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Sample records for cern lep collider

  1. The DELPHI detector at CERN's LEP collider

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    DELPHI (DEtector with Lepton, Photon and Hadron Identification), is a detector for e+e- physics, with special emphasis on powerful particle identification , three-dimensional information, high granularity and precise vertex determination. It is installed at LEP (Large Electron and Positron collider) at CERN where it has operated since 1989.

  2. LEP the lord of the collider rings at CERN 1980-2000

    CERN Document Server

    Schopper, Herwig Franz

    2009-01-01

    Housed by a 4 m diameter tunnel of 27 km circumference, with huge underground labs and numerous surface facilities, and set up with a precision of 0.1 mm per kilometer, the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) was not only the largest but also one of the most sophisticated scientific research instrument ever created by Man. Located at CERN, near Geneva, LEP was built during the years 1983 - 1989, was operational until 2000, and corroborated the standard model of particle physics through continous high precision measurements. The Author, director-general of CERN during the crucial period of the construction of LEP, recounts vividly the convoluted decision-making and technical implementation processes - the tunnel alone being a highly challenging geo- and civil engineering project - and the subsequent extremely fruitful period of scientific research. Finally he describes the difficult decision to close down LEP, at a time when the discovery of the Higgs boson seemed within reach. LEP was eventually dismantled...

  3. CERN Member States signatures at LEP inauguration

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The signatures of the dignitaries who represented CERN's Member States on the occasion of the Inauguration of LEP on 13 November 1989. The Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was inaugurated in the presence of some 1500 guests, including Heads of State and Ministers from all of CERN's 14 Member States.

  4. Le CERN fête le LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    Members of government from around the world gathered at CERN on 9 October to celebrate the achievements of the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP), the Laboratory's flagship particle accelerator. Over the eleven years of its operational lifetime, LEP has not only added greatly to mankind's pool of knowledge about the Universe, but has also changed the way that particle physics research is done, and proved to be a valuable training ground for young professionals in many walks of life.

  5. Collide@CERN Geneva

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Kieffer, Robert; Blas Temino, Diego; Bertolucci, Sergio; Mr. Decelière, Rudy; Mr. Hänni, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to “Collide@CERN Geneva Music”. Come to the public lecture about collisions between music and particle physics by the third winners of Collide@CERN Geneva, Vincent Hänni & Rudy Decelière, and their scientific inspiration partners, Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer. The event marks the beginning of their residency at CERN, and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 16 October 2014 at 19.00. Doors will open at 18.30.

  6. LEP : the Large Electron Positron Collider Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    LEP was CERN's flagship research facility from 1989 until 2000 when it stepped aside to make way for installation of the Laboratory's next major accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider, LHC. With a circumference of 27 kilometres, LEP was the largest circular particle collider in the world. Inside its beam pipe, about 100 metres underground, bunches of electrons and positrons raced around in opposite directions as they were accelerated to almost the speed of light. In its first phase of operation, LEP was designed to collide electrons and positrons at an energy of around 100 GeV. After some seven years of accumulating data at this energy to study the Z particle - electrically neutral carrier of the weak interaction - everything was done to boost the energy of LEP's beams as high as possible.

  7. CERN balances linear collider studies

    CERN Multimedia

    ILC Newsline

    2011-01-01

    The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study, have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In a support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.   The scientist who now holds this position, Steinar Stapnes, is charged with making the linear collider a viable option for CERN’s future, one that could include either CLIC or the ILC. The transition to more involve the ILC must be gradual, he said, and the redefinition of his post is a good start. Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspect...

  8. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  9. Perturbative QCD tests from the LEP, HERA, and TEVATRON colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlmann, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    A review of QCD tests from LEP, HERA and the TEVATRON colliders is presented. This includes jet production, quark/gluon jet separation, quark/gluon propagator spin, {alpha}{sub s} updates, photon production, and rapidity gap experiments.

  10. Collide@CERN: sharing inspiration

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Late last year, Julius von Bismarck was appointed to be CERN's first "artist in residence" after winning the Collide@CERN Digital Arts award. He’ll be spending two months at CERN starting this March but, to get a flavour of what’s in store, he visited the Organization last week for a crash course in its inspiring activities.   Julius von Bismarck, taking a closer look... When we arrive to interview German artist Julius von Bismarck, he’s being given a presentation about antiprotons’ ability to kill cancer cells. The whiteboard in the room contains graphs and equations that might easily send a non-scientist running, yet as Julius puts it, “if I weren’t interested, I’d be asleep”. Given his numerous questions, he must have been fascinated. “This ‘introduction’ week has been exhilarating,” says Julius. “I’ve been able to interact ...

  11. Searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the LEP collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igo-Kemenes, Peter; Read, Alexander L.

    2016-10-01

    The Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider installed at CERN provided unprecedented possibilities for studying the properties of elementary particles during the years 1989-2000. The four detectors associated to the collider, run by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL Collaborations, were based on the latest available technologies. The conjunction of high collision energies, precise instrumentation and data analysis techniques allowed the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles to be tested at the level of quantum corrections. The search for new particles, in particular the long-sought Higgs boson, was one of the primary research subjects. During the twelve years of LEP, data samples of the highest quality and statistical weight were analysed. Concerning the search for the SM Higgs boson, the domain extending from zero mass to the kinematic limit imposed by the collider energy was scrutinised. The spirit of scientific competition gradually gave way to a collaborative effort, allowing the final results of LEP to be optimised. The methodology of Higgs boson searches is summarised in this paper together with the statistical methods adopted to combine the data of the four collaborations.

  12. The CERN LEP-SPS Librarian system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corniaux, C.; Morpurgo, G. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). SPS Div.)

    1990-08-01

    The complexity of a software working environment, such as the control system for the SPS and LEP accelerators, requires a considerable management effort. The software needed to run the machines is continuously evolving, as new releases of application and system programs are introduced rather frequency. Ideally the management effort must coordinate all the different software developers and their users (the machine operating team). A software tool, the Librarian, has been written to help them in performing this task. Its ultimate goal is to enable the accelerator operators to retain control of all the software running in the control system. All the source files needed to produce a piece of running software (a 'product') are saved together, and can be retrieved either individually or as a whole. Management of the different versions of a product is also implemented, as well as a scheme for protections and access rights depending on the type of user (Librarian manager, application manager or software developer). The data base ORACLE has been used to maintain logical links between files saved under the Librarian. (orig.).

  13. Loans may keep CERN collider on target

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, A

    1996-01-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) is considering taking out bank loans to fund its Large Hadron Collider project. CERN officials are evaluating this option in view of the German government's decision to substantially reduce its annual contributions to the project. They state that the bank loans may be the only way to complete the project by the year 2005, especially if other contributing nations follow Germany's lead.

  14. Search for Higgs bosons at LEP2 and hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Trefzger, T M

    2001-01-01

    The search for the Higgs boson was one of the most relevant issues of the final years of LEP running at high energies. An excess of 3 sigma beyond the background expectation has been found, consistent with the production of the Higgs boson with a mass near 115 GeV/c/sup 2/. At the upgraded Tevatron and at LHC the search for the Higgs boson will continue. At the Tevatron Higgs bosons can be detected with masses up to 180 GeV with an assumed total integrated luminosity of 20 fb/sup -1/. LHC has the potential to discover the Higgs boson in many different decay channels for Higgs masses up to 1 TeV. It will be possible to measure Higgs boson parameters, such as mass, width, and couplings to fermions and bosons. The results from Higgs searches at LEP2 and the possibilities for searches at hadron colliders will be reviewed. (156 refs).

  15. Collide@CERN is looking for mentors

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Collide@CERN Artist-in-Residence Programme is currently seeking CERN scientists interested in engaging in thought-provoking and creative collaborations with visiting artists.     In early 2012, a Digital artist will take up a 2-month residency and a Dance and Performance artist a 3-month residency.  Each artist will be allocated a specially selected science inspiration partner to work with. Both the artists and their mentors will give a public lecture in the Globe of Science and Innovation at the beginning and end of the residencies.  One scientist will be selected for each artist. Mentors and artists will be required to share knowledge by:   ·      Meeting once a week throughout the residency ·      Conducting online communications (such as a blog). If you are interested in becoming a mentor, please send the following information by e-m...

  16. At work on LEP, the world’s most powerful electron–positron collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez,

    1999-01-01

    The LHC will be built inside the same tunnel as an existing accelerator, the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider which came on stream in 1989. LEP will be removed from the tunnel at the end of this year to make way for the LHC. Here technicians make delicate adjustments to one of LEP’s thousands of magnets.

  17. Collide@CERN ProHelvetia Public Lecture

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Heuer, Rolf; Mr. de Diesbach, Simon; Mr. Dubois, Marc; Ms. Perrenoud, Laura; Mr. Vust, Michel; Mrs. Bello, Monica

    2015-01-01

    You are very warmly invited to the opening presentation of Fragment.In’s residency at CERN. Fragment.In are the winners of Collide@CERN ProHelvetia, a collective formed by Laura Perrenoud, Simon de Diesbach, and Marc Dubois. They will present their artistic work along with their CERN scientific inspiration partner, who will present his/her work on Science. In their proposal, Fragment.In has a unique, original and creative approach to data visualization. We look forward to having them at CERN. Collide@CERN is the three month residency programme providing artists with time and space to reflect, research and renew their artistic practice.

  18. Comedy Collider presents: No cause for conCERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Traczyk, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Comedy Collider presents: No cause for conCERN was the highly anticipated follow up to LHComedy: CERN After Dark, starring an entirely new ensemble of comedy talent. Time: 13th June 2014, 19:30 for 20:00 Location: Globe of Science and Innovation, CERN, Geneva, Switzerland

  19. The LEP inauguration ceremony

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    This photo was taken in November 1989 at the inauguration of the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider. From the left, Princess Margriet of the Netherlands, King Carl Gustav of Sweden, CERN Council President Josef Rembser, President Francois Mitterand of France, President Jean-Pascal Delamuraz of Switzerland, Carlo Rubbia, Director-General of CERN at the time.

  20. The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B. A.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Achenbach, R.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D. L.; Adamyan, F.; Addy, T. N.; Aderholz, M.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, P. F.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, S. M.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alimonti, G.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, J.; Alves, R.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amaral, S. P.; Ambrosini, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Anderson, B.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andricek, L.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Apsimon, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, S. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Athar, B.; Atkinson, T.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, A.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bailey, D. C.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Ballester, F.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbier, G.; Barclay, P.; Bardin, D. Y.; Bargassa, P.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barriuso Poy, A.; Barros, N.; Bartheld, V.; Bartko, H.; Bartoldus, R.; Basiladze, S.; Bastos, J.; Batchelor, L. E.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Batraneanu, S.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Batusov, V.; Bauer, F.; Bauss, B.; Baynham, D. E.; Bazalova, M.; Bazan, A.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beaugiraud, B.; Beccherle, R. B.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Belanger, G. A. N.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellachia, F.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Beltramello, O.; Belymam, A.; Ben Ami, S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benes, J.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, S.; Bergsma, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernabéu, J.; Bernardet, K.; Berriaud, C.; Berry, T.; Bertelsen, H.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Besson, N.; Beteille, A.; Bethke, S.; Bialas, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieri, M.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Binet, S.; Bingefors, N.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bischofberger, M.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzell, J. P.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blaising, J. J.; Blanch, O.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boehm, M.; Boek, J.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bonino, R.; Bonis, J.; Bonivento, W.; Bonneau, P.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Boosten, M.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P. S. L.; Booth, P.; Booth, J. R. A.; Borer, K.; Borisov, A.; Borjanovic, I.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosi, F.; Bosman, M.; Bosteels, M.; Botchev, B.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouzakis, K.; Boyd, G. R.; Boyd, J.; Boyer, B. H.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Braccini, S.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Braun, H. M.; Bravo, S.; Brawn, I. P.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N. D.; Breugnon, P.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Broklova, Z.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brouwer, G.; Broz, J.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Budagov, I. A.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E. J.; Bujor, F.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burckhart-Chromek, D.; Burdin, S.; Burns, R.; Busato, E.; Buskop, J. J. F.; Buszello, K. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Cabruja Casas, E.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calderón Terol, D.; Callahan, J.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Camard, A.; Camarena, F.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campabadal Segura, F.; Campana, S.; Canale, V.; Cantero, J.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Caprio, M.; Caracinha, D.; Caramarcu, C.; Carcagno, Y.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardeira, C.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Cardini, A.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carr, F. S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castelo, J.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.; Castrovillari, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerna, C.; Cernoch, C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerutti, F.; Cervetto, M.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chalifour, M.; Chamizo llatas, M.; Chan, A.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Charron, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheng, T. L.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chevalley, J. L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chren, D.; Christiansen, T.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuguev, A. G.; Ciapetti, G.; Cicalini, E.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Civera, J. V.; Clark, A.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B. C.; Clément, C.; Clements, D.; Clifft, R. W.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coco, R.; Coe, P.; Coelli, S.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F. A.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Correard, S.; Corso-Radu, A.; Coss, J.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cox, J.; Cragg, D. A.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuneo, S.; Cunha, A.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Silva, P. V. M.; Da Silva, R.; Dabrowski, W.; Dael, A.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S. J.; Dalmau, J.; Daly, C. H.; Dam, M.; Damazio, D.; Dameri, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dankers, R.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Dargent, P.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J. P.; David, M.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Boer, R.; DeCastro, S.; DeGroot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Broise, X.; DeLa Cruz-Burelo, E.; DeLa Taille, C.; DeLotto, B.; DeOliveira Branco, M.; DePedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; DeSalvo, A.; DeSanctis, U.; DeSanto, A.; DeVivie DeRegie, J. B.; DeZorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedes, G.; Dedovich, D. V.; Defay, P. O.; Degele, R.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; DelPapa, C.; DelPeso, J.; DelPrete, T.; Delagnes, E.; Delebecque, P.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca Silberberg, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demierre, P.; Demirköz, B.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S. P.; Dennis, C.; Densham, C. J.; Dentan, M.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K. K.; Dewhurst, A.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Simone, A.; Diaz Gomez, M. M.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietl, H.; Dietrich, J.; Dietsche, W.; Diglio, S.; Dima, M.; Dindar, K.; Dinkespiler, B.; Dionisi, C.; Dipanjan, R.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Dixon, S. D.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Dogan, O. B.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Domingo, E.; Donega, M.; Dopke, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Dorholt, O.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drake, G.; Drakoulakos, D.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Drohan, J. G.; Dubbert, J.; Dubbs, T.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dührssen, M.; Dür, H.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duffin, S.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dumont Dayot, N.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Durand, D.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Dzahini, D.; Díez Cornell, S.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egede, U.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; Eklund, L. M.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engström, M.; Ennes, P.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Epshteyn, V. S.; Ereditato, A.; Eremin, V.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Esteves, F.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. 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M.; Maxfield, S. J.; May, E. N.; Mayer, J. K.; Mayri, C.; Mazini, R.; Mazzanti, M.; Mazzanti, P.; Mazzoni, E.; Mazzucato, F.; McKee, S. P.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCormick, C.; McCubbin, N. A.; McDonald, J.; McFarlane, K. W.; McGarvie, S.; McGlone, H.; McLaren, R. A.; McMahon, S. J.; McMahon, T. R.; McMahon, T. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Mechtel, M.; Meder-Marouelli, D.; Medinnis, M.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Meessen, C.; Mehdiyev, R.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meinhard, H.; Meinhardt, J.; Meirosu, C.; Meisel, F.; Melamed-Katz, A.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Mendes Jorge, P.; Mendez, P.; Menke, S.; Menot, C.; Meoni, E.; Merkl, D.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messmer, I.; Metcalfe, J.; Meuser, S.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, T. C.; Meyer, W. T.; Mialkovski, V.; Michelotto, M.; Micu, L.; Middleton, R.; Miele, P.; Migliaccio, A.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikulec, B.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Miller, R. J.; Miller, W.; Milosavljevic, M.; Milstead, D. A.; Mima, S.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minano, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Miralles Verge, L.; Misawa, S.; Miscetti, S.; Misiejuk, A.; Mitra, A.; Mitrofanov, G. Y.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Mkrtchyan, S.; Mladenov, D.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Mochizuki, A.; Mockett, P.; Modesto, P.; Moed, S.; Mönig, K.; Möser, N.; Mohn, B.; Mohr, W.; Mohrdieck-Möck, S.; Moisseev, A. M.; Moles Valls, R. M.; Molina-Perez, J.; Moll, A.; Moloney, G.; Mommsen, R.; Moneta, L.; Monnier, E.; Montarou, G.; Montesano, S.; Monticelli, F.; Moore, R. W.; Moore, T. B.; Moorhead, G. F.; Moraes, A.; Morel, J.; Moreno, A.; Moreno, D.; Morettini, P.; Morgan, D.; Morii, M.; Morin, J.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morone, M.-C.; Morozov, S. V.; Morris, E. J.; Morris, J.; Morrissey, M. C.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moszczynski, A.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Mouthuy, T.; Moye, T. H.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mueller, J.; Müller, M.; Muijs, A.; Muller, T. R.; Munar, A.; Munday, D. J.; Murakami, K.; Murillo Garcia, R.; Murray, W. J.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A. M.; Naito, D.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Nakano, I.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nassiakou, M.; Nasteva, I.; Nation, N. R.; Naumann, T.; Nauyock, F.; Nderitu, S. K.; Neal, H. A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P.; Neganov, A.; Negri, A.; Negroni, S.; Nelson, C.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Neukermans, L.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, C.; Nicholson, R.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicoletti, G.; Nicquevert, B.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, J.; Niinikoski, T.; Niinimaki, M. J.; Nikitin, N.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L. J.; Nomachi, M.; Nomoto, H.; Noppe, J.-M.; Nordberg, M.; Norniella Francisco, O.; Norton, P. R.; Novakova, J.; Nowak, M.; Nozaki, M.; Nunes, R.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nyman, T.; O'Connor, P.; O'Neale, S. W.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Neill, M.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermaier, M.; Oberson, P.; Ochi, A.; Ockenfels, W.; Odaka, S.; Odenthal, I.; Odino, G. A.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Okawa, H.; Olcese, M.; Olchevski, A. G.; Oliver, C.; Oliver, J.; Olivo Gomez, M.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onea, A.; Onofre, A.; Oram, C. J.; Ordonez, G.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orellana, F.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I. O.; Orr, R. S.; Orsini, F.; Osborne, L. S.; Osculati, B.; Osuna, C.; Otec, R.; Othegraven, R.; Ottewell, B.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Øye, O. K.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padhi, S.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pailler, P. M.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Palla, J.; Pallin, D.; Palmer, M. J.; Pan, Y. B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panin, V. N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Paoloni, A.; Papadopoulos, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Park, I.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, S.; Parkman, C.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passardi, G.; Passeri, A.; Passmore, M. S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr; Pataraia, S.; Pate, D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pauna, E.; Peak, L. S.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Peez, M.; Pei, E.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pellegrini, G.; Pengo, R.; Pequenao, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perazzo, A.; Pereira, A.; Perepelkin, E.; Perera, V. J. O.; Perez Codina, E.; Perez Reale, V.; Peric, I.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrin, E.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Perrot, G.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petereit, E.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, P. J. F.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petti, R.; Pezzetti, M.; Pfeifer, B.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Pickford, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pier, S.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pimenta Dos Santos, M. A.; Pina, J.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinhão, J.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Placakyte, R.; Placci, A.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskach, A. V.; Podkladkin, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polak, I.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pommès, K.; Ponsot, P.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popescu, R.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Posch, C.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospichal, P.; Pospisil, S.; Postranecky, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Poulard, G.; Pousada, A.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Prast, J.; Prat, S.; Prata, M.; Pravahan, R.; Preda, T.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Price, M. J.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Primor, D.; Prokofiev, K.; Prosso, E.; Proudfoot, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylaev, A. N.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qian, Z.; Qing, D.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Rabbers, J. J.; Radeka, V.; Rafi, J. M.; Ragusa, F.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Raine, C.; Raith, B.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rajek, S.; Rammer, H.; Ramstedt, M.; Rangod, S.; Ratoff, P. N.; Raufer, T.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Reads, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D.; Redlinger, G. R.; Reeves, K.; Rehak, M.; Reichold, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z.; Renaudin-Crepe, S. R. C.; Renkel, P.; Rensch, B.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Rewiersma, P.; Rey, J.; Rey-Campagnolle, M.; Rezaie, E.; Reznicek, P.; Richards, R. A.; Richer, J.-P.; Richter, R. H.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Riegler, W.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rios, R. R.; Riu Dachs, I.; Rivline, M.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robins, S.; Robinson, D.; Robson, A.; Rochford, J. H.; Roda, C.; Rodier, S.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rohrbach, F.; Roldán, J.; Rolli, S.; Romance, J. B.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, F.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosselet, L.; Rossi, L. P.; Rossi, L.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruber, R.; Ruckert, B.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruggiero, G.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybkine, G.; da Costa, J. Sá; Saavedra, A. F.; Saboumazrag, S.; F-W Sadrozinski, H.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Sala, P.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salt, J.; Saltó Bauza, O.; Salvachúa Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sánchez Sánchez, C. A.; Sanchis Lozano, M. A.; Sanchis Peris, E.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansone, S.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santander, J.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, J.; Sapinski, M.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, D.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Savva, P.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrissa, E.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schaller, M.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schick, H.; Schieck, J.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schioppa, M.; Schlager, G.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmid, P.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, K.; Schmitz, M.; Schmücker, H.; Schoerner, T.; Scholte, R. C.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schram, M.; Schricker, A.; Schroff, D.; Schuh, S.; Schuijlenburg, H. W.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J.; Schumacher, M.; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A.; Schweiger, D.; Schwemling, Ph; Schwick, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Secker, H.; Sedykh, E.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Selldén, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sexton, K. A.; Sfyrla, A.; Shah, T. P.; Shan, L.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shears, T. G.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shield, P.; Shilov, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoa, M.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siebel, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, D.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S.; Sjölin, J.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slattery, P.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Small, A.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D. S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, B.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Soares, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Söderberg, M.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Sole, D.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solov'yanov, O. V.; Soloviev, I.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Soret Medel, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Soukup, J.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spegel, M.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spogli, L.; Spousta, M.; Sprachmann, G.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Staley, R. J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Staroba, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavrianakou, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stefanidis, E.; Steffens, J. L.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G.; Stewart, T. D.; Stiller, W.; Stockmanns, T.; Stodulski, M.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strickland, V.; Striegel, D.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Su, D.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultanov, S.; Sun, Z.; Sundal, B.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutcliffe, P.; Sutton, M. R.; Sviridov, Yu M.; Sykora, I.; Szczygiel, R. R.; Szeless, B.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Taboada Gameiro, S.; Tadel, M.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tarrant, J.; Tartarelli, G.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Tcherniatine, V.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Terada, S.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thion, J.; Thioye, M.; Thomas, A.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thomas, E.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timm, S.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Titov, M.; Tobias, J.; Tocut, V. M.; Toczek, B.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres Pais, J. G.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Towndrow, E. F.; Trefzger, T.; Treichel, M.; Treis, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tribanek, W.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trilling, G.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trka, Z.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; C-L Tseng, J.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Turala, M.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tyndel, M.; Typaldos, D.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzamarioudaki, E.; Tzanakos, G.; Ueda, I.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Ullán Comes, M.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urkovsky, E.; Usai, G.; Usov, Y.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valderanis, C.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van der Bij, H.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Van Berg, R.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Varanda, M.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vassilieva, L.; Vataga, E.; Vaz, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vedrine, P.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, S.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vertogardov, L.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Vigeolas, E.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villate, J.; Villella, I.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincent, P.; Vincke, H.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives, R.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Vollmer, C. F.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von Boehn-Buchholz, R.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Vos, M.; Voss, K. C.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vovenko, A. S.; Vranjes, N.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuaridel, B.; Vudragovic, M.; Vuillemin, V.; Vuillermet, R.; Wänanen, A.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wallny, R. S.; Walsh, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, J. C.; Wappler, F.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warner, G. P.; Warren, M.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watts, G.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Webel, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weilhammer, P. M.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wellisch, H. P.; Wells, P. S.; Wemans, A.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werneke, P.; Werner, P.; Werthenbach, U.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiesmann, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Wijnen, T.; Wildauer, A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilmut, I.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winton, L.; Witzeling, W.; Wlodek, T.; Woehrling, E.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wright, C.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wunstorf, R.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Xiang, A.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, J. C.; Yang, S.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yarradoddi, K.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajac, J.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, A. Yu; Zalite, Yo K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhichao, L.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H. Z.; Zhuang, X. A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zoeller, M. M.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2008-08-01

    The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

  1. Ryoji Ikeda, Data Artist - Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Koek, Ariane; Heuer, Rolf; Ikeda, Ryoji; Mr. Horst, Hoertner

    2014-01-01

    at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation, CERN. You are very warmly invited to the opening presentation of Data Artist, Ryoji Ikeda’s residency at CERN. Ryoji Ikeda, one of the world’s leading electronic composers and visual artists, is the new Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN award winner. Ryoji Ikeda and his science inspiration partner, Theoretical Physicist, Dr. Tom Melia will talk about their work in arts and science. They are at the beginning of their creative journey together at CERN. A little about Ryoji Ikeda – the new Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN artist in residence. Ryoji Ikeda focuses on the essential characteristics of sound itself and that of visuals as light by means of both mathematical precision and mathematical aesthetics. Ikeda has gained a reputation as one of the few international artists working convincingly across both visual ...

  2. CERN Library | Mario Campanelli presents "Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider" | 16 March

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2016-01-01

    "Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider" by Mario Campanelli. Presentation on Wednesday, 16 March at 4 p.m. in the Library (bldg 52-1-052) The book aims to explain the historical development of particle physics, with special emphasis on CERN and collider physics. It describes in detail the LHC accelerator and its detectors, describing the science involved as well as the sociology of big collaborations, culminating with the discovery of the Higgs boson.  Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider  Mario Campanelli World Scientific Publishing, 2015  ISBN 9789814656641​

  3. Lep vertical tunnel movements - lessons for future colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitthan, R. [CERN-Conseil Europeen pour la recherche nucleaire, Clic-Study Group and the Survey Group, Geneve (Switzerland)

    1999-07-01

    The data from 10 years of vertical surveys verify for all of LEP the previous observation, localized to region P1, that LEP floor movements are predominantly deterministic. This rules out the ATL model as being correct for this tunnel. If generalized, for yearly movements a random ATL model underestimates the possible maximum long-term motions. In contrast, extrapolation of the LEP vertical data to the short-term (hours and days) time-scale shows that the random approach predicts larger short-term movements than the deterministic model. This means that simulations using the ATL hypothesis are overtly pessimistic with regard to the frequency of operational realignments required. Depending on the constants chosen in the models these differences can be large, of the order of a magnitude and more. This paper deals solely with the directly measured months-to-years tunnel motions in rock, and the extrapolation of such ground motions to hourly or daily time-spans It does not, address the important question of the contribution of hourly-scale movements of the accelerator components, which could have a random part, to the combined motion. Nor does it address the question of movements of accelerator tunnels like HERA or TRISTAN which are built in water and debris, and not in solid rock. (author)

  4. Gilles Jobin Collide@CERN - Strangels Intervention

    CERN Multimedia

    Gregory Batardon

    2012-01-01

    STRANGELS Cie Gilles Jobin. Site specific choreographic intervention inside the CERN's library. Three strangels on a migration to another dimension rest at the CERN's library. Strangels need food for thoughts. Do not pay attention to them they are only strangels. Dancers : Ruth Childs, Susana Panadès Diaz, Gilles Jobin

  5. From the CERN web: Collide@CERN, Fermilab neutrinos and more

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This new section highlights articles, blog posts and press releases published in the CERN web environment over the past weeks. This way, you won’t miss a thing...   Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt. (Photo: Matthias H. Risse). Collide@CERN Ars Electronica Award goes to “Semiconductor” 10 August – Collide@CERN Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt, two English artists collaborating under the name Semiconductor, are this year’s recipients of the Collide@CERN Ars Electronica Award. In the coming months, they will begin a two-month residency at CERN.  Continue to read…     Illustration: Fermilab/Sandbox Studio.   Fermilab experiment sees neutrinos change over 500 miles 7 August - Fermilab press release Scientists on the NOvA experiment saw their first evidence of oscillating neutrinos, confirming that the extraordinary detector built for the project not only functions as planned but is also making great p...

  6. 12th CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the twelfth edition, from 28th August to 6th September 2017. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Other schools, such as the CERN European School of High Energy Physics, may provide more appropriate training for students in experimental HEP who are still working towards their PhDs. Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2017, when CERN will welcome students to the twelfth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School. The School will include nine days of lectures and discussions, and one free day in the middle of the period. Limited scholarship ...

  7. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Applications are now open for the 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, which will take place at CERN from 6 to 15 June 2007. The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic program and application procedure. The application deadline is 9 March 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be given on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be  supported by in-depth discussion sess...

  8. EIB lends EUR 300 million for CERN's major collider

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    "The European Investment Bank (EIB) is lending EUR 300 million to finance the final phase of construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The EIB loan will also help to finance the instrumentation to record and analyse the high-energy particle collisions at the LHC" (1 page).

  9. Search for Exotic Processes at the CERN pp Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansari, R.; Bagnaia, P.; Banner, M.;......Kofoed-Hansen

    1987-01-01

    The total UA2 data sample at the CERN pp̄ Collider corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 910 nb−1. Limits on various hypothetical processes, such as production of excited electrons, additional charged or neutral vector bosons, or supersymmetric particles, are presented from the analysis of t...

  10. Third intervention of Gilles Jobin and Collide@CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Everything you wanted to know about contemporary dance but were afraid to ask. - 4 September 2012 at 4 p.m. in the Council Chamber -   A subjective and personal presentation of the recent history of contemporary dance by Gilles Jobin, Collide@CERN choreographer in residence.

  11. CERN to start Large Hadron Collider november 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is expected to provide its first collisions in November 2007, CERN has announced. A two-month run at 0.9 TeV is planned for 2007 to test the accelerating and detecting equipment, and a full power run at 14 TeV is expected in the spring of 2008."

  12. Collide@CERN: Horizons Irrésolus

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Sound Installation by Collide@CERN Geneva artists Rudy Decelière and Vincent Hänni in collaboration with physicists Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer, for the Electron Festival 25-27th March, 2016 (see here).   Horizons irrésolus is a sound installation that follows on the artistic residency Collide@CERN 2014.    Registration is absolutely required. Each guest will have to have registered using their own name. Guests without having registered will not be able to come into CERN. Free entrance: Book here  A shuttle will be available every 15 minutes from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. from CERN Reception (in front of CERN Globe) to the sound art installation. Access from Geneva to CERN Reception by tram 18, end of the line. With the support from The Republic and Canton of Geneva and The City of Geneva. Find out more on the artists and their Geneva 2...

  13. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    June 6-15, 2007, CERN The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007 The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, extensively covered the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis t...

  14. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Adzic, P; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Allanach, B; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Bruning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Caldwell, A; Cetinkaya, V; Chekelian, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; Roeck, A.De; d'Enterria, D; DiNezza, P; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klees, R; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kraemer, M; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Milhano, J G; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinolfi, L; Rizvi, E; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schaefer, M; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; South, D; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Kate, H.Ten; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Thompson, P; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Ullrich, T; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F; CERN. Geneva. LHeC Department

    2012-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  15. Projects for ultra-high-energy circular colliders at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomyagkov, A. V.; Koop, I. A.; Levichev, E. B.; Piminov, P. A.; Sinyatkin, S. V.; Shatilov, D. N.; Benedict, M.; Oide, K.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-12-01

    Within the Future Circular Collider (FCC) design study launched at CERN in 2014, it is envisaged to construct hadron (FCC-hh) and lepton (FCC-ee) ultra-high-energy machines aimed to replace the LHC upon the conclusion of its research program. The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics is actively involved in the development of the FCC-ee electron-positron collider. The Crab Waist (CR) scheme of the collision region that has been proposed by INP and will be implemented at FCC-ee is expected to provide high luminosity over a broad energy range. The status and development of the FCC project are described, and its parameters and limitations are discussed for the lepton collider in particular.

  16. Are there indications of compositeness of leptons and quarks in CERN LEP data?

    CERN Document Server

    Elfgren, Erik

    2007-01-01

    The ``preon-trinity'' model for the compositeness of leptons, quarks and heavy vector bosons predicts several new heavy leptons and quarks. Three of them can be produced in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilations at CERN LEP energies, since they can be created out of a system of three preons and their antipreons, where three preons form a heavy lepton or quark, while the other three go into a normal lepton or quark. In fact, these new particles are predicted to be lighter than the top quark, while the top itself cannot be produced this way, due to its particular preon substructure. The empirical situation is analyzed, and the most likely masses are estimated.

  17. 3rd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at ...

  18. LEP3: A High Luminosity e+e- Collider to study the Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Assmann, R W; Butterworth, A; Janot, P; Jimenez, J M; Grojean, C; Milanese, A; Modena, M; Osborne, J A; Zimmermann, F; Piekarz, H; Oide, K; Yokoya, K; Ellis, J; Klute, M; Zanetti, M; Velasco, M; Telnov, V; Rivkin, L; Murray, B; Cai, Y

    2012-01-01

    The LHC experiments discovered a new particle of mass around 125 GeV, candidate for the scalar Higgs boson of the Standard Model. An e+e- collider operating close to the ZH threshold could be the tool of choice for studying this unique particle in detail. We present here the concept of a storage ring collider, which we call LEP3. Preliminary studies show that at a centre-of-mass energy of 240 GeV, near-constant luminosities of 10^34 cm^{-2}s^{-1} are possible in up to four collision points, while respecting a number of constraints including beamstrahlung. The integrated luminosity is 100fb^{-1}/y per interaction point, 20,000 e+e- --> ZH events would be produced per year and per experiment. LEP3 could also operate in multi-bunch mode at the Z resonance, with luminosities of several\\times10^35 cm^{-2}s^{-1}, yielding O(10^11) Z decays per year, as well as just above the WW threshold. The short luminosity lifetime requires the use of top-up injection, which, in turn calls for a full-energy injector. The present...

  19. LEP3: A High Luminosity e+e- Collider to Study the Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A U; Assmann, R W; Butterworth, A; Janot, P; Jimenez, J M; Grojean, C; Milanese, A; Modena, M; Osborne, J A; Zimmermann, F; Piekarz, H; Oide, K; Yokoya, K; Ellis, J; Klute, M; Zanetti, M; Velasco, M; Telnov, V; Rivkin, L; Cai, Y

    2012-01-01

    The LHC experiments have discovered a new particle with a mass around 125 GeV that is a strong candidate for the scalar Higgs boson expected in the Standard Model. An e+e− collider operating close to the ZH threshold (at a centre-of-mass energy of 240 GeV) could be the tool of choice for studying this unique particle in detail. We present here the concept of a storage ring collider, which we call LEP3. Preliminary studies show that at a centre-of-mass energy of 240 GeV, near-constant luminosities of 1034 cm-2s-1 are possible in up to four collision points, while respecting a number of constraints including beamstrahlung limits. With an integrated luminosity of 100fb-1 per year and per interaction point, 20,000 e+e- - ZH events would be produced per year and per experiment. LEP3 could also operate in multi-bunch mode at the Z resonance, with luminosities of several×1035cm-2s-1, yielding O(1011) Z decays per year, as well as just above the WW threshold, potentially improving our knowledge of W and Z propert...

  20. Heavy quark and quarkonium production at CERN LEP2: k_T-factorization versus data

    CERN Document Server

    Lipatov, A V

    2004-01-01

    We present calculations of heavy quark and quarkonium production at CERN LEP2 in the k_T-factorization QCD approach. Both direct and resolved photon contribution are taken into account. The conservative error analisys is performed. The unintegrated gluon distribution in the photon is taken from the full CCFM evolution equation. The traditional color-singlet mechanism to describe non-perturbative transition of heavy quark pair into a final quarkonium is used. Our analisys covers polarization properties of heavy quarkonia at moderate and large transverse momenta. We find that the total and differential open charm production cross sections are consistent with the recent experimental data taken by the L3, OPAL and ALEPH collaborations. At the same time the DELPHI data for the inclusive J/Psi production exceed our predictions but experimental uncertainties are too large to claim a significant inconsistency. The bottom production in photon-photon collisions at CERN LEP2 is hard to explain within the k_T-factorizati...

  1. Greece at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1997-01-01

    Greece, one of CERN*'s founding Member States, inaugurated its first Industrial Exhibition at the Meyrin site on Tuesday, 14 October. After a meeting with CERN's Director General, Professor Christopher Llewellyn Smith, Professor Emmanuel Frangoulis, the General Secretary of the Greek Ministry of Industry, accompanied by Prof Emmanuel Floratos, Greek delegate to CERN council visited the DELPHI experiment on the LEP collider, guided by Andromachi Tsirou, a Greek physicist.

  2. Influence of the transverse beam sizes on the ep -> ep. gamma. cross section at the HERA and a FUTURE CERN electron-proton collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotkin, G.L.; Polityko, S.I.; Serbo, V.G.; Schiller, A.

    1988-06-01

    In the process ep -> ep..gamma.., proposed for luminosity measurements at HERA, impact parameters occur which are larger than the transverse beam sizes in the ep-colliders in HERA and a CERN option (LHC+LEP). This decreases the number of observed photons compared to the standard QED calculation. The difference is larger than 10% at photon energies E/sub ..gamma../ < 0.4E/sub e/ for the CERN option and E/sub ..gamma../ < 0.01E/sub e/ for HERA. (orig.)

  3. The CERN Antiproton Collider Programme Accelerators and Accumulation Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koziol, Heribert

    2004-01-01

    One of CERN's most daring and successful undertakings was the quest for the intermediate bosons, W and Z. In this paper, we describe the accelerator part of the venture which relied on a number of innovations: an extension of the budding method of stochastic cooling by many orders of magnitude; the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator, depending on several novel accelerator methods and technologies; major modifications to the 26 GeV PS Complex; and the radical conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which just had started up as an accelerator, to a protonâ€"antiproton collider. The SPS Collider had to master the beamâ€"beam effect far beyond limits reached ever before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the huge detectors UA1 and UA2.

  4. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, June 6-15, 2007, CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis techniques and tools...

  5. Help LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    Carreras,R; Lehmann,P

    1988-01-01

    première partie: Help LEP ou le tunnel de l'infini- pièce radiophonique intéréssant sur l'origine de la matière deuxième partie: Help LEP débat; suite à cette pièce interview avec 3 physiciens du Cern sur le projet LEP et le but du Cern qui est la recherche fondamentale

  6. Recent results from LEP

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Gurtu

    2000-04-01

    Recent results from the LEP collider at CERN are presented: on the identification of +- → +- and the determination of the mass and width and limits on its anomalous couplings; the search for the Standard Model and non-minimal Higgs; search for SUSY and other new particles. Fits to all electroweak data leading to predictions of the Higgs mass within the Standard Model are presented.

  7. The LEP impedance model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotter, B. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-08-01

    This report describes a number of measurements and computations of the impedance of the Large Electron Positron collider LEP at CERN. The work has been performed over several years, together with D. Brandt, K. Cornelis, A. Hofmann, G. Sabbi and many others. The agreement between measurements of single bunch instabilities on the machine and computer simulations is in general excellent and gives confidence in the impedance model used. (author)

  8. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  9. Premiers résultats en provenance du LEP2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    CERN's Large Electron-Positron collider, LEP, produced its first pair of fundamental particles known as W+ and W- today, taking particle physics research into new and unexplored territory. This follows a busy winter of upgrades which have transformed LEP into a new accelerator, earning it the name LEP2. Hundreds of physicists from all over the world come to CERN to do their research at LEP2, which will be further upgraded over the coming years, bringing the possibility of new discoveries and extending our understanding of the Universe.

  10. The LEP groundbreaking ceremony

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    French President Francois Mitterand and Swiss President Pierre Aubert visiting CERN for the LEP ground-breaking ceremony on 13 September 1983. They are seen here with Emilio Picasso, LEP project director, and Herwig Schopper, CERN's then Director-General.

  11. Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LEP II probes of minimal and string-motivated supergravity models

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, Howard W; Kao, C; Pois, H

    1995-01-01

    We explore the ability of the Tevatron to probe Minimal Supersymmetry with high energy scale boundary conditions motivated by supersymmetry breaking in the context of supergravity/superstring theory. A number of boundary condition possibilities are considered: dilaton-like string boundary conditions applied at the standard GUT unification scale or alternatively at the string scale; and extreme (``no-scale'') minimal supergravity boundary conditions imposed at the GUT scale or string scale. For numerous specific cases within each scenario the sparticle spectra are computed and then fed into ISAJET 7.07 so that explicit signatures can be examined in detail. We find that, for some of the boundary condition choices, large regions of parameter space can be explored via same-sign dilepton and isolated trilepton signals. For other choices, the mass reach of Tevatron collider experiments is much more limited. We also compare mass reach of Tevatron experiments with the corresponding reach at LEP 200.

  12. Art and science interactions - First Collide @CERN public lecture by Julius Von Bismarck

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Creative collisions between the arts and science have begun at CERN with the first Collide@CERN artist, Julius Von Bismarck starting his digital arts residency at the world's largest particle physics laboratory outside Geneva. He was chosen from 395 entries from 40 countries around the world from the Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN competition launched last September 2011. To mark this special occasion, the first Collide@CERN public lecture open to everyone will take place on March 21st 2012 at CERN's Globe of Science and Innovation, with a drinks reception at 18.45 and with presentations starting at 19.30. The event is free and will be opened by the Director General of CERN, Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer and Gerfried Stocker, the Artistic Director of Ars Electronica, Linz, - CERN's international cultural partners for the digital arts Collide@CERN award known as Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN in recognition of our joint partnership. Julius Von Bismarck and his CERN science inspiration partner, the physic...

  13. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073687; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Zhang, Chunhui; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kumar, Shyam; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Masui, Hiroshi; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papcun, Peter; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; 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Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasar, Cigdem; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density $\\rho_{\\mu} > 5.9~$m$^{-2}$. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplic...

  14. Superconductive technologies for the Large Hadron collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project is the largest plant based on superconductivity and cryogenics: 27 km of tunnel filled with superconducting magnets and other equipment that will be kept at 1.9 K. The dipole magnets have to generate a minimum magnetic field of 8.3 T to allow collisions of proton beams at an energy of 14 TeV in the centre of mass. The construction of LHC started in 1997 at CERN in Geneva and required 10 years of research and development on fine- filament NbTi superconducting wires and cables, on magnet technology and on He-II refrigerators. In particular the project needs the production of about 1000 tons of high-homogeneity NbTi with current densities of more than 2000 A mm/sup -2/ at 9 T and 1.9 K, with tight control also of all other cable properties such as magnetization, interstrand resistance and copper resistivity. The paper describes the main dipole magnets and reviews the most significant steps in the research and development, focusing on the issues related to the conductor, to...

  15. American superconductor technology to help CERN to explore the mysteries of matter company's high temperature superconductor wire to be used in CERN's Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    American Superconductor Corporation has been selected by CERN, to provide 14,000 meters of high temperature superconductor (HTS) wire for current lead devices that will be used in CERN's Large Hadron Collider (1 page).

  16. Measurement of the s dependence of jet production at the CERN pp collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel, J.A.; Bagnaia, P.; Banner, M.

    1985-01-01

    The production of very large transverse momentum (pT) hadron jets has been measured in the UA2 experiment at the CERN pp Collider for s=630 GeV. The inclusive jet production cross sections exhibit a pT-dependent increase with respect to the s=546 GeV data from previous Collider runs. This increas...

  17. Hangout With CERN: The Large Hadron Collider (S01E02)

    CERN Multimedia

    Kahle, Kate

    2012-01-01

    In this second Hangout with CERN "The Large Hadron Collider" ATLAS physicist Steven Goldfarb is joined by Giulia Papotti and Laurette Ponce from the CERN Control Centre, Despina Hatzifotiadou and Ken Read from the ALICE experiment, Achintya Rao and Roberto Rossin from the CMS experiment and Patrick Koppenburg from the LHCb experiment, as well as Jaana Nystrom from Finland and Liz Krane from the USA. This hangout answers questions about the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) received via #askCERN on Twitter and Google+ and via YouTube and Facebook comments. Recorded live on 8th November 2012.

  18. Investigation of induced radioactivity in the CERN Large Electron Positron collider for its decommissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The future installation of the Large Hadron Collider in the tunnel formerly housing the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) required the dismantling of the latter after 11-year operation. As required by the French legislation, an extensive theoretical study was conducted before decommissioning to establish the possible activation paths both in the accelerator and in the four experiments (L3, ALEPH, OPAL and DELPHI) installed around the ring. The aim was to define which areas may contain activated material and which ones would be completely free of activation. The four major sources of activation in LEP, i.e., distributed and localized beam losses, synchrotron radiation and the super-conducting RF cavities, were investigated. Conversion coefficients from unit lost beam power to induced specific activity were established for a number of materials. A similar study was conducted for the four experiments, evaluating the four potential sources of induced radioactivity, namely e**+e **- annihilation events, two-p...

  19. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School 2013 open for applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2013, when CERN will welcome students to the eighth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School.   Experiments at hadron colliders will continue to provide our best tools for exploring physics at the TeV scale for some time. With the completion of the 7-8 TeV runs of the LHC, and the final results from the full Tevatron data sample becoming available, a new era in particle physics is beginning, heralded by the Higgs-like particle recently discovered at 125 GeV. To realize the full potential of these developments, CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the eighth edition, from 28 August to 6 September 2013. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school which particularly targets young postdocs in exper...

  20. LEP is upgraded

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    A superconducting radio-frequency cavity is installed on the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider. This upgrade, known as LEP-2, allowed the accelerator to reach new, higher energies and so investigate new areas of physics.

  1. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron-proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  2. LEP3: A high luminosity e+e- collider in the LHC tunnel to study the Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A P; Koratzinos, M; Zanetti, M

    2012-01-01

    Recent indications from the LHC suggest that the Higgs boson might be light, within the mass range 115- 130 GeV. Such object could be studied at an e+e− collider with about 240-GeV centre-of-mass energy. A corresponding Higgs factory – ‘LEP3’ – could be installed in the LHC tunnel, reducing its cost and also allowing for a second life of the two LHC general-purpose detectors. We present preliminary accelerator and beam parameters for LEP3 [1] tailored so as to provide a peak luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1 at each of two experiments, while respecting a number of constraints including beamstrahlung limits. At this luminosity around 20,000 Higgs events per year per experiment could be obtained for a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass of 115-130 GeV. For the parameters considered the estimated luminosity lifetime is about 16 minutes, and the synchrotron radiation losses are 50 MW per beam. High operational efficiency requires two rings: a low emittance collider storage ring operating at constant energy,...

  3. Timken steel technology used in CERN's hadron collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The Timken Company's steel technology helped Superbolt, Inc. provide equipment to the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and its large particle physics laboratory located near Geneva, Switzerland." (1,5 page)

  4. CERN told to start technical thinking for next collider

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    CERN has been told to begin technical design work for the successor to the LHC. A report commissioned last year, suggests that future design work should focus on developping cost-effective high-field magnets (1 page).

  5. Heavy quark and quarkonium production at CERN LEP2. k{sub T}-factorization versus data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    2005-02-01

    We present calculations of heavy quark and quarkonium production at CERN LEP2 in the {kappa}{sub T}-factorization QCD approach. Both direct and resolved photon contribution are taken into account. The conservative error analysis is performed. The unintegrated gluon distribution in the photon is obtained from the full CCFM evolution equation. The traditional color-singlet mechanism to describe non-perturbative transition of QQ-pair into a final quarkonium is used. Our analysis covers polarization properties of heavy quarkonia at moderate and large transverse momenta. We find that the total and differential open charm production cross sections are consistent with the recent experimental data taken by the L3, OPAL and ALEPH collaborations. At the same time the DELPHI data for the inclusive J/{psi} production exceed our predictions but experimental uncertainties are too large to claim a significant inconsistency. The bottom production in photon-photon collisions at CERN LEP2 is hard to explain within the {kappa}{sub T}-factorization formalism. (orig.)

  6. Heavy quark and quarkonium production at CERN LEP2: k{sub T}-factorization versus data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, D.V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-05-01

    We present calculations of heavy quark and quarkonium production at CERN LEP2 in the k{sub T}-factorization QCD approach. Both direct and resolved photon contributions are taken into account. A conservative error analysis is performed. The unintegrated gluon distribution in the photon is obtained from the full CCFM evolution equation. The traditional color-singlet mechanism to describe the non-perturbative transition of a Q anti Q -pair into a final quarkonium is used. Our analysis covers the polarization properties of heavy quarkonia at moderate and large transverse momenta. We find that the total and differential open charm production cross sections are consistent with the recent experimental data taken by the L3, OPAL and ALEPH collaborations. At the same time the DELPHI data for the inclusive J/{psi} production exceed our predictions, but experimental uncertainties are too large to claim a significant inconsistency. The bottom production in photon-photon collisions at CERN LEP2 is hard to explain within the k{sub T}-factorization formalism. (orig.)

  7. Public Lecture Collide@CERN Pro Helvetia | 23 July | Main Auditorium

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    You are very warmly invited to the opening presentation of Fragment.In’s residency at CERN.   Fragment.In: Simon de Diesbach, Laura Perrenoud and Marc Dubois. 23 July 2015 - 7 p.m. Main Auditorium  The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception at 8.30 p.m. Doors open at 6.30 p.m.  Opening address by Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, Michel Vust, project leader at the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia, and Monica Bello, Head of Arts@CERN. Fragment.In are the winners of Collide@CERN Pro Helvetia, formed by Laura Perrenoud, Simon de Diesbach, and Marc Dubois. They will present their artistic work along with their CERN scientific inspiration partner, who will present his/her scientific work. In their proposal, Fragment.In took a unique, original and creative approach to data visualization. We look forward to having them at CERN.  Fragment.In Collide@CERN is the three month residency programme providing artists with time and...

  8. High Energy Booster Options for a Future Circular Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Stoel, Linda; Bartmann, Wolfgang; Burkart, Florian; Goddard, Brennan; Herr, Werner; Kramer, Thomas; Milanese, Attilio; Rumolo, Giovanni; Shaposhnikova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In case a Future Circular Collider for hadrons (FCC-hh) is constructed at CERN, the tunnels for SPS, LHC and the 100 km collider will be available to house a High Energy Booster (HEB). The different machine options cover a large technology range from an iron-dominated machine in the 100 km tunnel to a superconducting machine in the SPS tunnel. Using a modified LHC as reference, these options are compared with respect to their energy reach, magnet technology and filling time of the collider. Potential issues with beam transfer, reliability and beam stability are presented.

  9. CERN celebrating the Lowering of the final detector element for large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    In the early hours of the morning the final element of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector began the descent into its underground experimental cavern in preparation for the start-up of CERNs Large Hadron Collider (LHC) this summer. This is a pivotal moment for the CMS collaboration.

  10. Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

  11. A search for relativistic particles with fractional electric charge at the Cern collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, M.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    A search for relativistic particles with fractional electric charge has been performed at the CERN collider using a telescope of scintillation counters to detect particles with abnormally low ionisation. The thickness of the detector (40 gr cm−2) limits this search to particles without strong...

  12. Inclusive Charged Particle Production at the CERN pp Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, M.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse momentum distributions of pions, kaons and protons have been measured around 90° in the UA2 detector at the SPS p collider, at a CM energy of 540 GeV. All the cross sections have increased by more than a factor of 2 over those measured at ISR energies and exhibit a flatter behaviour wi...

  13. There’s more to particle physics at CERN than colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CERN’s scientific programme must be compelling, unique, diverse, and integrated into the global landscape of particle physics. One of the Laboratory’s primary goals is to provide a diverse range of excellent physics opportunities and to put its unique facilities to optimum use, maximising the scientific return.   In this spirit, we have recently established a Physics Beyond Colliders study group with a mandate to explore the unique opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex to address some of today’s outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The study group will provide input to the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. The process kicked off with a two-day workshop at CERN on 6 and 7 September, organised by the study group conveners: Joerg Jaeckel (Heidelberg), Mike Lamont (CERN) and Claude Vallée (CPPM Marseille and DESY). Its purpo...

  14. PARTICLE PHYSICS: CERN Collider Glimpses Supersymmetry--Maybe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seife, C

    2000-07-14

    Last week, particle physicists at the CERN laboratory in Switzerland announced that by smashing together matter and antimatter in four experiments, they detected an unexpected effect in the sprays of particles that ensued. The anomaly is subtle, and physicists caution that it might still be a statistical fluke. If confirmed, however, it could mark the long-sought discovery of a whole zoo of new particles--and the end of a long-standing model of particle physics.

  15. Une énergie record ouvre de nouvelles perspectives de découvertes au LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    At CERN on 2 August 1999 at 11h15, beams of electrons and positrons were accelerated in the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) to 100 GeV and brought into collision for the first time at this energy. There were two reasons for the backslapping, cheering and popping of corks that followed in the LEP control room. First, the setting of a new energy record for an electron-positron accelerator, represents a tremendous technical achievement by CERN accelerator specialists. Second, the collision energy of 200 GeV opens up exciting new discovery potential for the LEP experiments.

  16. CERN-BINP Workshop for Young Scientists in e+e- Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The "CERN-BINP workshop for young scientists in e+e- colliders" is organised in the framework of the EU-funded CREMLIN project. The CREMLIN project aims at strengthening science cooperation between six Russian megascience facilities and related research infrastructure counterparts in Europe. BINP and CERN coordinate a dedicated CREMLIN work package focusing on a future super-charm-tau factory (SCT) at BINP. SCT aims at producing e+e- collisions with up to 5 GeV centre-of-mass energy and at very high luminosity. In parallel CERN is hosting design studies for two possible high-energy e+e- colliders: FCC-ee and CLIC. In matters of physics, design and technologies the BINP and CERN studies address technological and scientific questions of common interest. Similar issues are dealt with in the framework of other flavour factories and energy frontier e+e- colliders worldwide. The 3-day workshop provides young scientists (at the student and postdoc level) opportunities to present their work and exchange experiences. ...

  17. A great european project: the electron-poistron collider ring (LEP). A window on the past; Un grande progetto europeo: l`anello di collisione elettrone-positrone (il LEP). Una finestra sul passato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picasso, E.

    1996-12-31

    Cosmology is a historical discipline and as History, the farther away from the present the period studied, the fewer are the documents and their interpretation is ever more difficult. The Large electron positron Collider (LEP) enables the physicists to go back in time and to study the phenomena which occurred approximately one tenth of a thousandth millionth of a second after the Big Bang. In the Avogadro`s conference the cosmological arguments are briefly presented and LEP is described in some details. [Italiano] la Cosmologia e` una disciplina storica e come avviene per la storia piu` si allontana dalla nostra epoca il periodo da studiare, piu` rari si fanno i documenti e piu` difficile e` l`interpretazione. Il grande anello di collisione, il LEP, permette ai fisici di risalire indietro nel tempo e di studiare i fenomeni che sono avvenuti circa un decimo di miliardesimo dopo il Big Bang. In questo senso limitato il LEP e` una finestra sul tempo. Nella conferenza Avogadro gli argomenti di cosmologia sono brevemente presentati e la costruzione del LEP e` descritta in dettaglio.

  18. Collide@CERN: exclusive open rehearsal of Gilles Jobin's last piece

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Collide@CERN and Gilles Jobin, artist in residency at CERN, present an exclusive open rehearsal of his last piece SPIDER GALAXIES Tuesday 31 July 2012 - A new piece created to open new territories of the mind - Join us in Restaurant 1 from 4 p.m. (next to the Glass Box Restaurant) With this piece, the body turns into matter, which is complete, spatial and sensual. Come and see Gilles Jobin and his dancers. With a score by Cristian Vogel and Carla Scaletti invoking sound particles, while Daniel Demont disperses the spectrum. Protean, infinitely large or infinitesimal, such are the Spider Galaxies.    

  19. Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider from the proton to the Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Campanelli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The book aims to explain the historical development of particle physics, with special emphasis on CERN and collider physics. It describes in detail the LHC accelerator and its detectors, describing the science involved as well as the sociology of big collaborations, culminating with the discovery of the Higgs boson. Readers are led step-by-step to understanding why we do particle physics, as well as the tools and problems involved in the field. It provides an insider's view on the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

  20. Testing Color Evaporation in Photon-Photon Production of $J/\\Psi$ at CERN LEP II

    CERN Document Server

    Éboli, Oscar J P; Mizukoshi, J K

    2003-01-01

    The DELPHI Collaboration has recently reported the measurement of J/Psi production in photon-photon collisions at LEP II. These newly available data provide an additional proof of the importance of colored c bar{c} pairs for the production of charmonium because these data can only be explained by considering resolved photon processes. We show here that the inclusion of color octet contributions to the J/Psi production in the framework of the color evaporation model is able to reproduce this data. In particular, the transverse-momentum distribution of the J/Psi mesons is well described by this model.

  1. University of Tennessee deploys force10 C-series to analyze data from CERN's Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Force20 networks, the pioneer in building and securing reliable networks, today announced that the University of Tennessee physics department has deployed the C300 resilient switch to analyze data form CERN's Large Hadron Collider." (1 page)

  2. Discriminating supersymmetry and black holes at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava; Cavaglià, Marco

    2008-03-01

    We show how to differentiate the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model from black hole events at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Black holes are simulated with the CATFISH generator. Supersymmetry simulations use a combination of pythia and isajet. Our study, based on event-shape variables, visible and missing momenta, and analysis of dilepton events, demonstrates that supersymmetry and black hole events at the LHC can be easily discriminated.

  3. Diffractive Higgs boson production at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enberg, R; Ingelman, G; Kissavos, A; Tîmneanu, N

    2002-08-19

    Improved possibilities to find the Higgs boson in diffractive events, having less hadronic activity, depend on whether the cross section is large enough. Based on the soft color interaction models that successfully describe diffractive hard scattering at DESY HERA and the Fermilab Tevatron, we find that only a few diffractive Higgs events may be produced at the Tevatron, but we predict a substantial rate at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Determining the structure of Higgs couplings at the CERN LargeHadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plehn, Tilman; Rainwater, David; Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    2002-02-01

    Higgs boson production via weak boson fusion at the CERN Large Hadron Collider has the capability to determine the dominant CP nature of a Higgs boson, via the tensor structure of its coupling to weak bosons. This information is contained in the azimuthal angle distribution of the two outgoing forward tagging jets. The technique is independent of both the Higgs boson mass and the observed decay channel.

  5. Speakers at CERN's LEP celebration on 9 October 2000 - L. to r. : M. Philippe Busquin, Commissioner for Research European Union; Prof. Marino Gago, Minister of Science and Technology Portugal; Prof. Dimitar Dimitrov, Minister of Education and Science Bulgaria; M. Lubomir Fogas, Deputy Prime Minister Slovak Republic and Prof. Andrzej Wiszniewski Minister of Science Poland : during the LEP celebration.

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Speakers at CERN's LEP celebration on 9 October 2000 - L. to r. : M. Philippe Busquin, Commissioner for Research European Union; Prof. Marino Gago, Minister of Science and Technology Portugal; Prof. Dimitar Dimitrov, Minister of Education and Science Bulgaria; M. Lubomir Fogas, Deputy Prime Minister Slovak Republic and Prof. Andrzej Wiszniewski Minister of Science Poland : during the LEP celebration.

  6. News from the Library: CERN Library and Collide@CERN present media artist Nataša Teofilović

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2012-01-01

    The Serbian media artist Nataša Teofilović creates virtual characters which are living art works, often employing animation techniques. She won an honorary mention for her work in the first Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN competition for her outstanding digital works which cross the boundaries between virtual and real spaces.  As part of her prize, Arts@CERN offered Nataša the opportunity for a two-day visit to CERN, which is being funded by a Swedish foundation travel grant.   Nataša talks about why and how she creates her digital work and virtual beings, shows examples and reveals insights into the role and status of an artist in her native Serbia. Nataša Teofilović has an PhD and MA in Digital Art (Belgrade University of Arts, Interdisciplinary Studies) and holds a BA in Architecture from Belgrade University of Architecture. She lives in Pančevo, Vojvodina, Serbia. See examples of Nataša’s work here. &quo...

  7. Bosons production $W^{\\pm}$ via $e^{-}$ p-collisions at CERN LEP/LHC energies with a $W{\\pm}$ anomalous magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the production of charged bosons in deep inelastic e/sup - /p-scattering, in the context of an electroweak model, in which the vector boson self interactions may be different from those prescribed by the electroweak standard model. We show that even small deviations from the standard model value of kappa ( kappa =1) implies an observable deviation in the W/sup +or-/ production rates at CERN LEP /LHC energies.

  8. Operation of the Four 12 kW at 4.5 K Refrigerators for LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Bangert, N

    1999-01-01

    In 1998 the first energy upgrade of the LEP Electron/Positron collider, LEP2, was completed at CERN. Sixty-eight superconducting modules supplied by four 12 kW @ 4.5 K equivalent power refrigerators have been operated allowing a colliding beam energy of 94.5 GeV. Meanwhile, the operation and maintenance responsibilities were transferred to an industrial firm on the basis of a result-oriented contract. After a short description of the operational organization, we report on the operation of the LEP2 cryogenic system over the past three years. Particular attention is given to power availability, failure statistics and recovery time after interruptions. The most relevant problems and their solutions are exposed. Finally, we review the interactions between the cryogenic system and the particle beams, which are limiting the ultimate performance of the LEP collider.

  9. Pierre Aubert and Francois Mitterand visiting CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The Swiss President Pierre Aubert and the French President Francois Mitterand (with CERN's Director General Herwig Schopper to their right) on the occasion of a ceremony celebrating the "ground-breaking" for the Large Electron-Positron Collider, LEP, September 1983.

  10. For Information: CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Applications are Now Open for the CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School August 9-18, 2006 Please go to the school web site http://hcpss.fnal.gov/ and follow the links to the Application process. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS APRIL 8, 2006. Successful applicants and support awards will be announced shortly thereafter. Also available on the web is the tentative academic program of the school. The main goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers a broad picture of both the theoretical and experimental aspects of hadron collider physics. The emphasis of the first school will be on the physics potential of the first years of data taking at the LHC, and on the experimental and theoretical tools needed to exploit that potential. A series of lectures and informal discussions will include an introduction to the theoretical and phenomenological framework of hadron collisions, and current theoretical models of frontier physics, as...

  11. 3rd CERN-Fermilab HadronCollider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    EP Department

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at Fermilab. Further enquiries should ...

  12. Le CERN s'envole vers des énergies plus élevées

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1995-01-01

    CERN's Large Electron-Positron Collider LEP has moved up a gear. On 31 October, particle collisions were observed for the first time at 130 GeV, the highest energy ever achieved in an electron-positron collider. After six years of studying the elementa ry particle known as the Z, LEP moved smoothly up to its new energy, bringing the possibility of discovering new particles and furthering our understanding of how the Universe works.

  13. Role-Based Access Control for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Yastrebov, I

    2010-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest scientific instrument ever created. It was built with the intention of testing the most extreme conditions of the matter. Taking into account the significant dangers of LHC operations, European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has developed multi-pronged approach for machine safety, including access control system. This system is based on role-based access control (RBAC) concept. It was designed to protect from accidental and unauthorized access to the LHC and injector equipment. This paper introduces the new model of the role-based access control developed at CERN and gives detailed mathematical description of it. We propose a new technique called dynamic authorization that allows deploying RBAC gradually in the large systems. Moreover, we show how the protection for the very large distributed equipment control system may be implemented in efficient way. This paper also describes motivation of the project, requirements and overview of the main components: au...

  14. A Common Software Configuration Management System for CERN SPS and LEP Accelerators and Technical Services

    CERN Document Server

    Hatziangeli, Eugenia; Bragg, A E; Ninin, P; Patino, J; Sobczak, H

    1999-01-01

    Software configuration management activities are crucial to assure the integrity of current operational and the quality of new software either being developed at CERN or outsourced. The functionality of the present management system became insufficient with large maintenance overheads. In order to improve our situation, a new software configuration management system has been set up. It is based on Razor, a commercial tool, which supports the management of file versions and operational software releases, along with integrated problem reporting capabilities. In addition to the basic tool functionality, automated procedures were custom made, for the installation and distribution of operational software. Policies were developed and applied over the software development life cycle to provide visibility and control. The system ensures that, at all times, the status and location of all deliverable versions are known, the state of shared objects is carefully controlled and unauthorised changes prevented. It provides ...

  15. A Common Software-Configuration Management System for CERN SPS and LEP Accelerators and Technical Services

    CERN Document Server

    Hatziangeli, Eugenia; Bragg, A E; Ninin, P; Patino, J; Sobczak, H

    2000-01-01

    Software-configuration management activities are crucial to ensure the integrity of current operational software and the quality of new software either being developed at CERN or outsourced. The functionality of the present management system became insufficient with large maintenance overheads. In order to improve our situation, a new software-configuration management system has been set up. It is based on Razor R, a commercial tool, which supports the management of file versions and operational software releases, along with integrated problem-reporting capabilities. In addition to the basic tool functionality, automated procedures were custom-made for the installation and distribution of operational software. The system ensures that, at all times, the status and location of all deliverable versions are known, the state of shared objects is carefully controlled and unauthorized changes prevented. This paper outlines the reasons for selecting the chosen tool, the implementation of the system and the final goal...

  16. Energy Extraction in the CERN Large Hadron Collider a Project Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Kazmine, B; Medvedko, A S; Sytchev, V V; Vasilev, L B

    2001-01-01

    In case of a resistive transition (quench), fast and reliable extraction of the magnetic energy, stored in the superconducting coils of the electromagnets of a particle collider, represents an important part of its magnet protection system. In general, the quench detectors, the quench heaters and the cold by-pass diodes across each magnet, together with the energy extraction facilities provide the required protection of the quenching superconductors against damage due to local energy dissipation. In CERN's LHC machine the energy stored in each of its eight superconducting dipole chains exceeds 1300 MJ. Following an opening of the extraction switches this energy will be absorbed in large extraction resistors located in the underground collider tunnel or adjacent galleries, during the exponential current decay. Also the sixteen, 13 kA quadrupole chains (QF, QD) and more than one hundred and fifty, 600 A circuits of the corrector magnets will be equipped with extraction systems. The extraction switch-gear is bas...

  17. Accuracy of the Transverse Emittance Measurements of the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, Federico; Dehning, Bernd Dehning

    High energy accelerators and storage rings are designed to collide charged particle beams and study their collision products. The production rate of the collision products has to be maximized in order to reduce the statistical uncertainty of the produced events. Monitoring the transverse distribution of the accelerated species allows to measure and optimize the beam transverse emittance, which directly affects the secondary particles production rate. The beam transverse emittance is measured by a class of diagnostics, the transverse profile monitors, designed to observe the particles transverse distributions. This thesis work aims at determining the accuracy of two classes of profile monitors presently installed in the CERN accelerators and foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): wire scanners and residual gas monitors. The explanation of the linear dynamics that characterize the particles transverse motion in an accelerator is followed by the description of the principles of operation of the studied mo...

  18. Pair production of neutral Higgs bosons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Barrientos-Bendezu, A A

    2001-01-01

    We study the hadroproduction of two neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model, which provides a handle on the trilinear Higgs couplings. We include the contributions from quark-antiquark annihilation at the tree level and those from gluon-gluon fusion, which proceeds via quark and squark loops. We list compact results for the tree-level partonic cross sections and the squark loop amplitudes, and we confirm previous results for the quark loop amplitudes. We quantitatively analyze the hadronic cross sections at the CERN Large Hadron Collider assuming a favorable supergravity-inspired scenario.

  19. Associated production of Z and neutral Higgs bosons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Palisoc, Caesar P. [Univ. of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines). National Inst. of Physics

    2011-12-15

    We study the hadroproduction of a CP-even or CP-odd neutral Higgs boson in association with a Z boson in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) We include the contributions from quark-antiquark annihilation at the tree level and those from gluon-gluon fusion, which proceeds via quark and squark loops, and list compact analytic results. We quantitatively analyze the hadronic cross sections at the CERN Large Hadron Collider assuming a favorable supergravity-inspired MSSM scenario. (orig.)

  20. Lower limit on dark matter production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jonathan L; Su, Shufang; Takayama, Fumihiro

    2006-04-21

    We evaluate the prospects for finding evidence of dark matter production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We consider weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) and superWIMPs and characterize their properties through model-independent parametrizations. The observed relic density then implies lower bounds on dark matter production rates as functions of a few parameters. For WIMPs, the resulting signal is indistinguishable from background. For superWIMPs, however, this analysis implies significant production of metastable charged particles. For natural parameters, these rates may far exceed Drell-Yan cross sections and yield spectacular signals.

  1. W production at large transverse momentum at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Richard J; Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Sabio Vera, Agustín

    2005-11-25

    We study the production of W bosons at large transverse momentum in pp collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We calculate the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections to the differential cross section. We find that the NLO corrections provide a large increase to the cross section but, surprisingly, do not reduce the scale dependence relative to leading order (LO). We also calculate next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) soft-gluon corrections and find that, although they are small, they significantly reduce the scale dependence thus providing a more stable result.

  2. From the LHC to future colliders. CERN Theory Institute summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeck, A. de [CERN, Dept. of Physics, Geneva (Switzerland); Univ. of Antwerp, Wilrijk (Belgium); Ellis, J.; Wells, J.; Gripaios, B.; Dittmar, M. [CERN, Dept. of Physics, Geneva (Switzerland); Grojean, C. [CERN, Dept. of Physics, Geneva (Switzerland); CEA, Saclay (France); Heinemeyer, S. [Inst. de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-UC, Santander (Spain); Jakobs, K.; Schumacher, M.; Duehrssen, M. [Albert-Ludwigs-Univ., Physikalisches Inst., Freiburg (Germany); Weiglein, G.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Morton-Thurtle, V.; Rolbiecki, K.; Smillie, J.; Tattersall, J. [Univ. of Durham, IPPP, Durham (United Kingdom); Azuelos, G. [Univ. de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); Dawson, S.; Assamagan, K.; Gopalakrishna, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Han, T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Dept. of Physics, Madison (United States); Hewett, J.; Rizzo, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park (United States); Lancaster, M.; Ozcan, E. [UCL, London (United Kingdom); Mariotti, C. [Sezione di Torino, INFN, Torino (Italy); Moortgat, F. [ETH Honggerberg, Dept. of Physics, Zurich (Switzerland); Polesello, G. [Sezione di Pavia, INFN, Pavia (Italy); Riemann, S.; Bechtle, P. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Carena, M.; Juste, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia (United States); Chachamis, G. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Chen, K.F.; Hou, W.S. [National Taiwan Univ., Dept. of Physics, Taipei (China); Curtis, S. de [Univ. of Florence (Italy); INFN, Dept. of Physics, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Desch, K.; Wienemann, P. [Univ. Bonn, Physikalisches Inst., Bonn (Germany); Dreiner, H. [Bonn Univ., Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Inst., Bonn (Germany); Foster, B. [Univ. of Oxford, Particle Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Frandsen, M.T. [Univ. of Southern Denmark, CP3 - Origins, Odense (Denmark); Univ. of Oxford, Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2010-04-15

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, the Working Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions. (orig.)

  3. Donation of LEP Equipment

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    In accordance with CERN's Financial Rules, the Management hereby notifies Finance Committee of the gift of a LEP copper cavity to the town of Meyrin (CH) following a request from the Meyrin municipal authorities.

  4. $W^{+-}$-production in $e^{-}$ p-collisions at CERN LEP/LHC energies with a non-standard $W^{+-}$ anomalous magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the production of charged bosons in deep inelastic e-p- scattering, in the context of an electroweak model, in which the vector boson self interactions may be different from those prescribed by the electroweak standard model. We present results which show the strong dependence of the cross section on the anomalous magnetic dipole moment kappa of the W/sup +or-/. We show that even small deviations from the standard model value of kappa ( kappa =1) implies an observable deviation in the W/sup +or-/-production rates at CERN LEP/LHC energies. We also show that for the analysis of the charged boson production via e/sup -/p collisions at LEP/LHC energies will be very important to include the contribution from heavy boson exchange diagrams to the cross section rates. (25 refs).

  5. The Large Hadron Collider of CERN and the roadmap toward higher performance

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is exploring the new frontier of particle physics. It is the largest and most ambitious scientific instrument ever built and 100 years after the Rutherford experiment it continues that tradition of “smashing atoms” to unveil the secret of the infinitely small. LHC makes use of all what we learnt in 40 years of hadron colliders, in particular of ISR and Sp-pbarS at CERN and Tevatron at Fermilab, and it is based on Superconductivity, discovered also 100 years ago. Designing, developing the technology, building and finally commissioning the LHC took more than twenty years. While LHC is now successfully running, we are already preparing the future for the next step. First, by increasing of a factor five the LHC luminosity in ten years from now, and then by increasing its energy by a factor two or more, on the horizon of the next twenty years. These LHC upgrades, in luminosity and energy, will be the super-exploitation of the CERN infrastructure and is the best investment that the HEP...

  6. For information - Université de Genève : Accelerator Physics Challenges for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2005-01-01

    UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE Faculte des sciences Section de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet - 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél : (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Mercredi 16 March SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE à 17h00 - Auditoire Stückelberg Accelerator Physics Challenges for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN Prof. Olivier Bruning / CERN The Large Hadron Collider project at CERN will bring the energy frontier of high energy particle physics back to Europe and with it push the accelerator technology into uncharted teritory. The talk presents the LHC project in the context of the past CERN accelerator developments and addresses the main challenges in terms of technology and accelerator physics. Information: http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: A. Cervera Villanueva

  7. LEP Traceability

    CERN Document Server

    Billen, R

    2000-01-01

    After more than ten years of production for high energy physics, CERN's current flagship, LEP, will be closed down definitively October 1st, 2000. Starting immediately, some 30,000 tonnes of LEP materials will be removed from the tunnel to make room for LHC installation. The dismantling project is a major undertaking in terms of resources and constraints, which has to be completed in less than one year. Moreover, since LEP is classified as a nuclear installation in France (as if it was a nuclear power plant), special procedures have to be followed in addition to the normal environmental and safety issues. One major facet of the project is the "traceability" of everything that comes out of the LEP tunnel. This implies that each piece of equipment must be identified and tracked from its origin through any temporary storage to its final destination. Special procedures have to be followed for all materials even if they are not radioactive. As much of the equipment as possible will be recycled or disposed of. This...

  8. From the LHC to Future Colliders CERN Theory Institute Summary Report

    CERN Document Server

    de Roeck, A; Grojean, C; Heinemeyer, S; Jakobs, K; Weiglein, G; Wells, J; Azuelos, Georges; Dawson, S; Gripaios, B; Han, T; Hewett, J; Lancaster, M; Mariotti, C; Moortgat, F; Moortgat-Pick, G; Polesello, G; Riemann, S; Schumacher, M; Assamagan, K; Bechtle, P; Carena, M S; Chachamis, G; Chen, K F; De Curtis, S; Desch, K; Dittmar, M; Dreiner, H; Dührssen, M; Frandsen, M T; Giammanco, A; Godbole, R; Govoni, P; Gunion, J F; Hollik, W; Hou, W S; Isidori, G; Juste, A; Kalinowski, J; Korytov, A; Kou, E; Kraml, S; Krawczyk, M; Martin, A; Milstead, D; Morton-Thurtle, V; Mönig, K; Melé, B; Pieri, M; Plehn, T; Reina, L; Richter-Was, E; Rizzo, T; Rolbiecki, K; Sannino, F; Schram, M; Smillie, J; Sultansoy, S; Uwer, P

    2010-01-01

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300/fb of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10/fb of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, the Working Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discover...

  9. The LEP project Lifting the curtain on physics of the year 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Kanel, A

    1982-01-01

    Describes some of the work carried out by CERN, particularly that concerning the proton and neutron. A few details are given of installed plant for this type of research. The author deals particularly with the LEP machine (Large Electron Positron collider). The reasons for having such a machine are given and this is followed by a description of some of the techniques used. Public fears have been raised concerning the project and, because of this, CERN has organised three public debates at Geneva for discussion of all aspects involved. These include atom bombs, nuclear energy, and stocking of radioactive waste material. There have been some threats of sabotage regarding the LEP installation.

  10. Observation of Single Isolated Electrons of High Transverse Momentum in Events with Missing Transverse Energy at the CERN pp Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, M.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    We report the results of a search for single isolated electrons of high transverse momentum at the CERN collider. Above 15 GeV/c, four events are found having large missing transverse energy along a direction opposite in azimuth to that of the high-pT electron. Both the configuration of the events...

  11. Black holes in many dimensions at the CERN large Hadron collider testing critical string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hewett, J L; Rizzo, T G; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2005-01-01

    We consider black hole production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a generic scenario with many extra dimensions where the standard model fields are confined to a brane. With ~20 dimensions the hierarchy problem is shown to be naturally solved without the need for large compactification radii. We find that in such a scenario the properties of black holes can be used to determine the number of extra dimensions, n. In particular, we demonstrate that measurements of the decay distributions of such black holes at the LHC can determine if n is significantly larger than 6 or 7 with high confidence and thus can probe one of the critical properties of string theory compactifications.

  12. The Radiological Situation in the Beam-Cleaning Sections of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Brugger, Markus; Stevenson, Graham

    2003-01-01

    This thesis contributes to radiological assessments of the design and operation of the Large Hadron Collider currently under construction at CERN. In particular, the scope of this thesis is to examine the beam cleaning insertions - two of the main loss regions of the LHC where beam particles which would otherwise cause unwanted losses at different places of the machine are purposely intercepted. Two critical issues with regard to the protection of personnel and environment are studied: remanent dose rates due to induced radioactivity and airborne radioactivity. Although a detailed estimate of remanent dose rates is important for an optimization of later maintenance interventions only very limited information on remanent dose rates to be expected around the collimators was available so far. This thesis is an attempt to extend the knowledge considerably, especially by applying a new calculational method. Since this new approach is used for the first time in the design of the LHC a careful benchmarking with expe...

  13. Transverse-momentum resummation for slepton-pair production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzi, G.; Fuks, B.; Klasen, M.

    2006-07-01

    We perform a first precision calculation of the transverse-momentum (qT) distribution of slepton pair and slepton-sneutrino associated production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We implement soft-gluon resummation at the next-to-leading logarithmic level and consistently match the obtained result to the pure fixed-order perturbative result at leading order in the QCD coupling constant, i.e. O(αs). We give numerical predictions for τ˜1τ˜1* and τ˜1ν˜τ*+τ˜1*ν˜τ production, also implementing recent parametrizations of nonperturbative effects. The results show a relevant contribution of resummation both in the small and intermediate qT-regions and little dependence on unphysical scales and nonperturbative contributions.

  14. Transverse-momentum resummation for slepton-pair production at the CERN large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzi, G; Klasen, M

    2006-01-01

    We perform a first precision calculation of the transverse-momentum (q_T) distribution of slepton pair and slepton-sneutrino associated production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We implement soft-gluon resummation at the next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) level and consistently match the obtained result to the pure fixed-order perturbative result at leading order (LO) in the QCD coupling constant, i.e. O(alpha_s). We give numerical predictions for stau_1 stau_1^* and stau_1 sneutrino_tau^* + stau_1^* sneutrino_tau production, also implementing recent parameterizations of non-perturbative effects. The results show a relevant contribution of resummation both in the small and intermediate q_T-regions and little dependence on unphysical scales and non-perturbative contributions.

  15. Parton distribution functions probed in ultraperipheral collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, J; Brady, N; Clark, D B; Godat, E; Olness, F

    2016-01-01

    Vector meson production in ultra-peripheral pA and AA collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are very sensitive to Parton Distribution Functions (PDF) as well as to their leading-order, next-to-leading-order, and medium corrections. This process is a complimentary tool to explore the effects of different PDFs in particle production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus central collisions. Existing and forthcoming data available, e.g., from ALICE and CMS, may be used in conjunction with our theoretical predictions to constrain the PDFs. We make predictions for rapidity distributions and for cross sections of J/$\\psi$ , $\\psi(2S)$ and $\\Upsilon$ production at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5$ TeV. We use the second energy as representative for the Run 2 of PbPb collisions at the LHC.

  16. Landscape of supersymmetric particle mass hierarchies and their signature space at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Nath, Pran

    2007-12-21

    The minimal supersymmetric standard model with soft breaking has a large landscape of supersymmetric particle mass hierarchies. This number is reduced significantly in well-motivated scenarios such as minimal supergravity and alternatives. We carry out an analysis of the landscape for the first four lightest particles and identify at least 16 mass patterns, and provide benchmarks for each. We study the signature space for the patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider by analyzing the lepton+ (jet> or =2) + missing P{T} signals with 0, 1, 2, and 3 leptons. Correlations in missing P{T} are also analyzed. It is found that even with 10 fb{-1} of data a significant discrimination among patterns emerges.

  17. Black holes in many dimensions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider: testing critical string theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, JoAnne L; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G

    2005-12-31

    We consider black hole production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a generic scenario with many extra dimensions where the standard model fields are confined to a brane. With approximately 20 dimensions the hierarchy problem is shown to be naturally solved without the need for large compactification radii. We find that in such a scenario the properties of black holes can be used to determine the number of extra dimensions, . In particular, we demonstrate that measurements of the decay distributions of such black holes at the LHC can determine if is significantly larger than 6 or 7 with high confidence and thus can probe one of the critical properties of string theory compactifications.

  18. Design optimization of 600 A-13 kA current leads for the Large Hadron Collider project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, D M; Al-Mosawl, M K; Friend, C M; Thacker, P; Ballarino, A

    2001-01-01

    The requirements of the Large Hadron Collider project at CERN for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads have been widely publicized. CERN require hybrid current leads of resistive and HTS materials with current ratings of 600 A, 6 kA and 13 kA. BICC General Superconductors, in collaboration with the University of Southampton, have developed and manufactured prototype current leads for the Large Hadron Collider project. The resistive section consists of a phosphorus de-oxidized copper conductor and heat exchanger and the HTS section is constructed from BICC General's (Pb, Bi)2223 tapes with a reduced thermal conductivity Ag alloy sheath. We present the results of the materials optimization studies for the resistive and the HTS sections. Some results of the acceptance tests at CERN are discussed. (9 refs).

  19. T-odd Gluon-Top-Quark Effective Couplings at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, S Y; Lee, J; Lee, Jake

    1997-01-01

    The T-odd top-quark chromoelectric dipole moment (tCEDM) is probed through top-quark-pair production via gluon fusion at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by considering the possibility of having polarized protons. The complete analytic expressions for the tree-level helicity amplitudes of gg-> ttbar is also presented. For the derived analytic results we determine the 1-sigma statistical sensitivities to the tCEDM form factor for (i) typical CP-odd observables composed of lepton and anti-lepton momenta from t and tbar semileptonic decays for unpolarized protons, and (ii) a CP-odd event asymmetry for polarized protons by using the so-called Berger-Qiu (BQ) parametrization of polarized gluon distribution functions. We find that at the CERN LHC, the CP-odd energy and angular correlations can put a limit of 10^{-18} to 10^{-17} g_scm on the real and imaginary parts of the tCEDM, while the simple CP-odd event asymmetry with polarized protons could put a very strong limit of 10^{-20} g_scm on the imaginary part ...

  20. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R; Boccone, V; Bracco, C; Brugger, M; Cauchi, M; Cerutti, F; Deboy, D; Ferrari, A; Lari, L; Marsili, A; Mereghetti, A; Mirarchi, D; Quaranta, E; Redaelli, S; Robert-Demolaize, G; Rossi, A; Salvachua, B; Skordis, E; Tambasco, C; Valentino, G; Weiler, T; Vlachoudis, V; Wollmann, D

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010--2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5--4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An un-controlled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multi-stage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the co...

  1. Heavy-ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schukraft, J

    2012-02-28

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) took first data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in proton-proton (pp) and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of the LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most quantum chromodynamics-inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high-density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid.

  2. Cryogenic Studies for the Proposed CERN Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC)

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F

    2011-01-01

    The LHeC (Large Hadron electron Collider) is a proposed future colliding beam facility for lepton-nucleon scattering particle physics at CERN. A new 60 GeV electron accelerator will be added to the existing 27 km circumference 7 TeV LHC for collisions of electrons with protons and heavy ions. Two basic design options are being pursued. The first is a circular accelerator housed in the existing LHC tunnel which is referred to as the "Ring-Ring" version. Low field normal conducting magnets guide the particle beam while superconducting (SC) RF cavities cooled to 2 K are installed at two opposite locations at the LHC tunnel to accelerate the beams. For this version in addition a 10 GeV re-circulating SC injector will be installed. In total four refrigerators with cooling capacities between 1.2 kW and 3 kW @ 4.5 K are needed. The second option, referred to as the "Linac-Ring" version consists of a race-track re-circulating energy-recovery type machine with two 1 km long straight acceleration sections. The 944 hi...

  3. Fault Tracking of the Superconducting Magnet System at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Griesemer, Tobias

    2016-03-25

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is one of the most complex machines ever built. It is used to explore the mysteries of the universe by reproducing conditions of the big bang. High energy particles are collide in particle detectors and as a result of the collision process secondary particles are created. New particles could be discovered during this process. The operation of such a machine is not straightforward and is subject to many different types of failures. A model of LHC operation needs to be defined in order to understand the impact of the various failures on availability. As an example a typical operational cycle is described: the beams are first injected, then accelerated, and finally brought into collisions. Under nominal conditions, beams should be in collision (so-called ‘stable beams’ period) for about 10 hours and then extracted onto a beam dump block. In case of a failure, the Machine Protection Systems ensure safe extraction of the beams. From the experience in LHC Run 1 (2009 - 20...

  4. b-tagging in DELPHI at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bates, M; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bibby, J; Biffi, P; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Branchini, P; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Couchot, F; Crawley, B; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Almagne, B; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dijkstra, H; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Geralis, T; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Hansen, J; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hernando, J A; Herr, H; Heuser, J M; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jalocha, P; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Kucewicz, W; Kurowska, J; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Niezurawski, P; Nikolenko, M; Nomerotski, A; Norman, A; Nygren, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stavitski, I; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

    2004-01-01

    The standard method used for tagging b-hadrons in the DELPHI experiment at the CERN LEP Collider is discussed in detail. The main ingredient of b-tagging is the impact parameters of tracks, which relies mostly on the vertex detector. Additional information, such as the mass of particles associated to a secondary vertex, significantly improves the selection efficiency and the background suppression. The paper describes various discriminating variables used for the tagging and the procedure of their combination. In addition, applications of b-tagging to some physics analyses, which depend crucially on the performance and reliability of b-tagging, are described briefly.

  5. PARTICLE PHYSICS: CERN Gives Higgs Hunters Extra Month to Collect Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, O

    2000-09-22

    After 11 years of banging electrons and positrons together at higher energies than any other machine in the world, CERN, the European laboratory for particle physics, had decided to shut down the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) and install a new machine, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in its 27-kilometer tunnel. In 2005, the LHC will start bashing protons together at even higher energies. But tantalizing hints of a long-sought fundamental particle have forced CERN managers to grant LEP a month's reprieve.

  6. CERN Library | Pauline Gagnon presents the book "Who cares about particle physics? : making sense of the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider and CERN" | 15 September

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2016-01-01

    "Who cares about particle physics? : making sense of the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider and CERN ", by Pauline Gagnon. Thursday 15 September 2016, 16:00 - 17:30 in the CERN Library (Bldg 52 1-052) *Coffee will be served at 15:30* CERN, the European Laboratory for particle physics, regularly makes the news. What kind of research happens at this international laboratory and how does it impact people's daily lives? Why is the discovery of the Higgs boson so important? Particle physics describes all matter found on Earth, in stars and all galaxies but it also tries to go beyond what is known to describe dark matter, a form of matter five times more prevalent than the known, regular matter. How do we know this mysterious dark matter exists and is there a chance it will be discovered soon? About sixty countries contributed to the construction of the gigantic Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its immense detectors. Dive in to discover how international teams of researchers...

  7. Shimon Pérès visite le CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1995-01-01

    Shimon Peres, Israel's Foreign Minister, made an official visit to CERN on 26 January. He was accompanied by the Israeli Ambassador to the International Organizations in Geneva, Yosef Lamdan, and was received by CERN's Director General, Prof. Christopher Llewellyn Smith. The visit took place at the site of the giant OPAL experiment, on the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP), where there is major Israeli involvement.

  8. LEP shuts down after eleven years of forefront research

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    After extended consultation with the appropriate scientific committees, CERN’s Director-General Luciano Maiani announced today that the LEP accelerator had been switched off for the last time. LEP was scheduled to close at the end of September 2000 but tantalising signs of possible new physics led to LEP’s run being extended until 2 November. At the end of this extra period, the four LEP experiments had produced a number of collisions compatible with the production of Higgs particles with a mass of around 115 GeV. These events were also compatible with other known processes. The new data was not sufficiently conclusive to justify running LEP in 2001, which would have inevitable impact on LHC construction and CERN’s scientific programme. The CERN Management decided that the best policy for the Laboratory is to proceed full-speed ahead with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. Steve Myers, Head of SL Division, with members of the LEP team, pulling the symbolic rope to swich off the accelerator. CERN Co...

  9. CERN moves into the LHC era

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Dr Hans Eschelbacher (on the left), President of the CERN Council for the last three years, hands over to his successor Maurice Bourquin.  The CERN Council, where the representatives of the 20 Member States of the Organization decide on scientific programmes and financial resources, held its 116th session on 15 December under the chairmanship of Dr. Hans C. Eschelbacher (DE). 'Le Roi est mort. Vive le Roi !' The Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) era has ended and CERN's future is the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), stated Director General, Prof. Luciano Maiani. He opened his report to Council with a 'homage to LEP', which reached the end of its career during 2000 and is now being dismantled to make way for CERN's next major machine, the LHC collider, in the same 27-kilometre tunnel. The strong indications of a Higgs boson at 115 GeV found during the year were the culmination of LEP's long and distinguished physics career, during which the machine opened up new regimes of precision physics, involvi...

  10. Development of a beam condition monitor for use in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider using synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Hernando, L; Ilgner, C; MacPherson, A; Oh, A; Pernegger, H; Pritchard, T; Stone, R; Worm, S

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will collide two counter rotating proton beams, each with a store energy about 350MJ; enough to melt 550kg of copper. If there is failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damage not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor last increments of particle flux near the interaction point and if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control, to dump the beams. Due to its radiation hardness and minimal services requirements, synthetic CVD diamond is being considered as BCM sensor option. (12 refs).

  11. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  12. The Thermosiphon Cooling System of the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Battistin, M; Bitadze, A; Bonneau, P; Botelho-Direito, J; Boyd, G; Corbaz, F; Crespo-Lopez, O; Da Riva, E; Degeorge, C; Deterre, C; DiGirolamo, B; Doubek, M; Favre, G; Godlewski, J; Hallewell, G; Katunin, S; Lefils, D; Lombard, D; McMahon, S; Nagai, K; Robinson, D; Rossi, C; Rozanov, A; Vacek, V; Zwalinski, L

    2015-01-01

    The silicon tracker of the ATLAS experiment at CERN Large Hadron Collider will operate around –15°C to minimize the effects of radiation damage. The present cooling system is based on a conventional evaporative circuit, removing around 60 kW of heat dissipated by the silicon sensors and their local electronics. The compressors in the present circuit have proved less reliable than originally hoped, and will be replaced with a thermosiphon. The working principle of the thermosiphon uses gravity to circulate the coolant without any mechanical components (compressors or pumps) in the primary coolant circuit. The fluorocarbon coolant will be condensed at a temperature and pressure lower than those in the on-detector evaporators, but at a higher altitude, taking advantage of the 92 m height difference between the underground experiment and the services located on the surface. An extensive campaign of tests, detailed in this paper, was performed using two small-scale thermosiphon systems. These tests confirmed th...

  13. The CERN Large Hadron Collider as a tool to study high-energy density matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Gryaznov, V; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Kain, V; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Temporal, M

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate two extremely powerful 7 TeV proton beams. Each beam will consist of 2808 bunches with an intensity per bunch of 1.15*10/sup 11/ protons so that the total number of protons in one beam will be about 3*10/sup 14/ and the total energy will be 362 MJ. Each bunch will have a duration of 0.5 ns and two successive bunches will be separated by 25 ns, while the power distribution in the radial direction will be Gaussian with a standard deviation, sigma =0.2 mm. The total duration of the beam will be about 89 mu s. Using a 2D hydrodynamic code, we have carried out numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper target that is irradiated with one of the LHC beams. These calculations show that only the first few hundred proton bunches will deposit a high specific energy of 400 kJ/g that will induce exotic states of high energy density in matter.

  14. The CERN Large Hadron Collider as a tool to study high-energy density matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Kain, V; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Temporal, M; Hoffmann, D H H; Fortov, V E

    2005-04-08

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate two extremely powerful 7 TeV proton beams. Each beam will consist of 2808 bunches with an intensity per bunch of 1.15x10(11) protons so that the total number of protons in one beam will be about 3x10(14) and the total energy will be 362 MJ. Each bunch will have a duration of 0.5 ns and two successive bunches will be separated by 25 ns, while the power distribution in the radial direction will be Gaussian with a standard deviation, sigma=0.2 mm. The total duration of the beam will be about 89 mus. Using a 2D hydrodynamic code, we have carried out numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper target that is irradiated with one of the LHC beams. These calculations show that only the first few hundred proton bunches will deposit a high specific energy of 400 kJ/g that will induce exotic states of high energy density in matter.

  15. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the LEP2 collider near $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Perrodo, P; Pietrzyk, B; Alemany, R; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Becker, U; Boix, G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Leroy, O; Maley, P; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Vreeswijk, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Chalmers, M; Curtis, L; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Ward, J J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Marinelli, N; Martin, E B; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Robertson, N A; Williams, M; Van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Kröcker, M; Nürnberger, H A; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; De Vivie de Régie, J B; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Chambers, J T; Coles, J; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Przysiezniak, H; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Trabelsi, A; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Prange, G; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Mamier, G; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Vogt, M; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    2000-01-01

    During 1997 the ALEPH experiment at LEP gathered $57 \\pb$ of data at centre-of-mass energies near $183 ~\\G$. These data are used to look for possible signals from the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson in the reaction $\\ee\\r\\H\\Z$. No evidence of a signal is found in the data; seven events are selected, in agreement with the expectation of 7.2 events from background processes. This observation results in an improved lower limit on the mass of the Higgs boson: $\\mH > 87.9 \\Gcs$ at 95\\% confidence level.

  16. Search for the standard model Higgs boson at the LEP2 Collider near sqrt(s)=183 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Perrodo, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Halley, A. W.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Loomis, C.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Tournefier, E.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Ward, J. J.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E. B.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Robertson, A. N.; Williams, M. I.; van Gemmeren, P.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Kröcker, M.; Nürnberger, H.-A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; de Vivie de Régie, J.-B.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Chambers, J. T.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faïf, G.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Prange, G.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Mamier, G.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Vogt, M.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-02-01

    During 1997 the ALEPH experiment at LEP gathered 57 pb-1 of data at centre-of-mass energies near 183 GeV. These data are used to look for possible signals from the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson in the reaction e+e--->HZ. No evidence of a signal is found in the data; seven events are selected, in agreement with the expectation of 7.2 events from background processes. This observation results in an improved lower limit on the mass of the Higgs boson: mH>87.9 GeV/c2 at 95% confidence level.

  17. Prompt D*+ production in proton-proton and lead-lead collisions, measured with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, R. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the results are presented of the first measurements of the D*+ meson nuclear modification factor RAA in heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector at CERN. These open charmed mesons are a useful tool to investigat

  18. Evidence for colour-octet mechanism from CERN LEP2{gamma}{gamma}{yields}J/{psi}+X data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, M.; Kniehl, B.A.; Mihaila, L.N.; Steinhauser, M. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2001-12-01

    We present theoretical predictions for the transverse-momentum distribution of J/{psi} mesons promptly produced in {gamma}{gamma} collisions within the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics, including the contributions from both direct and resolved photons, and we perform a conservative error analysis. The fraction of J/{psi} mesons from decays of bottom-flavoured hadrons is estimated to be negligibly small. New data taken by the DELPHI Collaboration at LEP2 nicely confirm these predictions, while they disfavour those obtained within the traditional colour-singlet model. (orig.)

  19. Evidence for the color-octet mechanism from CERN LEP2 gamma gamma --> J/psi + X Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Michael; Kniehl, Bernd A; Mihaila, Luminiţa N; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2002-07-15

    We present theoretical predictions for the transverse-momentum distribution of J/psi mesons promptly produced in gammagamma collisions within the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics, including the contributions from both direct and resolved photons, and we perform a conservative error analysis. The fraction of J/psi mesons from decays of bottom-flavored hadrons is estimated to be negligibly small. New data taken by the DELPHI Collaboration at LEP2 nicely confirm these predictions, while they disfavor those obtained within the traditional color-singlet model.

  20. First Lecture of Collide@CERN Geneva for Dance and Performance: Gilles Jobin artist in residency and his inspiration partner Joao Pequenao

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    CERN, jointly with Canton and City of Geneva, presents the public lecture of Gilles Jobin, the first winner of the Prix Collide@CERN Geneva, residency award for Dance and Performance arts, and his inspiration partner. They will present their work in dance and science at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on Wendesday 23 May 2012 at 19h (open doors at 18.30h) Refreshments will be served afterwards. Please reserve your places for you and your friends by contacting merce.monje.cano@cern.ch. +41 22 76 75246 We very much look forward to seeing you there.

  1. Lecture | CERN prepares its long-term future: a 100-km circular collider to follow the LHC? | CERN Globe | 11 March

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Particle physics is a long-term field of research: the LHC was originally conceived in the 1980s, but did not start running until 25 years later. An accelerator unlike any other, it is now just at the start of a programme that is set to run for another 20 years.   Frédérick Bordry. While the LHC programme is already well defined for the next two decades, it is now time to look even further ahead, and so CERN is initiating an exploratory study for a future long-term project centred on a next-generation circular collider with a circumference of 80 to 100 kilometres. A worthy successor to the LHC, whose collision energies will reach 13 TeV in 2015, such an accelerator would allow particle physicists to push the boundaries of knowledge even further. The Future Circular Collider (FCC) programme will focus especially on studies for a hadron collider, like the LHC, capable of reaching unprecedented energies in the region of 100 TeV. Opening with an introduction to the LHC and...

  2. Sprint final pour le LEP

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    Director General's Status Report The Director General, Prof. Luciano Maiani, began his report with the performance of the Laboratory's flagship accelerator, the Large Electron-Positron collider, LEP, during its final year. LEP is achieving its highest energy collisions ever with beams of over 104 GeV, well exceeding its design energy and giving experiments a final chance of discovering the still-elusive Higgs particles before the end of it's experimental programme in September. Thanks to precision data from LEP and elsewhere, scientists already know that Higgs particles, if they exist, must be within range of LEP's successor, the LHC.

  3. Attend the lecture of the first artist-scientist inspiration partners of the Collide@CERN programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Julius Von Bismarck, the first winner of the Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN residency award for the digital arts and his science inspiration partner, Dr. James Wells, will present their individual work in art and science at the beginning of the residency on Wednesday 21 March at 18:45 at the Globe of Science and Innovation.   Hands up, this is a photo shoot! Julius Von Bismarck in action. All are welcome! The event will be in English, the common language between the artist and the scientist. To make a reservation for you and any guests, please send an e-mail to merce.monje.cano@cern.ch or call +41 22 76 75 246. For the complete programme of the event, see the official invitation.

  4. Cryogenic testing of by-pass diode stacks for the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Della Corte, A; Hagedorn, Dietrich; Turtu, S; Basile, G L; Catitti, A; Chiarelli, S; Di Ferdinando, E; Taddia, G; Talli, M; Verdini, L; Viola, R

    2002-01-01

    A dedicated facility prepared by ENEA (Italian Agency for Energy and Environment) for the cryogenic testing of by-pass diodes for the protection of the CERN Large Hadron Collider main magnets will be described. This experimental activity is in the frame of a contract awarded to OCEM, an Italian firm active in the field of electronic devices and power supplies, in collaboration with ENEA, for the manufacture and testing of all the diode stacks. In particular, CERN requests the measurement of the reverse and forward voltage diode characteristics at 300 K and 77 K, and endurance test cycles at liquid helium temperature. The experimental set-up at ENEA and data acquisition system developed for the scope will be described and the test results reported. (3 refs).

  5. CERN-RD39 collaboration activities aimed at cryogenic silicon detector application in high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Eremin, Vladimir; Verbitskaya, Elena; Dehning, Bernd; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R.; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Kurfürst, Christoph; Härkönen, Jaakko

    2016-07-01

    Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) made of silicon are new devices for monitoring of radiation environment in the vicinity of superconductive magnets of the Large Hadron Collider. The challenge of BLMs is extreme radiation hardness, up to 1016 protons/cm2 while placed in superfluid helium (temperature of 1.9 K). CERN BE-BI-BL group, together with CERN-RD39 collaboration, has developed prototypes of BLMs and investigated their device physics. An overview of this development-results of the in situ radiation tests of planar silicon detectors at 1.9 K, performed in 2012 and 2014-is presented. Our main finding is that silicon detectors survive under irradiation to 1×1016 p/cm2 at 1.9 K. In order to improve charge collection, current injection into the detector sensitive region (Current Injection Detector (CID)) was tested. The results indicate that the detector signal increases while operated in CID mode.

  6. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  7. Phenomenology of W plus or minus H plus or minus production at the CERN Large Handron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, S

    1999-01-01

    Barrientos Bendezu' and Kniehl [hep-ph/9807480] recently suggested that $W^\\pm H^\\mp$ associated production may be a useful channel in the search for the elusive heavy charged Higgs bosons of the 2 Higgs Doublet Model at the Large Hadron Collider. We investigate the phenomenology of this mechanism in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, with special attention paid to the most likely heavy Higgs decay, $H^\\mp\\to tb\\to b\\bar b W^\\mp$, and to the irreducible background from top pair production. We find that the semi-leptonic signature `$b\\bar b W^+W^-\\to b\\bar b jj \\ell$ + missing momentum' is dominated by top-antitop events, which overwhelm the charged Higgs signal over the heavy mass range that can be probed at the CERN collider

  8. Probing small parton densities in ultraperipheral A A and pA collisions at the CERN large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikman, Mark; Vogt, Ramona; White, Sebastian

    2006-03-01

    We calculate photoproduction rates for several hard processes in ultraperipheral proton-lead and lead-lead collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with square root of sNN = 8.8 and 5.5 TeV, respectively, which could be triggered in the large LHC detectors. We use ATLAS as an example. The lead ion is treated as a source of (coherently produced) photons with energies and intensities greater than those of equivalent ep collisions at the DESY collider HERA. We find very large rates for both inclusive and diffractive production that will extend the HERA x range by nearly an order of magnitude for similar virtualities. We demonstrate that it is possible to reach the kinematic regime where nonlinear effects are larger than at HERA.

  9. CERN, Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (pages 1-3) is being built at CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva. CERN offers some extremely exciting opportunities to see "big bang" in action. (1 page)

  10. The Higgs Boson in the Standard Model - From LEP to LHC: Expectations, Searches, and Discovery of a Candidate

    CERN Document Server

    Dittmaier, S

    2012-01-01

    The quest for the Higgs boson of the Standard Model, which was a cornerstone in the physics programme at particle colliders operating at the energy frontier for several decades, is the subject of this review. After reviewing the formulation of electroweak symmetry breaking via the Higgs mechanism within the Standard Model, the phenomenology of the Higgs boson at colliders and the theoretical and phenomenological constraints on the Standard Model Higgs sector are discussed. General remarks on experimental searches and the methodology of statistical interpretation are followed by a description of the phenomenology of Higgs-boson production and the corresponding precise predictions. The strategies of the experimental searches and their findings are discussed for the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) at CERN, the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron at Fermilab, and the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The article concludes with the description of the observation of a Higgs-like boson at the...

  11. Visit ALEPH experiment on the LEP collider by twenty-eight young scientists chosen to represent their respective countries

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    Following an international meeting of secondary school pupils on the theme of "Future Scientists: Women and Men" in Paris on 23 and 24 April. The aim of this meeting, which was organised by UNESCO, was to encourage young people, and girls in particular, to choose scientific studies and careers. Twenty-eight young scientists chosen to represent their respective countries visited the CERN site this week following an international meeting of secondary school pupils on the theme of "Future Scientists: Women and Men" in Paris on 23 and 24 April. The aim of this meeting, which was organised by UNESCO, was to encourage young people, and girls in particular, to choose scientific studies and careers.

  12. LEP Dismantling: Wagons Roll!

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The first trucks transporting material from LEP and its four experiments left CERN on 31 January. Since the LEP dismantling operation began, the material had been waiting to be removed from the sites of the four experiments and the special transit area on the Prévessin site. On the evening of 30 January, the French customs authorities gave the green light for the transport operation to begin. So first thing the next day, the two companies in charge of recycling the material, Jaeger & Bosshard (Switzerland) and Excoffier (France), set to work. Only 1500 truckloads to go before everything has been removed!

  13. Large Area Silicon Tracking Detectors with Fast Signal Readout for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Köstner, S

    2005-01-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles, which is summarized briefly in the second chapter, incorporates a number of successful theories to explain the nature and consistency of matter. However not all building blocks of this model could yet be tested by experiment. To confirm existing theories and to improve nowadays understanding of matter a new machine is currently being built at CERN, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), described in the third chapter. LHC is a proton-proton collider which will reach unprecedented luminosities and center of mass energies. Five experiments are attached to it to give answers to questions like the existence of the Higgs meson, which allows to explain the mass content of matter, and the origin of CP-violation, which plays an important role in the baryogenesis of the universe. Supersymmetric theories, proposing a bosonic superpartner for each fermion and vice versa, will be tested. By colliding heavy ions, high energy and particle densities can be achieved and probed. This stat...

  14. Study of some optical glues for the Compact Muon Solenoid at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Montecchi, Marco

    2001-01-01

    Two Avalanche Photodiodes will measure the light produced in each of the 61,200 PbWO4 crystals composing the barrel part of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN. To improve the collection of the photons, these detectors will be glued to the crystal. To be used in CMS, the optical glue must fulfil several requirements. The paper describes those requirements and reports the results of the investigation of several commercial optical glues. In particular, refractive index, absorption length, radiation hardness and forecast ageing after 15 years are reported. The most promising glue for CMS was more deeply investigated, in particular its chemical composition, chemical compatibility with the other parts of the calorimeter and curing time in realistic conditions.

  15. Constraining the Higgs couplings to up and down quarks using production kinematics at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bonner, Gage

    2016-01-01

    We study the prospects for constraining the Higgs boson's couplings to up and down quarks using kinematic distributions in Higgs production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We find that the Higgs $p_T$ distribution can be used to constrain these couplings with precision competitive to other proposed techniques. With 3000 fb$^{-1}$ of data at 13 TeV in the four-lepton decay channel, we find $-0.73 \\lesssim \\bar{\\kappa}_u \\lesssim 0.33$ and $-0.88 \\lesssim \\bar{\\kappa}_d \\lesssim 0.32$, where $\\bar{\\kappa}_q = (m_q/m_b) \\kappa_q$ is a scaling factor that modifies the $q$ quark Yukawa coupling relative to the Standard Model bottom quark Yukawa coupling. The sensitivity may be improved by including additional Higgs decay channels.

  16. Calculation of abort thresholds for the Beam Loss Monitoring System of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Nemcic, Martin; Dehning, Bernd

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is one of the most critical machine protection systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland. Its main purpose is to protect the superconducting magnets from quenches and other equipment from damage by requesting a beam abort when the measured losses exceed any of the predefined threshold levels. The system consist of circa 4000 ionization chambers which are installed around the 27 kilometres ring (LHC). This study aims to choose a technical platform and produce a system that addresses all of the limitations with the current system that is used for the calculation of the LHC BLM abort threshold values. To achieve this, a comparison and benchmarking of the Java and .NET technical platforms is performed in order to establish the most suitable solution. To establish which technical platform is a successful replacement of the current abort threshold calculator, comparable prototype systems in Java and .NET we...

  17. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Y P; Barranco, J; Tomás, R; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F; Calaga, R; Morita, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit...

  18. Who cares about particle physics? making sense of the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider and CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051327

    2016-01-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for particle physics, regularly makes the news. What kind of research happens at this international laboratory and how does it impact people's daily lives? Why is the discovery of the Higgs boson so important? Particle physics describes all matter found on Earth, in stars and all galaxies but it also tries to go beyond what is known to describe dark matter, a form of matter five times more prevalent than the known, regular matter. How do we know this mysterious dark matter exists and is there a chance it will be discovered soon? About sixty countries contributed to the construction of the gigantic Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its immense detectors. Dive in to discover how international teams of researchers work together to push scientific knowledge forward. Here is a book written for every person who wishes to learn a little more about particle physics, without requiring prior scientific knowledge. It starts from the basics to build a solid understanding of current res...

  19. CERN-RD39 collaboration activities aimed at cryogenic silicon detector application in high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng [National-Provincial Laboratory of Special Function Thin Film Materials, School of Material Sciences and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Eremin, Vladimir [Ioffe Institute, 26 Politekhnicheskaya str., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Verbitskaya, Elena, E-mail: elena.verbitskaya@cern.ch [Ioffe Institute, 26 Politekhnicheskaya str., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Dehning, Bernd; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R.; Alexopoulos, Andreas [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kurfürst, Christoph [Technische Universität, Universitätsring 1, 1010 Wien (Austria); Härkönen, Jaakko [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Gustaf Hällströminkatu, 200014 Helsingin yliopisto (Finland)

    2016-07-11

    Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) made of silicon are new devices for monitoring of radiation environment in the vicinity of superconductive magnets of the Large Hadron Collider. The challenge of BLMs is extreme radiation hardness, up to 10{sup 16} protons/cm{sup 2} while placed in superfluid helium (temperature of 1.9 K). CERN BE-BI-BL group, together with CERN-RD39 collaboration, has developed prototypes of BLMs and investigated their device physics. An overview of this development—results of the in situ radiation tests of planar silicon detectors at 1.9 K, performed in 2012 and 2014—is presented. Our main finding is that silicon detectors survive under irradiation to 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} at 1.9 K. In order to improve charge collection, current injection into the detector sensitive region (Current Injection Detector (CID)) was tested. The results indicate that the detector signal increases while operated in CID mode. - Highlights: • Activities aimed at upgrading of Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) at HL-LHC are described. • Overview of in situ radiation tests of silicon BLMs immersed in LHe is presented. • Silicon detectors with 300 and 100 μm thickness survived radiation at 1.9 K. • Current injection is still effective at 1.9 K for radiation hardness improvement. • Si detectors are currently installed on the magnets for their operation as BLMs.

  20. slice of a LEP bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a slice of a LEP dipole bending magnet, made as a concrete and iron sandwich The bending field needed in LEP is small (about 1000 Gauss), equivalent to two of the magnets people stick on fridge doors. Because it is very difficult to keep a low field steady, a high field was used in iron plates embedded in concrete. A CERN breakthrough in magnet design, LEP dipoles can be tuned easily and are cheaper than conventional magnets.

  1. Slice of a LEP bending magnet

    CERN Document Server

    This is a slice of a LEP dipole bending magnet, made as a concrete and iron sandwich. The bending field needed in LEP is small (about 1000 Gauss), equivalent to two of the magnets people stick on fridge doors. Because it is very difficult to keep a low field steady, a high field was used in iron plates embedded in concrete. A CERN breakthrough in magnet design, LEP dipoles can be tuned easily and are cheaper than conventional magnets.

  2. Development of large-capacity refrigeration at 1.8 K for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P; Claudet, G

    1996-01-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, is working towards the construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a high-energy, high-luminosity particle accelerator and collider [1] of 26.7 km circumference, due to start producing frontier physics, by bringing into collision intense proton and ion beams with centre-of-mass energies in the TeV-per-constituent range, at the beginning of the next century. The key technology for achieving this ambitious scientific goal at economically acceptable cost is the use of high-field superconducting magnets using Nb-Ti conductor operating in superfluid helium [2]. To maintain the some 25 km of bending and focusing magnets at their operating temperature of 1.9 K, the LHC cryogenic system will have to produce an unprecedented total refrigeration capacity of about 20 kW at 1.8 K, in eight cryogenic plants distributed around the machine circumference [3]. This has requested the undertaking of an industrial development programme, in the form of a collaboration betwe...

  3. Ceremony to mark the installation of first magnet at LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Team

    1987-01-01

    Speech from French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac following the installation of the first magnet at LEP on 4 June 1987. And from Herwig Schopper, CERN Director-General; Swiss President Pierre Aubert and Wolfgang Kummer, President of the CERN Council.

  4. Meeting LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    Adams,J; Schnell,W

    1979-01-01

    Le DG J.Adams fait l'introduction et présente les deux autres orateurs. Pierre Darriulat qui fait un doscours sur la physique à l'occasion du LEP, Wolfgang Schnell, qui parle du projet de la machine LEP et le DG lui-même contribue avec quelques réflexions. Présentation des dias

  5. Precise determination of the Wtb couplings at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Del Áquila, F

    2003-01-01

    Top pair production at the CERN LHC is the ideal place to search for nonstandard Wtb couplings in t to Wb to l nu b decays. The lb forward-backward asymmetry in the W rest frame is very sensitive to sigma /sup mu nu / couplings, and can spot one-loop QCD corrections to the decay vertex with more than 5 sigma statistical significance. We discuss the potential of this asymmetry to signal nonstandard gamma /sup mu / and sigma /sup mu nu / couplings and compare with tt spin correlation asymmetries, which have a lower sensitivity. We also briefly summarize the results for the Fermilab Tevatron. (25 refs).

  6. L3 experiment dismantling at LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    The last muon chamber is removed from the L3 experiment at the LEP collider, which was in operation from 1989 to 2000. The large red magnet yoke will be reused by the ALICE experiment when the LHC is constructed.

  7. Reaching record-low β* at the CERN Large Hadron Collider using a novel scheme of collimator settings and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Bracco, C.; De Maria, R.; Giovannozzi, M.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Redaelli, S.; Quaranta, E.; Salvachua, B.

    2017-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is built to collide intense proton beams with an unprecedented energy of 7 TeV. The design stored energy per beam of 362 MJ makes the LHC beams highly destructive, so that any beam losses risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets or damage to accelerator components. Collimators are installed to protect the machine and they define a minimum normalized aperture, below which no other element is allowed. This imposes a limit on the achievable luminosity, since when squeezing β* (the β-function at the collision point) to smaller values for increased luminosity, the β-function in the final focusing system increases. This leads to a smaller normalized aperture that risks to go below the allowed collimation aperture. In the first run of the LHC, this was the main limitation on β*, which was constrained to values above the design specification. In this article, we show through theoretical and experimental studies how tighter collimator openings and a new optics with specific phase-advance constraints allows a β* as small as 40 cm, a factor 2 smaller than β*=80 cm used in 2015 and significantly below the design value β*=55 cm, in spite of a lower beam energy. The proposed configuration with β*=40 cm has been successfully put into operation and has been used throughout 2016 as the LHC baseline. The decrease in β* compared to 2015 has been an essential contribution to reaching and surpassing, in 2016, the LHC design luminosity for the first time, and to accumulating a record-high integrated luminosity of around 40 fb-1 in one year, in spite of using less bunches than in the design.

  8. Crab dispersion and its impact on the CERN Large Hadron Collider collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, P; Tomàs, R; Zimmermann, F

    2010-01-01

    Crab cavities are proposed to be used for a luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The crab cavity introduces another kind of dispersion to the particles which is z dependent, and thus could complicate the beam dynamics and have an impact on the LHC collimation system. As for LHC, the off-momentum beta-beat and dispersion-beat already compromise the performance of the collimation system; the crab dispersion introduced by global crab cavities might do the same, and should be carefully evaluated. In this paper, we present a definition for the crab dispersion, and study its impact on the LHC collimation system.

  9. Fluctuations as a test of chemical nonequilibrium at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that large chemical potential leads to the significant increase of multiplicity fluctuations for bosons, and makes the fluctuations infinite in the case of Bose-Einstein condensation. It allows us to distinguish between the models that explain the anomalous proton to pion ratio and the low transverse momentum enhancement of pion spectra in Pb+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider within chemical equilibrium or nonequilibrium models. The effects of resonance decays, finite size of the system, requirements to the event statistics, different momentum cuts, and limited detector acceptance are considered. The obtained results show the possibility to observe a substantial increase of the normalized kurtosis for positively or negatively charged pions in the case of nonequilibrium or partial pion condensation using currently measured data.

  10. LEP - ppbar

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN ???

    1983-01-01

    Aerial views. UA1, big rectangle of metal going down to the detector. E. Jones, ACOL control room, filled with people (a first?). See ACOL. Chantier, LEP shaft. Underground. LEP dipole magnet construction. Interview with Schopper and LEP: history has shown that the discovery of new phenomena has led to new applications...."I don't have the imagination to predict what could come out from the research we are doing now," but history has shown...electro-magnetism led to radio, tv. Comments : colour washed out, green. Silent at beginning and from time to time after

  11. New results for light gravitinos at hadron colliders: Fermilab Tevatron limits and CERN LHC perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Michael; Pignol, Guillaume

    2007-06-01

    We derive Feynman rules for the interactions of a single gravitino with (s)quarks and gluons/gluinos from an effective supergravity Lagrangian in nonderivative form and use them to calculate the hadroproduction cross sections and decay widths of single gravitinos. We confirm the results obtained previously with a derivative Lagrangian as well as those obtained with the nonderivative Lagrangian in the high-energy limit and elaborate on the connection between gauge independence and the presence of quartic vertices. We perform extensive numerical studies of branching ratios, total cross sections, and transverse-momentum spectra at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC. From the latest CDF monojet cross section limit, we derive a new and robust exclusion contour in the gravitino-squark/gluino mass plane, implying that gravitinos with masses below 2×10-5 to 1×10-5eV are excluded for squark/gluino masses below 200 and 500 GeV, respectively. These limits are complementary to the one obtained by the CDF Collaboration, 1.1×10-5eV, under the assumption of infinitely heavy squarks and gluinos. For the LHC, we conclude that supersymmetric scenarios with light gravitinos will lead to a striking monojet signal very quickly after its startup.

  12. CERN Library | Arthur I. Miller presents "Colliding worlds: How Cutting-Edge Science Is Redefining Contemporary Art" | 21 October

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, an exciting new art movement has emerged in which artists illuminate the latest advances in science.   Some of their provocative creations - a live rabbit implanted with the fluorescent gene of a jellyfish, a gigantic glass-and-chrome sculpture of the Big Bang itself - can be seen in traditional art museums and magazines, while others are being made by leading designers at Pixar, Google's Creative Lab and the MIT Media Lab. Arthur I. Miller takes readers on a wild journey to explore this new frontier. From the movement's origins a century ago - when Einstein shaped Cubism and X-rays affected fine photography - to the latest discoveries of biotechnology, cosmology and quantum physics, Miller shows how today's artists and designers are producing work at the cutting edge of science. Tuesday, 21 October 2014 at 14:30 in the Library, Bldg. 52 1-052 https://indico.cern.ch/event/346299/ *Coffee will be served from 2 p.m.* "Colliding Worlds: How Cutt...

  13. Sources of machine-induced background in the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R; Boccone, V; Bregliozzi, G; Burkhardt, H; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Huhtinen, M; Lechner, A; Levinsen, Y; Mereghetti, A; Mokhov, N V; Tropin, I S; Vlachoudis, V

    2013-01-01

    One source of experimental background in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particles entering the detectors from the machine. These particles are created in cascades, caused by upstream interactions of beam protons with residual gas molecules or collimators. We estimate the losses on the collimators with SixTrack and simulate the showers with FLUKA and MARS to obtain the flux and distribution of particles entering the ATLAS and CMS detectors. We consider some machine configurations used in the first LHC run, with focus on 3.5 TeV operation as in 2011. Results from FLUKA and MARS are compared and a very good agreement is found. An analysis of logged LHC data provides, for different processes, absolute beam loss rates, which are used together with further simulations of vacuum conditions to normalize the results to rates of particles entering the detectors. We assess the relative importance of background from elastic and inelastic beam-gas interactions, and the leakage out of the LHC collimation system, a...

  14. Sources of machine-induced background in the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, R.; et al.,

    2013-11-21

    One source of experimental background in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particles entering the detectors from the machine. These particles are created in cascades, caused by upstream interactions of beam protons with residual gas molecules or collimators. We estimate the losses on the collimators with SixTrack and simulate the showers with FLUKA and MARS to obtain the flux and distribution of particles entering the ATLAS and CMS detectors. We consider some machine configurations used in the first LHC run, with focus on 3.5 TeV operation as in 2011. Results from FLUKA and MARS are compared and a very good agreement is found. An analysis of logged LHC data provides, for different processes, absolute beam loss rates, which are used together with further simulations of vacuum conditions to normalize the results to rates of particles entering the detectors. We assess the relative importance of background from elastic and inelastic beam-gas interactions, and the leakage out of the LHC collimation system, and show that beam-gas interactions are the dominating source of machine-induced background for the studied machine scenarios. Our results serve as a starting point for the experiments to perform further simulations in order to estimate the resulting signals in the detectors.

  15. Monitoring of damage on water–cooled cables installed in the Large Hadron Collider (CERN) and research on possible alternatives.

    CERN Document Server

    Wollmann, Alexander; Guillaume, J C; Ricci, D

    To supply the superconducting magnets in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, several thousand metres of water–cooled cables were installed. These cables consist of a flexible copper core surrounded by a reinforced rubber hose. Although the hose material has been selected carefully, on many cables the rubber hose has suffered from damage. After giving a general overview on common rubber materials and known reasons for their ageing, the technology of water–cooled cables and their special requirements will be introduced. Then, the aim of this thesis is to present the monitoring of the damage on the rubber hoses. This includes an introduction to the monitoring technique used, followed by an analysis and discussion of the results obtained. As a different way of investigating the damage, a pressure test for the rubber hose will be proposed and specified; and the possibility of using alternative conductors for the current supply of the LHC main magnets will be examined. Finally, a series of radiation tests on pot...

  16. Light-by-light scattering in ultraperipheral Pb-Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Lebiedowicz, Piotr; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    We calculate cross sections for diphoton production in (semi)exclusive PbPb collisions, relevant for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The calculation is based on the equivalent photon approximation in the impact parameter space. The cross sections for the elementary γ γ →γ γ subprocess are calculated including two different mechanisms. We take into account box diagrams with leptons and quarks in the loops. In addition, we consider a vector-meson dominance (VDM-Regge) contribution with virtual intermediate hadronic (vector-like) excitations of the photons. We get measurable cross sections in PbPb collisions. This opens a possibility to study the γ γ →γ γ (quasi)elastic scattering at the LHC. We present many interesting differential distributions which could be measured by the ALICE, CMS, or ATLAS Collaborations at the LHC. We study whether a separation or identification of different components (boxes, VDM-Regge) is possible. We find that the cross section for elastic γ γ scattering could be measured in the heavy-ion collisions for subprocess energies smaller than Wγ γ≈15 -20 GeV.

  17. Reliability of the Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Guaglio, G; Santoni, C

    2005-01-01

    The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out....

  18. Novel Concepts for Optimization of the CERN Large Hadron Collider Injection Lines.

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Wenninger, J

    2011-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently the particle accelerator with the highest center of mass energy in the world and is for that reason the most promising instrument for particle physics discoveries in the near future. The transfer lines TI2 and TI8 which transfer the beam from the last pre-accelerator, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to the LHC are with a total length of about 6 km the longest ones in the world, which makes it necessary to do optics matching with high precision. Tests between 2004 and 2008 revealed several, previousely unpredicted, effects in these lines: An assymetry in betatron phase between the two transverse planes, a dispersion mismatch at the injection point from the transfer lines to the LHC and unexpectedly strong transverse coupling at the same location. In this thesis, we introduce the methods and tools that we developed to investigate these discrepancies. We describe the analysis of the available data, measurements of the transfer line optics and the calculation of op...

  19. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams Generating High-Energy-Density Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, IV; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. This data has been used as input to a sophisticated two--dimensional hydrodynamic computer code, BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1~m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy de...

  20. The original LEP machine Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    With a circumference of 27 kilometres,LEP is the largest particle collider in the world.At about 100 metres underground,bunches of electrons and positrons race around in opposite directions as they are accelerated to almost the speed of light.In its first phase of operation,LEP was designed to collide electrons and positrons at an energy of around 100 GeV.After accumulating data on the decay of the Z particle -electrically neutral messenger of the weak force with a mass of 91.2 GeV -everything was done to boost the energy of LEP 's particle beams as high as possible.

  1. Precision Experiments at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) established the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics with unprecedented precision, including all its radiative corrections. These led to predictions for the masses of the top quark and Higgs boson, which were beautifully confirmed later on. After these precision measurements the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in 1999 jointly to 't Hooft and Veltman "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics". Another hallmark of the LEP results were the precise measurements of the gauge coupling constants, which excluded unification of the forces within the SM, but allowed unification within the supersymmetric extension of the SM. This increased the interest in Supersymmetry (SUSY) and Grand Unified Theories, especially since the SM has no candidate for the elusive dark matter, while Supersymmetry provides an excellent candidate for dark matter. In addition, Supersymmetry removes the quadratic divergencies of the SM and {\\it predicts} the Hig...

  2. Proposal for the donation of LEP equipment

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    CERN has announced that LEP equipment will become available for donations to educational and scientific research institutes, to museums and public bodies in Member States and non-member States. A number of requests for a limited amount of equipment have been received. CERN has no further use for this equipment. The Finance Committee is invited to approve these donations.

  3. Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

    CERN Multimedia

    Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert

    1981-01-01

    Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

  4. Et. réact. $e^{+} e^{-} \\to e^{+} e^{-} \\gamma$, $e^{+} e^{-} \\to e^{+} e^{-} e^{+} e^{-}$ et $e^{+} e^{-} \\to e^{+} e ^{-} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ pour la calibrat. cristaux BGO calorim. électromagn. L3,, CERN, mesure luminosité LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Rayo, F

    1989-01-01

    Et. réact. $e^{+} e^{-} \\to e^{+} e^{-} \\gamma$, $e^{+} e^{-} \\to e^{+} e^{-} e^{+} e^{-}$ et $e^{+} e^{-} \\to e^{+} e ^{-} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ pour la calibrat. cristaux BGO calorim. électromagn. L3,, CERN, mesure luminosité LEP

  5. Radiative Return Capabilities of a High-Energy, High-Luminosity $e^+e^-$ Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy $E_{CM}$ can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at $E_{CM}$ = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy $e^+e^-$ colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  6. Conclusions from 12 Years Operational Experience of the Cryoplants for the Superconducting Magnets of the LEP Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, K; Delikaris, D; Passardi, Giorgio

    2002-01-01

    The Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) has ended its last physics run in November 2000, and it is at present being dismantled to liberate the tunnel for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project to be completed by end of 2005. The cryogenic systems for the superconducting solenoid and focusing quadrupoles for the two LEP experiments, ALEPH and DELPHI, each supplying a cooling power of 800 W/4.5 K entropy equivalent, have accumulated more then 100'000 hours of running time. The paper summarises the 12 years cryogenic experience in the various operating modes: cool-down, steady state, recovery after energy fast dump, utilities failures and warm-up of the superconducting magnets. The detailed operation statistics is presented and compared to the other CERN cryogenic systems. Emphasis is given to the technical analysis of the fault conditions and of their consequences on the helium refrigeration production time in view of the future operation of the LHC cryogenics.

  7. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams generating high-energy-density matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/ c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. These data have been used as input to a sophisticated two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1 m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy deposition region will extend to a length of about 35 m over the beam duration. This is due to the fact that first few tens of bunches deposit sufficient energy that leads to high pressure that generates an outgoing radial shock wave. Shock propagation leads to continuous reduction in the density at the target center that allows the protons delivered in subsequent bunches to penetrate deeper and deeper into the target. This phenomenon has also been seen in case of heavy-ion heated targets [N. A. Tahir, A. Kozyreva, P. Spiller, D. H. H. Hoffmann, and A. Shutov, Phys. Rev. E 63, 036407 (2001)]. This effect needs to be considered in the design of a sacrificial beam stopper. These simulations have also shown that the target is severely damaged and is converted into a huge sample of high-energy density (HED) matter. In fact, the inner part of the target is transformed into a strongly coupled plasma with fairly uniform physical conditions. This work, therefore, has

  8. Experience with the LEP Superconducting RF Accelerating System

    CERN Document Server

    Geschonke, Günther

    1998-01-01

    CERN is presently upgrading the large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) to higher energy by installing superconducting RF accelerating cavities. For a total installed circumferential voltage of about 2800 MV, 272 cavities operating at 352 MHz will be needed, representing an active length of 462 m and a cold surface of more than 1600 m2. The series production cavities are made out of copper, sputter-coated with a thin layer of niobium and cooled with liquid He to 4.5 K. The cavities are produced by industry and the acceptance testing is done at CERN. In 1996, 176 cavities had been installed and run successfully at their design gradient of 6 MV/m during physics at a beam energy of 86 GeV. As RF power sources 36 klystrons will finally be installed with a nominal RF output power of 1 MW each. In this paper the superconducting accelerating system in LEP will be described and experience gained during operation for physics as well as new developments will be presented.

  9. The DELPHI distributed information system for exchanging LEP machine related information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönszelmann, M.; Gaspar, C.

    1994-12-01

    An information management system was designed and implemented to interchange information between the DELPHI experiment at CERN and the monitoring/control system for the LEP (Large Electron Positron Collider) accelerator. This system is distributed and communicates with many different sources and destinations (LEP) using different types of communication. The system itself communicates internally via a communication system based on a publish-and-subscribe mechanism, DIM (Distributed Information Manager). The information gathered by this system is used for on-line as well as off-line data analysis. Therefore it logs the information to a database and makes it available to operators and users via DUI (DELPHI User Interface). The latter was extended to be capable of displaying "time-evolution" plots. It also handles a protocol, implemented using a finite state machine, SMI (State Management Interface), for (semi-)automatic running of the Data Acquisition System and the Slow Controls System.

  10. Monitoring the waste water of LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Rühl, I

    1999-01-01

    Along the LEP sites CERN is discharging water of differing quality and varying amounts into the local rivers. This wastewater is not only process water from different cooling circuits but also water that infiltrates into the LEP tunnel. The quality of the discharged wastewater has to conform to the local environmental legislation of our Host States and therefore has to be monitored constantly. The most difficult aspect regarding the wastewater concerns LEP Point 8 owing to an infiltration of crude oil (petroleum), which is naturally contained in the soil along octant 7-8 of the LEP tunnel. This paper will give a short summary of the modifications made to the oil/water separation unit at LEP Point 8. The aim was to obtain a satisfactory oil/water separation and to install a monitoring system for a permanent measurement of the amount of hydrocarbons in the wastewater.

  11. 13000 a current lead with 1.5 W heat load to 4.5 K for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Good, J A; Martini, L

    2000-01-01

    Cryogenic Ltd. and ENEL S.p.A. have collaborated on the design and construction of prototype current leads for the Large Hadron Collider project at CERN, Geneva. The aim is to deliver a direct current of 13 kA into a 4.5 K liquid helium bath with a total heat load of less than 1.5 W. These hybrid leads transport the current via a resistive heat exchanger cooled by a separate source of helium gas in the high temperature region, and below 50 K via self-cooled high temperature superconductor. (6 refs).

  12. The design and construction of a double-sided Silicon Microvertex Detector for the L3 experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, A. [Technical Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Physical Inst.; Ahlen, S.; Marin, A.; Zhou, B. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Ambrosi, G.; Babucci, E.; Bertucci, B.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G.M.; Caria, M.; Checcucci, B.; Easo, S.; Fiandrini, E.; Krastev, V.R.; Massetti, R.; Pauluzzi, M.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L. [INFN/Universita di Perugia (Italy); Baschirotto, A.; Bosetti, M.; Pensotti, S.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rattaggi, M.; Terzi, G. [INFN/Universita di Milano (Italy); Battiston, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)]|[INFN/Universita di Perugia (Italy); Bay, A.; Burger, W.J.; Extermann, P.; Perrin, E.; Susinno, G.F. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Bencze, G.Y.L.; Kornis, J.; Toth, J. [KFKI/Research Inst. for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Bobbink, G.J.; Duinker, P. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brooks, M.L.; Coan, T.E.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Kinnison, W.W.; Lee, D.M.; Mills, G.B.; Thompson, T.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Busenitz, J.; DiBitonto, D. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Camps, C.; Commichau, V.; Hangartner, K.; Schmitz, P. [RWTH, Aachen (Germany). 3. Physikalisches Institut; Castellini, G. [INFN/IROE, Firenze (Italy); Chen, A.; Hou, S.; Lin, W.T. [NCU, Chung/Li (Taiwan, Province of China); Gougas, A.; Kim, D.; Paul, T. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Hauviller, C.; Herve, A.; Josa, I. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Landi, G. [INFN/Universita di Firenze (Italy); Lebeau, M. [LAPP, Annecy (France); Lecomte, P.; Viertel, G.M.; Waldmeier, S. [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Leiste, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)]|[DESY-IFH, Zeuthen (Germany); Lejeune, E.; Weill, R. [Univ. of Lausanne (Switzerland); Lohmann, W.; Nowak, H.; Sachwitz, M.; Schoeniech, B.; Tonisch, F.; Trowitzsch, G.; Vogt, H. [DESY-IFH, Zeuthen (Germany); Passaleva, G. [INFN/Universita di Firenze (Italy)]|[INFN/Universita di Perugia (Italy); Yeh, S.C. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan)

    1993-12-01

    A Silicon Microvertex Detector (SMD) has been commissioned for the L3 experiment at the Large Electron-Positron colliding-beam accelerator (LEP) at the European Center for Nuclear Physics, (CERN). The SMD is a 72,672 channel, two layer barrel tracker that is comprised of 96 ac-coupled, double-sided silicon detectors. Details of the design and construction are presented.

  13. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  14. Inauguration LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Schopper,H; Janis

    1983-01-01

    Le DG H.Schopper salue le président de la république française, F.Mitterand, le président de la confédaration suisse P.Aubert, ainsi que les ministres et représentants du gouvernement des 12 états membres pour la célébration et inauguration du LEP.

  15. GPS Precision Timing at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Beetham, C G

    1999-01-01

    For the past decade, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been used to provide precise time, frequency and position co-ordinates world-wide. Recently, equipment has become available specialising in providing extremely accurate timing information, referenced to Universal Time Co-ordinates (UTC). This feature has been used at CERN to provide time of day information for systems that have been installed in the Proton Synchrotron (PS), Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Large Electron Positron (LEP) machines. The different systems are described as well as the planned developments, particularly with respect to optical transmission and the Inter-Range Instrumentation Group IRIG-B standard, for future use in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  16. Inside the LEP control room at start-up

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    Physicists grouped around a screen in the LEP control room at the strat-up of LEP on 14 July 1989. The emotion of the moment is clear. Carlo Rubbia, Director-General of CERN at the time, is in the centre and on his left, Herwig Schopper, former Director-General of the Organization.

  17. Magnetic-field-induced squeezing effect at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Endrődi, Gergely; Petersen, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    In off-central heavy-ion collisions, quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is exposed to the strongest magnetic fields ever created in the universe. Because of the paramagnetic nature of the QGP at high temperatures, the spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field configuration exerts an anisotropic force density that competes with the pressure gradients resulting from purely geometric effects. In this paper, we simulate (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics with external magnetic fields to estimate the effect of this force density on the anisotropic expansion of the QGP in collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While negligible for quickly decaying magnetic fields, we find that long-lived fields generate a substantial force density that suppresses the momentum anisotropy of the plasma by up to 20 % at the LHC energy and also leaves its imprint on the elliptic flow v2 of charged pions.

  18. Chiral electric field in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Yang, Chun-Bin; Cai, Xu; Feng, Sheng-Qin

    2016-08-01

    It has been proposed that electric fields may lead to chiral separation in quark-gluon plasma (QGP). This is called the chiral electric separation effect. The strong electromagnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both be completely produced in off-central nuclear-nuclear collision. We use the Woods-Saxon nucleon distribution to calculate the electric field distributions of off-central collisions. The chiral electric field spatial distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy regions are systematically studied in this paper. The dependence of the electric field produced by the thermal quark in the central position with different impact parameters on the proper time with different collision energies in the RHIC and LHC energy regions are studied in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375069, 11435054, 11075061, 11221504) and Key Laboratory Foundation of Quark and Lepton Physics (Hua-Zhong Normal University)(QLPL2014P01)

  19. High baryon densities in heavy ion collisions at energies attainable at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Kapusta, Joseph I.

    2017-01-01

    In very high-energy collisions nuclei are practically transparent to each other but produce very hot nearly baryon-free matter in the so-called central rapidity region. The energy in the central rapidity region comes from the kinetic energy of the colliding nuclei. We calculate the energy and rapidity loss of the nuclei using the color glass condensate model. This model also predicts the excitation energy of the nuclear fragments. Using a space-time picture of the collision we calculate the baryon and energy densities of the receding baryonic fireballs. For central collisions of gold nuclei at the highest energy attainable at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, for example, we find baryon densities more than ten times that of atomic nuclei over a large volume.

  20. LEP Electroweak and QCD Exhibition Lepton-Photon 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The LEP collider an at centre-of-mass energies around the Z mass from 1989 to 1995 (LEP1).F om 1995 to 2000 (LEP2),the energy was gradually increased, crossing the W-pair production threshold in 1996,and eaching 208 GeV in 2000. Each of the four experiments,ALEPH,DELPHI,L3 and OPAL,observed around 4.5 million Z and 12 thousand W-pair events.

  1. The vacuum chamber in the interaction region of particle colliders a historical study and developments implementations in the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Knaster, J R; Gamez-Mejias, L

    2004-01-01

    The history of particle colliders begins in the early 60's when an idea previously patented by R. Wideroe in 1953 is constructed. The design of the vacuum chamber in their experimental area became essential as it was the rst physical barrier that the particles to be detected needed to traverse. The interaction of the products of the collisions with the vacuum chamber structural materials, hindered the identification of the significative events. This Thesis analyses the historical evolution of the experimental vacuum chambers and summarizes the technical criteria that are to be fulfilled. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) presently under construction at CERN is the last generation of particle colliders. Four big experiments will be in operation (ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHCb) in the LHC with diferent physics objectives. In particular, LHCb will be devoted to the study of CP violation and the design of its vacuum chamber is the scope of this Thesis. Physics simulations with an initial design consisting of a conical ...

  2. CERN looks to the long-term future: might a 100km circular collider follow the LHC around mid-century?

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Particle physics is a long-term field of research: the LHC was originally conceived in the 1980s, but did not start running until 25 years later. An accelerator unlike any other, it is now just at the start of a programme that is set to run for another 20 years. While the LHC programme is already well defined for the next two decades, it is now time to look even further ahead, and so CERN is initiating an exploratory study for a future long-term project centred on a next-generation circular collider with a circumference of 80 to 100 kilometres. A worthy successor to the LHC, whose collision energies will reach 13 TeV in 2015, such an accelerator would allow particle physicists to push the boundaries of knowledge even further. The Future Circular Collider (FCC) programme will focus on studies for a hadron collider, like the LHC, capable of reaching unprecedented energies in the region of 100 TeV. It will also study electron-positron and electron-proton options. Opening with an introduction to the LHC and its...

  3. A Study of J/psi Production at the LEP $e^{+} e{-}$ Collider; and the Implementation of the DELPHI Slow Controls System

    CERN Document Server

    Adye, T J

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes two separate areas of work conducted for the DELPHI detector at LEP. The first concerns the Slow Controls of the DELPHI detector, which enable a single operator to oversee the proper functioning of the apparatus and to diagnose faults as they occur. The hardware and software of this system, as well as their interface to the experiment and the operator, are described. Some conclusions are drawn from seven years' design work and the initial six years' operation of DELPHI. Secondly, a study is made of the production, at e+e- collision centre of mass energies close to the Z0 resonance, of J/psi mesons, decaying to mu+ mu-. J/psi mesons produced via a B-hadron are used to measure the mean B lifetime, tau_B = (1.53 +- 0.11 (stat.) +- 0.06 (syst.)) ps A measurement is also made of the fraction of J/psis produced promptly at the e+e- collision point, N(Z0 -> prompt J/psi X) / N(Z0 -> J/psi X) = (9.6 +- 3.2 (stat.) +- 1.2 (syst.))%. This method is largely model-independent.

  4. First measurement and correction of nonlinear errors in the experimental insertions of the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, E. H.; Tomás, R.; Giovannozzi, M.; Persson, T. H. B.

    2015-12-01

    Nonlinear magnetic errors in low-β insertions can contribute significantly to detuning with amplitude, linear and nonlinear chromaticity, and lead to degradation of dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. As such, the correction of nonlinear errors in the experimental insertions of colliders can be of critical significance for successful operation. This is expected to be of particular relevance to the LHC's second run and its high luminosity upgrade, as well as to future colliders such as the Future Circular Collider. Current correction strategies envisioned for these colliders assume it will be possible to calculate optimized local corrections through the insertions, using a magnetic model of the errors. This paper shows however, that reliance purely upon magnetic measurements of the nonlinear errors of insertion elements is insufficient to guarantee a good correction quality in the relevant low-β* regime. It is possible to perform beam-based examination of nonlinear magnetic errors via the feed-down to readily observed beam properties upon application of closed orbit bumps, and methods based upon feed-down to tune have been utilized at RHIC, SIS18, and SPS. This paper demonstrates the extension of such methodology to include direct observation of feed-down to linear coupling in the LHC. It is further shown that such beam-based studies can be used to complement magnetic measurements performed during LHC construction, in order to validate and refine the magnetic model of the collider. Results from first attempts of the measurement and correction of nonlinear errors in the LHC experimental insertions are presented. Several discrepancies of beam-based studies with respect to the LHC magnetic model are reported.

  5. LEP - Large Electron Positron Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) is 27 km long. Its four detectors (ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL) measure precisely what happens in the collisions of electrons and positrons. These conditions only exist-ed in the Universe when it was about 10 -10 sec old.

  6. The inauguration of the LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Carreras, Rafel; Delamuraz, Jean Pascal; Mitterrand, F; Rubbia, Carlo; CERN. Geneva

    1989-01-01

    - introduction to the particle physics and to the collider by R. CARRERAS. - arrival of the various official delegations. - Addresses from : - Prof. Carlo RUBBIA, Director-General of CERN. - His Majesty the King CARL XVI GUSTAV of Sweden. - Mr. Jean-Pascal DELAMURAZ, President of the Swiss Confederation. - Mr. Francois Mitterrand, President of the French Republic.

  7. The Large Hadron Collider and the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN as Tools to Generate Warm Dense Matter and Non–Ideal Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2011-01-01

    The largest accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, has entered into commission- ing phase. It is expected that when this impressive machine will become fully operational, it will generate two counter rotating 7 TeV/c proton beams that will be made to collide, leading to an unprecedented luminosity of 1034 cm−2s−1. Total energy stored in each LHC beam is about 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is a very critical issue when working with such extremely powerful beams. It is important to know the consequences of an accidental release of the beam energy in order to design protection system for the equipment. For this purpose we have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the interaction of one full LHC beam with copper and graphite targets which are materials of practical importance. Our calculations have shown that the LHC protons will penetrate up to about 35 m in solid copper and 10 m in solid graphite. A very interesting outcome of this work i...

  8. The Large Hadron Collider and the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN as Tools to Generate Warm Dense Matter and Non-Ideal Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Deutsch, C; Gryaznov, V; Lomonosov, I V; Shutov, A; Piriz, A R; Fortov, V E; Geissel, H; Redmer, R

    2011-01-01

    The largest accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, has entered into commissioning phase. It is expected that when this impressive machine will become fully operational, it will generate two counter rotating 7 TeV/c proton beams that will be made to collide, leading to an unprecedented luminosity of 10(34) cm(-2)s(-1). Total energy stored in each LHC beam is about 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is a very critical issue when working with such extremely powerful beams. It is important to know the consequences of an accidental release of the beam energy in order to design protection system for the equipment. For this purpose we have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the interaction of one full LHC beam with copper and graphite targets which are materials of practical importance. Our calculations have shown that the LHC protons will penetrate up to about 35 m in solid copper and 10 m in solid graphite. A very interesting outcome of this work i...

  9. Fault detection on the Large Hadron Collider at CERN: design, simulation and realization of a High Voltage Pulse Generator

    CERN Document Server

    Cavicchioli, C; Biagi, E; Bozzini, D

    2007-01-01

    This project was developed inside the Quality Assurance Plan (ELQA) of the LHC. The superconducting circuits of the collider show a great complexity concerning the control system, because of various reasons: the tunnel is placed around 50 to 175 m underground, the circuits work at temperatures of 1.9 K, all the structure should be perfectly aligned and the electronic part has considerable dimensions. To maximize the running time of the collider, it is necessary to develop methods for the diagnostic of defects and for the precise localization of the segment of the accelerator that contains the fault. From my studies it emerged that a possible way to localize electrical faults in the LHC superconducting circuits is to combine the use of time domain reflectometry methods and high voltage pulses. Therefore, I have designed and realized a high voltage pulse generator that will be an important instrument for the fault location among the accelerator.

  10. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Brüning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Cetinkaya, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; De Roeck, A; d'Enterria, D; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinol, L; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Ten Kate, H; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F

    2012-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ ran...

  11. Looking For Physics Beyond The Standard Model: Searches For Charged Higgs Bosons At $e^{+}e^{-}$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kiiskinen, A P

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes direct searches for pair production of charged Higgs bosons performed in the data collected by the DELPHI detector at the LEP collider at CERN. In addition, the possibilities to discover and study heavy charged Higgs bosons at possible future high-energy linear colliders are presented. The existence of charged Higgs bosons is predicted by many extensions of the Standard Model. A possible discovery of these particles would be a solid proof for physics beyond the Standard Model. Discovery of charged Higgs bosons, and measurement of their properties, would also provide useful information about the structure of the more general theory. New analysis methods were developed for the searches performed at LEP. A large, previously unexplored, mass range for cover but no evidence for the existence of the charged Higgs bosons was found. This allowed setting new lower mass limits for the charged Higgs boson within the framework of general two Higgs doublet models. Results have been interpreted and pr...

  12. Electroweak Measurements in Electron-Positron Collisions at W-Boson-Pair Energies at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Schael, S.; Bruneliere, R.; Buskulic, D.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Perlas, J.; Riu, I.; Ruiz, H.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Bazarko, A.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Bird, F.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, B.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Greening, T.C.; Hagelberg, R.; Halley, A.W.; Gianotti, F.; Girone, M.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Kado, M.; Lehraus, I.; Lazeyras, P.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; May, J.; Moutoussi, A.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, B.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Veenhof, R.; Valassi, A.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Bertelsen, H.; Fernley, T.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Kraan, A.C.; Lindahl, A.; Mollerud, R.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Picchi, P.; Colrain, P.; ten Have, I.; Hughes, I.S.; Kennedy, J.; Knowles, I.G.; Lynch, J.G.; Morton, W.T.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J.M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A.S.; Turnbull, R.M.; Wasserbaech, S.; Buchmuller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, W.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E.B.; Nash, J.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Keemer, N.R.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Sloan, T.; Smizanska, M.; Snow, S.W.; Williams, M.I.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Blumenschein, U.; van Gemmeren, P.; Giehl, I.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kasemann, M.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Muller, A.S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wanke, R.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Etienne, F.; Fouchez, D.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Tilquin, A.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Buscher, V.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Villegas, M.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Mutz, A.M.; Schune, M.H.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Edwards, M.; Haywood, S.J.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Ward, J.J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Barberio, E.; Bohrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Burkhardt, H.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Lutters, G.; Meinhard, H.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Mirabito, L.; Misiejuk, A.; Neugebauer, E.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Schafer, U.; Sieler, U.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Trier, H.; Apollonio, M.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Pitis, L.; He, H.; Kim, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Bellantoni, L.; Berkelman, K.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J.S.; Cranmer, K.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J.L.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Johnson, R.P.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, A.M.; Walsh, J.; Wear, J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J.M.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; 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Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. 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Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M-L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Achard, P.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V.P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; 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Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Nowak, H.; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Pioppi, M.; Pirou'e, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Rembeczki, S.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, K.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, C.; Ting, S.C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.; Abbiendi, G.; Ackerstaff, K.; Ainsley, C.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Altekamp, N.; Ametewee, K.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, R.J.; Baumann, S.; Bechtle, P.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Bosch, H.M.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, R.M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, M.; Dallison, S.; de Jong, S.; De Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; De Wolf, E.A.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Donkers, M.; Doucet, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Fath, P.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Ford, M.; Foucher, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Giunta, M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Graham, K.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauke, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hilse, T.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, A.; Hoffman, K.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jones, R.W.L.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; King, B.J.; Kirk, J.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R.V.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A., Jr.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lewis, C.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; List, J.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Matthews, W.; Mattig, P.; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McNab, A.I.; McPherson, R.A.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nijjhar, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Omori, T.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Posthaus, A.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rees, D.L.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Sasaki, M.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schulz, M.; Schumacher, M.; Schutz, P.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Smith, T.J.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Springer, R.W.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Steiert, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, D.; Strohmer, R.; Strumia, F.; Stumpf, L.; Surrow, B.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Taylor, R.J.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Toya, D.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Utzat, P.; Vachon, B.; Van Kooten, R.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vincter, M.; Vokurka, E.H.; Vollmer, C.F.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Ward, J.J.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2013-01-01

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3~fb$^{-1}$ collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from $130~GeV$ to $209~GeV$. Combining the published results of the four LEP experiments, the measurements include total and differential cross-sections in photon-pair, fermion-pair and four-fermion production, the latter resulting from both double-resonant WW and ZZ production as well as singly resonant production. Total and differential cross-sections are measured precisely, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model at centre-of-mass energies never explored before in electron-positron collisions. Final-state interaction effects in four-fermion production, such as those arising from colour reconnection and Bose-Einstein correlations between the two W decay systems arising ...

  13. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  14. Proton enhancement at large pT at the CERN large hadron collider without structure in associated-particle distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Rudolph C; Yang, C B

    2006-07-28

    The production of pions and protons in the pT range between 10 and 20 GeV/c for Pb+Pb collisions at CERN LHC is studied in the recombination model. It is shown that the dominant mechanism for hadronization is the recombination of shower partons from neighboring jets when the jet density is high. Protons are more copiously produced than pions in that pT range because the coalescing partons can have lower momentum fractions, but no thermal partons are involved. The proton-to-pion ratio can be as high as 20. When such high pT hadrons are used as trigger particles, there will not be any associated particles that are not in the background.

  15. Particle multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the CERN large hadron collider from nonlinear evolution with running coupling corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albacete, Javier L

    2007-12-31

    We present predictions for the pseudorapidity density of charged particles produced in central Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. Particle production in such collisions is calculated in the framework of k(t) factorization. The nuclear unintegrated gluon distributions at LHC energies are determined from numerical solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation including recently calculated running coupling corrections. The initial conditions for the evolution are fixed by fitting Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider data at collision energies square root[sNN]=130 and 200 GeV per nucleon. We obtain dNch(Pb-Pb)/deta(square root[sNN]=5.5 TeV)/eta=0 approximately 1290-1480.

  16. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  17. Reliability of the beam loss monitors system for the large hadron collider at CERN; Fiabilite du systeme des moniteurs de pertes du faisceau pour le Large Hadron Collider au CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guaglio, G

    2005-12-15

    The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out. The reliability figures of the BLMS have been calculated using a commercial software package (Isograph.). The effect of the variation of the parameters on the obtained results has been evaluated with a sensitivity analysis. The reliability model has been extended by the results of radiation tests. Design improvements, like redundant optical transmission, have been implemented in an iterative process. The proposed system is compliant with the reliability requirements. The model uncertainties are given by the limited knowledge of the thresholds levels of the superconductive magnets and of the locations of the losses along the ring. The implemented model allows modifications of the system, following the measuring of the hazard rates during the LHC life. It can also provide reference numbers to other accelerators which will implement similar technologies. (author)

  18. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158 GeV/u $In^{49+}$ ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, Edgar; Hansen, Jan; Page, Eric; Vincke, H

    2004-01-01

    During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 7/ molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the super proton synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV) graphite, and 316 LN (low carbon with nitrogen) stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158 GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental ...

  19. Impact of the recent results by the CMS and ATLAS Collaborations at the CERN Large Hadron Collider on an effective Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Scopel, S; Fornengo, N; Bottino, A

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the impact for light neutralinos in an effective Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model of the recent results presented by the CMS and ATLAS Collaborations at the CERN Large Hadron Collider for a search of supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse pb. We find that, in the specific case of light neutralinos, efficiencies for the specific signature searched by ATLAS (jets+missing transverse energy and an isolated lepton) imply a lower sensitivity compared to CMS (which searches for jets +missing transverse energy). Focusing on the CMS bound, if squark soft masses of the three families are assumed to be degenerate, the combination of the ensuing constraint on squark and gluino masses with the experimental limit on the b to s + gamma decay imply a lower bound on the neutralino mass that can reach the value of 11.9 GeV, depending on the gluino mass. On the other hand, when the universality condition among squ...

  20. Electromagnetic probes of a pure-glue initial state in nucleus-nucleus collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovchenko, V.; Karpenko, Iu. A.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Satarov, L. M.; Mishustin, I. N.; Kämpfer, B.; Stoecker, H.

    2016-08-01

    Partonic matter produced in the early stage of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is assumed to be composed mainly of gluons, and quarks and antiquarks are produced at later times. To study the implications of such a scenario, the dynamical evolution of a chemically nonequilibrated system is described by ideal (2+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics with a time dependent (anti)quark fugacity. The equation of state interpolates linearly between the lattice data for the pure gluonic matter and the lattice data for the chemically equilibrated quark-gluon plasma. The spectra and elliptic flows of thermal dileptons and photons are calculated for central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider energy of √{sN N}=2.76 TeV. We test the sensitivity of the results to the choice of equilibration time, including also the case where the complete chemical equilibrium of partons is reached already at the initial stage. It is shown that a suppression of quarks at early times leads to a significant reduction of the yield of the thermal dileptons, but only to a rather modest suppression of the pT distribution of direct photons. It is demonstrated that an enhancement of photon and dilepton elliptic flows might serve as a promising signature of the pure-glue initial state.

  1. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158 GeV/u In49+ ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Hansen, J.; Page, E.; Vincke, H.

    2004-10-01

    During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 104 to 107 molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the Super Proton Synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV) graphite, and 316LN (low carbon with nitrogen) stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158 GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental setup, the results of the pressure rise measurements are presented, and the derived desorption yields are compared with data from other experiments.

  2. 2001 Report on the Next Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronnberg, J; Breidenbach; Burke, D; Corlett, J; Dombeck, T; Markiewicz, T

    2001-08-28

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  3. Measurement of Elastic Scattering and of Total Cross-Section at the CERN $\\bar{p}p$ Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to measure elastic scattering and the total cross-section at the $\\bar{p}p$ collider. \\\\ \\\\ Up to 1983 the experimental apparatus was composed of two parts : \\item 1) Telescopes of high accuracy drift and proportional chambers and counters inserted into vertically moveable sections of the vacuum chamber ('Roman pots'), detect elastic scattering in the angular region from .5 mrad up to about 3 mrad. \\item 2) The total inelastic rate is measured with a forward/backward system of drift chambers and counter hodoscopes and the UA2 central detector covering together @= 4@p solid angle. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ With these two set-ups, the measured value of the total cross-section confirms extrapolation with (ln s)|2 behaviour. Elastic scattering and diffraction dissociation were measured in the range .03~$<$~-t~$<$~1.6~GeV|2. \\\\ \\\\ From 1984 on, six horizontally moveable ``Roman Pots'' have been installed farther away from the intersection region (up to 100~m). Using an especially desi...

  4. LEP a new instrument for high-energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Udo, Fred

    1981-01-01

    Describes the LEP project of CERN. LEP (large electron/positron storage ring) is to be used to investigate electron/positron collisions at 44 to 260 GeV. The circumference of the ring will be 30.6 km. The theory is outlined. Two circular systems of beam bundles (electrons and positrons) move in opposite directions and are accelerated and focused (to 0.4 mm diameter) until collisions take place. (11 refs).

  5. Review of LEP results

    CERN Document Server

    Parodi, F

    2001-01-01

    I present a review of the results obtained during 10 years of activity in b-physics at LEP. Special emphasis is put on measurements that attained precisions not even envisaged at the beginning of the LEP programme (V/sub ub/ and Delta m/sub s/). Finally the impact of these measurements on the CKM parameters determination is presented. (16 refs).

  6. CAD for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    A work station of the Computer-Aided Design system which was installed in 1982 to aid in the mechanics design for LEP. Visible on the screen is a design made for a pick-up for LEP. See Annual Report 1982 p. 79, Fig. 2.

  7. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  8. VIdeo News Release : CERN sets date for first attempt at 7 TeV collisions in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    footage and interview of Mike Lamont, leader of the Operation Group . Geneva, 23 March 2010. With beams routinely circulating in the Large Hadron Collider at 3.5 TeV, the highest energy yet achieved in a particle accelerator, CERN has set the date for the start of the LHC research programme. The first attempt for collisions at 7 TeV (3.5 TeV per beam) is scheduled for 30 March. “The LHC is not a turnkey machine,” said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer. “The machine is working well, but we’re still very much in a commissioning phase and we have to recognize that the first attempt to collide is precisely that. It may take hours or even days to get collisions.” The last time CERN switched on a major new research machine, the Large Electron Positron collider, LEP, in 1989 it took three days from the first attempt to collide beams to the first recorded collisions. The current LHC run began on 20 November 2009, with the first circulating beam at 0.45 TeV. Milestones were quick to follow, with twin circulat...

  9. CERN - Commission Européenne

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Rolf-Dieter HEUER, Director General of CERN visits Commissioner Janez POTOCNIK (BRUSSELS, 03/03/2009, Ref.62264) CERN LHC Inauguration : extracts from the CERN LHC (European Organization for Nuclear Research - Large Hadron Collider) Inauguration and statements (GENEVA, 21/10/2008, Ref.59811) Commissioner Viviane REDING's visit to CERN (GENEVA, recorded 28/10/2005, Ref.42185)

  10. Tay Physics at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobie, Randall J.

    2003-02-01

    Although it has been a number of years since the end of LEP-I, there have recently been a number of new results involving high precision measurements of the properties of the tau lepton. In particular we will discuss the results that are unique to LEP such as the tau polarization. In addition, we will discuss the recent measurements of the topological branching ratios and the leptonic decay modes where LEP has an advantage over the B-Factories due to the reduced background from hadronic events.

  11. UK committee to push for CERN budget cuts

    CERN Multimedia

    Walgate, Robert

    1985-01-01

    A committee set up to assess Britain's continued membership of CERN will suggest that spending on high energy physics should be reduced. Germany and France also believe that CERN could survive cuts but the Director General Professor Schopper defended the CERN budget saying that increased spending was needed to increase the energy of LEP and to fulfill pension requirements (1 page)

  12. CERN'S Fire and Rescue Group Gets New Ambulance

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ambulance is to replace another based on the off-road vehicle design which was originally acquired for the civil engineering phase of LEP construction. Just one figure, in 1999, the CERN ambulance was called out 195 times.

  13. Plascore receives awards from CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Plascore recently was awarded two honors from CERN, European High Energy Physics Lab, for its involvement in the manufacture of Thermoplastic Honeycomb panels for their large superconducting super collider (1/2 page).

  14. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC, ILC and the CERN management.

  15. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  16. Understanding SUSY limits from LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Lipniacka, A

    2003-01-01

    LEP results have constrained heavily the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, while providing hints for light Higgs boson and for "SUSY-assisted'' gauge coupling unification. In this paper the results obtained at LEP within two scenarios, the gravity-mediated MSSM framework and the minimal SUGRA scenario are presented. Model-dependence and coverage of LEP results is discussed.

  17. Industrial services at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The Bulletin looks at industrial services contracts and the real impact of the cost reductions at CERN. The level of industrial services contracts varies from one phase to another. For example, during the dismantling of LEP (photo) it rose substiantially to fall again at the end of dismantling. Industrial services contracts are an important resource for CERN. The level and nature of such contracts changes according to the phase of operation of the Laboratory. A construction phase, as for the LHC, requires a higher level of industrial services contracts compared with a period of normal running. During the operation of LEP, industrial services contracts were thus maintained at a level of 120 MCHF per year. The level rose to 156 MCHF in 2001 to include contracts awarded for dismantling LEP, and fell to about 144 MCHF in 2002 when the dismantling was complete. During the whole LHC construction period, up to 2007, industrial services spending will be stable in the range 135-140 MCHF per year. For the running pe...

  18. Tevatron's complex collider cousins

    CERN Multimedia

    Fischer, W

    2004-01-01

    Letter referring to Schwarzschild's story "Disappointing performance and tight budgets confront Fermilab with tough decisions" and contesting that the Tevatron is not the most complex accelerator operating. They use the examples of CERN's SPS collider, HERA at DESY and the RHIC at Brookhaven (1/4 page)

  19. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Wright, Alison

    2007-01-01

    "We are on the threshold of a new era in particle-physics research. In 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - the hightest-energy accelerator ever built - will come into operation at CERN, the European labortory that straddles the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1/2 page)

  20. Inter-string Bose-Einstein correlations in hadronic Z decays using the L3 detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qin

    2008-01-01

    Bose-Einstein Correlations (BEC) of identical bosons can be used for the femtoscopy of the pro- duction properties of bosons in high energy particle collisions. This quantum mechanical BEC effect is a direct consequence of the symmetrization of the wave function of a boson system and is frequently used on photons in Astophysics to measure the angular size and other properties of distant stars. In particle collisions, the effect can be observed experimentally as an enhancement of the production of identical bosons with small four-momentum difference Q relative to a production that would occur in a world without Bose-Einstein statistics. In this thesis, BEC are studied between identical pions produced in electron-positron collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 91 GeV in the LEP e+ e− Collider of CERN, near Geneva. The final-state particles of these collisions are detected in the detector of the L3 experiment, which is positioned at one of the four intersections of LEP. According to the present picture of bo...

  1. Large Hadron Collider au CERN: des big bangs en série sous le contrôle de WorldFIP

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Thanks to WorlsFIP, associated with a GPS system, CERN is able to synchronize most of the LHC equipments, to drive the magnetic field of giant experiments, to put back automatically the clock at the hour and date events with a precision better than 10 mu s. (1 page)

  2. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  3. LEP dismantling starts

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Since the end of November, various teams have been getting stuck into dismantling the LEP accelerator and its four experiments. After making the installations safe, the dismantling and removal of 40,000 tonnes of equipment is underway. Down in the tunnel, it is a solemn moment. It is 10 o'clock on 13 December and Daniel Regin, one of those heading the dismantling work, moves in on a magnet, armed with a hydraulic machine. Surrounded by teams gathered there for a course in dismantling, he makes the first cut into LEP. The great deconstruction has begun. In little over than a year, the accelerator will have been cleared away to make room for its successor, the LHC. The start of the operation goes back to 27 November. Because before setting about the machine with hydraulic shears and monkey wrenches, LEP had first to be made safe - it was important to make sure the machine could be taken apart without risk. All the SPS beam injection systems to LEP were cut off. The fluids used for cooling the magnets and superc...

  4. LEP vacuum chamber, prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, see 8305170 for more details. Here we see the strips of the NEG pump, providing "distributed pumping". The strips are made from a Zr-Ti-Fe alloy. By passing an electrical current, they were heated to 700 deg C.

  5. LEP Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is a cut-out of a LEP vacuum chamber for dipole magnets showing the beam channel and the pumping channel with the getter (NEG) strip and its insulating supports. A water pipe connected to the cooling channel can also be seen at the back.The lead radiation shield lining is also shown. See also 8305563X.

  6. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  7. Challenges in future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S

    2002-01-01

    For decades, electron-positron colliders have been complementing proton-proton colliders. But the circular LEP, the largest e/sup -/e /sup +/ collider, represented an energy limit beyond which energy losses to synchrotron radiation necessitate moving to e/sup -/e/sup + / linear colliders (LCs), thereby raising new challenges for accelerator builders. Japanese-American, German, and European collaborations have presented options for the "Future Linear Collider " (FLC). Key accelerator issues for any FLC option are the achievement of high enough energy and luminosity. Damping rings, taking advantage of the phenomenon of synchrotron radiation, have been developed as the means for decreasing beam size, which is crucial for ensuring a sufficiently high rate of particle-particle collisions. Related challenges are alignment and stability in an environment where even minute ground motion can disrupt performance, and the ability to monitor beam size. The technical challenges exist within a wider context of socioeconomi...

  8. 5-8 Mar 1992: 650 physicists meet in Evian to discuss experiments on CERN's new accelerator project, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audioivisual Unit

    1992-01-01

    General Meeting on LHC Physics and Detectors - Towards the LHC experimental programme 5 - 8 Mar 1992 - Evian-les-Bains, France. With G. Flügge, C. H. Llewellyn Smith, M. Della Negra, P. Jenni, J. Schükraft, G. Brianti, C. Rubbia. At 30', images of a LHC special session with William Mitchell, President of Council, Ch. Llewellyn Smith, Chairman of the Scientific Policy Committee, Carlo Rubbia, CERN Director General and J.E. Augustin, Chairman of ECFA

  9. CREATIVE COLLISIONS: ARTS @CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    In 2000, CERN hosted Signatures of the Invisible – one of the landmark initiatives in arts and science. In 2012, CERN is now initiating its own science/arts programme Collide@CERN in different arts disciplines. The first of these is in digital arts, and the international competition to find the winning artist is called the Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN. It was announced September 2011 at CERN’s first collaboration with an international arts festival – Ars Electronica in Linz. The competition attracted over 395 entries from 40 countries around the world. The winning artist, Julius Von Bismarck, will begin his two month residency here at CERN next month. Ariane Koek who leads on this initiative, discusses the residency programme, as well as the background about Art@CERN. History has shown that particle physics and the arts are great inspiration partners. The publication of the paper by Max Planck which gave birth to quantum mechanics as well as those by Einstein, heavily influenced some of the grea...

  10. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  11. Electroweak interactions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Swain, J D

    2000-01-01

    The electroweak interactions are based on an extension of the electromagnetic (Maxwell) interactions, realized in a rather odd way so that the symmetries of the theory are not immediately obvious. This "broken" theory has been the subject of intense investigation at LEP, and has passed all tests with flying colours. These lectures are meant to complement the many excellent presentations of the standard SU(2)/sub L/*U(1)/sub Y/ electroweak interactions in three main ways: first to clarify the physical meaning of symmetries in particle physics, second, to summarize the recent tests of the standard model using LEP data, and finally to look at possible roles of gravity in understanding mass. (10 refs).

  12. LEP Magnets Get a Second Lease of Life

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Removed one minute, recycled the next! Around 900 yokes from the LEP dipole magnets have been re-used as building material. 906 yokes from the LEP dipole magnets have been incorporated in the foundations of the new Building 954, where they have been used to create the underfloor space and reinforcements. The recycling of LEP is already under way. Over half of CERN's accelerator has been dismantled so far, and parts of its magnets are already beginning a new life: since 16 May, some of the LEP dipole magnet yokes have been re-used as building material. The dipole yokes, the only ones of their kind, are made up of steel plates and layers of concrete sandwiched together, thus forming blocks of reinforced concrete. It would be a painstaking task to separate the basic materials for re-use, which led to the idea of using the yokes intact as reinforcements. 906 LEP yokes have gone into the foundations of the brand-new Building 954 on the Prévessin site. They have been used to build the underfloor space ...

  13. UX-15 Reaches LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The creation of the world's largest sandstone cavern, not a small feat! At the bottom, cave-in preventing steel mesh can be seen clinging to the top of the tunnel. The digging of UX-15, the cavern that will house ATLAS, reached the upper ceiling of LEP on October 10th. The breakthrough which took place nearly 100 metres underground occurred precisely on schedule and exactly as planned. But much caution was taken beforehand to make the LEP breakthrough clean and safe. To prevent the possibility of cave-ins in the side tunnels that will eventually be attached to the completed UX-15 cavern, reinforcing steel mesh was fixed into the walls with bolts. Obviously no people were allowed in the LEP tunnels below UX-15 as the breakthrough occurred. The area was completely evacuated and fences were put into place to keep all personnel out. However, while personnel were being kept out of the tunnels below, this has been anything but the case for the work taking place up above. With the creation of the world's largest...

  14. Visible Cascade Higgs Decays to Four Photons at Hadron Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Spencer; Fox, Patrick J.; Weiner, Neal

    2007-03-01

    The presence of a new singlet scalar particle a can open up new decay channels for the Higgs boson, through cascades of the form h→2a→X, possibly making discovery through standard model channels impossible. If a is CP odd, its decays are particularly sensitive to new physics. Quantum effects from heavy fields can naturally make h→4g the dominant decay which is difficult to observe at hadron colliders, and is allowed by CERN LEP for mh>82GeV. However, there are usually associated decays, either h→2g2γ or h→4γ, which are more promising. The decay h→4γ is a clean channel that can discover both a and h. At the CERN LHC with 300fb-1 of luminosity, a branching ratio of order 10-4 is sufficient for discovery for a large range of Higgs boson masses. With total luminosity of ˜8fb-1, discovery at the Fermilab Tevatron requires more than 5×10-3 in branching ratio.

  15. Visible cascade Higgs decays to four photons at hadron colliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Spencer; Fox, Patrick J; Weiner, Neal

    2007-03-16

    The presence of a new singlet scalar particle a can open up new decay channels for the Higgs boson, through cascades of the form h --> 2a --> X, possibly making discovery through standard model channels impossible. If a is CP odd, its decays are particularly sensitive to new physics. Quantum effects from heavy fields can naturally make h --> 4 g the dominant decay which is difficult to observe at hadron colliders, and is allowed by CERN LEP for m(h) > 82 GeV. However, there are usually associated decays, either h --> 2g2gamma or h --> 4gamma, which are more promising. The decay h-->4gamma is a clean channel that can discover both a and h. At the CERN LHC with 300 fb(-1) of luminosity, a branching ratio of order 10(-4) is sufficient for discovery for a large range of Higgs boson masses. With total luminosity of approximately 8 fb(-1), discovery at the Fermilab Tevatron requires more than 5 x 10(-3) in branching ratio.

  16. The "Silicon Wheel" prototype for the barrel of the silicon tracker deep inside the CMS detector at CERN'S future LHC proton collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1997-01-01

    Elements on a specially designed structure will track the emerging particles close to the beam pipe. The supporting structure is made out of special carbon fibre discs holding 112 detector modules (448 individual silicon detectors). The modules are arranged to provide three detection points per track and are distributed in seven layers on a spiral geometry to leave enough room for cables, cooling tubes, etc. The inner radius of the wheel is 20.5 cm; the overall diameter is 80 The prototype is a combined CMS silicon community effort; the main participating institutions were: Aachen (Germany), Bari (Italy), CERN, Florence (Italy), Imperial College (UK), Oulu (Finland), Padova, Perugia, Pisa (Italy), Rutherford Laboratory

  17. Multiplicities and correlations at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E

    2002-01-01

    A brief review on recent charge multiplicity and correlation measurements at LEP is given. The measurements of unbiased gluon jet multiplicity are discussed. Recent results on charged particle Bose- Einstein and Fermi-Dirac correlations at LEP1. are reported. New results on two-particle correlations of neutral pions are given. Correlations of more than two particles (high-order correlations) obtained using different methods are performed. Recent Bose-Einstein correlation measurements at LEP2 are discussed. (13 refs).

  18. P{bar P} collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demarteau, M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1992-04-01

    A brief introduction to {bar p}p collider physics is given. Selected results from the collider experiments at the CERN S{bar p}pS and the Tevatron collider are described. The emphasis is on experimental aspects of {bar p}p collisions. Minimum bias physics and the production of jets, Intermediate Vector Bosons and heavy flavors is reviewed. The outlook for physics at hadron colliders for the near future is briefly discussed.

  19. CERN: le Mondial de la particule

    CERN Multimedia

    Favier, R

    1998-01-01

    Avec le LEP (acc\\’{e}l\\’{e}rateur de particules), le CERN est devenu le v\\’{e}ritable phare de la science europ\\’{e}enne. Notamment pour la physique des particules. Riche de multiples exp\\’{e}riences r\\’{e}ussies, mais aussi de quelques prix Nobel, le CERN est en train de vivre une nouvelle aventure scientifique, en lan

  20. Ex / Noise / CERN / Deerhoof

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN, SM18,

    2015-01-01

    Indie rockers Deerhoof battled with the noise of CERN’s magnet test facilities on 30 August 2015. The band visited CERN at the invitation of ATLAS physicist James Beacham, whose pilot project Ex/Noise/CERN collides experimental music artists with experimental particle physics. Credits: -Producer- CERN Video Productions James Beacham François Briard -Director- Noemi Caraban -Camera- Yann Krajewski Piotr Traczyk Noemi Caraban -Crane operator- Antonio Henrique Jorge-Costa -Live recording at CERN- Mixing at Rec studio/Geneva By Serge Morattel -Infography- Daniel Dominguez Noemi Caraban -Deerhoof- John Dieterich Satomi Matsuzaki Ed Rodriguez Greg Saunier w/Deron Pulley SPECIAL THANKS TO: Michal Strychalski Marta Bajko Maryline Charrondiere Luca Bottura Christian Giloux Rodrigue Faes Mariane Catallon Georgina Hobgen Hailey Reissman Marine Bass

  1. Design study of the large hadron electron collider and a rapid cycling synchrotron as alternative to the PS booster upgrade at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitterer, Miriam

    2013-02-22

    With the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the exploration of particle physics at center of mass energies at the TeV scale has begun. To extend the discovery potential of the LHC, a major upgrade is foreseen around 2020 of the LHC itself and the LHC injectors - the chain of accelerators preparing the beam for the LHC. One of the injectors - the second one in the chain - is the Proton Synchrotron (PS) Booster. Its performance is currently limited by the space-charge effect, which is the effect of the electromagnetic field of the particle beam on itself. This effect becomes weaker with higher energy, and therefore an energy upgrade of the PS Booster to 2 GeV maximum beam energy is foreseen. As the PS Booster is with its 40 years already an old machine, the construction of a new accelerator, a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS), to replace the PS Booster has been proposed. In this thesis different options for the beam guidance in the RCS - referred to as lattice and optics - are studied, followed by a more general comparison of different lattices and optics and their performance under consideration of the space-charge effect. To further complement the LHC physics program, also the possibility of deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering at the LHC has been suggested, referred to as Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC). In this case the proton beam of the LHC collides with the electron beam, which is accelerated in a separate newly built machine. Two options are considered as electron accelerator: a new energy recovery linac - the Linac-Ring option - and the installation of an electron ring in the existing LHC tunnel - the Ring-Ring option. One of the main challenges of the Ring-Ring option is the integration of the electron ring in the current LHC tunnel. A layout, lattice and optics of the electron accelerator is developed in this thesis, which meets the requirements with regard to integration and reaches the beam parameters demanded by the particle physics experiments.

  2. LEP radio-frequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    One of the copper radio-frequency accelerating cavities installed for the first phase of LEP (1989-1995). Bunches of electrons and positrons circulated in LEP in opposite directions and were accelerated in eight different sets of 16 cavities (situated on either side of the four experiments), gaining 400 million volts of accelerating power per turn.

  3. A measurement of $\\tau$ lepton polarization using the L3 detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, T C

    1994-01-01

    W e rep ort on the measuremen t of the a v erage p olarization and forw ard-bac kw ard p olarization asymmetry of tau leptons pro duced in electron-p ositron collisions at the Large Electron P ositron (LEP) collider at the Europ ean Lab oratory for P article Ph ysics (CERN). The data w as collected using the L3 detector during 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993 and consists of appro ximately 86 000 Z -> pi + pi - events. The tau p olarization w as determined as a function of the pro duction p olar angle using the follo wing 1-prong deca y mo des: t - -> e-v e v t, t- -> u-vuvt, t- -> pi-vt, t- -> p-vt and t- -> a1vt. F rom this measuremen tw e obtain the follo wing ratio of v ector- to axial-v ector w eak neutral couplings for taus and electrons: g V =g A = 0 : 0752 0 : 0063(stat : ) 0 : 00 45(s yst : ), g e V =g e A =0 : 0791 0 : 0099 (stat : ) 0 : 00 25(syst : ). This is consisten t with the h yp othesis of e - T univ ersalit y of the w eak neutral curren t. Assuming lepton univ ersalit y ,w e nd the e ecti...

  4. Facts about real antimatter collide with fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    Siegfried, Tom

    2004-01-01

    When science collides with fiction, sometimes a best seller emerges from the debris. Take Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, for instance, a murder mystery based on science at CERN, the European nuclear research laboratory outside Geneva

  5. Towards future circular colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  6. Physics of W bosons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Mele, S

    2004-01-01

    The high-energy and high-luminosity data-taking campaigns of the LEP e+e- collider provided the four collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, with about 50 000 W-boson pairs and about a thousand singly-produced W bosons. This unique data sample has an unprecedented reach in probing some aspects of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions, and this article reviews several achievements in the understanding of W-boson physics at LEP. The measurements of the cross sections for W-boson production are discussed, together with their implication on the existence of the coupling between Z and W bosons. The precision measurements of the magnitude of triple gauge-boson couplings are presented. The observation of the longitudinal helicity component of the W-boson spin, related to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, is described together with the techniques used to probe the CP and CPT symmetries in the W-boson system. A discussion on the intricacies of the measurement of the mass of the W boson, ...

  7. Triangular flow of thermal photons from an event-by-event hydrodynamic model for 2.76 A TeV Pb + Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Rupa; Srivastava, Dinesh K.; Renk, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the triangular flow parameter v3 of thermal photons from an event-by-event ideal hydrodynamic model for 0-40% central collisions of Pb nuclei at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. v3 determined with respect to the participant plane (PP) is found to be nonzero and positive, and its pT dependence is qualitatively similar to the elliptic flow parameter v2(PP) of thermal photons in the range 1 ≤pT≤6 GeV/c . In the range pT≤ 3 GeV/c , v3(PP) is found to be about 50-75% of v2(PP) and for pT> 3 GeV/c the two anisotropy parameters become comparable. The value of v3 is driven by local density fluctuations both directly via the creation of triangular geometry and indirectly via additional flow. As expected, the triangular flow parameter calculated with respect to the reaction plane v3(RP) is found to be close to zero. We show that v3(PP) strongly depends on the spatial size of fluctuations, especially in the higher pT(≥3 GeV /c ) region where a larger value of σ results in a smaller v3(PP ) . In addition, v3(PP ) is found to increase with the assumed formation time of the thermalized system.

  8. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  9. 2015 CERN-Fermilab HCP Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the tenth edition, from 24 June to 3 July 2015. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Lecture Topics include: Statistics in HEP, Heavy Flavour, Heavy Ion, Standard Model, Higgs searches and measurements, BSM theory, BSM searches, Top physics, QCD and Monte Carlos, Accelerators, Detectors for the future, Trigger and DAQ, Dark Matter Astroparticle, and two special lectures on Future Colliders, and 20 years after the top discovery. Calendar and Details: Mark your calendar for  24 June - 3 July 2015, when CERN will welcome students to t...

  10. The LEP 2 machine : pushing to the limits 209 GeV! Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    By installing 288 new superconducting accelerating cavities after 1995,and thanks to the excellent work of the CERN teams,energies up to 209 GeV -well beyond LEP 's original design energy -have been achieved.Significant experi- mental data have been collected at energies in excess of 206 GeV.

  11. Supersymmetric photonic signals at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    López, J; Zichichi, Antonino

    1996-01-01

    We explore and contrast the single-photon and diphoton signals expected at LEP 2, that arise from neutralino-gravitino (e^+ e^- -> chi + gravitino -> gamma + E_miss) and neutralino-neutralino (e^+ e^- -> chi + chi -> gamma + gamma + E_miss) production in supersymmetric models with a light gravitino. LEP 1 limits imply that one may observe either one, but not both, of these signals at LEP 2, depending on the values of the neutralino and gravitino masses: single-photons for m_chi > Mz and m_gravitino < 3 x 10^-5 eV; diphotons for m_chi < Mz and all allowed values of m_gravitino.

  12. Hadronisation at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Haim, E

    2003-01-01

    An overview of recent results from LEP concerning the hadronisation process is presented. Emphasis is placed on the $b$-quark. The first presented analysis is the measurement of the $b$-quark fragmentation function. It includes a new, hadronic-model independent method to extract the x-dependence of the non-perturbative QCD component from the measured fragmentation function. This is followed by the results of two analyses on, respectively, production rates of b-excited states and branching fractions of b-quarks to neutral and charged b-hadrons. Multiplicity in the final state is also discussed concerning the difference in multiplicities between b and light quark initiated events, and total multiplicities in three jet events. Finally, recent measurements of \\omega and \\eta meson production rates are given.

  13. Rare B decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, P M

    2001-01-01

    The results of the LEP experiments for rare B decays will be reviewed, covering hadronic final states, radiative and other rare decays and results for the inclusive charmless branching ratio. (8 refs).

  14. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged manget and retrofil others to correct the underlying design flaw.."(1 page)

  15. Learning with the ATLAS Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, R. M.; Johansson, K. E.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Long, L.; Pequenao, J.; Reimers, C.; Watkins, P.

    2012-01-01

    With the start of the LHC, the new particle collider at CERN, the ATLAS experiment is also providing high-energy particle collisions for educational purposes. Several education projects--education scenarios--have been developed and tested on students and teachers in several European countries within the Learning with ATLAS@CERN project. These…

  16. Observation of radiation degradation of electrical insulators in the CERN particle accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Ch.; Coste, V.; Fontaine, A.; Tavlet, M.

    1999-05-01

    For the selection of polymer-based materials to be used in radiation environments, radiation tests have been performed at the European Organization for Particle Physics Research (CERN) for several decades. According to the recommendations of the IEC Standard 544, mechanical tests are carried out, and the radiation degradation is measured after accelerated irradiations. It is well known that during long-term exposures, oxygen and moisture are allowed to diffuse in the materials and hence to induce more severe degradation; this phenomenon is known as the `dose-rate effect'. During machine shut-downs, samples of rigid and flexible polymeric insulators (magnet-coil resins and cable insulations) have been taken out and tested after several years of exposure in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and in the Large Electron-Position Collider (LEP). The mechanical test results are compared to the ones after the accelerated qualification tests, and to the ones of a study conducted in 1991 to estimate the lifetime of cables in the radiation environment of LEP 200. They confirm that thermoplastics are more sensitive to long-term irradiations than the thermosetting resins and the composites, but that the dose-rate effect cannot be neglected in the latter.

  17. ISOLDE 1985-1987: In the shadow of LEP construction

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    This report describes my time at CERN from 1985 to 1987. Only very briefly before, ISOLDE was recognized by the CERN Management as a CERN facility and not only as a collaboration performing experiments at the synchrocyclotron (SC). Due to LEP construction the human resources were extremely restricted and I acted in one person as ISOLDE Group Leader, as Coordinator of the Synchrocyclotron, and as person responsible for the ISOLDE Technical Group. In addition, I was responsible for the students of my research groups from Mainz University which were active in laser spectroscopy of neutron-deficient nuclides in the mercury region and in getting ISOLTRAP on the floor and into operation. Due to LEP construction also the financial resources were extremely limited and my requests to the EP Division Leader B. Hyams and to the Director General H. Schopper for financial support for installation of a laser ion source and ISOLTRAP were turned down. Still, I and my students had a lot of fun at ISOLDE and I am very happy th...

  18. CERN, accelerator of motivation

    CERN Multimedia

    François Becler

    2014-01-01

    Have your dreams ever come true? My dream did, when I was lucky enough to be allowed into the world’s largest particle physics laboratory and spend five whole days there.   François, in front of LEP's DELPHI detector, displayed in the LHCb cavern. François was given the opportunity to visit the experiment during his placement at CERN. I’m a pupil in my last year at the Collège Jean-Jacques Rousseau in Saint-Julien-en-Genevois and was on a work experience placement at CERN from 16 to 20 December last year. I’m so happy I was chosen because working alongside physicists and engineers of all nationalities was like a dream come true. The first thing that impressed me was the size of the site, its infrastructures and facilities but also the fact that I was working in a prestigious, world-renowned organisation. I spent lots of time looking at the map and trying to find my way around... CERN's such a massive place ! Th...

  19. Le Japon contribue au grand collisionneur de hadrons du CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1995-01-01

    Japan's Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (Monbusho), announced on May 10 that it would help to finance the construction of CERN*'s next particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This announcement follows the visit of a CERN delegation, led by Director-General Prof. Christopher Llewellyn Smith to Japan in March 1995.

  20. Radiative corrections for the LHC and linear collider era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Laenen; D. Wackeroth

    2009-01-01

    We emphasize the importance of including radiative corrections when extracting physics from colliders such as the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and a future linear collider (LC). We review both well-tested methods and recent advances for calculating these corr

  1. Cryogénie et supraconductivité pour le grand collisionneur de hadrons (LHC) du CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently in construction at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research near Geneva (Switzerland), will be the most advanced research instrument of the world’s high-energy physics community, providing access to the structure of matter at an unprecedentedly fine scale. Reusing the 26.7 km circumference tunnel and infrastructure of the past LEP electron-positron collider, the LHC makes use of advanced technology: high-field superconducting magnets based on niobium-titanium alloy conductors operating in superfluid helium at 1.9 K will guide and bring into collision intense beams of protons and ions. After some ten years of focussed R&D, the LHC components are being series-built by specialized industry in CERN member states and procured through world-wide collaborations. After briefly recalling the physics goals, performance challenges and design choices, we present main aspects of cryogenics and superconductivity as key technologies for the LHC and report on its c...

  2. The CERN GSM monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabrous, C

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the way CERN has approached the problem of monitoring its own GSM infrastructure, especially in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator tunnel and other underground facilities, where a leaky feeder cable carries mobile phone signals, and where this technology is the only means for inter-personnel communications

  3. Cern collisions light up Copenhagen

    CERN Multimedia

    Banks, Michael

    2010-01-01

    "Anyone passing by the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, might be startled by some strange moving lights on the facade of the institute's main building. In fact, the dancing beams show, almost in real time, collisions form the Atlas experiment at Cern's Large Hadron Collider (LHC)" (1 paragraph)

  4. Transporting the last superconducting module to be removed from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    All 72 of LEP's superconducting modules have now been raised to the surface. Some 80% will be preserved at CERN, with 10% being reused for the LHC and a further 10% of obsolete non-radioactive material destined for recycling. These pictures show the last of these modules on its journey from PM18 to the old ISR tunnel where the modules will be stored in the short term. Photo 01: The Ansaldo 1020 module leaves PM18 by lorry. Photo 03: The module on the SM18 site. Photos 06, 08: The module on the road.

  5. APD performance in a luminosity monitor at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolome, E.; Boix, G. E-mail: gaelle.boix@cern.ch; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Clemente, S.; Fernandez, E.; Garrido, L.; Lorenz, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Wright, A

    2000-03-11

    Avalanche Photo-Diodes (APDs) are being used as optical readout elements in a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter made of alternate layers of tungsten and plastic scintillators. The calorimeter serves as a small-angle luminosity monitor in the stray magnetic field of the ALEPH detector at LEP (CERN). Its scintillators are coupled both to APDs and conventional PMTs simultaneously via wavelength shifter fibres. In this paper we present results on the overall performance of the APDs, including gain and stability versus time and energy, based on the direct comparison of the two photosensitive devices.

  6. APD performance in a luminosity monitor at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomé, E.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Clemente, S.; Fernández, E.; Garrido, L.; Lorenz, E.; Martínez, M.; Merino, G.; Riu, I.; Sánchez, F.; Wright, A.

    2000-03-01

    Avalanche Photo-Diodes (APDs) are being used as optical readout elements in a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter made of alternate layers of tungsten and plastic scintillators. The calorimeter serves as a small-angle luminosity monitor in the stray magnetic field of the ALEPH detector at LEP (CERN). Its scintillators are coupled both to APDs and conventional PMTs simultaneously via wavelength shifter fibres. In this paper we present results on the overall performance of the APDs, including gain and stability versus time and energy, based on the direct comparison of the two photosensitive devices.

  7. APD performance in a luminosity monitor at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomé, E; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Clemente, S; Fernández, E; Garrido, L; Lorenz, E; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Wright, A

    2000-01-01

    Avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) are being used as optical readout elements in a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter made of alternate layers of tungsten and plastic scintillators. The calorimeter serves as a small-angle luminosity monitor in the stray magnetic field of the ALEPH detector at LEP (CERN). Its scintillators are coupled both to APDs and conventional PMTs simultaneously via wavelength shifter fibres. In this paper we present results on the overall performance of the APDs, including gain and stability versus time and energy, based on the direct comparison of the two photosensitive devices. (6 refs).

  8. CERN The next 50 years

    CERN Document Server

    Maiani, Luciano

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN is a 14 TeV proton-proton collider that is at the cutting edge of technology, and is a heartening sign of both the public's support for basic science in Europe and beyond, and the determination of European countries to stay at the forefront of particle physics. Realization of this project started some 50 years ago. Now for the next 50 years, particle phycists not only at CERN are planning a new generation of experiments that will push the high-energy boundary back even further. At CERN, a high-energy electron-positron linear collider, such as the 3-5 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) project is being considered. At Fermilab, focus is on a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) that would take physicists into the 200 TeV region. These two possibilities could be among the long-term goals of the global accelerator network, which would keep the world's particle physicists busy until 2050.

  9. WORK ON TELEPHONE NETWORK LEP SITE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The telephone service will make modifications on the LEP network the 12th December 2000 from 5.30pm. This will cause disturbances on telephone connections on the whole LEP area. For more information please call 160026.

  10. Le LEP sera encore là en l'an 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    CERN's Large Electron-Positron collider got the green light today to achieve its full potential by running for an additional year in the year 2000. Delegates attending the 110th meeting of the Laboratory's governing body, Council, approved the move after a careful presentation of the proposal's scientific merits and financial aspects by CERN's Director General Chris Llewellyn Smith.

  11. The Spirit counts - People at and around CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    After a few biographical remarks I shall concentrate on human aspects which are not covered by official documents, but which are as important to the success of CERN as scientific and technical competence. The approval of LEP, general problems of the project management and the approval of the LEP experiments under conditions never encountered before at CERN will be covered. The special spirit created at CERN based on the competence and solidarity of the CERN staff and its users made it possible to find new ways of successful international collaboration combining competition with cooperation. Career Summary Physics diploma and doctorate from Hamburg University, now Prof. emer.; research assistant at Stockholm Technical University (with Lise Meitner); Cavendish Laboratory UK (with O.R.Frisch); Cornell University (with R.R. Wilson); research in optics, nuclear and elementary particle physics. various professorships in Germany and director of university institutes; Director of DESY, Hamburg, 1973-1980...

  12. Una evaluación externa del CERN aconseja mejorar la gestión

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    An external committee of evaluation which studied the CERN situation before it undertook the construction of the Large Hadron Collider said the design of this new machine is excellent, but that CERN should improve its management

  13. Muon colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R. B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A. J.; Chen, P.; Cheng, W.-H.; Cho, Y.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R. C.; Gallardo, J. C.; Garren, A.; Green, M.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Popovic, M.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Summers, D.; Stumer, I.; Syphers, M.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; Van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.

    1996-05-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity μ+μ- colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  14. Muon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sessler, A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Skrinsky, A. [BINP, RU-630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  15. Future frontiers for e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions: physics of SLC and LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorfan, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    A brief historical review is given of the contribution to particle physics of e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions, followed by a discussion of the LEP and SLC machines and the reasons for developing linear colliders. A brief overview of the Standard Model and some essential formalism for the process e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. f anti f are presented, followed by a discussion of detectors. Tests of the Standard Model and physics beyond the Standard Model that can be made running at the Z/sup 0/ are considered. LEP physics at energies above the Z/sup 0/ is discussed. (LEW)

  16. Neutral Higgs bosons in the standard model and in the minimal supersymmetric model: Searches at LEP

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Igo-Kemenes

    2004-03-01

    During the twelve years of operation of the $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider LEP, the associated collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, have extensively searched for Higgs bosons over a broad range of masses. We present the final results from LEP for the standard model Higgs boson which are obtained from a statistical combination of the data from the four experiments. We also present preliminary combined results for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM) where the Higgs sector is assumed to be CP invariant. Finally, we discuss an alternative MSSM scenario including CP violation in the Higgs sector.

  17. CERN is 25 years old

    CERN Document Server

    Anthoine, R

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the history of CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, which has just celebrated its twenty-fifth anniversary. The member states, the site (Geneva) and accelerators, and the research carried out are all discussed. Amongst the apparatus and research described are the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron), the ISOLDE linear isotope separator, BEBC (Big European Bubble Chamber), and the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings). Discoveries made since the founding of CERN include that of neutral currents, measurement of the magnetic characteristics of the muon to a great accuracy, creation of exotic atoms, neutrino analysis of proton and neutron structure, hadron classification, future/past time asymmetry in neutral kaons, and the first measurements of the lifetimes of charmed hadrons. Future projects considered include LEP, the Large Electron Positron Ring. (0 refs).

  18. Design of a 120 MeV $H^{-}$ Linac for CERN High-Intensity Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F

    2002-01-01

    The SPL (Superconducting Proton Linac) study at CERN foresees the construction of a 2.2 GeV linac as a high beam-power driver for applications such as a second-generation radioactive ion beam facility or a neutrino superbeam. At the same time such a high-performance injector would both modernize and improve the LHC injection chain. The 120 MeV normal-conducting section of the SPL could be used directly in a preliminary stage for H- charge-exchange injection into the PS Booster. This would increase the proton flux to the CERN experiments while also improving the quality and reliability of the beams for the LHC. The 120 MeV linac consists of a front-end, a conventional Drift Tube Linac (DTL) to 40 MeV and a Cell Coupled Drift Tube Linac (CCDTL) to the full energy. All the RF structures will operate at 352 MHz, using klystrons and RF equipment recovered from the LEP collider. This paper concentrates on the design of the 3 to 120 MeV section. It introduces the design criteria for high-stability beam optics and th...

  19. CERN Choir

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

      Do you like singing? The CERN Choir is looking for basses and tenors Join us! Programme Spring Session 2015: Donizetti: Misere & Missa di Gloria e Credo Bellini: Salve Regina Bruckner: Requiem in D minor Next concert: Sunday 31 May 2015 at 17:00 Musicales de Comesières (GE) Rehearsals at CERN Main Auditorium, building 500 On Wednesdays from 20.00 to 22:00 Membership fee: January to June 150 CHF September to December: 100CHF Contact: Baudouin.bleus@cern.ch Facebook/Choeur-du-CERN

  20. Higgs particle searches at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    Results on searches for the Higgs particle performed by the four LEP experiments are received in the framework of the Standard Model, Two Doublet Model, and Minimal Supersymmetric Model. The combined mass lower limit for the standard Higgs boson is 66 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95 % CL for a statistics of 14.6 Million hadronic Z decays. (authors). 24 refs.

  1. Colour reconnection at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P

    2002-01-01

    The preliminary results on the search of colour reconnection effects (CR) from the four experiments at LEP, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, are reviewed. Extreme models are excluded by studies of standard variables, and on going studies of a method first suggested by L3, the particle flow method (D. Duchesneau, (2001)), are yet inconclusive. (22 refs).

  2. Heavy Quark Asymmetries at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Halley, A W

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of b and c quark asymmetries using data collected at LEP 1 are described. The relative merits of each of the individual techniques used is emphasised as is the most profitable way of combining them. Effects of radiative corrections are discussed, together with the impact of these measurements on global electroweak fits used to estimate the expected mass of the Higgs boson.

  3. Heavy quark physics from LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornan, P.J. [Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01

    A review of some of the latest results on heavy flavor physics from the LEP Collaborations is presented. The emphasis is on B physics, particularly new results and those where discrepancies is given of the many techniques which have been developed to permit these analyses.

  4. CERN honours Carlo Rubbia

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    On 7 April CERN will be holding a symposium to mark the 75th birthday of Carlo Rubbia, who shared the 1984 Nobel Prize for Physics with Simon van der Meer for contributions to the discovery of the W and Z bosons, carriers of the weak interaction. Following a presentation by Rolf Heuer, lectures will be given by eminent speakers on areas of science to which Carlo Rubbia has made decisive contributions. Michel Spiro, Director of the French National Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics (IN2P3) of the CNRS, Lyn Evans, sLHC Project Leader, and Alan Astbury of the TRIUMF Laboratory will talk about the physics of the weak interaction and the discovery of the W and Z bosons. Former CERN Director-General Herwig Schopper will lecture on CERN’s accelerators from LEP to the LHC. Giovanni Bignami, former President of the Italian Space Agency, will speak about his work with Carlo Rubbia. Finally, Hans Joachim Schellnhuber of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research and Sven Kul...

  5. CERN honours Carlo Rubbia

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    On 7 April CERN will be holding a symposium to mark the 75th birthday of Carlo Rubbia, who shared the 1984 Nobel Prize for Physics with Simon van der Meer for contributions to the discovery of the W and Z bosons, carriers of the weak interaction. Following a presentation by Rolf Heuer, lectures will be given by eminent speakers on areas of science to which Carlo Rubbia has made decisive contributions. Michel Spiro, Director of the French National Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics (IN2P3) of the CNRS, Lyn Evans, sLHC Project Leader, and Alan Astbury of the TRIUMF Laboratory will talk about the physics of the weak interaction and the discovery of the W and Z bosons. Former CERN Director-General Herwig Schopper will lecture on CERN’s accelerators from LEP to the LHC. Giovanni Bignami, former President of the Italian Space Agency and Professor at the IUSS School for Advanced Studies in Pavia will speak about his work with Carlo Rubbia. Finally, Hans Joachim Sch...

  6. Carlo Rubbia, former CERN Director-General, appointed Senator for life by the President of Italy.

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    Today, the President of the Italian Republic Giorgio Napolitano appointed four new senators for life: the music director and conductor “maestro” Claudio Abbado, the neuroscientist Professor Elena Cattaneo, the renowned architect Renzo Piano and Professor Carlo Rubbia, who was CERN Director-General from 1989 to 1993.   Carlo Rubbia during his talk for the discovery of the W particle in 1983. In 1984, Carlo Rubbia, then head of the UA1 collaboration, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, together with Simon van der Meer, for the discovery of the W and Z particles – at that time two important missing components of the Standard Model. During his term of office as Director-General, the Large Electron Positron collider was inaugurated and the four LEP experiments produced their first results. He also mounted the case for the new Large Hadron Collider, which in 2012 led to the discovery of a Higgs boson. In 1993, the last year of his mandate, the World Wide Web proto...

  7. Physics beyond Colliders Kickoff Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kickoff workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  8. Workshop on Physics Beyond Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kick-off workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  9. Proposal for the award of an industrial support contract for radiation monitoring services for LEP dismantling

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Service contract for radiation monitoring services for LEP dismantling. Following a market survey carried out among 34 firms in nine Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2769/SL/LEP) was sent on 13 March 2000 to seven firms and three consortia in five Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received six tenders from three firms and three consortia in four Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium ISS MULTISERVICE (CH), NFI (SE) and ISS GEBÄUDESERVICE (DE), the lowest technically qualified bidder, for radiation monitoring services for LEP dismantling for a total amount of 990 792 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: CH-59%, DE-26%, SE-15%.

  10. Courrier CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Example of the cover page of the French version of the CERN Courier; Courrier CERN from January 1962. The journal was published both in English and French up to volume 45, no. 5, June 2005. Since then there is a single-language edition where articles are published either in French or English with an abstract in the other language.

  11. Signals of universal extra dimension at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biplob Bhattacherjee

    2007-11-01

    In the minimal universal extra dimension model, single production of = 2 gauge bosons provides a unique discriminating feature from supersymmetry. We discuss how the proposed international linear collider can act as a = 2 factory, much in the same vein as LEP.

  12. CERN & Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Non Member State Summer Students 2015 are interviewed about their decision to study STEM subjects, to apply for CERN NMSSS programme, their experience onsite @CERN and takeaways, their future goals and aspirations, offering also advice to fellow students.The Non Member State Summer Student Programme stands for a unique opportunity for students from all over the world to spend their summer at CERN in Geneva, getting involved in some of the world’s biggest experiments. For 8 weeks, summer students gather on-site at CERN and join in the day-to-day work of research. The Programme targets advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students of physics, computing and engineering, particularly from developing countries. Participating students receive scientific training, attend lectures and work on laboratory-based projects alongside with CERN experts and fellow students.

  13. Automatic high voltage conditioning of the electrostatic LEP separators without conventional programming

    CERN Document Server

    Balhan, B; Carlier, E; Dieperink, J H; Mertens, V

    1995-01-01

    The TS Tool Kit is a generic, fully data-driven, and user-configurable software system developed at CERN for supervisory, control, and data acquisition applications. It provides a comprehensive framework to solve fairly complex process control problems requiring response times of the order of a second, without any need for conventional programming. The characteristics and benefits of this approach are discussed at the example of the new high voltage conditioning process for the electrostatic LEP separators.

  14. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  15. LEP vacuum chamber, early prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The structure of LEP, with long bending magnets and little access to the vacuum chamber between them, required distributed pumping. This is an early prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, made from extruded aluminium. The main opening is for the beam. The small channel to the right is for cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchroton radiation from the beam. The 4 slots in the channel to the left house the strip-shaped ion-getter pumps (see 7810255). The ion-getter pumps depended on the magnetic field of the bending magnets, too low at injection energy for the pumps to function well. Also, a different design was required outside the bending magnets. This design was therefore abandoned, in favour of a thermal getter pump (see 8301153 and 8305170).

  16. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armesto, N.; Dainese, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Masciocchi, S.; Roland, C.; Salgado, C. A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Wiedemann, U. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  17. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, N; d'Enterria, D; Masciocchi, S; Roland, C; Salgado, C A; van Leeuwen, M; Wiedemann, U A

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  18. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomyagkov, A.; Levichev, E.; Piminov, P.

    2016-12-01

    The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DA Φ NE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DA Φ NE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  19. Standard Model Higgs at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrer-Ribas, E

    2000-01-01

    In 1999 the LEP experiments collected data at centre of mass energies between 192 and 202 GeV for about 900 pb-1 integrated luminosity. Combined results are presented for the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. No statistically significant excess has been observed when compared to Standard Model background expectation which can be translated into a lower bound on the mass of the Higgs boson at 107.9 GeV/c^2 at 95 % confidence level.

  20. CERN confirms goal of 2007 start-up for LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Speaking at the 131st session of CERN Council on 17 December 2004, the Director-General, Robert Aymar, confirmed that the top priority is to maintain the goal of starting up the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2007.

  1. Researchers visit CERN in search of elusive Higgs boson

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "When Switzerland's CERN laboratory newest particle collider begins smashing atoms, scientists from the University of Chicago and Indiana University will be there to help crunch the data by using a worldwide supercomuting grid." (1 page)

  2. University of Tennessee deploys force10 switch for CERN work

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Force20 networks, the pioneer in building and securing reliable networks, today announced that the University of Tennessee physics department has deployed the C300 resilient switch to analyze data form CERN's Large Hadron Collider." (1/2 page)

  3. Llewellyn Smith, Director-General designate of CERN, discusses LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Sweet, William N

    1992-01-01

    Christopher Llewellyn Smith was nominated by the Committee of Council to be Director General of CERN. He aims to pave the way for the Large Hadron Collider and utilize to the full the Large Electron-Positron machine.

  4. Destination Universe: The Incredible Journey of a Proton in the Large Hadron Collider (English version)

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    This brochure illustrates the incredible journey of a proton as he winds his way through the CERN accelerator chain and ends up inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC is CERN's flagship particle accelerator which can collide protons together at close to the speed of light, creating circumstances like those just seconds after the Big Bang.

  5. Destination Universe: The Incredible Journey of a Proton in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    This brochure illustrates the incredible journey of a proton as he winds his way through the CERN accelerator chain and ends up inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC is CERN's flagship particle accelerator which can collide protons together at close to the speed of light, creating circumstances like those just seconds after the Big Bang.

  6. Big research in new dimensions. Thinkers of our time about the actual elementary-particle physics at CERN; Grossforschung in neuen Dimensionen. Denker unserer Zeit ueber die aktuelle Elementarteilchenphysik am CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kommer, Christoph (ed.) [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany); DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Satz, Helmut [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Blanchard, Philippe [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Abt. Theoretische Physik

    2016-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Research from the highest energies to the smallest particles at CERN, the laborious way to the Large Hadronic Collider, CERN as accelerator of techniques, culture, and society, a philosophical and sociological perspective of questions concerning CERN, quark matter research at CERN, the FAIR facility for antiproton and ion research. (HSI)

  7. CERN boss quashes LHC delay rumours

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Robert Aymar, the director general of CERN, has dispelled rumours that a series of buckled electrical connectors at the Large Hadron Collider will delay the accelerator's official start-up date of May 2008. Writing in this week's CERN Bulletin, Aymar says that the problem concerns only a small percentage of the connectors and that it is "business as usual" for bringing the new accelerator online." (1,5 page)

  8. Le Japon devient observateur au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1995-01-01

    A Japanese delegation, lead by Mr. Kaoru Yosano, Japan's Minister of Monbusho, (Ministry of Education, Science and Culture), was warmly applauded by the delegates of CERN's Member States when it entered the Council Chamber for the first time as an official Observer. Mr. Yosano, thanked the CERN Council for unanimously agreeing to grant Japan Official Observer Status and also accepting Japan's offer to contribute to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project.

  9. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Service

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC and ILC, which led to a host of good results and important decisions. The International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) studies both call for cutting-edge technologies. At first glance they may appear to be in competition, but they are in fact complementary and have a common objective – namely to propose a design , as soon as possible and at the lowest possible cost, for the linear accelerator best suited to taking over the baton of physics research at the high-energy frontier after the LHC.

  10. CERN and the high energy frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsesmelis Emmanuel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the particle physics programme at CERN at the high-energy frontier. Starting from the key open questions in particle physics and the large-scale science facilities existing at CERN, concentrating on the Large Hadron Collider(LHC, this paper goes on to present future possibilities for global projects in high energy physics. The paper presents options for future colliders, all being within the framework of the recently updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, and all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics. The paper concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward for high-energy physics research.

  11. Denis Guedj at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Denis Guedj (right), pictured with Etiennette Auffray Hillemanns of the CMS collaboration and Hartmut Hillemanns of the DG-KTT group.French author Denis Guedj, who is also a mathematician and Professor of History of Science at Paris VIII University, visited CERN on 7 and 8 October. During a presentation in the CERN Library he discussed his 15 published books and likened the process of novel writing to working on a scientific experiment: it begins with a limited amount of data, and then questions arise, problems are solved and further research reveals truths. Denis Guedj works hard to ensure that his novels contain ‘true fiction’. His most recent visit to CERN will help him to write a new book set at the LHC in which he will combine his scientific interest in what happens when a proton and proton collide with a human story about what happens to a male and female physicist who meet in the LHC tunnel. "Visiting the CMS cavern was...

  12. CERN Rocks

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 15th CERN Hardronic Festival took place on 17 July on the terrace of Rest 3 (Prévessin). Over 1000 people, from CERN and other International Organizations, came to enjoy the warm summer night, and to watch the best of the World's High Energy music. Jazz, rock, pop, country, metal, blues, funk and punk blasted out from 9 bands from the CERN Musiclub and Jazz club, alternating on two stages in a non-stop show.  The night reached its hottest point when The Canettes Blues Band got everybody dancing to sixties R&B tunes (pictured). Meanwhile, the bars and food vans were working at full capacity, under the expert management of the CERN Softball club, who were at the same time running a Softball tournament in the adjacent "Higgs Field". The Hardronic Festival is the main yearly CERN music event, and it is organized with the support of the Staff Association and the CERN Administration.

  13. A Bridge Too Far: The Demise of the Superconducting Super Collider, 1989-1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In October 1993 the US Congress terminated the Superconducting Super Collider -- at over 10 billion the largest and costliest basic-science project ever attempted. It was a disastrous loss for the nation's once-dominant high-energy physics community, which has been slowly declining since then. With the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, Europe has assumed world leadership in this field. A combination of fiscal austerity, continuing SSC cost overruns, intense Congressional scrutiny, lack of major foreign contributions, waning Presidential support, and the widespread public perception of mismanagement led to the project's demise nearly five years after it had begun. Its termination occurred against the political backdrop of changing scientific needs as US science policy shifted to a post-Cold War footing during the early 1990s. And the growing cost of the SSC inevitably exerted undue pressure upon other worthy research, thus weakening its support in Congress and the broader scientific community. As underscored by the Higgs boson discovery, at a mass substantially below that of the top quark, the SSC did not need to collide protons at 40 TeV in order to attain its premier physics goal. The selection of this design energy was governed more by politics than by physics, given that Europeans could build the LHC by eventually installing superconducting magnets in the LEP tunnel under construction in the mid-1980s. In hindsight, there were good alternative projects the US high-energy physics community could have pursued that did not involve building a gargantuan, multibillion-dollar machine at a green-field site in Texas. Research supported by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, and the Richard Lounsbery Foundation.

  14. CERN celebrates discoveries and looks to the future

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Nobel laureates will be among the distinguished guests at a symposium at CERN on 16 September. The symposium will celebrate the double anniversary of major discoveries at CERN that underlie the modern theory of particles and forces. It will also look forward to future challenges and opportunities ... with the construction of the Large Hadron Collider.

  15. New physics with the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    2001-01-01

    Investigating the 'strong' interactions between particles would be best investigated using a lepton-antilepton collider of energy 2 TeV or more. Plans for an accelerator of this type, called CLIC, have been underway at CERN for many years in collaboration with other accelerator laboratories (5 pages).

  16. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  17. Vacuum Chambers for LEP sections

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The picture shows sections of the LEP vacuum chambers to be installed in the dipole magnets (left) and in the quadrupoles (right). The dipole chamber has three channels: the beam chamber, the pumping duct where the NEG (non-evaporabe getter) is installed and the water channel for cooling (on top in the picture). The pumping duct is connected to the beam chamber through holes in the separating wall. The thick lead lining to shield radiation can also be seen. These chambers were manufactured as extruded aluminium alloy profiles.

  18. LEP des inquiétudes subsistent

    CERN Multimedia

    1984-01-01

    Certains propriétaires de terrains et de constructions situés sur le pourtour du LEP restent inquiets: qu'arriverait-il an cas de contestation sur la valeur de réparation d'éventuels dommages causés par la construction du LEP? (1 page).

  19. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  20. Signing of the agreement between CERN and the United States

    CERN Multimedia

    1997-01-01

    Siging of the agreement between CERN and the United States for a contribution of $531 million to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. The Agreement was signed by Dr. Matha Krebs, Director of the Office of Energy Research, DOE, Dr Bob Eisenstein, Assistant Director of Physical and Mathematical Science, NSF, and Prof. Christopher Llewellyn Smith, Director General of CERN at the Council session in December 1997. At the same occasion, the USA was granted Observer Status at CERN.

  1. Determination of W boson mass from the four quark decay in the DELPHI experiment at LEP; Mesure de la masse du boson W dans la desintegration a quatre quarks dans l'experience DELPHI au LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duperrin, Arnaud [Universite Claude Bernard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1999-04-20

    The accurate determination of W boson mass allows testing the coherence of standard model and imposing new constrains upon some of its parameters as for instance the Higgs boson mass. The W mass obtained by direct reconstruction of WW{yields}qq-bar qq-bar, was measured by means of the data recorded in 1997 and 1998 by DELPHI experimentat the center-of-mass energies 183 GeV and 189 GeV, for a total luminosity of 212 pb{sup -1} at the LEP collider of CERN. A neural network was used to label the signal what led to an efficiency and a selection accuracy of 86% and 80%, respectively. The number of the selected events among the data was 1710. By mass reconstruction, the jet multiplicity was let to vary free between four and eight jets. A new fast algorithm of kinematic fitting of the jets was developed to improve the mass resolution of the multi-jet events, by imposing the energy and momentum conservation. The association of jets has been carried out also by means of a neural network. The W boson mass was extracted starting from a probability fitting of the two-dimensional distribution provided by complete simulation and formed by the mean and the difference of two masses of W reconstructs. A technique of Monte Carlo re-weighting has been developed to obtain the simulation spectra for arbitrary M{sub W} values. The leading systematic uncertainties are studied by gathering a large number of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}Z{yields}qq-bar events and by merging them for obtaining events similar to the W pairs. The value of the W mass obtained from the data based on this probability is M{sub W} = 80.350{+-}0.099 (stat.) {+-} 0.038 (exp.) {+-} 0.056 (th.) {+-} 0.018 (LEP) GeV/c{sup 2}. This result is competitive and in good agreement with other determinations. The current world average mass of W boson is M{sub W} = 80.394 {+-} 0.042 GeV/c{sup 2}. This result, included in a global fitting of the electroweak data, constraints the standard Higgs boson to a mass lower than 262 Ge

  2. Robot adventures at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Imagine if the CERN robots had an end-of-year party... From retrieving data tapes to handling material safely, the robots at CERN fulfill numerous tasks. Find out more: http://cern.ch/go/VjX7 Produced by: CERN Video Productions Director: Christoph M. Madsen Copyright © 2015 CERN. Terms of use: http://copyright.web.cern.ch/

  3. CERN selects Fujikura's radiation resistant fiber

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Fujikura recently announced that its radiation resistant single mode optical fiber has been selected by CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, to provide communication links within the world's largest particle accelerator - the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - near Geneva, Switzerland." (1/2 page)

  4. CERN selects Fujikura's radiation resistant fibre

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Fujikura today announced that its radiation resistant single mode optical fibre has been selected by CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, to provide communication links within the world's largest particle accelerator - the Large hadron Collider (LHC) - near Genevan, Switzerland. (1/2 page)

  5. CERN tests largest superconducting solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN's Compacts Muon Solenoid (CMS) - the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet - has reached full field in testing. The instrument is part of the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, located in a giant subterranean chamber at Cessy on the Franco-Swiss border." (1 page)

  6. The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aamodt, K.; de Haas, A.P.; Grebenyuk, O.; Ivan, C.G.; Kamermans, R.; Mischke, A.; Nooren, G.J.L.; Oskamp, C.J.; Peitzmann, T.; Simili, E.; van den Brink, A.; van Eijndhoven, N.J.A.M.; Yuting, B.

    2008-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a general-purpose, heavy-ion detector at the CERN LHC which focuses on QCD, the strong-interaction sector of the Standard Model. It is designed to address the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at extreme values of energy dens

  7. Bosons & More: Celebrating CERN / Part 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Team, CERN

    2013-01-01

    The "Bosons & More" event for CERN people this evening celebrated the success of the Open Days, and the exceptional achievements of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The British progressive rock band the Alan Parsons Live Project lead the celebrations until late in the night.

  8. Torchwood sends inspection team to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Sherriff, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    "Torchwood's Captain Jack has been sighted at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. Does this mean that when it is switched on it is likely to open a rift under Cardiff from whence all manner of spooky things shall spring?" (1/2 page)

  9. Milestone, Weighing 1430 Tons, Reached at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    More on the subject of the Large Hadron Collider (see my last post, pointing to the very good Scientific American package). CERN announced today that the final piece of one of the main LHC particle detectors was at last safely lowered underground early this morning.

  10. LEP2 Present and Future Performance and Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, S

    1998-01-01

    The LEP collider was operated during 1996 for the first time at beam energies beyond the W pair threshold. In the first period, lasting about six weeks, operation was possible at 80.5GeV per beam by powering all of the 144 superconducting cavities (sc) as well as the original 120 room temperature cavities. After the summer shutdown, when an additional 32 sc cavities were installed, operation for physics was performed at 86GeV per beam for about four weeks. The integrated luminosity at high energy, delivered to the detectors, was 25pb-1 in the two fairly short running periods. The maximum integrated luminosity over a 24 hour period exceeded 1.1pb-1. The present performance and limitations of the machine are reviewed as well as some of the crucial technical systems.

  11. CERN choir

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Don't forget a special performance of Joseph Haydn's Creation, an oratorio in three parts, given by the CERN choir and the Annecy choir Pro Musica, this Sunday at 8.30 p.m. at the Grand Casino. Tickets (38 CHF) are available at Fnac Rive and Balexert.

  12. Snapshots of CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Rebecca Leam

    Art was the language of communication between science and the thousands of visitors attending CERN’s two photographic exhibitions in Italy and Spain in October. The artistic images of CERN’s Nobel Prize winners, Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machinery and detectors raised people's curiosity and helped to promote the understanding of particle physics.   The exhibition “Accelerating Nobels” at Genoa’s 7th Science Festival. The exhibition “Accelerating Nobels” attracted over 600’000 visitors during Genoa’s 7th annual Science Festival. It showed science photographer Volker Steger’s 21 portraits of physics Nobels holding their own impromptu drawings of their best discovery. “The theme of the festival was ‘The Future’. The exhibition illustrated the long history of particle physics discoveries at CERN which all lead to what the LHC is going to find, including probably more ...

  13. Remote control of a streak camera for real time bunch size measurement in LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, A J; De Vries, J C

    1995-01-01

    A double sweep streak camera, built by industry according to CERN specifications, has been used for a number of years to provide real time three-dimensional measurements of bunches in LEP, by means of a dedicated synchrotron light source. Originally requiring local manipulation in an underground lab close to the LEP tunnel, the camera can now be fully operated via the control system network. Control functions, such as the adjustment of lens and mirror positions, the selection of camera weep speeds, and the setting of 12 ps resolution trigger timing, are handled by various networked VME systems, as is real time image processing. Bunch dimension averages are transferred every few seconds via the control system to the LEP measurement database, and a dedicated high bandwidth video transmission allows the streak camera images and processed results to be viewed in real time (at 25 Hz) in the LEP control room. Feedback control loops for light intensity, trigger timing and image tracking allow the setup to provide us...

  14. ABS at the SPS and LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, J

    1999-01-01

    LEP and SPS are large circular accelerators equiped with more than 100 orbit monitors and corrector dipoles in each plane. At the SPS orbit control is mainly used to minimize beam losses, while for LEP the orbit is a crucial parameter for lumonisity performance. Various algorithms and strategies have been developped for LEP to find "Golden Orbits" that optimize the dispersion and the beam emittances. Despite those differences, the two machines share a large amount of control software for beam steering. The experience and problems related to beam steering at such large machines will be presented. The limitations of the orbit control system sharing between the two machines will be reviewed.

  15. slice of LEP beamtube with getter strip

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    A section of the LEP beam pipe. This is the chamber in which LEP's counter-rotating electron and positron beams travel. It is made of lead-clad aluminium. The beams circulate in the oval cross-section part of the chamber. In the rectangular cross-section part, LEP's innovative getter-strip vacuum pump is installed. After heating to purify the surface of the getter, the strip acts like molecular sticky tape, trapping any stray molecules left behind after the accelerator's traditional vacuum pumps have done their job.

  16. Prototype steel-concrete LEP dipole magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    The magnetic field needed in the LEP dipole magnets was rather low, of a fraction of tesla. This lead to the conception of a novel yoke structure consisting of stacks of 1.5 mm thick low-carbon steel laminations spaced by 4.1 mm with the spaces filled with concrete. The excitation coils were also very simple: aluminium bars insulated by polyester boxes in this prototype, by glass-epoxy in the final magnets. For details see LEP-Note 118,1978 and LEP-Note 233 1980. See also 8111529,7908528X.

  17. Probing the Big Bang with LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, David N.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that LEP probes the Big Bang in two significant ways: (1) nucleosynthesis, and (2) dark matter constraints. In the first case, LEP verifies the cosmological standard model prediction on the number of neutrino types, thus strengthening the conclusion that the cosmological baryon density is approximately 6 percent of the critical value. In the second case, LEP shows that the remaining non-baryonic cosmological matter must be somewhat more massive and/or more weakly interacting than the favorite non-baryonic dark matter candidates of a few years ago.

  18. GERMANY AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    13 - 15 November 2001 Administration Building Bldg 60 - ground and 1st floor 09.00 hrs - 17.30 hrs OPENING CEREMONY 10h00 - 13 November GERMANY AT CERN Thirty-three German companies will be demonstrating their supplies and services offered for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other key CERN programmes. The Industrial exhibition will be enriched with a display of objects of contemporary German art. The official German presentation is under the patronage of the Federal Minister of Education and Research (BMBF), Bonn. There follows : the list of exhibitors, the list of lectures to be given at the exhibition. A detailed programme will be available in due course at : your Divisional Secretariat, the Reception information desk, building 33, the exhibition. LIST OF EXHIBITORS Accel Instruments GmbH Representative: 1.1 Accel Instruments GmbH/CH-8754 Netsal apra-norm Elektromechanik GmbH Representative: 2.1 apra-norm s.n.c./F-67500 Haguenau Babcock Noell Nuclear GmbH Balcke-D&u...

  19. SUSY Without Prejudice at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Thomas G

    2008-01-01

    We explore the physics of the general CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation, the pMSSM. The 19 soft SUSY breaking parameters are chosen so to satisfy all existing experimental and theoretical constraints assuming that the WIMP is the lightest neutralino. We scan this parameter space twice using both flat and log priors and compare the results which yield similar conclusions. Constraints from both LEP and the Tevatron play an important role in obtaining our final model samples. Implications for future TeV-scale $e^+e^-$ linear colliders(LC) are discussed.

  20. 6th IT First Tuesday@CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    François Grey

    2005-01-01

    Thursday 12 May, 17:30-19:30, Main Auditorium, CERN Data management in the 21st Century: the Petabyte challenge A Petabyte is a million Gigabytes, the equivalent of over 200,000 DVDs. That may seem like an enormous amount of data, but managing such quantities of data is a reality in the world of science, and is increasingly becoming an imperative in the world of business. This IT First Tuesday@CERN presents the Petabyte challenge, and some of the emerging solutions, from both scientific and commercial perspectives. For CERN's Large Hadron Collider, a Grid solution has been chosen to provide the necessary distributed storage capacity for the anticipated 15 Petabytes of data per year that this collider will produce. IBM is CERN's storage partner in the CERN openlab for DataGrid applications, and is testing the companies innovative TotalStorage SAN distributed filesystem in CERN's demanding IT environment. For Lausanne-based VisioWave, managing stored video data provides an extreme storage challenge. For D...

  1. Geneva University honours two CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Albert Hofmann Steve Myers On 8 June, two CERN staff members will receive Geneva University's highest distinction. On the proposal of the University's particle physicists, Steve Myers and Albert Hoffmann, who orchestrated LEP commissioning and operation and were instrumental in its success, will awarded the distinction of doctor honoris causa. The ceremony, interspersed with musical interludes, will be followed by a formal reception and is open to all. The Uni Dufour car park will be free to members of the public attending the ceremony. 8 June 2001 at 10.00 a.m. Uni Dufour, Auditoire Piaget 24, rue Général Dufour, Geneva.

  2. A luminosity measurement at LEP using the L3 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffeman, E.N.

    1996-06-25

    To perform high precision measurements at particle colliders it is crucial to know the exact intensity of the colliding beams. In particle physics this quantity is generally referred to as the luminosity. The determination of the luminosity in one of the experiments (L3) is the topic of this thesis. The implementation and the use of a silicon strip detector in L3, will be described in detail. In chapter one the most important parameters measured at LEP are discussed, preceded by a short introduction to the Standard Model. The process generally used for luminosity measurements in electron positron colliders is small angle Bhabha scattering. This process is discussed at the end of chapter one. In chapter two the characteristics of the collider and the L3 experiment are given. Together with the signature of the small angle Bhabha scattering, these experimental conditions determine the specifications for the design of the luminosity monitor. The general features of silicon strip detectors for their application in high energy physics are presented in chapter three. Some special attention is given to the behaviour of the sensors used for the tracking detector in the luminosity monitor. The more specific design details of the luminosity monitor are constricted to chapter four. In chapter five the conversion from detector signals into ccordinates relevant for the analysis is explained. The selection of the small angle Bhabha scattering events and the subsequent determination of the luminosity, are presented in chapter six. Systematic uncertainties are carefully studied. Important for a good understanding of the Bhabha selection are the events where a photon is produced in the scattering process. These events are separately studied. In chapter seven a comparison is presented between the radiative events observed in the data and their modelling in the Bhlumi Monte Carlo programme. (orig.).

  3. CERN OVERVIEW animation

    CERN Multimedia

    Arzur Catel Torres

    2015-01-01

    This animation shows how the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) works. The film begins with an aerial view of CERN near Geneva, with outlines of the accelerator complex, including the underground Large Hadron Collider (LHC), 27-km in circumference. The positions of the four largest LHC experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are revealed before we see protons travelling around the LHC ring. The proton source is a simple bottle of hydrogen gas. An electric field is used to strip hydrogen atoms of their electrons to yield protons. Linac 2, the first accelerator in the chain, accelerates the protons to the energy of 50 MeV. The beam is then injected into the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), which accelerates the protons to 1.4 GeV, followed by the Proton Synchrotron (PS), which pushes the beam to 25 GeV. Protons are then sent to the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) where they are accelerated to 450 GeV. The protons are finally transferred to the two beam pipes of the LHC. The beam in one pipe circulates clockwise while ...

  4. CERN's vacuums honoured to the full

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN's Cristoforo Benvenuti is awarded one of the most prestigious prizes in the world of vacuum techniques     Because we constantly run into such individuals, we tend to forget that CERN has specialists with world reputations. It takes the international prizes they win to remind us of the fact. One such prize, the American Vacuum Society (AVS)'s Gaede-Langmuir Award for 2002, has gone to Cristoforo Benvenuti, Leader of the Surfaces and Materials Technologies Group in EST Division. The award, conferred once every two years, is one of the leading prizes in the vacuum field. By coincidence, its very first winner was Pierre Auger, one of CERN's founding fathers, back in 1978. Cristoforo Benvenuti, a senior physicist who joined CERN in 1966, has been singled out for his work on getter technologies. These technologies made their name at CERN with the coming of LEP, where they were used for pumping the machine. Getter is a material with the property of capturing gas molecules and thereby actin...

  5. The LHC Physics Centre at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Although raw physics data is produced at CERN, thanks to the GRID its analysis is performed in various institutes worldwide. In addition, workshops, conferences and meetings take place all over the world. The physicist community is decentralized, and CERN must continue to provide intellectual leadership. The LHC Physics Centre is the tool that will make this possible.   Until the early days of LEP, a large part of the scientific activity related to CERN’s experiments was strongly centered at the Laboratory. Few places had the infrastructure to host activities such as the working groups preparing the Yellow Reports, and the limited access to information in the pre-web era made CERN the natural place to learn what was happening in the field. “I remember the days when we, the theorists, would come to CERN just to read the most recent preprints, which were reaching CERN's Library before we could get them in our institutes”, says Michelangelo Mangano, a member of the Theo...

  6. Study of muon bundles from extensive air showers with the ALICE detector at CERN LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtejer, K.

    2016-05-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. The large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber are exploited to study the muonic component of extensive air showers. We present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. The latest version of the QGSJET hadronic interaction model was used to simulate the development of the resulting air showers. High multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons were also studied. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP without satisfactory explanations for the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. We demonstrate that the high muon-multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 1016 eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range.

  7. CERN Shuttle

    CERN Multimedia

    General Infrastructure Services Department

    2011-01-01

    As of Monday 21 February, a new schedule will come into effect for the Airport Shuttle (circuit No. 4) at the end of the afternoon: Last departure at 7:00 pm from Main Buildig, (Bldg. 500) to Airport (instead of 5:10 p.m.); Last departure from Airport to CERN, Main Buildig, (Bldg. 500), at 7:30 p.m. (instead of 5:40 p.m.). Group GS-IS

  8. LEP sees the end of the tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    After 14 months, which have seen the removal of 30,000 tonnes of material from the tunnel, the LEP dismantling operation has now been completed. LHC installation, which will be subject to new safety rules, can go ahead.

  9. Determination of the LEP beam energy

    CERN Document Server

    Torrence, E

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the determination of the LEP beam energy above the production threshold for W boson pairs. A brief overview of the magnetic extrapolation method is presented which is currently used to determine the LEP beam energy to a relative precision of 2*10/sup -4 /. A new method for beam energy measurements based on an in-line energy spectrometer is presented, and current developments in the commissioning of this device are outlined. (2 refs).

  10. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  11. Aerial view of CERN under the snow

    CERN Multimedia

    1963-01-01

    In this photograph taken in the winter of 1963, CERN still looks quite bare under its mantle of snow. The Proton Synchrotron (PS), resembling a bicycle wheel in shape, had been in operation since the summer of 1959. A proposal had just been made for the site of CERN's second large project, the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR): France was to house the world's first proton-proton collider. In September 1965, the French authorities signed an agreement making more than 40 hectares of land available for the extension of the CERN site established in Switzerland into French territory. The ISR project received final approval from the CERN Council in December 1965. The civil engineering work on the French part began in November 196

  12. Project management as a breakthrough at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Ninin, P

    1998-01-01

    Building and maintaining control systems for high-energy physics is becoming an increasingly complex and costly activity. The quickly evolving technology and the tight budget conditions require today a better management of our engineering activities. This situation led us to organize these activities as "projects" and to use modern project management practices already widely spread in industry. In this context, many aspects of the re-engineering of the controls infrastructure of the two CERN largest particle accelerators - SPS and LEP - as well as the supervision of the CERN wide technical services are fully conducted as projects with special control over the costs, resources, objectives, activities and maintenance aspects. This paper presents our experience in project-based management with special emphasis on its applicability in a research environment, the impact on the current working practices, and the potential benefits for the future. Some key concepts and techniques of project management are introduced...

  13. Project management as a breakthrough at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Eynden, M

    1997-01-01

    Building and maintaining control systems for high energy physics is becoming an increasingly complex and costly activity. The quickly evolving technology and the tight budget conditions require today a better management of our engineering activities. This situation led us to organise these activities as "projects" and to use modern project management practices already widely spread in industry. In this context, many aspects of the re-engineering of the controls infrastructure of the two CERN largest particle accelerators - SPS and LEP - as well as the supervision of the CERN wide technical services are fully conducted as projects with special control over the costs, resources, objectives, activities and maintenance aspects. This paper presents our experience in project-based management with special emphasis on its applicability in a research environment, on the impact on the current working pratices and on the potential benefits for the future. Some key concepts and techniques of project management are introd...

  14. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: OPAL experiment at LEP; D{phi} experiment at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon interactions at TEV II; CYGNUS experiment; final results from {nu}{sub e}{sup {minus}e} elastic scattering; physics with CLEO detector at CESR; results from JADE at PETRA; rare kaon-decay experiment at BNL; search for top quark; and super conducting super collider activities.

  15. Monitoring Control Applications at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, F; Milcent, H; Petrova, L B; Varela, F

    2011-01-01

    The Industrial Controls and Engineering (EN-ICE) group [1] of the Engineering Department at CERN has produced, and is responsible for the operation of around 60 applications, which control critical processes in the domains of cryogenics, quench protection systems, power interlocks for the Large Hadron Collider and other subsystems of the accelerator complex. These applications require 24/7 operation and a quick reaction to problems. For this reason the EN-ICE group is presently developing the Monitoring Operation of cOntrols Networks (MOON) tool to detect, anticipate and inform of possible anomalies in the integrity of the applications. The tool builds on top of Simatic WinCC Open Architecture (WinCC OA) [2] SCADA and makes usage of the Joint COntrols Project (JCOP) [3] and the UNified INdustrial COntrol System (UNICOS) [4] Frameworks developed at CERN. The tool provides centralized monitoring and software management of the different elements integrating the control systems like Windows and L...

  16. The standard model Higgs search at the large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satyaki Bhattacharya; on behalf of the CMS and the ATLAS Collaborations

    2007-11-01

    The experiments at the large hadron collider (LHC) will probe for Higgs boson in the mass range between the lower bound on the Higgs mass set by the experiments at the large electron positron collider (LEP) and the unitarity bound (∼ 1 TeV). Strategies are being developed to look for signatures of Higgs boson and measure its properties. In this paper results from full detector simulation-based studies on Higgs discovery from both ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC will be presented. Results of simulation studies on Higgs coupling measurement at LHC will be discussed.

  17. [The CERN and the megascience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Peris, José

    2006-01-01

    In this work we analyse the biggest particle accelerator in the world: the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ring shaped tunnel is 27 km long and it is buried over 110 meters underground, straddling the border betwen France and Switzerland at the CERN laboratory near Geneva. Its mission is to recreate the conditions that existed shortly after the Big-Bang and to look for the hypothesised Higgs particle. The LHC will accelerate protons near the speed of the light and collide them head on at an energy of to 14 TeV (1 TeV = 10(12) eV). Keeping such high energy in the proton beams requires enormous magnetic fields which are generated by superconducting electromagnets chilled to less than two degrees above absolute zero. It is expected that LHC will be inaugurated in summer 2007.

  18. Status of PACMAN Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Catalan-Lasheras, Nuria; Modena , Michele

    2015-01-01

    Though the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is just at the start of a program expected to run for 20 additional years, CERN is studying the next generation of colliders, like the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). This project proposes an electron-positron collider with a length close to 50 km and with a centre of mass energy of 3 TeV at the collision point. One of the main challenges is the sub-micrometric size of the beams, down to a few nanometres at the interaction point. As a consequence, the accelerator will require unprecedented nanometric tolerances of beam alignment. A series of several thousands components will have to be assembled, aligned at the micrometre level and most critically, stabilized actively at the nanometre level. PACMAN, a study on Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometre scale, is a Marie Curie Program supported by the European Commission (FP7 Program), creating a network of 16 Academic and Industrial Partners. The project is hosted at CERN and it offe...

  19. CERN agonizes over whether to keep up the hunt for the Higgs

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Senior managers at CERN were meeting as Nature went to press, to decide whether to fund a one-year extension for LEP, at an estimated cost of 100 million CHF, in a bid to confirm possible earlier sightings of the Higgs boson (3 paragraphs).

  20. CERN moves to http://home.cern

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    A new top-level domain for CERN will be inaugurated next week, with the migration of the core website to http://home.cern.   The new home.cern webpage. The .cern top-level domain is intended for the exclusive use of CERN and its affiliates, and will soon be open for applications from within the community. Clear governance mechanisms for registration and management of .cern domains have been put in place. Applications for domains may be submitted by current members of the CERN personnel, and must be sponsored by a CERN entity such as a department, experiment, project or CERN-recognised experiment. For more information please refer to the registration policy. The acquisition of the .cern top-level domain was negotiated via ICANN’s new gTLD programme by a board comprising members of the CERN Legal Service, Communications group and IT department. .cern is one of over 1,300 new top-level domains that will launch over the coming months and years. The .cern domain nam...

  1. 欧洲核子中心汇聚全球的努力筹划未来的巨大环型对撞机%CERN Promote the Wide International Collaboration for Building a Huge Future Circular Collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱思进

    2014-01-01

    结合2014年2月参加“对未来环型对撞机研究的启动会议”的见闻,介绍了全球高能物理界正在讨论如何通过广泛国际合作、在欧洲核子中心(CERN)建造未来环形高能加速器和粒子对撞机的新动态,简要回顾了历史上高能加速器和对撞机建设的经验和教训,摘编了与会者提出的相关见解和建议,希望中国高能物理的长远发展可从中借鉴和参考.

  2. Search for supersymmetric particles at 130 GeV < √s < 140 GeV at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, M.; Adam, A.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alpat, B.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Antreasyan, D.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Baschirotto, A.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Boucham, A.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brock, I. C.; Buijs, A.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenhuijs, A.; Cai, X. D.; Campanelli, M.; Capell, M.; Romeo, G. Cara; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Castello, R.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chan, A.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chereau, X.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A. P.; Colino, N.; Commichau, V.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; De Boeck, H.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; DiBitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dorne, I.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Dutta, S.; Easo, S.; Efremenko, Yu; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S. N.; Gau, S. S.; Gentile, S.; Gerald, J.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldstein, J.; Gong, Z. F.; Gougas, A.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Hangarter, K.; Hartmann, B.; Hasan, A.; He, J. T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Hu, G.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, A.; Kirkby, D.; Kirkby, J.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Köngeter, A.; Korolko, I.; Koutsenko, V.; Koulbardis, A.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krenz, W.; Kuijten, H.; Kunin, A.; de Guevara, P. Ladron; Landi, G.; Lapoint, C.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Lieb, E.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, W.; Lu, Y. S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mangla, S.; Marchesini, P.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNally, D.; McNeil, R. R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; von der Mey, M.; Mi, Y.; Mihul, A.; van Mil, A. J. W.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monteleoni, B.; Moore, R.; Morganti, S.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Muheim, F.; Nagy, E.; Nahn, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Ostonen, R.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Park, H. K.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Peach, D.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petrak, S.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Pinto, J. C.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Produit, N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Redaelli, M.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Riles, K.; Ro, S.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosselet, Ph; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sarkar, S.; Sassowsky, M.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schoeneich, B.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shukla, J.; Shumilov, E.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Strauch, K.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Susinno, G. F.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Tang, X. W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Toker, O.; Tonisch, F.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tully, C.; Tuchscherer, H.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Völkert, R.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorobyov, An. A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xu, J.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yao, X. Y.; Ye, J. B.; Yeh, S. C.; You, J. M.; Zaccardelli, C.; Zalite, An; Zemp, P.; Zeng, J. Y.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, G. J.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; L3 Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    A search for supersymmetric particles (charginos, neutralinos, sleptons and stop quarks) has been performed with data collected by the L3 detector during the November 1995 run of the LEP collider at centre of mass energies between 130 and 140 GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 5.1 pb -1. We observe no signal for supersymmetric particles and we set improved exclusion limits on their production cross sections and masses.

  3. UK @ CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    17 – 18 November 2008 9.00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m. on Monday 17 November 9.00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m. on Tuesday 18 November Individual meetings will take place in the technicians’ or engineers’ offices. The companies will contact relevant users/technicians but anyone wishing to arrange an appointment with a specific company can contact Caroline Laignel (mailto:caroline.laignel@cern.ch, tel. 73722). A list of the companies is available from all departmental secretariats and on the web at: http://fi-dep.web.cern.ch/fi-dep/structure/memberstates/exhibitions_visits.htm List of companies: 1. Caburn MDC Europe Ltd. 2. Croft Engineering Services 3. Cryox Ltd. 4. Goodfellow Cambridge Ltd. 5. Gravatom Engineering Systems Ltd. 6. High Voltage Technology 7. Lilco Ltd. 8. Micro Metalsmiths Ltd. 9. Photek Ltd. 10. Shadow Robot Company 11. Sundance Multiprocessor Technology Ltd. 12. Tessella plc 13. Thermal Resources Management Ltd. 14. Torr Scientific Ltd. For further information please contact Mrs C. Laignel, FI-DI, tel. 7372...

  4. A busy week for Arts@CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    Last week, Semiconductor – the winners of the Collide@CERN Ars Electronica award for 2015 – and artists Francesco Mariotti and José­-Carlos Mariátegui visited CERN and met the scientists.   Ruth Jarman (left) and Joe Gerhardt (right) of Semiconductor with Peter Jenni, one of the scientists they met during their visit to ATLAS.   Just a few weeks ago, Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt, two English artists collaborating under the name Semiconductor, were awarded the Collide@CERN Ars Electronica prize for 2015. Last week, they came on their first visit to CERN to meet the scientists and select their scientific partner in preparation for their residency. They will soon begin a two-month residency at CERN before going to Linz (Austria), where they will spend a month at the Ars Electronica Futurelab. During their residency, the artists aim to create a digital artwork elaborating on the n...

  5. CERN comes under fresh financial pressure

    CERN Multimedia

    Dickson, D

    1996-01-01

    Germany's decision to effect a 10% cut in its annual subscription to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 1997 has added to the financial problems of the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva, Switzerland. Reduced European contributions will have a crucial impact on the planned construction and completion of LHC. Proposals for non-European membership to reduce the financial burden on CERN members is doubtful in the current political context. The German move hints at a reappraisal of the funding projections for LHC.

  6. Laser ion source studies at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Tambini, J

    1995-01-01

    The plasma produced when a powerful laser pulse is focused onto a target surface in vacuum can provide a copious source of highly charged ions. Ions can then be extracted from the plasma to form a high current, short pulse length ion beam. Experimental laser ion sources have been the subject of investigation in medical physics and particle accelerator applications; a laser ion source is an option for the injection system of heavy ions for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN where a high intensity lead ion beam is required. This paper describes work carried out at CERN to develop a CO2 laser ion source.

  7. CERN: Exploring the frontiers of knowledge

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN video productions

    2011-01-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is one of the world’s largest and most respected centres for scientific research. We conduct fundamental research in physics to study the basic constituents of matter — the elementary particles. By studying what happens when very energetic particles collide, physicists can learn more about the laws of nature. Founded in 1954, the CERN Laboratory sits astride the Franco–Swiss border near Geneva. It was one of Europe’s first joint ventures and now has 20 Member States.

  8. Computer Security: Security operations at CERN (4/4)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Stefan Lueders, PhD, graduated from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich and joined CERN in 2002. Being initially developer of a common safety system used in all four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, he gathered expertise in cyber-security issues of control systems. Consequently in 2004, he took over responsibilities in securing CERN's accelerator and infrastructure control systems against cyber-threats. Subsequently, he joined the CERN Computer Security Incident Response Team and is today heading this team as CERN's Computer Security Officer with the mandate to coordinate all aspects of CERN's computer security --- office computing security, computer centre security, GRID computing security and control system security --- whilst taking into account CERN's operational needs. Dr. Lueders has presented on these topics at many different occasions to international bodies, governments, and companies, and published several articles. With the prevalence of modern information technologies and...

  9. Pairs of charged heavy fermions from an $SU(3)_{L}(-)U(1)_{N}$ model at $e^{+}e^{-}$ colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Cieza-Montalvo, J E; 10.1103/PhysRevD.67.075022

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the production, backgrounds, and signatures of pairs of charged heavy fermions using the SU(3)/sub L/(-)U(1)/sub N/ electroweak model in e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliders (Next Linear Collider and CERN Linear Collider). We also analyze the indirect evidence for a boson Z'. (23 refs).

  10. 20 years ago: first collisions (at LEP)

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    It’s been 20 years since the first electron positron collision at LEP, and I have to confess to a little self-indulgence in my message this week. Back then I was a member of the OPAL collaboration, the first to see collisions at LEP just before midnight on 13 August 1989 and almost exactly one month after the first circulating beam. It was a historic moment, and the atmosphere in the OPAL control room, 100 metres underground, was one of anticipation and excitement. We reported back to the LEP control room, champagne duly arrived, and over the next few hours, all the experiments were recording data. The pilot run was as smooth as it could be, and within weeks we were announcing new physics. It’s interesting to contrast the start-up of LEP with that of the LHC. With the benefit of hindsight, LEP seems to have got going without a hitch, and indeed it was a smooth start. We circulated beam on 14 July, much to the joy of one of our host states, and it was just a month ...

  11. QCD at collider energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidis, A.; Bordes, G.

    1986-05-01

    We examine available experimental distributions of transverse energy and transverse momentum, obtained at the CERN pp¯ collider, in the context of quantum chromodynamics. We consider the following. (i) The hadronic transverse energy released during W+/- production. This hadronic transverse energy is made out of two components: a soft component which we parametrize using minimum-bias events and a semihard component which we calculate from QCD. (ii) The transverse momentum of the produced W+/-. If the transverse momentum (or the transverse energy) results from a single gluon jet we use the formalism of Dokshitzer, Dyakonov, and Troyan, while if it results from multiple-gluon emission we use the formalism of Parisi and Petronzio. (iii) The relative transverse momentum of jets. While for W+/- production quarks play an essential role, jet production at moderate pT and present energies is dominated by gluon-gluon scattering and therefore we can study the Sudakov form factor of the gluon. We suggest also how through a Hankel transform of experimental data we can have direct access to the Sudakov form factors of quarks and gluons.

  12. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  13. Physics motivations for future CERN accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    de Roeck, A; Gianotti, F; de Roeck, Albert; Ellis, John; Gianotti, Fabiola

    2001-01-01

    We summarize the physics motivations for future accelerators at CERN. We argue that (a) a luminosity upgrade for the LHC could provide good physics return for a relatively modest capital investment, (b) CLIC would provide excellent long-term perspectives within many speculative scenarios for physics beyond the Standard Model, (c) a Very Large Hadron Collider could provide the first opportunity to explore the energy range up to about 30 TeV, (d) a neutrino factory based on a muon storage ring would provide an exciting and complementary scientific programme and a muon collider could be an interesting later option.

  14. Delay in Europe could mean extra year for U.S. Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Physicists were hardly surprised when officials at the European lab CERN announced last week that the world's new highest-energy atom smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will not start up in November as planned..."(1 page)

  15. New CKM-related studies on b decays in the DELPHI experiment at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Mitaroff, Winfried A

    2003-01-01

    The e-e+ collider LEP, running at sqrt{s} = m(Z0), has been a copious source of b-hadrons produced in decays Z0 -> b \\b. We present recent studies using up to 4*10^6 hadronic Z0 decays acquired by the DELPHI detector between 1992 and 2000. They rely on efficient particle identification, precise track and vertex reconstruction and sophisticated data analysis algorithms. Presented are: a new measurement of the CKM matrix element |V_cb| in the semileptonic exclusive decays B0_d -> D*+ l- \

  16. China and CERN renew their Co-operation Agreement

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Liu Yanhua, Chinese Vice Minister of Science and Technology, and Dr. Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN, sign a new Co-operation Agreement between the Government of the People's Republic of China and CERN. During his visit to CERN on 17 February, Liu Yanhua, Vice Minister of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China, signed a new Co-operation Agreement with the Laboratory. The Agreement, which is valid for a period of five years and renewable, lays down the framework for the development of scientific and technological co-operation between CERN and China. This includes China's participation, as a non-Member State, in CERN's research projects as well as its main programmes. Robert Aymar and Liu Yanhua underlined that this Agreement will provide an excellent framework for close co-operation on the LHC Programme and Grid and accelerator technologies. Scientific co-operation between China and CERN is nothing new, as Chinese physicists already took part in the LEP experiments. Today, CERN's C...

  17. Recent results from LEPS and prospects of LEPS II at SPring-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niiyama M.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available SPring-8/LEPS is a GeV photon beam facility for hadron physics. The linearly polarized photon beam is produced by backward-Compton scattering of laser photons from 8 GeV electrons. We have studied photoproduction of hadrons which contain strange quarks. In this article, firstly, we report one of the recent results from LEPS, the κ(800 meson search in the γp → K*0Σ+ reaction. Secondly, the status of the construction of a new GeV photon beam line LEPS II is described.

  18. Quantum chromodynamics studies at LEP2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunanda Banerjee

    2000-07-01

    Several studies have been made to the hadronic final states in +- collisions at LEP. Studies of the annihilation process at LEP2 have given rise to results on jet rate, event shape, heavy flavour production, inclusive momentum spectra, Bose–Einstein correlation and colour reconnection effects. Event shape studies have given rise to accurate determination of the strong coupling constant s using $\\mathcal{O}(^{2}_{s})$ with resummed leading and next-to-leading log calculation and also with power law corrections. Studies of 2-photon processes have yielded results on cross-section, heavy flavour production, photon structure function and ** scattering.

  19. Measurement of the W mass at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Przysiezniak, H

    2000-01-01

    The mass of the W boson is measured using W pair events collected with the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL detectors at LEP2. Three methods are used: the cross section method, the lepton energy spectrum method and the direct reconstruction method, where the latter is described more in detail. For data collected at E/sub cm/=161, 172 and 183 GeV, the following combined preliminary result is obtained: M/sub W//sup LEP/=80.37+or-0.08 GeV/c/sup 2/. (5 refs).

  20. Le Conseil du CERN donne le feu vert pour le grand collisionneur de hadrons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1994-01-01

    CERN* Council, under the presidency of Prof. Hubert Curien, today agreed by consensus to approve the construction of the 14 TeV (1 Tera electron volt, TeV = 1 million million electron volts) Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  1. Canadian ATLAS data center to support CERN's LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The biggest science experiment in history is currently underway at the world-famous CERN labs in Switzerland, and Canada is poised to play a critical role in its success. Thanks to a $10.5 million investment announced by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), an ultra-sophisticated computing facility -- the ATLAS Data Center -- will be created to support the ATLAS project at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC)." (1 page)

  2. Welcome to the CERN OPENDAYS: Our Universe is Yours

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    CERN is one of the world’s largest and most respected centres for scientific research. Its business is fundamental physics: finding out what the Universe is made of and how it works. At CERN, large and highly complex scientific instruments are used to study the basic constituents of matter: the fundamental particles. By studying what happens when these particles collide, physicists further our understanding of the laws of Nature

  3. Bienvenue au CERN !

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    CERN, the Laboratory which invented the World-Wide Web has re-invented its public Web site. The new face of CERN has gone live at http://www.cern.ch/ Public . CERN's new Web pages have been designed to give visitors an informative introduction to the fascinating world of particle physics. For those whose whirl around the Web only allows a short stop, there's the 'CERN in two minutes' page.

  4. Collider and Detector Protection at Beam Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Drozhdin, A. I.

    2003-12-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occured at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  5. GERMANY AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    13 - 15 November 2001 Administration Building Bldg 60 - ground and 1st floor 09.00 hrs - 17.30 hrs OPENING CEREMONY 10h00 - 13 November Thirty-three German companies will be demonstrating their supplies and services offered for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other key CERN programmes. The Industrial exhibition will be enriched with a display of objects of contemporary German art. The official German presentation is under the patronage of the Federal Minister of Education and Research (BMBF), Bonn. There follows : the list of exhibitors, the list of lectures to be given at the exhibition. A detailed programme will be available in due course at : your Divisional Secretariat, the Reception information desk, building 33, the exhibition. LIST OF EXHIBITORS Accel Instruments GmbH Representative: Accel Instruments GmbH/CH-8754 Netsal apra-norm Elektromechanik GmbH Representative: apra-norm s.n.c./F-67500 Haguenau Babcock Noell Nuclear GmbH Balcke-Dürr Energietec...

  6. GERMANY AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    13 - 15 November 2001 Administration Building Bldg 60 - ground and 1st floor 09.00 hrs - 17.30 hrs OPENING CEREMONY 10h00 - 13 November Thirty-three German companies will be demonstrating their supplies and services offered for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other key CERN programmes. The Industrial exhibition will be enriched with a display of objects of contemporary German art. The official German presentation is under the patronage of the Federal Minister of Education and Research (BMBF), Bonn. There follows : the list of exhibitors, the list of lectures to be given at the exhibition. A detailed programme will be available in due course at : your Divisional Secretariat, the Reception information desk, building 33, the exhibition. LIST OF EXHIBITORS Accel Instruments GmbH Representative: Accel Instruments GmbH/CH-8754 Netsal apra-norm Elektromechanik GmbH Representative: apra-norm s.n.c./F-67500 Haguenau Babcock Noell Nuclear GmbH Balcke-Dürr Energiet...

  7. UK @ CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    17 – 18 November 2008 9.00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m. on Monday 17 November 9.00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m. on Tuesday 18 November Individual meetings will take place in the technicians’ or engineers’ offices. The companies will contact relevant users/technicians but anyone wishing to arrange an appointment with a specific company can contact Caroline Laignel (caroline.laignel@cern.ch, tel. 73722). A list of the companies is available from all departmental secretariats and on the web here. List of companies: 1. Caburn MDC Europe Ltd. 2. Croft Engineering Services 3. Cryox Ltd. 4. Goodfellow Cambridge Ltd. 5. Gravatom Engineering Systems Ltd. 6. High Voltage Technology 7. Lilco Ltd. 8. Micro Metalsmiths Ltd. 9. Photek Ltd. 10. Shadow Robot Company 11. Sundance Multiprocessor Technology Ltd. 12. Tessella plc 13. Thermal Resources Management Ltd. 14. Torr Scientific Ltd. For further information please contact Mrs C. Laignel, FI-DI, tel. 73722.

  8. Globaliseeruv kuritegevus ja terror / Ando Leps

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Leps, Ando, 1935-

    2002-01-01

    29. märtsil moodustati Riias ülemaailmsel kuritegevuse- ja terrorismivastasel foorumil Läänemerega piirnevate riikide Kuritegevuse- ja Terrorismivastane Foorum. Võeti vastu põhikiri, nimetati ametisse juhatus ja büroo direktor. Foorumi üheks kaasesimeheks valiti Ando Leps. Autor: Keskerakond. Parlamendisaadik

  9. Demonstration model of LEP bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    To save iron and raise the flux density, the LEP bending magnet laminations were separated by spacers and the space between the laminations was filled with concrete. This is a demonstration model, part of it with the spaced laminations only, the other part filled with concrete.

  10. Lessons on Ancient China for LEP Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigglesworth, Pierre Giles

    A unit in a Glendale, California sixth grade social studies curriculum is presented as a model for addressing two problems in the instruction of the growing population of limited English-proficient (LEP) students: (1) inadequate teacher training; and (2) shortage of appropriate, effective instructional materials. For the curriculum segment on…

  11. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  12. Members of the global linear-collider community who attended IWLC2010 in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    The International Workshop on Linear Colliders (IWLC2010) recently brought together many experts involved in research and development for an electron–positron linear collider – the favoured future facility to complement the LHC. Organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) and hosted by CERN, the meeting took place on 18–22 October and attracted 479 registered participants.

  13. Man-made Black Holes? Can a particle collider be taken too far?

    CERN Multimedia

    Rupley, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    "Can a particle collider be taken too far? That question is being raised about the next-generation Large Hadron Collider (LHC), shown in the photo here. The huge particle pulverizer and accelerator is located at the CERN particle physics laboratory, near Geneva, Switzerland." (1/2 page)

  14. CERN's 50th anniversary open day attracts record number of visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    Some of the biggest attractions were the huge detectors under construction for the Large Hadron Collider. Such tours helped the visitors gain a sense of the scale of CERN's work - and even those who already had some notion of CERN were awed by the gigantic detectors, caverns, and tunnels.

  15. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-07-01

    General relativity(GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton’s theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen do not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). This serves as a confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without common assumptions such as, e.g., coupling of gravity to virtual particles, dynamics of distant astrophysical sources and the nature of absolute gravitational potentials.

  16. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-01-01

    General relativity(GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton’s theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen do not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). This serves as a confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without common assumptions such as, e.g., coupling of gravity to virtual particles, dynamics of distant astrophysical sources and the nature of absolute gravitational potentials. PMID:27461548

  17. Compton Scattering of Quasi-Real Virtual Photons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kraber, M; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2005-01-01

    Compton scattering of quasi-real virtual photons, gamma e+- -> gamma e+-, is studied with 0.6fb-1 of data collected by the L3 detector at the LEP e+e- collider at centre-of-mass energies root(s')=189-209GeV. About 4500 events produced by the interaction of virtual photons emitted by e+- of one beam with e-+ of the opposite beam are collected for effective centre-of-mass energies of the photon-electron and photon-positron systems in the range from root(s')= 35GeV up to root(s')=175GeV, the highest energy at which Compton scattering was ever probed. The cross sections of the gamma e+- -> gamma e+- process as a function of root(s') and of the rest-frame scattering angle are measured, combined with previous L3 measurements down to root(s')~20GeV, and found to agree with the QED expectations.

  18. CERN's LHC is awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The European Physical Society (EPS), the Centro di Cultura Scientifica “Alessandro Volta” and Edison S.p.A. have awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize for outstanding contributions to physics to three CERN physicists.   The award was given to: • Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, • Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director for Research and Computing, • Stephen Myers, CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology, for having led - building on decades of dedicated work by their predecessors - the culminating efforts in the direction, research and operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which resulted in many significant advances in high energy particle physics, in particular, the first evidence of a Higgs-like boson in July 2012. To learn more, check out e-EPS News.

  19. Catalysed fusion: a very different book about CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2013-01-01

    Not many books get reviews resulting in headlines like "Steamy novel challenges CERN's serious image", "Love and death at CERN" and so on. But Francis Farley's book "Catalysed Fusion" does not leave its readers untouched.   Those of you who have been around some time will know Farley from when he worked at CERN. For "newcomers", Farley is a well-known physicist who put together the first experiment on the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and has since taken part in all the experiments relating to this phenomenon. The back cover of his book reads: "A sizzling romance and a romp with subatomic particles at CERN. Love, discovery and adventure in the city where nations meet and beams collide. Life in a large laboratory. As always, the challenges are the same. Who leads? Who follows? Who succeeds? Who gets the credit? Who gets the women or the men? Young Jeremy arrives in CERN and joins the quest ...

  20. Ageing collider throws up hint or dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Ananthaswamy, Anil

    2008-01-01

    "Never mind the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, its ageing predecessor may have discovered a new and unexpected kind of particle. The announcement last week from the Tevatron particle accelerator at Fermilab in Batavai, Illinois, provided some excitement amid the frustration of ongoing repairs to the LHC."

  1. Signing of the agreement between CERN and the United States in 1997

    CERN Multimedia

    1997-01-01

    Signing of the agreement between CERN and the United States for a contribution of $531 million to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. The agreement was signed by Matha Krebs, Director of the Office of Energy Research, DOE, Bob Eisenstein, Assistant Director of Physical and Mathematical Science, NSF, and Christopher Llewellyn Smith, former Director-General of CERN at the Council session in December 1997. At the same occasion the USA was granted Observer Status at CERN.

  2. Aerial view of the LEP site

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The road from CERN-Meyrin to St. Genis-Pouilly run parallel, near to the bottom line, traversed towards left by the Route de Gex pointing to Excenevex and Gex. In the background, is the Jura. Lower, towards right, one sees the buildings of the CERN site at Prevessin.

  3. Whither colliders after the Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rolf-Dieter Heuer

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy as well as upgrades to the LHC (luminosity and energy) and to its injectors. This may be complemented by a linear electron–positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and by the International Linear Collider, by a high-energy electron– proton machine, the LHeC, and/or by a muon collider. This contribution describes the various future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining the key messages for the way forward.

  4. Searches for R-parity-violating supersymmetry at colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Sirois, Y

    2000-01-01

    The search for R-parity-violating supersymmetry at existing colliders is reviewed with emphasis on the sensitivity to the new Yukawa couplings lambda , lambda ' (inducing lepton-number-violating interactions) and lambda " (inducing baryon-number-violating interactions). One dramatic consequence of the existence any such nonvanishing coupling is the instability of supersymmetric matter. The extent to which this affects the sensitivity to other free parameters of minimal supersymmetric models has been extensively studied at LEP and is briefly reviewed. Given that supersymmetric matter has not been observed yet, and since its existence still cannot be ruled out, we concentrate here on the important question of a possible "discovery" of supersymmetry (if it exists) through the R- parity-violating couplings. The case of resonant production of sleptons via lambda ' and squarks via lambda " at the Tevatron, as well as the case of resonant production of sneutrinos at LEP involving lambda , is briefly discussed. A par...

  5. Hangout with CERN: Welcome to CERN (S01E01)

    CERN Multimedia

    Kahle, Kate

    2012-01-01

    In this first Hangout with CERN "Welcome to CERN" ATLAS physicist Steven Goldfarb, CERN theorist Alvaro De Rujula and Mick Storr from the CERN education group introduce CERN and answer some of the questions received via #askCERN on Twitter and Google+. Recorded live on 1st November 2012.

  6. Virgin Galactic explores CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Virgin Galactic visited CERN with a group of future astronauts and Sir Richard Branson. During their visit the group was shown around various experiments, including the Globe, SM18, AMS and the CERN Control Centre.

  7. CERN Shop Christmas Sale

    CERN Multimedia

    Visits & Exhibition Service/ETT-VE

    2001-01-01

    11-13.12.2001 Looking for Christmas present ideas? Come to the Reception Shop Special Stand in Meyrin, Main Building, ground floor, from Tuesday 11 to Thursday 13 December from 10.30 to 16.00. CERN Calendar 10.- CERN Sweat-shirts(M, L, XL) 30.- CERN T-shirt (M, L, XL) 20.- New CERN silk tie (2 colours) 35.- Fancy silk tie (blue, bordeau) 25.- Silk scarf (light blue, red, yellow) 35.- Swiss army knife with CERN logo 25.- CERN watch 25.- CERN baseball cap 15.- CERN briefcase 15.- Book 'Antimatter' (English) 35.- Book 'How the web was born' (English) 25.- The Search for Infinity (French, Italian, English, German) 40.-   If you miss this special occasion, the articles are also available at the Reception Shop in Building 33 from Monday to Saturday between 08.30 and 17.30 hrs.

  8. Doing business with CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The Procurement Service, in collaboration with the Communications group’s Design team, has recently launched a new information campaign targeted at companies wishing to supply their products and services to CERN. This campaign comprises:   A brochure, available in hard and soft copy:  http://procurement.web.cern.ch/brochures/doing-business-with-cern.   A 6-minute video overview: https://procurement-dev.web.cern.ch/doing-business-with-cern. This campaign is intended for Member State firms with whom CERN is yet to do business. The key objectives are: To emphasise that CERN can be considered a major customer across a wide range of activities;   To present CERN’s procurement procedures in a dynamic and digestible way;   To highlight the information available on CERN’s procurement website: http://procurement.web.cern.ch. Furthermore, a new section called “Having a contract with CERN” is also now ava...

  9. France at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Rolf Heuer, CERN Director General, visits the exhibition "La France au CERN". The exhibition France at CERN, organized by UBIFRANCE in collaboration with CERN's GS/SEM (Site Engineering and Management) service, took place from Monday 7 to Wednesday 9 June in the Main Building. The 36 French firms taking part came to present their products and technologies related to the Organization's activities. The next exhibition will be "Netherlands at CERN" in November.

  10. La Pologne au CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1995-01-01

    On 28 November 1995 the first Polish industrial and technological exhibition opened at CERN. In his inaugural speech Prof Aleksander Luczak, the Polish Deputy Prime Minister, announced : "The first Polish exhibition which I am opening today indicates a new stage of our presence at CERN. It provides an opportunity for CERN to get better acquainted with our industrial potential and, on the other hand, provides an opportunity for our exhibitors to learn more about CERN and the extraordinary people who work here.

  11. The CERN Library

    CERN Multimedia

    Hester, Alec G

    1968-01-01

    Any advanced research centre needs a good Library. It can be regarded as a piece of equipment as vital as any machine. At the present time, the CERN Library is undergoing a number of modifications to adjust it to the changing scale of CERN's activities and to the ever increasing flood of information. This article, by A.G. Hester, former Editor of CERN COURIER who now works in the Scientific Information Service, describes the purposes, methods and future of the CERN Library.

  12. Le grand collisionneur de hadrons Evolution du projet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1994-01-01

    As early as 1977, during preparatory discussions for building CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP), it was clear that excavating the LEP tunnel would make more economic sense if it could be reused for a successor machine. Thus, while LEP was being designed and built in the early '80s, groups in CERN were busy looking at the longer term future.

  13. LEP : Top and Higgs Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Although not produced in an observable way, heavy particles like the top quark and perhaps the Higgs particle made their presence felt at LEP. This is due to one of the more curious features of quantum physics. Particles can appear from the quantum vacuum for an imperceptibly short length of time before disappearing back into the vacuum again, and these quantum fluctuations leave their traces in the 'real' world. The theoretical work that has made calculations of such phenomena possible was recognised by the award of the 1999 Nobel Prize for physics to Gerardus t'Hooft and Martinus Veltman. Their work allowed LEP to establish the Standard Model as a true quantum field theory, one of its great-est achievements.

  14. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  15. La maquette digitale du tunnel du LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Brouns, G

    2000-01-01

    Pour l'installation du LHC et son équipement périphérique (ligne cryogénique, câbles, tuyauterie, etc.) dans le tunnel du LEP, une maquette digitale CAO doit être faite. Après un rappel de la définition théorique du tunnel du LEP, cette LHC project Note décrit comment sont utilisées et intégrées d'anciennes et de nouvelles mesures du tunnel pour arriver à un ensemble de données qui permettent de construire la maquette digitale (CAO) du tunnel du LHC. Ensuite, les résultats sont comparés à leur valeur théorique d'une part, et aux anciennes valeurs disponibles d'autre part.

  16. In the CERN Library

    CERN Multimedia

    1963-01-01

    Seen in this picture is Noria Christophoridou, librarian of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission, who has been sent by her government to CERN for a year to widen her experience of library and documentation services. In the photograph she is providing information to Kurt Gottfried, a CERN visiting scientist from Harvard University, who is spending a year with CERN's Theory Division

  17. 2005 CERN Relay Race

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race takes place each year in May and sees participants from all areas of the CERN staff. The winners in 2005 were The Shabbys with Los Latinos Volantes in second and Charmilles Technologies a close third. To add a touch of colour and levity, the CERN Jazz Club provided music at the finishing line.

  18. CERN Photowalk 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    CERN is organising a Photowalk on Friday 25 September 2015. At this event a few selected photographers will get the chance to come to CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, for an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour of the laboratory. For more information: http://photowalk2015.web.cern.ch/

  19. CERN confident of LHC start-up in 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Delegates attending the 140th meeting of CERN Council today heard a confident report from the Laboratory about the scheduled start-up of the world's highest energy particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2007." (1/2 page)

  20. Performance of the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Mis̈kowiec, D.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montano Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Twinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Ploskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H O; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Rd, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Safarík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Sándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, C. B.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J M; Saard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Subieta Vasquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Sumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J M; Szanto De Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Ter Minasyan, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.

    2014-01-01

    ALICE is the heavy-ion experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The experiment continuously took data during the first physics campaign of the machine from fall 2009 until early 2013, using proton and lead-ion beams. In this paper we describe the running environment and the data handling proced

  1. Al CERN prima fase sistema gestione dati LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Al via la prima fase per la realizzazione del sistema Lhc computing Grid (LCG), progettato per elaborare le quantita' di dati senza precedenti che, a partire dal 2007, saranno prodotte dagli esperimenti eseguiti con il nuovo grande acceleratore Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presso il Cern di Ginevra" 1 page

  2. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. Ian Wilso seems to hold it in his hands. The storage cavities had 4 portholes, 1 each for: RF feed; tuning; connection to the accelerating cavity; vacuum pump. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the lower LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. See also 8002294, 8006510X, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  3. LEP tests of CPT in B oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Jimack, Martin Paul

    1999-01-01

    A review of LEP tests of CPT in the B system is presented. There are published results from OPAL and preliminary results from DELPHI. The combined result for the parameter Im delta /sub B/, determined in B oscillations, is Im delta /sub B/=-0.016+or-0.012. A test of the lifetime difference between b and b hadrons is also presented. (8 refs).

  4. Search for Excited Leptons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R S; Hansen, J M; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    A search for charged and neutral excited leptons is performed in 217 pb-1 of data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. The pair- and single-production mechanisms are investigated and no signals are detected. Combining with L3 results from searches at lower centre-of-mass energies, gives improved limits on the masses and couplings of excited leptons.

  5. Experimental and numerical studies on the proposed application of hollow electron beam collimation for the LHC at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Moens, Vince; Redaelli, Stefano; Rivkin, Leonid

    This thesis work was carried out in the framework of U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (USLARP), a collaboration between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the U.S. Department of Energy. The first half of the work was completed at Fermilab (USA), the location of the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider and the second largest particle collider in the world. The second half was completed at CERN (Switzerland), the location of the largest proton collider in the world (Large Hadron Collider (LHC)).\

  6. Hadron Colliders and Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisov D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes main developments of the hadron colliders and physics results obtained since their inception around forty years ago. The increase in the collision energy of over two orders of magnitude and even larger increases in luminosity provided experiments with unique data samples. Developments of full acceptance detectors, particle identification and analysis methods provided fundamental discoveries and ultra-precise measurements which culminated in the completion and in depth verification of the Standard Model. Hadron Collider Physics symposium provided opportunities for those working at hadron colliders to share results of their research since 1979 and helped greatly to develop the field of particle physics.

  7. Photon collider Higgs factories

    CERN Document Server

    Telnov, V I

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

  8. LEP Dismantling Reaches Half-Way Stage

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    LEP's last superconducting module leaves its home port... Just seven months into the operation, LEP dismantling is forging ahead. Two of the eight arcs which form the tunnel have already been emptied and the last of the accelerator's radiofrequency (RF) cavities has just been raised to the surface. The 160 people working on LEP dismantling have reason to feel pleased with their progress. All of the accelerator's 72 superconducting RF modules have already been brought to the surface, with the last one being extracted on 2nd May. This represents an important step in the dismantling process, as head of the project, John Poole, explains. 'This was the most delicate part of the project, because the modules are very big and they could only come out at one place', he says. The shaft at point 1.8 through which the RF cavity modules pass is 18 metres in diameter, while each module is 11.5 metres long. Some modules had to travel more than 10 kilometres to reach the shaft. ... is lifted up the PM 1.8 shaft, after a m...

  9. CERN Video News

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    From Monday you can see on the web the new edition of CERN's Video News. Thanks to a collaboration between the audiovisual teams at CERN and Fermilab, you can see a report made by the American laboratory. The clip concerns the LHC magnets that are being constructed at Fermilab. Also in the programme: the spectacular rotation of one of the ATLAS coils, the arrival at CERN of the first American magnet made at Brookhaven, the story of the discovery 20 years ago of the W and Z bosons at CERN. http://www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page.

  10. CERN Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Cricket Club

    2010-01-01

    CERN Cricket Club Match Reports The cricket season is well under way, despite the weather, and several matches have been played. The match reporters have, however, found it too difficult to limit their reports to ¼ of a page, hence the reports have not appeared in the bulletin. All reports can be found at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/reports/reports.html The list of forthcoming matches can be consulted at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/fixtures.html Further information about the CERN Cricket Club can be found at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/

  11. CERN Photo club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photo club

    2016-01-01

    The CERN Photo Club organizes in collaboration with Canon Switzerland a photo contest open to all members of the CERN (Persons with a CERN access card). The only restriction is that the photos must have been taken with a CANON camera (DSLR, bridge or compact) between 1 and 31 October 2016. Send your three best pictures at  Photo.Contest@cern.ch with a short description explaining the images. Further information on the Photo club website: http://photoclub.web.cern.ch/content/photo-contest-october-2016

  12. Britain at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    On 8 October, H.E. Mr David Beattie, British Ambassador to Switzerland, Mr John R. Nichols, H.M. Consul-General in Geneva and, Prof. Christopher Llewellyn Smith, CERN*'s Director General, formally opened the industrial exhibition of thirty-three British hi-tech companies at CERN, which takes place from 8 to 11 October, 1996. The exhibition offers British companies the opportunity to display their products in fields that are of immediate importance to the scientists, engineers and technicians working at CERN, and also to scientists from non-Member States who take part in research projects at CERN.

  13. Linguistic Simplification: A Promising Test Accommodation for LEP Students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Stansfield

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is a synopsis of an experimental study of the effects of linguistic simplification, a test accommodation..designed for LEP students. Conducted as part of Delaware's statewide assessment program, this study examined the..effects of linguistic simplification of fourth- and sixth-grade science test items and specifically looked at score..comparability between LEP and non-LEP examinees.

  14. Pouring concrete to form a model LEP dipole yoke

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic field needed in the LEP dipole magnets was rather low, of a fraction of tesla. This lead to the conception of a novel yoke structure consisting of stacks of 1.5 mm thick low-carbon steel laminations spaced by 4.1 mm with the spaces filled with concrete. For details see LEP-Note 118,1978 and LEP-Note 233,1980. See also 8111529, 8111710X, 7901023X,7908294

  15. CERN honours Georges Charpak

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    CERN pays tribute to the work of Georges Charpak at a colloquium in honour of his 85th birthday. var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-008/CERN-MOVIE-2009-008-0753-kbps-480x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-008/CERN-MOVIE-2009-008-Multirate-200-to-753-kbps-480x360.wmv', 'false', 480, 360, 'https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-008/CERN-MOVIE-2009-008-posterframe-480x360-at-10-percent.jpg', '1167500', true, 'Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-008/CERN-MOVIE-2009-008-0600-kbps-maxH-360-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.mp4'); Watch the video conference of Georges Charpak.   On 9 March CERN’s Main Auditorium was the venue for a fascinating and moving celebration marking the 85th birthday of Georges Charpak, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1992 for his inven...

  16. Single- and multi-photon final states with missing energy at e sup + e sup - colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Montagna, G; Nicrosini, O; Piccinini, F

    1999-01-01

    The search for new physics in single- and multi-photon final states with large missing energy at LEP and future e sup + e sup - colliders requires precise predictions for the Standard Model irreducible background. While at LEP1 the theoretical situation is under control, going to LEP2 (and beyond) some improvements are necessary. To approach the aimed O(1%) theoretical accuracy, the tree-level matrix elements for the processes e sup + e sup - -> nu nu-barn gamma, with n=1, 2, 3, are exactly computed in the Standard Model, including the possibility of anomalous couplings for single-photon production. Due to the presence of observed photons in the final state, particular attention is paid to the treatment of higher-order QED corrections. Comparisons with existing calculations are shown and commented on. An improved version of the event generator NUNUGPV is presented.

  17. CERN Holiday Gift Guide

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Do you have last-minute gifts to get? Stuck for ideas? The CERN Shop and the ATLAS and CMS secretariats have some wonderfully unique gifts and stocking-fillers for sale this year - perfect for the physics fanatics in your life. Let's take a look...   1. CERN Notebook, 10 CHF - 2. CERN Pop-up book, 30 CHF - 3. USB Stick 8GB, 25 CHF - 4. CERN Tumbler, 12 CHF 5. ATLAS 3D Viewer, 5 CHF - 6. ATLAS Puzzle, 15 CHF - 7. CMS Umbrella, 25 CHF   These gifts are all available at the CERN Shop, with the exception of the ATLAS 3D Viewer and the CMS umbrella, which are only available from the respective secretariats. Don’t forget! If you’re from CERN, you still have time to take advantage of a 10% off discount at the CERN shop. Offer ends 20 December.

  18. Le CERN: centre du monde, centre de l'univers... Une chance pour Genève!

    CERN Multimedia

    Tesnier, Grégory

    From Asia, Europa, America, Oceania, Africa, the curious have see the images or read the story of the startup of the Great Hadron Collider (LHC), new giant experiment launched last week by CERN. (1 page)

  19. Fifty years of the CERN Proton Synchrotron Volume 2

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Manglunki, Django; Burnet, Jean-Paul; Carli, Christian; Chanel, Michel; Garoby, Roland; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hancock, Steven; Haseroth, Helmut; Hübner, Kurt; Küchler, Detlef; Lewis, Julian; Lombardi, Alessandra; Martini, Michel; Maury, Stephan; Métral, Elias; Möhl, Dieter; Plass, Günther; Rinolfi, Louis; Scrivens, Richard; Steerenberg, Rende; Steinbach, Charles; Vretenar, Maurizio; Zickler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This report sums up in two volumes the first 50 years of operation of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. After an introduction on the genesis of the machine, and a description of its magnet and powering systems, the first volume focuses on some of the many innovations in accelerator physics and instrumentation that it has pioneered, such as transition crossing, RF gymnastics, extractions, phase space tomography, or transverse emittance measurement by wire scanners. The second volume describes the other machines in the PS complex: the proton linear accelerators, the PS Booster, the LEP pre-injector, the heavy-ion linac and accumulator, and the antiproton rings.

  20. Fifty years of the CERN Proton Synchrotron Volume 1

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Carli, Christian; Chanel, Michel; Garoby, Roland; Gilardoni, Simone; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hancock, Steven; Haseroth, Helmut; Hübner, Kurt; Küchler, Detlef; Lewis, Julian; Lombardi, Alessandra; Manglunki, Django; Martini, Michel; Maury, Stephan; Métral, Elias; Möhl, Dieter; Plass, Günther; Rinolfi, Louis; Scrivens, Richard; Steerenberg, Rende; Steinbach, Charles; Vretenar, Maurizio; Zickler,Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This report sums up in two volumes the first 50 years of operation of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. After an introduction on the genesis of the machine, and a description of its magnet and powering systems, the first volume focuses on some of the many innovations in accelerator physics and instrumentation that it has pioneered, such as transition crossing, RF gymnastics, extractions, phase space tomography, or transverse emittance measurement by wire scanners. The second volume describes the other machines in the PS complex: the proton linear accelerators, the PS Booster, the LEP pre-injector, the heavy-ion linac and accumulator, and the antiproton rings.

  1. Genesis of the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn

    2015-01-13

    This paper describes the scientific, technical and political genesis of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It begins with an outline of the early history of the LHC, from first thoughts and accelerator and detector developments that underwrote the project, through the first studies of the LHC and its scientific potential and the genesis of the experimental programme, to the presentation of the proposal to build the LHC to the CERN Council in December 1993. The events that led to the proposal to build the LHC in two stages, which was approved in December 1994, are then described. Next, the role of non-Member State contributions and of the agreement that CERN could take loans, which allowed single stage construction to be approved in December 1996, despite a cut in the Members' contributions, are explained. The paper concludes by identifying points of potential relevance for the approval of possible future large particle physics projects.

  2. Internal lecture | LEP II era/precision physics (1994-2004) | Main Auditorium | 25 July

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    LEP II era/precision physics, by Lydia Fayard, Roberto Tenchini, and Steve Myers.   3.30 p.m. - 3.45 p.m.: coffee 3.45 p.m. - 4.30 p.m.: The quest for the direct CP Violation in the Kaon System at CERN: The NA31 & NA48 experiments by Lydia Iconomidou-Fayard (Université de Paris-Sud 11 (FR)). Abstract After years of studying kaon properties at CERN, the hunt for direct CP violation in this system started in the 1980s and lasted about two decades. While expected to be small, this component is a probe into the validity of the Standard Model and its precise measurement was the main goal of two experiments at CERN, namely NA31 and NA48. In this talk, we will review the two collaborations in their historical contexts. The challenging detectors and beams, the analyses, the innovative methods and tools, and the first non-zero evidence of Re(epsilon'/epsilon) that resulted in the evolution from NA31 to NA48 in order to increase accuracy and further squeeze the...

  3. Future Circular Collider study week 2017

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The annual meetings of the worldwide Future Circular Collider study (FCC) are major international events that review the progress in every domain which is relevant to develop feasible concepts for a next generation frontier particle accelerate based high-energy physics research infrastructure. This 3rd meeting is jointly organised by CERN and DESY. It is also the annual meeting of the EuroCirCol EC Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Action project. Previous events took place in Washington and Rome. In 2017 the FCC Week will take place in Berlin, Germany between May 29 and June 2.

  4. CERN Table Tennis Club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Table Tennis Club

    2014-01-01

    CERN Table Tennis Club Announcing CERN 60th Anniversary Table Tennis Tournament to take place at CERN, from July 1 to July 15, 2014   The CERN Table Tennis Club, reborn in 2008, is encouraging people at CERN to take more regular exercise. This is why the Club, thanks to the strong support of the CERN Staff Association, installed last season a first outdoor table on the terrace of restaurant # 1, and will install another one this season on the terrace of Restaurant # 2. Table tennis provides both physical exercise and friendly social interactions. The CERN Table Tennis club is happy to use the unique opportunity of the 60th CERN anniversary to promote table tennis at CERN, as it is a game that everybody can easily play, regardless of level. Table tennis is particularly well suited for CERN, as many great physicists play table tennis, as you might already know: “Heisenberg could not even bear to lose a game of table tennis”; “Otto Frisch played a lot of table tennis;...

  5. Signature for a partership between CERN and Israel - His Excellency Mr Itzhak Levanon, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Israel to the Unite Nations Office and specialized institutions in Geneva and Mr Robert Aymar, CERN Director General

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    On 29 November 2004, the Israeli ambassador to the United Nations Office at Geneva, Itzhak Levanon, and CERN's director-general, Robert Aymar, signed a new protocol to the Co-operation Agreement between the government of Israel and CERN. This protocol covers a substantial increase in the Israeli contribution to CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Project. Israeli scientists have been participating in CERN's scientific activities since 1960, and in 1992 Israel became the first non-member state to make regular financial contributions to CERN's budget.

  6. ERL-BASED LEPTON-HADRON COLLIDERS: eRHIC AND LHeC

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Two hadron-ERL colliders are being proposed. The Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) plans to collide the high-energy protons and heavy ions in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN with 60-GeV polarized electrons or positrons. The baseline scheme for this facility adds to the LHC a separate recirculating superconducting (SC) lepton linac with energy recovery, delivering a lepton current of 6.4mA. The electron-hadron collider project eRHIC aims to collide polarized (and unpolarized) electrons with a current of 50 (220) mA and energies in the range 5–30 GeV with a variety of hadron beams— heavy ions as well as polarized light ions— stored in the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL. The eRHIC electron beam will be generated in an energy recovery linac (ERL) installed inside the RHIC tunnel.

  7. International linear collider reference design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  8. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute. Its main purpose and long-term goal is to design an energyfrontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV in a new 80–100 km tunnel. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90–350 GeV highluminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines are being assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed by the end of 2018, in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. This overview summarizes the status of machine designs and parameters, and it discusses the essential technical components being developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets wit...

  9. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; /CERN; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Jakobs, K.; /Freiburg U.; Weiglein, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Azuelos, G.; /TRIUMF; Dawson, S.; /Brookhaven; Gripaios, B.; /CERN; Han, T.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Hewett, J.; /SLAC; Lancaster, M.; /University Coll. London; Mariotti, C.; /INFN, Turin; Moortgat, F.; /Zurich, ETH; Moortgat-Pick, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Polesello, G.; /INFN, Pavia; Riemann, S.; /DESY; Assamagan, K.; /Brookhaven; Bechtle, P.; /DESY; Carena, M.; /Fermilab; Chachamis, G.; /PSI, Villigen /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /INFN, Florence /Bonn U. /CERN /Bonn U. /Freiburg U. /Oxford U. /Louvain U., CP3 /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /INFN, Milan Bicocca /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Frascati /Fermilab /Warsaw U. /Florida U. /Orsay, LAL /LPSC, Grenoble /Warsaw U. /Yale U. /Stockholm U., Math. Dept. /Durham U., IPPP /DESY /Rome U. /University Coll. London /UC, San Diego /Heidelberg U. /Florida State U. /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /McGill U. /Durham U., IPPP; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  10. From the LHC to future colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Roeck, A.; Assamagan, K.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Jakobs, K.; Weiglien, G.; Well, J.; Azuelos, G.; Dawson, S.; Gripaios, B.; Han, T.; Hewett, J.; Lancaster, M.; Mariotti, C.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Polesello, G.; Riemann, S.; Schumacher, M.; Bechtle, P.; Carena, M.; Chachamis, G.; Chen, K.F.; De Curtis, S.; Desch, K.; Dittmar, M.; Dreiner, H.; Duhrssen, M.; Foster, B.; Frandsen, M.T.; Giammanco, A.; Godbole, R.; Gopalakrishna, S.; Govoni, P.; Gunion, J.; Hollik, W.; Hou, W.S.; Isidori, G.; Juste, A.; Kalinowski, J.; Korytov, A.; Kou, E.; Kraml, S.; Krawczyk, M.; Martin, A.; Milstead, D.; Morton-Thurtle, V.; Moenig, K.; Mele, B.; Ozcan, E.; Pieri, M.; Plehn, T.; Reina, L.; Richter-Was, E.; Rizzo, T.; Rolbiecki, K.; Sannino, F.; Schram, M.; Smillie, J.; Sultansoy, S.; Tattersall, J.; Uwer, P., Webber, B.; and Wienemann, P.

    2010-03-02

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, the Working Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  11. Muon collider design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A.; Caspi, S.; P., Chen; W-H., Cheng; Y., Cho; Cline, D.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.; Garren, A.; Gordon, H.; Green, M.; Gupta, R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnstone, C.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Kycia, T.; Y., Lee; Lissauer, D.; Luccio, A.; McInturff, A.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; K-Y., Ng; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Norum, B.; Oide, K.; Parsa, Z.; Polychronakos, V.; Popovic, M.; Rehak, P.; Roser, T.; Rossmanith, R.; Scanlan, R.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Stumer, I.; Summers, D.; Syphers, M.; Takahashi, H.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Willis, W.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-11-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity \\mu^+ \\mu^- colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are discussed.

  12. The development of colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    During the period of the 50`s and the 60`s colliders were developed. Prior to that time there were no colliders, and by 1965 a number of small devices had worked, good understanding had been achieved, and one could speculate, as Gersh Budker did, that in a few years 20% of high energy physics would come from colliders. His estimate was an under-estimate, for now essentially all of high energy physics comes from colliders. The author presents a brief review of that history: sketching the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological advances which made it all possible.

  13. Crab Waist collision scheme: a novel approach for particle colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zobov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    A new concept of nonlinear focusing of colliding bunches, called Crab Waist (CW)collision scheme, has been proposed at LNF INFN. It has been successfully tested at the Italian lepton collider DAFNE in operational conditions providing luminosity for two different experimental detectors, SIDDHARTA and KLOE-2. Considering a high efficiency of the scheme for increasing collision luminosity and its relative simplicity for implementation several new collider projects have been proposed and are under development at present. These are the SuperKEKB B-factory ready to start commissioning in 2016 in Japan, the SuperC-Tau factory proposed in Novosibirsk and entered in the short list of Russian mega-science projects, the new 100-km electron-positron Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) under design study at CERN and some others. In this paper we describe the CW collision scheme, discuss its advantages and report principal results achieved at the electron-positron Phi-factory DAFNE.

  14. Germany at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    From left to right: Maximilian Metzger, CERN's Secretary-General, Hermann Schunck, Director at the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, and Robert Aymar, CERN's Director-General, talking to Wolfgang Holler from Butting, one of the companies at the "Germany at CERN" exhibition. Far right : Susanne-Corinna Langer-Greipl from BMBF, delegate to the CERN Finance Committee. For three days, CERN's Main Building was transformed into a showcase for German industry. Twenty-nine companies from sectors related to particle physics (electrical engineering, vacuum and low temperature technology, radiation protection, etc.) were here for the ninth "Germany at CERN" exhibition, organised by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), which gave them the opportunity to meet scientists and administrators from the Laboratory. On 1 March the exhibition was visited by a German delegation headed by Dr Hermann Schunck, Director at BMBF.

  15. CERN Cricket club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Cricket club

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club 2015 season begins soon, the first net practice is scheduled (weather permitting) for Thursday April 16th, at 18:00! The club is always looking for new players and newcomers will be made very welcome. Anyone who is interested in joining the club should sign up on our web site: http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/ or turn up for net practice, which takes place each Thursday evening from April 16th (apart from CERN official holidays) until the end of September (starting at 18:00 to around 19:30) at the CERN Prévessin site: http://club-cricket.web.cern.ch/Club-Cricket/CERN-Ground.html The first match will be at home on Sunday, April 19th against Rhone CC from Lyon.

  16. German visits to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    State secretary to Germany's Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Frieder Meyer-Krahmer, with CERN's Director-General Robert Aymar.On 21 February, Professor Frieder Meyer-Krahmer, State Secretary to Germany's Federal Ministry of Education and Research, came to CERN. He visited the ALICE and ATLAS experiments and the computing centre before meeting the CERN's Director-General, some German physicists and members of the top management. The Minister of Science, Research and the Arts of the Baden-Württemberg regional government, Peter Frankenberg, and CERN's Director-General, Robert Aymar, signing an agreement on education. In the background: Sigurd Lettow, CERN's Director of Finance and Human Resources, and Karl-Heinz Meisel, Rector of the Fachhochschule Karlsruhe. The Minister of Science, Research and the Arts of the Baden-Württemberg regional government, Prof. Peter Frankenberg, visited CERN on 23 February. He was accompanied by the Rector of the Fachhochschule Karlsruhe, Prof. Karl-Heinz Meisel, and b...

  17. CERN and the environment

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2016-01-01

    New webpages answer common questions about CERN and the environment.   One of the new public webpages dedicated to CERN and the environment. Do your neighbours ever ask you about CERN’s environmental impact? And about radiation in particular? If so, the answers to those questions can now be found online on a new set of public webpages dedicated to CERN and the environment. These pages, put together by the Occupational Health, Safety and Environmental Protection (HSE) unit and the groups responsible for CERN's site maintenance, contain a wealth of information on topics linked to the environment, such as biodiversity at CERN, waste management, ionising radiation, and water and electricity consumption. “CERN forms part of the local landscape, with its numerous sites and scientific activities. It’s understandable that people living nearby have questions about the impact of these activities and it’s important that we respond with complete transp...

  18. Young Artists@ CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In view of 50th anniversary of CERN, about 20 young artists will be visiting CERN from 26 to 31 January to learn about the laboratory's research and the mysterious world of particle physics. The impressions they take home will be the main inspiration for the artwork they will then produce for an exhibition to be inaugurated in October 2004 as part of CERN's 50th anniversary celebration. We are looking for scientists who are interested in the Art-Science synergy and who can volunteer to discuss their work at CERN to these young artists during this week (25-31/01). Please contact renilde.vanden.broeck@cern.ch if you are interested. The project is called Young Artists@ CERN and for more information look at this website: http://www.hep.ucl.ac.uk/~andy/CERNart/

  19. LEP vacuum chamber, cross-section

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Cross-section of the final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber. The elliptic main-opening is for the beam. The small channel to the left is for the cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchrotron radiation. The square channel to the right houses the Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) pump. The chamber is made from extruded aluminium. Its outside is clad with lead, to stop the synchrotron radiation emitted by the beam. For good adherence between Pb and Al, the Al chamber was coated with a thin layer of Ni. Ni being slightly magnetic, some resulting problems had to be overcome. See also 8301153.

  20. K+ photoproduction at SPring-8/LEPS

    CERN Document Server

    Sumihama, M

    2003-01-01

    A series of experiments have been carried out by using a linearly polarized photon beam at the SPring-8/LEPS facility from December 2000 to June 2001. The photon beam asymmetries and differential cross sections of the p(gamma,K+)Lambda and p(gamma,K+)Sigma^0 reactions have been measured in the photon energy range from 1.5 GeV to 2.4 GeV at forward angles, 0 deg. < Theta_cm < 60 deg.. We report preliminary results of the photon beam asymmetries.

  1. B and D Spectroscopy at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Muheim, F

    1999-01-01

    Results from the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL on the spectroscopy of B and charmed mesons are presented. The predictions of Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) for the masses and the widths of excited L=1 B mesons are supported by a new measurement from L3. A few B_c candidate eve nts have masses consistent with the recent CDF observation and the predictions. New results on Ddstar production and B -> Ddstar l nu are also presented. The evidence for a Dstarpr meson reported recently by DELPHI is not supported by OPAL and CLEO.

  2. Search for Charged Higgs Bosons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    A search for pair-produced charged Higgs bosons is performed with the L3 detector at LEP using data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 629.4/pb. Decays into a charm and a strange quark or into a tau lepton and its neutrino are considered. No significant excess is observed and lower limits on the mass of the charged Higgs boson are derived at the 95% confidence level. They vary from 76.5 to 82.7GeV, as a function of the H->tv branching ratio.

  3. Measurement of W Polarisation at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R S; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    The three different helicity states of W bosons produced in the reaction e+ e- -> W+ W- -> l nu q q~ at LEP are studied using leptonic and hadronic W decays. Data at centre-of-mass energies \\sqrt s = 183-209 GeV are used to measure the polarisation of W bosons, and its dependence on the W boson production angle. The fraction of longitudinally polarised W bosons is measured to be 0.218 \\pm 0.027 \\pm 0.016 where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  4. Search for Single Top Production at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Ewers, A; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R S; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S V; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R P; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2002-01-01

    Single top production in e^+e^- annihilations is searched for in data collected by the L3 detector at centre-of-mass energies from 189 to 209 GeV, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 634 pb-1. Investigating hadronic and semileptonic top decays, no evidence of single top production at LEP is obtained and upper limits on the single top cross section as a function of the centre-of-mass energy are derived. Limits on possible anomalous couplings, as well as on the scale of contact interactions responsible for single top production are determined.

  5. CERN - better than science fiction!

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    From left to right: Allan Cameron (Production Designer), Sam Breckham (Location Manager), James Gillies (Head of Communication at CERN), Jacques Fichet (from the CERN audiovisual service), Rolf Landua (former spokesman of the ATHENA antihydrogen experiment at CERN and Head of CERN's Education Group), Ron Howard, and Renilde Vanden Broeck (CERN press officer).

  6. Single-cell LEP-type cavity on measurement stand

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    A single-cell cavity, made of copper, with tapered connectors for impedance measurements. It was used as a model of LEP-type superconducting cavities, to investigate impedance and higher-order modes and operated at around 600 MHz (the LEP acceleration frequency was 352.2 MHz). See 8202500.

  7. Upgrade of the cryogenic CERN RF test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirotte, O.; Benda, V.; Brunner, O.; Inglese, V.; Koettig, T.; Maesen, P.; Vullierme, B.

    2014-01-01

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990's in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  8. Upgrade of the Cryogenic CERN RF Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Pirotte, O; Brunner, O; Inglese, V; Koettig, T; Maesen, P; Vullierme, B

    2014-01-01

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  9. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Running Club

    2010-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 20 May, starting at 12.15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on the route, and how to register your team for the relay race, can be found at: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay

  10. The CERN PC farm

    CERN Multimedia

    Serge Bellegarde

    2005-01-01

    Housed in the CERN Computer Centre, these banks of computers process and store data produced on the CERN systems. When the LHC starts operation in 2008, it will produce enough data every year to fill a stack of CDs 20 km tall. To handle this huge amount of data, CERN has also developed the Grid, allowing the processing power to be shared between computer centres around the world.

  11. Sharing resources@CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    The library is launching a 'sharing resources@CERN' campaign, aiming to increase the library's utility by including the thousands of books bought by individual groups at CERN. This will improve sharing of information among CERN staff and users. Photo 01: L. to r. Eduardo Aldaz, from the PS division, Corrado Pettenati, Head Librarian, and Isabel Bejar, from the ST division, read their divisional copies of the same book.

  12. Longitudinal intensity effects in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081238; Rivkin, Leonid

    This PhD thesis provides an improved knowledge of the LHC longitudinal impedance model and a better understanding of the longitudinal intensity effects. These effects can limit the LHC performance and lead to a reduction of the integrated luminosity. The LHC longitudinal impedance was measured with beams. Results obtained using traditional techniques are consistent with the expectations based on the impedance model, although the measurement precision was proven insufficient for the low impedance of the LHC. Innovative methods to probe the LHC reactive impedance were successfully used. One of the methods is based on exciting the beam with a sinusoidal rf phase modulation to estimate the synchrotron frequency shift from potential-well distortion. In the second method, the impedance is estimated from the loss of Landau damping threshold, which is also found to be in good agreement with analytical estimations. Beam-based impedance measurements agree well with estimations using the LHC impedance model. Macropartic...

  13. The Large Hadron Collider, a personal recollection

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, L

    2014-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavor spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing LEP tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of an idea first proposed by Bob Palmer at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1978, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact 2-in-1 structure was essential for the LHC due to both the limited space available in the existing Large Electron-Positron collider tunnel and the cost. The second innovation was the bold move to use superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor. In this article, no attempt is made to give a comprehensive review of the machine design. This can be found in the LHC Design Report {[}1], w...

  14. Two Nobel Prizes connected to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Nobel Prizes in Physics and in Physiology or Medicine, announced last week, both have connections with particle physics and CERN. Alexei Abrikosov, Vitaly Ginzburg and Anthony Leggett have received the prize in physics for their "pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids". The most important superconducting materials technically have proved to be those known as type II superconductors, which allow superconductivity and magnetism to exist at the same time and remain superconductive in high magnetic fields. The coils for the superconducting magnets in CERN's Large Hadron Collider are made from niobium-titanium alloy - a type II superconductor. The LHC will operate thanks to magnets made of type II superconductors. Here, superconducting cables for the LHC are on display during a VIP visit.Abrikosov, who is now at the Argonne National Laboratory, was working at the Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems in his native Moscow when he succeeded in formula...

  15. CERN in the Media – Video Presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    Carolyn Lee

    2010-01-01

    You may have seen them around the CERN site – cameramen, reporters and presenters roaming around hallways and cafeterias, interviewing people and doing their best to tell the world about the Large Hadron Collider. In recent years CERN has dominated the media spotlight when it comes to particle physics. And particle physics has become cool and interesting among the general public. When CERN’s Press Office announces media events, such as the start-up of the LHC in September 2008, the premiere of "Angels and Demons" in February 2009, the twentieth anniversary of the World Wide Web in March 2009 and the LHC First Physics event in March 2010, hundreds of journalists throng to CERN to capture the atmosphere and interview people. These events have resulted in thousands of print articles and hundreds of TV programmes around the world. Starting on 28 May, the CERN Press Office will be organizing film/news/TV programme presentations during lunchtimes every other Friday. This i...

  16. Dear CERN Computing Community,

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    This is to remind you that LXPLUS6 cluster will be switched off on: Friday May 30th 2003 12:00 CETPlease start using lxplus.cern.ch now to avoid unnecessary problems at the last minute. Note especially, that telnet and ftp to lxplus.cern.ch are not provided and will not work, instead secure protocols such as ssh and sftp should be used. Also LINUX6 resources in LXBATCH will no longer be available from the same date - Friday May 30th 2003 8:00 CET. See: http://cern.ch/plus/issues.html for other know issues. Vladimir Bahyl CERN/IT/FIO/FS

  17. Dear CERN Computing Community,

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    This is to remind you that LXPLUS6 cluster will be switched off on: Friday May 30th 2003 12:00 CET Please start using lxplus.cern.ch now to avoid unnecessary problems at the last minute. Note especially, that telnet and ftp to lxplus.cern.ch are not provided and will not work, instead secure protocols such as ssh and sftp should be used. Also LINUX6 resources in LXBATCH will no longer be available from the same date - Friday May 30th 2003 8:00 CET. See: http://cern.ch/plus/issues.html for other know issues. Vladimir Bahyl CERN/IT/FIO/FS

  18. Integrity at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Department, HR

    2015-01-01

    In the fulfillment of its mission, CERN relies upon the trust and material support of its Member States and partners, and is committed to exercising exemplary stewardship of the resources with which it is entrusted. Accordingly, CERN expects the highest level of integrity from all its contributors (whether members of the personnel, consultants, contractors working on site, or persons engaged in any other capacity at or on behalf of CERN). Integrity is a core value of CERN, defined in the Code of Conduct as “behaving ethically, with intellectual honesty and being accountable for one’s own actions”.

  19. Britain at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    H. E. Mr Christopher Hulse, Ambassador of United Kingdom in Switzerland, CERN Director General Luciano Maiani, Sir David Wright, Chief Executive of British Trade International and Roger Cashmore, CERN Director of research visit the Britain at CERN exhibition. From 14 to 17 November 30 British companies exhibited leading edge technologies at CERN. This is Britain's 18th exhibition at CERN since 1968. Out of the 30 companies, which attended the Britain at CERN exhibition in 1998, 25 have received an order or a contract relating to CERN during the last two years. The exhibition was inaugurated on Tuesday by Sir David Wright, Chief Executive of British Trade International. He was accompanied by H.E. Mr Christopher Hulse CMG, OBE, Her Majesty's Ambassador to Switzerland, and Mr. David Roberts, Deputy Head of Mission and Director of Trade Promotion at the British Embassy in Bern. CERN Director-General, Professor Luciano Maiani, underlined the major contribution of British physicists to CERN, pointing out the fact ...

  20. Proposal for the award of an industrial support contract for dismantling LEP cooling and ventilation equipment

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Service contract for dismantling LEP cooling and ventilation equipment. Following a market survey carried out among 68 firms in fourteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2658/ST/SL) was sent on 11 February 2000 to 14 firms and one consortium in eight Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received nine tenders from seven firms and two consortia in six Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm ZVVZ (CZ), the lowest bidder, for a total amount of 822 005 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The contract will include options for additional dismantling work in the LEP structure, specified in the tender, for a total amount of 313 311 Swiss francs, not subject to revision, bringing the total amount to a maximum of 1 135 316 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: CZ-100%.