parte (BITRAN & MORABITO, 1995b revisamos métodos de decomposição exatos e aproximados para modelos de avaliação de desempenho em sistemas com múltiplas classes de produtos e diversas estações de trabalho. Nesta segunda parte examinamos modelos de otimização de três categorias de problemas: a primeira minimiza o investimento de capital de maneira a atingir uma medida de desempenho (estoque em processo ou leadtime, a segunda busca otimizar a medida de desempenho sujeito às restrições de recursos, e a terceira explora resultados de pesquisas recentes com a redução de complexidade mediante reprojeto da planta e da partição de produtos.This paper presents the second (and last part of our survey on open queueing network models applied to discrete manufacturing systems. We focus on design and planning for job-shops. In the first part (Bitran and Morabito, 1995b we reviewed exact and approximate decomposition methods for performance evaluation models for single and multiple product class systems. The second part reviews optimization models of three categories of problems: the first minimizes capital investment subject to attaining a performance measure (WIP or leadtime, the second seeks to optimize the performance measure subject to resource constraints, and the third explores recent research developments in complexity reduction through shop redesign and products partitioning.

  11. IMS Learning Design desde dentro. Una especificación para crear escenarios de aprendizaje online (parte II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel; Berbegal, Nidia; Griffiths, David; Tattersall, Colin; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Presentamos la segunda entrega de esta tesis desarrollada en el marco del proyecto europeo denominado Understanding New Frameworks of Learning Design (UNFOLD, 2004). Referencia para la primera parte: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/473

  12. A Capillary Tube-Refrigerant Charge Design Methodology for Household Refrigerators-Part II: Equivalent Diameter and Test Procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Boeng, Joel; Melo, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    In the first part of this work an experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to map the energy consumption of a household refrigerator subjected to several combinations of refrigerant charge and expansion restriction. In the second part, the expansion restriction imposed by the pair metering valve-capillary tube was converted into an equivalent tube diameter applying two different procedures: dry nitrogen flow and mathematical modeling. An empirical correlation to estimate the energy...

  13. THE ROCK PROCESSING SECTOR: PART I: CUTTING TECHNOLOGY TOOLS, A NEW DIAMOND SEGMENT BAND SAW PART II: STUDY OF CUTTING FORCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABRAHAM SEGADE ROBLEDA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta el estado del arte de los procedimientos de corte empleados en la transformación de roca ornamental, principalmente, disco con segmentos de diamante, hilo diamantado y los telares. En todos ellos, una reducción en el espesor de corte, repercute de forma directa en la rentabilidad. Se presenta una herramienta novedosa, con un espesor de corte la mitad del mejor conseguido en herramientas convencionales: una sierra de cinta sobre la que se sueldan segmentos de diamante. Se construyen los primeros prototipos, se realizan pruebas de corte y se estudian las características del corte realizado. En una segunda parte se revisan los estudios que existen en la actualidad sobre la medición de fuerzas de corte en granito con herramientas convencionales, y se monitoriza una máquina prototipo de sierra de cinta. Se estudian las fuerzas de corte para este nuevo proceso de corte, se mide la fuerza tangencial, y la fuerza de avance, bajo diferentes condiciones de trabajo.

  14. The natural history of Caroline Atoll, Southern Line Islands. Part II. Seabirds, other terrestrial animals, and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, C.B.; Kepler, A.K.; Ellis, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    conclusion: Lushly wooded Caroline Atoll, with the majority of its 39 islets (399 ha of land) either in near-pristine condition or having recovered remarkably from past disturbance, is one of the least spoiled atolls in the Pacific. Uninhabited, it harbors plant ecosystems and breeding seabirds (Pt. II) of national and international importance. Its marine and terrestrial ecosystems are prime outdoor ecological laboratories for research on geological processes including ground water, sea level changes, the dynamics of motu formation, fish poisoning, and numerous facets of ecology including plant succession and Pisonia growth rates. Caroline boasts prime coral reefs thickly studded with Tridacna clams, substantial numbers of coconut crabs, breeding sites for green turtles, wintering grounds for shorebirds including the rare Bristle-thighed Curlew, ancient Tuamotuan marae, and a crystalline, unpolluted lagoon. The variety, abundance, and quality of its flora and fauna qualify it for status as an officially recognized international preserve (Pt. II, Sect. G). Efforts toward its conservation have thus far been unsuccessful: in 1992 it was leased to a private French businessman who is currently fishing the reefs for commercial profit, as well as disturbing seabird, turtle and coconut crab populations.

  15. A model for emergency department end-of-life communications after acute devastating events--part II: moving from resuscitative to end-of-life or palliative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limehouse, Walter E; Feeser, V Ramana; Bookman, Kelly J; Derse, Arthur

    2012-11-01

    The model for emergency department (ED) end-of-life communications after acute devastating events addresses decision-making capacity, surrogates, and advance directives, including legal definitions and application of these steps. Part II concerns communications moving from resuscitative to palliative and end-of-life treatments. After completing the steps involved in determining decision-making, emergency physicians (EPs) should consider starting palliative measures versus continuing resuscitative treatment. As communications related to these end-of-life decisions increasingly fall within the scope of emergency medicine (EM) practice, we need to become educated about and comfortable with them. PMID:23167864

  16. Nonceramic insulators for the transmission power lines. Part II: Application that it requires of a careful selection; Aisladores no ceramicos para las areas de transmision. Parte II: Aplicacion que requiere de una seleccion cuidadosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro Chavez, Jose Luis [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    In this second part is mentioned the possible mechanisms of degradation that can appear in nonceramic insulators in order to identify them during the inspections that are made in the field throughout their useful life. Some techniques of evaluation of accelerated aging, as well as important aspects that must be considered for the selection of the insulation in the case of a particular application, are presented. [Spanish] En esta segunda parte se mencionan los posibles mecanismos de degradacion que pueden presentarse en los aisladores no ceramicos a fin de identificarlos durante las inspecciones que se realicen en campo a lo largo de su vida util. Se exponen algunas tecnicas de evaluacion de envejecimiento acelerado, asi como aspectos importantes que deben considerarse para la seleccion del aislamiento en el caso de una aplicacion particular.

  17. Una visión histórica de las drogas de abuso desde la perspectiva criminológica (Parte II An historical vision of drugs of abuse from the criminological perspective (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. López-Muñoz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available En la primera parte de este trabajo se analizó la historia de las principales drogas de abuso desde la vertiente criminológica y el desarrollo de la normativa legal para combatir estos problemas. En esta segunda parte, se analiza el vínculo entre el uso/abuso de drogas y la delictogénesis, que puede ser clasificado según una triple tipología: delincuencia inducida o delitos cometidos bajo el efecto de las drogas (delitos contra las personas y contra la seguridad del tráfico; delincuencia funcional/instrumental o delitos relacionados con las conductas encaminadas a financiar la propia dependencia (delitos contra la propiedad, como robos, asaltos; delincuencia relacional o delitos englobados en el concepto legal de narcotráfico (cultivo, elaboración y distribución de drogas de abuso.In the first part of this paper we analyzed the history of the main drugs of abuse from the criminological perspective and the development of legal norms to fight against these problems. In this second part, we analyze the link between drug use/abuse and the crime genesis, which can be classified according to a triple typology: induced crime, or crimes committed under the influence of drugs (crimes against the persons and traffic security; functional/instrumental crime, or crimes related to the behavior directed to pay for their dependency (crimes against property, such as robberies and assaults; relational crime, or crimes included in the legal concept of drug trafficking (cultivation, manufacture and distribution of drugs of abuse.

  18. Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. Chapter II, subchapter D. Energy conservation; Part 440. Weatherization assistance for low-income persons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-29

    Proposals to amend Appendix A of Part 440 of Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons are described. The proposals establish new specifications for the materials purchased for utilization in the weatherization of dwellings which qualify for assistance under Part 440. These proposed regulations prescribe the minimum requirements which must be met or exceeded by each type of material and the Federal standards to which they must conform. In addition, these regulations include installation requirements for each class of material installed at the request of the enduser. (MCW)

  19. Projections of Northern Great Plains coal mining and energy conversion development, 1975 to 2000 A. D. Final report, Parts I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, T.M.; Duffield, J.W.; McBride, J.R.; Stroup, R.L.; Wheeling, T.D.; Tomlinson, W.D.; Thurman, W.J.; Silverman, A.J.

    1976-03-01

    This study projects the probable levels of coal development in Montana and adjacent Northern Great Plains (NGP) states in the next 5, 10, and 25 years under a variety of electric growth rate assumptions. The final report is in four parts. Part I provides an outline of the methodology and a summary of the projection. Part II is a detailed comparison of the results with other projections of NGP coal development, principally the Northern Great Plains Resources Program's National and Regional Energy Considerations Work Group Report and the Federal Energy Administration's Project Independence Report. Part III is a compilation of the fourteen working papers on which the final projections are based. Part IV is a listing of computer programs developed for the project and the printout for the price-sensitive projection model. This is the first step in developing a detailed price-sensitive study of demand for Northern Great Plains coal. The following are explored: the interfuel substitution problem, alternative coal-based technologies that may become commercial on a modest to large scale in the next twenty-five years (MHD, coal liquefaction, in-situ gasification, fluidized bed combustion, and others) is not explored; neither are the restraints that a range of environmental, land use, and taxation laws and regulations may place on coal resource and conversion development.

  20. A stochastic model for the synthesis and degradation of natural organic matter. Part III: Modeling Cu(II) complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An agent-based biogeochemical model has been developed which begins with biochemical precursor molecules and simulates the transformation and degradation of natural organic matter (NOM). This manuscript presents an empirical quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) which uses the numbers of ligand groups, charge density and heteroatom density of a molecule to estimate Cu-binding affinity (KCu') at pH 7.0 and ionic strength 0.10 for the molecules in this model. Calibration of this QSAR on a set of 41 model compounds gives a root mean square error of 0.88 log units and r2 0.93. Two simulated NOM assemblages, one beginning with small molecules (tannins, terpenoids, flavonoids) and one with biopolymers (protein, lignin), give markedly different distributions of logKCu'. However, calculations based on these logKCu' distributions agree qualitatively with published experimental Cu(II) titration data from river and lake NOM samples

  1. Road Tripping Down the Digital Preservation Highway, Part II: Road Signs, Billboards, and Rest Stops along the Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colati, Jessica Branco; Colati, Gregory C.

    2011-01-01

    In this second of a two-part article on road tripping down the Digital Preservation Highway, the authors follow the continuing adventures of Peter Palmer, erstwhile librarian at Bellaluna University and manager of the library's and University's digital content, as he journeys down the Digital Preservation Highway. In the authors' last visit with…

  2. Exploring Innovation Processes from a Complexity Perspective. Part II. Experiences from the Subsea Increased Oil Recovery Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, Tone Merethe Berg; Johannessen, Stig

    2007-01-01

    In this second part of the papers, exploring innovation processes from a complexity perspective, we present an empirical example to strengthen further the relevance of the approach. The example draws on a longitudinal research initiative conducted in cooperation with the Norwegian petroleum company Statoil ASA. We conducted our research into the…

  3. Modeling phase equilibria for acid gas mixtures using the CPA equation of state. Part II: Binary mixtures with CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsivintzelis, Ioannis; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    In Part I of this series of articles, the study of H2S mixtures has been presented with CPA. In this study the phase behavior of CO2 containing mixtures is modeled. Binary mixtures with water, alcohols, glycols and hydrocarbons are investigated. Both phase equilibria (vapor–liquid and liquid...

  4. A Three-Attribute Transfer Skills Framework--Part II: Applying and Assessing the Model in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Irit; Dori, Yehudit Judy

    2015-01-01

    In an era in which information is rapidly growing and changing, it is very important to teach with the goal of students' engagement in life-long learning in mind. This can partially be achieved by developing transferable thinking skills. In our previous paper--Part I, we conducted a review of the transfer literature and suggested a…

  5. Expanding the Conversation about SEM: Advancing SEM Efforts to Improve Student Learning and Persistence--Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yale, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The first article in this two-part series focused on the need for enrollment management conceptual and organizational models to focus more intentionally and purposefully on efforts related to improving student learning, success, and persistence. Time and again, SEM is viewed from a conventional lens comprising marketing, recruitment and …

  6. Anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine: Part II: the “hypermobile” cervical spine †

    OpenAIRE

    McGregor, Marion; Mior, Silvano A.

    1989-01-01

    This is the second of a three part series describing the clinical issues surrounding the radiographic assessment of the working definition of hypermobility. Described are the two major forms of hypermobility, namely generalized and segmental. Each form is reviewed and supported with available documentation. A case report is presented which highlights the clinical aspects of segmented hypermobility.

  7. Botanical remedies of the former Dutch East Indies (Indonesia). Part II: Dicotyledones up to and including leguminosae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, H H

    1983-07-01

    The botanical remedies reported in Heyne's De Nuttige Planten van Nederlandsch-Indië (Volumes I-IV, 1913-1922) have been screened out of economic botanical context, translated into English and summarized as a table of names, therapeutic indications, plant parts, and available details of preparation and use. PMID:6632938

  8. Cross-Cultural Perspectives on the Classification of Children with Disabilities: Part II. Implementing Classification Systems in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Margaret J.; Dyson, Alan; Nagle, Katherine; Thurlow, Martha; Rouse, Martyn; Hardman, Michael; Norwich, Brahm; Burke, Phillip J.; Perlin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article is the second in a 2-part synthesis of an international comparative seminar on the classification of children with disabilities. In this article, the authors discuss classification frameworks used in identifying children for the purpose of providing special education and related services. The authors summarize 7 papers that addressed…

  9. Diagnosing GCM errors over West Africa using relaxation experiments. Part II: intraseasonal variability and African easterly waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, Benjamin [CNRM-GAME, Meteo-France, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Centre de Recherches de Climatologie, CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, Dijon (France); Douville, Herve [CNRM-GAME, Meteo-France, CNRS, Toulouse (France)

    2011-10-15

    A near-global grid-point nudging of the Arpege-Climat atmospheric General Circulation Model towards ECMWF reanalyses is used to diagnose the regional versus remote origin of the summer model biases and variability over West Africa. First part of this study revealed a limited impact on the monsoon climatology compared to a control experiment without nudging, but a significant improvement of interannual variability, although the amplitude of the seasonal anomalies remained underestimated. Focus is given here on intraseasonal variability of monsoon rainfall and dynamics. The reproducible part of these signals is investigated through 30-member ensemble experiments computed for the 1994 rainy season, a year abnormally wet over the Sahel but representative of the model systematic biases. In the control experiment, Arpege-Climat simulates too few rainy days that are associated with too low rainfall amounts over the central and western Sahel, in line with the seasonal dry biases. Nudging the model outside Africa tends to slightly increase the number of rainy days over the Sahel, but has little effect on associated rainfall amounts. However, results do indicate that a significant part of the monsoon intraseasonal variability simulated by Arpege-Climat is controlled by lateral boundary conditions. Parts of the wet/dry spells over the Sahel occur in phase in the 30 members of the nudging experiment, and are therefore embedded in larger-scale variability patterns. Inter-member spread is however not constant across the selected summer season. It is partly controlled by African Easterly Waves, which show dissimilar amplitude from one member to another, but a coherent phasing in all members. A lowpass filtering of the nudging fields suggests that low frequency variations in the lateral boundary conditions can lead to eastward extensions of the African Easterly Jet, creating a favorable environment for easterly waves, while high frequency perturbations seem to control their

  10. The influence of Injection Pockets on the Performance of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings: Part II - Comparison Between Theory and Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrichson, Niels; Fuerst, Axel; Santos, Ilmar

    2006-01-01

    This is Part II of a two-part series of papers describing the effects of high pressure injection pockets on the operating conditions of tilting-pad thrust bearings. Measurements of the distribution of pressure and oil film thickness are presented for tilting-pad thrust bearing pads of approximately...... 100 cm2 surface area. Two pads are measured in a laboratory test-rig at loads of approximately 0.5, 1.5 and 4.0 MPa and velocities of up to 33 m/s. One pad has a plain surface. The other pad has a conical injection pocket at the pivot point and a leading edge taper. The measurements are compared to...... theoretical values obtained using a three dimensional thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic (TEHD) numerical model. At low and intermediate loads the theoretical pressure distribution corresponds well to the measured values for both pads although the influence of the pocket is slightly underestimated. At high loads...

  11. American society of clinical oncology update on the role of bisphosphonates and bone health issues in women with breast cancer Part II. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vysotskaya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available American society of clinical oncology update on the roleof bisphosphonates and bone health issues in women with breast cancer Part II. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer

  12. Large-scale stochastic hereditary systems under Markovian structural perturbations. Part II. Qualitative analysis of isolated subsystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Ladde

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In this part of the work, the convergence and stability analysis of isolated subsystems of stochastic hereditary systems under random structural perturbations is investigated. The variational comparison theorems developed in Part I are used to achieve this goal. Under algebraic conditions on the rate coefficients, time-delay, and an intensity matrix associated with the Markov chain, convergence and stability results are obtained. Furthermore, it is shown that these properties are affected by hereditary and random structural perturbations effects. It is further shown that the mathematical conditions are algebraically simple and are robust to the parametric changes. This investigation provides a basis for drawing the conclusions about the overall large-scale system.

  13. An efficient finite volume model for shallow geothermal systems—Part II: Verification, validation and grid convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, M.; Al-Khoury, R.

    2012-12-01

    This part of the series of two papers presents the computational capability of the finite volume model, described in Part I, to simulate three-dimensional heat transfer processes in multiple borehole heat exchangers embedded in a multi-layer soil mass. Geothermal problems which require very fine grids, of the order of millions of finite volumes, can be simulated using coarse grids, of the order of few to tens of thousands elements. Accordingly, significant reduction of CPU time is gained, rendering the model suitable for utilization in engineering practice. A verification example comparing the computational results with an analytical solution of a benchmark case is given. A validation example comparing computed results with measured results is presented. Furthermore, numerical examples are presented describing the possible utilization of the model for research works and design.

  14. Large-scale stochastic hereditary systems under Markovian structural perturbations. Part II. Qualitative analysis of isolated subsystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this part of the work, the convergence and stability analysis of isolated subsystems of stochastic hereditary systems under random structural perturbations is investigated. The variational comparison theorems developed in Part I are used to achieve this goal. Under algebraic conditions on the rate coefficients, time-delay, and an intensity matrix associated with the Markov chain, convergence and stability results are obtained. Furthermore, it is shown that these properties are affected by hereditary and random structural perturbations effects. It is further shown that the mathematical conditions are algebraically simple and are robust to the parametric changes. This investigation provides a basis for drawing the conclusions about the overall large-scale system.

  15. Numerical analysis of the double scaling limit in the bosonic part of the II-B matrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bosonic IIB matrix model, which contains the bosonic part of the IIB matrix model conjectured to be a non-perturbative definition of the type IIB superstring theory, is studied using a numerical method. The large N scaling behavior of the model is shown performing a Monte Carlo simulation. The expectation value of the Wilson loop operator is measured and the string tension is estimated. From the numerical results, the prescription of the double scaling limit is obtained

  16. Reading chest radiographs in the critically ill (Part II): Radiography of lung pathologies common in the ICU patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is part 2 of two series review of reading chest radiographs in the critically ill. Conventional chest radiography remains the cornerstone of day to day management of the critically ill occasionally supplemented by computed tomography or ultrasound for specific indications. In this second review we discuss radiographic findings of cardiopulmonary disorders common in the intensive care patient and suggest guidelines for interpretation based not only on imaging but also on the pathophysiology and clinical grounds. (author)

  17. Nutritional care of the elite child and adolescent athlete: Part II: Special dietary issues and competition nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Hattie

    2009-01-01

    This article (second of two parts) presents a review of literature and resources on special dietary issues and sport performance. Young athletes preparing for competition adopt various dietary plans. Those adopting a vegetarian diet should be screened for possible low energy and specific micronutrient (e.g Fe, Ca, vit B12) intakes which can be avoided with a well-balanced diet and appropriate supplementation. Vegetarianism has also been linked with disordered eating (DE). The prevalence of DE...

  18. A framework for predicting the non-visual effects of daylight – Part II: The simulation model

    OpenAIRE

    Mardaljevic, John; Andersen, Marilyne; Roy, Nicolas; Christoffersen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a climate-based simulation framework devised to investigate the potential for the non-visual effects of daylight in buildings. It is part 2 of a study where the first paper focused on the formulation of the photobiological underpinnings of a threshold-based model configured for lighting simulation from the perspective of the human nonvisual system (e.g. circadian response). This threshold-based model employs a static dose-response curve and instantaneous exposure of dayli...

  19. Studies in the Chemical Constituents of Azadirachta indica Part II: Isolation and Structure of the New Triterpenoid Azadirachtol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, S; Siddiqui, B S; Faizi, S

    1985-12-01

    A new triterpenoid named azadirachtol ( 1) has been isolated from the fruits of AZADIRACHTA INDICA Juss. (neem) of which the structure is reported on the basis of chemical and spectral data. Azadirachtol appears to be the first apo-tirucallol (apo-euphol) derivative possessing an eight carbons side-chain with an oxygenated ring system isolated from neem. Moreover, it is the first instance of the isolation of an 11-hydroxy triterpenoid from any of the various parts of neem. PMID:17345262

  20. Evolution of an alumina-magnesia/self-forming spinel castable. Part II: physico-chemical and mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez-Campos D.; Diaz J. I.; Rodriguez R. M.

    1999-01-01

    This study was carried out in conjunction with the investigation, reported in Part I, on the microstructural characteristics of an alumina-spinel castable with several percentages of MgO content. Bulk density and cold crushing strength of samples were evaluated dried and at three fired states (1000, 1200, 1400 °C). Results indicate little influence of MgO additions on physico-chemical properties of the alumina-magnesia/self-forming spinel castable. Characteristics compared with those reported...