WorldWideScience

Sample records for cerium perchlorates

  1. Reactions between cerium(IV) and methyl-6-x-derivatives of aniline in perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation of 2,6-dimethyl-, 2-isopropyl-6-methyl, 2-chloro-6-methyl-and 2-methyl-6-nitro aniline with cerium(IV) in perchloric acid solutions has been examined. It has been found that the concentration of hydrogen ions and the basicity of nitrogen atom in the amine group decide about the resultant intermediate products. Some of these products can be practically prepared using cerium(IV) as an oxidizing agent. (author). 16 refs, 1 tab

  2. Studies on reactions of cerium(4) reduction with alcohols. Part 3. Reactions of cerium(4) reduction with butane-2,3-diol, butane-1,3-diol and cis-butene-2-diol-1,4 in aqueous solutions of perchloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic study of the red-ox reaction kinetics of cerium ions -diols-water systems in presence of the perchloric acid is given. Dependence of the various agents and its concentrations on equilibrium constants the complex formation reactions and complex stability are discussed and compared. (B.Cz.)

  3. Oxidation of alginate and pectate biopolymers by cerium(IV) in perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions: A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Ahmed

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of alginate (Alg) and pectate (Pec) carbohydrate biopolymers was studied by spectrophotometry in aqueous perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions at fixed ionic strengths and temperature. In both acids, the reactions showed a first order dependence on [Ce(IV)], whereas the orders with respect to biopolymer concentrations are less than unity. In perchloric acid, the reactions exhibited less than unit orders with respect to [H(+)] whereas those proceeded in sulfuric acid showed negative fractional-first order dependences on [H(+)]. The effect of ionic strength and dielectric constant was studied. Probable mechanistic schemes for oxidation reactions were proposed. In both acids, the final oxidation products were characterized as mono-keto derivatives of both biopolymers. The activation parameters with respect to the slow step of the mechanisms were computed and discussed. The rate laws were derived and the reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanisms were calculated. PMID:26794772

  4. Perchlorate in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelango, P. Kalyani [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States); Tian Kang [Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Dasgupta, Purnendu K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States)]. E-mail: Sandyd@ttu.edu

    2006-05-10

    There has been no reliable published data on the presence of perchlorate in seawater. Seaweeds are among the most important plant life in the ocean and are good sources of iodine and have been widely used as food and nutritional supplement. Perchlorate is known to inhibit the transport of iodide by the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), present e.g., in the thyroid and mammary glands. With perchlorate being increasingly detected in drinking water, milk and various other foods, increasing the iodide intake through inexpensive natural supplements may be an attractive solution for maintaining iodine assimilation. We report here measurable concentrations of perchlorate in several samples of seawater (detectable in about half the samples analyzed). We also report the iodide and perchlorate concentrations of 11 different species of seaweed and the corresponding bioconcentration factors (BCF) for perchlorate and iodide, relative to the seawater from which they were harvested. All seaweed samples came from the same region, off the coast of Northeastern Maine. Concentrations of iodide and perchlorate in four seawater samples collected from the region near harvest time were 30 {+-} 11 and 0.16 {+-} 0.084 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively. Concentrations of both iodide and perchlorate varied over a wide range for different seaweed species; iodide ranging from 16 to 3134 mg kg{sup -1} and perchlorate from 0.077 to 3.2 mg kg{sup -1}. The Laminaria species had the highest iodide concentration; Laminaria digitata is the seaweed species most commonly used in the kelp tablets sold in health food stores. Our sample of L. digitata contained 3134 {+-} 15 mg iodide/kg dry weight. The BCF varied widely for different species, with Laminaria species concentrating iodide preferentially over perchlorate. The iodide BCF (BCF{sub i}) to perchlorate BCF (BCF{sub p}) quotient ranged from 0.66 to 53; L. digitata and L. saccarina having a BCF{sub i}/BCF{sub p} value of 45 and 53, respectively, far

  5. Breastfed infants metabolize perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelor, C Phillip; Kirk, Andrea B; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kroll, Martina; Campbell, Catrina A; Choudhary, Pankaj K

    2012-05-01

    Bifidobacteria are the dominant intestinal bacteria in breastfed infants. It is known that they can reduce nitrate. Although no direct experiments have been conducted until now, inferred pathways for Bifidobacterium bifidum include perchlorate reduction via perchlorate reductase. We show that when commercially available strains of bifidobacteria are cultured in milk, spiked with perchlorate, perchlorate is consumed. We studied 13 breastfed infant-mother pairs who provided 43 milk samples and 39 infant urine samples, and 5 formula-fed infant-mother pairs who provided 21 formula samples and 21 infant urine samples. Using iodine as a conservative tracer, we determined the average urinary iodine (UI) to milk iodine (MI) concentration ratio to be 2.87 for the breastfed infants. For the same samples, the corresponding perchlorate concentration ratio was 1.37 (difference significant, p perchlorate is lost. For the formula fed infant group the same ratios were 1.20 and 1.58; the difference was not significant (p = 0.68). However, the small number of subjects in the latter group makes it more difficult to conclude definitively whether perchlorate reduction does or does not occur. PMID:22497505

  6. Bioelectrical Perchlorate Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrash, C.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Several bioreactor designs are currently available for the ex-situ biological attenuation of perchlorate- contaminated waters and recently, some of these reactor designs were conditionally approved by the California Department of Health Services for application in the treatment of perchlorate contaminated drinking water. However, all of these systems are dependent on the continual addition of a chemical electron donor to sustain microbial activity and are always subject to biofouling and downstream water quality issues. In addition, residual labile electron donor in the reactor effluent can stimulate microbial growth in water distribution systems and contribute to the formation of potentially toxic trihalomethanes during disinfection by chlorination. As part of our ongoing studies into microbial perchlorate reduction we investigated the ability of dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) to metabolize perchlorate using a negatively charged electrode (cathode) in the working chamber of a bioelectrical reactor (BER) as the primary electron donor. In this instance the DPRB use the electrons on the electrode surface either directly or indirectly in the form of electrolytically produced H2 as a source of reducing equivalents for nitrate and perchlorate reduction. As part of this investigation our fed-batch studies showed that DPRB could use electrons from a graphite cathode poised at -500mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) for the reduction of perchlorate and nitrate. We isolated a novel organism, Dechlorospirillum strain VDY, from the cathode surface after 70 days operation which readily reduced 100 mg.L-1 perchlorate in a mediatorless batch bioelectrical reactor (BER) in 6 days. Continuous up-flow BERs (UFBERs) seeded with active cultures of strain VDY continuously treated waters containing 100 mg.L-1 perchlorate with almost 100% efficiency throughout their operation achieving a non-optimized volumetric loading of 60 mg.L-1 reactor volume.day-1. The same UFBERs also treated

  7. Isotopic mapping of groundwater perchlorate plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, Neil C; Hoaglund, John R; Marroquin, Roy J; Beloso, Abelardo D; Heraty, Linnea J; Bortz, Sarah E; Patterson, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of stable isotope ratios of chlorine and oxygen in perchlorate can, in some cases, be used for mapping and source identification of groundwater perchlorate plumes. This is demonstrated here for large, intersecting perchlorate plumes in groundwater from a region having extensive groundwater perchlorate contamination and a large population dependent on groundwater resources. The region contains both synthetic perchlorate derived from rocket fuel manufacturing and testing activities and agricultural perchlorate derived predominantly from imported Chilean (Atacama) nitrate fertilizer, along with a likely component of indigenous natural background perchlorate from local wet and dry atmospheric deposition. Most samples within each plume reflect either a predominantly synthetic or a predominantly agricultural perchlorate source and there is apparently a minor contribution from the indigenous natural background perchlorate. The existence of isotopically distinct perchlorate plumes in this area is consistent with other lines of evidence, including groundwater levels and flow paths as well as the historical land use and areal distribution of potential perchlorate sources. PMID:21352209

  8. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  9. 2-(Benzenesulfonamidopyridinium perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Li

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C11H11N2O2S+·ClO4−, the dihedral angle between the benzene and pyridinium rings is 87.33 (10°. An intramolecular N—H...O interaction, with an S=O-bonded O atom as receptor, occurs in the cation. In the crystal structure, ion pairs occur, being linked by strong N—H...O hydrogen bonds. The perchlorate anion plays a further role in the molecular packing by accepting several weak C—H...O interactions.

  10. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brierley, Martin, E-mail: martin.brierley@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Knowles, John, E-mail: john.knowles@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase.

  11. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase

  12. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  13. Study on the uranium-cerium extraction and his application to the treatment of irradiated uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was made a study on the behavior of uranium and cerium(IV) extraction, using the latter element as a plutonium simulator in a flowsheet of the treatment of irradiated uranium. Cerium(IV) was used under the same conditions as a plutonium in the Purex process because the admitted similar properties. An experimental work was initiated to determine the equilibrium curves of uranium, under the following conditions: concentration of 1 to 20 g U/1 and acidity varying from 1 to 5M in HNO3. Other parameters studied were the volumetric ratio of the phases and the influence of the concentration of TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate). To guarantee the cerium(IV) extraction, the diluent (varsol) was previously treated with 10% potassium dichromate in perchloric acid, potassium permanganate in 1M sulphuric acid and concentrated sulphuric acid at 70 deg to eliminate reducing compounds. The results obtained for cerium extraction, allowed a better understanding of its behavior in solution. The results permitted to conclude that the decontamination for cerium are very high in the first Purex extraction cycle. The easy as cerium(IV) is reduced to the trivalent state contributes a great deal to its decontamination. (author)

  14. Peptide biomarkers as evidence of perchlorate biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Reema; Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2011-02-01

    Perchlorate is a known health hazard for humans, fish, and other species. Therefore, it is important to assess the response of an ecosystem exposed to perchlorate contamination. The data reported here show that a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach for the detection of perchlorate-reducing enzymes can be used to measure the ability of microorganisms to degrade perchlorate, including determining the current perchlorate degradation status. Signature peptides derived from chlorite dismutase (CD) and perchlorate reductase can be used as biomarkers of perchlorate presence and biodegradation. Four peptides each derived from CD and perchlorate reductase subunit A (PcrA) and seven peptides derived from perchlorate reductase subunit B (PcrB) were identified as signature biomarkers for perchlorate degradation, as these sequences are conserved in the majority of the pure and mixed perchlorate-degrading microbial cultures examined. However, chlorite dismutase signature biomarker peptides from Dechloromonas agitata CKB were found to be different from those in other cultures used and should also be included with selected CD biomarkers. The combination of these peptides derived from the two enzymes represents a promising perchlorate presence/biodegradation biomarker system. The biomarker peptides were detected at perchlorate concentrations as low as 0.1 mM and at different time points both in pure cultures and within perchlorate-reducing environmental enrichment consortia. The peptide biomarkers were also detected in the simultaneous presence of perchlorate and an alternate electron acceptor, nitrate. We believe that this technique can be useful for monitoring bioremediation processes for other anthropogenic environmental contaminants with known metabolic pathways. PMID:21115710

  15. Organic carbon biostimulates rapid rhizodegradation of perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifru, Dawit D; Nzengung, Valentine A

    2008-12-01

    Previous hydroponics and field studies identified phytodegradation and rhizodegradation as the two main mechanisms by which plants metabolize perchlorate. Plant uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate is a slower and undesired process that poses ecological risks resulting from phytoaccumulation of some fraction of the perchlorate. Meanwhile, rhizodegradation is a more rapid and favored process involving perchlorate-degrading bacteria utilizing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a carbon and energy (electron) source to rapidly degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. In the present study, rhizodegradation of perchlorate by willow trees (Salix nigra) was biostimulated using electron sources obtained from natural and artificial carbon sources. In bioreactors provided with carbon sources as 500 mg/L DOC, 25 to 40 mg/L of initial perchlorate concentrations were removed to below the ion chromatography method detection limit of 2 microg/L in approximately 9 d. For planted controls provided with no electron donors, the time required for the complete removal of the same doses of perchlorate was up to 70 d. Enhancement of rhizodegradation by organic carbon reduced the phytoaccumulated fraction of perchlorate by an order of magnitude from approximately 430 to 20 mg/kg. The implication of the present study is that the high fraction uptake and phytoaccumulation of perchlorate in agricultural products and the recycling of perchlorate into the ecosystem can be significantly curtailed by supplying electron donors derived from organic carbon sources to the root zone of plants. PMID:18593217

  16. Perchlorate Removal in groundwater by perchlorate reductases from the perchlorate respiring bacterium, perc1ace

    OpenAIRE

    Frankenberger, William

    2003-01-01

    [Note: See PDF for correct symbols.] Perchlorate (ClO4-) is an important energetic component of solid rocket fuel. The major source of ClO4- pollution is the military, space program and supporting industries. ClO4- is recalcitrant in the environment and is potentially toxic. The California Department of Health Services adopted an action level of 4 ppb for perchlorate in potable water. Microorganisms that reduce ClO4- to chloride and molecular oxygen have been isolated. For designing an effici...

  17. Hydrated cerium(3) vanadates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been ascertained by the methods of chemical, thermal and X-ray phase analyses, IR spectroscopy that in the system LiVO3-Ce(NO3)3-HNO3-LiOH-H2O in equilibrium conditions the following compounds are precipitated: cerium dodecavanadate Ce2(V12O31)3·3nH2O, where 11.0 5O13)2·nH2O, where 6.5 2V10O28·19H2O; vanadates Ce(VO3)3·4H2O and CeVO4·H2O. Cerium orthovanadate is crystallized in tetragonal crystal system with zircon structure and crystal lattice parameters as follows: a=7.3726(14) and c=6.4939(23) A

  18. PERCHLORATE PHYTOREMEDIATION USING HARDWOOD TREES AND VASCULAR PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and soils at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate iswater soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of...

  19. Chromatographic separation of cerium(Ⅲ) in L-valine medium using poly[dibenzo-18-crown-6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SABALE Sandip R; MOHITE Baburao S

    2009-01-01

    A column chromatographic method has been developed for the separation and determination of cerium(Ⅲ) using poly[dibenzo-18-crown-6]. The separation was carried out in L-valine medium. The adsorption of cerium(Ⅲ) was quantitative from 1×10-1 to 1×10-4 mol/L L-valine. Amongst the various eluents, 1.0-8.0 mol/L hydrochloric acid, 1.0-8.0 mol/L hydrobromic acid, 1.0-8.0 mol/L perchloric acid, 1.0-2.0 mol/L sulfuric acid and 4.0-5.0 mol/L acetic acid, were found to be the efficient eluents for cerium(Ⅲ). The capacity of poly[dibenzo-18-crown-6] for cerium(Ⅲ) was (0.428±0.01) mmol/g. The method was applied to the separation of cerium(Ⅲ) from associated elements link uranium(Ⅵ) and thorium(Ⅳ). It was also applied for the determination of cerium(Ⅲ) in geological samples. The method is simple, rapid and selective with good reproducibility (approximately±2% ).

  20. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE BY TOBACCO PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in the plant tissues. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of tobacco plants in phytoremediation, a technology that employs plants to degrade,...

  1. Thermodynamic properties of cerium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic properties of cerium oxides in the CeO2-CeO1.5 composition range are studied. For this purpose method of electromotive force with solid electrolyte is used, equilibrium constants of reduction of cerium oxides by hydrogen are measured. Necessity of using atmosphere of argon or purified nitrogen to work with pyrophoric cerium oxides is stressed. The obtained results and the earlier known literary data on CeO2 and Ce2O3 thermodynamic properties are tabulated. 14 refs.; 5 tabs

  2. Photochemical precipitation of thorium and cerium and their separation from other ions in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, M; Heyn, A H; Hoffman, M Z; Agarwal, R P

    1970-10-01

    Thorium was precipitated from homogeneous solution by exposing solutions of thorium and periodate in dilute perchloric acid to 253.7 nm radiation from a low-pressure mercury lamp. Periodate is reduced photochemically to iodate which causes the formation of a dense precipitate of the basic iodate of thorium(IV). The precipitate was redissolved, the iodate reduced, the thorium precipitated first as the hydroxide, then as the oxalate and ignited to the dioxide for weighing. Thorium(IV) solutions containing 8-200 mg of ThO(2) gave quantitative results with a standard deviation (s) of 0.2 mg. Separations from 25 mg each of iron, calcium, magnesium, 50 mg of yttrium and up to 500 mg of uranium(VI) were quantitative (s = 0.25 mg). Separations from rare earths, except cerium, were accomplished by using hexamethylenetetramine rather than ammonia for the precipitation of the hydroxide. Cerium(III) was similarly precipitated and converted into CeO(2) for weighing. Quantitative results were obtained for 13-150 mg of CeO(2) with a standard deviation of 0.2 mg. Separations from 200 mg of uranium were quantitative. Other rare earths and yttrium interfered seriously. The precipitates of the basic cerium(IV) and thorium iodates obtained are more compact than those obtained by direct precipitation and can be handled easily. Attempts to duplicate Suzuki's method for separating cerium from neodymium and yttrium were not successful. PMID:18960820

  3. Peptide Biomarkers as Evidence of Perchlorate Biodegradation▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Reema; Crawford, Ronald L.; Paszczynski, Andrzej J.

    2010-01-01

    Perchlorate is a known health hazard for humans, fish, and other species. Therefore, it is important to assess the response of an ecosystem exposed to perchlorate contamination. The data reported here show that a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach for the detection of perchlorate-reducing enzymes can be used to measure the ability of microorganisms to degrade perchlorate, including determining the current perchlorate degradation status. Signature peptides derive...

  4. Perchlorate reduction by microbes inhabiting oil reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebensteiner, Martin; Stams, Alfons; Lomans, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Microbial perchlorate and chlorate reduction is a unique type of anaerobic respiration as during reduction of (per)chlorate chlorite is formed, which is then split into chloride and molecular oxygen. In recent years it was demonstrated that (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria may employ oxygenase-dependent pathways for the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings suggested that (per)chlorate may be used as oxygen-releasing compound in anoxic environments that contain hydrocarbons, such as polluted soil sites and oil reservoirs. We started to study perchlorate reduction by microbes possibly inhabiting oil reservoirs. One of the organisms studied was Archaeoglobus fulgidus. This extremely thermophilic archaeon is known as a major contributor to souring in hot oil reservoirs. A. fulgidus turned out to be able to use perchlorate as terminal electron acceptor for growth with lactate (Liebensteiner et al 2013). Genome based physiological experiments indicated that A. fulgidus possesses a novel perchlorate reduction pathway. Perchlorate is first reduced to chlorite, but chlorite is not split into chloride and molecular oxygen as occurs in bacteria. Rather, chlorite reacts chemically with sulfide, forming oxidized sulfur compounds, which are reduced to sulfide in the electron transport chain by the archaeon. The dependence of perchlorate reduction on sulfur compounds could be shown. The implications of our findings as novel strategy for microbiological enhanced oil recovery and for souring mitigation are discussed. Liebensteiner MG, Pinkse MWH, Schaap PJ, Stams AJM and Lomans BP (2013) Archaeal (per)chlorate reduction at high temperature, a matter of abiotic-biotic reactions. Science 340: 85-87

  5. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  6. A Colorimetric Bioassay for Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinnickel, M. L.; Smith, S.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Recognition of perchlorate (ClO4-) as a widespread contaminant across the United States and its potential adverse affects towards human health has motivated the EPA to place ClO4- on its contaminant candidate list for drinking water supplies. While a federal MCL has not yet been set, a recommended public health goal of 1 ppb (μg.L-1) was established by the US EPA in 2002. To date, methods of detection require use of sensitive ion chromatographic equipment that are expensive, time consuming, and require highly trained personnel for use. Our studies are focused on the development of a highly sensitive, simple, and robust colorimetric bioassay based on the primary enzyme involved in microbial ClO4- reduction, the perchlorate reductase (Pcr). A previously published assay used reduced methyl viologen (MV, the dye is reduced with sodium hydrosulfite) as an electron donor to demonstrate Pcr activity. The assay directly correlates the amount of MV oxidized with the amount of ClO4- reduced by assuming a transfer of four electrons. To test this assumption, we compared actual concentrations of MV oxidized to ClO4- reduced in this assay. ClO4- concentrations were determined using a Dionex ICS-500 ion chromatography system, while MV concentrations were determined using a standard curve generated at 578 nm. Comparisons between the two revealed that twelve molecules of MV were oxidized for each molecule of ClO4- reduced. The oxidation of these additional eight MV molecules is explained by the interaction of the dye with chlorite (the product of the Pcr reaction) and other contaminants that could be present in the enzyme prep. This unsettling result indicated this assay would be problematic for the detection of ClO4- in soil, which has many chemicals that could react with MV. To improve upon this assay, we have tried to reduce ClO4- using less reactive dyes and reductants. The reductants ascorbic acid, NADH, and dithiothreitol drive Pcr catalyzed ClO4- reduction, however, they

  7. The Microbiology of Perchlorate in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    In the last decade perchlorate has been identified as an important groundwater component that poses potential health threat. Although primarily sourced anthropogenically, many recent studies have identified significant natural pools throughout the US and the natural mechanisms of its synthesis remain a mystery. As such, the true perchlorate concentrations naturally present in the environment are still unknown making its regulation problematic. Because of its solubility and non-reactivity the fate and transport of perchlorate in the environment is primarily a function of microbial activity. In the last seven years more than forty specialized perchlorate respiring organisms have been identified and characterized. These dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) are metabolically diverse and environmental populations tend to be dominated by two primary genotypes, the Dechloromonas and the Azospira species. As such, the majority of our understanding of this metabolism is based on these organisms. These organisms are readily found in soil and sedimentary environments and often associate with the rhizosphere. Recent research has demonstrated an accumulation of these organisms along plant roots suggesting their catabolism of root exudates and molecular studies has demonstrated their existence as endophytic infections of the stem and leaves of actively growing Brachypodium grass plants although their exact role under these conditions is unknown. These microorganisms are generally not nutritionally fastidious and vitamin supplementation is unnecessary for growth although molybdenum is a required trace element for perchlorate reduction. The Dechloromonas and Azospira species generally grow optimally at pH values near neutrality in freshwater environments. Even so, recent field studies have shown that related deep-branching members of these genera often predominate in sites of adverse pH or salinity with some species being capable of growth and perchlorate respiration

  8. Silver(I) imidazole perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of silver(I) imidazole perchlorate reveals the presence of a planar (Ag+)6 cluster, in which three radiating pairs of Ag+ ions 3.051(1) A apart are disposed on the corners of an equilateral triangle, the inner Ag+ ions being 3.493(1) A apart. Each silver ion carries two linearly co-ordinated imidazole ligands, the whole unit has 32 (D3) symmetry. Exposure to 60Co γ-rays at 77 K results in electron addition to a group of three equivalent silver atoms. The 109Ag, 107Ag, and 14N hyperfine coupling constants show that the total 5s character of the unpaired electron is only ca. 0.55, and delocalisation onto six equivalent nitrogen ligands accounts for ca. 0.25. Low g values suggest that the remaining spin density is in 5p orbitals on silver. There is no indication of delocalisation onto the remaining three Ag+ ions in the cluster. Possible reasons for this selectivity are discussed. The electron-loss centre appears to be a normal Ag2+ complex. It is suggested that marked distortion results in the hole being trapped on one silver rather than being delocalised. (author)

  9. Valence instabilities in cerium intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to study the magnetic behaviour of cerium in intermetallic compounds, that show an IV behaviour, e.g. CeSn3. In the progress of the investigations, it became of interest to study the effect of changes in the lattice of the IV compound by substituting La or Y for Ce, thus constituting the Cesub(1-x)Lasub(x)Sn3 and Cesub(1-x)Ysub(x)Sn3 quasibinary systems. A second purpose was to examine the possibility of introducing instabilities in the valency of a trivalent intermetallic cerium compound: CeIn3, also by La and Y-substitutions in the lattice. Measurements on the resulting Cesub(1-x)Lasub(x)In3 and Cesub(1-x)Ysub(x)In3 quasibinaries are described. A third purpose was to study the (gradual) transition from a trivalent cerium compound into an IV cerium compound. This was done by examining the magnetic properties of the CeInsub(x)Snsub(3-x) and CePbsub(x)Snsub(3-x) systems. Finally a new possibility was investigated: that of the occurrence of IV behaviour in CeSi2, CeSi, and in CeGa2. (Auth.)

  10. Perchlorate in The Great Lakes: Isotopic Composition and Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Poghosyan, Armen; Sturchio, Neil C.; Morrison, Candice G.; Beloso, Abelardo D., Jr.; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M.; Jackson, W. Andrew; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate is a persistent and mobile contaminant in the environment with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (δ^(18)O, Δ^(17)O) and chlorine (δ^(37)Cl) along with the abundance of the radioactive isotope ^(36)Cl were used to trace perchlorate sources and behavior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. These lakes were selected for study as a likely repository of recent atmospheric perchlorate deposition. Perchlorate concentrations in the Great Lakes range from 0....

  11. Identification, Characterization, and Classification of Genes Encoding Perchlorate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Kelly S.; Shang, Ching; Chakraborty, Romy; Belchik, Sara M.; Coates, John D.; Achenbach, Laurie A.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of perchlorate to chlorite, the first enzymatic step in the bacterial reduction of perchlorate, is catalyzed by perchlorate reductase. The genes encoding perchlorate reductase (pcrABCD) in two Dechloromonas species were characterized. Sequence analysis of the pcrAB gene products revealed similarity to α- and β-subunits of microbial nitrate reductase, selenate reductase, dimethyl sulfide dehydrogenase, ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, and chlorate reductase, all of which are type II m...

  12. Environmental biotechnology and microbiology of (per)chlorate reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehboob, F.; Schraa, G.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorates are the salts derived from perchloric acid (HClO4). They occur both naturally and through manufacturing. They have been used as a medicine for more than 50 years to treat thyroid gland disorders and are used extensively within the pyrotechnics industry, and ammonium perchlorate is also

  13. Quantitative Detection of Perchlorate-Reducing Bacteria by Real-Time PCR Targeting the Perchlorate Reductase Gene▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Hamilton, Nicholas S.; Stewart, Valley; Scow, Kate M.; Hristova, Krassimira R.

    2008-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting the pcrA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of perchlorate reductase, detected pcrA genes from perchlorate-reducing bacteria in three different genera and from soil microbial communities. Partial pcrA sequences indicated differences in the composition of perchlorate-reducing bacterial communities following exposure to different electron donors.

  14. Quantitative detection of perchlorate-reducing bacteria by real-time PCR targeting the perchlorate reductase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Hamilton, Nicholas S; Stewart, Valley; Scow, Kate M; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2008-03-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting the pcrA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of perchlorate reductase, detected pcrA genes from perchlorate-reducing bacteria in three different genera and from soil microbial communities. Partial pcrA sequences indicated differences in the composition of perchlorate-reducing bacterial communities following exposure to different electron donors. PMID:18245250

  15. Improvements in or relating to cerium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the preparation of a dispersible cerium compound comprises heating a substantially dry cerium (IV) oxide hydrate in the presence of a deaggregating agent to cause deaggregation of aggregated crystallites in the cerium (IV) oxide hydrate and produce a dry dispersible cerium compound. The deaggregating agent is an acid species e.g. NO3-, Cl- or ClO4-. The dry dispersible product may be mixed with an aqueous medium to form a colloidal dispersion and if the dispersion is allowed to dry, a gel. (author)

  16. Radiative lifetimes of neutral cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to ±5%, have been measured for 153 levels of neutral cerium using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLIF) on a slow beam of cerium atoms. Of the 153 levels studied, 150 are even parity and 3 are odd parity. The levels range in energy from 16 869 to 28 557 cm-1. This set of Ce I lifetimes is much more extensive than others published to date, and will provide the absolute calibration for a very large set of measured Ce I transition probabilities. Accurate transition probabilities for lines in the visible and ultraviolet are needed both in astrophysics, for the determination of elemental abundances, and by the lighting community, for research and development of metal halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  17. Radiative lifetimes of neutral cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, E A; Buettner, K P; Lawler, J E [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)], E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu, E-mail: Kevin.Buettner@usma.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu

    2009-04-28

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to {+-}5%, have been measured for 153 levels of neutral cerium using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLIF) on a slow beam of cerium atoms. Of the 153 levels studied, 150 are even parity and 3 are odd parity. The levels range in energy from 16 869 to 28 557 cm{sup -1}. This set of Ce I lifetimes is much more extensive than others published to date, and will provide the absolute calibration for a very large set of measured Ce I transition probabilities. Accurate transition probabilities for lines in the visible and ultraviolet are needed both in astrophysics, for the determination of elemental abundances, and by the lighting community, for research and development of metal halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  18. Perchlorate levels in soil and waters from the Atacama Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, R; Palma, P; Parker, D; Molina, M; Godoy, F A; Escudey, M

    2014-02-01

    Perchlorate is an anion that originates as a contaminant in ground and surface waters. The presence of perchlorate in soil and water samples from northern Chile (Atacama Desert) was investigated by ion chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. Results indicated that perchlorate was found in five of seven soils (cultivated and uncultivated) ranging from 290 ± 1 to 2,565 ± 2 μg/kg. The greatest concentration of perchlorate was detected in Humberstone soil (2,565 ± 2 μg/kg) associated with nitrate deposits. Perchlorate levels in Chilean soils are greater than those reported for uncultivated soils in the United States. Perchlorate was also found in superficial running water ranging from 744 ± 0.01 to 1,480 ± 0.02 μg/L. Perchlorate water concentration is 30-60 times greater than levels established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (24.5 μg/L) for drinking. PMID:24165784

  19. Atmospheric origins of perchlorate on Mars and in the Atacama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catling, D. C.; Claire, M. W.; Zahnle, K. J.; Quinn, R. C.; Clark, B. C.; Hecht, M. H.; Kounaves, S.

    2010-01-01

    Isotopic studies indicate that natural perchlorate is produced on Earth in arid environments by the oxidation of chlorine species through pathways involving ozone or its photochemical products. With this analogy, we propose that the arid environment on Mars may have given rise to perchlorate through the action of atmospheric oxidants. A variety of hypothetical pathways can be proposed including photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we made a preliminary study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate to help shed light on the origin of Martian perchlorate. We investigated gas phase pathways using a 1-D photochemical model. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for future investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate.

  20. Plant-mediated transformation of perchlorate into chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nzengung, V.A.; Wang, C. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Geology; Harvey, G. [AEM, Wright Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The decontamination of perchlorate-contaminated water by woody plants was investigated in sand and hydroponic bioreactors. Willow trees were found to be the most favorable woody plants with phraetophytic characteristics in comparative screen tests with eastern cottonwoods and Eucalyptus cineria. Willows decontaminated aqueous solutions dosed with 10--100 mg/.L of perchlorate to below the method detection limit of 2 {micro}g/L. Two phytoprocesses were identified as important in the remediation of perchlorate-contaminated water: (1) uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate in the tree branches and leaves and (2) rhizodegradation. Exposure of rooted willow trees to perchlorate-dosed media stimulated rhizodegradation. Homogeneous degradation studies using media from the root zone of dosed willow trees confirmed that rhizosphere-associated microorganisms mediated the degradation of perchlorate to chloride. Experiments conducted with varying ranges of nitrate concentrations clearly indicated that high nitrate concentrations interfered with rhizodegradation of perchlorate. This study provides evidence that the efficacy of phytoremediation of perchlorate-contaminated environments may depend on the concentration of competing terminal electron acceptors, such as nitrate, and the nitrogen source of the nutrient solution., Since perchlorate does not volatilize from water readily, a perchlorate remediation scheme may involve an intensively cultivated plantation of trees with phraetophytic characteristics and irrigation with the contaminated water.

  1. Perchlorate Exposure and Thyroid Function in Ammonium Perchlorate Workers in Yicheng, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of low level dust on the thyroid function of workers chronically exposed to ammonium perchlorate (AP is uncertain and controversial. The aim of this study was to examine whether workers in China with long-term (>3 years occupational exposure to low levels of AP dust had affected thyroid homeostasis. Mean occupational exposures to AP dust ranged from 0.43 to 1.17 mg/m3. Geometric means of post-shift urinary perchlorate levels were 20.5 µg/L for those exposed and 12.8 µg/L for the controls. No significant differences were found for thyroid function parameters of FT3, FT4, or log TSH or for TPO prevalence or thyroglobulin levels. Additionally, no differences in findings were observed for complete blood count (CBC, serum biochemical profile, or pulmonary function test. Median urinary iodine levels of 172 and 184 µg/L showed that the workers had sufficient iodine intake. This study found no effect on thyroid function from long term, low-level documented exposure to ammonium perchlorate. It is the first study to report both thyroid status parameters and urinary perchlorate, a biomarker of internal perchlorate exposure, in occupationally exposed workers in China.

  2. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS: DEVELOPMENT OF A PLANT KINETIC MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in plant tissues. This research determined the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. Three hydroponics growth studies were completed u...

  3. Different Strategies for Biological Remediation of Perchlorate Contaminated Groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has gained attention recently due to its interference with thyroid gland function. In infants and unborn children, inadequate thyroid hormone production can cause mental retardation and thyroid tumors. Since new perchlorate standards will be proposed in 2013, and if a stricter standard is imposed, cost effective technologies will be in high demand. The overall objective of this research was to evaluate two perchlorate bioremediation strategies using indigenous soil bact...

  4. Perchlorate and nitrate in leafy vegetables of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, C A; Crump, K S; Krieger, R I; Khandaker, N R; Gibbs, J P

    2005-12-15

    In previous studies trace levels of perchlorate were found in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) irrigated with Colorado River water, which is contaminated with low levels of perchlorate from aerospace and defense related industries. In this paper, we report the results of a survey conducted across North America to evaluate the occurrence of perchlorate in leafy vegetables produced outside the lower Colorado River region, and evaluate the relative iodide uptake inhibition potential to perchlorate and nitrate in these leafy vegetables. Conventionally and organically produced lettuce and other leafy vegetable samples were collected from production fields and farmers' markets in the central and coastal valleys of California, New Mexico, Colorado, Michigan, Ohio, New York, Quebec, and New Jersey. Results show that 16% of the conventionally produced samples and 32% of the organically produced samples had quantifiable levels of perchlorate using ion chromatography. Estimated perchlorate exposure from organically produced leafy vegetables was approximately 2 times that of conventional produce, but generally less than 10% of the reference dose recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Furthermore, the iodide uptake inhibition potential of perchlorate was less than 1% of that of the nitrate present. These data are consistent with those of other reported perchlorate survey work with lettuce, bottled water, breast milk, dairy milk, and human urine, and suggest a wide national presence of perchlorate. PMID:16475313

  5. Atmospheric Production of Perchlorate on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claire, M.; Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Natural production and preservation of perchlorate on Earth occurs only in arid environments. Isotopic evidence suggests a strong role for atmospheric oxidation of chlorine species via pathways including ozone or its photochemical derivatives. As the Martian atmosphere is both oxidizing and drier than the driest places on Earth, we propose an atmospheric origin for the Martian perchlorates measured by NASA's Phoenix Lander. A variety of hypothetical formation pathways can be proposed including atmospheric photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Here, we investigate gas phase formation pathways using a 1-D photochemical model (Catling et al. 2009, accepted by JGR). Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we start with a study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. These results are sensitive to estimated reaction rates for ClO3 species. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for further investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate. In addition to the Atacama results, we will present a preliminary study incorporating chlorine chemistry into an existing Martian photochemical model (Zahnle et al. JGR 2008).

  6. Interaction of perchlorate and trichloroethene bioreductions in mixed anaerobic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li-Lian; Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhao-Xin; Yi, Yang-Yi; Tang, Youneng; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-11-15

    This work evaluated the interaction of perchlorate and trichloroethene (TCE), two common co-contaminants in groundwater, during bioreduction in serum bottles containing synthetic mineral salts media and microbial consortia. TCE at concentrations up to 0.3mM did not significantly affect perchlorate reduction; however, perchlorate concentrations higher than 0.1mM made the reduction of TCE significantly slower. Perchlorate primarily inhibited the reduction of vinyl chloride (VC, a daughter product of TCE) to ethene. Mechanistic analysis showed that the inhibition was mainly because perchlorate reduction is thermodynamically more favorable than reduction of TCE and its daughter products and not because of toxicity due to accumulation of dissolved oxygen produced during perchlorate reduction. As the initial perchlorate concentration increased from 0 to 600mg/L in a set of serum bottles, the relative abundance of Rhodocyclaceae (a putatively perchlorate-reducing genus) increased from 6.3 to 80.6%, while the relative abundance of Dehalococcoides, the only known genus that is able to reduce TCE all the way to ethene, significantly decreased. Similarly, the relative abundance of Proteobacteria (a phylum to which most known perchlorate-reducing bacteria belong) increased from 22% to almost 80%. PMID:27449607

  7. Perchlorate in the Great Lakes: isotopic composition and origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Armen; Sturchio, Neil C; Morrison, Candice G; Beloso, Abelardo D; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M; Jackson, W Andrew; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    Perchlorate is a persistent and mobile contaminant in the environment with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (δ(18)O, Δ(17)O) and chlorine (δ(37)Cl) along with the abundance of the radioactive isotope (36)Cl were used to trace perchlorate sources and behavior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. These lakes were selected for study as a likely repository of recent atmospheric perchlorate deposition. Perchlorate concentrations in the Great Lakes range from 0.05 to 0.13 μg per liter. δ(37)Cl values of perchlorate from the Great Lakes range from +3.0‰ (Lake Ontario) to +4.0‰ (Lake Superior), whereas δ(18)O values range from -4.1‰ (Lake Superior) to +4.0‰ (Lake Erie). Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ(17)O values (+1.6‰ to +2.7‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7‰) and the other four lakes (∼+1.7‰). The stable isotopic results indicate that perchlorate in the Great Lakes is dominantly of natural origin, having isotopic composition resembling that measured for indigenous perchlorate from preindustrial groundwaters of the western USA. The (36)Cl/Cl ratio of perchlorate varies widely from 7.4 × 10(-12) (Lake Ontario) to 6.7 × 10(-11) (Lake Superior). These (36)ClO4(-) abundances are consistent with an atmospheric origin of perchlorate in the Great Lakes. The relatively high (36)ClO4(-) abundances in the larger lakes (Lakes Superior and Michigan) could be explained by the presence of (36)Cl-enriched perchlorate deposited during the period of elevated atmospheric (36)Cl activity following thermonuclear bomb tests in the Pacific Ocean. PMID:25171443

  8. High ozone increases soil perchlorate but does not affect foliar perchlorate content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3) is implicated in the natural source inventory of perchlorate (ClO4-), a hydrophilic salt that migrates to ground water and interferes with uptake of iodide in mammals, including humans. Tropospheric O3 is elevated in many areas. We previously showed (Grantz et al., 2013; Environmental Pol...

  9. PERCHLORATE IDENTIFICATION IN FERTILIZERS AND ACCUMULATION IN LETTUCE SEEDLINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate has contaminated groundwater, drinking water and soils at several locations in the U.S. The primary source of contamination at sites that have been investigated to date seems to be from industrial and military operations that use Perchlorate as an oxidizing agent. How...

  10. Thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate during gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess radiation damage effects in propellants, pyrotechnics, and similar materials, thermal decomposition measurements were made on ammonium perchlorate powders and crystals during gamma-ray irradiation. Gas evolution studies were made on single crystals and powders of ammonium perchlorate, both at room temperature and at 2270C. The results are discussed. (U.S.)

  11. Inhibited oxidation of polymethylsiloxane, containing cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of oxidation of oligomeric polydimethylsiloxane in the presence of cerium-containing organosilicon antioxidant at 285-310 deg was investigated. High energy of activation for initiation process (around 272 kJ/mole) was established as a feature specific for chain oxidation of polydimethylsiloxane. It was found that cerium-containing antioxidant, as well as the iron-containing one, based on iron capronate, is of the ''depleting'' inhibitors, i.e. it looses its inhibiting ability during oxidation

  12. Electrodeposition of Oriented Cerium Oxide Films

    OpenAIRE

    Golden, Teresa D.; Adele Qi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide films of preferred orientation are electrodeposited under anodic conditions. A complexing ligand, acetate, was used to stabilize the cerium (III) ion in solution for deposition of the thin films. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the ligand and metal tended to bind as a weakly bidentate complex. The crystallite size of the films was in the nanometer range as shown by Raman spectroscopy and was calculated from X-ray diffraction data. Crystallite sizes from 6 to 2...

  13. Ionic flotation of cerium, praseodymium and neodymium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of practically complete flotation extraction of cerium, praseodymium and neodymium ions collected with the help of potassium abietate is shown. It is established that the most complete flotation extraction of cerium, praseodymium and neodymium ions takes place from solutions having 6-8 pH value in the presence of 1.5-2.5 multiple collector surplus. Solution temperature increase from 20 to 80 deg influences positively the flotation process

  14. Pharmacological potential of cerium oxidenanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celardo, Ivana; Pedersen, Jens Z.; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology promises a revolution in pharmacology to improve or create ex novo therapies. Cerium oxidenanoparticles (nanoceria), well-known as catalysts, possess an astonishing pharmacological potential due to their antioxidant properties, deriving from a fraction of Ce3+ ions present in CeO2. These defects, compensated by oxygen vacancies, are enriched at the surface and therefore in nanosized particles. Reactions involving redox cycles between the Ce3+ and Ce4+oxidation states allow nanoceria to react catalytically with superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, mimicking the behavior of two key antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, potentially abating all noxious intracellularreactive oxygen species (ROS) via a self-regenerating mechanism. Hence nanoceria, apparently well tolerated by the organism, might fight chronic inflammation and the pathologies associated with oxidative stress, which include cancer and neurodegeneration. Here we review the biological effects of nanoceria as they emerge from in vitro and in vivo studies, considering biocompatibility and the peculiar antioxidant mechanisms.

  15. Bioremediation Potential of Perchlorate Contaminated Deep Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, H.; Ronen, Z.; Weisbrod, N.; Dahan, O.; Nativ, R.

    2007-12-01

    Widespread perchlorate contamination was found in the vadose zone near a plant that manufactures ammonium perchlorate above the coastal aquifer of Israel in Ramat Hasharon. As part of the plant's operations, untreated industrial wastewater was disposed of for over 30 years in unlined wastewater ponds and nearby washes, causing contamination of the unsaturated zone (up to 2200 mg kg-1 sediment at a depth of 20 m) and the groundwater below it (up to 300 mg L-1). In this study, we examined the potential for microbial metabolism of perchlorate reduction in the contaminated deep vadose zone profile by native microbial communities. Microbial reduction of perchlorate was found in three of the four sediment samples taken from different depths. The sediments taken from 1 m (shallowest) and 35 m (deepest- close to the water table) showed the fastest degradation rates, while the sediment taken from 15 m showed the slowest rate. No perchlorate reduction was observed in the sediment taken from 20 m, where perchlorate concentrations were highest. These results were correlated to the viable microorganism counts in the profile. In experiments in which the effect of nitrate was examined, the lag time for perchlorate degradation was found to be inversely correlated to the initial nitrate concentration, while the perchlorate-reduction rates were faster in treatments with higher initial nitrate concentrations. We found no perchlorate degradation as long as nitrate was present in the system: perchlorate reduction was initiated only after all of the nitrate had been reduced. Nitrate-reduction rates were correlated to the initial nitrate concentrations and no lag period was observed. Nitrite was temporarily accumulated during nitrate reduction and was totally reduced, like nitrate, after 4 days. Count of viable microbial communities as well as PCR analysis of the chlorite dismutase gene in the native microbial population exposed to high concentrations of perchlorate (10,000-20,000 mg L-1

  16. Experimental chlorine stable isotope fractionation of perchlorate respiring bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ader, M.; Coleman, M.; Coates, J.; Chaudhuri, S.

    2006-12-01

    Perchlorate natural occurrences on earth are very limited and seem restricted to extremely arid environments such as nitrate deposits of the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, where perchlorate contents can reach 0.1 to 1%. Anthropogenically sourced perchlorate however is extensively used as a major component of explosives and rocket fuels. Careless disposal of these highly soluble and very stable perchlorates locally led to the contamination of drinking water, now recognised as posing a significant health threat. Recent studies have demonstrated that some microorganisms are able to completely reduce perchlorate to innocuous chloride, and offer a great potential for the bioremediation of contaminated waters. Provided that the isotopic fractionation associated with this reduction is significant, the measurement of the chloride isotopic composition of contaminated water is a powerful tool for monitoring the progress of in-situ remediation. We report here, the characterisation of the isotopic fractionation associated with perchlorate reduction performed by Dechlorosoma suillum strain PS during 3 culture experiments performed in a batch fermentor (anoxic, 37°°C, pH =7). The basal medium contained acetate as the electron donor and perchlorate as the electron acceptor. When possible, chloride salts were replaced by sulphate salts so as to lower the initial chloride content. The paired chlorine isotopic compositions of chloride and perchlorate in solutions sampled throughout the experiment were measured using the method described in Ader et al. 2001. The fractionation between chloride and perchlorate was calculated independently for each sample, using on the one hand the chloride content and isotopic composition and on the other hand the perchlorate content and isotopic composition. The results show that the fractionation is constant within error throughout the experiment for the 3 experiments with a weighted mean of -14.94±0.14‰. This value is much lower than the

  17. Proteomic detection of proteins involved in perchlorate and chlorate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Reema; Deobald, Lee A; Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2009-09-01

    Mass spectrometry and a time-course cell lysis method were used to study proteins involved in perchlorate and chlorate metabolism in pure bacterial cultures and environmental samples. The bacterial cultures used included Dechlorosoma sp. KJ, Dechloromonas hortensis, Pseudomonas chloritidismutans ASK-1, and Pseudomonas stutzeri. The environmental samples included an anaerobic sludge enrichment culture from a sewage treatment plant, a sample of a biomass-covered activated carbon matrix from a bioreactor used for treating perchlorate-contaminated drinking water, and a waste water effluent sample from a paper mill. The approach focused on detection of perchlorate (and chlorate) reductase and chlorite dismutase proteins, which are the two central enzymes in the perchlorate (or chlorate) reduction pathways. In addition, acetate-metabolizing enzymes in pure bacterial samples and housekeeping proteins from perchlorate (or chlorate)-reducing microorganisms in environmental samples were also identified. PMID:19199051

  18. Thermal decomposition of beryllium perchlorate tetrahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal decomposition of Be(ClO4)2x4H2O was studied by the differential flow technique in the helium stream. The kinetics was followed by an exchange reaction of the perchloric acid appearing by the decomposition with potassium carbonate. The rate of CO2 liberation in this process was recorded by a heat conductivity detector. The exchange reaction yielding CO2 is quantitative, it is not the limiting one and it does not distort the kinetics of the process of perchlorate decomposition. The solid products of decomposition were studied by infrared and NMR spectroscopy, roentgenography, thermography and chemical analysis. A mechanism suggested for the decomposition involves intermediate formation of hydroxyperchlorate: Be(ClO4)2x4H2O → Be(OH)ClO4+HClO4+3H2O; Be(OH)ClO4 → BeO+HClO4. Decomposition is accompained by melting of the sample. The mechanism of decomposition is hydrolytic. At room temperature the hydroxyperchlorate is a thick syrup-like compound crystallizing after long storing

  19. Optimization of process efficiency in cerium electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive metal electrorefining presents a number of problems that pose daunting obstacles to commercial operation. Typical reduction of reactive metal oxides or halide can introduce a variety of impurities such as iron, nickel, chromium, silicon, aluminum and various other metals which must be removed. This research program has addressed the various parameters of molten salt electrorefining of cerium metal to provide insight to this extremely important process. Cerium has been chosen as the surrogate for certain reactive metals on account of its similar electrochemical characteristics. The justification for such a choice has been investigated. The cell components and configuration, current efficiency of the process, purity of the cathodically deposited metal and the power requirement of the system have been optimized in a molten calcium chloride salt electrolyte using a molten, stirred impure metal anode. Various refractory crucible design and electrode materials have been studied to improve the process reliability. The equimolar NaKCl2 salt used in the electrorefining of some reactive metals is found to be inappropriate as a relatively high temperature is required to electrorefine cerium, i.e. melting point of Ce [798 C]. The homogeneity of the anode is controlled by the stirring at an optimized rate. This paper highlights the validity of cerium oxide and intermetallics of cerium as a surrogate for other reactive metal oxides or the respective intermetallics

  20. Perchlorates as Powerful Catalysts in Many Important Organic Transformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Bartoli; L. Sambri; M. Locatelli

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction For long times, metallic perchlorates have been considered dangerous compounds[1] in that they function as explosives and as incontrollable oxidizers. Therefore, the fear of the great hazard connected with their manufacture and uses had prevented an extensive use both in research laboratories and in industrial processes[2].However, recently it has been cleared that this bad reputation is due to the mistaken association of metallic perchlorates with the oxidizing potential of perchloric acid and the pyrotechnic performances of NH4ClO4.

  1. Effects of Perchlorate on Organic Molecules under Simulated Mars Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) was discovered in the northern polar region of Mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and has also been recently detected by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater [1,2]. Perchlorate has also been shown to be formed under current Mars conditions via the oxidation of mineral chlorides, further supporting the theory that perchlorate is present globally on Mars [3]. The discovery of perchlorate on Mars has raised important questions about the effects of perchlorate on the survival and detection of organic molecules. Although it has been shown that pyrolysis in the presence of perchlorate results in the alteration or destruction of organic molecules [4], few studies have been conducted on the potential effects of perchlorate on organic molecules under martian surface conditions. Although perchlorate is typically inert under Mars-typical temperatures [5], perchlorate does absorb high energy UV radiation, and has been shown to decompose to form reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorite (ClO2-) when exposed to martian conditions including UV or ionizing radiation [6,7]. Here we investigate the effects of perchlorate on the organic molecules tryptophan, benzoic acid and mellitic acid in order to determine how perchlorate may alter these compounds under Mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV flux found on Mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and each organic, as well as varying concentrations of perchlorate salts, and exposed in the MSC. Subsequent to exposure in the MSC samples are leached and the leachate analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS to determine the degree of degradation of the original organic and the identity of any potential decomposition products formed by oxidation or chlorination. References: [1] Kounaves et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol. 115, p. E00E10, 2010 [2] Glavin et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol

  2. Simultaneous removal of perchlorate and energetic compounds in munitions wastewater by zero-valent iron and perchlorate-respiring bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Hubbard, Brian; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's insensitive melt-pour explosive, PAX-21 in addition to RDX and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The objective of this study is to develop an innovative treatment process to remove both perchlorate and energetic compounds simultaneously from PAX-21 production wastewater. It was hypothesized that the pretreatment of PAX-21 wastewater with zero-valent iron (ZVI) would convert energetic compounds to products that are more amenable for biological oxidation and that these products serve as electron donors for perchlorate-reducing bacteria. Results of batch ZVI reduction experiments showed that DNAN was completely reduced to 2,4-diaminoanisole and RDX was completely reduced to formaldehyde. Anaerobic batch biodegradation experiments showed that perchlorate (30 mg L(-1)) in ZVI-treated PAX-21 wastewater was decreased to an undetectable level after 5 days. Batch biodegradation experiments also confirmed that formaldehyde in ZVI-treated wastewater was the primary electron donor for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. The integrated iron-anaerobic bioreactor system was effective in completely removing energetic compounds and perchlorate from the PAX-21 wastewater without adding an exogenous electron donor. This study demonstrated that ZVI pretreatment not only removed energetic compounds, but also transformed energetic compounds to products that can serve as the source of electrons for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. PMID:24410688

  3. The NAS Perchlorate Review: Adverse Effects?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Richard B.; Corley, Richard; Cowan, Linda; Utiger, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    To the editor: Drs. Ginsberg and Rice argue that the reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg per day recommended by the National Academies’ Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion is not adequately protective. As members of the committee, we disagree. Ginsberg and Rice base their conclusion on three points. The first involves the designation of the point of departure as a NOEL (no-observed-effect level) versus a LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse- effect level). The committee chose as its point of departure a dose of perchlorate (0.007 mg/kg per day) that when given for 14 days to 7 normal subjects did not cause a significant decrease in the group mean thyroid iodide uptake (Greer et al. 2002). Accordingly, the committee considered it a NOEL. Ginsberg and Rice focus on the fact that only 7 subjects were given that dose, and they 1seem to say that attention should be paid only to the results in those subjects in whom there was a 1fall in thyroid iodide uptake, and that the results in those in whom there was no fall or an increase should be ignored. They consider the dose to be a LOAEL because of the fall in uptake in those few subjects. It is important to note that a statistically significant decrease of, for example, 5% or even 10%, would not be biologically important and, more important, would not be sustained. For example, in another study (Braverman et al. 2004), administration of 0.04 mg/kg per day to normal subjects for 6 months had no effect on thyroid iodide uptake when measured at 3 and 6 months, and no effect on serum thyroid hormone or thyrotropin concentrations measured monthly (inspection of Figure 5A in the paper by Greer et al. suggests that this dose would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake by about 25% if measured at 2 weeks). The second issue involves database uncertainty. In clinical studies, perchlorate has been administered prospectively to 68 normal subjects for 2 weeks to 6 months. In one study (Brabant et al. 1992

  4. Behavioral response of dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yvonne; Gustavson, Ruth L; Ali, Nadia; Weber, Karrie A; Westphal, Lacey L; Coates, John D

    2009-10-01

    The response behavior of three dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors (nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate) was investigated with two different assays. The observed response was species-specific, dependent on the prior growth conditions, and was inhibited by oxygen. We observed attraction toward nitrate when Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB and Azospira suillum strain PS were grown with nitrate. When D. aromatica and Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB were grown with perchlorate, both responded to nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate. When A. suillum was grown with perchlorate, the organism responded to chlorate and perchlorate but not nitrate. A gene replacement mutant in the perchlorate reductase subunit (pcrA) of D. aromatica resulted in a loss of the attraction response toward perchlorate but had no impact on the nitrate response. Washed-cell suspension studies revealed that the perchlorate grown cells of D. aromatica reduced both perchlorate and nitrate, while A. suillum cells reduced perchlorate only. Based on these observations, energy taxis was proposed as the underlying mechanism for the responses to (per)chlorate by D. aromatica. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first investigation of the response behavior of perchlorate-reducing bacteria to environmental stimuli. It clearly demonstrates attraction toward chlorine oxyanions and the unique ability of these organisms to distinguish structurally analogous compounds, nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate and respond accordingly. PMID:19533120

  5. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  6. Determination of Perchlorate in Bottled Water from Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Iannece

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Perchlorate is regarded as an emerging persistent inorganic contaminant. It is widely known that perchlorate is an endocrine disruptor as it competitively inhibits iodide transport in the thyroid gland. As drinking water is the major source of human exposure to perchlorate, its occurrence in commercially available bottled waters purchased in different regions of Italy was investigated. Perchlorate was measured using the rapid, sensitive, and selective LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM of the transition 98.8→82.8, which corresponds to the loss of one oxygen atom in the perchlorate ion (ClO4−→ClO3−. The chlorine isotope ratio (35Cl/37Cl was used as a confirmation tool. The limit of quantification (LOQ for this method was 5 ng/L, and the recovery ranged from 94% to 108%. Perchlorate was detected in 44 of the 62 drinking waters tested, with concentrations ranging from <5 to 75 ng/L. These values are similar in magnitude to those reported in drinking water from the USA and do not pose an immediate health concern.

  7. Chemolithotrophic perchlorate reduction linked to the oxidation of elemental sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiumin; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Salazar, Margarita; Bentley, Harold; Bentley, Richard

    2007-04-15

    Perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) contamination of ground and surface water has been recently recognized as a widespread environmental problem. Biological methods offer promising perspectives of perchlorate remediation. Facultative anaerobic bacteria couple the oxidation of organic and inorganic electron-donating substrates to the reduction of perchlorate as a terminal electron acceptor, converting it completely to the benign end-product, chloride. Insoluble inorganic substrates are of interest for low maintenance bioreactor or permeable reactive barrier systems because they can provide a long-term supply of electron donor without generating organic residuals. The main objective of this research was to investigate the feasibility of utilizing elemental sulfur (S(0)) as an insoluble electron donor for the biological reduction of perchlorate. A chemolithotrophic enrichment culture derived from aerobic activated sludge was obtained which effectively coupled the oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfate with the reduction of perchlorate to chloride and gained energy from the process for cell growth. The enrichment culture grew at a rate of 0.41 or 0.81 1/d in the absence and presence of added organic carbon for cell growth, respectively. The enrichment culture was also shown to carry out sulfur disproportionation to a limited extent as evidenced by the formation of sulfide and sulfate in the absence of added electron acceptor. When nitrate and perchlorate were added together, the two electron acceptors were removed simultaneously after an initial partial decrease in the nitrate concentration. PMID:17009322

  8. Study of the discharge ionization of cerium at a solid-paste graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discharge ionization of cerium(3) at a solid-paste graphite electrode was studied by stripping voltametry. The optimal conditions for the concentration and following determination of cerium in 1 x 10-4 - 1 x 10-6 M cerium(3) solutions were found. The conditional constant of cerium(4) reduction to cerium(3) was also calculated

  9. New layered functionalized cerium(IV) phenylphosphonates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melánová, Klára; Beneš, L.; Svoboda, Jan; Zima, Vítězslav; Vlček, Milan

    Lille: European Materials Research Society, 2014. Q.PI-20. [E- MRS 2014 Spring Meeting. 26.05.2014-30.05.2014, Lille] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-13368S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : cerium * layered phosphonates * thermogravimetry Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  10. Oxidation of some disubstituted anisole derivatives with ceric perchlorate in perchloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of concentration of particular reagents on the kinetics of Ce(IV) reduction by 2,6-dimethyl and 3,5-dimethyl-anisole as well as 2-methoxy-5-methyl- and 4-methoxy-2-methyl-aniline in perchloric acid solution was investigated, establishing the stoichiometry of these processes. Some intermediate products - macromolecular, derivatives of p-benzoquinone and 4,4'-diphenoquinone - were separated and identified. The effects of substituents and the conditions of performed oxidation processes on the kind and yields of the resultant products were considered. (author). 22 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Perchlorate in The Great Lakes: Distribution, Isotopic Composition and Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, A.; Sturchio, N. C.; Jackson, W. A.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.; Hatzinger, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrations, stable chlorine and oxygen isotopic compositions, and 36Cl abundances of perchlorate were investigated in the five Laurentian Great Lakes. Samples were collected during monitoring cruises in 2007 and 2008 of the U.S. EPA's RV Lake Guardian and in 2010 at the water supply intake of Marquette, MI on the southern shore of Lake Superior. Concentrations of perchlorate were measured by IC/MS/MS at 24 locations, including one or two depth profiles in each lake. Mean concentrations (μg/L) are: Superior, 0.06 × 0.01; Michigan, 0.10 × 0.01; Huron, 0.11 × 0.01; Erie, 0.08 × 0.01, and Ontario, 0.09 × 0.01. Concentration vs. depth is nearly constant in each lake, indicating well-mixed conditions. Perchlorate was extracted from near-surface water by passing 15,000 to 80,000 L of water through 1-L cartridges containing Purolite A530E bifunctional anion-exchange resin. In the laboratory, perchlorate was eluted from the resin, purified, and precipitated as a >99% pure crystalline phase. Milligram amounts were recovered from each lake. Chlorine and oxygen isotopic analyses were performed at Caltech using the Cameca 7f-GEO SIMS instrument, following validation of the SIMS method with analyses of USGS-37 and USGS-38 isotopic reference materials. Results indicate a relatively narrow range in δ37Cl values (+2.9 to +3.9 ‰) and a wider range in δ18O values (-4.0 to +4.1 ‰), with a general geographic trend of increasing δ18O from west to east. Oxygen-17 was measured at UIC using dual-inlet IRMS of O2 produced by decomposition of KClO4. Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ17O values (+1.6 ‰ to +2.7 ‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7 ‰) and the other four lakes (~ +1.7 ‰). The isotopic data indicate that perchlorate is dominantly of natural origin, having stable isotopic compositions resembling those of perchlorate from pre-industrial groundwaters in the western USA. The 36Cl

  12. Perchlorate, iodine supplements, iodized salt and breast milk iodine content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine if increasing maternal iodine intake through single dose tablets will decrease breast milk concentrations of the iodine-uptake inhibitor, perchlorate, through competitive inhibition. We also sought to determine if the timing of supplementation influences the fraction of iodine excreted in milk versus urine and to compare the effectiveness of iodized salt as a means of providing iodine to breastfed infants. Thirteen women who did not use supplements, seven of whom used iodized salt and six of whom used non-iodized salt, submitted four milk samples and a 24-h urine collection daily for three days. Women repeated the sampling protocol for three more days during which ∼ 150 μg of iodine were taken in the evening and again for three days with morning supplementation. Samples were analyzed using isotope-dilution inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for iodine and isotope-dilution ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for perchlorate. No statistically significant differences were observed in milk iodine or perchlorate concentrations during the two treatment periods. Estimated perchlorate intake was above the U.S. National Academy of Sciences suggested reference dose for most infants. Single daily dose iodine supplementation was not effective in decreasing milk perchlorate concentrations. Users of iodized salt had significantly higher iodine levels in milk than non-users. Iodized salt may be a more effective means of iodine supplementation than tablets. - Highlights: ► Estimated infant exposures to perchlorate were, on a μg/kg basis, ∼ 5 × higher than those of mothers. ► Daily supplements are less effective than iodized salt in providing iodine to lactating women. ► Low iodine and high perchlorate in milk may place infants at risk of iodine deficiency.

  13. Perchlorate, iodine supplements, iodized salt and breast milk iodine content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Andrea B. [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Sciences Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Kroll, Martina; Dyke, Jason V.; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Dias, Rukshan A.; Dasgupta, Purnendu K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 700 Planetarium Place, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    This study was undertaken to determine if increasing maternal iodine intake through single dose tablets will decrease breast milk concentrations of the iodine-uptake inhibitor, perchlorate, through competitive inhibition. We also sought to determine if the timing of supplementation influences the fraction of iodine excreted in milk versus urine and to compare the effectiveness of iodized salt as a means of providing iodine to breastfed infants. Thirteen women who did not use supplements, seven of whom used iodized salt and six of whom used non-iodized salt, submitted four milk samples and a 24-h urine collection daily for three days. Women repeated the sampling protocol for three more days during which {approx} 150 {mu}g of iodine were taken in the evening and again for three days with morning supplementation. Samples were analyzed using isotope-dilution inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for iodine and isotope-dilution ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for perchlorate. No statistically significant differences were observed in milk iodine or perchlorate concentrations during the two treatment periods. Estimated perchlorate intake was above the U.S. National Academy of Sciences suggested reference dose for most infants. Single daily dose iodine supplementation was not effective in decreasing milk perchlorate concentrations. Users of iodized salt had significantly higher iodine levels in milk than non-users. Iodized salt may be a more effective means of iodine supplementation than tablets. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated infant exposures to perchlorate were, on a {mu}g/kg basis, {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign higher than those of mothers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daily supplements are less effective than iodized salt in providing iodine to lactating women. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low iodine and high perchlorate in milk may place infants at risk of iodine deficiency.

  14. Uptake and accumulation of bulk and nanosized cerium oxide particles and ionic cerium by radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weilan; Ebbs, Stephen D; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Gao, Cunmei; Ma, Xingmao

    2015-01-21

    The potential toxicity and accumulation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in agricultural crops has become an area of great concern and intense investigation. Interestingly, although below-ground vegetables are most likely to accumulate the highest concentrations of ENMs, little work has been done investigating the potential uptake and accumulation of ENMs for this plant group. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate how different forms of cerium (bulk cerium oxide, cerium oxide nanoparticles, and the cerium ion) affected the growth of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and accumulation of cerium in radish tissues. Ionic cerium (Ce(3+)) had a negative effect on radish growth at 10 mg CeCl3/L, whereas bulk cerium oxide (CeO2) enhanced plant biomass at the same concentration. Treatment with 10 mg/L cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) had no significant effect on radish growth. Exposure to all forms of cerium resulted in the accumulation of this element in radish tissues, including the edible storage root. However, the accumulation patterns and their effect on plant growth and physiological processes varied with the characteristics of cerium. This study provides a critical frame of reference on the effects of CeO2 NPs versus their bulk and ionic counterparts on radish growth. PMID:25531028

  15. Developmental exposure to perchlorate alters synaptic transmission in hippocampus of the adult rat: in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate, a contaminant found in food and water supplies throughout the USA, blocks iodine uptake into the thyroid gland to reduce circulating levels of thyroid hormone. Neurological function accompanying developmental exposure to perchlorate was evaluated in the present study...

  16. Chlorine isotopic composition of perchlorate in human urine as a means of distinguishing among exposure sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Armen; Morel-Espinosa, Maria; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C; Ferreccio, Catterina; Steinmaus, Craig M; Sturchio, Neil C

    2016-05-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant with high human exposure potential. Natural perchlorate forms in the atmosphere from where it deposits onto the surface of Earth, whereas synthetic perchlorate is manufactured as an oxidant for industrial, aerospace, and military applications. Perchlorate exposure can potentially cause adverse health effects in humans by interfering with the production of thyroid hormones through competitively blocking iodide uptake. To control and reduce perchlorate exposure, the contributions of different sources of perchlorate exposure need to be quantified. Thus, we demonstrate a novel approach for determining the contribution of different perchlorate exposure sources by quantifying stable and radioactive chlorine isotopes of perchlorate extracted from composite urine samples from two distinct populations: one in Atlanta, USA and one in Taltal, Chile (Atacama region). Urinary perchlorate from the Atlanta region resembles indigenous natural perchlorate from the western USA (δ(37)Cl=+4.1±1.0‰; (36)Cl/Cl=1 811 (±136) × 10(-15)), and urinary perchlorate from the Taltal, Chile region is similar to natural perchlorate in nitrate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert of northern Chile (δ(37)Cl=-11.0±1.0‰; (36)Cl/Cl=254 (±40) × 10(-15)). Neither urinary perchlorate resembled the isotopic pattern found in synthetic perchlorate. These results indicate that natural perchlorate of regional provenance is the dominant exposure source for the two sample populations, and that chlorine isotope ratios provide a robust tool for elucidating perchlorate exposure pathways. PMID:25805252

  17. Thermodynamic studies in the system cerium-gadolinium-oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two independent measuring methods have been applied to studying the phase relations of the system cerium-gadolinium. The calorimetric measurements have been done in a high-temperature calorimeter with cerium dioxide doped with 10 mole % of Gd2O3. Further thermodynamic quantities have been obtained by the electrochemical method and e.m.f. measurements, yielding additional information on disorders in doped cerium dioxide. (orig./BBR)

  18. Aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residuals: A novel sorbent for perchlorate removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate contamination of aquifers and drinking-water supplies has led to stringent regulations in several states to reduce perchlorate concentrations in water at acceptable levels for human consumption. Several perchlorate treatment technologies exist, but there is significant cost associated with their use, and the majority of them are unable to degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. We propose the use of a novel sorbent for perchlorate, i.e. an aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residual (Al-WTR), which is a by-product of the drinking-water treatment process. Perchlorate sorption isotherms (23 ± 1 oC) showed that the greatest amount (65%) of perchlorate removed by the Al-WTR was observed with the lowest initial perchlorate load (10 mg L-1) after only 2 h of contact time. Increasing the contact time to 24 h, perchlorate removal increased from 65 to 76%. A significant correlation was observed between the amounts of perchlorate removed with evolved chloride in solution, suggesting degradation of perchlorate to chloride. - Drinking-water treatment residuals are a low-cost sorbent for perchlorate

  19. Electrochemical reduction of cerium oxide into metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fray Farthing and Chen (FFC) and Ono and Suzuki (OS) processes were developed for the reduction of titanium oxide to titanium metal by electrolysis in high temperature molten alkali chloride salts. The possible transposition to CeO2 reduction is considered in this study. Present work clarifies, by electro-analytical techniques, the reduction pathway leading to the metal. The reduction of CeO2 into metal was feasible via an indirect mechanism. Electrolyses on 10 g of CeO2 were carried out to evaluate the electrochemical process efficiency. Ca metal is electrodeposited at the cathode from CaCl2-KCl solvent and reacts chemically with ceria to form not only metallic cerium, but also cerium oxychloride.

  20. Electrochemical reduction of cerium oxide into metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claux, Benoit [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Universite de Grenoble, LEPMI-ENSEEG, 1130 rue de la Piscine, BP75, F-38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Serp, Jerome, E-mail: jerome.serp@cea.f [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Fouletier, Jacques [Universite de Grenoble, LEPMI-ENSEEG, 1130 rue de la Piscine, BP75, F-38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)

    2011-02-28

    The Fray Farthing and Chen (FFC) and Ono and Suzuki (OS) processes were developed for the reduction of titanium oxide to titanium metal by electrolysis in high temperature molten alkali chloride salts. The possible transposition to CeO{sub 2} reduction is considered in this study. Present work clarifies, by electro-analytical techniques, the reduction pathway leading to the metal. The reduction of CeO{sub 2} into metal was feasible via an indirect mechanism. Electrolyses on 10 g of CeO{sub 2} were carried out to evaluate the electrochemical process efficiency. Ca metal is electrodeposited at the cathode from CaCl{sub 2}-KCl solvent and reacts chemically with ceria to form not only metallic cerium, but also cerium oxychloride.

  1. Cerium and jojoba in engines?; Cerium et jojoba dans les moteurs?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massy-Delhotel, E.

    1996-10-01

    The Belgium company CreaTel proposes a new system, called Forac, which can lead to a 10% reduction of fuel consumption in thermal engines together with a quasi-complete reduction of CO, HC, NOx pollutants and CO{sub 2} particulates emission. The system comprises a steam production device and an admission pipe with a cerium alloy whorl inside. The steam produced is mixed with the admission air and tears cerium particles from the inside of the admission pipe to the combustion chamber. The cerium particles act as a catalyst which favours the complete combustion of the fuel. The same company proposes also lubricant additives made from liquid jojoba wax which allow the reduction of pollutant emissions, fuel consumption and noise emissions of diesel engines. (J.S.)

  2. Interaction between perchlorate and iodine in the metamorphosis of Hyla versicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparling, D.W.; Harvey, G.; Nzengung, V.

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a water-soluble, inorganic anion that is often combined with ammonium, potassium or other cations for use in industry and agriculture. Ammonium perchlorate, for example, is a potent oxidizer and is used in various military applications including rocket fuel. It has also been found in an historically widely used fertilizer, Chilean nitrate and in other fertilizers. It has been found in ground and surface waters of over 30 states and is considered a human health risk. Because of its similar atomic radius and volume, perchlorate competes with iodide for thyroid uptake and storage and thereby inhibits production of thyroid hormones. Amphibians may be particularly affected by perchlorate because they rely on the thyroid for metamorphosis. This study exposed early larval Hyla versicolor to concentrations of perchlorate ranging from 2.2 to 50 ppm to determine the effects of perchlorate on a native amphibian. In addition, three controls, 0 perchlorate, 0 perchlorate with 0.10 ppm iodide (C + I) and 50 ppm perchlorate + 0.10 ppm iodide (50 + I) were tested. Mortality (metamorphosis. The estimated EC50 for total inhibition of metamorphosis at 70 days of treatment was 3.63 ppm. There was no evidence of inhibition of development with the 50 + I, C + I, or controls, indicating that the presence of small concentrations of iodide could counter the effects of perchlorate. When tadpoles that had been inhibited by perchlorate were subsequently treated with iodide, development through prometamorphosis progressed but mortality was very high.

  3. Competitive microbial reduction of perchlorate and nitrate with a cathode directly serving as the electron donor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial reduction of perchlorate with an electrode as the electron donor represents an emerging technology for remediation of perchlorate contamination; it is important to know how perchlorate reduction behaves when nitrate, a co-contaminant of perchlorate is present. We reported that electrons derived from the electrode can be directly transferred to the bacteria with perchlorate or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. The presence of nitrate, even at the 0.07 mM level, can slow reduction of perchlorate (0.70 mM) as a poised potential of -0.50 V (vs. SCE) was applied to the inoculated cathode. Increasing the concentration of nitrate resulted in a noticeable inhibitory effect on perchlorate reduction. When the nitrate concentration was 2.10 mM, reduction of 0.70 mM perchlorate was totally inhibited. Bacterial community analyses based on 16S rDNA gene analysis with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed that most of the bacteria newly enriched on the nitrate and/or perchlorate biocathodes were the known electrochemically active denitrifiers, which possibly prefer to reduce nitrate over perchlorate. These results show that nitrate is a more favorable electron acceptor than perchlorate in the bioelectrochemical system where the cathode directly serves as the electron donor

  4. Structural, optical, morphological and dielectric properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation method. The average crystallite size of cerium oxide nanoparticles was calculated from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and found to be 11 nm. The FT-IR spectrum clearly indicated the strong presence of cerium oxide nanoparticles. Raman spectrum confirmed the cubic nature of the cerium oxide nanoparticles. The Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the nanoparticles agglomerated forming spherical-shaped particles. The Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM) analysis confirmed the prepared cerium oxide nanoparticles with the particle size being found to be 16 nm. The optical absorption spectrum showed a blue shift by the cerium oxide nanoparticles due to the quantum confinement effect. The dielectric properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles were studied for different frequencies at different temperatures. The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss of the cerium oxide nanoparticles decreased with increase in frequency. The AC electrical conductivity study revealed that the conduction depended on both the frequency and the temperature. (author)

  5. Structural, optical, morphological and dielectric properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabaharan, Devadoss Mangalam Durai Manoharadoss [Department of Physics, NPR College of Engineering and Technology, Natham, Dindigul, Tamil Nadu (India); Sadaiyandi, Karuppasamy [Department of Physics, Alagappa Government Arts College, Karaikudi, Sivaganga, Tamil Nadu (India); Mahendran, Manickam [Department of Physics, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai, Tamil Nadu (India); Sagadevan, Suresh, E-mail: duraiphysics2011@gmail.com [Department of Physics, AMET University (India)

    2016-03-15

    Cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation method. The average crystallite size of cerium oxide nanoparticles was calculated from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and found to be 11 nm. The FT-IR spectrum clearly indicated the strong presence of cerium oxide nanoparticles. Raman spectrum confirmed the cubic nature of the cerium oxide nanoparticles. The Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the nanoparticles agglomerated forming spherical-shaped particles. The Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM) analysis confirmed the prepared cerium oxide nanoparticles with the particle size being found to be 16 nm. The optical absorption spectrum showed a blue shift by the cerium oxide nanoparticles due to the quantum confinement effect. The dielectric properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles were studied for different frequencies at different temperatures. The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss of the cerium oxide nanoparticles decreased with increase in frequency. The AC electrical conductivity study revealed that the conduction depended on both the frequency and the temperature. (author)

  6. Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil

    OpenAIRE

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Dennis E. Rolston; Hristova, Krassimira R.; Scow, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared to unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting the PRB preferentially ...

  7. Radiation induced color centers in cerium-doped and cerium-free multicomponent silicate glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅鑫杰; 宋力昕; 李家成

    2014-01-01

    The effect of doped cerium on the radiation-resistance behavior of silicate glass was investigated in our work. The ultra-violet-visible absorption spectra and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra were obtained after the cerium-rich and ce-rium-free multicomponent silicate glasses (K509 and K9) were irradiated by gamma rays with a dose range from 10 to 1000 kGy. The results showed that E’ center, oxygen deficient center (ODC) and non-bridging oxygen hole center (HC1 and HC2) were induced in K9 and K509 glasses after radiation. The concentrations of all color centers presented an exponential growth with the increase of the gamma dose. Moreover, the concentration of HC1 and HC2 in cerium-doped K509 glass was much lower than that in cerium-free K9 glass at the same dose of radiation, which could be attributed to the following mechanism:Ce3+ions capturing holes then forming Ce3++centers inhibited the formation of hole trapped color centers (HC1 and HC2) and Ce4+ions capturing electrons to form Ce3+centers suppressed the formation of electron trapped color centers like E’ center.

  8. Branched polymeric media: Perchlorate-selective resins from hyperbranched polyethyleneimine

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Dennis P.

    2012-10-02

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is a persistent contaminant found in drinking groundwater sources in the United States. Ion exchange (IX) with selective and disposable resins based on cross-linked styrene divinylbenzene (STY-DVB) beads is currently the most commonly utilized process for removing low concentrations of ClO4 - (10-100 ppb) from contaminated drinking water sources. However, due to the low exchange capacity of perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins (∼0.5-0.8 eq/L), the overall cost becomes prohibitive when treating groundwater with higher concentration of ClO4 - (e.g., 100-1000 ppb). In this article, we describe a new perchlorate-selective resin with high exchange capacity. This new resin was prepared by alkylation of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) beads obtained from an inverse suspension polymerization process. Batch and column studies show that our new PEI resin with mixed hexyl/ethyl quaternary ammonium chloride exchange sites can selectively extract trace amounts of ClO4 - from a makeup groundwater (to below detection limit) in the presence of competing ions. In addition, this resin has a strong-base exchange capacity of 1.4 eq/L, which is 1.75-2.33 times larger than those of commercial perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins. The overall results of our studies suggest that branched PEI beads provide versatile and promising building blocks for the preparation of perchlorate-selective resins with high exchange capacity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  9. Sample processing method for the determination of perchlorate in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, many different water sources and foods have been reported to contain perchlorate. Studies indicate that significant levels of perchlorate are present in both human and dairy milk. The determination of perchlorate in milk is particularly important due to its potential health impact on infants and children. As for many other biological samples, sample preparation is more time consuming than the analysis itself. The concurrent presence of large amounts of fats, proteins, carbohydrates, etc., demands some initial cleanup; otherwise the separation column lifetime and the limit of detection are both greatly compromised. Reported milk processing methods require the addition of chemicals such as ethanol, acetic acid or acetonitrile. Reagent addition is undesirable in trace analysis. We report here an essentially reagent-free sample preparation method for the determination of perchlorate in milk. Milk samples are spiked with isotopically labeled perchlorate and centrifuged to remove lipids. The resulting liquid is placed in a disposable centrifugal ultrafilter device with a molecular weight cutoff of 10 kDa, and centrifuged. Approximately 5-10 ml of clear liquid, ready for analysis, is obtained from a 20 ml milk sample. Both bovine and human milk samples have been successfully processed and analyzed by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry (IC-MS). Standard addition experiments show good recoveries. The repeatability of the analytical result for the same sample in multiple sample cleanup runs ranged from 3 to 6% R.S.D. This processing technique has also been successfully applied for the determination of iodide and thiocyanate in milk

  10. Ultrathin, epitaxial cerium dioxide on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that ultrathin, highly ordered, continuous films of cerium dioxide may be prepared on silicon following substrate prepassivation using an atomic layer of chlorine. The as-deposited, few-nanometer-thin Ce2O3 film may very effectively be converted at room temperature to almost fully oxidized CeO2 by simple exposure to air, as demonstrated by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. This post-oxidation process essentially results in a negligible loss in film crystallinity and interface abruptness

  11. Ultrathin, epitaxial cerium dioxide on silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Flege, Jan Ingo; Kaemena, Björn; Höcker, Jan; Bertram, Florian; Wollschläger, Joachim; Schmidt, Thomas; Falta, Jens

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that ultrathin, highly ordered, continuous films of cerium dioxide may be prepared on silicon following substrate prepassivation using an atomic layer of chlorine. The as-deposited, few-nanometer-thin Ce2O3 film may very effectively be converted at room temperature to almost fully oxidized CeO2 by simple exposure to air, as demonstrated by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. This post-oxidation process essentially results in a negligible loss in film cryst...

  12. Radiative lifetimes of singly ionized cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative lifetimes accurate to ±5% have been measured for 74 levels in Ce II using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow beam of cerium ions. The 17 odd-parity and 57 even-parity levels studied here lie in the energy range 24 000-36 000 cm-1. This new set of lifetimes in Ce II is substantially more extensive than previously published sets, to which a detailed comparison is made. The present lifetime results will provide the absolute calibration for a very large set of measured transition probabilities for Ce II. These are needed for research in astrophysics and lighting

  13. Radiative lifetimes of singly ionized cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartog, E A Den; Lawler, J E [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)], E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu

    2008-02-28

    Radiative lifetimes accurate to {+-}5% have been measured for 74 levels in Ce II using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow beam of cerium ions. The 17 odd-parity and 57 even-parity levels studied here lie in the energy range 24 000-36 000 cm{sup -1}. This new set of lifetimes in Ce II is substantially more extensive than previously published sets, to which a detailed comparison is made. The present lifetime results will provide the absolute calibration for a very large set of measured transition probabilities for Ce II. These are needed for research in astrophysics and lighting.

  14. Crystal structure of cerium(4) - dicesium trisulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium(4) - dicesium trisulfate is investigated by the X-ray diffraction method. Parameters of a monoclinic cell equal: a = 9.772(2), b = 16.797(2), c = 14.812(1)A, β 96.40(1), sp.gr. P21. The structure is formed by interchanging of anion [Ce4(SO4)128-]∞ and cation (Cs+) layers arranged parallel (101). Atoms Ce and Cs are arranged according to the law of a cubic close packing. Coordination polyhedron Ce1 and Ce2 is the two-hat trigonal prism, nine vertices Ce3 and Ce4 are one-hat antiprism

  15. Perchlorate exposure in lactating women in an urban community in New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate is most widely known as a solid oxidant for missile and rocket propulsion systems although it is also present as a trace contaminant in some fertilizers. It has been detected in drinking water, fruits, and vegetables throughout New Jersey and most of the United States. At sufficiently high doses, perchlorate interferes with the uptake of iodine into the thyroid and may interfere with the development of the skeletal system and the central nervous system of infants. Therefore, it is important to quantify perchlorate in breast milk to understand potential perchlorate exposure in infants. In this study we measured perchlorate in breast milk, urine, and drinking water collected from 106 lactating mothers from Central New Jersey. Each subject was asked to provide three sets of samples over a 3-month period. The average ± SD perchlorate level in drinking water, breast milk, and urine was 0.168 ± 0.132 ng/mL (n = 253), 6.80 ± 8.76 ng/mL (n = 276), and 3.19 ± 3.64 ng/mL (3.51 ± 6.79 μg/g creatinine) (n = 273), respectively. Urinary perchlorate levels were lower than reference range values for women of reproductive age (5.16 ± 11.33 μg/g creatinine, p = 0.03), likely because of perchlorate secretion in breast milk. Drinking water perchlorate levels were ≤ 1.05 ng/mL and were not positively correlated with either breast milk or urine perchlorate levels. These findings together suggest that drinking water was not the most important perchlorate exposure source for these women. Creatinine-adjusted urine perchlorate levels were strongly correlated with breast milk perchlorate levels (r = 0.626, p = < 0.0005). Breast milk perchlorate levels in this study are consistent with widespread perchlorate exposure in lactating women and thus infants. This suggests that breast milk may be a source of exposure to perchlorate in infants. - Research Highlights: → The general population, including infants, is exposed to perchlorate. → Breast milk is a significant

  16. Inhibition of perchlorate reduction by nitrate in a fixed biofilm reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate and nitrate were reduced simultaneously in fixed biofilm reactors. Reduction of 1000 μg L-1 perchlorate decreased slightly with the addition of 10-16 mg L-1 NO3-N when excess acetate was supplied while denitrification was complete. When influent acetate was reduced by 50% to well below the stoichiometric requirement, perchlorate reduction decreased by 70% while denitrification decreased by only 20%, suggesting that competition for electrons by nitrate was a factor in inhibition. Reduction of nitrate was favored over perchlorate, even though reactor biofilm had been enriched under perchlorate-reducing conditions for 10 months. When excess acetate was restored, perchlorate and nitrate returned to initial levels. The average most probable numbers of perchlorate- and nitrate-reducing bacteria during excess substrate operation were not significantly different and ranged between 2.0 x 105 and 7.9 x 105 cells cm-2 media surface area. The effect of nitrate on chloride generation by suspensions of perchlorate-reducing populations was studied using a chloride ion probe. The rate of reduction of 2 mM perchlorate decreased by 30% in the presence of 2 mM nitrate when excess acetate was added. When acetate was limited, perchlorate reduction decreased by 70% in the presence of equi-molar nitrate

  17. Detection of Perchlorate Anion on Functionalized Silver Colloids Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tio, J.; Wang, W.; Gu, B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate anion interferes with the uptake of iodide by the human thyroid gland and consequently disrupts the regulation of metabolism. Chronic exposure to high levels of perchlorate may lead to the formation of thyroid gland tumors. Although the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not set a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for perchlorate, a draft drinking water range of 4-18 ppb based on 2 liter daily consumption of water has been established. The current EPA approved method for detecting perchlorate uses ion chromatography which has a detection limit of ~1ppb and involves lengthy analytical time in the laboratory. A unique combination of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect and the bifunctional anion exchange resin’s high selectivity may provide an alternative way to detect perchlorate at such low concentrations and with high specificity. SERS, which uses laser excitation of adsorbed perchlorate anions on silver nanoparticles, has been shown to detect perchlorate anions at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. Normal micro-Raman analysis of perchlorate sorbed onto the resin beads has detected an even lower concentration of 10 ppb. In an effort to integrate these two effects, silver nanoparticles were coated with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride, a functional group similar to that found on the resin bead, and subsequently inserted into different perchlorate concentration environments. This method has resulted in perchlorate detection down to ~10 ppb and a more consistent detection of perchlorate anion at ~50 ppb than that of earlier methods. As suggested by the direct insertion of functionalized silver colloids into perchlorate samples, this technique may potentially allow for the development of a probe using on-site Raman spectrometry to detect significantly low concentrations of perchlorate in situ rather than in the laboratory.

  18. Sensitivity and adaptability of methanogens to perchlorates: Implications for life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Goodhart, Timothy H.; Harpool, Joshua D.; Hearnsberger, Christopher E.; McCracken, Graham L.; McSpadden, Stanley W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander discovered perchlorate at its landing site, and in 2012, the Curiosity rover confirmed the presence of perchlorate on Mars. The research reported here was designed to determine if certain methanogens could grow in the presence of three different perchlorate salt solutions. The methanogens tested were Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanococcus maripaludis. Media were prepared containing 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2%, 5% and 10% wt/vol magnesium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate, or calcium perchlorate. Organisms were inoculated into their respective media followed by incubation at each organism's growth temperature. Methane production, commonly used to measure methanogen growth, was measured by gas chromatography of headspace gas samples. Methane concentrations varied with species and perchlorate salt tested. However, all four methanogens produced substantial levels of methane in the presence of up to 1.0% perchlorate, but not higher. The standard procedure for growing methanogens typically includes sodium sulfide, a reducing agent, to reduce residual molecular oxygen. However, the sodium sulfide may have been reducing the perchlorate, thus allowing for growth of the methanogens. To investigate this possibility, experiments were conducted where stainless steel nails were used instead of sodium sulfide as the reducing agent. Prior to the addition of perchlorate and inoculation, the nails were removed from the liquid medium. Just as in the prior experiments, the methanogens produced methane at comparable levels to those seen with sodium sulfide as the reductant, indicating that sodium sulfide did not reduce the perchlorate to any significant extent. Additionally, cells metabolizing in 1% perchlorate were transferred to 2%, cells metabolizing in 2% were transferred to 5%, and finally cells metabolizing in 5% were transferred to 10%. All four species produced methane at 2% and 5%, but not 10

  19. Relative source contributions for perchlorate exposures in a lactating human cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Andrea B. [University of North Texas Health Sciences Center (United States); Dyke, Jason V. [University of Texas at Arlington (United States); Ohira, Shin-Ichi [Kumamoto University (Japan); Dasgupta, Purnendu K., E-mail: Dasgupta@uta.edu [University of Texas at Arlington (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Perchlorate is an iodine-uptake inhibitor and common contaminant of food and drinking water. Understanding the amount of perchlorate exposure occurring through non-water sources is essential for accurate estimates of human exposure levels, and establishment of drinking water limits for this pervasive contaminant. The study objective was to determine the amount of perchlorate intake derived from diet rather than water. Subjects provided drinking water samples, detailed fluid-intake records, 24 h urine collections and four milk samples for nine days. Samples were analyzed for perchlorate by isotope dilution ion chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Amounts of perchlorate derived from drinking water and dietary sources were calculated for each individual. Water of local origin was found to contribute a minor fraction of perchlorate intake. Estimated fraction intake from drinking water ranged from 0 to 36%. The mean and median dose of perchlorate derived from non-water sources by lactating women was 0.18 μg/kg/day (range: 0.06 to 0.36 μg/kg/day.) Lactating women consumed more fluid (mean 2.424 L/day) than has been assumed in recent risk assessments for perchlorate. The data reported here indicate that lactating women may be exposed to perchlorate through dietary sources at markedly higher levels than estimated previously. Exposures to perchlorate from non-water sources may be higher than recent estimates, including those used to develop drinking water standards. - Highlights: ► Residence in an area with perchlorate-contaminated water may be a poor predictor of exposure. ► Exposures to perchlorate from food are likely underestimated. ► The relative contributions for human perchlorate exposures should be weighted more heavily towards non-water sources.

  20. Relative source contributions for perchlorate exposures in a lactating human cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate is an iodine-uptake inhibitor and common contaminant of food and drinking water. Understanding the amount of perchlorate exposure occurring through non-water sources is essential for accurate estimates of human exposure levels, and establishment of drinking water limits for this pervasive contaminant. The study objective was to determine the amount of perchlorate intake derived from diet rather than water. Subjects provided drinking water samples, detailed fluid-intake records, 24 h urine collections and four milk samples for nine days. Samples were analyzed for perchlorate by isotope dilution ion chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Amounts of perchlorate derived from drinking water and dietary sources were calculated for each individual. Water of local origin was found to contribute a minor fraction of perchlorate intake. Estimated fraction intake from drinking water ranged from 0 to 36%. The mean and median dose of perchlorate derived from non-water sources by lactating women was 0.18 μg/kg/day (range: 0.06 to 0.36 μg/kg/day.) Lactating women consumed more fluid (mean 2.424 L/day) than has been assumed in recent risk assessments for perchlorate. The data reported here indicate that lactating women may be exposed to perchlorate through dietary sources at markedly higher levels than estimated previously. Exposures to perchlorate from non-water sources may be higher than recent estimates, including those used to develop drinking water standards. - Highlights: ► Residence in an area with perchlorate-contaminated water may be a poor predictor of exposure. ► Exposures to perchlorate from food are likely underestimated. ► The relative contributions for human perchlorate exposures should be weighted more heavily towards non-water sources

  1. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)). PMID:27035210

  2. Low soluble cerium compounds in salt melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of cerium tungstate NaCe(WO4)2 and cerium phosphate Na3Ce2(PO4)3 in high-temperature salt melts has been investigated. The solubility in the NaCe(WO4)2-NaWO4-NaCl(1) and Na3Ce2(PO4)3-Na2WO4-NaCl(2) systems at 700-800 deg C has been studied. It is shown, that with the increase of the Na2WO4 part in systems (1), (2) the solubility increases in the following way: for NaCe(WO4)2 from 1.3x10-3 m in NaCl melt to 4.9x10-3 m in NaWO4 melt, for Na3Ce2(PO4)3 from 0.4x10-3 m in NaCl melt to 5.7x10-3 m in NaWO4 melt. With an increase in the Na2WO4 part in system (2) the formation of a new phase - NaCe(WO4)2 is observed. The melting enthalpy of NaCe(WO4)2 is 19+-3 kJ/mol

  3. Isotopic tracing of perchlorate sources in groundwater from Pomona, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Isotopic analysis of groundwater perchlorate can provide source identification. • Citrus cultivation in Pomona, CA caused perchlorate contamination of groundwater. • Hydrologic modeling and mass balance support interpretation of perchlorate source. - Abstract: The groundwater of Pomona, California, is contaminated with perchlorate (ClO4-). This water is treated to reduce the ClO4- concentration to less than 6 μg L−1 for compliance with California Department of Public Health drinking water regulations. A study of the isotopic composition of oxygen and chlorine in ClO4- has been conducted to determine the source of the contamination. Isotopic compositions were measured for ClO4- samples extracted from 14 wells, yielding ranges of δ18O values from −10.8‰ to −8.0‰, Δ17O values from +4.6‰ to +7.5‰, and δ37Cl values from −12.8‰ to −8.9‰. Evaluation of mixing proportions using published isotopic data for three ClO4- end-members (synthetic, Atacama, and indigenous natural ClO4-) indicates that contamination is dominantly (85–89%) Atacama ClO4- derived from past use of imported Chilean nitrate fertilizer in citrus cultivation. This interpretation is consistent with (1) aerial photography archives showing extensive citrus fields surrounding Pomona in the early- to mid-20th century, (2) mass-balance estimates for ClO4-, and (3) numerical hydrologic models yielding travel-times for ClO4- from fields to wells that are in the range of 15 to >100 years. The hydrologic models predict that ClO4- contamination of Pomona groundwater will persist for decades into the future

  4. 4-(2-Azaniumylethylpiperazin-1-ium bis(perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Reisi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C6H17N32+·2ClO4−, the piperazine ring adopts a chair conformation with the ethylammonium fragment occupying an equatorial position. In the crystal, the dications and perchlorate anions are linked through N—H...O hydrogen bonding and weak C—H...O hydrogen bonding into a three-dimensional supramolecular network.

  5. Genetic Factors That Might Lead to Different Responses in Individuals Exposed to Perchlorate

    OpenAIRE

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H. Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell–surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant wome...

  6. Purification and Characterization of (Per)Chlorate Reductase from the Chlorate-Respiring Strain GR-1

    OpenAIRE

    Kengen, Servé W. M.; Rikken, Geoffrey B.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; van Ginkel, Cees G.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    1999-01-01

    Strain GR-1 is one of several recently isolated bacterial species that are able to respire by using chlorate or perchlorate as the terminal electron acceptor. The organism performs a complete reduction of chlorate or perchlorate to chloride and oxygen, with the intermediate formation of chlorite. This study describes the purification and characterization of the key enzyme of the reductive pathway, the chlorate and perchlorate reductase. A single enzyme was found to catalyze both the chlorate-...

  7. Transposon and Deletion Mutagenesis of Genes Involved in Perchlorate Reduction in Azospira suillum PS

    OpenAIRE

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Clark, Iain C.; Liao, Annette; Coates, John D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although much work on the biochemistry of the key enzymes of bacterial perchlorate reduction, chlorite dismutase, and perchlorate reductase has been published, understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this metabolism has been somewhat hampered by the lack of a clear model system amenable to genetic manipulation. Using transposon mutagenesis and clean deletions, genes important for perchlorate reduction in Azospira suillum PS have been identified both inside and outside the previo...

  8. Extraction of scandium ions by 1-alkyl-3-methyl-2-pyrazoline-5-ones from perchlorate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of acid and interphase distribution of 1-alkyl-3-methyl-2-pyrazoline-5-ones in the system water-chloroform-perchloric acid are studied. Reagents capable to extract scandium cations from subacid solutions in the presence of perchlorate ions. 1-Alkyl-3-methyl-2-pyrazoline-5-ones stratifies aqueous solutions of perchloric acid into two liquid phase. Scandium ions are concentrated in the lower phase having small volume

  9. Bordoni relaxation and magnetic transformation in cerium and cerium-lanthanum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internal friction in pure cerium and cerium-base alloys with 2.5 and 12 weight percent of lanthanum added at temperature ranging from 4.2 deg up to 77 deg K is described. Amplitude-independent internal friction has been measured with an inverse torsion pendulum with a specimen oscillation frequency of 1-30 hz in vacuum not less than 1.10-5 torr. A temperature of the specimen has been determined with a capacitance-type sensor and a gas gauge. A curve showing the dependence of internal friction upon a temperature of pure cerium has two distinct peaks; the first at 12.5 deg K, the second at 45 deg K. The 12.5 deg K peak is accounted for by a transition of antiferromagnetic β-Ce into a paramagnetic state. The 45 deg K peak is a Bordoni maximum. The paper describes an influence of additions, specimen oscillation frequency variations, deformation and annealing upon the peak behaviour. Added lanthanum reduces not only a peak temperature but a height as well. Studies of the 45 deg K peak have shown that its temperature location depends upon the specimen oscillation frequency. As the frequency increases the peak tends to a range of high temperatures which confirms its relaxation nature

  10. Uranyl ion behaviour in perchloric media and its extraction by TBP CCl/sub 4/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahia, A. (Centre de Developpement des Materiaux, Commissariat aux Energies Nouvelles, Alger (Algeria)); Benali-Baitich, O. (Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), Institut de Chimie, Alger (Algeria))

    The behaviour of uranyl ion in aqueous solution of perchloric acid (O < Cub(HC104) < 13 mol.1/sup -1/) shows that for an acidity higher than 9 mol.1/sup -1/, there is formation of a monoperchlorato complex. The extraction of uranly perchlorate from aqueous perchloric solutions by TBP diluted CC1/sub 4/ as a function of uranium and perchloric acid concentrations enabled us on one hand, to concluded that UO/sub 2//sup + +/ is solvated by 2 TBP molecules, and on the other hand, to determine the composition of the coextracted HC1O/sub 4/ solvated species.

  11. Perchlorate in fish from a contaminated site in east-central Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate, a known thyroid endocrine disruptor, contaminates surface waters near military instillations where solid fuel rocket motors are manufactured or assembled. To assess potential perchlorate exposure to fish and the human population which may feed on them, fish were collected around the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant in McLennan County, TX, and analyzed for the presence of the perchlorate anion. The sampling sites included Lake Waco and Belton Lake, and several streams and rivers within their watersheds. The general tendency was that perchlorate was only found in a few species sampled, and perchlorate was not detected in every individual within these species. When detected in the fish, perchlorate tissue concentrations were greater than that in the water. This may be due to highly variable perchlorate concentrations in the water coupled with individual-level variation in elimination from the body, or to routes of exposure other than water. - In perchlorate-contaminated lakes and streams, perchlorate is detected infrequently in fish heads, fillets, and whole bodies, but may be detected more often depending on species and seasonal trends, and always at concentrations higher in the fish than in the water

  12. Preparing Process of Cerium Acetate and Rare Earth Acetate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao Jun; Ma Ying; Xu Yanhui; Zhang Jun; Chang Shu; Hao Xianku

    2004-01-01

    Preparing process was presented and the influences of concentration of acetic acid, reaction temperature, the ratio of cerium carbonate and acetic acid, heat preservation time to the yield of cerium acetate were discussed.The crystalline cerium acetate and rare earth acetate such as ( La, Ce, Pr, Nd) (Ac) 3, ( Ce, Pr, Nd) (Ac) 3, ( Pr, Nd, Er,Y) (Ac) 3 and yttrium acetate were prepared under this condition.The shape, structure and composition of the crystals were determined by the methods of SEM, TG-DTA, X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis.The optimum prepared conditions of cerium acetate were described.This prepared process has characteristics such as simple process route, low cost, high yield, good quality, no pollution to environment, etc.

  13. Adsorption of Some Hazardous Radionuclides on Cerium(IV) Antimonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium(IV) antimonate had been prepared by the dropwise addition of 0.6 M antimony pentachloride and 0.6 M cerium ammonium nitrate solutions by a molar radio of Ce/Sb 0.75. Exchange isotherms for H+/Co2+ , H+/Cs+, H+/Zn2+ , H+/Sr2+ and H+/Eu3+ have been determined at 25, 40 and 60 degree. Besides it was proved that europium is physically adsorbed while zinc, strontium, cobalt and cesium are chemically adsorbed. Moreover, the heat of adsorption of zinc, strontium, cobalt and cesium on cerium(IV) antimonate had been calculated and indicated that cerium(IV) antimonate is of endothermic behaviour towards these ions. Also the distribution coefficients of these ions were determined and it was found that the selectivity in the order: Eu3+ >Sr2+ > Cs+>Na+

  14. A contribution to the radiologic findings in cerium pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Report on a 69 year old man, who had been employed as photographer in the printing industry and who had been exposed to Cerium for 40 years. The chest X-ray which was performed 9 years after the end of the exposure displayes striate densities of the lungs, which must be considered as a late stage of Cerium-pneumoconiosis. The changes which were found fulfill the code 't 1/0 RO, RM, RU, LO, LM, LU, p 0/1 RO, RM, LO, LM, em, tbu' according to the 'ILO U/C 1971 classification of pneumoconiosis'. The diagnosis could be substantiated by measureing Cerium in the lung parenchyma qualitatively and quantitatively using neutrone activating analysis. The radiolgic findings of the Cerium pneumoconiosis are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Polymer Coated Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Vishal; Shah, Shreya; Shah, Hirsh; Rispoli, Fred J.; McDonnell, Kevin T.; Workeneh, Selam; Karakoti, Ajay; Kumar, Amit; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles have found numerous applications in the biomedical industry due to their strong antioxidant properties. In the current study, we report the influence of nine different physical and chemical parameters: pH, aeration and, concentrations of MgSO4, CaCl2, KCl, natural organic matter, fructose, nanoparticles and Escherichia coli, on the antibacterial activity of dextran coated cerium oxide nanoparticles. A least-squares quadratic regression model was developed to underst...

  16. Cerium intermetallics CeTX. Review III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure-property relationships of CeTX intermetallics with structures other than the ZrNiAl and TiNiSi type are systematically reviewed. These CeTX phases form with electron-poor and electron-rich transition metals (T) and X = Mg, Zn, Cd, Hg, Al, Ga, In, Tl, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, P, As, Sb, and Bi. The review focusses on the crystal chemistry, the chemical bonding peculiarities, and the magnetic and transport properties. Furthermore 119Sn Moessbauer spectroscopic data, high-pressure studies, hydrogenation reactions and the formation of solid solutions are reviewed. This paper is the third of a series of four reviews on equiatomic intermetallic cerium compound [Part I: R. Poettgen, B. Chevalier, Z. Naturforsch. 2015, 70b, 289; Part II: R. Poettgen, B. Chevalier, Z. Naturforsch. 2015, 70b, 695].

  17. Cerium fluoride crystals for calorimetry at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution homogeneous calorimetry is fully justified for part of the physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main design features of proposed CeF3 crystals for calorimetry for LHC are discussed. The severe constraints LHC imposes on detectors make the use of 'classical' crystals impossible. Therefore, a large R and D effort has been undertaken by the 'Crystal Clear' collaboration in order to find new, dense, fast and radiation hard crystals. A good candidate, cerium fluoride, has been identified and studied. It is interesting at this stage to review the specifications of scintillators for LHC and to see how well available data on CeF3 luminescence, decay time, light yield, optical transmission and resistance to radiation meet them. Milestones to reach before starting a large scale crystal production in view of the eventual construction of a calorimeter, are also discussed. (author) 15 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  18. Further results on cerium fluoride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic investigation of the properties of cerium fluoride monocrystals has been performed by the 'Crystal Clear' collaboration in view of a possible use of such crystals for the construction of high precision electromagnetic calorimeters for the future generation of high luminosity accelerators. A large sample of different crystals grown by several producers has been studied. The spectroscopic characteristics, the transmission, luminescence and excitation spectra and the decay time curves are analysed. The light yield of the different crystals is measured with photomultipliers and Si photodiodes and compared to reference standards like BGO and NaI(Tl). The radiation damage behaviour is then presented for γ and neutron irradiations, at different doses and dose rates, including thermal and optical bleaching. (orig.)

  19. Further results on cerium fluoride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.; Auffray, E.; Aziz, T.; Baccaro, S.; Banerjee, S.; Bareyre, P.; Barone, L.E.; Borgia, B.; Boutet, D.; Burq, J.P.; Chemarin, M.; Chipaux, R.; Dafinei, I.; D' Atanasio, P.; De Notaristefani, F.; Dezillie, B.; Dujardin, C.; Dutta, S.; Faure, J.L.; Fay, J.; Ferrere, D.; Francescangeli, O.; Fuchs, B.A.; Ganguli, S.N.; Gillespie, G.; Goyot, M.; Gupta, S.K.; Gurtu, A.; Heck, J.; Herve, A.; Hillemanns, H.; Holdener, F.; Ille, B.; Joensson, L.; Kierstead, J.; Krenz, W.; Kway, W.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lebeau, M.; Lebrun, P.; Lecoq, P.; Lemoigne, Y.; Loomis, G.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Madjar, N.; Majni, G.; El Mamouni, H.; Mangla, S.; Mares, J.A.; Martin, J.P.; Mattioli, M.; Mauger, G.J.; Mazumdar, K.; Mengucci, P.; Merlo, J.P.; Moine, B.; Nikl, N.; Pansart, J.P.; Pedrini, C.; Poinsignon, J.; Polak, K.; Raghavan, R.; Rebourgeard, P.; Rinaldi, D.; Rosa, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Sahuc, P.; Samsonov, V.; Sarkar, S.; Schegelski, V.; Schmitz, D.; Schneegans, M.; Seliverstov, D.; Stoll, S.; Sudhakar, K.; Sven; Crystal Clear Collaboration

    1993-08-15

    A systematic investigation of the properties of cerium fluoride monocrystals has been performed by the 'Crystal Clear' collaboration in view of a possible use of such crystals for the construction of high precision electromagnetic calorimeters for the future generation of high luminosity accelerators. A large sample of different crystals grown by several producers has been studied. The spectroscopic characteristics, the transmission, luminescence and excitation spectra and the decay time curves are analysed. The light yield of the different crystals is measured with photomultipliers and Si photodiodes and compared to reference standards like BGO and NaI(Tl). The radiation damage behaviour is then presented for [gamma] and neutron irradiations, at different doses and dose rates, including thermal and optical bleaching. (orig.)

  20. Mechanical and Thermophysical Properties of Cerium Monopnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Vyoma; Singh, Devraj; Jain, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    The ultrasonic attenuation due to phonon-phonon interaction, thermoelastic relaxation and dislocation damping mechanisms has been investigated in cerium monopnictides CeX (X: N, P, As, Sb and Bi) for longitudinal and shear waves along {linearity parameters, Zener anisotropy, ultrasonic velocity, ultrasonic Grüneisen parameter, thermal relaxation time, acoustic coupling constants and ultrasonic attenuation. The fracture/toughness ratio is less than 1.75, which shows that the chosen materials are brittle in nature as found for other monopnictides. The drag coefficient acting on the motion of screw and edge dislocations due to shear and compressional phonon viscosities of the lattice have also been evaluated for both the longitudinal and shear waves. The thermoelastic loss and dislocation damping loss are negligible in comparison to loss due to Akhieser damping (phonon-phonon interaction). The obtained results for CeX are in qualitative agreement with other semi-metallic monopnictides.

  1. Cerium intermetallics CeTX. Review III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poettgen, Rainer; Janka, Oliver [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Chevalier, Bernard [Bordeaux Univ., Pessac (France). Inst. de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Bordeaux

    2016-05-01

    The structure-property relationships of CeTX intermetallics with structures other than the ZrNiAl and TiNiSi type are systematically reviewed. These CeTX phases form with electron-poor and electron-rich transition metals (T) and X = Mg, Zn, Cd, Hg, Al, Ga, In, Tl, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, P, As, Sb, and Bi. The review focusses on the crystal chemistry, the chemical bonding peculiarities, and the magnetic and transport properties. Furthermore {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopic data, high-pressure studies, hydrogenation reactions and the formation of solid solutions are reviewed. This paper is the third of a series of four reviews on equiatomic intermetallic cerium compound [Part I: R. Poettgen, B. Chevalier, Z. Naturforsch. 2015, 70b, 289; Part II: R. Poettgen, B. Chevalier, Z. Naturforsch. 2015, 70b, 695].

  2. Comparison of Titration ICP and XRF Spectrometry Methods in Determination of Cerium in Lens Polishing Powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three analytical methods in determination of cerium in cerium oxide separated from monazite ore for producing lens polishing powder were compared. These methods are titration ICP and XRF spectrometry techniques. The cerium oxide sample with estimated 45% cerium content needed to be digested and converted into solution before the analysis. The analytical results shown significantly no difference between each method. However, the titration method was found to be more convenient and suitable for quality control in the production of cerium oxide as it does not require standard cerium and the complicated analytical instruments

  3. Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

    2004-12-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular

  4. Perchlorate in the Hydrologic Cycle - An Overview of Sources and Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonestrom, D. A.; Jackson, W.; Mayer, K.; Orris, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) in water and food is of concern due to deleterious health affects associated with hypothyroidism. The presence of widespread perchlorate in 0-to-28 ka-old pristine ground water of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (Plummer et al., 2006, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es051739h), in ground water >1 mile from agricultural activities in the Southern High Plains (Rajagapolan et al., 2006, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es052155i), and in unsaturated zones throughout the arid and semiarid southwestern United States (Rao et al., 2007, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es062853i) clearly indicates that perchlorate is a non-exotic component of the hydrologic cycle, at least in dry environments. The natural system has been greatly perturbed in places by human activities. Most anthropogenic inputs are associated with the manufacture and use of explosives and rocket fuel, providing concentrated sources of excess perchlorate to the hydrologic cycle. Perchlorate-containing fertilizers and irrigation provide dispersed sources within and down-gradient from agricultural areas. Natural sources include photochemically mediated reactions involving ozone at the land surface and in the lower atmosphere. A growing body of work indicates that a small, but persistent, meteoric source acting over thousands of years can explain observed accumulations of unsaturated-zone perchlorate in arid regions. In addition to meteoric sources, oxyanions produced during volcanogenic processes can include appreciable amounts of natural perchlorate. Terrestrial plants take up perchlorate in soil water, with some species of xerophytic succulents concentrating the anion to high levels. Similarly, perchlorate in marine plants indicates that perchlorate is part of marine biochemical cycles. Perchlorate-bearing marine sediments of late Tertiary age suggest that perchlorate has been part of global geochemical cycles for millions of years and, furthermore, can be preserved in the subsurface despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of

  5. Physiological and Genetic Description of Dissimilatory Perchlorate Reduction by the Novel Marine Bacterium Arcobacter sp. Strain CAB

    OpenAIRE

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Wang, Ouwei; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Bauer, Stefan; Lee, Joyce; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacterium (DPRB), Arcobacter sp. strain CAB, was isolated from a marina in Berkeley, CA. Phylogenetically, this halophile was most closely related to Arcobacter defluvii strain SW30-2 and Arcobacter ellisii. With acetate as the electron donor, strain CAB completely reduced perchlorate (ClO4 −) or chlorate (ClO3 −) [collectively designated (per)chlorate] to innocuous chloride (Cl−), likely using the perchlorate reductase (Pcr) and chlorite di...

  6. Bifunctional lanthanum phosphate substrates as novel adsorbents and biocatalyst supports for perchlorate removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, Sasidharan [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Prajeesh, Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil; Anupama, Vijaya Nadaraja [Process Engineering and Environmental Technology Division, CSIR – National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Industrial Estate P.O., Thiruvananthapuram 695019 (India); Krishnakumar, Bhaskaran [Process Engineering and Environmental Technology Division, CSIR – National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Industrial Estate P.O., Thiruvananthapuram 695019 (India); Academy of Scientific and Industrial Research (AcSIR) (India); Hareesh, Padinhattayil [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Nair, Balagopal N. [R and D Centre, Noritake Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan); Warrier, Krishna Gopakumar [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Academy of Scientific and Industrial Research (AcSIR) (India); Hareesh, Unnikrishnan Nair Saraswathy, E-mail: hareesh@niist.res.in [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Academy of Scientific and Industrial Research (AcSIR) (India)

    2014-06-30

    Graphical abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign thermal gelation process, performed the role of dual functional sorbent facilitating perchlorate adsorption and bioremediation through the growth of perchlorate reducing microbial colonies. - Highlights: • Lanthanum phosphate monoliths as efficient perchlorate adsorbents. • And also as substrates for biofilm (perchlorate reducing bacteria) growth. • Environmentally benign thermal gelation process for substrate fabrication. • 98% adsorption efficiency for perchlorate concentrations up to 100 μg/L. • The regenerated monoliths show nearly 100% reusability. - Abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign colloidal forming process employing methyl cellulose, are reported here as excellent adsorbents of perchlorate with >98% efficiency and with 100% reusability. Additionally, the effectiveness of such substrates as biocatalyst supports that facilitate biofilm formation of perchlorate reducing microbes (Serratia marcescens NIIST 5) is also demonstrated for the first time. The adsorption of perchlorate ions is attributed to the pore structure of lanthanum phosphate substrate and the microbial attachment is primarily ascribed to its intrinsic hydrophobic property. Lanthanum phosphate thus emerges as a dual functional material that possesses an integrated adsorption/bioremediation property for the effective removal of ClO{sub 4}{sup −} which is an increasingly important environmental contaminant.

  7. Identification of a Perchlorate Reduction Genomic Island with Novel Regulatory and Metabolic Genes ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Engelbrektson, Anna; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Byrne-Bailey, Kathy; Coates, John D.

    2011-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the genomes of four dissimilatory (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria has revealed a genomic island associated with perchlorate reduction. In addition to the characterized metabolic genes for perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, the island contains multiple conserved uncharacterized genes possibly involved in electron transport and regulation.

  8. Identification of a perchlorate reduction genomic island with novel regulatory and metabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Ryan A; Engelbrektson, Anna; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Byrne-Bailey, Kathy; Coates, John D

    2011-10-01

    A comparative analysis of the genomes of four dissimilatory (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria has revealed a genomic island associated with perchlorate reduction. In addition to the characterized metabolic genes for perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, the island contains multiple conserved uncharacterized genes possibly involved in electron transport and regulation. PMID:21856823

  9. Bifunctional lanthanum phosphate substrates as novel adsorbents and biocatalyst supports for perchlorate removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign thermal gelation process, performed the role of dual functional sorbent facilitating perchlorate adsorption and bioremediation through the growth of perchlorate reducing microbial colonies. - Highlights: • Lanthanum phosphate monoliths as efficient perchlorate adsorbents. • And also as substrates for biofilm (perchlorate reducing bacteria) growth. • Environmentally benign thermal gelation process for substrate fabrication. • 98% adsorption efficiency for perchlorate concentrations up to 100 μg/L. • The regenerated monoliths show nearly 100% reusability. - Abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign colloidal forming process employing methyl cellulose, are reported here as excellent adsorbents of perchlorate with >98% efficiency and with 100% reusability. Additionally, the effectiveness of such substrates as biocatalyst supports that facilitate biofilm formation of perchlorate reducing microbes (Serratia marcescens NIIST 5) is also demonstrated for the first time. The adsorption of perchlorate ions is attributed to the pore structure of lanthanum phosphate substrate and the microbial attachment is primarily ascribed to its intrinsic hydrophobic property. Lanthanum phosphate thus emerges as a dual functional material that possesses an integrated adsorption/bioremediation property for the effective removal of ClO4− which is an increasingly important environmental contaminant

  10. Terbium nitrate luminescence quenching by eosin in he presence of lithium perchlorate in sulfolane solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenching of terbium nitrate luminescence by anionic dye, eosin, in the presence of lithium perchlorate in sulfolane solutions was studied. Temperature dependence of terbium nitrate luminescence in sulfolane solutions in the presence of perchlorate anions were considered. The values of energy required for water molecular substitution in Tb3+ ion coordination sphere for solvent molecule in electrolyte solution were ascertained

  11. Archaeal (Per)Chlorate Reduction at High Temperature: An Interplay of Biotic and Abiotic Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebensteiner, M.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Schaap, P.J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lomans, B.P.

    2013-01-01

    Perchlorate and chlorate anions [(per)chlorate] exist in the environment from natural and anthropogenic sources, where they can serve as electron acceptors for bacteria. We performed growth experiments combined with genomic and proteomic analyses of the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus that s

  12. Monitoring of perchlorate in diverse foods and its estimated dietary exposure for Korea populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Woo; Oh, Sung-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2012-12-01

    The perchlorate concentrations in various Korean food samples were monitored, and 663 samples belonging to 39 kinds of food were analyzed. The analysis results revealed that dairy products contain the highest average concentration of 6.34 μg/kg and high detection frequency of over 85%. Fruit and vegetables showed the next highest perchlorate concentration with an average of 6.17 μg/kg. Especially, with its average concentration of 39.9 μg/kg, spinach showed the highest perchlorate level among all target food samples studied. Tomato was followed by spinach, which showed a high perchlorate average concentration of 19.8 μg/kg, and over 7 μg/kg was detected in ham and sausage (avg. 7.31 μg/kg) and in instant noodles (avg. 7.58 μg/kg). Less than 2 μg/kg was detected in fishes, meats and beverages. The exposure dose of perchlorate in Korean by food intake was calculated on the basis of the analyzed perchlorate levels in this study. The daily perchlorate dose to which Korean adults are exposed is 0.04 μg/kg bw/day, which is lower than the RfD (0.7 μg/kg bw/day) value suggested by US NAS. This result indicates that Korean people's current exposure to perchlorate from domestic food consumption is evaluated as safe. PMID:23116718

  13. Photodimerization and photooxygenation of 9-vinylcarbazole catalyzed by titanium dioxide and magnesium perchlorate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajime; Maeda; Mio; Yamamoto; Hideyuki; Nakagawa; Kazuhiko; Mizuno

    2010-01-01

    Photoreaction of 9-vinylcarbazole in acetonitrile in the presence of titanium dioxide and a catalytic amount of magnesium perchlorate gave 3,6-di(9-carbazolyl)-1,2-dioxane as a photooxygenated product via photodimerization of 9-vinylcarbazole.The photoreaction proceeds via an electron transfer mechanism,where magnesium perchlorate accelerated formation of the photo-oxygenated product.

  14. CRYSTALLIZATION KINETICS OF AMMONIUM PERCHLORATE IN AN AGITATED VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahidh Kaseer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available 31Overall crystal growth kinetics for ammonium perchlorate in laboratory scale batch  agitated vessel crystallizer have been determined from batch experiments performed in an integral mode. The effects of temperature between 30-60ºC, seed size 0.07, 0.120 and 0.275 mm and stirrer speed 160, 340, and 480 rpm, on the kinetics of crystal growth were investigated. Two different methods, viz. polynomial fitting and initial derivative were used to predict the kinetics expression. In general both methods gave comparable results for growth kinetics estimation. The order of growth process is not more than two. The activation energy for crystal growth of ammonium perchlorate was determined and found  to be equal to 5.8 kJ/ mole.            Finally, the influence of the affecting parameters on the crystal growth rate gives general expression that had an obvious dependence of the growth rate on each variables of concern (temperature, seed size, and stirrer speed .The general overall growth rate expression had shown that super saturation is the most significant variable. While the positive dependence of the stirrer speed demonstrates the importance of the diffusional step in the growth rate model. Moreover, the positive dependence of the seed size demonstrate the importance of the surface integration  step in the growth rate model. All the studied variables tend to suggest that the growth rate characteristics  of ammonium perchlorate from aqueous solution commenced in a batch crystallizer are diffusion kinetic controlled process.

  15. (Dicyanamido)[tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine]zinc(II) perchlorate

    OpenAIRE

    Shi Guo Zhang; Hong Yan Zhao; Hong Li

    2008-01-01

    In the title complex, [Zn(C2N3)(C18H18N4)]ClO4, the ZnII ion has a slightly distorted trigonal–bipyramidal ZnN5 coordination geometry. The crystal structure is stabilized by weak intermolecular C—H...O and C—H...N hydrogen bonds. In addition, there are relatively close contacts between the O atoms of the perchlorate anion and symmetry-related pyridine rings [O...Cg = 3.179 (3) and 3.236 (3) Å, where Cg is the centroid of a pyridine ring], and between t...

  16. CRYSTALLIZATION KINETICS OF AMMONIUM PERCHLORATE IN AN AGITATED VESSEL

    OpenAIRE

    Nahidh Kaseer; Rafi' J. Yaqub; Ahmed Khalid

    2013-01-01

    31Overall crystal growth kinetics for ammonium perchlorate in laboratory scale batch  agitated vessel crystallizer have been determined from batch experiments performed in an integral mode. The effects of temperature between 30-60ºC, seed size 0.07, 0.120 and 0.275 mm and stirrer speed 160, 340, and 480 rpm, on the kinetics of crystal growth were investigated. Two different methods, viz. polynomial fitting and initial derivative were used to predict the kinetics expression. In general both me...

  17. Prediction of Particle Size of Ammonium Perchlorate during Pulverisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Jain

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium perchlorate has been pulverised by an impact mill (air classifier mill to studythe influence of different operating parameters, viz., effect of mill speed, classifier speed, feedrate, and damper opening (suction rate on the particle size. Further based on the differentgrinding parameters, an empirical equation has been developed and used for the prediction ofparticle size. The experimental results indicate that the values are very close to the predictedones. In addition, particle size distribution has also been studied by applying different modelequations and it has been found that Rosin-Rammler model is the most suitable model for thisoperation.

  18. Comparative DFT study of crystalline ammonium perchlorate and ammonium dinitramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weihua; Wei, Tao; Zhu, Wei; Xiao, Heming

    2008-05-22

    The electronic structure, vibrational properties, absorption spectra, and thermodynamic properties of crystalline ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium dinitramide (ADN) have been comparatively studied using density functional theory in the local density approximation. The results shows that the p states for the two solids play a very important role in their chemical reaction. From the low frequency to high frequency region, ADN has more motion modes for the vibrational frequencies than AP. The absorption spectra of AP and ADN display a few, strong bands in the fundamental absorption region. The thermodynamic properties show that ADN is easier to decompose than AP as the temperature increases. PMID:18396853

  19. Specific heat and thermodynamic properties of the cesium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cesium perchlorate specific heat has been measured in a vacuum adiabatic microcalorimeter in the 10-365 K range. On the basis of the data obtained the thermodynamic functions are calculated. Csub(p)sup(0) (298.15 K) = 110.4+-0.2 J/Kxmol; S0 (298.15 K)=175.9+-0.5 J/Kxmol; H0 (298.15 K) - H0(0)=22280+-50 J/mol; - [G0 (289.15 K) - H0(0)]/T = 101.2+-0.2 J/Kxmol

  20. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J; Oh, Seok-Young

    2011-08-30

    US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21 wastewater was rapidly decreased to an undetectable level in 2 days. This result demonstrated that iron treatment not only removed energetic compounds but also eliminated the toxic constituents that inhibited the subsequent microbial process. PMID:21700387

  1. Characterization of Perchlorate in a New Frozen Human Urine Standard Reference Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lee L.; Jarrett, Jeffery M.; Davis, W. Clay; Kilpatrick, Eric L.; Oflaz, Rabia; Turk, Gregory C.; Leber, Dennis D.; Valentin, Liza; Morel-Espinosa, Maria; Blount, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate, an inorganic anion, has recently been recognized as an environmental contaminant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Urine is the preferred matrix for assessment of human exposure to perchlorate. Although the measurement technique for perchlorate in urine was developed in 2005, the calibration and quality assurance aspects of the metrology infrastructure for perchlorate are still lacking in that there is no certified reference material (CRM) traceable to the International System of Units (SI). To meet the quality assurance needs in biomonitoring measurements of perchlorate and the related anions that affect thyroid health, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3668 Mercury, Perchlorate, and Iodide in Frozen Human Urine. SRM 3668 consists of perchlorate, nitrate, thiocyanate, iodine, and mercury in urine at two levels that represent the 50th and 95th percentiles, respectively, of the concentrations (with some adjustments) in the U.S. population. It is the first CRM being certified for perchlorate. Measurements leading to the certification of perchlorate were made collaboratively at NIST and CDC using three methods based on liquid or ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS or IC-MS/MS). Potential sources of bias were analyzed and results were compared for the three methods. Perchlorate in SRM 3668 Level I urine was certified to be 2.70 μg L−1 ± 0.21 μg L−1, and for SRM 3668 Level II urine, the certified value is 13.47 μg L−1 ± 0.96 μg L−1. PMID:22850897

  2. Specific adsorption of perchlorate anions on Pt{hkl} single crystal electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Gary A; Brew, Ashley; Hunter, Katherine; Sharman, Jonathan; Wright, Edward

    2014-07-21

    The voltammetry of Pt{111}, Pt{100}, Pt{110} and Pt{311} single crystal electrodes as a function of perchloric acid concentration (0.05-2.00 M) has been studied in order to test the assertion made in recent reports by Watanabe et al. that perchlorate anions specifically adsorb on polycrystalline platinum. Such an assertion would have significant ramifications for our understanding of electrocatalytic processes at platinum surfaces since perchlorate anions at low pH have classically been assumed not to specifically adsorb. For Pt{111}, it is found that OHad and electrochemical oxide states are both perturbed significantly as perchloric acid concentration is increased. We suggest that this is due to specific adsorption of perchlorate anions competing with OHad for adsorption sites. The hydrogen underpotential deposition (H UPD) region of Pt{111} however remains unchanged although evidence for perchlorate anion decomposition to chloride on Pt{111} is reported. In contrast, for Pt{100} no variation in the onset of electrochemical oxide formation is found nor any shift in the potential of the OHad state which normally results from the action of specifically adsorbing anions. This suggests that perchlorate anions are non-specifically adsorbed on this plane although strong changes in all H UPD states are observed as perchloric acid concentration is increased. This manifests itself as a redistribution of charge from the H UPD state situated at more positive potential to the one at more negative potential. For Pt{110} and Pt{311}, marginal changes in the onset of electrochemical oxide formation are recorded, associated with specific adsorption of perchlorate. Specific adsorption of perchlorate anions on Pt{111} is deleterious to electrocatalytic activity in relation to the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as measured using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) in a hanging meniscus configuration. This study supports previous work suggesting that a large component of the ORR

  3. Inhibition of pH fronts in corrosion cells due to the formation of cerium hydroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soestbergen, M. van; Erich, S.J.F.; Huinink, H.P.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of cerium-based corrosion inhibitors on the pH front between the alkaline cathode and acidic anode in corrosion cells has been studied. The cerium component of these inhibitors can affect the pH front since it precipitates in an alkaline environment as cerium hydroxide, which is important

  4. Cerium as a Surrogate in the Plutonium Immobilized Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) plans to immobilize a portion of the excess weapons useable plutonium in a ceramic form for final geologic disposal. The proposed immobilization form is a titanate based ceramic consisting primarily of a pyrochlore phase with lesser amounts of brannerite, rutile, zirconolite, vitreous phases and/or other minor phases depending on the impurities present in the feed. The ceramic formulation is cold-pressed and then densified via a reactive sintering process. Cerium has been used as a surrogate for plutonium to facilitate formulation development and process testing. The use of cerium vs. plutonium results in differences in behavior during sintering of the ceramic form. The phase development progression and final phase assemblage is different when cerium is substituted for the actinides in the form. However, the physical behavior of cerium oxide powder and the formation of a pyrochlore-rich ceramic of similar density to the actinide-bearing material make cerium an adequate surrogate for formulation and process development studies

  5. Electrodeposited cerium film as chromate replacement for tinplate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerium film was prepared on tinplate by electrodeposition method. Sulfide-stain resistance of the Ce-passivated, unpassivated and Cr-passivated tinplates was evaluated using a cysteine tarnish test. Corrosion behavior of these tinplates in contact with 3.5% NaCl solution and 0.1 M citric-citrate buffer solution was investigated using Tafel measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement, respectively. The adhesion of epoxyphenolic lacquer to the Ce-passivated tinplate was checked using a cross hatch cutter. The morphology, composition and thickness of the cerium film were studied by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. According to the results, the Ce-passivated tinplate shows the best sulfide-stain resistance and the best corrosion protection property compared with the unpassivated and Cr-passivated tinplates. The adhesion of epoxyphenolic lacquer to the Ce-passivated tinplate is good. The cerium film is composed of the closely packed particles of about 50-200 nm in diameter. The film mainly consists of cerium and oxygen, which mainly exist as CeO2, Ce2O3 and their hydrates such as Ce(OH)4, Ce(OH)3. The total cerium amount of the film is about 0.110 g/m2

  6. Potential for recovery of cerium contained in automotive catalytic converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic converters (CATCONs) are required by Federal law to be installed in nearly all gasoline- and diesel-fueled onroad vehicles used in the United States. About 85 percent of the light-duty vehicles and trucks manufactured worldwide are equipped with CATCONs. Portions of the CATCONs (called monoliths) are recycled for their platinum-group metal (PGM) content and for the value of the stainless steel they contain. The cerium contained in the monoliths, however, is disposed of along with the slag produced from the recycling process. Although there is some smelter capacity in the United States to treat the monoliths in order to recover the PGMs, a great percentage of monoliths is exported to Europe and South Africa for recycling, and a lesser amount is exported to Japan. There is presently no commercial-scale capacity in place domestically to recover cerium from the monoliths. Recycling of cerium or cerium compounds from the monoliths could help ensure against possible global supply shortages by increasing the amount that is available in the supply chain as well as the number and geographic distribution of the suppliers. It could also reduce the amount of material that goes into landfills. Also, the additional supply could lower the price of the commodity. This report analyzes how much cerium oxide is contained in CATCONs and how much could be recovered from used CATCONs.

  7. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mckigney, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reifarth, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  8. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF3) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  9. Stabilized zirconia with cerium and neodymium addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zr0,9 Ce0,05 Nd0,05 O1,975 system was synthesized with the use of the Pechini method. The polymeric resin was calcined at 350 deg C/3 h and analysed by FTIR that show bands relative to organic. Radicals esther type. The TGA curve indicated the polymeric decomposition occurring from 30 deg C to 740 deg C. DTA analysis show a exothermic peak in 100 deg C due to loss of water of material. From 500 deg C to 800 deg C was observed a intense peak due to polymer decomposition and the zirconia crystallization. The calcined powder from 350 deg C/3 h e 30 min to 900 deg/3 h were analysed by XRD that show the crystalline phase formation with the increase of temperature. The X-ray diffraction pattern show the presence of two phases, such as tetragonal and cubic of zirconia demonstrating that neodymium and cerium additions led to zirconia stabilization. (author)

  10. Cerium Dioxide Thin Films Using Spin Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Channei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium dioxide (CeO2 thin films with varying Ce concentrations (0.1 to 0.9 M, metal basis were deposited on soda-lime-silica glass substrates using spin coating. It was found that all films exhibited the cubic fluorite structure after annealing at 500°C for 5 h. The laser Raman microspectroscopy and GAXRD analyses revealed that increasing concentrations of Ce resulted in an increase in the degree of crystallinity. FIB and FESEM images confirmed the laser Raman and GAXRD analyses results owing to the predicted increase in film thickness with increasing Ce concentration. However, porosity and shrinkage (drying cracking of the films also increased significantly with increasing Ce concentrations. UV-VIS spectrophotometry data showed that the transmission of the films decreased with increasing Ce concentrations due to the increasing crack formation. Furthermore, a red shift was observed with increasing Ce concentrations, which resulted in a decrease in the optical indirect band gap.

  11. Chlorination and Carbochlorination of Cerium Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorination and carbochlorination of cerium oxide were studied by thermogravimetry under controlled atmosphere (TG) in the 7000C 9500C temperature range.Both reactants and products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (RX), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Thermodynamic calculations were performed by computer assisted software.The chlorination starts at a temperature close to 8000C.This reaction involves the simultaneous formation and evaporation of CeCl3.Both processes control the reaction rate and their kinetic may not be easily separated.The apparent chlorination activation energy in the 8500C-9500C temperature range is 172 to 5 kJ/ mole.Carbon transforms the CeO2-Cl2 into a more reactive system: CeO2-C-Cl2, where the effects of the carbon content, total flow rate and temperature were analyzed.The carbochlorination starting temperature is 7000C.This reaction is completed in one step controlled by mass transfer with an apparent activation energy of 56 to 5 kJ/mole in the 8500C-9500C temperature range

  12. Environmental Geochemistry of Cerium: Applications and Toxicology of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica T. Dahle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium is the most abundant of rare-earth metals found in the Earth’s crust. Several Ce-carbonate, -phosphate, -silicate, and -(hydroxide minerals have been historically mined and processed for pharmaceutical uses and industrial applications. Of all Ce minerals, cerium dioxide has received much attention in the global nanotechnology market due to their useful applications for catalysts, fuel cells, and fuel additives. A recent mass flow modeling study predicted that a major source of CeO2 nanoparticles from industrial processing plants (e.g., electronics and optics manufactures is likely to reach the terrestrial environment such as landfills and soils. The environmental fate of CeO2 nanoparticles is highly dependent on its physcochemical properties in low temperature geochemical environment. Though there are needs in improving the analytical method in detecting/quantifying CeO2 nanoparticles in different environmental media, it is clear that aquatic and terrestrial organisms have been exposed to CeO2 NPs, potentially yielding in negative impact on human and ecosystem health. Interestingly, there has been contradicting reports about the toxicological effects of CeO2 nanoparticles, acting as either an antioxidant or reactive oxygen species production-inducing agent. This poses a challenge in future regulations for the CeO2 nanoparticle application and the risk assessment in the environment.

  13. Cerium luminescence in borate glass and effect of aluminium on blue green emission of cerium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CeO2 doped lead borate (CE) and lead alumino borate (CEA) glasses are prepared by melt quench method at high temperature. The main luminescence band of 5d–4f transition of Ce3+ ions with maxima at around 489 nm of Ce3+ ions in these glasses has been observed, along with red shift and larger stokes shift, which shows that the covalency of the rare earth to oxygen bond increases with the increase in CeO2 content at the expense of Al2O3. Shifting of UV absorption edge towards longer wavelength and a decrease in band gap with increase in CeO2 concentration in both the glass systems has been observed. Moreover densification and stabilization of glass network has been observed which is due to conversion of BO3 units to more compact and stable BO4 units. This covalency effect and the formation of BO4 groups with addition of CeO2 and incorporation of Al2O3 content are responsible for clear effect on luminescence of the present glass system. Moreover the optical basicity values were theoretically determined along with density and molar volume. -- Highlights: • Aluminium incorporation assists in dispersing the clusters of cerium ions and thus enhancing luminescence response. • Decrease of optical band gap energy with an increase of cerium concentration shows the semiconducting behavior. • Larger stokes shift shows that the covalency of rare earth to oxygen bond increases with increase in CeO2

  14. Cerium, manganese and cerium/manganese ceramic monolithic catalysts. Study of VOCs and PM removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    COLMAN-LERNER Esteban; PELUSO Miguel Andrs; SAMBETH Jorge; THOMAS Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic supported cerium, manganese and cerium-manganese catalysts were prepared by direct impregnation of aqueous precursor, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method (BET), temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) acidity measurements and electrical conductivity. The catalytic activity was evaluated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) (ethanol, methyl ethyl ketone and toluene) oxidation. Additionally, catalysts were tested in particulate matter (PM) combustion. The characterization results indicated that Ce was in the form of Ce4+ and Ce3+, and Mn existed in the form of Mn4+and Mn3+on the surface of the Mn/AC sample and in the form of Mn4+ in the Ce/Mn/AC monolith. VOC oxidation results revealed that the Ce/Mn/AC sample showed an excellent performance compared with ceramic supported CeO2 (Ce/AC) and MnOx (Mn/AC) samples. The PM combustion was also higher on Ce/Mn/AC monoliths. The enhanced catalytic activity was mainly attributed to the Ce and Mn interaction which enhanced the acidity, conductiv-ity and the reducibility of the oxides.

  15. Ion Chromatographic Determination of low level Perchlorate in Natural Waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a persistent contaminant of drinking-, surface-, and ground-water, and of soils. Possible contributions of ClO4- contamination are the military, the space program, and supporting industries and fertilizers. Perchlorate has long been known to have a negative effect on the thyroid gland. It has been added to the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Contaminant candidate List (CCL) in 1998, so that ClO4 can be regulated at a concentration safe to humans. This paper describes the determination of trace level ClO4- in various matrices utilizing ion chromatographic method. The method utilizes a Dionex IonPac AS11 column with suppressed conductivity detection, 1500ul sample loop, and a 100 mN NaOH eluent at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min. These parameters allow a method detection limit (MDL) of 0.277ug/1 and a short retention time of 8 minutes. A quality control, proficiency testing samples from the EPA and a number of environmental samples from New York State (ground water) and California (ground and surface waters) were analyzed by this technique. Concentrations measured were in the range of 1.9-217 ug/1. No evidence of ClO4- was found in various commonly used fertilizers. (author)

  16. Extraction of scandium by benzoylantipyrine from chloride-perchlorate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution of scandium complexes in case of extraction by benzoyl-4-antipyrine (BANT) in chloroform from aqueous chloride-perchlorate solutions, depending on extraction, perchlorate-ion and salting out agents concentration, was studied. It has been ascertained that scandium distribution factor is nearly 50 at NaClO4 and BANT concentrations equal to 2 and 0.1 mol/l respectively. Introduction of salting out agents (NaCl, CaCl2) and HCl at a constant content of NaClO4 (0.5 mol/l) increases noticeably scandium extraction. For 0.1 mol/l BANT solution in chloroform the extraction capacity in terms of scandium makes up 1.26 g/l. The optimal conditions for the element extraction have been found, the composition of the complex extracted has been ascertained (Sc:BANT:ClO4- = 1:3:3) and extraction mechanism has been suggested. Influence of interfering elements on scandium distribution factor was studied

  17. Elaboration and characterization of thin solid films containing cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, S.; Guerfi, S.; Siab, R.

    2009-11-01

    Cerium oxide films are widely studied as a promising alternative to Cr(VI) based pre-treatments for the corrosion protection of different metals and alloys. Cathodic electrodeposition of Cerium containing thin films was realised on TA6V substrates from a Ce(NO3)3, 6H2O and mixed water-ethyl alcohol solutions at 0.01 M. Experimental conditions to obtain homogeneous and crack free thin films were determined. The deposited cerium quantity appears proportional to the quantity of electricity used, as indicated by the Faraday law. Subsequent thermal treatment lead to a CeO2 coating, expected to provide an increase of TA6V oxidation resistance at high temperatures. The deposits were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), optical and scanning electron microscopies.

  18. Cerium uptake by zeolite A synthesized from natural clinoptilolite tuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural clinoptilolite tuffs from the Semnan region in Iran was used for the synthesis of zeolite A. The tuffs and synthesized zeolites were characterized by XRD and XRF. The sorption behavior of the synthesized zeolite toward cerium was studied. Using the Lagergren's equation, the absorption constant was calculated. The measured distribution coefficient values (Kd) indicated that cerium uptake is higher in lower initial concentrations, higher temperature and higher pH values. Thermodynamic parameters of the exchange were calculated through construction of ion-exchange isotherms at three temperatures of 298, 323 and 343 K. The dynamic absorption of cerium was also studied by passing the solution through a column in the presence and absence of sodium ions. (author)

  19. The relationship between perchlorate in drinking water and cord blood thyroid hormones: First experience from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Javidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the controversial information regarding the effects of perchlorate on thyroid function of high risk population as neonates, and given the high prevalence rate of thyroid disorders specially congenital hypothyroidism in our region, this study aims to investigate for the first time in Iran, the relationship between drinking groundwater perchlorate and cord blood thyroid hormones level in an industrial region. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, drinking groundwater perchlorate level of rural areas of Zarinshahr, Isfahan was measured. Simultaneously, cord blood level of thyroid hormones of neonates born in the studied region was measured. Thyroid function test of neonates in regions with low and high perchlorate level were compared. Results: In this study, 25 tap water samples were obtained for perchlorate measurement. Level of cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, T4 and T3 of 25 neonates were measured. Mean (standard deviation of perchlorate, TSH, T4 and T3 was 3.59 (5.10 μg/l, 7.81 (4.14 mIU/m, 6.06 (0.85 mg/dl, and 63.46 (17.53 mg/dl, respectively. Mean levels of thyroid function tests were not different in low ( 0.05. Conclusions: Perchlorate did not appear to be related to thyroid function of neonates in the studied industrial region. It seems that iodine status of the regions, as well as other environmental contaminants and genetic background, could impact on its relation with thyroid function of neonates.

  20. A bioassay for the detection of perchlorate in the ppb range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinnickel, Mark; Smith, Stephen C; Koo, Jonathan; O'Connor, Susan M; Coates, John D

    2011-04-01

    A bioassay for the determination of ppb (μg·L(-1)) concentrations of perchlorate has been developed and is described herein. The assay uses the enzyme perchlorate reductase (PR) from the perchlorate-reducing organism Dechloromonas agitata in purified and partially purified forms to detect perchlorate. The redox active dye phenazine methosulfate (PMS) is shown to efficiently shuttle electrons to PR from NADH. Perchlorate can be determined indirectly by monitoring NADH oxidization by PR. To lower the detection limit, we have shown that perchlorate can be concentrated on a solid-phase extraction (SPE) column that is pretreated with the cation decyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Perchlorate is eluted from these columns with a solution of 2 M NaCl and 200 mM morpholine propane sulfonic acid (MOPS, pH 12.5). By washing these columns with 15 mL of 2.5 mM DTAB and 15% acetone, contaminating ions, such as chlorate and nitrate, are removed without affecting the bioassay. Because of the effect of complex matrices on the SPE columns, the method of standard additions is used to analyze tap water and groundwater samples. The efficacy of the developed bioassay was demonstrated by analyzing samples from 2-17000 ppb in deionized lab water, tap water, and contaminated groundwater. PMID:21384912

  1. Microbial community analysis of perchlorate-reducing cultures growing on zero-valent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic microbial mixed cultures demonstrated its ability to completely remove perchlorate in the presence of zero-valent iron. In order to understand the major microbial reaction in the iron-supported culture, community analysis comprising of microbial fatty acids and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) techniques was performed for perchlorate reducing cultures. Analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and subsequent principal component analysis (PCA) showed clear distinctions not only between iron-supported perchlorate reducing culture and seed bacteria, but also among perchlorate-reducing cultures receiving different electron donors. The DGGE pattern targeting the chlorite dismutase (cld) gene showed that iron-supported perchlorate reducing culture is similar to hydrogen-fed cultures as compared to acetate-fed culture. The phylogenetic tree suggested that the dominant microbial reaction may be a combination of the autotrophic and heterotrophic reduction of perchlorate. Both molecular and chemotaxonomic experimental results support further understanding in the function of zero-valent iron as an adequate electron source for enhancing the microbial perchlorate reduction in natural and engineered systems.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of magnesium doped cerium oxide for the fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Kumari, Monika; Kumar, Mintu; Kumar, Sacheen; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    Cerium oxide has attained much attentions in global nanotechnology market due to valuable application for catalytic, fuel additive, and widely as electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cell. Doped cerium oxide has large oxygen vacancies that allow for greater reactivity and faster ion transport. These properties make cerium oxide suitable material for SOFCs application. Cerium oxide electrolyte requires lower operation temperature which shows improvement in processing and the fabrication technique. In our work, we synthesized magnesium doped cerium oxide by the co-precipitation method. With the magnesium doping catalytic reactivity of CeO2 was increased. Synthesized nanoparticle were characterized by the XRD and UV absorption techniques.

  3. Genetic factors that might lead to different responses in individuals exposed to perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A

    2005-11-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell-surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant women may have low iodine intake. Congenital hypothyroidism affects 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 infants, and 15% of these cases have been attributed to genetic defects. Our objective in this review is to identify genetic biomarkers that would help define subpopulations sensitive to environmental perchlorate exposure. We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification. Furthermore, we summarize relevant studies of perchlorate in humans. Because of perchlorate inhibition of iodide uptake, it is biologically plausible that chronic ingestion of perchlorate through contaminated sources may cause some degree of iodine discharge in populations that are genetically susceptible to defects in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, thus deteriorating their conditions. We conclude that future studies linking human disease and environmental perchlorate exposure should consider the genetic makeup of the participants, actual perchlorate exposure levels, and individual iodine intake/excretion levels. PMID:16263499

  4. Perchlorate Exposure Reduces Primordial Germ Cell Number in Female Threespine Stickleback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ann M.; Earp, Nathanial C.; Redmond, Mandy E.; Postlethwait, John H.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate is a common aquatic contaminant that has long been known to affect thyroid function in vertebrates, including humans. More recently perchlorate has been shown to affect primordial sexual differentiation in the aquatic model fishes zebrafish and threespine stickleback, but the mechanism has been unclear. Stickleback exposed to perchlorate from fertilization have increased androgen levels in the embryo and disrupted reproductive morphologies as adults, suggesting that perchlorate could disrupt the earliest stages of primordial sexual differentiation when primordial germ cells (PGCs) begin to form the gonad. Female stickleback have three to four times the number of PGCs as males during the first weeks of development. We hypothesized that perchlorate exposure affects primordial sexual differentiation by reducing the number of germ cells in the gonad during an important window of stickleback sex determination at 14–18 days post fertilization (dpf). We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the number of PGCs at 16 dpf in control and 100 mg/L perchlorate-treated male and female stickleback. Perchlorate exposure from the time of fertilization resulted in significantly reduced PGC number only in genotypic females, suggesting that the masculinizing effects of perchlorate observed in adult stickleback may result from early changes to the number of PGCs at a time critical for sex determination. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of a connection between an endocrine disruptor and reduction in PGC number prior to the first meiosis during sex determination. These findings suggest that a mode of action of perchlorate on adult reproductive phenotypes in vertebrates, including humans, such as altered fecundity and sex reversal or intersex gonads, may stem from early changes to germ cell development. PMID:27383240

  5. Perchlorate Exposure Reduces Primordial Germ Cell Number in Female Threespine Stickleback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M Petersen

    Full Text Available Perchlorate is a common aquatic contaminant that has long been known to affect thyroid function in vertebrates, including humans. More recently perchlorate has been shown to affect primordial sexual differentiation in the aquatic model fishes zebrafish and threespine stickleback, but the mechanism has been unclear. Stickleback exposed to perchlorate from fertilization have increased androgen levels in the embryo and disrupted reproductive morphologies as adults, suggesting that perchlorate could disrupt the earliest stages of primordial sexual differentiation when primordial germ cells (PGCs begin to form the gonad. Female stickleback have three to four times the number of PGCs as males during the first weeks of development. We hypothesized that perchlorate exposure affects primordial sexual differentiation by reducing the number of germ cells in the gonad during an important window of stickleback sex determination at 14-18 days post fertilization (dpf. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the number of PGCs at 16 dpf in control and 100 mg/L perchlorate-treated male and female stickleback. Perchlorate exposure from the time of fertilization resulted in significantly reduced PGC number only in genotypic females, suggesting that the masculinizing effects of perchlorate observed in adult stickleback may result from early changes to the number of PGCs at a time critical for sex determination. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of a connection between an endocrine disruptor and reduction in PGC number prior to the first meiosis during sex determination. These findings suggest that a mode of action of perchlorate on adult reproductive phenotypes in vertebrates, including humans, such as altered fecundity and sex reversal or intersex gonads, may stem from early changes to germ cell development.

  6. The PL "violet shift" of cerium dioxide on silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    CeO2 thin film was fabricated by dual ion beam epitaxial technique. The phenomenon of PL violet shift at room temperature was observed, and the distance of shift was about 65 nm. After the analysis of crystal structure and valence in the compound were carried out by XRD and XPS technique, it was concluded that the PL shift was related with valence of cerium ion in the oxides. When the valence of cerium ion varied from tetravalence to trivalence, the PL peak position would move from blue region to violet region and the phenomenon of "violet shift" was observed.

  7. Photo-assisted reduction in nanostructured cerium-based coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured cerium-based coatings on AZ31 Mg alloy substrates exposed to sunlight under ambient conditions had an ∼30% increase in Ce(III) species compared to unexposed coatings as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A decrease in film cracks and shift in bandgap from 2.5 eV to 2.7 eV were also measured. Visible changes in color, from yellow to translucent, with exposure were also observed and suggest that cerium-based coatings are reduced by light exposure in humid environments

  8. Membrane assisted liquid-liquid extraction of cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane assisted liquid-liquid extraction of cerium was investigated, with emphasis placed on the study of the reaction chemistry and the kinetics of non-dispersive solvent extraction and stripping with microporous membranes. A bulk liquid membrane process was developed for the purification of cerium(IV) from sulfate solutions containing other rare earth elements. The cerium process was studied in both a flat sheet contained liquid membrane configuration and with hollow fibre contactors. Di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (DEHPA) was identified as a suitable extractant for cerium(IV) from sulfuric acid solution, with due consideration of factors such as extraction ability, resistance to degradation, solvent selectivity and potential for sulfate transfer into a strip solution. A detailed study of the extraction of cerium(IV) with DEHPA defined the extraction reaction chemistry. The Ce/DEHPA/sulfate system was also investigated with a flat sheet bulk liquid membrane configuration, using both sulfuric and hydrochloric acid as receiver solutions. These tests identified that hydrophobic membranes provide better mass transfer for extraction and hydrophilic membranes are better for stripping. The presence of an impurity, mono 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (MEHPA), was found to have a dramatic accelerating effect on the rate of the chemical extraction reaction. This was attributed to its higher interfacial activity and population compared to DEHPA, and the fact that MEHPA was also found to be an active carrier for cerium(IV). The mass transfer rate of membrane assisted extraction and stripping of cerium, using hydrophobic and hydrophilic microporous membranes, respectively, was investigated using a modified Lewis-type cell. It was quantitatively demonstrated that the extraction process was mainly controlled by membrane diffusion and the stripping process was controlled by the chemical reaction rate, with membrane diffusion becoming important at low distribution coefficients

  9. Optical and electrical studies of cerium mixed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherly, T. R., E-mail: trsherly@gmail.com [Post Graduate Department of Physics, Sanathana Dharma College, Alappuzha, Kerala (India); Raveendran, R. [Nanoscience Research Laboratory, Sree Narayana College, Kollam, Kerala 691001 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The fast development in nanotechnology makes enthusiastic interest in developing nanomaterials having tailor made properties. Cerium mixed oxide materials have received great attention due to their UV absorption property, high reactivity, stability at high temperature, good electrical property etc and these materials find wide applications in solid oxide fuel cells, solar control films, cosmetics, display units, gas sensors etc. In this study cerium mixed oxide compounds were prepared by co-precipitation method. All the samples were doped with Zn (II) and Fe (II). Preliminary characterizations such as XRD, SEM / EDS, TEM were done. UV - Vis, Diffuse reflectance, PL, FT-IR, Raman and ac conductivity studies of the samples were performed.

  10. Electrical, thermal and infrared studies of cerium(III) orthovanadate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium(III) orthovandate with a small deviation from stoichiometric composition is a p-type semiconductor between 30 and 800 degC. The electrical conduction in cerium(III) orthovanadate is due to thermally activated hopping of holes on equivalent Ce3+ -Ce4+ lattice sites. The DTA result of CeVO4 indicated a possible phase transition at about 70 degC. The IR spectrum of the sample showed bands at 865 and 810 cm-1, typical of VO4 group of orthovanadates. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  11. Stepwise hydrochloric acid extraction of monazite hydroxides for the recovery of cerium lean rare earths, cerium, uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monazite sand is normally processed by the caustic soda route to produce mixed rare earth chloride, thorium hydroxide and trisodium phosphate. Bulk of the mixed rare earth chloride is used for the preparation of FC catalysts. Recently some of the catalyst producers have shown preference to cerium depleted (lanthanum enriched) rare earth chloride rather than the natural rare earth chloride obtained from monazite. Therefore, a process for producing cerium depleted rare earth chloride, cerium, thorium and uranium from rare earth + thorium hydroxide obtained by treating monazite, based on stepwise hydrochloric acid extraction, was developed in the authors laboratory. The process involves drying of the mixed rare earth-thorium hydroxide cake obtained by monazite-caustic soda process followed by stepwise extraction of the dried cake with hydrochloric acid under specified conditions

  12. Properties of Cerium Containing Lead Free Solder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huxiao

    With increasing concerns of the intrinsic toxicity of lead (Pb) in electronics, a series of tin (Sn) based alloys involving silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) have been proposed as replacements for Pb-Sn solder and widely accepted by industry. However, they have a higher melting point and often exhibit poorer damage tolerance than Pb-Sn alloys. Recently, a new class of alloys with trace amount of rare-earth (RE) elements has been discovered and investigated. In previous work from Prof. Chawla's group, it has been shown that cerium (Ce)-based Pb-free solder are less prone to oxidation and Sn whiskering, and exhibit desirable attributes of microstructural refinement and enhanced ductility relative to lanthanum (La)-based Sn-3.9Ag-0.7Cu (SAC) alloy. Although the formation of RESn3 was believed to be directly responsible for the enhanced ductility in RE-containing SAC solder by allowing microscopic voids to nucleate throughout the solder volume, this cavitation-based mechanism needs to be validated experimentally and numerically. Additionally, since the previous study has exhibited the realistic feasibility of Ce-based SAC lead-free solder alloy as a replacement to conventional SAC alloys, in this study, the proposed objective focuses on the in in-depth understanding of mechanism of enhanced ductility in Ce-based SAC alloy and possible issues associated with integration of this new class of solder into electronic industry, including: (a) study of long-term thermal and mechanical stability on industrial metallization, (b) examine the role of solder volume and wetting behavior of the new solder, relative to Sn-3.9Ag-0.7Cu alloys, (c) conduct experiments of new solder alloys in the form of mechanical shock and electromigration. The research of this new class alloys will be conducted in industrially relevant conditions, and the results would serve as the first step toward integration of these new, next generation solders into the industry.

  13. Modulated structures in oxidized cerium niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three previously reported oxidized cerium niobate phases CeNbO4+x (x = 0.08, 0.25, and 0.33) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder and electron diffraction. All three phases display structures which are modulated variants of a parent fergusonite-type CeIIINbO4 structure (I2/a, a = 5.5342(2) angstrom, b = 11.4016(6) angstrom, c = 5.1583(3) angstrom, β = 94.600(5)degree). The x = 0.08 phase with parent unit cell (I2/a, a = 5.3029(8) angstrom, b = 11.483(2) angstrom, c = 5.2515(8) angstrom, β = 91.32(2)degree) is a two-dimensional, incommensurately modulated phase characterized by incommensurate primary modulation wavevectors q1 ∼ [0.345, 0, 0.138]p* and q2 ∼ [-0.069, 0, 0.172]p* (p for parent). The x = 0.25 phase with parent unit cell (I2/a, a = 5.3522(8) angstrom, b = 11.374(3) angstrom, c = 5.116(1) angstrom, β = 93.34(2)degree) is a commensurately modulated superstructure phase characterized by the reciprocal space unit cell ar* = 1/12[402]p*, br* = 1/4[020]p*, and cr* = 1/3[101]p* (r for resultant). The x = 0.33 phase with parent unit cell (I1, a = 5.4374(8) angstrom, b = 11.189(2) angstrom, c = 5.1458(8) angstrom, α = 90.56(1), β = 94.37(1), γ = 88.19(1)degree) is again commensurately modulated with q = 1/3[101]p*. The close structural relationship between the three oxidized phases and possible interstitial oxygen sites in the CeIIINbO4 structure are discussed

  14. Cerium Oxyhydroxide Clusters: Formation, Structure and Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederic Aubriet; Jean-Jacques Gaumet; Wibe A de Jong; Groenewold, Gary S (058000); Gianotto, Anita K (057404); McIlwain, Michael E (051783); Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Christopher M. Leavitt

    2009-06-01

    Cerium oxyhydroxide cluster anions were produced by irradiating ceric oxide particles using 355 nm laser pulses that were synchronized with pulses of nitrogen gas admitted to the irradiation chamber. The gas pulse stabilized the nascent clusters that are largely anhydrous [CexOy] ions and neutrals. These initially-formed species react with water, principally forming closed-shell (c-s) oxohydroxy species that are described by the general formula [CexOy(OH)z]-. In general, the extent of hydroxylation varies from a value of 3 OH per Ce atom when x = 1 to a value slightly greater than 1 for x > 8. The Ce3 and Ce6 species deviate significantly from this trend: the x = 3 cluster accommodates more hydroxyl moieties compared to neighboring congeners at x = 2 and x = 4. Conversely, the x = 6 cluster is significantly less hydroxylated. Density functional theory (DFT) modeling of the cluster structures show that the hydrated clusters are hydrolyzed, and contain one-to-multiple hydroxide moieties, but not datively bound water. DFT also predicts an energetic preference for formation of highly symmetric structures as the size of the clusters increases. The calculated structures indicate that the ability of the Ce3 oxyhydroxide to accommodate more extensive hydroxylation is due to a more open, hexagonal structure in which the Ce atoms can participate in multiple hydrolysis reactions. Conversely the Ce6 oxyhydroxide has an octahedral structure that is not conducive to hydrolysis. In addition to the c-s clusters, open-shell (o-s) oxyhydroxides and superoxides are also formed, and they become more prominent as the size of the clusters increases, suggesting that the larger ceria clusters have an increased ability to stabilize a non-bonding electron. The overall intensity of the clusters tends to monotonically decrease as the cluster size increases, however this trend is interrupted at Ce13, which is significantly more stable compared to neighboring congeners, suggesting formation of

  15. Cerium Oxyhydroxide Clusters: Formation, Structure and Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubriet, F.; Gaumet, Jean-Jacques; De Jong, Wibe A.; Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; McIIwain, Michael E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Leavitt, Christopher M.

    2009-05-11

    Cerium oxyhydroxide cluster anions were produced by irradiating ceric oxide particles using 355 nm laser pulses that were synchronized with pulses of nitrogen gas admitted to the irradiation chamber. The gas pulse stabilized the nascent clusters that are largely anhydrous [CexOy] ions and neutrals. These initially-formed species react with water, principally forming closed-shell (c-s) oxohydroxy species that are described by the general formula [CexOy(OH)z]-. In general, the extent of hydroxylation varies from a value of 3 OH per Ce atom when x = 1 to a value slightly greater than 1 for x > 8. The Ce3 and Ce6 species deviate significantly from this trend: the x = 3 cluster accommodates more hydroxyl moieties compared to neighboring congeners at x = 2 and x = 4. Conversely, the x = 6 cluster is significantly less hydroxylated. Density functional theory (DFT) modeling of the cluster structures show that the hydrated clusters are hydrolyzed, and contain one-to-multiple hydroxide moieties, but not datively bound water. DFT also predicts an energetic preference for formation of highly symmetric structures as the size of the clusters increases. The calculated structures indicate that the ability of the Ce3 oxyhydroxide to accommodate more extensive hydroxylation is due to a more open, hexagonal structure in which the Ce atoms can participate in multiple hydrolysis reactions. Conversely the Ce6 oxyhydroxide has an octahedral structure that is not conducive to hydrolysis. In addition to the c-s clusters, open-shell (o-s) oxyhydroxides and superoxides are also formed, and they become more prominent as the size of the clusters increases, suggesting that the larger ceria clusters have an increased ability to stabilize a non-bonding electron. The overall intensity of the clusters tends to monotonically decrease as the cluster size increases, however this trend is interrupted at Ce13, which is significantly more stable compared to neighboring congeners, suggesting formation of

  16. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Kim, Byung J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Champaign, IL 61826-9005 (United States); Oh, Seok-Young, E-mail: quartzoh@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} Ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. {yields} DNAN is identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. {yields} Iron treatment not only removes energetic compounds but also eliminates the toxic constituents that inhibit the subsequent microbial process. - Abstract: US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21

  17. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. → DNAN is identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. → Iron treatment not only removes energetic compounds but also eliminates the toxic constituents that inhibit the subsequent microbial process. - Abstract: US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO4-) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21 wastewater was rapidly decreased to

  18. Cerium tartrate as a corrosion inhibitor for AA 2024-T3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cerium tartrate was found to be an effective inhibitor for AA 2024-T3. • Both anodic and cathodic inhibitions were present during the corrosion process. • The corrosion of Al2CuMg phase was well inhibited by cerium tartrate. - Abstract: A new corrosion inhibitor, cerium tartrate, was synthetized. The inhibition behavior of cerium tartrate for 2024-T3 aluminum alloy was investigated in 0.05 M NaCl solution. The immersion tests indicate that the corrosion of Al2CuMg phase was well inhibited. The electrochemical results show that both anodic and cathodic inhibitions are present during the corrosion process. The surface characterizations reveal that the protective film of cerium tartrate inhibits the dealloying of Al2CuMg phase in the initial stage, and then cerium ions transform to cerium oxide/hydroxides and appear at the Al2CuMg phase, blocking the further corrosion at those corrosion sites

  19. Nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and cerium dioxide-titanium dioxide composite thin films on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two series of composite thin films were deposited on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD)-nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and nanoparticulate cerium dioxide embedded in a titanium dioxide matrix. The films were analysed by a range of techniques including UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis by X-rays. The AACVD prepared films showed the functional properties of photocatalysis and super-hydrophilicity. The CeO2 nanoparticle thin films displaying photocatalysis and photo-induced hydrophilicity almost comparable to that of anatase titania.

  20. Cathodic electrodeposition of cerium-based oxides on carbon steel from concentrated cerium nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlaoui, Y. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Pedraza, F. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: fpedraza@univ-lr.fr; Remazeilles, C.; Cohendoz, S.; Rebere, C. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Tifouti, L. [Laboratoire de Genie de l' Environnement, Universite Badji Mokhtar, BP 1223, 23020 El Hadjar-Annaba (Algeria); Creus, J. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France)

    2009-02-15

    In this work the elaboration by cathodic electrodeposition of cerium-based oxides on carbon steel from relatively concentrated cerium nitrate solutions is investigated. In particular, the study presented here (Part I) focuses on the electrochemical and analytical characterisation of the films and on the correlations between the electrochemical features and the characteristics of the layers. The effect of other parameters such as concentration, temperature, pH and additives to improve the behaviour of the film against corrosion will be investigated in part II of the study. The electrochemical characterisation will reveal that Ce(IV)-steel interactions can be responsible for some weak electrochemical waves appearing in the cyclic voltammograms that often are attributed to oxygen or nitrates reduction. This results from the oxidation of Ce(III) solutions to Ce(IV) in contact with air. Furthermore, the deposits strongly depend on the applied current density. Low current densities do not render fully covering deposits on the steel and a carbonated green rust will appear. On the contrary, the increase of the current density leads to denser layers of relatively small crystallite size that readily covers the steel surface. The deposits have a needle-like morphology and the Ce content achieves a plateau of about 20-22 at.%. However, a significant network of cracks appears probably occurring during the deposition process itself. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicate that the deposits are not fully crystalline after 550 deg. C in contrast with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns that unambiguously show a fluorite-type CeO{sub 2} phase whose crystallite size decreases with increasing the current density. The rinsing medium also brings about different features of the films. Rinsing with water allows to incorporate more nitrates and to adsorb CO{sub 2} than when rinsing with ethanol. However, R-OH bonds will be trapped in the latter.

  1. Cathodic electrodeposition of cerium-based oxides on carbon steel from concentrated cerium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the elaboration by cathodic electrodeposition of cerium-based oxides on carbon steel from relatively concentrated cerium nitrate solutions is investigated. In particular, the study presented here (Part I) focuses on the electrochemical and analytical characterisation of the films and on the correlations between the electrochemical features and the characteristics of the layers. The effect of other parameters such as concentration, temperature, pH and additives to improve the behaviour of the film against corrosion will be investigated in part II of the study. The electrochemical characterisation will reveal that Ce(IV)-steel interactions can be responsible for some weak electrochemical waves appearing in the cyclic voltammograms that often are attributed to oxygen or nitrates reduction. This results from the oxidation of Ce(III) solutions to Ce(IV) in contact with air. Furthermore, the deposits strongly depend on the applied current density. Low current densities do not render fully covering deposits on the steel and a carbonated green rust will appear. On the contrary, the increase of the current density leads to denser layers of relatively small crystallite size that readily covers the steel surface. The deposits have a needle-like morphology and the Ce content achieves a plateau of about 20-22 at.%. However, a significant network of cracks appears probably occurring during the deposition process itself. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicate that the deposits are not fully crystalline after 550 deg. C in contrast with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns that unambiguously show a fluorite-type CeO2 phase whose crystallite size decreases with increasing the current density. The rinsing medium also brings about different features of the films. Rinsing with water allows to incorporate more nitrates and to adsorb CO2 than when rinsing with ethanol. However, R-OH bonds will be trapped in the latter

  2. Effect of nitrate, acetate, and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Rolston, Dennis E; Hristova, Krassimira R; Scow, Kate M

    2011-05-01

    The effect of nitrate, acetate, and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared with unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting that the PRB preferentially use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In contrast, nitrate eliminated the inhibitory effect of acetate amendment on perchlorate reduction and increased the rate and the extent, possibly because the preceding nitrate reduction/denitrification decreased the acetate concentration that was inhibitory to the native PRB. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, perchlorate reductase gene (pcrA) copies, representing PRB densities, increased with either perchlorate or nitrate reduction, suggesting that either perchlorate or nitrate stimulates the growth of the PRB. In contrast, in acetate-amended soil pcrA increased only when perchlorate was depleted: a large portion of the PRB may have not utilized nitrate in this amendment. Nitrate addition did not alter the distribution of the dominant pcrA clones in hydrogen-amended soil, likely because of the functional redundancy of PRB as nitrate-reducers/denitrifiers, whereas acetate selected different pcrA clones from those with hydrogen amendment. PMID:21284679

  3. Electrorheological Effects of Cerium-Doped TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹剑波; 赵晓鹏

    2001-01-01

    It is found that the doping of cerium ion into anatase TiO2 can improve the electrorheological (ER) effects of TiO2 and broaden the operational temperature range. Especially, the substitution of 7-11 mol% of the cerium dopant for Ti can obtain a relatively high shear stress, t-7.4kPa (at 4kV/mm), which is ten times larger than that of pure TiO2 ER fluid. Also, the typical Ce-doped TiO2 ER fluid shows the highest shear stress at 80℃, but 40℃ for pure TiO2 ER fluid. The dielectric loss and dielectric constant at a low frequency of TiO2 is improved by the doping of cerium, and the temperature dependence of the dielectric properties shows an obvious differnce between pure and doped TiO2 ER fluids. These can well explain the ER behaviour of doped TiO2. Furthermore, the change of rheological and dielectric properties is discussed on the basis of the lattice distortion and defects in TiO2 arising from the doping of cerium.

  4. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boiko R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search, 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β. The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  5. Enhanced K-edge angiography utilizing cerium-target diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerium-target x-ray tube is useful in order to perform cone-beam K-edge angiography because Kα rays from the cerium target are absorbed effectively by iodine-based contrast mediums. The x-ray generator consists of a main controller, an x-ray tube unit with a high-voltage circuit and an insulation transformer, and a personal computer. The tube is a glass-enclosed diode with a cerium target and a 0.5-mm-thick beryllium window. The maximum tube voltage and current were 65 kV and 0.4 mA, respectively, and the focal-spot sizes were approximately 1 x 1 mm. Sharp cerium Kα lines were left using a barium sulfate filter, and the x-ray intensity was 16.8 μGy/s at 1.0 m from the source with a tube voltage of 60 kV and a current of 0.40 mA. Angiography was performed with an x-ray film (Fuji IX 100) using iodine-based microspheres 15 μm in diameter. In angiography of non-living animals, we observed fine blood vessels of 100 μm or less with high contrasts. (author)

  6. Electrodeposition of cerium from aqueous cerous chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium was plated as a grey, metallic, adherent deposit from aqueous cerous chloride baths containing certain organic addition agents. The cathodic current efficiency was determined for each case. Chemical analysis indicates that the purity of the metal is better than 99.0 per cent. (author). 7 refs

  7. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... complexes. 721.8657 Section 721.8657 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance..., hydroxy oleate propionate complexes (PMN P-99-0026) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. Thermoluminescence studies in cerium doped NaCl crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium is known to enter substitutionally in trivalent state when doped in alkali halides. Cerium doped NaCl crystals exhibit greatly enhanced thermoluminescence output upon X-irradiation at RT, the intensity of emission being about 10 times that in undoped crystals for similar dosage of irradiation. The cerium doped crystals give upon X-irradiation a very intense glow peak at 145degC with shoulders at 120degC and 210degC. Upon partially bleaching the crystal with F-light, the peak at 120degC becomes prominent probably due to faster bleaching of the glow at 145degC. From further optical bleaching studies, it is concluded that the glow peak at around 120degC is due to cerium centres in the irradiated crystal and the 145degC peak due to F centres. This F centre emission occurs at lower temperature, compared to that in the undoped crystals where it occurs at around 180degC. The spectral emission in the Ce doped crystals is in the blue-green region as compared to the emission in the blue region in undoped crystals. The trap depth and other parameters of the 120degC glow peak are estimated by the total curve fitting method. (author)

  9. Competition between magnetic order and Kondo effect in cerium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a mean-field analysis of the competition between magnetic order and Kondo effect in a Kondo-lattice model usually employed to discuss properties of certain cerium compounds. A phase diagram is obtained showing an antiferromagnetic phase and a Kondo-compensated regime, in agreement with the Doniach diagram. A general discussion of the mean-field approach is also presented

  10. Electrical measurements in the cerium oxide doped samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical behaviour of an interface formed by cerium oxide doped system has been studied. The system was (Ce O2)1-0,005 (Y O 1,5)0,005/(Ce O2)1-0,14(Y O 1,5)0,14. This work relates results of impedance analysis, and curves U(I) at different temperatures and polarizations conditions. (author)

  11. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, R. S.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search), 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β). The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides) was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  12. A rapid and simple method for the separation of TBP-dodecane by perchloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic solvents, including TBP etc., are widely used as an extractant, and treated and disposed by storage, incineration, and absorption into absorbent after they were used. Any of those methods does not aim at recycling of solvents, treating concurrently the extractant and the diluent without separating them. In this paper, a test is reported on the TBP-dodecane separation by perchloric acid for a separation test of the diluent from the extractant as a first step toward recycling. Basically this separation method is already reported by P. Mark et al. as a method for the analysis of TBP, but it requires a large amount of perchloric acid. With a further detailed study of the perchloric acid effects on the TBP-dodecane separation, it was made clear that the separation is possible by adding a fixed amount of TBP contacted with perchloric acid to the TBP-dodecane solvent. In this paper, its outline is presented. (author)

  13. ANALYSIS OF HYDROPONIC FERTILIZER MATRIXES FOR PERCHLORATE: COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven retail hydroponic nitrate fertilizer products, two liquid and five solid, were comparatively analyzed for the perchlorate anion (ClO4-) by ion chromatography (IC) with suppressed conductivity detection, complexation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (cESI-MS), norma...

  14. Radioiodine tracers as useful tools in studies of thyrotoxic effects of exogenous bromide and perchlorate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the use of 125I and 131I radionuclides, we followed the effects of exogenous bromide and perchlorate ions on the metabolism of iodine and of thyroid hormone in the rat. The presumed thyrotoxic effects of bromide and perchlorate have been confirmed and quantified. Correct assay conditions for the radiometric determination of the enzyme activity of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) have been established. The use of the adapted radiometric assay revealed a divergent influence of bromide and perchlorate ions on the TPO activity in the rat thyroids. Excessive bromide exerted a biphasic effect, depending on the extent of bromide intake in the animals. In contrast, in all the rats that were administered with high amounts of perchlorate were found elevated TPO activities. (author)

  15. On the stability of perchlorate ions against reductive attacks in electrochemical systems and in the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GYŐZŐ G. LÁNG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The problems related to the electrochemical/electrocatalytic stability of perchlorate ions are reviewed in the light of recent experimental results. The electrocatalytic, catalytic, and electrochemical reduction processes are presented and the links between them are outlined. Some possible mechanisms of the complicated reduction processes are discussed. Various methods for the detection of reduction process are presented, e.g. voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and radiotracer methods. Environmental aspects and some methods for perchlorate removal and wastewater treatment are briefly summarized.

  16. The perchlorate discharge test with 123I for the diagnosis of the Pendred syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for the diagnosis of the Pendred Syndrome in children by the Perchlorate discharge test using 123I is described. The older child, who has the Pendred Syndrome and the obligatory hearing deficit, frequently has neither a goitre nor hypothyroidism, but other investigations (bone growth, scars and function tests) can also show changes. However a more certain diagnosis of this disorder in children is possible by the perchlorate discharge test using 123I. (orig.)

  17. Behavioral response of dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yvonne; Gustavson, Ruth L.; Ali, Nadia; Weber, Karrie A.; Westphal, Lacey L.; Coates, John D.

    2009-01-01

    The response behavior of three dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors (nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate) was investigated with two different assays. The observed response was species-specific, dependent on the prior growth conditions, and was inhibited by oxygen. We observed attraction toward nitrate when Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB and Azospira suillum strain PS were grown with nitrate. When D. aromatica and Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB were ...

  18. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment. PMID:25828411

  19. Cerium as a surrogate in the plutonium immobilization waste form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, James Christopher

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, approximately 50 tonnes (MT) of weapons useable plutonium (Pu) has been identified as excess. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has decided that at least a portion of this material will be immobilized in a titanate-based ceramic for final disposal in a geologic repository. The baseline formulation was designed to produce a ceramic consisting primarily of a highly substituted pyrochlore with minor amounts of brannerite and hafnia-substituted rutile. Since development studies with actual actinide materials is difficult, surrogates have been used to facilitate testing. Cerium has routinely been used as an actinide surrogate in actinide chemistry and processing studies. Although cerium appeared as an adequate physical surrogate for powder handling and general processing studies, cerium was found to act significantly different from a chemical perspective in the Pu ceramic form. The reduction of cerium at elevated temperatures caused different reaction paths toward densification of the respective forms resulting in different phase assemblages and microstructural features. Single-phase fabrication studies and cerium oxidation state analyses were performed to further quantify these behavioral differences. These studies indicated that the major phases in the final phase assemblages contained point defects likely leading to their stability. Additionally, thermochemical arguments predicted that the predominant pyrochlore phase in the ceramic was metastable. The apparent metastabilty associated with primary phase in the Pu ceramic form indicated that additional studies must be performed to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of these compounds. Moreover, the metastability of this predominant phase must be considered in assessment of long-term behavior (e.g. radiation stability) of this ceramic.

  20. Preparation, Characterization and Antibacterial Property of Cerium Substituted Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Yingguang; Yang Zhuoru; Cheng Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and cerium substituted hydroxyapatite (CeHAP) with the atomic ratio of Ce/[Ca+Ce] (xCe) from 0 to 0.2 were prepared by sol-gel-supercritical fluid drying (SCFD) method. The nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, XRD, and FT-IR, and the effects of cerium on crystal structure, crystallinity, and particle shape were discussed. With the tests of bacterial inhibition zone and antibacterial ratio, the antibacterial property of HAP and CeHAP nanoparticles on Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus were researched. Results showed that the nanoparticles of HAP and CeHAP could be made by sol-gel-SCFD, cerium could partially substitute for calcium and enter the structure of HAP. After substitution, the crystallinity, the IR wavenumbers of bonds in CeHAP decreased gradually with increase of cerium substitution, and the morphology of the nanoparticles changed from the short rod-shaped HAP to the needle-shaped CeHAP. The nanoparticles of HAP and CeHAP with xCe below 0.08 had antibacterial property only forcibly contacting with the test bacteria at the test concentration of 0.1 g·ml-1, however, the CeHAP nanoparticles had antibacterial ability at that concentration no matter statically or dynamically contacting with the test bacteria when xCe was above 0.08, and the antibacterial ability gets better with the increase of xCe, indicating that the antibacterial property was improved after calcium was partially substituted by cerium. The improved antibacterial effects of CeHAP nanoparticle on Lactobacillus showed its potential ability to anticaries.

  1. Microbial redox processes in deep subsurface environments and the potential application of (perchlorate in oil reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G Liebensteiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of microorganisms to thrive under oxygen-free conditions in subsurface environments relies on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized elements, such as sulfate, ferric iron or CO2, coupled to the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. A broad phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms from subsurface environments has been described using isolation-based and advanced molecular ecological techniques. The physiological groups reviewed here comprise iron-, manganese- and nitrate-reducing microorganisms. In the context of recent findings also the potential of chlorate and perchlorate [jointly termed (perchlorate] reduction in oil reservoirs will be discussed. Special attention is given to elevated temperatures that are predominant in the deep subsurface. Microbial reduction of (perchlorate is a thermodynamically favorable redox process, also at high temperature. However, knowledge about (perchlorate reduction at elevated temperatures is still scarce and restricted to members of the Firmicutes and the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus. By analyzing the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of functional genes in (metagenome databases and combining this knowledge with extrapolations to earlier-made physiological observations we speculate on the potential of (perchlorate reduction in the subsurface and more precisely oil fields. In addition, the application of (perchlorate for bioremediation, souring control and microbial enhanced oil recovery are addressed.

  2. Preliminary analyses for perchlorate in selected natural materials and their derivative products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orris, G.J.; Harvey, G.J.; Tsui, D.T.; Eldrige, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Increasing concern about sources of perchlorate contamination in ground and surface waters has led to interest in identifying potential sources of natural perchlorate and products derived from these natural sources. To date, most perchlorate found in ground and surface waters has been attributed to its major uses as an oxidizer in solid propellants for rockets, in fireworks and other explosives, and a variety of other uses of man-made perchlorate salts. However, perchlorate found in the soils, surface water, and ground water of some locations cannot be linked to an anthropogenic source. This paper contains preliminary data on the detection and non-detection of perchlorate in a variety of natural materials and their products, including some fertilizer materials. These data were previously presented at two conferences; once in poster session and once orally (Harvey and others, 1999; Orris and others, 2000). Although the results presented here are included in a journal article awaiting publication, the lack of public information on this topic has led to repeated requests for the data used as the basis for our presentations in 1999 and 2000.

  3. A screened hybrid density functional study on energetic complexes: Cobalt, nickel and copper carbohydrazide perchlorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The molecular geometry, electronic structure, infrared spectra, and heats of reaction and formation of cobalt and nickel tris(carbohydrazide) perchlorates as well as copper bis(carbohydrazide) perchlorate are investigated using the HSE screened hybrid density functional. The metal-ligand interaction, thermal stability, and red-shift of the amino stretching vibrations of these complexes are also discussed. Moreover, it is found there is a relationship between the energy gap and impact sensitivity. - Abstract: The molecular geometry, electronic structure, infrared spectra and thermochemical properties of cobalt and nickel tris(carbohydrazide) perchlorates (CoCP and NiCP) as well as copper bis(carbohydrazide) perchlorate (CuCP) were investigated using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) screened hybrid density functional. The results show that both perchlorate ions coordinate with the copper atom, and the interactions between copper and perchlorate are ionic, whereas all the metal-carbohydrazide interactions are covalent. Due to the delocalization from the σN-H bond orbital to the n*M antibond orbital, the amino stretching vibrations of these complexes show considerable red-shift compared with those of free carbohydrazide ligand. The calculated heats of reaction and formation indicate that the formations of these complexes are exothermic, and the order of their thermal stability is NiCP > CoCP > CuCP. These agree well with the experimental results. Finally, we find that there is a relationship between the energy gap and impact sensitivity.

  4. Mechanistic Studies on the Radiolytic Decomposition of Perchlorates on the Martian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew M.; Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-04-01

    Perchlorates—inorganic compounds carrying the perchlorate ion ({{ClO}}4{}-)—were discovered at the north polar landing site of the Phoenix spacecraft and at the southern equatorial landing site of the Curiosity Rover within the Martian soil at levels of 0.4-0.6 wt%. This study explores in laboratory experiments the temperature-dependent decomposition mechanisms of hydrated perchlorates—namely magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O)—and provides yields of the oxygen-bearing species formed in these processes at Mars-relevant surface temperatures from 165 to 310 K in the presence of galactic cosmic-ray particles (GCRs). Our experiments reveal that the response of the perchlorates to the energetic electrons is dictated by the destruction of the perchlorate ion ({{ClO}}4{}-) and the inherent formation of chlorates ({{ClO}}3{}-) plus atomic oxygen (O). Isotopic substitution experiments reveal that the oxygen is released solely from the perchlorate ion and not from the water of hydration (H2O). As the mass spectrometer detects only molecular oxygen (O2) and no atomic oxygen (O), atomic oxygen recombines to molecular oxygen within the perchlorates, with the overall yield of molecular oxygen increasing as the temperature drops from 260 to 160 K. Absolute destruction rates and formation yields of oxygen are provided for the planetary modeling community.

  5. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: perchlorate-free red- and green-light illuminants based on 5-aminotetrazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Moretti, Jared D

    2013-09-16

    Prototype testing of perchlorate-free hand-held signal illuminants for the US Army's M126 A1 red-star and M195 green-star parachute illuminants are described. Although previous perchlorate-free variants for these items have been developed based on high-nitrogen compounds that are not readily available, the new formulations consist of anhydrous 5-aminotetrazole as the suitable perchlorate replacement. Compared to the perchlorate-containing control, the disclosed illuminants exhibited excellent stabilities toward various ignition stimuli and had excellent pyrotechnic performance. The illuminants are important from both military and civil fireworks perspectives, as the perchlorate-free nature of the illuminants adequately address environmental concerns associated with perchlorate-containing red- and green-light-emitting illuminants. PMID:23950104

  6. Determination of silver and cerium in the liver and the kidney from a severely burned infant treated with silver sulfadiazine and cerium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver and cerium in the liver and the kidney from severely burned infant were analyzed by neutron activation method. The patient was treated topically with cerium nitrate/silver sulfadiazine cream and cerium nitrate solution for 3 months. Then, the treatment with these drugs was stopped because o f abdominal distention. The patient died 1 month after the cessation of the treatment with these drugs. The tissue specimens, blank liver sample and reference standards were irradiated with TRIGA MARK II Reactor of Rikkyo University. About 1 month after the irradiation, the activities were measured with a Ge(Li) detector coupled to a 4096 channel pulse height analyzer. A large amount of silver was detected both in the liver and in the kidney and a trace of cerium only in the liver. A considerable amount of silver was detected in the liver and its quantity was about 1600 times more than that of normal livers reported by Hamilton, Minski and Cleary (1972 -- 73). Neither silver nor cerium were detected in the blank liver. These results suggest that prolonged topical chemotherapy of cerium nitrate/silver sulfadiazine cream and cerium nitrate solution for the extensive burn injuries causes considerable absorption of silver and cerium into the liver and the kidney. (author)

  7. [Determination of silver and cerium in the liver and the kidney from a severely burned infant treated with silver sulfadiazine and cerium nitrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, K

    1983-02-01

    Silver and cerium in the liver and the kidney from severely burned infant were analyzed by neutron activation method. The patient was treated topically with cerium nitrate/silver sulfadiazine cream and cerium nitrate solution for 3 months. Then, the treatment with these drugs was stopped because of abdominal distention. The patient died 1 month after the cessation of the treatment with these drugs. The tissue specimens, blank liver sample and reference standards were irradiated with TRIGA MARK II Reactor of Rikkyo University. About 1 month after the irradiation, the activities were measured with a Ge(Li) detector coupled to a 4096 channel pulse height analyzer. A large amount of silver was detected both in the liver and in the kidney and a trace of cerium only in the liver. A considerable amount of silver was detected in the liver and its quantity was about 1600 times more than that of normal livers reported by Hamilton, Minski and Cleary (1972-73). Neither silver nor cerium were detected in the blank liver. These results suggest that prolonged topical chemotherapy of cerium nitrate/silver sulfadiazine cream and cerium nitrate solution for the extensive burn injuries causes considerable absorption of silver and cerium into the liver and the kidney. PMID:6867381

  8. Determination of silver and cerium in the liver and the kidney from a severely burned infant treated with silver sulfadiazine and cerium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirakawa, Keiko (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo)

    1983-02-01

    Silver and cerium in the liver and the kidney from severely burned infant were analyzed by neutron activation method. The patient was treated topically with cerium nitrate/silver sulfadiazine cream and cerium nitrate solution for 3 months. Then, the treatment with these drugs was stopped because of abdominal distention. The patient died 1 month after the cessation of the treatment with these drugs. The tissue specimens, blank liver sample and reference standards were irradiated with TRIGA MARK II Reactor of Rikkyo University. About 1 month after the irradiation, the activities were measured with a Ge(Li) detector coupled to a 4096 channel pulse height analyzer. A large amount of silver was detected both in the liver and in the kidney and a trace of cerium only in the liver. A considerable amount of silver was detected in the liver and its quantity was about 1600 times more than that of normal livers reported by Hamilton, Minski and Cleary (1972 -- 73). Neither silver nor cerium were detected in the blank liver. These results suggest that prolonged topical chemotherapy of cerium nitrate/silver sulfadiazine cream and cerium nitrate solution for the extensive burn injuries causes considerable absorption of silver and cerium into the liver and the kidney.

  9. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Anna eEngelbrektson; Christopher eHubbard; Lauren eTom; Aaron eBOUSSINA; Yong Tae eJin; Hayden eWong; Yvette Marisa Piceno; Hans Karl Carlson; Mark eConrad; Andersen, Gary L.; Coates, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 m...

  10. High-performing red-light-emitting pyrotechnic illuminants through the use of perchlorate-free materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Poret, Jay C

    2014-07-01

    The development of perchlorate-free M662 40 mm illuminating pyrotechnic compositions is described. On the bases of cost, performance, and sensitivity, potassium periodate was determined to be most effective potassium perchlorate replacement in the compositions tested. The optimal periodate-based composition exceeded the performance of the perchlorate-containing control, exhibited low sensitivity values to impact, friction, and electrostatic discharge, and had high thermal onset temperatures. PMID:24939042

  11. Fundamental aspects of regenerative cerium oxide nanoparticles and their applications in nanobiotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Swanand D.

    Cerium oxide has been used extensively for various applications over the past two decades. The use of cerium oxide nanoparticles is beneficial in present applications and can open avenues for future applications. The present study utilizes the microemulsion technique to synthesize uniformly distributed cerium oxide nanoparticles. The same technique was also used to synthesize cerium oxide nanoparticles doped with trivalent elements (La and Nd). The fundamental study of cerium oxide nanoparticles identified variations in properties as a function of particle size and also due to doping with trivalent elements (La and Nd). It was found that the lattice parameter of cerium oxide nanoparticles increases with decrease in particle size. Also Raman allowed mode shift to lower energies and the peak at 464 cm-1 becomes broader and asymmetric. The size dependent changes in cerium oxide were correlated to increase in oxygen vacancy concentration in the cerium oxide lattice. The doping of cerium oxide nanoparticles with trivalent elements introduces more oxygen vacancies and expands the cerium oxide lattice further (in addition to the lattice expansion due to the size effect). The lattice expansion is greater for La-doped cerium oxide nanoparticles compared to Nd-doping due to the larger ionic radius of La compared to Nd, the lattice expansion is directly proportional to the dopant concentration. The synthesized cerium oxide nanoparticles were used to develop an electrochemical biosensor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The sensor was useful to detect H2O2 concentrations as low as 1muM in water. Also the preliminary testing of the sensor on tomato stem and leaf extracts indicated that the sensor can be used in practical applications such as plant physiological studies etc. The nanomolar concentrations of cerium oxide nanoparticles were also found to be useful in decreasing ROS (reactive oxygen species) mediated cellular damages in various in vitro cell cultures. Cerium oxide

  12. Perchlorate in the San Antonio Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlquist, L.; Rajagapolan, S.; Jackson, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in drinking-water supplies and can have adverse health effects on humans by disrupting thyroid function. Perchlorate and other constituents were analyzed from ground-water samples that were collected in 2004-06 from 99 wells completed in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The fractured karstic carbonate Edwards aquifer, declared a sole-source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, supplies nearly one-half million acre-feet per year for drinking water and other uses. Wells were located in a variety of land-use settings that included rangeland, agriculture, and urban; well types included domestic, public, and observation. Perchlorate was detected in 98 percent of the samples, and concentrations ranged from less than 0.05 to 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). Five samples contained concentrations greater than 1 μg/L and were from wells in the urban northern San Antonio area. The results from three samples that contained perchlorate at concentrations greater than 2 μg/L are anomalous. Chloride concentration ranged from 5.6 to 69 milligrams per liter, typical for freshwater in the Edwards aquifer. No significant (r2 greater than 0.7) correlations were observed when perchlorate concentrations were correlated with depth to water, total depth of well, or concentrations of bicarbonate, nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, bromide, chloride, fluoride, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, strontium, and dissolved solids. Tritium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.9 tritium units in 31 of the 99 samples and indicate at least some fraction of modern water (post-atmospheric nuclear tests). No correlation between apparent tritium age and perchlorate concentration was observed, a possible indication that anthropogenic influences are not affecting observed perchlorate concentrations. The molar ratio of chloride to perchlorate ranged from 17,000 to 320

  13. Study of microbial perchlorate reduction: Considering of multiple pH, electron acceptors and donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xing [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Gao, Baoyu, E-mail: bygao@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jin, Bo [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005,Australia (Australia); Zhen, Hu [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Xiaoyi [CSIRO Land and Water, Gate 5, Waite Road, Urrbrae, SA 5064 (Australia); Dai, Ming [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005,Australia (Australia)

    2015-03-21

    Graphical abstract: Schemes of perchlorate reduction in ClO{sub 4}{sup −}/ClO{sub 3}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −} e{sup −}acceptor systems. - Highlights: • We created a multiple electron acceptor/donor system for ClO{sub 4}{sup −} reduction. • Nitrate reduction was inhibited when using perchlorate-grown Azospira sp. KJ. • Reduction proceeded as an order of ClO{sub 3}{sup −}, ClO{sub 4}{sup −}and NO{sub 3}{sup −}. • Oxidation of acetate was inhibited by succinate in acetate–succinate series. - Abstract: Bioremediation of perchlorate-cotaminated water by a heterotrophic perchlorate reducing bacterium creates a multiple electron acceptor-donor system. We experimentally determined the perchlorate reduction by Azospira sp. KJ at multiple pH, electron acceptors and donors systems; this was the aim of this study. Perchlorate reduction was drastically inhibited at the pH 6.0, and the maximum reduction of perchlorate by Azospira sp. KJ was observed at pH value of 8.0. Perchlorate reduction was retarded in ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–ClO{sub 3}{sup −}, ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–ClO{sub 3}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −},and ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −} acceptor systems, while being completely inhibited by the additional O{sub 2} in the ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–O{sub 2} acceptor system. The reduction proceeded as an order of ClO{sub 3}{sup −}, ClO{sub 4}{sup −}, and NO{sub 3}{sup −} in the ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–ClO{sub 3}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −} system. K{sub S,}v{sub max}, and q{sub max} obtained at different e{sup −} acceptor and donor conditions are calculated as 140.5–190.6 mg/L, 8.7–13.2 mg-perchlorate/L-h, and 0.094–0.16 mg-perchlorate/mg-DW-h, respectively.

  14. Study of microbial perchlorate reduction: Considering of multiple pH, electron acceptors and donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Schemes of perchlorate reduction in ClO4−/ClO3−–NO3− e−acceptor systems. - Highlights: • We created a multiple electron acceptor/donor system for ClO4− reduction. • Nitrate reduction was inhibited when using perchlorate-grown Azospira sp. KJ. • Reduction proceeded as an order of ClO3−, ClO4−and NO3−. • Oxidation of acetate was inhibited by succinate in acetate–succinate series. - Abstract: Bioremediation of perchlorate-cotaminated water by a heterotrophic perchlorate reducing bacterium creates a multiple electron acceptor-donor system. We experimentally determined the perchlorate reduction by Azospira sp. KJ at multiple pH, electron acceptors and donors systems; this was the aim of this study. Perchlorate reduction was drastically inhibited at the pH 6.0, and the maximum reduction of perchlorate by Azospira sp. KJ was observed at pH value of 8.0. Perchlorate reduction was retarded in ClO4−–ClO3−, ClO4−–ClO3−–NO3−,and ClO4−–NO3− acceptor systems, while being completely inhibited by the additional O2 in the ClO4−–O2 acceptor system. The reduction proceeded as an order of ClO3−, ClO4−, and NO3− in the ClO4−–ClO3−–NO3− system. KS,vmax, and qmax obtained at different e− acceptor and donor conditions are calculated as 140.5–190.6 mg/L, 8.7–13.2 mg-perchlorate/L-h, and 0.094–0.16 mg-perchlorate/mg-DW-h, respectively

  15. Synthesis and crystal kinetics of cerium oxide nanocrystallites prepared by co-precipitation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, C.J., E-mail: cjshih@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetics Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shi-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y.J. [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Hon, M.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    Cerium oxide nanocrystallites were synthesized at a relatively low temperature using cerium nitrate as starting materials in a water solution by a co-precipitation process. Effect of calcination temperature on the crystallite growth of cerium oxide nano-powders was investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. The crystallization temperature of the cerium oxide powders was estimated to be about 273 K by XRD analysis. When calcined from 473 to 1273 K, the crystallization of the face-centered cubic phase was observed by XRD. The crystallite size of the cerium oxide increased from 10.0 to 43.8 nm with calcining temperature increasing from 673 to 1273 K. The activation energy for growth of cerium oxide nanoparticles was found to be 16.0 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  16. Synthesis and crystal kinetics of cerium oxide nanocrystallites prepared by co-precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium oxide nanocrystallites were synthesized at a relatively low temperature using cerium nitrate as starting materials in a water solution by a co-precipitation process. Effect of calcination temperature on the crystallite growth of cerium oxide nano-powders was investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. The crystallization temperature of the cerium oxide powders was estimated to be about 273 K by XRD analysis. When calcined from 473 to 1273 K, the crystallization of the face-centered cubic phase was observed by XRD. The crystallite size of the cerium oxide increased from 10.0 to 43.8 nm with calcining temperature increasing from 673 to 1273 K. The activation energy for growth of cerium oxide nanoparticles was found to be 16.0 kJ mol-1.

  17. Effect of cerium modification on microstructure and properties of hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi, Xiaohui, E-mail: mkmkzxh@hotmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043, Hebei Province (China); Liu, Jinzhi [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043, Hebei Province (China); Xing, Jiandong; Ma, Shengqiang [State Key Laboratory Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2014-05-01

    The effect of cerium modification on the microstructure and properties of hypereutectic high chromium cast iron primarily containing 4.0 wt% C and 20.0 wt% Cr was studied by means of optical microscopy, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides were refined obviously when cerium was added in the melt. Ce{sub 2}S{sub 3} was found in the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides and acted as the heterogeneous substrate of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides. The impact toughness of the specimen modified with 0.5 wt% cerium increased by 50% compared with the specimen without cerium modification. The hardness of the alloy modified with cerium increased slightly compared with the specimen without cerium modification.

  18. Particle size distribution and perchlorate levels in settled dust from urban roads, parks, and roofs in Chengdu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwen; Shen, Yang; Pi, Lu; Hu, Wenli; Chen, Mengqin; Luo, Yan; Li, Zhi; Su, Shijun; Ding, Sanglan; Gan, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    A total of 27 settled dust samples were collected from urban roads, parks, and roofs in Chengdu, China to investigate particle size distribution and perchlorate levels in different size fractions. Briefly, fine particle size fractions (intake is safe to both children and adults in Chengdu, China. However, due to perchlorate mainly existing in fine particles, there is a potential for perchlorate to transfer into surface water and the atmosphere by runoff and wind erosion or traffic emission, and this could act as an important perchlorate pollution source for the indoor environment, and merits further study. PMID:26608047

  19. Americium(3) solvent extraction by oxides of dialkyl(diaryl)[dialkylcarbamoylmethyl]phosphines (CMPO) from perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of americium(3) from perchloric acid solutions by CMPO was investigated. It is shown that americium(3) is much more effectively extracted from perchloric acid solutions, than from nitric acid ones, and increase in americium distribution coefficient depends considerably on reagent nature. As a consequence, anomalous aryl effect increases significantly in perchloric acid solutions. The value of anomalous aryl effect depends directly on stoichiometry of extracted complexes in nitric acid and perchloric acid media. Conditions for extractional concentration of americium up to the 100-fold one with small reagent consumption were suggested

  20. Soil Flushing Through a Thick Vadose Zone: Perchlorate Removal Documented at Edwards AFB, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battey, T. F.; Shepard, A. J.; Tait, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    There are currently few viable alternatives for perchlorate remediation in the vadose zone, particularly for the relatively thick vadose zones that are typical in the arid southwest where many perchlorate sites occur. Perchlorate in the vadose zone occurs in the form of highly soluble salts that may represent a risk to human or ecological receptors, and may also represent a threat to the underlying groundwater. A soil flushing treatability study was conducted at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert of southern California at a site with a 129-foot thick vadose zone consisting primarily of clayey sand. This study utilized an infiltration gallery in conjunction with extraction, treatment, and re-injection of groundwater at the site, which contained perchlorate-contaminated soil and groundwater. The study objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the infiltration gallery to 1) introduce treated groundwater back into the aquifer and 2) wash the perchlorate from the vadose zone soils to the aquifer. The infiltration gallery consisted of slotted PVC pipes within a highly permeable engineered bed of washed gravel. The initial water introduced into the gallery was amended with potassium bromide tracer. A downhole neutron probe was used to track the movement of the wetting front downward and outward from the gallery. Successive neutron measurements in vertical access tubes revealed that the introduced water reached the 125-foot bottom of the access tubes 14 weeks after the water was introduced into the gallery. The bromide tracer was detected in groundwater immediately below the gallery approximately 1 week later. The infiltration gallery was able to sustain an average flow rate of 2.3 gallons per minute. Prior to infiltration, the perchlorate concentration in groundwater below the gallery was 4,500 µg/L. Approximately 18 weeks after the start of infiltration, a perchlorate spike of 72,400 µg/L was detected below the gallery. The increase in perchlorate

  1. Critical indices for reversible gamma-alpha phase transformation in metallic cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, E. D.; Tkachenko, T. B.

    1980-08-01

    Critical indices for cerium have been determined within the framework of the pseudobinary solution theory along the phase equilibrium curve, the critical isotherm, and the critical isobar. The results obtained verify the validity of relationships proposed by Rushbrook (1963), Griffiths (1965), and Coopersmith (1968). It is concluded that reversible gamma-alpha transformation in metallic cerium is a critical-type transformation, and cerium has a critical point on the phase diagram similar to the critical point of the liquid-vapor system.

  2. The effect of cerium valence states at cerium oxide nanoparticle surfaces on cell proliferation

    KAUST Repository

    Naganuma, Tamaki

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and controlling cell proliferation on biomaterial surfaces is critical for scaffold/artificial-niche design in tissue engineering. The mechanism by which underlying integrin ligates with functionalized biomaterials to induce cell proliferation is still not completely understood. In this study, poly-l-lactide (PL) scaffold surfaces were functionalized using layers of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs), which have recently attracted attention for use in therapeutic application due to their catalytic ability of Ce4+ and Ce3+ sites. To isolate the influence of Ce valance states of CNPs on cell proliferation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoblast-like cells (MG63) were cultured on the PL/CNP surfaces with dominant Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions. Despite cell type (hMSCs and MG63 cells), different surface features of Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions clearly promoted and inhibited cell spreading, migration and adhesion behavior, resulting in rapid and slow cell proliferation, respectively. Cell proliferation results of various modified CNPs with different surface charge and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, indicate that Ce valence states closely correlated with the specific cell morphologies and cell-material interactions that trigger cell proliferation. This finding suggests that the cell-material interactions, which influence cell proliferation, may be controlled by introduction of metal elements with different valence states onto the biomaterial surface. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (perchlorate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eEngelbrektson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (perchlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (perchlorate (10 mM. Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Perchlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (perchlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved.

  4. Study of cerium diffusion in undoped lithium-6 enriched glass with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Moore, Michael E.; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lukosi, Eric D.; Hayward, Jason P.

    2016-07-01

    Undoped lithium-6 enriched glasses coated with pure cerium (99.9%) with a gold protection layer on top were heated at three different temperatures (500, 550, and 600 °C) for varied durations (1, 2, and 4 h). Diffusion profiles of cerium in such glasses were obtained with the conventional Rutherford backscattering technique. Through fitting the diffusion profiles with the thin-film solution of Fick's second law, diffusion coefficients of cerium with different annealing temperatures and durations were solved. Then, the activation energy of cerium for the diffusion process in the studied glasses was found to be 114 kJ/mol with the Arrhenius equation.

  5. Doping of KDP single crystals with cerium: Growth and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The features of doping of KDP crystals with cerium ions and organocerium complexes with alizarin complexon and arsenazo III have been investigated. It is established that 'direct' doping by introducing cerium salts into the initial solution cannot be implemented. The effect of organometallic complexes of cerium on the crystal growth has been studied. Organocerium complexes predominantly enter the prismatic or pyramidal growth sectors. It is shown that the complex arsenazo III + Ce blocks the growth of the prismatic sector. Cerium-doped KDP crystals exhibit a photoluminescence band peaking at the wavelength λmax= 350 nm.

  6. Fabrication of mesoporous cerium dioxide films by cathodic electrodeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Ahn, Jae-Hoon; Park, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Gil-Pyo; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon

    2007-11-01

    Mesoporous cerium dioxide (Ceria, CeO2) thin films have been successfully electrodeposited onto ITO-coated glass substrates from an aqueous solution of cerium nitrate using CTAB (Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide) as a templating agent. The synthesized films underwent detailed characterizations. The crystallinity of synthesized CeO2 film was confirmed by XRD analysis and HR-TEM analysis, and surface morphology was investigated by SEM analysis. The presence of mesoporosity in fabricated films was confirmed by TEM and small angle X-ray analysis. As-synthesized film was observed from XRD analysis and HR-TEM image to have well-crystallized structure of cubic phase CeO2. Transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray analysis revealed the presence of uniform mesoporosity with a well-ordered lamellar phase in the CeO2 films electrodeposited with CTAB templating. PMID:18047150

  7. Antioxidant activity of levan coated cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Jung; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Levan coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (LCNPs) with the enhanced antioxidant activity were successfully synthesized and characterized. Levan and their derivatives are attractive for biomedical applications attributable to their antioxidant, anti-inflammation and anti-tumor properties. LCNPs were synthesized using the one-pot and green synthesis system with levan. For production of nanoparticles, levan plays a role as a stabilizing and reducing agent. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis showed that LCNPs successfully synthesized. The morphology and size of nanoparticles were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). LCNPs have good water solubility and stability. The conjugation of levan with cerium oxide nanoparticles improved antioxidant activity. Moreover the level of ROS was reduced after treatment of LCNPs to H2O2 stimulated NIH3T3 cells. These results demonstrate that the LCNPs are useful for applying of treatment of ROS induced diseases. PMID:27312651

  8. Adsorption of Fluoride Ion by Inorganic Cerium Based Adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao Zhongzhi(焦中志); Chen Zhonglin; Yang Min; Zhang Yu; Li Guibai

    2004-01-01

    Excess of fluoride in drinking water is harmful to human health, the concentration of F- ions must be maintained in the range of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/L. An inorganic cerium based adsorbent (CTA) is developed on the basis of research of adsorption of fluoride on cerium oxide hydrate. Some adsorption of fluoride by CTA adsorbent experiments were carried out, and results showed that CTA adsorbent has a quick adsorption speed and a large adsorption capacity. Adsorption follows Freundlich isotherm, and low pH value helps fluoride removal. Some physical-chemical characteristics of CTA adsorbent were experimented, fluoride removal mechanism was explored, and results showed that hydroxyl group of CTA adsorbent played an important role in the fluoride removal.

  9. Structure, phase transitions and molecular motions in 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czupinski, O.; Bator, G.; Ciunik, Z.; Jakubas, R.; Medycki, W.; Swiergiel, J.

    2002-09-01

    The crystal structure of the 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate (4-apyH)ClO4 has been determined at 100 K by means of x-ray diffraction as monoclinic, with space group P 21, with Z = 8. The crystal undergoes two structural phase transitions: one of first-order type, reversible, at 241/243 K (on cooling/heating respectively) and one of weakly first-order type, irreversible, at 277 K (on heating). The crystal dynamics is discussed on the basis of the temperature dependence of the 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance second moment (M2) and spin-lattice relaxation time T1. Both phase transitions are interpreted in terms of the changes in the motional state of (4-apyH)+ cations and ClO4- anions. The dielectric dispersion studies disclose a relaxation process over the high-temperature phase (above 241 K) in the audio-frequency region. The dielectric results are described by a Cole-Cole equation. The title crystal reveals pyroelectric properties below 241 K. The ferroelastic domain structure of (4-apyH)ClO4 is observed over the whole temperature range studied.

  10. Structure, phase transitions and molecular motions in 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of the 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate (4-apyH)ClO4 has been determined at 100 K by means of x-ray diffraction as monoclinic, with space group P 21, with Z=8. The crystal undergoes two structural phase transitions: one of first-order type, reversible, at 241/243 K (on cooling/heating respectively) and one of weakly first-order type, irreversible, at 277 K (on heating). The crystal dynamics is discussed on the basis of the temperature dependence of the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance second moment (M2) and spin-lattice relaxation time T1. Both phase transitions are interpreted in terms of the changes in the motional state of (4-apyH)+ cations and ClO4- anions. The dielectric dispersion studies disclose a relaxation process over the high-temperature phase (above 241 K) in the audio-frequency region. The dielectric results are described by a Cole-Cole equation. The title crystal reveals pyroelectric properties below 241 K. The ferroelastic domain structure of (4-apyH)ClO4 is observed over the whole temperature range studied. (author)

  11. Structure, phase transitions and molecular motions in 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czupinski, O.; Bator, G.; Ciunik, Z.; Jakubas, R. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland); Medycki, W.; Swiergiel, J. [Institute of Molecular Physics, PAS, Poznan (Poland)

    2002-09-16

    The crystal structure of the 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate (4-apyH)ClO{sub 4} has been determined at 100 K by means of x-ray diffraction as monoclinic, with space group P 2{sub 1}, with Z=8. The crystal undergoes two structural phase transitions: one of first-order type, reversible, at 241/243 K (on cooling/heating respectively) and one of weakly first-order type, irreversible, at 277 K (on heating). The crystal dynamics is discussed on the basis of the temperature dependence of the {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance second moment (M{sub 2}) and spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1}. Both phase transitions are interpreted in terms of the changes in the motional state of (4-apyH){sup +} cations and ClO{sub 4}- anions. The dielectric dispersion studies disclose a relaxation process over the high-temperature phase (above 241 K) in the audio-frequency region. The dielectric results are described by a Cole-Cole equation. The title crystal reveals pyroelectric properties below 241 K. The ferroelastic domain structure of (4-apyH)ClO{sub 4} is observed over the whole temperature range studied. (author)

  12. Iodine-deficient vegetarians: a hypothetical perchlorate-susceptible population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl; Dourson, Michael; Borak, Jonathan

    2005-06-01

    Recent risk assessments of environmental perchlorate have been subject to much debate. A particular concern is whether appropriate susceptible sub-populations have been identified. Iodine-deficient pregnant women, especially vegetarians, have been proposed as such a potential susceptible sub-population, but there is no evidence of iodine deficiency in the US population and the adequacy of iodine nutrition has not been studied in US vegetarians. To understand the possibility that US vegetarians might be iodine deficient, we reviewed the prevalence, demography, and lifestyle characteristics of US vegetarians as well as the world literature on iodine nutrition in vegetarians. Our findings indicate that strict vegetarians and vegans, who comprise probably less than 0.1% of the US population, have higher education, higher incomes, and healthier lifestyles than the general population. Field studies indicate that vegetarian diets need not lead to iodine deficiency and vegans may suffer excess iodine intake. It is remains uncertain whether there are iodine-deficient vegans or pregnant women in the US. Of more general concern is whether the 10-fold default uncertainty factor is needed for intraspecies (i.e., within human) variability to protect such hypothetical susceptible sub-populations. PMID:15896441

  13. Chlorine-36 abundance in natural and synthetic perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, M [NON LANL; Sturchio, Neil C [UNIV OF ILLIONOIS; Caffee, M [PURDUE UNIV; Belosa, A D [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Heraty, Jr., L J [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Bohike, J K [RESTON, VA; Hatzinger, P B [SHAW ENIVIORNMENTAL C0.; Jackson, W A [TEXAS TECH; Gu, B [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) is ubiquitous in the environment. It occurs naturally as a product of atmospheric photochemical reactions, and is synthesized for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -}; nitrate produced from these soils has been exported worldwide since the mid-1800's for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} into the environment has complicated attempts to understand the geochemical cycle of ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} samples from the southwestern United States have relatively high {sup 36}Cl abundances ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 3,100 x 10{sup -15} to 28,800 x 10{sup -15}), compared with samples of synthetic ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10{sup -15} to 40 x 10{sup -15}) and Atacama Desert ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10{sup -15} to 590 x 10{sup -15}) ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. These data give a lower limit for the initial {sup 36}Cl abundance of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and provide temporal and other constraints on its geochemical cycle.

  14. Hydrogen oxidation on gold electrode in perchloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustersic, M.G.; Almeida, N.V.; Von Mengershausen, A.E. [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, 25 de Mayo N 384, 5730 Villa Mercedes, San Luis (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this research is to study the interface gold/perchloric acid solution in presence of hydrogen. The reactive is generated by H{sup +} ion reduction and by saturating the electrolyte with the gaseous H{sub 2}. No evidence of H{sub 2} dissociative adsorption is found. In special conditions, a strongly adsorbed layer is formed from the atoms diffusing from inside of the metal. The mass transport occurs in three ways: the diffusion of H atoms inwards, the diffusion of H atoms back to the surface and the dissolved H{sub 2} diffusion from the bulk electrolyte to the surface. When dissolved H{sub 2} reacts, the reaction is kinetically controlled when the H{sub 2} partial pressure is high, and it is diffusionally controlled when the reactive partial pressure is low. Above 0.7 V, (measured vs. RHE), the (100) plane surface reconstruction lifts, and the rate determining step is the H diffusion towards inside of the metal, and the current suddenly falls. The Hydrogen redox reaction on gold shows reversibility with respect to the potential when the reactives are the H diffusing outwards of the metal and the H{sup +} ion present in the electrolyte. However, the absolute current values of oxidation and reduction are different because the reactive sources are different. (author)

  15. Widespread occurrence of (per)chlorate in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Davila, Alfonso F.; Sears, Derek W. G.; Coates, John D.; McKay, Christopher P.; Brundrett, Maeghan; Estrada, Nubia; Böhlke, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) and chlorate (ClO3-) are ubiquitous on Earth and ClO4- has also been found on Mars. These species can play important roles in geochemical processes such as oxidation of organic matter and as biological electron acceptors, and are also indicators of important photochemical reactions involving oxyanions; on Mars they could be relevant for human habitability both in terms of in situ resource utilization and potential human health effects. For the first time, we extracted, detected and quantified ClO4- and ClO3- in extraterrestrial, non-planetary samples: regolith and rock samples from the Moon, and two chondrite meteorites (Murchison and Fayetteville). Lunar samples were collected by astronauts during the Apollo program, and meteorite samples were recovered immediately after their fall. This fact, together with the heterogeneous distribution of ClO4- and ClO3- within some of the samples, and their relative abundance with respect to other soluble species (e.g., NO3-) are consistent with an extraterrestrial origin of the oxychlorine species. Our results, combined with the previously reported widespread occurrence on Earth and Mars, indicate that ClO4- and ClO3- could be present throughout the Solar System.

  16. Development of a zinc-cerium redox flow battery

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) can be used to store energy on the large and medium scale (kW – MW), particularly in applications such as load levelling of electrical power supplies, power quality control application and facilitating renewable energy deployment. In this thesis, the development of a divided and undivided zinc-cerium redox flow battery from its fundamental chemistry in aqueous methanesulfonic acid has been described. This comprehensive investigation has focused on th...

  17. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Boiko R.S.; Barabash A.S.; Belli P.; Bernabei R.; Cappella F.; Cerulli R.; Danevich F.A.; Incicchitti A.; Laubenstein M.; Mokina V.M.; Nisi S.; Poda D.V.; Polischuk O.G.; Tretyak V.I.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search), 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β). The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical an...

  18. Properties of ceramics based on cerium dioxide with crystalline filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems of the increase of thermal resistance of ceramics on the basis of cerium dioxide with the interduction of filamentous crystals (FC) of CeO2 and MgO have been considered. It is established that FC of MgO and CeO2 are dissolved in the matrix, foAming fine oblong pores, promoting relaxation of thermal strains and preventing crack propagation, which increases the material thermal resistance

  19. Far infrared properties of PbTe doped with cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, P.M. [Institute of Technical Sciences SASA, Knez Mihailova 35/IV, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)]. E-mail: nikolic@sanu.ac.yu; Koenig, W. [Max Planck Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 7000 Stuttgart 80 (Germany); Vujatovic, S.S. [Institute of Technical Sciences SASA, Knez Mihailova 35/IV, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Blagojevic, V. [Faculty of Electronic Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar Kralja Aleksandra 73, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Lukovic, D. [Institute of Technical Sciences SASA, Knez Mihailova 35/IV, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Savic, S. [Institute of Technical Sciences SASA, Knez Mihailova 35/IV, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Radulovic, K. [Institute of Technical Sciences SASA, Knez Mihailova 35/IV, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Urosevic, D. [Mathematical Institute SASA, Knez Mihailova 35/I, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Nikolic, M.V. [Center for Multidisciplinary Studies of the University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2007-05-16

    Single crystal samples of lead telluride doped with cerium were made using the Bridgman method. Far infrared reflectivity spectra in the temperature range from 10 to 300 K are presented. The experimental data were numerically analyzed using a fitting procedure based on the plasmon-phonon interaction model and optical parameters were determined. Two additional local modes were observed at about 138 and 337 cm{sup -1}. The origin of these local vibrational impurity modes was discussed.

  20. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Bryant C.; Monique E. Johnson; Walker, Marlon L.; Riley, Kathryn R.; Christopher M. Sims

    2016-01-01

    Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs) have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of CNPs to develop potential new treatment modalities for both oxidative- and nitrosative-stress induced disorders and diseases. In order to reach the point where o...

  1. Monomers, Dimers, and Helices: Complexities of Cerium and Plutonium Phenanthrolinecarboxylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Samantha K; Ferrier, Maryline G; Baumbach, Ryan E; Silver, Mark A; Lezama Pacheco, Juan; Kozimor, Stosh A; La Pierre, Henry S; Stein, Benjamin W; Arico, Alexandra A; Gray, Danielle L; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2016-05-01

    The reaction of Ce(III) or Pu(III) with 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid (PDAH2) results in the formation of new f-element coordination complexes. In the case of cerium, Ce(PDA)(H2O)2Cl·H2O (1) or [Ce(PDAH)(PDA)]2[Ce(PDAH)(PDA)] (2) was isolated depending on the Ce/ligand ratio in the reaction. The structure of 2 is composed of two distinct substructures that are constructed from the same monomer. This monomer is composed of a Ce(III) cation bound by one PDA(2-) dianionic ligand and one PDAH(-) monoanionic ligand, both of which are tetradentate. Bridging by the carboxylate moieties leads to either [Ce(PDAH)(PDA)]2 dimers or [Ce(PDAH)(PDA)]1∞ helical chains. For plutonium, Pu(PDA)2 (3) was the only product isolated regardless of the Pu/ligand ratio employed in the reaction. During the reaction of plutonium with PDAH2, Pu(III) is oxidized to Pu(IV), generating 3. This assignment is consistent with structural metrics and the optical absorption spectrum. Ambiguity in the assignment of the oxidation state of cerium in 1 and 2 from UV-vis-near-IR spectra invoked the use of Ce L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements. These experiments support the assignment of Ce(III) in both compounds. The bond distances and coordination numbers are also consistent with these assignments. 3 contains 8-coordinate Pu(IV), whereas the cerium centers in 1 and 2 are 9- and/or 10-coordinate, which correlates with the increased size of Ce(III) versus Pu(IV). Taken together, these data provide an example of a system where the differences in the redox behavior between these f elements creates more complex chemistry with cerium than with plutonium. PMID:27070401

  2. Fungus mediated synthesis of biomedically important cerium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • First time biological synthesis of cerium oxide oxide nanoparticles using fungus Humicola sp. • Complete characterization of cerium oxide nanoparticles. • Biosynthesis of naturally protein capped, luminescent and water dispersible CeO2 nanoparticles. • Biosynthesized CeO2 nanoparticles can be used for many biomedical applications. - Abstract: Nanomaterials can be synthesized by chemical, physical and the more recently discovered biological routes. The biological routes are advantageous over the chemical and physical ones as unlike these, the biological synthesis protocols occur at ambient conditions, are cheap, non-toxic and eco-friendly. Although purely biological and bioinspired methods for the synthesis of nanomaterials are environmentally benign and energy conserving processes, their true potential has not been explored yet and attempts are being made to extend the formation of technologically important nanoparticles using microorganisms like fungi. Though there have been reports on the biosynthesis of oxide nanoparticles by our group in the past, no attempts have been made to employ fungi for the synthesis of nanoparticles of rare earth metals or lanthanides. Here we report for the first time, the bio-inspired synthesis of biomedically important cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles using the thermophilic fungus Humicola sp. The fungus Humicola sp. when exposed to aqueous solutions of oxide precursor cerium (III) nitrate hexahydrate (CeN3O9·6H2O) results in the extracellular formation of CeO2 nanoparticles containing Ce (III) and Ce (IV) mixed oxidation states, confirmed by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). The formed nanoparticles are naturally capped by proteins secreted by the fungus and thus do not agglomerate, are highly stable, water dispersible and are highly fluorescent as well. The biosynthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy, Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), Transmission

  3. Jet formation in cerium metal to examine material strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examining the evolution of material properties at extreme conditions advances our understanding of numerous high-pressure phenomena from natural events like meteorite impacts to general solid mechanics and fluid flow behavior. Recent advances in synchrotron diagnostics coupled with dynamic compression platforms have introduced new possibilities for examining in-situ, spatially resolved material response with nanosecond time resolution. In this work, we examined jet formation from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cerium initially shocked into a transient, high-pressure phase, and then released to a low-pressure, higher-temperature state. Cerium's rich phase diagram allows us to study the yield stress following a shock induced solid-solid phase transition. X-ray imaging was used to obtain images of jet formation and evolution with 2–3 μm spatial resolution. From these images, an analytic method was used to estimate the post-shock yield stress, and these results were compared to continuum calculations that incorporated an experimentally validated equation-of-state (EOS) for cerium coupled with a deviatoric strength model. Reasonable agreement was observed between the calculations and the data illustrating the sensitivity of jet formation on the yield stress values. The data and analysis shown here provide insight into material strength during dynamic loading which is expected to aid in the development of strength aware multi-phase EOS required to predict the response of matter at extreme conditions

  4. Enhancing cerium and plutonium solubility by reduction in borosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachia, J.-N.; Deschanels, X.; Den Auwer, C.; Pinet, O.; Phalippou, J.; Hennig, C.; Scheinost, A.

    2006-06-01

    High-level radioactive wastes produced by spent fuel reprocessing containing fission and activation products as well as actinides are incorporated in a borosilicate glass. To ensure optimum radionuclide containment, the resulting glass must be as homogeneous as possible. Microscopic heterogeneity can arise from various processes including the excess loading of an element above its solubility limit. The current actinide loading limit is 0.4 wt%. Work is in progress to assess the actinide solubility in these glasses, especially for plutonium. Initially the actinides were simulated by lanthanides and hafnium. The results show that trivalent elements (La, Gd) exhibit greater solubility than tetravalent elements (Pu, Hf). Cerium is an interesting element because its oxidation state varies from IV to III depending on the process conditions, such as the temperature and redox potential of the melt. In order to quantify the solubility increase, cerium-doped glass samples were melted under reducing conditions by adding a reducing agent. The solubility observed at 1473 K increased significantly from 0.95 to 13.00 wt%. Several reducing compounds have been tested. This paper deals with this study and the application to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The reduction state was characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) for plutonium and by chemical analysis for cerium. The material homogeneity was verified by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Preliminary findings concerning the reduction of Pu-doped glasses fabricated in hot cells are also discussed.

  5. Microbial Community Structure during Nitrate and Perchlorate Reduction in Ion-exchange Brine Using the Hydrogen-based membrane Biofilm Reactor (MBIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detoxification of perchlorate by microbial communities under denitrifying conditions has been recently reported, although the identity of the mixed populations involved in perchlorate reduction is not well understood. In order to address this, the bacterial diversity of membrane ...

  6. NOVEL ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN URINARY PERCHLORATE AND POTENTIALLY RELEVANT EFFECTS ON RISK FACTORS FOR HEART DISEASE BASED ON NHANES 2001-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental pollutant, and is a thyroid hormone disruptor. A previous population study based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002 database showed that urinary perchlorate concentrations were associated with signi...

  7. Adaptive evolution of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 for developing resistance to perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta-Kolte, M. G.; Youngblut, M.; Redford, S.; Gregoire, P.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its toxic, explosive, and corrosive nature, inadvertent biological H2S production by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) poses significant health and industrial operational risks. Anthropogenic sources are dominated by the oil industry where H2S in reservoir gases and fluids has an associated annual cost estimated at $90 billion globally. Our previous studies have identified perchlorate (ClO4-) as a selective and potent inhibitor of SRM in pure culture and complex microbial ecosystems. However, constant addition of inhibitors like perchlorate to natural ecosystems may result in a new adaptive selective pressure on SRM populations. With this in mind we investigated the ability of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, a model oil reservoir SRM, to adapt to perchlorate and develop a resistance. Serial transfers of three parallel cultures with increasing concentrations of perchlorate up to 100 mM were generated and compared to wild-type strains that were transferred for same number of generations in absence of perchlorate. Genome sequencing revealed that all three adapted strains had single non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the same gene, Dde_2265, the sulfate adenylytransferase (ATP sulfurylase (ATPS)) (EC 2.7.7.4). ATPS catalyzes the first committed step in sulfate reduction and is essential in all SRM. IC50s against growth for these evolved strains demonstrated a three-fold increased resistance to perchlorate compared to wild-type controls. These evolved strains also had 5x higher transcriptional abundance of Dde_2265 compared to the wild-type strain. Biochemical characterization of the purified ATPS enzyme from both wild-type and the evolved strain showed that the mutant ATPS from the evolved strain was resistant to perchlorate inhibition of ATP turnover with a KI for perchlorate that was 3x greater relative to the wild-type ATPS. These results demonstrate that a single-base pair mutation in ATPS can have a significant impact on developing

  8. Dissolution of cerium from cerium-based conversion coatings on Al 7075-T6 in 0.1 M NaCl solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Dissolution of cerium from cerium-based conversion coatings (CeCCs) on Al 7075-T6. ► Immersion of CeCCs in 0.1 M NaCl showed dissolution only possible at pH ⩽ 2. ► Corrosion protection of CeCCs is not provided by dissolution of cerium species. ► CeCCs corrosion protection mechanism differ from chromate-based conversion coatings. - Abstract: Cerium-based conversion coatings (CeCCs) were immersed in 0.1 M NaCl for ∼500 h over a range of pH (2.0–5.7) to investigate the dissolution of cerium species. Dissolution was detected by UV–vis spectroscopy only in the pH 2 solution. Similar cerium concentrations were detected from the dissolution of as-deposited and phosphate post-treated CeCCs. Solubility diagrams for Ce(OH)3, Ce(OH)4, CeO2, and CePO4 showed that only Ce(OH)3 was soluble in acidic conditions. Although pKsp(CePO4) ≈ pKsp(Ce(OH)3), the dissolution of the post-treated CeCCs was slightly higher than the as-deposited CeCCs. Thus, corrosion protection of CeCCs is not provided solely by dissolution of cerium species.

  9. Effects of lanthanum nitrate on growth and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of Alternanthera philoxeroides under perchlorate stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢寅峰; 蔡贤雷; 刘伟龙; 陶功胜; 陈倩; 张强

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of exogenous lanthanum (La) on Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb under perchlorate stress, changes in the growth and physiological parameters were investigated in solution culture experiments under controlled condi-tions. Different concentrations of La (NO3)3 were used in our study. It was shown that 0.1 and 0.5 mg/L La3+alleviated the inhibition effect of perchlorate on A. philoxeroides, including relative growth yield, dry weight of different organs, leaf area and root activity. And La3+prevented decline in the relative chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters including Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm',ΦPSI and ETR induced by perchlorate stress. Moreover, 0.5 mg/L La3+showed an optimal mitigative effect, while excess La3+(5.0 mg/L) led to synergistic effect on stress. Correlation analysis revealed a significant positive relationship between growth indexes and the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, root activity and relative chlorophyll content (p<0.05). The results suggested that appropriate concentration of La3+could effectively alleviate growth inhibition and injury of A. philoxeroides caused by perchlorate stress, and the mitigative effect of La3+might be achieved by improving root activity, maintaining chlorophyll content and promoting photochemical efficiency of photosystem II of A. philoxeroides under perchlorate stress.

  10. Perchlorate and Nitrate Remediation Efficiency and Microbial Diversity in a Containerized Wetland Bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jr., B D; Dibley, V; Pinkart, H; Legler, T

    2004-06-09

    We have developed a method to remove perchlorate (14 to 27 {micro}g/L) and nitrate (48 mg/L) from contaminated groundwater using a wetland bioreactor. The bioreactor has operated continuously in a remote field location for more than two years with a stable ecosystem of indigenous organisms. This study assesses the bioreactor for long-term perchlorate and nitrate remediation by evaluating influent and effluent groundwater for reduction-oxidation conditions and nitrate and perchlorate concentrations. Total community DNA was extracted and purified from 10-g sediment samples retrieved from vertical coring of the bioreactor during winter. Analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of short, 16S rDNA, polymerase-chain-reaction products was used to identify dominant microorganisms. Bacteria genera identified were closely affiliated with bacteria widely distributed in soils, mud layers, and fresh water. Of the 17 dominant bands sequenced, most were gram negative and capable of aerobic or anaerobic respiration with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, and Nitrospira). Several identified genera (Rhizobium, Acinetobactor, and Xanthomonas) are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen into a combined form (ammonia) usable by host plants. Isolates were identified from the Proteobacteria class, known for the ability to reduce perchlorate. Initial bacterial assessments of sediments confirm the prevalence of facultative anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing perchlorate and nitrate in situ.

  11. Assessment of perchlorate-reducing bacteria in a highly polluted river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliotta, Giovanni; Motta, Oriana; Guarino, Francesco; Iannece, Patrizia; Proto, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    A 1-year monitoring experiment of the Sarno River basin was conducted during 2008 to evaluate the overall quality of the water over time and to compare the results with those obtained previously. The physico-chemical and microbiological characteristics of the water course had not changed appreciably with respect to previous determinations, thus emphasizing the major contribution of untreated urban wastewater to the overall pollution of the river. Moreover, attention was paid to the perchlorate ion, one of the so-called emerging contaminants, which is widespread in natural environments and is known to have adverse effects on the human thyroid gland. Over the entire monitoring program, we did not find appreciable levels of perchlorate, although the particular environmental condition could support its development. Thus, a dedicated study was designed to assess the presence of bacteria that can reasonably reduce perchlorate levels. By enrichment and molecular procedures, we identified α- and β-Proteobacteria strains, classified by 16S rDNA sequences as Dechlorospirillum sp. and Dechlorosoma sp., respectively. Further physiologic characterization and the presence of the alpha subunit gene (pcrA) of the perchlorate reductase in both strains confirmed the presence in the river of viable and active perchlorate dissimilatory bacteria. PMID:20843743

  12. Surface modification of silver nanofilms for improved perchlorate detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jumin; Han, Mei-Juan; Li, Jinwei; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2012-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), as one of the most sensitive spectroscopic analysis methods, has been investigated extensively for the detection of environmental contaminants in recent years. In this work, we reported the new development of robust SERS substrates for rapid and sensitive sensing of aqueous perchlorate, a widespread environmental contaminant. The fabrication of the substrates consisted of two simple steps: (a) formation of Ag nanofilms on Cu and surface-roughened Cu foils (Ag/Cu and Ag/rCu nanofilms) using a controllable and inexpensive one-step electroless plating process, and (b) surface modification of the Ag nanofilms with cysteamine (Cys) self-assembly monolayer (SAM) (Cys-Ag/Cu and Cys-Ag/rCu substrates). Due to the strong affinity of -NH(3)(+) groups of the Cys molecules for perchlorate ions, the rapid SERS detection of perchlorate has been realized with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 5 μg L(-1) (ppb) for aqueous samples without need for drying. Various calibration curves with good linear relationships were obtained, indicating the quantification potential of SERS analysis of perchlorate using these new substrates. It was found that the neutral pH yielded the maximum SERS signals, and 85% of original sensitivity was remained in 5 days of storage time in the air, indicating the substrates are fairly stable. Within 10 regeneration-reuse cycles, the SERS signals of perchlorate kept in the range of 85-105% of the original value, verifying its reusability. PMID:22494687

  13. The developments and challenges of cerium half-cell in zinc–cerium redox flow battery for energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc–cerium redox flow batteries (ZCBs) are emerging as a very promising new technology with the potential to store a large amount of energy economically and efficiently, thanking to its highest thermodynamic open-circuit cell voltage among all the currently studied aqueous redox flow batteries. However, there are numerous scientific and technical challenges that must be overcome if this alluring promise is to turn into reality, from designing the battery structure, to optimizing the electrolyte compositions and elucidating the complex chemical reactions that occur during charge and discharge. This review article is the first summary of the most significant developments and challenges of cerium half-cell and the current understanding of their chemistry. We are certain that this review will be of great interest to audience over a broad range, especially in fields of energy storage, electrochemistry, and chemical engineering

  14. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jane Y., E-mail: jym1@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Ma, Joseph K. [School of Pharmacy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Castranova, Vincent [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO{sub 2}-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO{sub 2} in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO{sub 2} exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO{sub 2} induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO{sub 2} and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO{sub 2} induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. -- Highlights: ► Cerium oxide exposure significantly affected the following parameters in the lung. ► Induced fibrotic cytokine OPN and TGF-β1 production and phospholipidosis. ► Caused imbalance of the MMP-9/ TIMP-1 ratio that favors fibrosis

  15. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO2-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO2 in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO2 exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO2 induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO2 and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO2 induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. -- Highlights: ► Cerium oxide exposure significantly affected the following parameters in the lung. ► Induced fibrotic cytokine OPN and TGF-β1 production and phospholipidosis. ► Caused imbalance of the MMP-9/ TIMP-1 ratio that favors fibrosis. ► Cerium oxide particles were detected in

  16. Electrochemical behavior of carbon paper on cerium methanesulfonate electrolytes for zinc-cerium flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The voltammetric behavior of the Ce(III)/(IV) half-cell reaction in various electrolytes containing 0.6 M Ce was investigated on both pristine and metal-modified carbon paper (CP) electrodes at three different temperatures (25, 40 and 55 °C) in order to find the most favorable electrochemical conditions. The pristine CP displayed robust electrochemical performance for up to 200 repetitive CV cycles while the Pt loaded electrode’s performance was stable for only 70 cycles, even though the latter exhibited a more reversible behavior, moving from a quasi-reversible to a reversible system (Dox. = 4.0 × 10−6 cm2 s−1 and Dred. = 2.5 × 10−6 cm2 s−1). The In and La metal modified electrodes did not show any improvement with regard to the kinetics or reversibility of the reaction. The addition of 1 M H2SO4 to the base electrolyte enhanced the cerium reduction reaction by a factor of 3, (−7.2 × 10−3 A cm−2). The highest exchange current densities (jo) were achieved at 40 °C for the CP-Pt (1 × 10−3 A cm−2) attributable to the presence of the catalytic Pt. Elevated temperatures (40 and 55 °C) improved D and ΔEp. while also the mass transport parameters a) dynamic viscosity (∼1.5 mPa·s) and b) electrolytic conductivity (∼265 mS cm−1) of the Ce(III)/(IV) half-cell reaction. Overall, pristine CP and to a lesser extent CP-Pt demonstrated good stability with prolonged cycling and kinetics comparable with the ones of Pt and Pt based electrodes

  17. Activation energies involved in isothermal dehydration and decomposition of gamma-irradiated magnesium perchlorate (Paper No. RE-23)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-irradiation enhances the acceleratory rate of dehydration as well as decomposition of magnesium perchlorate. Activation energies computed using Arrhenius treatment decreased with rise in radiation dose prior to its thermal dehydration and decomposition. The reduction in the activation energies may be attributed to the strain and stress produced in voids of the samples of magnesium perchlorate due to irradiation. (author)

  18. Martian Chlorine Chemistry: A Study of Perchlorate on the Martian Surface, Evidence of an Ongoing Formation Mechanism and Implications of a Complex Chlorine Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Brandi L.

    2015-10-01

    The research presented herein addresses the detection of perchlorate on Mars, evidence of perchlorate in Mars meteorite EETA 79001, determination of the perchlorate parent salts at the Phoenix landing site, and the ongoing formation of perchlorate from chloride minerals as well as from other oxychlorine species. The detection of perchlorate in three samples by the Phoenix Wet Chemistry Laboratory and the implication of these results are discussed. The further detection of perchlorate in Mars meteorite EETA 79001 by ion chromatography and the determination of the parent salts of the perchlorate detected at the Phoenix landing site by electrochemical analyses and ion chromatography are detailed and the implications of the identity of the parent salts are discussed. The possible formation pathways for martian perchlorate are then explored and a possible mechanism for ongoing perchlorate formation on the martian surface is detailed. Perchlorate is shown to be formed upon exposure of chloride minerals, as well as of chlorite and chlorate salts, to current Mars relevant conditions including temperature, pressure, ultraviolet radiation and atmospheric composition. The implications of this ongoing perchlorate formation for the survival and detection of organics, the oxidizing nature of the soil, formation of liquid brines and recurring slope lineae are discussed. Further preliminary experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of perchlorate formation on the survival and degradation of organic compounds.

  19. A simplified method for obtaining high-purity perchlorate from groundwater for isotope analyses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    vonKiparski, G; Hillegonds, D

    2011-04-04

    Investigations into the occurrence and origin of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) found in groundwater from across North America have been sparse until recent years, and there is mounting evidence that natural formation mechanisms are important. New opportunities for identifying groundwater perchlorate and its origin have arisen with the utilization of improved detection methods and sampling techniques. Additionally, application of the forensic potential of isotopic measurements has begun to elucidate sources, potential formation mechanisms and natural attenuation processes. Procedures developed appear to be amenable to enable high precision stable isotopic analyses, as well as lower precision AMS analyses of {sup 36}Cl. Immediate work is in analyzing perchlorate isotope standards and developing full analytical accuracy and uncertainty expectations. Field samples have also been collected, and will be analyzed when final qa/qc samples are deemed acceptable.

  20. The effect of various reaction parameters on bioremediation of perchlorate-contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioremediation was employed to treat perchlorate-contaminated water. All enrichments and growth of mixed cultures were performed in anaerobic acetate medium. Enrichment cultures were started with activated sludge obtained from a local wastewater treatment plant where it predominantly treats domestic wastewater. Several parameters affecting perchlorate removal were examined through batch experiments, these include the amount of domesticated sludge, the acetate concentration, pH, the C/N ratio and the reaction temperature. The results indicated that acetate was an effective carbon source and electron donor. Under the selected conditions, namely 1.0 g domesticated sludge, an acetate concentration of 1.2 g l-1, pH 8.0, a C/N ratio of 20 at 40 deg, C, 50 mg l-1 perchlorate could be rapidly reduced to non-detectable levels within 24 h

  1. Dracorhodin perchlorate induces the apoptosis of glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Luo, Junjie; Meng, Linghu; Pan, Taifeng; Zhao, Binjie; Tang, Zhen-Gang; Dai, Yongjian

    2016-04-01

    Dracorhodin perchlorate (Dp), a synthetic analogue of the antimicrobial anthocyanin red pigment, has recently been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in various types of cancer cells. Yet, the inhibitory effect of Dp on human glioma cells remains uninvestigated. Therefore, in the present study, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry were used to detect cell viability and cell cycle progression in glioma U87MG and T98G cells, respectively. Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double staining and JC-1 staining were separately applied to determine cellular apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential damage in the cells. The expression levels of associated proteins involved in cell cycle progression and apoptosis were measured by western blotting. The activities of caspase‑9/-3 were determined by Caspase-Glo-9/3 assay. The results indicated that Dp treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and blocked cell cycle progression at the G1/S phase in the U87MG and T98G cells via the upregulation of p53 and p21 protein expression, and simultaneous downregulation of Cdc25A, Cdc2 and P-Cdc2 protein expression. Additionally, Dp treatment led to the loss of cellular mitochondrial membrane potential, and the release of cytochrome c, and strongly induced the occurence of apoptosis. Increased expression levels of Bim and Bax protein and the downregulated expression of Bcl-2 protein were observed. Caspase-9/-3 were activated and their activities were elevated after Dp treatment. These findings indicate that Dp inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioma cells, and is a possible candidate for glioma treatment. PMID:26846469

  2. Microbial perchlorate reduction with elemental sulfur and other inorganic electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiumin; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A; Byrnes, David J; Bentley, Harold; Bentley, Richard

    2008-03-01

    ClO(4)(-) has recently been recognized as a widespread contaminant of surface and ground water. This research investigated chemolithotrophic perchlorate reduction by bacteria in soils and sludges utilizing inorganic electron-donating substrates such as hydrogen, elemental iron, and elemental sulfur. The bioassays were performed in anaerobic serum bottles with various inocula from anaerobic or aerobic environments. All the tested sludge inocula were capable of reducing perchlorate with H2 as electron donor. Aerobic activated sludge was evaluated further and it supported perchlorate reduction with Fe(0) and S(0) additions under anaerobic conditions. Heat-killed sludge did not convert ClO(4)(-), confirming the reactions were biologically catalyzed. ClO(4)(-) (3mM) was almost completely removed by the first sampling time on d 8 with H2 (> or = 0.37mMd(-1)), after 22d with S(0) (0.18mM d(-1)) and 84% removed after 37d with Fe(0) additions (0.085mMd(-1)). Perchlorate-reduction occurred at a much faster rate (1.12mMd(-1)), when using an enrichment culture developed from the activated sludge with S(0) as an electron donor. The enrichment culture also utilized S(2-) and S(2)O(3)(2-) as electron-donating substrates to support ClO(4)(-) reduction. The mixed cultures also catalyzed the disproportionation of S(0) to S(2-) and SO(4)(2-). Evidence is presented demonstrating that S(0) was directly utilized by microorganisms to support perchlorate-reduction. In all the experiments, ClO(4)(-) was stoichiometrically converted to chloride. The study demonstrates that microorganisms present in wastewater sludges can readily use a variety of inorganic compounds to support perchlorate reduction. PMID:17988714

  3. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cerium oxide nanorods were uniformly grown on diverse substrates. • Changes in growth conditions led to morphology evolution of cerium oxide nanostructures. • The grown cerium oxide nanostructures were single or poly crystalline. • Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods made the diverse substrates superhydrophobic and anti-corrosive without any surface modifiers. - Abstract: Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields

  4. EIS study of nano crystalline Ni-cerium oxide coating electrodeposition mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasannejad, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahrabi, T., E-mail: Tshahrabi34@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafarian, M. [Department of Chemistry, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4416, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rouhaghdam, A. Sabour [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-03

    Research highlights: > In this study a new procedure was used for electrodeposition of Ni-cerium oxide amorphous-nano crystalline composite coatings. The innovation of this method is that the metal and oxides are deposited simultaneously on the samples from the plating bath solution containing Ni ions and Ce ions with no powder added. - Abstract: In this study a novel procedure was used for the electrodeposition of Ni-cerium oxide nano crystalline composite coatings. The novelty of this method lies in the fact that the metal and the oxide are both deposited simultaneously on the substrate, directly from the plating bath containing Ni and Ce ions with no oxide powder addition. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to study the mechanisms of Ni-CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite coating deposition. The results indicated that the morphology of Ni-cerium oxide coatings varied based on the Ni:Ce ion ratio. When this ratio exceeds 100, sporadic distribution of cerium oxide in the Ni matrix occurred. On the other hand, when the aforementioned ratio was less than 100, it was found that Ni species were dispersed in a continuous film of cerium oxide. Furthermore, it was observed that Ni in Ni-cerium oxide composite coating was nanocrystalline, while cerium oxide was amorphous. Introduction of the cerium ions to the plating bath resulted in the reduction of the Ni grains average size.

  5. Electrodeposition of cerium from fused mixture of CeCl sub(3)+NaCl-KCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic cerium has been prepared by fused salt electrolysis of 30% CeCl sub(3)+ NaCl-KCl (equimolar) mixture, in the temperature ranged 650-850 sup(0)C, in argon atmosphere. The metal nodules were collected from solidified salts bath. Analysis of these nodules has been done and a 97,3% metallic cerium was obtained. (author)

  6. EIS study of nano crystalline Ni-cerium oxide coating electrodeposition mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → In this study a new procedure was used for electrodeposition of Ni-cerium oxide amorphous-nano crystalline composite coatings. The innovation of this method is that the metal and oxides are deposited simultaneously on the samples from the plating bath solution containing Ni ions and Ce ions with no powder added. - Abstract: In this study a novel procedure was used for the electrodeposition of Ni-cerium oxide nano crystalline composite coatings. The novelty of this method lies in the fact that the metal and the oxide are both deposited simultaneously on the substrate, directly from the plating bath containing Ni and Ce ions with no oxide powder addition. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to study the mechanisms of Ni-CeO2 nanocomposite coating deposition. The results indicated that the morphology of Ni-cerium oxide coatings varied based on the Ni:Ce ion ratio. When this ratio exceeds 100, sporadic distribution of cerium oxide in the Ni matrix occurred. On the other hand, when the aforementioned ratio was less than 100, it was found that Ni species were dispersed in a continuous film of cerium oxide. Furthermore, it was observed that Ni in Ni-cerium oxide composite coating was nanocrystalline, while cerium oxide was amorphous. Introduction of the cerium ions to the plating bath resulted in the reduction of the Ni grains average size.

  7. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Rip, E-mail: dongrip@hanyang.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cerium oxide nanorods were uniformly grown on diverse substrates. • Changes in growth conditions led to morphology evolution of cerium oxide nanostructures. • The grown cerium oxide nanostructures were single or poly crystalline. • Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods made the diverse substrates superhydrophobic and anti-corrosive without any surface modifiers. - Abstract: Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  8. Cerium doped red mud catalytic ozonation for bezafibrate degradation in wastewater: Efficiency, intermediates, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingbing; Qi, Fei; Sun, Dezhi; Chen, Zhonglin; Robert, Didier

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the performance of bezafibrate (BZF) degradation and detoxification in the aqueous phase using cerium-modified red mud (RM) catalysts prepared using different cerium sources and synthesis methods were evaluated. Experimental results showed that the surface cerium modification was responsible for the development of the catalytic activity of RM and this was influenced by the cerium source and the synthesis method. Catalyst prepared from cerium (IV) by precipitation was found to show the best catalytic activity in BZF degradation and detoxification. Reactive oxygen species including peroxides, hydroxyl radicals, and super oxide ions were identified in all reactions and we proposed the corresponding catalytic reaction mechanism for each catalyst that prepared from different cerium source and method. This was supported by the intermediates profiles that were generated upon BZF degradation. The surface and the structural properties of cerium-modified RM were characterized in detail by several analytical methods. Two interesting findings were made: (1) the surface texture (specific surface area and mesoporous volume) influenced the catalytic reaction pathway; and (2) Ce(III) species and oxygen vacancies were generated on the surface of the catalyst after cerium modification. This plays an important role in the development of the catalytic activity. PMID:26706928

  9. Effects of larval-juvenile treatment with perchlorate and co-treatment with thyroxine on zebrafish sex ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhi, S.; Torres, L.; Patino, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of larval-juvenile exposure to perchlorate, a thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitor, on the establishment of gonadal sex ratios in zebrafish. Zebrafish were exposed to untreated water or water containing perchlorate at 100 or 250 ppm for a period of 30 days starting at 3 days postfertilization (dpf). Recovery treatments consisted of a combination of perchlorate and exogenous thyroxine (T4; 10 nM). Thyroid histology was assessed at the end of the treatment period (33 dpf), and gonadal histology and sex ratios were determined in fish that were allowed an additional 10-day period of growth in untreated water. As expected, exposure to perchlorate caused changes in thyroid histology consistent with hypothyroidism and these effects were reversed by co-treatment with exogenous T4. Perchlorate did not affect fish survival but co-treatment with T4 induced higher mortality. However, relative to the corresponding perchlorate concentration, co-treatment with T4 caused increased mortality only at a perchlorate concentration of 100 ppm. Perchlorate alone or in the presence of T4 suppressed body length at 43 dpf relative to control values. Perchlorate exposure skewed the sex ratio toward female in a concentration-dependent manner, and co-treatment with T4 not only blocked the feminizing effect of perchlorate but also overcompensated by skewing the sex ratio towards male. Moreover, co-treatment with T4 advanced the onset of spermatogenesis in males. There was no clear association between sex ratios and larval survival or growth. We conclude that endogenous thyroid hormone plays a role in the establishment of gonadal sex phenotype during early development in zebrafish. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A low cost igniter utilizing an SCB and titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickes, R. W., Jr.; Grubelich, M. C.; Hartman, J. K.; McCampbell, C. B.; Churchill, J. K.

    1994-01-01

    A conventional NSI (NASA Standard Initiator) normally employs a hot-wire ignition element to ignite ZPP (zirconium potassium perchlorate). With minor modifications to the interior of a header similar to an NSI device to accommodate an SCB (semiconductor bridge), a low cost initiator was obtained. In addition, the ZPP was replaced with THKP (titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate) to obtain increased overall gas production and reduced static-charge sensitivity. This paper reports on the all-fire and no-fire levels obtained and on a dual mix device that uses THKP as the igniter mix and a thermite as the output mix.

  11. Linking methane oxidation with perchlorate reduction: a microbial base for possible Martian life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. G.; Carlstrom, C.; Baesman, S. M.; Coates, J. D.; Oremland, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observations of methane (CH4) and perchlorate (ClO4-) within the atmosphere and surface of Mars, respectively, provide impetus for establishing a metabolic linkage between these compounds whereby CH4 acts as an electron donor and perchlorate acts as an electron acceptor. Direct linkage through anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) has not been observed. However, indirect syntrophic oxygenase-dependent oxidation of CH4 with an aerobic methane oxidizer is feasible. The pathway for anaerobic dissimilatory perchlorate reduction includes 3 steps. The first 2 are sequential reductions of (1) perchlorate to chlorate and (2) chlorate to chlorite, mediated by perchlorate reductase. The third step is disproportionation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen, mediated by chlorite dismutase. Utilization of thusly derived oxygen by hydrocarbon-degrading organisms in anoxic environments was first demonstrated by Coates et. al. (1998)1, however the link to aerobic methane oxidation was not examined at that time. Here, we systematically explore the potential for several species of aerobic methanotrophs to couple with chlorite during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. In one experiment, 0.5 kPa CH4 was completely removed in one day from the headspace of combined cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB and Methylococcus capsulatus in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Oxidation of labeled 14CH4 to 14CO2 under similar conditions was later confirmed. Another experiment demonstrated complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 over several days by Methylobacter albus strain BG8 with strain CKB in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Finally, we observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing natural soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and strain CKB and in the presence of 10 mM chlorite. This soil, collected from a pristine lake shoreline, demonstrated endogenous methane, perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite uptake. Other soil and

  12. Tuning Reactivity and Electronic Properties through Ligand Reorganization within a Cerium Heterobimetallic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Jerome R.; Gordon, Zachary; Booth, Corwin H.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Walsh, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-24

    Cerium compounds have played vital roles in organic, inorganic, and materials chemistry due to their reversible redox chemistry between trivalent and tetravalent oxidation states. However, attempts to rationally access molecular cerium complexes in both oxidation states have been frustrated by unpredictable reactivity in cerium(III) oxidation chemistry. Such oxidation reactions are limited by steric saturation at the metal ion, which can result in high energy activation barriers for electron transfer. An alternative approach has been realized using a rare earth/alkali metal/1,1'-BINOLate (REMB) heterobimetallic framework, which uses redox-inactive metals within the secondary coordination sphere to control ligand reorganization. The rational syntheses of functionalized cerium(IV) products and a mechanistic examination of the role of ligand reorganization in cerium(III) oxidation are presented.

  13. The recrystallization and texture of magnesium-zinc-cerium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, L.W.F. [Novelis Global Technology Centre, 945 Princess Street, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 5L9 (Canada); Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2B2 (Canada)], E-mail: luke.mackenzie@novelis.com; Pekguleryuz, M.O. [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2B2 (Canada)

    2008-09-15

    Optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and X-ray diffraction are employed to characterize the microstructures and textures of as-rolled and annealed Mg-1Zn and Mg-1Zn-xCe. Mg-1Zn exhibited 'basal' textures: the basal poles aligned with the sheet normal direction. With the addition of cerium, the texture was basal when recrystallization was limited; during recrystallization, the basal texture component weakened, to be replaced by a component with basal poles rotated {approx}45 deg. towards the transverse direction. Deformation, recrystallization and texture are discussed.

  14. The recrystallization and texture of magnesium-zinc-cerium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and X-ray diffraction are employed to characterize the microstructures and textures of as-rolled and annealed Mg-1Zn and Mg-1Zn-xCe. Mg-1Zn exhibited 'basal' textures: the basal poles aligned with the sheet normal direction. With the addition of cerium, the texture was basal when recrystallization was limited; during recrystallization, the basal texture component weakened, to be replaced by a component with basal poles rotated ∼45 deg. towards the transverse direction. Deformation, recrystallization and texture are discussed

  15. High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

    2010-04-21

    High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn

  16. A steady-state biofilm model for simultaneous reduction of nitrate and perchlorate, part 1: model development and numerical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youneng; Zhao, Heping; Marcus, Andrew K; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2012-02-01

    A multispecies biofilm model is developed for simultaneous reduction of nitrate and perchlorate in the H(2)-based membrane biofilm reactor. The one-dimension model includes dual-substrate Monod kinetics for a steady-state biofilm with five solid and five dissolved components. The solid components are autotrophic denitrifying bacteria, autotrophic perchlorate-reducing bacteria, heterotrophic bacteria, inert biomass, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The dissolved components are nitrate, perchlorate, hydrogen (H(2)), substrate-utilization-associated products, and biomass-associated products (BAP). The model explicitly considers four mechanisms involved in how three important operating conditions (H(2) pressure, nitrate loading, and perchlorate loading) affect nitrate and perchlorate removals: (1) competition for H(2), (2) promotion of PRB growth due to having two electron acceptors (nitrate and perchlorate), (3) competition between nitrate and perchlorate reduction for the same resources in the PRB: electrons and possibly reductase enzymes, and (4) competition for space in the biofilm. Two other special features are having H(2) delivered from the membrane substratum and solving directly for steady state using a novel three-step approach: finite-difference for approximating partial differential and/or integral equations, Newton-Raphson for solving nonlinear equations, and an iterative scheme to obtain the steady-state biofilm thickness. An example result illustrates the model's features. PMID:22191376

  17. A STUDY ON THE ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN YOUNG HEAD LETTUCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall objective of this study was to demonstrate in a greenhouse study the potential for incorporation of perchlorate from aqueous solutions of 10, 50, 100, 500, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 ppb into an agricultural food crop (lettuce; Lactuca sativa), which is typically grown ...

  18. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage.

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2010-08-03

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO(2). The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts.

  19. ISSUES IN MANAGING THE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) contamination of ground and surface waters has placed drinking water supplies at risk in communities throughout the US, especially in the West. Several major assessment studies of that risk in terms of health and environmental impact are ...

  20. Trace determination of perchlorate using electromembrane extraction and capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kiplagat, I.K.; Doan, T.K.O.; Kubáň, Pavel; Boček, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 21 (2011), s. 3008-3015. ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/10/1219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : electromembrane extraction * perchlorate * capillary electrophoresis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2011

  1. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Mehboob, Farrakh; van Gelder, Antonie H; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Stams, Alfons J M

    2010-09-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO(2). The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts. PMID:20680263

  2. Periodate salts as pyrotechnic oxidizers: development of barium- and perchlorate-free incendiary formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Chen, Gary

    2012-07-01

    In a flash: pyrotechnic incendiary formulations with good stabilities toward various ignition stimuli have been developed without the need for barium or perchlorate oxidizers. KIO(4) and NaIO(4) were introduced as pyrotechnic oxidizers and exhibited excellent pyrotechnic performance. The periodate salts may garner widespread use in military and civilian fireworks because of their low hygroscopicities and high chemical reactivities. PMID:22639415

  3. Developmental exposure to perchlorate alters synaptic transmission in hippocampus of the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Food Quality Protection Act and Safe Drinking Water Act mandate the EPA to identify potential health risks associated with chemicals that act on the endocrine system. Perchlorate, a contaminant found in food and water supplies throughout the USA, blocks iodine uptake into the...

  4. Double-Polymer-Modified Pencil Lead for Stripping Voltammetry of Perchlorate in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadyar, Anahita; Kim, Yushin; Ward, Michelle M.; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    The inexpensive and disposable electrode based on a double-polymer-modified pencil lead is proposed for upper-division undergraduate instrumental laboratories to enable the highly sensitive detection of perchlorate. Students fabricate and utilize their own electrodes in the 3-4 h laboratory session to learn important concepts and methods of…

  5. DISTRIBUTION OF PERCHLORATE IN SAMPLES OF SODIUM NITRATE (CHILE SALTPETER) FERTILIZER DERIVED FROM NATURAL CALICHE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two lots of sodium nitrate fertilizer derived from Chilean caliche were analyzed to determine the distribution of perchlorate throughout the material. Although our samples represent a limited amount, we found that distribution was essentially homogeneous in any 100-g portion. Whe...

  6. Radioiodine tracers as useful tools in studies of thyrotoxic effects of exogenous bromide and perchlorate ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 2 (2012), s. 405-408. ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : bromide * perchlorate * radioiodine tracer * thyroid hormone Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.467, year: 2012

  7. Preparation and Analysis of Solid Solutions in the Potassium Perchlorate-Permanganate System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Garrett K.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment, designed for and tested in an advanced inorganic laboratory methods course for college seniors and graduate students, that prepares and analyzes several samples in the nearly ideal potassium perchlorate-permanganate solid solution series. The results are accounted for by a theoretical treatment based upon aqueous…

  8. 高氯酸诺氟沙星铜(Ⅱ)%Norfloxacin Coppe(Ⅱ) Perchlorate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢永荣; 叶琼; 熊仁根

    2004-01-01

    The hydrothermal treatment of Cu(ClO4)2·6H2O and Norfloxacin (H-Norf) afforded [Cu(H-Noff)2(ClO4)2] (1) in which center Cu has a square planar geometry while perchlorate just acts as charge balance anions. CCDC:140821.

  9. Radiation decomposition of ammonium perchlorate in the presence of composite rocket propellant ingredients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolysed ammonium perchlorate (AP) oxidises aqueous iodide ions more when it is irradiated in combination with either aluminium, hydroxy terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), copper chromite or iron oxide. The influence is large in the case of AP + HTPB and AP + Copper chromite. (author)

  10. Soil organic matter influences cerium translocation and physiological processes in kidney bean plants exposed to cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Sun, Youping; Barrios, Ana C; Niu, Genhua; Margez, Juan P Flores-; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-11-01

    Soil organic matter plays a major role in determining the fate of the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the soil matrix and effects on the residing plants. In this study, kidney bean plants were grown in soils varying in organic matter content and amended with 0-500mg/kg cerium oxide nanoparticles (nano-CeO2) under greenhouse condition. After 52days of exposure, cerium accumulation in tissues, plant growth and physiological parameters including photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids), net photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance were recorded. Additionally, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were measured to evaluate oxidative stress in the tissues. The translocation factor of cerium in the nano-CeO2 exposed plants grown in organic matter enriched soil (OMES) was twice as the plants grown in low organic matter soil (LOMS). Although the leaf cover area increased by 65-111% with increasing nano-CeO2 concentration in LOMS, the effect on the physiological processes were inconsequential. In OMES leaves, exposure to 62.5-250mg/kg nano-CeO2 led to an enhancement in the transpiration rate and stomatal conductance, but to a simultaneous decrease in carotenoid contents by 25-28%. Chlorophyll a in the OMES leaves also decreased by 27 and 18% on exposure to 125 and 250mg/kg nano-CeO2. In addition, catalase activity increased in LOMS stems, and ascorbate peroxidase increased in OMES leaves of nano-CeO2 exposed plants, with respect to control. Thus, this study provides clear evidence that the properties of the complex soil matrix play decisive roles in determining the fate, bioavailability, and biological transport of ENMs in the environment. PMID:27343939

  11. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Heraty, L.J.; Borden, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental context. Perchlorate (ClO4-) and nitrate (NO3-) are common co-contaminants in groundwater, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Each of these compounds is biodegradable, so in situ enhanced bioremediation is one alternative for treating them in groundwater. Because bacteria typically fractionate isotopes during biodegradation, stable isotope analysis is increasingly used to distinguish this process from transport or mixing-related decreases in contaminant concentrations. However, for this technique to be useful in the field to monitor bioremediation progress, isotope fractionation must be quantified under relevant environmental conditions. In the present study, we quantify the apparent in situ fractionation effects for stable isotopes in ClO4- (Cl and O) and NO3- (N and O) resulting from biodegradation in an aquifer. Abstract. An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br- as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78% and nitrate concentrations decreased by 82% during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (18O/37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of ???0.8 (18O/15N), which is within the range of values

  12. Systematics of Natural Perchlorate in Precipitation, Soils, and Plants at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Jackson, W. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Taylor, E. M.

    2007-12-01

    Naturally occurring perchlorate is known to be associated with nitrate deposits of the hyperarid Atacama Desert in Chile, and recent large-scale sampling has identified a substantial reservoir (up to 1 kg/ha) of natural perchlorate in diverse unsaturated zones of the arid and semiarid Southwestern United States (Rao et al., 2007, ES&T, DOI: 10.1021/es062853i). The objective of the Amargosa Desert work is to develop a better understanding of the deposition, accumulation, and biological cycling of perchlorate in arid environments. Occurrence of perchlorate was evaluated by sampling shallow soil profiles up to 3 m in depth at four different locations and at two different time periods, and by sampling dominant plant species growing near the subsurface profiles. Deposition of perchlorate was evaluated by analyzing both bulk deposition (precipitation plus dry fall, collected under oil) collected on site and wet deposition samples collected by the National Atmospheric Deposition program at a nearby site. Soil samples and atmospheric-deposition samples were tested for both perchlorate (ClO4- ) and major anions. Perchlorate concentrations (0.2-20 µg/kg) were variable with depth in soil profiles and generally correlated most highly with chloride (Cl-) and nitrate (NO3-), although the intensity of these relations differed among profiles. Plant concentrations were generally above 1 mg/kg, suggesting ClO4- accumulation. Concentrations of ClO4- were generally much greater in total deposition than wet deposition samples, indicating a substantial dryfall component of meteoric deposition. This presentation will present the mass distribution and variability of perchlorate in bulk deposition, soils, and plants. Reasons for observed relations between subsurface concentrations of perchlorate and other anions will be explored.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis of cerium titanate nanorods and its application in visible light photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cerium titanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple hydrothermal process. • The size of the cerium titanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. • Cerium titanate nanorods exhibit good photocatalytic activities for methyl blue. - Abstract: Cerium titanate nanorods have been prepared via a hydrothermal process using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as the surfactant. The cerium titanate nanorods have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) diffuse reflectance spectrum. XRD shows that the nanorods are composed of CeTi21O38 phase. Electron microscopy observations indicate that the nanorods have good single crystalline nature. The diameter and length of the nanorods are about 50–200 nm and 1–2 μm, respectively. Cerium titanate nanorods have a band gap of 2.65 eV. The photocatalytic activities of the nanorods have been investigated by degrading methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. MB solution with the concentration of 10 mg L−1 can be degraded totally with the irradiation time increasing to 240 min. Cerium titanate nanorods exhibit great potential in photocatalytic degradation of MB under visible light irradiation

  14. An environmentally compliant cerium-based conversion coating for aluminum protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuan

    Chromate conversion coatings have been extensively used in the aircraft industry for the corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. Unfortunately, hexavalent chromium, which is a primary component in the chromating process, is a confirmed carcinogen. Because of rising remediation and disposal costs caused by increasingly strict regulations, the replacement of the traditional chromate conversion process is becoming a top priority in the metal finishing industry. This research focused on the electrodeposition of cerium-based coatings on 7075-T6 aluminum alloy in an electrolyte containing a cerium salt, an oxidizing agent and an organic solvent. The cerium-rich deposits were characterized by phase composition, oxidation state, coating thickness, surface morphology, deposition mechanism and polarization behavior. Chemical and electrochemical tests were utilized to compare the corrosion resistance between cerium-based coatings and chromate conversion coatings. To characterize and simulate the deposition process, a variety of approaches were utilized to study the oxidation states of cerium in various soluble and precipitated forms as a function of hydrogen peroxide and electrolyte pH. The pH ranges where the oxidation and reduction reactions dominate were determined. Further studies were performed to optimize the corrosion performance of cerium-based coatings and to understand the effects of electrolyte constituents and deposition parameters. The optimum levels for these variables were identified. A patent disclosure on the cerium-based coating process was made to the University of Missouri-Rolla and has now been officially filed with the U.S. Patent Office.

  15. X-ray absorption study of cerium in the passive film on aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion-resistance of aluminum-based alloys and metal-matrix composites can be increased by treatment with cerium compounds. Immersion in a 1000 ppm solution of Ce Cl3 for periods of several days has been shown to increase the pitting potential and reduce the corrosion rate. Such treatment is being considered as an alternative to the use of chromate conversion coatings. The protective action of cerium is considered to be due to the formation of a film containing cerium oxide/hydroxide with cerium in the oxidation states 3 and 4. This occurs by precipitation of cerium compounds onto cathodic sites due to the increase of pH associated with oxygen reduction. Cerium compounds are considerably less soluble than aluminum compounds at high pH. It is proposed that the cerium oxide/hydroxide creates a barrier to the reduction of oxygen stifling cathodic reaction with a corresponding reduction in corrosion rate and open circuit potential. Glancing angle x-ray techniques are well-suited to studying the composition and structure of surface layers on materials. X-rays incident at very small angles (of the order of milliradians) below the critical angle do not penetrate beyond the surface layers of the material. With the extremely high brightness beams of x-rays provided by synchrotron sources the authors detect and characterize the chemical state of elements present in low concentrations in the surface of materials

  16. The solubility of cerium in La2Ti2O7 by DFT + U calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the solubility of cerium in La2Ti2O7, the density functional theory plus Hubbard U correction (DFT + U) approach is employed. The geometrical structure, solution energy and electronic structure of La2−yCeyTi2O7 (0 ≤ y ≤ 2) have been analyzed. The results reveal that the La2Ti2O7–Ce2Ti2O7 solid solution exits over the entire range of cerium content. The calculated increase in the O48f positional parameter, x, with increasing cerium content, may indicate the increased radiation resistance. The results of the density of states distribution and the Bader charge for each ion in La2Ti2O7–Ce2Ti2O7 solid solution suggest that cerium exhibits a reduced charge state in the solid solution. - Highlights: • La2Ti2O7–Ce2Ti2O7 solid solution exits over the entire range of cerium content from 0 to 2. • Cerium incorporation in La2Ti2O7 may lead to increased radiation resistance of La2−yCeyTi2O7 (0 ≤ y ≤ 2) . • Cerium in the solid solution of La2−yCeyTi2O7 (0 ≤ y ≤ 2) exhibits a reduced charge state

  17. Novel in situ coordinated cerium salt/acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel rubber composite of acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) filled with cerium salt particles was vulcanized via in situ coordination for the first time. The resulting materials exhibit good mechanical properties. Curing characteristics analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, tensile testing, and an equilibrium swelling method were used for the characterization of the composite. The results in this paper indicate that the composite is a kind of elastomer based on the in situ coordination crosslinking interactions between the nitrile groups (–CN) of NBR and cerium ions. The mechanical properties of vulcanized cerium salt/ NBR rubber are altered when changing the sorts of cerium salt. Moreover, these materials show good irradiation resistance because of the introduction of the cerium salt. -- Highlights: ► Cerium salts were firstly used to vulcanize the acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber. ► Cerium salts act as not only crosslink agents but also reinforcing fillers in the matrix. ► These materials show good irradiation resistance and mechanical properties at same time.

  18. Characterization of microstructure and catalytic of cerium oxide obtained by colloidal solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated to obtain particles of cerium oxide, for use as catalysts for the combustion of methane using the technique of through polymeric colloidal solution. Obtaining the colloidal system is based on hydrolysis of salts such as cerium acetylacetonate, cerium nitrate in the presence of additives such as polyvinylbutyral (PVB), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl acetate (PVA), at concentrations of 5, 10 and 15% in aqueous or alcoholic medium. These solutions containing ions of interest were subjected to a heat treatment at 650° C for 30 minutes, with heating rate of 2 ° C/ min. After heat treatment, the fibers were characterized according to their morphology, surface area, crystallinity, weight loss and catalytic activity. Samples obtained from cerium acetylacetonate were more reactive than the cerium nitrate to the combustion of methane, as showed greater conversions and higher temperatures reached during the process, which is of utmost importance since the combustion catalytic methane is used for generating thermal energy. After the reaction with methane, the samples underwent significant change in surface area, probably due to the intensity of combustion reactions of the nitrate and the generation of heat involved in this reaction, which gave rise to coarse particles. During the combustion process using the obtained from particles of cerium acetylacetonate, there was the release of large quantities of nitrogen compared to the results of assays with the particles obtained with cerium nitrate. (author)

  19. Mesoscopic structure of cerium waste loaded hydrated cement by SANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementation is one of the most commonly used methods for conditioning radioactive wastes. It provides a cost-effective solution for encapsulation of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes into suitable solid form for long term safety storage. Cerium is used for decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste and after this decontamination process, secondary wastes with corrosion products are created, which must be managed properly and cemented for near surface disposal. In the present work, modification of mesoscopic structure in hydrated cement due to addition of simulated cerium waste at different concentrations has been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Structural modifications, in mesoscopic length scale, have been observed. The scattering profiles for three kinds of cement blocks (virgin, 10 g/l and 20 g/l of corrosion product (C.P.) with 4 mm thickness) are shown. Data have been analyzed in the light of polydisperse spherical particles model assuming a log-normal distribution. Widely separated bimodal particle size distributions best represent the present data. Further, it has been observed that the scattering profile obeys power-law (Q-n) behaviour in two domains of Q, which reflects the self-similar/self-affined morphology of the inhomogeneities. Estimated parameters from SANS data are tabulated. A comparison is shown mentioning the value of scattering radius of gyration, exponent values (η) and average particle size for each kind of hydrated cement sample. (author)

  20. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M. [Zabolotny Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv D0368 (Ukraine); Baranchikov, Alexander E. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, Anastasia V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir K., E-mail: van@igic.ras.ru [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus.

  1. Sorption removal of arsenic by cerium-exchanged zeolite P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modification of zeolite P was performed by exchanged of its sodium with cerium(III). The resulting cerium-exchanged zeolite P, (CeZP) did not change in its crystallinity compared to original zeolite. The CeZP was subsequently used to sorb As(V) from aqueous solution. Maximum sorption of As(V) by CeZP occurred at pH range 3-10. In addition, the sorption capacity increased with increasing initial As(V) concentrations. The sorption follows Langmuir model with maximum sorption capacity of 8.72 mg g-1 at 25 deg. C and increased to 23.42 mg g-1 at 90 deg. C, indicating an endothermic process. The arsenic sorption by CeZP was not affected by the present of nitrate, chloride, sulphate, carbonate and bromide but was reduced significantly in the presence of phosphate. This study shows that the as prepared CeZP was found effective for the removal of arsenic from wastewater sample of wood treatment industry

  2. New sunscreen materials based on amorphous cerium and titanium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium-titanium pyrophosphates Ce1-xTi xP2O7 (with x = 0, 0.50, and 1.0), which are novel phosphate materials developed as UV-shielding agents for use in cosmetics, were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescent analysis, UV-vis reflectance, and Raman spectroscopy. Since the optical reflectance shifted to lower wavelengths by the crystallization of the phosphates and the stabilization of the amorphous state of the cerium-titanium pyrophosphates was carried out by doping niobium (Nb). Raman spectroscopic study of the phosphate showed that P-O-P bending and stretching modes decreased with the loading of Nb, accompanying with the formation of Nb-O stretching mode. Therefore, the increase in the amount of the non-bridging oxygen in the amorphous phosphate should be the reason for the inhibition of the crystallization. This stabilization is a significant improvement, which enables to apply these amorphous phosphates not only to cosmetics and paints, but also plastics and films

  3. Altering properties of cerium oxide thin films by Rh doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thin films of ceria doped by rhodium deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. • Concentration of rhodium has great impact on properties of Rh–CeOx thin films. • Intensive oxygen migration in films with low concentration of rhodium. • Oxygen migration suppressed in films with high amount of Rh dopants. - Abstract: Ceria containing highly dispersed ions of rhodium is a promising material for catalytic applications. The Rh–CeOx thin films with different concentrations of rhodium were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering and were studied by soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, Temperature programmed reaction and X-ray powder diffraction techniques. The sputtered films consist of rhodium–cerium mixed oxide where cerium exhibits a mixed valency of Ce4+ and Ce3+ and rhodium occurs in two oxidation states, Rh3+ and Rhn+. We show that the concentration of rhodium has a great influence on the chemical composition, structure and reducibility of the Rh–CeOx thin films. The films with low concentrations of rhodium are polycrystalline, while the films with higher amount of Rh dopants are amorphous. The morphology of the films strongly influences the mobility of oxygen in the material. Therefore, varying the concentration of rhodium in Rh–CeOx thin films leads to preparing materials with different properties

  4. Cerium compounds in the fashion of the light actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers familiar with the light actinides easily recognize in cerium compounds a microcosm of the rich variety of properties seen in the light actinides. The parallelism seen between comparable cerium and actinide compounds strongly suggests that the same physical models are applicable. The most significant is the relative size of the f-orbital. Localization is generally tighter in Ce compounds than uranium compounds, making Ce roughly analogous to Np through Am. A way to see the actinide parallelism is to compare Hill plots. Compounds in the different regions of the plots (representing different physics) are isostructural compounds with the same companion (B) elements. The most common materials exhibiting a direct f-f interaction are the cubic Laves compounds. Accordingly, we have determined the band structures of CeRu2, CeRh2, CeIr2, CeOs2, and CeNi2. Compounds illustrative of the interaction of f-orbitals with ligand orbitals are the Cu3Au structured materials. Materials calculated in this class are CeRh3, CePd3, and CeSn3 - the materials of much interest as mixed valent. Although the focus is on the Ce compounds, calculations performed on uranium isomorphs are used to highlight the interesting physics

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of Cerium from Monazite Bangka using Tiron reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To anticipate the analysis of individual rare earth element from monazite processing which have done at PTPBGN division and samples from other division of P2BGN, and to develop the Ce analysis method by spectrophotometric using tiron reagent. The purpose of the experiment is to find out the method and the condition of Ce analysis with high accuracy and applicable. The variable observation were cerium-tiron spectrum, pH, ligand concentration, buffer concentration, linearity, anion influence, limit detection, impurities of elements and complex stability. The complex of cerium-tiron produce the maximum absorption at 497.5 nm and stable until 8 hours. The optimum conditions of this method was : tiron concentration is 0.25 %, pH 8.5 with buffer solution sodium acetate is 0.3 M. Detection limit is 1.00 ppm and area of linearity between 1 - 100 ppm, and PO4, Fe, U and Ti was influence to this method. The content of Ce from 2 samples of monazite Bangka which determine by this method was 18%

  6. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF3:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF3 nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF3 and CeF3:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF3 nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H2O2. • CeF3 and CeF3:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus

  7. The van Hemmen-Kondo model for disordered cerium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interplay between disorder and strong correlations has been observed experimentally in disordered cerium alloys such as Ce(Ni, Cu) or Ce(Pd, Rh). In the case of Ce(Ni, Cu) alloys with a Cu concentration x between 0.6 and 0.3, the first studies have shown a smooth transition with decreasing temperature from a spin glass phase to ferromagnetism; for x smaller than 0.2, a Kondo phase has been observed. The situation is more complicated now due to the recent observation of magnetic clusters. The competition between the Kondo effect, the spin glass (SG) and the ferromagnetic (FE) ordering has been extensively studied theoretically. The Kondo effect is described by the usual mean-field approximation; we have treated the SG behavior successively by the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, then by the Mattis model and finally by the van Hemmen model, which takes both a ferromagnetic part and a site-disorder random part for the intersite exchange interaction. We present here the results obtained by the van Hemmen-Kondo model: for a large Kondo exchange JK, a Kondo phase is obtained while, for smaller JK, the succession of an SG phase, a mixed SG-FE one and finally an FE one has been obtained with decreasing temperature. This model improves the theoretical description of disordered Kondo systems by providing a simpler approach for further calculations of magnetic clusters and can, therefore, account for recent experimental data on disordered cerium systems.

  8. New sunscreen materials based on amorphous cerium and titanium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masui, Toshiyuki [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Handai Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hirai, Hidekazu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Handai Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Imanaka, Nobuhito [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Handai Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: imanaka@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Gin-ya [Juri Institute for Environmental Science and Chemistry, College of Analytical Chemistry, 2-1-8 Temma, Kita-ku, Osaka 530-0043 (Japan)

    2006-02-09

    Cerium-titanium pyrophosphates Ce{sub 1-x}Ti {sub x}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} (with x = 0, 0.50, and 1.0), which are novel phosphate materials developed as UV-shielding agents for use in cosmetics, were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescent analysis, UV-vis reflectance, and Raman spectroscopy. Since the optical reflectance shifted to lower wavelengths by the crystallization of the phosphates and the stabilization of the amorphous state of the cerium-titanium pyrophosphates was carried out by doping niobium (Nb). Raman spectroscopic study of the phosphate showed that P-O-P bending and stretching modes decreased with the loading of Nb, accompanying with the formation of Nb-O stretching mode. Therefore, the increase in the amount of the non-bridging oxygen in the amorphous phosphate should be the reason for the inhibition of the crystallization. This stabilization is a significant improvement, which enables to apply these amorphous phosphates not only to cosmetics and paints, but also plastics and films.

  9. [Ion chromatography of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate using their postcolumn reactions with cerium (IV) and fluorescence detection of cerium (III)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q; Hu, K; Miura, Y

    1999-09-01

    An ion chromatographic method was used to separate the species of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate in their mixtures. This method is based on the separation of each anion in their mixtures by using a separation column, and then on the fluorimetric measurement of cerium (III) formed by a postcolumn reaction of cerium (IV) with the species of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate in the effluent. The optimal conditions for separating and determining the above three species have been established. By using a 3 mmol/L carbonate eluent, the species of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate could be eluted at the proper retention times of 1.7, 2.6 and 5.0 min, respectively, and these three anions could be separated completely. The effects of the concentrations of cerium (IV) and sulfuric acid in the postcolumn reaction solution on the chromatographic peak-height were tested in order to obtain the optimal peak-height. It was found that the peak-height at first increases rapidly with an increase in the concentration of cerium (IV) and sulfuric acid respectively up to a certain concertation, then increases slowly. These critical concentrations of cerium (IV) and sulfuric acid also depend on the amount of the analyte injected. Meanwhile the baseline signals of the sepectra increase with an increase in the concentration of cerium (IV). Some concentrations above the critical concentration of sulfuric acid could be selected as the optimal concentration of sulfuric acid, but the concentration of cerium (IV) should be optimized by establishing a compromise between the higher peak-height and the lower baseline signal. The detection limit of this method was found to be 1 mumol/L for thiosulfate when an amount of 100 microL analyte was injected. PMID:12552889

  10. Structural, topographical and electrical properties of cerium doped strontium barium niobate (Ce:SBN60) ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. Gokul; Mathivanan, V.; Kumar, G. Ramesh; Yathavan, S.; Mohan, R.

    2016-05-01

    Tungsten bronze type cerium doped strontium barium niobate (Ce:SBN - Sr0.6B0.4Nb2O6) ceramics were synthesized by solid state process. Cerium was used as dopant to improve its electrical properties. Influence of Ce+ ions on the photoluminescence properties was investigated in detail. The grain size topographical behavior of SBN powders and their associated abnormal grain growth (AGG) were completely analyzed through SEM studies. Finally dielectric, measurement discusses about the broad phase transition observed due to cerium dopant The results were discussed in detail.

  11. Violet/blue emission from epitaxial cerium oxide films on silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violet/blue photoluminescence was observed from epitaxial cerium oxide films on silicon substrates. The films were deposited on silicon (111) substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions using pulsed laser ablation of a cerium oxide target and treated by rapid thermal annealing in argon. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements indicated the formation of a single crystal cerium oxide phase Ce6O11 different from CeO2 in the annealed films. The emission might be due to charge transfer transitions from the 4f band to the valence band of the oxide. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. The study on preparation of high dispersion and pure cerium dioxide for producing automotive exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-stage counter-current solvent extraction process using TBP as the solvent has been carried out for purifying cerium and the ammonium carbonate precipitation method has been used to produce the cerium oxide of high dispersion and pure. The flow sheet of extraction system includes 3 extraction stages with O/A = 0.7,2 stripping stages and 4 scrubbing stages with O/A = 5. The condition for ammonium carbonate precipitation, drying and calcination have been investigated and a procedure that seem to be practically suitable to prepare cerium dioxide powder with great specific surface area for producing automotive exhaust catalyst has been proposed. (LMT)

  13. Effect of Cerium on Mechanical Properties and Morphology of ZZn4-1 Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Effect of the addition of cerium in appropriate amount on the mechanical properties and morphology of ZZn4-1 alloy was investigated. In the case of samples collected from metal mould, the results show that the addition of cerium in appropriate amount can increase tensile strength and HB hardness, and can refine the microstructure of ZZn4-1 alloy considerably. In the case of samples collected from pressure die-casting, the addition of cerium in appropriate amount can refine the primary η-phase and the eutectic structure of pressure die-casting and improve mechanical and processing properties of the alloy.

  14. Ion exchange reactions in amorphous and crystalline aluminium silicates from solution of cerium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions of ion-exchange of Na+ by Ce3+ and NH4+ on the zeolite containing catalyst, amorphous silica alumina and zeolite Y have been studied. The cerium cations are shown to be exchanged by the Na+ cations with more selectivity than the anmonia cations. In the case of the zeolite containing catalyst and amorphous silica alumina the region of the staggered ion-exchange from the mixture of the solutions of cerium and ammonium sulphates was been detected. This is explained by the formation fo cerium complexes with the sulphate ions

  15. Studies of solution deposited cerium oxide thin films on textured Ni-alloy substrates for YBCO superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) buffer layers play an important role for the development of YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) based superconducting tapes using the rolling assisted biaxially textured substrates (RABiTS) approach. The chemical solution deposition (CSD) approach has been used to grow epitaxial CeO2 films on textured Ni-3 at.% W alloy substrates with various starting precursors of ceria. Precursors such as cerium acetate, cerium acetylacetonate, cerium 2-ethylhexanoate, cerium nitrate, and cerium trifluoroacetate were prepared in suitable solvents. The optimum growth conditions for these cerium precursors were Ar-4% H2 gas processing atmosphere, solution concentration levels of 0.2-0.5 M, a dwell time of 15 min, and a process temperature range of 1050-1150 deg. C. X-ray diffraction, AFM, SEM, and optical microscopy were used to characterize the CeO2 films. Highly textured CeO2 layers were obtained on Ni-W substrates with both cerium acetate and cerium acetylacetonate as starting precursors. YBCO films with a J c of 1.5 MA/cm2 were obtained on cerium acetylacetonate-based CeO2 films with sputtered YSZ and CeO2 cap layers

  16. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars is controversial yet the evidence has aroused scientific interest, as CH4 could be a harbinger of extant or extinct microbial life. There are various oxidized compounds present on the surface of Mars that could serve as electron acceptors for the anaerobic oxidation of CH4, including perchlorate (ClO4-). We examined the role of perchlorate, chlorate (ClO3-) and chlorite (ClO2-) as oxidants linked to CH4 oxidation. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction begins with reduction of ClO4- to ClO2- and ends with dismutation of chlorite to yield chloride (Cl-) and molecular oxygen (O2). We explored the potential for aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria to couple with oxygen derived from chlorite dismutation during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the N2-flushed headspace above cell suspensions of methanotrophs (Methylobacter albus strain BG8) and perchlorate reducing bacteria (Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB) in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. Similar rates of CH4 consumption were observed for these mixed cultures whether they were co-mingled or segregated under a common headspace, indicating that direct contact of cells was not required for methane consumption to occur. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing dried soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and D. agitata CKB and in the presence of 10 mM ClO2-. This soil (seasonally exposed sediment) collected from the shoreline of a freshwater lake (Searsville Lake, CA) demonstrated endogenous CH4 uptake as well as perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite reduction/dismutation. However, these experiments required physical separation of soil from the aqueous bacterial culture to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the

  17. Physiological and genetic description of dissimilatory perchlorate reduction by the novel marine bacterium Arcobacter sp. strain CAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlström, Charlotte I; Wang, Ouwei; Melnyk, Ryan A; Bauer, Stefan; Lee, Joyce; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D

    2013-01-01

    A novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacterium (DPRB), Arcobacter sp. strain CAB, was isolated from a marina in Berkeley, CA. Phylogenetically, this halophile was most closely related to Arcobacter defluvii strain SW30-2 and Arcobacter ellisii. With acetate as the electron donor, strain CAB completely reduced perchlorate (ClO4(-)) or chlorate (ClO3(-)) [collectively designated (per)chlorate] to innocuous chloride (Cl(-)), likely using the perchlorate reductase (Pcr) and chlorite dismutase (Cld) enzymes. When grown with perchlorate, optimum growth was observed at 25 to 30°C, pH 7, and 3% NaCl. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations were dominated by free-swimming straight rods with 1 to 2 polar flagella per cell. Strain CAB utilized a variety of organic acids, fructose, and hydrogen as electron donors coupled to (per)chlorate reduction. Further, under anoxic growth conditions strain CAB utilized the biogenic oxygen produced as a result of chlorite dismutation to oxidize catechol via the meta-cleavage pathway of aerobic catechol degradation and the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme. In addition to (per)chlorate, oxygen and nitrate were alternatively used as electron acceptors. The 3.48-Mb draft genome encoded a distinct perchlorate reduction island (PRI) containing several transposases. The genome lacks the pcrC gene, which was previously thought to be essential for (per)chlorate reduction, and appears to use an unrelated Arcobacter c-type cytochrome to perform the same function. IMPORTANCE The study of dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria (DPRB) has largely focused on freshwater, mesophilic, neutral-pH environments. This study identifies a novel marine DPRB in the genus Arcobacter that represents the first description of a DPRB associated with the Campylobacteraceae. Strain CAB is currently the only epsilonproteobacterial DPRB in pure culture. The genome of strain CAB lacks the pcrC gene found in all

  18. Determination of perchlorate in drinking water by ion chromatography using macrocycle-based concentration and separation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, John D; Simpson, David; Jensen, Bryce D; Gardner, Joseph S; Peterson, Quinn P

    2006-06-16

    Macrocycle-based ion chromatography provides a convenient, reliable method for the determination of perchlorate ion, which is currently of great interest to the environmental community. This study shows that effective perchlorate determinations can be made using standard conductimetric detection by combining an 18-crown-6-based mobile phase with an underivatized reversed-phase mobile phase ion chromatography (MPIC) column. One unique feature of this method is the flexibility in column capacity that is achieved through simple variations in eluent concentrations of 18-crown-6 and KOH, facilitating the separation of target analyte anions such as perchlorate. Using a standard anion exchange column as concentrator makes possible the determination of perchlorate as low as 0.2 ug/L in low ionic strength matrices. Determination of perchlorate at the sub-ug/L level in pure water and in spiked local city hard water samples with high background ion concentrations can be achieved this way. However, like other IC techniques, this method is challenged to achieve analyses at the ug/L level in the demanding high ionic strength matrix described by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1,000 mg/L chloride, sulfate and carbonate). We approached this challenge by use of the Cryptand C1 concentrator column, provided by Dionex Corporation, to effectively preconcentrate perchlorate while reducing background ion concentrations in the high ionic strength matrix. The retention characteristics of the concentrator column were studied in order to maximize its effectiveness for perchlorate determinations. The method makes possible the determination of perchlorate at the 5 ug/L level in the highest ionic strength matrix described by the EPA. PMID:16516902

  19. Perchlorate content of plant foliage reflects a wide range of species-dependent accumulation but not ozone-induced biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate (ClO4−) interferes with uptake of iodide in humans. Emission inventories do not explain observed distributions. Ozone (O3) is implicated in the natural origin of ClO4−, and has increased since pre-industrial times. O3 produces ClO4−in vitro from Cl−, and plant tissues contain Cl− and redox reactions. We hypothesize that O3 exposure may induce plant synthesis of ClO4−. We exposed contrasting crop species to environmentally relevant O3 concentrations. In the absence of O3 exposure, species exhibited a large range of ClO4− accumulation but there was no relationship between leaf ClO4− and O3, whether expressed as exposure or cumulative flux (dose). Older, senescing leaves accumulated more ClO4− than younger leaves. O3 exposed vegetation is not a source of environmental ClO4−. There was evidence of enhanced ClO4− content in the soil surface at the highest O3 exposure, which could be a significant contributor to environmental ClO4−. -- Highlights: • Exposure to ozone in crop species does not induce accumulation nor biosynthesis of perchlorate. • Older leaves accumulate more perchlorate than younger leaves. • Soil surface may accumulate perchlorate following exposure to ozone. • Species differ greatly in accumulation of perchlorate from the rhizosphere, independent of ozone. • Ozone exposed vegetation is not a candidate source of environmental perchlorate. -- Exposure of crop species to ozone did not lead to biosynthesis or greater accumulation of foliar perchlorate. Older leaves accumulated more perchlorate than younger leaves

  20. Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: Laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Beloso, A.D., Jr.; Streger, S.H.; Heraty, L.J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10??C and 22??C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22??C and 615 h at 10??C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were ??18O = -36.6 to -29.0??? and ??37Cl = -14.5 to -11.5???, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using 18O-enriched water (??18O = +198???) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (??18O = -8.1???) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio ??18O/??37Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 ?? 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (??18O/??37Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  1. Coulometric microdetermination of organic compounds with manganese(III) and cerium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation of compounds such as hydroquinon, p-aminophenol, paracetamol and phenacetin was performed using cerium(IV) and manganese(III) coulometrically electrogenerated. Quantitative results obtained are excellent even at the microscale level. (author)

  2. Immobilization of simulated radioactive soil waste containing cerium by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Xianhe, E-mail: maoxianhe@hotmail.com; Qin, Zhigui; Yuan, Xiaoning; Wang, Chunming; Cai, Xinan; Zhao, Weixia; Zhao, Kang; Yang, Ping; Fan, Xiaoling

    2013-11-15

    A simulated radioactive soil waste containing cerium as an imitator element has been immobilized by a thermite self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process. The compositions, structures, and element leaching rates of products with different cerium contents have been characterized. To investigate the influence of iron on the chemical stability of the immobilized products, leaching tests of samples with different iron contents with different leaching solutions were carried out. The results showed that the imitator element cerium mainly forms the crystalline phases CeAl{sub 11}O{sub 18} and Ce{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}. The leaching rate of cerium over a period of 28 days was 10{sup −5}–10{sup −6} g/(m{sup 2} day). Iron in the reactants, the reaction products, and the environment has no significant effect on the chemical stability of the immobilized SHS products.

  3. Immobilization of simulated radioactive soil waste containing cerium by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianhe; Qin, Zhigui; Yuan, Xiaoning; Wang, Chunming; Cai, Xinan; Zhao, Weixia; Zhao, Kang; Yang, Ping; Fan, Xiaoling

    2013-11-01

    A simulated radioactive soil waste containing cerium as an imitator element has been immobilized by a thermite self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process. The compositions, structures, and element leaching rates of products with different cerium contents have been characterized. To investigate the influence of iron on the chemical stability of the immobilized products, leaching tests of samples with different iron contents with different leaching solutions were carried out. The results showed that the imitator element cerium mainly forms the crystalline phases CeAl11O18 and Ce2SiO5. The leaching rate of cerium over a period of 28 days was 10-5-10-6 g/(m2 day). Iron in the reactants, the reaction products, and the environment has no significant effect on the chemical stability of the immobilized SHS products.

  4. Electroreduction of cerium ions on silver electrode in halide melts at 973 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of electroreduction of cerium ions in equimolar KCl-NaCl melt is explored at 973 K. The effect of the anionic composition of the melt on the electroreduction of cerium ions is studied. It is shown that the electrodeposition of cerium metal from halide melts on a silver electrode is the primary electrochemical process that occurs at potentials more positive than those corresponding to the supporting-electrolyte decomposition. The electroreduction of chloride complexes of cerium on a silver electrode in the melt in both steady- and non-steady-state polarization modes at rates below V≤0.5 V/s is controlled by the diffusion delivery; at higher polarization rates, the charge-transfer stage predominates

  5. Electrochemical separation of uranium and cerium in molten LiCl-KCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical separation of uranium from cerium in LiCl–KCl eutectic and the electrochemical behavior of Ce(III) were studied. According to the cyclic voltammogram of Ce(III) and the former result of U(III), electrodeposition potential was determined at -1.65 V (vs Ag/AgCl). The uranium metal was successfully deposited and separated from cerium. The morphology of deposit and cross section of electrode were investigated by SEM, firstly uranium deposit alloys with stainless steel and forms a thin transition layer, and secondly the uranium metal layer grows from the transition layer. The separation factors of uranium/cerium on different recovery ratios were determined through a series of steps. It was found that the content of cerium in the deposit and separation factors declined with increasing the initial concentration of U3+ in molten salts; the separation factors remained stable at around 20 in different uranium recovery ratios. (author)

  6. Synergistic extraction of uranium (VI), thorium (IV) and cerium (III) by thenoyltri-fluoroacetone and phenanthroline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synergistic extraction of uranium(VI), thorium(IV) and cerium(III) with thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA) and phenanthroline (phen) is studied. The extraction equilibrium constants are calculated and the mechanism of the synergistic extraction has been discussed

  7. The low gas flow rate foam separation of cerium(III) from dilute aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two low gas flow rate foam separation techniques, ion and precipitate flotation, have been investigated for the separation of trivalent cerium from solutions with initial cerium concentrations ranging from 1 x 10-8 to 1 x 10-4M in the pH range of 1.8 to 12 using the anionic collector sodium lauryl sulphate and the cationic surfactant cetyl trymethyl ammonium bromide. In addition to the type of collector, the pH and the cerium ion concentration, and other factors which can affect flotation results, viz. the time period of bubbling, the rate of gas flow, the ageing of both the cerium and the collector ions, the ionic strength, and the concentration of the collector ions have been investigated and optimum conditions have been established. Under optimum conditions removals as high a 98.5% can be achieved. (author)

  8. Cerium-based conversion coatings to improve the corrosion resistance of aluminium alloy 6061-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cerium-based conversion coatings. • Cerium salt sources assisted with hydrogen peroxide. • Protective properties of the conversion coating. - Abstract: Cerium-based conversion coatings were deposited on aluminium alloy 6061-T6 by immersion in two cerium salt sources (chloride- and nitrate-based) assisted with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The morphology and composition of the coatings were analysed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Electrochemical measurements to assess corrosion behaviour were performed using free corrosion potential, polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with a 3% NaCl solution. The influence of H2O2 on the generation of the coating was studied by cyclic voltammetry tests. The protective properties of the coating generated are heavily dependent upon the chelating effect, chaotropic anion, the pH and H2O2 content

  9. Synergistic inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in seawater by cerium chloride and sodium gluconate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Significant synergistic effect was determined for cerium and gluconate. • The mixture showed significant corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in seawater. • Predominant anodic inhibition mechanism was observed. • The presence of cerium ions incorporated in the protective layer was confirmed. - Abstract: In this research the effect of cerium (III) chloride heptahydrate (CC) and sodium gluconate (SG) on the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel C45 (1531) in natural seawater has been evaluated using electrochemical methods and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that substantial corrosion inhibition (94.98%) using CC and SG can be obtained in synergistic manner. Surface analysis confirmed the presence of cerium ions incorporated in the protective layer of carbon steel specimen. SG acts predominantly as anodic inhibitor whereas CC acts as a mixed type inhibitor. Using both inhibitors predominant mechanism of anodic inhibition is observed

  10. Cerium oxide for the destruction of chemical warfare agents: A comparison of synthetic routes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janos, P.; Henych, Jiří; Pelant, O.; Pilařová, V.; Vrtoch, L.; Kormunda, M.; Mazanec, K.; Štengl, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 304, MAR (2016), s. 259-268. ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Cerium oxide * Chemical warfare agents * Organophosphate compounds * Decontamination Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.529, year: 2014

  11. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  12. A Reservoir of Natural Perchlorate in Unsaturated Zones of Arid and Semi-Arid Regions, Southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. A.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Anderson, T. A.; Orris, G. J.; Rajagapolan, S.; Sandvig, R. M.; Scanlon, B. R.; Walvoord, M. A.; Jackson, W.

    2006-12-01

    Natural perchlorate (ClO4-) is generally present in unsaturated zones of steppe-to-desert regions of the arid and semi-arid southwestern United States. The perchlorate is associated with atmospherically deposited chloride that has accumulated throughout the Holocene. To assess this natural reservoir, we analyzed unsaturated-zone profiles from ten sites across Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah for perchlorate and other anions. The sampled sites represent a wide range of precipitation (0.1 0.5 m yr-1), dominant vegetation, soil type, underlying geology, and include five distinct ecological regions: Chihuahuan, Mojave, and southern Great Basin deserts; Arizona-New Mexico semi-desert; and Texas High Plains dry steppe. Concentrations of perchlorate correlated closely with chloride and bromide. The perchlorate reservoir (up to 1 kg ha-1) is sufficiently large to impact groundwater when natural recharge during pluvial periods or induced recharge after conversion to agriculture flushes accumulated salts from the unsaturated zone. This little explored source can explain perchlorate in milk and other agricultural products far from anthropogenic contamination, and should be considered when evaluating overall exposure risk.

  13. Inhibition of pH fronts in corrosion cells due to the formation of cerium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of cerium-based corrosion inhibitors on the pH front between the alkaline cathode and acidic anode in corrosion cells has been studied. The cerium component of these inhibitors can affect the pH front since it precipitates in an alkaline environment as cerium hydroxide, which is important since the corrosion inhibition mechanism of the cerium component is a result of its deposition as a highly electrical resistive (passivation) layer on the cathode. It is studied whether the cerium can reach the cathode when fed into the corrosion cell from an external source after the onset of corrosion. To this end a simulation model was set up that includes the Poisson–Nernst–Planck theory to describe ion transport and the Frumkin–Butler–Volmer equation to describe charge transfer at the electrodes. In this model both the self-dissociation of water and the formation of cerium hydroxide are taken into account. To support our findings experimentally a corrosion cell consisting of an aluminum and copper electrode was used, in which the pH fronts were visualized using a pH-indicator. Two types of inhibitors were used; namely, highly soluble CeCl3 and sparsely soluble cerium dibutylphosphate, Ce(dbp)3. The results show that CeCl3 can reduce the size of the alkaline region and reach the cathode to form a passivation layer, whereas the solubility in case of Ce(dbp)3 is too low to supply sufficient amounts of trivalent cerium cations to penetrate the alkaline region. This behavior can be explained by the simulation results, which reveal a threshold for the corrosion inhibitor solubility below which no passivation of the cathode occurs

  14. Construction of heterocyclic structures by trivalent cerium salts promoted bond forming reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Properzi, Roberta; Marcantoni, Enrico

    2014-02-01

    Cerium(III) salts have recently gained increasing attention in the synthetic community, owing to the powerful features that are reviewed in detail in this tutorial. This review reports significant examples of cerium(III) promoted synthesis of heterocyclic structures, initially dealing with the synthesis of five- and six-membered ring nitrogen containing heterocycles, then describing the preparation of their oxygenated analogues and finally discussing the achievement of seven-membered rings and mixed heterocyclic motifs. PMID:24217370

  15. Protein adsorption and cellular uptake of cerium oxide nanoparticles as a function of zeta potential

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Swanand; Sandberg, Amanda; Heckert, Eric; Self, William; Seal, Sudipta

    2007-01-01

    The surface chemistry of biomaterials can have a significant impact on their performance in biological applications. Our recent work suggests that cerium oxide nanoparticles are potent antioxidants in cell culture models and we have evaluated several therapeutic applications of these nanoparticles in different biological systems. Knowledge of protein adsorption and cellular uptake will be very useful in improving the beneficial effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles in biology. In the present ...

  16. Effects of Morphology of Cerium Oxide Catalysts for Reverse Water Gas Shift Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kovasevic, M.; Mojet, B.L.; Ommen, van, B.; Lefferts, L.

    2016-01-01

    Reverse water gas shift reaction (RWGS) was investigated over cerium oxide catalysts of distinct morphologies: cubes, rods and particles. Catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) in hydrogen. Nanoshapes with high concentration of oxygen vacancies contain less surface oxygen removable in TPR. Cerium oxide cubes exhibited two times higher activity per surface area as compared to rods and particles. Catalytic activity of the...

  17. Catalysts with Cerium in a Membrane Reactor for the Removal of Formaldehyde Pollutant from Water Effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Mirella Gutiérrez-Arzaluz; Luis Noreña-Franco; Saúl Ángel-Cuevas; Violeta Mugica-Álvarez; Miguel Torres-Rodríguez

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of cerium oxide, cobalt oxide, mixed cerium, and cobalt oxides and a Ce–Co/Al2O3 membrane, which are employed as catalysts for the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) reaction process and the removal of formaldehyde from industrial effluents. Formaldehyde is present in numerous waste streams from the chemical industry in a concentration low enough to make its recovery not economically justified but high enough to create an environmental hazard. Common biological degradation ...

  18. Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of cerium in ferrosilicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerium was determined in ferrosilicon samples by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence techniques (XRF) techniques, with a secondary target of gadolinium. The methods employed were: comparison and linear regression with reference materials with cerium concentration between 0.4 and 1.0%. The samples were prepared in the form of pellets and the analytical results are reported as an average of five determinations with a confidence limits at 95% probability. (Author)

  19. Imidazolium ionic liquids as solvents for cerium(IV)-mediated oxidation reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi, Hasan; Bodor, Andrea; Lantos, Diana; Horváth, István T; De Vos, Dirk; Binnemans, Koen

    2007-01-01

    Use of imidazolium ionic liquids as solvents for organic transformations with tetravalent cerium salts as oxidizing agents was evaluated. Good solubility was found for ammonium hexanitratocerate(IV) (ceric ammonium nitrate, CAN) and cerium(IV) triflate in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate ionic liquids. Oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate was studied by in-situ FTIR spectroscopy and 13C NMR spectroscopy on carbon-13-labeled benzyl alcohol. Ca...

  20. A chemical cleaning process with Cerium (IV)-sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical cleaning process with a high decontamination factor (DF) is requested for decommissioning. Usually, the process should be qualified with the features, such as the feasibility of treating large or complicated form waste, the minimization of secondary waste. Therefore, a powerful technique of redox decontamination process with Ce+4/Ce+3 has been studied at INER. First, the redox of cerium ion with electrolytic method was developed. Two kinds of home-made electrolyzer were used. One is with an ion-exchange membrane, and the other one is with a ceramic separator. Second, factors influencing the decontamination efficiency, such as the concentration of Ce+4, regeneration current density, temperature, acidity of solution were all studied experimentally, and the optimum conditions were specified too. Third, the liquid waste recycling and treatment were developed with electrodialysis and ion-exchange absorption methods. Finally, the hot test was proceeded with the contaminated metals from DCR of nuclear facility. (author)

  1. Extraction behavior of cerium by tetraoctyldiglycolamide from nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diamide N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA) was synthesized and characterized. The prepared TODGA was applied for extraction of Ce(III) from nitric acid solutions. The equilibrium studies included the dependencies of cerium distribution ratio on nitric acid, TODGA, nitrate ion, hydrogen ion and cerous ion concentrations. Analysis of the results indicates that the main extracted species is Ce(TODGA)2(NO3)3HNO3. The capacity of Ce loading is approximately 45 mmol/L for 0.1 M solution of TODGA in n-hexane. Finally, the thermodynamic parameters were calculated: K (25 deg C) = 3.8 x 103, ΔH = -36.7 ± 1.0 kJ/mol, ΔS = -54.6 ± 3.0 J/K mol, and ΔG = -20.4 ± 0.1 kJ/mol. (author)

  2. Deposition and investigation of lanthanum cerium hexaboride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzanyan, A. S.; Harutyunyan, S. R.; Vardanyan, V. O.; Badalyan, G. R.; Petrosyan, V. A.; Kuzanyan, V. S.; Petrosyan, S. I.; Karapetyan, V. E.; Wood, K. S.; Wu, H.-D.; Gulian, A. M.

    2006-09-01

    Thin films of lanthanum-cerium hexaboride, the promising thermoelectric material for low-temperature applications, are deposited on various substrates by the electron-beam evaporation, pulsed laser deposition and magnetron sputtering. The influence of the deposition conditions on the films X-ray characteristics, composition, microstructure and physical properties, such as the resistivity and Seebeck coefficient, is studied. The preferred (100) orientation of all films is obtained from XRD traces. In the range of 780-800 °C deposition temperature the highest intensity of diffractions peaks and the highest degree of the preferred orientation are observed. The temperature dependence of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient of films are investigated in the temperature range of 4-300 K. The features appropriate to Kondo effect in the dependences ρ( T) and S( T) are detected at temperatures below 20 K. Interplay between the value of the Seebeck coefficient, metallic parameters and Kondo scattering of investigated films is discussed.

  3. Structure and activity of tellurium-cerium oxide acrylonitrile catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammoxidation of propylene to acrylonitrile (ACN) was investigated over various silica-supported (Te,Ce)O catalysts at 360 and 4400C. The binary oxide system used consists of a single nonstoichiometric fluorite-type phase α-(Ce,Te)O2 up to about 80 mole% TeO2 and a tellurium-saturated solid solution β-(Ce,Te)O2 at higher tellurium concentrations. The ACN yield varies almost linearly with the tellurium content of (Ce,Te)O2. The β-(Ce,Te)O2 phase is the most active component of the system (propylene conversion and ACN selectivity at 440 C of 76.7 and 74%, respectively) and is slightly more selective to ACN than α-Te02. Tellurium reduces the overoxidation properties of cerium and selective oxidation occurs through Te(IV)-bonded oxygen

  4. Effect of Surface Modification on Behaviors of Cerium Oxide Nanopowders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Mei; Shi Zhenxue; Liu Zhaogang; Hu Yanhong; Wang Mitang; Li Hangquan

    2007-01-01

    Study was made on the effect of surface modification on the behaviors of cerium oxide nanopowders. A surfactant-sodium dodecyl sulfate(C12H25SO4Na) was used to modify the surface of CeO2 powder particles. The unmodified and modified CeO2 powders were characterized by using a powder comprehensive characteristic tester, laser particle size analyzer, specific surface area tester, X-ray diffraction tester, and a scanning electron microscope. The testing and analysis results showed that C12H25SO4Na surface modification might increase the flowability and dispersity, and decrease the specific surface area and agglomeration of CeO2 powders. The mechanism of the surface modification of CeO2 powder particles was also discussed.

  5. Management of decontamination solution arising from Cerium redox process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the recovery of Pu from decontamination stream generated from Cerium Redox Process meant for decontamination of contaminated metallic wastes. Extraction of Pu is carried out using PUREX solvent after reducing it to tetravalent state which is subsequently stripped using hydroxylamine nitrate and nitric acid mixture. Raffinate from this step containing Ce3+, 241Am and corrosion products is subjected to ozonisation wherein Ce3+ is oxidized to Ce4+. Quantitative extraction of Ce is achieved by PUREX solvent in second cycle which is stripped using a mixture of NaNO2 and HNO3. Raffinate from this step contains 241Am and corrosion product which is removed by solvent extraction using TEHDGA. The final alpha lean waste can be managed by cementation. (author)

  6. Modification mechanism of cerium on the Al-18Si alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the rare earth cerium (Ce) on the hypereutectic Al-Si alloy under different casting states have been studied by optical microscope and quantitative image analysis. It is found that the size and the quantity of primary silicon in castings decrease with the increase of added Ce in the melt. Meanwhile primary silicon changes from branched shape to fine facetted shape. Although the modification on eutectic silicon in castings also improves with the increase of added Ce in the melt, the effect of modification on eutectic silicon away from primary silicon is more obvious than that on eutectic silicon close to primary silicon. The modification mechanism was analyzed in detail by means of scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive analysis of X-ray and thermodynamics analysis, which included the analysis on the change in standard Gibbs energy of reaction and reaction equilibrium.

  7. Mechanochemical synthesis and spark plasma sintering of the cerium silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ce5Si3, Ce3Si2, CeSi, CeSi2−x and CeSi2 were mechanochemically synthesized. • Temperature and pressure were monitored to investigate reaction progress. • All syntheses proceeded through a MSR event followed by rapid solid-state diffusion. • Milling time before MSR correlates well with effective heat of formation. • Some synthesized material was densified by spark plasma sintering. - Abstract: The cerium silicides, Ce5Si3, Ce3Si2, CeSi, CeSi2−y, and CeSi2−x, have been prepared from the elements by mechanochemical processing in a planetary ball mill. Preparation of the cerium silicide Ce5Si4 was unsuccessfully attempted and potential reasons for this are discussed. Temperature and pressure of the milling vial were monitored in situ to gain insight into the mechanochemical reaction kinetics, which include a mechanically-induced self-propagating reaction (MSR). Some prepared powders were consolidated by spark plasma sintering to high density. Starting materials, as-milled powders, and consolidated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results obtained help elucidate key questions in mechanochemical processing of intermetallics, showing first phase formation similar to thin films, MSR ignition times that are composition- and milling speed-dependent, and sensitivity of stable compound formation on the impact pressure. The results demonstrate mechanochemical synthesis as a viable technique for rare earth silicides

  8. Mechanochemical synthesis and spark plasma sintering of the cerium silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanko, Gordon A.; Jaques, Brian; Bateman, Allyssa [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: darrylbutt@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Boulevard, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Ce{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, CeSi, CeSi{sub 2−x} and CeSi{sub 2} were mechanochemically synthesized. • Temperature and pressure were monitored to investigate reaction progress. • All syntheses proceeded through a MSR event followed by rapid solid-state diffusion. • Milling time before MSR correlates well with effective heat of formation. • Some synthesized material was densified by spark plasma sintering. - Abstract: The cerium silicides, Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Ce{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, CeSi, CeSi{sub 2−y}, and CeSi{sub 2−x}, have been prepared from the elements by mechanochemical processing in a planetary ball mill. Preparation of the cerium silicide Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 4} was unsuccessfully attempted and potential reasons for this are discussed. Temperature and pressure of the milling vial were monitored in situ to gain insight into the mechanochemical reaction kinetics, which include a mechanically-induced self-propagating reaction (MSR). Some prepared powders were consolidated by spark plasma sintering to high density. Starting materials, as-milled powders, and consolidated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results obtained help elucidate key questions in mechanochemical processing of intermetallics, showing first phase formation similar to thin films, MSR ignition times that are composition- and milling speed-dependent, and sensitivity of stable compound formation on the impact pressure. The results demonstrate mechanochemical synthesis as a viable technique for rare earth silicides.

  9. Extraction of tetravalent berkelium and cerium by aliquate-336-S-NO3 quaternary ammonium salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of tetravalent berkelium and cerium by aliquate-336-S-NO3 quaternary ammonium salt from nitric acid solutions is investigated. The effect of concentrations of nitric acid and extracting agent, nature of an oxidant (potassium bromate, potassium bichromate, mixture of AgNO3 and (NH4)2S2O8) and solvent on the distribution coefficient of berkelium(4) and cerium(4) is studied. It is established that solutions of aliquate-336-S-NO3 in carbon tetrachloride and dichloroethane extract quantitatively tetravalent berkelium from 10-12 M nitric acid solutions and cerium - from 1-10 M nitric acid solutions containing potassium bichromate as an oxidant. It is shown that the value of distribution coefficient for berkelium and cerium depends on the nature of an oxidant and extracting agent concentration. It is established that in the case of extraction by quaternary ammonium salt with one berkelium(4) mole four aliquate-336-SNO3 moles are associated and 1.5-1.6 mole of extracting agent are associated with one cerium(4) mole. It permits to make a conclusion that stoichiometry of extraction reactions by quaternary ammonium salt is not the same for tetravalent berkelium and cerium. It is shown that trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements are not practically extracted by aliquate-336-S-NO3 from nitric acid solutions

  10. Secondary transformation mechanism of paramagnetic centers in irradiated alkali metal perchlorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EPR method has been used to study thermal transformations of paramagnetic centres (PC) in X-ray irradiated potassium, rubidium and cesium perchlorates. Experimental data make it possible to suppose that diffusion coefficient of O- ion a rather high and this ion is freely diffused already at 262 K. Colliding with [MeClO4]+ centres it is transformed in a molecule of oxygen. Another part of O- is transformed in stable ozonide-ion at 300 K. About room temperature hole centres dissociate with formation of ClO2 radical. It is supposed that part of electron and hole centres is not stabilized but at 77 K it is transformed in stable radiolysis products. This process most effective proceeds in dislocations and on the surface of microcrystals. The suggested model of thermal transformations of primary PC in irradiated perchlorates of alkali metals explains formation of all the finite ion and paramagnetic radiolysis products

  11. Kinetics of oxidation of uranium(IV) by permanganate ion in aqueous perchlorate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of oxidation of uranium(IV) by permanganate ion in 1.0 mol dm-3 perchloric acid solution has been investigated using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. The reaction was found to be second order overall and first order in the concentrations of both reactants. The catalytic effect of the perchlorates of Hg2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ on the reaction rate has been investigated. The activation parameters were evaluated and found to be ΔS not= 30.52 ± 1.22 kJ-1 mol-1, ΔH not= 62.89 ± 1.87 kJ mol-1, and ΔG not=53.79 ± 1.44 kJ mol-1. A tentative mechanism consistent with the kinetics is discussed. (author)

  12. Laboratory investigation of perchlorate deliquescence at the surface of Mars with a Raman scattering lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakakos, George; Whiteway, James A.

    2015-10-01

    A sample of magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate was subjected to the water vapor pressure and temperatures found at the landing site of the Phoenix Mars mission. Laser Raman scattering was applied to detect the onset of deliquescence and provide a relative estimate of the quantity of water taken up and subsequently released by the sample. As the temperature of the sample decreased at the same rate as measured on Mars during the evening, significant uptake of water from the atmosphere was observed to occur prior to the frost point temperature being reached. As the temperature was lowered further, the relative humidity over ice increased to 100% and frost formed on the surface surrounding the perchlorate sample. Freezing of the brine film was observed at the eutectic temperature of -67°C, and thawing occurred at a temperature of -62°C.

  13. trans-Tetraaquabis[bis(pyridin-3-ylmethanone-κN]manganese(II bis(perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [Mn(C11H8N2O2(H2O4](ClO42, the Mn2+ ion is located on an inversion center with the slightly distorted N2O4 octahedral coordination sphere comprising N-atom donors from two monodentate trans-related bis(pyridin-3-ylmethanone ligands and four water ligands. The two perchlorate anions are linked to the mononuclear complex molecule through water O—H...O hydrogen bonds while inter-complex water O—H...N(pyridine interactions form an infinite chain structure extending along the b axis. The perchlorate anions also function as inter-unit links through water O—H...O hydrogen bonds which, together with water O—H...O(carbonyl interactions, give a three-dimensional framework structure.

  14. Thermal behavior of aluminum powder and potassium perchlorate mixtures by DTA and TG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the thermal decomposition characteristics of micron sized aluminum powder + potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic systems were studied with thermal analytical techniques. The results show that the reactivity of aluminum powder in air increases as the particle size decreases. Pure aluminum with 5 μm particle size has a fusion temperature about 647 deg. C, but this temperature for 18 μm powder is 660 deg. C. Pure potassium perchlorate has an endothermic peak at 300 deg. C corresponding to a rhombic-cubic transition, a fusion temperature around 590 deg. C and decomposes at 592 deg. C. DTA curves for Al5/KClO4 (30:70) mixture show a maximum peak temperature for thermal decomposition at 400 deg. C. Increasing the particle size of aluminum powder increases the ignition temperature of the mixture. The oxidation temperature increased by enhance in the aluminum content of the mixture

  15. Thermal behavior of aluminum powder and potassium perchlorate mixtures by DTA and TG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmortazavi, S.M. [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: pourmortazavi@yahoo.com; Fathollahi, M. [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajimirsadeghi, S.S. [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, S.G. [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-04-01

    In this work the thermal decomposition characteristics of micron sized aluminum powder + potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic systems were studied with thermal analytical techniques. The results show that the reactivity of aluminum powder in air increases as the particle size decreases. Pure aluminum with 5 {mu}m particle size has a fusion temperature about 647 deg. C, but this temperature for 18 {mu}m powder is 660 deg. C. Pure potassium perchlorate has an endothermic peak at 300 deg. C corresponding to a rhombic-cubic transition, a fusion temperature around 590 deg. C and decomposes at 592 deg. C. DTA curves for Al{sub 5}/KClO{sub 4} (30:70) mixture show a maximum peak temperature for thermal decomposition at 400 deg. C. Increasing the particle size of aluminum powder increases the ignition temperature of the mixture. The oxidation temperature increased by enhance in the aluminum content of the mixture.

  16. Radiation-chemical behaviour of Rh(3) in perchloric and nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodium(3) behaviour in solutions of concentrated (> 1 mol/l) nitric and perchloric acids under 60Co gamma radiation with dose rate of 3.5 Gy/s has been studied. It is shown that in case of nitrate solution irradiation by doses up to 2x104 Gy, rhodium(3) concentration does not change. Rhodium(3) proved to be stable in perchlorate solutions in case of irradiation by doses up to 3x104 Gy; however, in the presence of organic acids and alcohols its reduction to methane occurred. Kinetic characteristics of rhodium(3) reduction by ethyl alcohol by the doses up to 4x104 Gy have been ascertained, reduction mechanism being considered. 6 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  17. Experimental investigation on the heterogeneous kinetic process of the low thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longuet, Baptiste [Laboratoire Energetique Explosions et Structures Universite d' Orleans (Germany); Gillard, Philippe [Laboratoire Energetic Explosions et Structures, Universite d' Orleans, Bourges (France)

    2009-02-15

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate has been extensively studied in the past. Nevertheless, the various results published illustrate, on the one hand, significant differences regarding the influence of different parameters on the decomposition and on the other hand, a lack of useful quantitative laws to predict the thermal behaviour of this crystal under a range of conditions (temperature, duration of exposure, presence of confinement). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Electric conductivity of gel-polymeric electrolytes with Ca, Mg and Zn perchlorate salts

    OpenAIRE

    NIKOLA CVJETICANIN; SLAVKO MENTUS

    1999-01-01

    The gel-polymeric electrolytes were prepared with calcium, magnesium and zinc perchlorates dissolved in propylene carbonate together with poly (acrylo nitrile) or poly(methyl methacrylate) as a solution immobilizing polymers. The electric conductivity of these electrolytes was examined in the dependence of temperature and solvent content, at a constant salt-to-polymer concentration ratio. The electrolyte compositions were outlined having the conductivity close to 10-3 S cm-1. It was demonstra...

  19. Non-aqueous titrimetric assay of gabapentin in capsules using perchloric acid as titrant

    OpenAIRE

    Sameer A. M. Abdulrahman; KANAKAPURA BASAVAIAH

    2011-01-01

    Two simple, rapid, accurate and inexpensive methods using visual and potentiometric titrimetric techniques are described for the determination of gabapentin (GBP) in bulk drug as well as in capsules. The methods are based on the neutralization reaction of the primary amino group of GBP with acetous perchloric acid as titrant in anhydrous acetic acid medium. The end point was detected either visually using crystal violet as indicator or potentiometrically using a modified glass electrode SCE e...

  20. Electrochromic iridium oxide films: Compatibility with propionic acid, potassium hydroxide, and lithium perchlorate in propylene carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Rui-Tao; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.

    2013-01-01

    Porous thin films of It oxide were prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering onto unheated substrates. The crystallite size was similar to 5 nm, and a small amount of unoxidized Ir was present. The electrochromic performance was studied by optical transmittance measurements and cyclic voltammetry applied to films in aqueous and non-aqueous electrolytes, specifically being 1 M propionic acid, 1 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and 1 M lithium perchlorate in propylene carbonate (Li-PC). Cyclic v...

  1. Disproportionation of plutonium IV in concentrated solutions of plutonium in perchloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was carried out to study the dependence of the PuIV disproportionation reaction in perchloric acid solution on the plutonium concentration up to 20 g/l. Solutions of such high plutonium concentration have not previously been studied. It was found that the bimolecular rate constant and the equilibrium constant of the disproportionation reaction were not appreciably different from their values at lower concentrations. (author)

  2. Radiometric quantification of thyrotoxic and goitrogenic effects of exogenous bromide and perchlorate ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Stanislav

    Bratislava: Slovenská technická univerzita, 2012, s. 152-156. ISBN 978-80-227-3722-7. [Priemyselná toxikológia 2012 /32./. Svit, Vysoké Tatry (SK), 20.06.2012-22.06.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : bromide * perchlorate * radiometric assay * thyroid peroxidase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  3. The use of chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate to promote crude oil mineralization in salt marsh sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundrett, Maeghan; Horita, Juske; Anderson, Todd; Pardue, John; Reible, Danny; Jackson, W Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high volume of crude oil released by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the salt marshes along the gulf coast were contaminated with crude oil. Biodegradation of crude oil in salt marshes is primarily limited by oxygen availability due to the high organic carbon content of the soil, high flux rate of S(2-), and saturated conditions. Chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate were evaluated for use as electron acceptors in comparison to oxygen by comparing oil transformation and mineralization in mesocosms consisting of oiled salt marsh sediment from an area impacted by the BP Horizon oil spill. Mineralization rates were determined by measuring CO2 production and δ (13)C of the produced CO2 and compared to transformation evaluated by measuring the alkane/hopane ratios over a 4-month period. Total alkane/hopane ratios decreased (~55-70 %) for all treatments in the following relative order: aerated ≈ chlorate > nitrate > perchlorate. Total CO2 produced was similar between treatments ranging from 550-700 mg CO2-C. The δ (13)C-CO2 values generally ranged between the indigenous carbon and oil values (-17 and -27‰, respectively). Oil mineralization was greatest for the aerated treatments and least for the perchlorate amended. Our results indicate that chlorate has a similar potential as oxygen to support oil mineralization in contaminated salt marshes, but nitrate and perchlorate were less effective. The use of chlorate as a means to promote oil mineralization in situ may be a promising means to remediate contaminated salt marshes while preventing unwanted secondary impacts related to nutrient management as in the case of nitrate amendments. PMID:25854211

  4. The Investigation of Perchlorate/Iron Phase Mixtures as A Possible Source of Oxygen Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Morris, R. V.; Archer, P. D.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H.; Freissinet C.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Mahaffy, P.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Paz-Zorzano, Maria; Stern, J. C.; McKay, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover detected O2 and HCl gas releases from the Rocknest (RN) eolian bedform and the John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) drill hole materials in Gale Crater. Chlorinated hydrocarbons have also been detected by the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GCMS). These detections along with the detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) suggesting perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 and chlorine species. Laboratory thermal analysis of individual per-chlorates has yet to provide an unequivocal temperature match to the SAM O2 and HCl release data. These detections along with the detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory suggested perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 and chlorine species. Laboratory thermal analysis of pure perchlorates has yet to provide an unequivocal temperature match to the SAM O2 and HCl release data. Analog laboratory analysis of iron mineralogy detected in Gale materials that was physically mixed with Ca- and Mg-perchlorate has been shown to catalyze lower O2 release temperatures and approach some SAM O2 release data. Instead of physical mixtures used in previous work, the work presented here utilized perchlorate solutions added to Fe phases. This technique allowed for perchlorate to come in closer contact with the Fe-phase and may more closely mimic Mars conditions where humidity can increase enough to cause deliquescence of the highly hygroscopic perchlorate phases. The objective of this work is to: 1) Utilize a laboratory SAM analog instrument to evaluate the O2 release temperatures from Mg- and Ca-perchlorates solutions applied to Fephases detetected in Gale Crate; and 2) Determine if perchlorate solutions can provide improved matches with the SAM O2 temperature release profiles.

  5. Evaluation of the natural attenuation potential of a complex pollution plume (chlorate, perchlorate, 1,2dichloroethane and vinyl chloride) by autochthonous microbial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Harris-Hellal, Jennifer; Joulian, Catherine; Hube, Daniel; Coulon, Stéphanie; Guérin, Valérie; Garrido, Françis

    2013-01-01

    Artificially synthetized chloride-based-oxyanions such as perchlorate (ClO4-) and chlorate (ClO3-), are used in a vast number of applications such as military and aerospace industry; they are also used as herbicides and in pyrotechnic applications. Due to their very high solubility, perchlorate and chlorate are readily transported in water systems and can thus end up in drinking water. Ingestion of perchlorate may affect iodine uptake by the human thyroid and thus thyroidal hormone production...

  6. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of nano magnesium oxide catalyzed ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrhenius kinetic parameters of ammonium perchlorate (AP) catalyzed with nano-sized magnesium oxide (MgO) has been determined in this work. Nano particles of MgO with an average size of approximately 20 to 30 nm have been used to catalyze the AP. The particles were characterized using Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques before mixing with AP. Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA) shows that MgO nanoparticles have a strong catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. The addition of MgO nano particles reduces the two stage decomposition of ammonium perchlorate to a single stage. Arrhenius kinetic parameters of pure and the catalyzed AP have been calculated using non isothermal kinetic approach based on Kissinger method. The comparison of the thermal behavior and kinetic parameters of pure and catalyzed AP has also been carried out to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The results show that the activation energy of the catalyzed AP has increased from 138.1 kJ/mole to 159.1kJ/mole. The rate of reaction, however, has increased in the catalyzed AP showing that it has become more reactive by the addition of MgO nano particles. The enthalpy of activation has increased by 16 percent in the catalyzed AP. (author)

  7. Perchlorate induced low temperature carbonate decomposition in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R.

    2012-07-01

    Simulated Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) analyses have shown that a CO2 release detected between 400°C and 680°C by the Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument may have been caused by a reaction between calcium carbonate and hydrated magnesium perchlorate. In our experiments a CO2 release beginning at 385 ± 12°C was attributed to calcite reacting with water vapor and HCl gas from the dehydration and thermal decomposition of Mg-perchlorate. The release of CO2 is consistent with the TEGA detection of CO2 released between 400 and 680°C, with the amount of CO2 increasing linearly with added perchlorate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments confirmed CaCl2 formation from the reaction between calcite and HCl. These results have important implications for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. Heating soils may cause inorganic release of CO2; therefore, detection of organic fragments, not CO2 alone, should be used as definitive evidence for organics in Martian soils.

  8. Temporal and spatial variation of perchlorate in streambed sediments: results from in-situ dialysis samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate of perchlorate (ClO4-) in streambed sediments is becoming a concern due to the increasing number of groundwater and surface water contamination sites in the United States. Dialysis samplers were deployed at three sites over a period of 1 year to determine the vertical distribution of ClO4-in sediment pore water. Results indicated that the spatial and temporal ClO4-penetration into sediments could be affected by numerous factors, such as temperature, microbial degradation, ClO4-surface water concentration, and sediment physico-geological properties. In general, maximum ClO4-penetration into sediments at the studied sites was 30 cm below the sediment-water surface. The vertical sequential depletion of electron acceptors in sediments suggested that microbial reduction was responsible for ClO4-depletion in stream sediments. Biodegradation of ClO4-occurred over a seasonally variable active depth zone of 1-10 cm. Results implied that there was a rapid natural attenuation potential of perchlorate in saturated near-surface sediments. -Perchlorate may be rapidly attenuated in saturated near-surface sediments

  9. Widespread occurrence of perchlorate in water, foodstuffs and human urine collected from Kuwait and its contribution to human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomirah, Husam F; Al-Zenki, Sameer F; Alaswad, Marivi C; Alruwaih, Noor A; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-06-01

    Perchlorate is a thyroid hormone-disrupting compound and is reported to occur widely in the environment. Little is known on human exposure to perchlorate in Kuwait. In this study, 218 water samples, 618 commonly consumed foodstuffs and 532 urine samples collected from Kuwait were analysed to assess the exposure of the Kuwaiti population to perchlorate. For the estimation of daily intake of perchlorate, food consumption rates were obtained from the National Nutrition Survey in the State of Kuwait (NNSSK). The results showed that leafy vegetables accounted for a major share of perchlorate exposure among the Kuwaiti population at 0.062 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (36.2%), followed by fruits at 0.026 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (15.3%) and non-leafy vegetables at 0.017 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (10.1%). The urinary perchlorate geometric mean (GM) concentrations ranged from 8.51 to 17.1 µg l(-)(1) for the five age groups, which were higher than those reported in other countries. The estimated urinary perchlorate exposure for the Kuwaiti general population was 0.42 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1), which was higher than that reported for the United States. The dietary intake of perchlorate for the Kuwaiti population ranged from 0.14 to 0.67 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) for the five age groups, with a mean total daily intake of 0.17 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) for the general population. The highest estimated dietary mean daily intake of perchlorate (0.67 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1)) was found for children at 3-5 years. The estimated dietary perchlorate exposure in Kuwait is higher than the recommended mean reference dose (RfD) but lower than that of provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) set by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). PMID:27248576

  10. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrektson, Anna; Hubbard, Christopher G; Tom, Lauren M; Boussina, Aaron; Jin, Yong T; Wong, Hayden; Piceno, Yvette M; Carlson, Hans K; Conrad, Mark E; Anderson, Gary; Coates, John D

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM) treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (per)chlorate (10 mM). Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Per)chlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (per)chlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved. PMID:25071731

  11. Rapid measurement of perchlorate in polar ice cores down to sub-ng L(-1) levels without pre-concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kari; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Brandis, Derek; Cox, Thomas; Splett, Scott

    2015-10-01

    An ion chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ESI-MS/MS) method has been developed for rapid and accurate measurement of perchlorate in polar snow and ice core samples in which perchlorate concentrations are expected to be as low as 0.1 ng L(-1). Separation of perchlorate from major inorganic species in snow is achieved with an ion chromatography system interfaced to an AB SCIEX triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection and lower limit of quantification without pre-concentration have been determined to be 0.1 and 0.3 ng L(-1), respectively, with a linear dynamic range of 0.3-10.0 ng L(-1) in routine measurement. These represent improvements over previously reported methods using similar analytical techniques. The improved method allows fast, accurate, and reproducible perchlorate quantification down to the sub-ng L(-1) level and will facilitate perchlorate measurement in the study of natural perchlorate production with polar ice cores in which perchlorate concentrations are anticipated to vary in the low and sub-ng L(-1) range. Initial measurements of perchlorate in ice core samples from central Greenland show that typical perchlorate concentrations in snow dated prior to the Industrial Revolution are about 0.8 ng L(-1), while perchlorate concentrations are significantly higher in recent (post-1980) snow, suggesting that anthropogenic sources are a significant contributor to perchlorate in the current environment. PMID:26297465

  12. (Per)chlorate reduction by the thermophilic bacterium Moorella perchloratireducens sp. nov., isolated from underground gas storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; van Gelder, Ton; Weelink, Sander A; Stams, Alfons J M

    2008-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterium, strain An10, was isolated from underground gas storage with methanol as a substrate and perchlorate as an electron acceptor. Cells were gram-positive straight rods, 0.4 to 0.6 mum in diameter and 2 to 8 mum in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. Spores were terminal with a bulged sporangium. The temperature range for growth was 40 to 70 degrees C, with an optimum at 55 to 60 degrees C. The pH optimum was around 7. The salinity range for growth was between 0 and 40 g NaCl liter(-1) with an optimum at 10 g liter(-1). Strain An10 was able to grow on CO, methanol, pyruvate, glucose, fructose, cellobiose, mannose, xylose, and pectin. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, thiosulfate, neutralized Fe(III) complexes, and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. The G+C content of the DNA was 57.6 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA analysis, strain An10 was most closely related to Moorella thermoacetica and Moorella thermoautotrophica. The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell extracts. Strain An10 is the first thermophilic and gram-positive bacterium with the ability to use (per)chlorate as a terminal electron acceptor. PMID:17981952

  13. Thermal expansion and stability of cerium-doped Lu2SiO5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and dilatometry were used to measure the thermal expansion and thermal stability of cerium-doped Lu2SiO5. The thermal expansion of Lu2SiO5 was highly anisotropic, with expansion along the b- and c-axes 5-10 times greater than expansion along the a-axis. There were no measurable differences in the thermal expansion between undoped Lu2SiO5, cerium-doped Lu2SiO5 with high scintillation efficiency, cerium-doped Lu2SiO5 with low scintillation efficiency and annealed cerium-doped Lu2SiO5. Lu2SiO5 decomposed at temperatures as low as 1350 deg. C in 2, while the presence of 100-150 ppm O2 stabilized Lu2SiO5 at temperatures up to 1760 deg. C. No bulk defects were identified to account for the difference between high scintillation efficiency and low scintillation efficiency cerium-doped Lu2SiO5 samples

  14. Electrochemical deposition of cerium on porous silicon to improve photoluminescence properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we present results for Cerium (Ce) doping effects on photoluminescence (PL) properties of porous silicon (PS). Cerium was deposited using electrochemical deposition on porous silicon prepared by electrochemical anodization of P-type (100) Si. From the photoluminescence spectroscopy, it was shown that porous silicon treated with cerium can lead to an increase of photoluminescence when they are irradiated by light compared to the porous silicon layer without cerium. In order to understand the contribution of cerium to the enhanced photoluminescence, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were performed, and it was shown that the improved photoluminescence may be attributed to the change of Si–H bonds into Si–O–Ce bonds and to a newly formed PS layer during electrochemical Ce coating. - Highlights: ► Degradation of the surface structures and the PL properties of PS remains a key issue for industrial production. ► In order to solve this problem, the passivation of the PS surface by treating it with Ce is investigated. ► To understand the effects of Ce on PL properties, EDX, FTIR, XRD, AFM and UV–vis analysis were performed.

  15. Electrochemical deposition of cerium on porous silicon to improve photoluminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atyaoui, Malek, E-mail: atyaoui.malek@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Photovoltaieque, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' energie, PB:95, Hammam Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Dimassi, Wissem; Monther, Ghrib; Chtourou, Radhouane; Ezzaouia, Hatem [Laboratoire de Photovoltaieque, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' energie, PB:95, Hammam Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2012-02-15

    In this work, we present results for Cerium (Ce) doping effects on photoluminescence (PL) properties of porous silicon (PS). Cerium was deposited using electrochemical deposition on porous silicon prepared by electrochemical anodization of P-type (100) Si. From the photoluminescence spectroscopy, it was shown that porous silicon treated with cerium can lead to an increase of photoluminescence when they are irradiated by light compared to the porous silicon layer without cerium. In order to understand the contribution of cerium to the enhanced photoluminescence, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were performed, and it was shown that the improved photoluminescence may be attributed to the change of Si-H bonds into Si-O-Ce bonds and to a newly formed PS layer during electrochemical Ce coating. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation of the surface structures and the PL properties of PS remains a key issue for industrial production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In order to solve this problem, the passivation of the PS surface by treating it with Ce is investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To understand the effects of Ce on PL properties, EDX, FTIR, XRD, AFM and UV-vis analysis were performed.

  16. Catalysts with Cerium in a Membrane Reactor for the Removal of Formaldehyde Pollutant from Water Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Gutiérrez-Arzaluz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of cerium oxide, cobalt oxide, mixed cerium, and cobalt oxides and a Ce–Co/Al2O3 membrane, which are employed as catalysts for the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO reaction process and the removal of formaldehyde from industrial effluents. Formaldehyde is present in numerous waste streams from the chemical industry in a concentration low enough to make its recovery not economically justified but high enough to create an environmental hazard. Common biological degradation methods do not work for formaldehyde, a highly toxic but refractory, low biodegradability substance. The CWO reaction is a recent, promising alternative that also permits much lower temperature and pressure conditions than other oxidation processes, resulting in economic benefits. The CWO reaction employing Ce- and Co-containing catalysts was carried out inside a slurry batch reactor and a membrane reactor. Experimental results are reported. Next, a mixed Ce–Co oxide film was supported on an γ-alumina membrane used in a catalytic membrane reactor to compare formaldehyde removal between both types of systems. Catalytic materials with cerium and with a relatively large amount of cerium favored the transformation of formaldehyde. Cerium was present as cerianite in the catalytic materials, as indicated by X-ray diffraction patterns.

  17. Catalysts with Cerium in a Membrane Reactor for the Removal of Formaldehyde Pollutant from Water Effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Arzaluz, Mirella; Noreña-Franco, Luis; Ángel-Cuevas, Saúl; Mugica-Álvarez, Violeta; Torres-Rodríguez, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of cerium oxide, cobalt oxide, mixed cerium, and cobalt oxides and a Ce-Co/Al₂O₃ membrane, which are employed as catalysts for the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) reaction process and the removal of formaldehyde from industrial effluents. Formaldehyde is present in numerous waste streams from the chemical industry in a concentration low enough to make its recovery not economically justified but high enough to create an environmental hazard. Common biological degradation methods do not work for formaldehyde, a highly toxic but refractory, low biodegradability substance. The CWO reaction is a recent, promising alternative that also permits much lower temperature and pressure conditions than other oxidation processes, resulting in economic benefits. The CWO reaction employing Ce- and Co-containing catalysts was carried out inside a slurry batch reactor and a membrane reactor. Experimental results are reported. Next, a mixed Ce-Co oxide film was supported on an γ-alumina membrane used in a catalytic membrane reactor to compare formaldehyde removal between both types of systems. Catalytic materials with cerium and with a relatively large amount of cerium favored the transformation of formaldehyde. Cerium was present as cerianite in the catalytic materials, as indicated by X-ray diffraction patterns. PMID:27231888

  18. The kinetics of bromate-cerium(III) and -iron(II) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bromate-cerium(III) and -iron(II) reactions in acidic media were examined with special reference to their induction periods and reaction rates. In the bromate-cerium(III)reaction, the induction period is followed by a burst of cerium (IV) formation and then a gradual formation of cerium(IV). In the bromate-iron(II) reaction, a slow decrease occurs only in acidic media, even without bromate, so it may differ from the decrease in the tris(1, 10-phenanthroline)iron(II) concentration based on the oxidation by bromate. Itwas interpreted as the dissociation from ( Fe(phen)3 ) 2+ to ( Fe(phen)2 ) 2+ and phen. This is the induction period for iron(III) formation, which follows as the burst. The induction period and the rates of cerium(IV) or iron(III) formation can be interpreted on the basis of the mechanism for the Belousov oscillatory and the present redox reactions proposed by Noyes and his co-workers. (author)

  19. Effect of cerium loading on structure and morphology of modified Ce-USY zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Fillipe A.C.; Araujo, Daniel R.; Silva, Junia C.M.; Macedo, Julio L. de; Dias, Silvia C.L.; Dias, Jose A., E-mail: scdias@unb.br, E-mail: jdias@unb.br [Laboratorio de Catalise, Instituto de Quimica, Faculdade UnB-Gama, Universidade de Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Ghesti, Grace F. [Engenharia de Energia, Faculdade UnB-Gama, Universidade de Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Filho, Geraldo N.R. [Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Naturais, Universidade Federal do Para, Belem, PA (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    This work describes comprehensibly the effect of cerium loading on the structure and morphology of NH{sub 4}USY zeolite. The Ce-USY (2-25 wt.% of CeO{sub 2}) was obtained by wet impregnation of CeCl{sub 3} followed by calcination at 550 deg C for 8 h. At low loadings (2-10%), cerium species are mainly located at ion exchange positions in the framework, whereas at higher loadings (15.25%), small aggregates were formed on the HUSY surface. X-ray diffractograms (XRD) exhibited only the reflections related to HUSY, demonstrating the high dispersion of cerium species, but Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) detected CeO{sub x} for the materials above 10%. Reaction of CeCl{sub 3} with NH{sub 4}USY produced NH{sub 4}Cl, which decomposed to form HCl, leading to framework dealumination. The materials showed an increased Lewis/Bronsted ratio with increasing cerium loadings due to the interaction between the excess cerium and the OH groups of USY, and the consequent formation of CeO{sub x} species. (author)

  20. In-house SAD phasing with surface-bound cerium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium was used to enhance the anomalous signal in hen egg-white lysozyme crystals and led to successful in-house SAD phasing. The anomalous signal of cerium(III) ions present in a derivative of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals obtained by the addition of 0.025 M cerium chloride to the crystallization medium was used for phasing. X-ray intensity data were collected to 2 Å resolution using an in-house Cu Kα radiation data-collection facility. Phasing of a single-wavelength data set purely based on its f′′ led to a clearly interpretable electron-density map. Automated substructure solution by AutoSol in PHENIX resulted in four highest peaks corresponding to cerium(III) ions with data limited to 3 Å resolution, and about 90% of the residues were built automatically by AutoBuild in PHENIX. Cerium(III) ions bound on the surface of the enzyme are found to interact mainly with the main-chain and side-chain carbonyl groups of Asn, Glu, Tyr and Asp and with water molecules. Ce3+ ions were used as potential anomalous scatterers for the in-house single-wavelength anomalous scattering technique, and this is proposed as a tool for macromolecular phasing and for the study of the interactions of trivalent metal ions with proteins and other macromolecules

  1. Synthesis and catalytic properties of microemulsion-derived cerium oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockrick, Emanuel; Schrage, Christian; Grigas, Anett; Geiger, Dorin; Kaskel, Stefan

    2008-07-01

    The synthesis of cerium dioxide nanoparticles using an inverse microemulsion technique and precipitation method was investigated. Cerium hydroxide nanoparticles were synthesized by adding diluted ammonia to n-heptane-surfactant-cerium nitrate system. The micelle and particle size in the range of 5-12 nm were controlled by varying the molar water to surfactant ratio and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Cerium hydroxide nanoparticles were isolated and subsequently treated at 100-600 °C to obtain nanoscale ceria. Crystallite sizes of cerium dioxide in the range of 6-16 nm were estimated by Scherrer analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and HRTEM. The catalytic activity of particles annealed at 400 and 600 °C in soot combustion reactions was characterized by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) indicating a size-dependant activity. Crystallite sizes and catalytic stability of elevated ceria systems were tested in second combustion cycles.

  2. Effect of Cerium(IV)-Surfactant Reaction in Foam Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Han Beom; Jung, Chong-Hun; Yoon, In-Ho; Kim, Chorong; Choi, Wang-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Using foams allows the decommissioning of complex shaped facilities. The decontamination foam comprises at least one surfactant to generate the foam and one or more chemical reactants to achieve the dissolution of the contaminants at the solid surface. In order to improve the efficiency of decontamination foam, the present study attempts to find the optimum condition of chemical reagents to the foaming solution. The corrosion rate of radioactive nuclides contaminated stainless steel metal is very important factor for the foam decontamination process. The goal of this study is to develop the decontamination process for contaminated stainless steel in medium of nitric acid. Stainless steel needs a strong oxidizing agent such as Ce(IV) ion and the effects of cerium(IV). Surfactant interaction involved in foam decontamination and finally the improvement brought by formulation science. The formulation of foams loaded with strong oxidizing reagents such as Ce(IV) is an important factor. The enhanced decontamination properties of nitric acid with Ce(IV) additive on stainless steel is well known in liquid mediums. stainless steel metal is an important aspect in the foam decontamination process.

  3. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bryant C.; Johnson, Monique E.; Walker, Marlon L.; Riley, Kathryn R.; Sims, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs) have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of CNPs to develop potential new treatment modalities for both oxidative- and nitrosative-stress induced disorders and diseases. In order to reach the point where our experimental understanding of the antioxidant activity of CNPs can be translated into useful therapeutics in the clinic, it is necessary to evaluate the most current evidence that supports CNP antioxidant activity in biological systems. Accordingly, the aims of this review are three-fold: (1) To describe the putative reaction mechanisms and physicochemical surface properties that enable CNPs to both scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to act as antioxidant enzyme-like mimetics in solution; (2) To provide an overview, with commentary, regarding the most robust design and synthesis pathways for preparing CNPs with catalytic antioxidant activity; (3) To provide the reader with the most up-to-date in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence supporting the ROS-scavenging potential of CNPs in biology and medicine. PMID:27196936

  4. Deposition and investigation of lanthanum-cerium hexaboride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of lanthanum-cerium hexaboride, the promising thermoelectric material for low-temperature applications, are deposited on various substrates by the electron-beam evaporation, pulsed laser deposition and magnetron sputtering. The influence of the deposition conditions on the films X-ray characteristics, composition, microstructure and physical properties, such as the resistivity and Seebeck coefficient, is studied. The preferred (100) orientation of all films is obtained from XRD traces. In the range of 780-800 deg. C deposition temperature the highest intensity of diffractions peaks and the highest degree of the preferred orientation are observed. The temperature dependence of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient of films are investigated in the temperature range of 4-300 K. The features appropriate to Kondo effect in the dependences ρ(T) and S(T) are detected at temperatures below 20 K. Interplay between the value of the Seebeck coefficient, metallic parameters and Kondo scattering of investigated films is discussed. - Graphical abstract: Kondo scattering in (La,Ce)B6 films: temperature dependence of the resistivity of (La,Ce)B6 films on various substrates and the ceramics La0.99Ce0.01B6

  5. Synthesis and characterization of cerium oxide by electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceria-based materials have been synthesized by electrochemical process. Electrodeposition is an interesting cheap method which can be performed at ambient pressure and rather low temperature (less than 100 C). Moreover, it is easy to control in situ the film thickness. Ceria coatings were obtained by an indirect electrodeposition method. A potentiostatic technique (-0.7 V/SCE) was used to first reduce a hydroxide precursor (O2 or NO3-) before leading to the formation of cerium oxide after 2h of deposition time. This work focused on the characterization of ceria films deposited onto stainless steel in view of high temperature fuel cell applications. The chosen deposition conditions lead to quite adherent, homogenous and covering films. The microstructure and the crystallinity of the ceria thin layers were characterized by SEM, TEM and XRD measurements. Electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was also used to locally study the conductive properties of ceria layers and the homogeneity of the deposited films. Finally, electrochemical characterizations such as impedance spectroscopy were performed under air atmosphere. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Synthesis and characterization of cerium oxide by electrochemical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lair, V.; Ringuede, A. [LECA CNRS UMR 7575-ENSCP-Paris 6, Paris (France); Vermaut, P. [Groupe Metallurgie Structurale LPCS UMR CNRS, ENSCP-Paris 6, Paris (France); Griveau, S. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, Faculty of Pharmacy, Chemical and Genetic Pharmacology Laboratory, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    Ceria-based materials have been synthesized by electrochemical process. Electrodeposition is an interesting cheap method which can be performed at ambient pressure and rather low temperature (less than 100 C). Moreover, it is easy to control in situ the film thickness. Ceria coatings were obtained by an indirect electrodeposition method. A potentiostatic technique (-0.7 V/SCE) was used to first reduce a hydroxide precursor (O{sub 2} or NO{sub 3}{sup -}) before leading to the formation of cerium oxide after 2h of deposition time. This work focused on the characterization of ceria films deposited onto stainless steel in view of high temperature fuel cell applications. The chosen deposition conditions lead to quite adherent, homogenous and covering films. The microstructure and the crystallinity of the ceria thin layers were characterized by SEM, TEM and XRD measurements. Electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was also used to locally study the conductive properties of ceria layers and the homogeneity of the deposited films. Finally, electrochemical characterizations such as impedance spectroscopy were performed under air atmosphere. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Electron inelastic mean free paths in cerium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, M.; Holdynski, M.; Lisowski, W.; Sobczak, J. W.; Jablonski, A.

    2015-06-01

    Electron transport properties in CeO2 powder samples were studied by elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES). Prior to EPES measurements, the CeO2 sample surface was pre-sputtered by 0.5 keV Ar ion etching. As a result, an altered layer with thickness of 1.3 nm was created. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed two chemical states of cerium Ce4+ (68%) and Ce3+ (32%) at the surface region of CeO2 sample after such treatment. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport, was evaluated as a function of energy within the 0.5-2 keV range. Experimental IMFPs were corrected for surface excitations and approximated by the simple function λ = kEp, where λ was the IMFP, E denoted the energy (in eV), and k = 0.207 and p = 0.6343 were the fitted parameters. The IMFPs measured here were compared with IMFPs resulting from the TPP-2M predictive equation for the measured composition of oxide surface. The measured IMFPs were found to be from 3.1% to 20.3% smaller than the IMFPs obtained from the predictive formula in the energy range of 0.5-2 keV. The EPES IMFP value at 500 eV was related to the altered layer of sputtered CeO2 samples.

  8. Catalytic properties and biomedical applications of cerium oxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Walkey, Carl D.

    2014-11-10

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) have shown promise as catalytic antioxidants in the test tube, cell culture models and animal models of disease. However given the reactivity that is well established at the surface of these nanoparticles, the biological utilization of nanoceria as a therapeutic still poses many challenges. Moreover the form that these particles take in a biological environment, such as the changes that can occur due to a protein corona, are not well established. This review aims to summarize the existing literature on biological use of nanoceria, and to raise questions about what further study is needed to apply this interesting catalytic material to biomedical applications. These questions include: 1) How does preparation, exposure dose, route and experimental model influence the reported effects of nanoceria in animal studies? 2) What are the considerations to develop nanoceria as a therapeutic agent in regards to these parameters? 3) What biological targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are relevant to this targeting, and how do these properties also influence the safety of these nanomaterials?

  9. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bryant C; Johnson, Monique E; Walker, Marlon L; Riley, Kathryn R; Sims, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs) have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of CNPs to develop potential new treatment modalities for both oxidative- and nitrosative-stress induced disorders and diseases. In order to reach the point where our experimental understanding of the antioxidant activity of CNPs can be translated into useful therapeutics in the clinic, it is necessary to evaluate the most current evidence that supports CNP antioxidant activity in biological systems. Accordingly, the aims of this review are three-fold: (1) To describe the putative reaction mechanisms and physicochemical surface properties that enable CNPs to both scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to act as antioxidant enzyme-like mimetics in solution; (2) To provide an overview, with commentary, regarding the most robust design and synthesis pathways for preparing CNPs with catalytic antioxidant activity; (3) To provide the reader with the most up-to-date in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence supporting the ROS-scavenging potential of CNPs in biology and medicine. PMID:27196936

  10. Cerium doped lanthanum halides: fast scintillators for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is dedicated to two recently discovered scintillating crystals: cerium doped lanthanum halides (LaCl3:Ce3+ and LaBr3:Ce3+).These scintillators exhibit interesting properties for gamma detection, more particularly in the field of medical imaging: a short decay time, a high light yield and an excellent energy resolution. The strong hygroscopicity of these materials requires adapting the usual experimental methods for determining physico-chemical properties. Once determined, these can be used for the development of the industrial manufacturing process of the crystals. A proper comprehension of the scintillation mechanism and of the effect of defects within the material lead to new possible ways for optimizing the scintillator performance. Therefore, different techniques are used (EPR, radioluminescence, laser excitation, thermally stimulated luminescence). Alongside Ce3+ ions, self-trapped excitons are involved in the scintillation mechanism. Their nature and their role are detailed. The knowledge of the different processes involved in the scintillation mechanism leads to the prediction of the effect of temperature and doping level on the performance of the scintillator. A mechanism is proposed to explain the thermally stimulated luminescence processes that cause slow components in the light emission and a loss of light yield. Eventually the study of afterglow reveals a charge transfer to deep traps involved in the high temperature thermally stimulated luminescence. (author)

  11. Cerium toxicity, uptake and translocation in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue; LIN Yousheng; LIU Dongwu; XU Hengjian; LIU Tao; ZHAO Fengyun

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were cultivated in 0-500 μmol/L of extraneous cerium (Ce) for 7 d to investigate the toxicity,uptake and translocation of rare earth elements (REEs).The results showed that Ce could be largely absorbed by the roots of A.thaliana and translocated to the shoots.But the uptake rates of Ce by the roots were much higher than the translocation rates from roots to shoots.Ultrastructural analysis revealed that Ce was mainly distributed on the cell wall.At higher concentration,Ce could also enter cell,destroy the ultrastructure of cells and disturb the intrinsic balance of nutrient elements of A.thaliana.Addition of Ce (50-500 μmol/L) to the culture medium significantly inhibited the elongation of primary roots,decreased chlorophyll content,rosette diameter and fresh mass of plants.The damage increased with the increase of Ce concentration in culture medium,although primary root elongation,chlorophyll content,and rosette diameter were stimulated by relatively low concentration (0.5 μmol/L) of Ce.Thus,it is speculated that REEs may become a new type contamination if we don't well control the release of REEs into the environment.

  12. Effect of Cerium(IV)-Surfactant Reaction in Foam Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using foams allows the decommissioning of complex shaped facilities. The decontamination foam comprises at least one surfactant to generate the foam and one or more chemical reactants to achieve the dissolution of the contaminants at the solid surface. In order to improve the efficiency of decontamination foam, the present study attempts to find the optimum condition of chemical reagents to the foaming solution. The corrosion rate of radioactive nuclides contaminated stainless steel metal is very important factor for the foam decontamination process. The goal of this study is to develop the decontamination process for contaminated stainless steel in medium of nitric acid. Stainless steel needs a strong oxidizing agent such as Ce(IV) ion and the effects of cerium(IV). Surfactant interaction involved in foam decontamination and finally the improvement brought by formulation science. The formulation of foams loaded with strong oxidizing reagents such as Ce(IV) is an important factor. The enhanced decontamination properties of nitric acid with Ce(IV) additive on stainless steel is well known in liquid mediums. stainless steel metal is an important aspect in the foam decontamination process

  13. Toenail cerium levels and risk of a first acute myocardial infarction: The EURAMIC and heavy metals study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Aracena, J.; Riemersma, R.A.; Veer, van 't P.; Kok, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    The association between cerium status and risk of first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was examined in a case-control study in 10 centres from Europe and Israel. Cerium in toenails was assessed by neutron activation analysis in 684 cases and 724 controls aged 70years or younger. Mean concentratio

  14. Light and variable 37Cl/35Cl ratios in rocks from Gale Crater, Mars: Possible signature of perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, K. A.; Martin, P.; Archer, P. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairén, A. G.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2016-03-01

    Cl isotope ratios measured on HCl thermally evolved from as-yet-unknown phases in sedimentary rocks and sand in Gale Crater provide unexpected insights to the Martian surficial Cl cycle. The seven samples yield δ37Cl values ranging from - 1 ± 25 ‰ to - 51 ± 5 ‰. Five analyses from two samples of the Sheepbed mudstone (Yellowknife Bay study area) are analytically indistinguishable with a mean δ37Cl of - 11 ± 7 ‰ (1 σ). In contrast, four mudstones/sandstones from the Kimberley and Pahrump study areas also yielded indistinguishable ratios, but with a mean δ37Cl of - 43 ± 6 ‰. The Rocknest sand deposit gave a highly uncertain δ37Cl value of - 7 ± 44 ‰. These light and highly variable δ37Cl values are unique among known solar system materials. Two endmember models are offered to account for these observations, and in both, perchlorate, with its extreme ability to fractionate Cl isotopes, is critical. In the first model, SAM is detecting HCl from an oxychlorine compound (e.g., perchlorate) produced from volcanic gas emissions by atmospheric chemical reactions. Similar reactions in Earth's atmosphere may be responsible for the isotopically lightest known Cl outside of this study, in perchlorate from the Atacama Desert. Some of the Gale Crater δ37Cl values are more negative than those in Atacama perchlorate, but because reaction mechanisms and associated fractionation factors are unknown, it is impossible to assess whether this difference is prohibitive. If the negative δ37Cl signal is produced in this fashion, the isotopic variability among samples could arise either from variations in the relative size of the reactant chloride and product perchlorate reservoirs, or from variations in the fraction of perchlorate reduced back to chloride after deposition. Such reduction strongly enriches 37Cl in the residual perchlorate. Perchlorate reduction alone offers an alternative endmember model that can explain the observed data if SAM measured HCl derived

  15. Electron donors and co-contaminants affect microbial community composition and activity in perchlorate degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiangyu; Xie, Yuxuan; Wang, Jinfeng; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei

    2015-04-01

    Although microbial reduction of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is a promising and effective method, our knowledge on the changes in microbial communities during ClO4(-) degradation is limited, especially when different electron donors are supplied and/or other contaminants are present. Here, we examined the effects of acetate and hydrogen as electron donors and nitrate and ammonium as co-contaminants on ClO4(-) degradation by anaerobic microcosms using six treatments. The process of degradation was divided into the lag stage (SI) and the accelerated stage (SII). Quantitative PCR was used to quantify four genes: pcrA (encoding perchlorate reductase), cld (encoding chlorite dismutase), nirS (encoding copper and cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase), and 16S rRNA. While the degradation of ClO4(-) with acetate, nitrate, and ammonia system (PNA) was the fastest with the highest abundance of the four genes, it was the slowest in the autotrophic system (HYP). The pcrA gene accumulated in SI and played a key role in initiating the accelerated degradation of ClO4(-) when its abundance reached a peak. Degradation in SII was primarily maintained by the cld gene. Acetate inhibited the growth of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), but its effect was weakened by nitrate (NO3(-)), which promoted the growth of PRB in SI, and therefore, accelerated the ClO4(-) degradation rate. In addition, ammonia (NH4(+)), as nitrogen sources, accelerated the growth of PRB. The bacterial communities' structure and diversity were significantly affected by electron donors and co-contaminants. Under heterotrophic conditions, both ammonia and nitrate promoted Azospira as the most dominant genera, a fact that might significantly influence the rate of ClO4(-) natural attenuation by degradation. PMID:25382499

  16. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Shcherbakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2T M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth’s subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  17. Oxochloroalkoxide of the Cerium (IV and Titanium (IV as oxides precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Luiz Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cerium (IV and Titanium (IV oxides mixture (CeO2-3TiO2 was prepared by thermal treatment of the oxochloroisopropoxide of Cerium (IV and Titanium (IV. The chemical route utilizing the Cerium (III chloride alcoholic complex and Titanium (IV isopropoxide is presented. The compound Ce5Ti15Cl16O30 (iOPr4(OH-Et15 was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR and TG/DTG. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the oxides resulting from the thermal decomposition of the precursor at 1000 degreesC for 36 h indicated the formation of cubic cerianite (a = 5.417Å and tetragonal rutile (a = 4.592Å and (c = 2.962 Å, with apparent crystallite sizes around 38 and 55nm, respectively.

  18. Mesoporous cerium oxide nanospheres for the visible-light driven photocatalytic degradation of dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subas K. Muduli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A facile, solvothermal synthesis of mesoporous cerium oxide nanospheres is reported for the purpose of the photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes and future applications in sustainable energy research. The earth-abundant, relatively affordable, mixed valence cerium oxide sample, which consists of predominantly Ce7O12, has been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron and UV–vis spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Together with N2 sorption experiments, the data confirms that the new cerium oxide material is mesoporous and absorbs visible light. The photocatalytic degradation of rhodamin B is investigated with a series of radical scavengers, suggesting that the mechanism of photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation involves predominantly hydroxyl radicals as the active species.

  19. Kinetics of deso/sub x/ reaction on copper and cerium-based sorbent-catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics of SO/sub 2/ removal using a copper-based sorbent CuO/gamma-AI/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and a cerium modified copper sorbent CuO-CeO/sub 2/gamma-AI/sub 2/O, were measured on a TGA and their kinetics behaviors were simulated with a proposed empirical rate model (ERM). The purpose of cerium addition to the copper sorbent was to study the difference of sorbent's kinetics. The cerium modified copper sorbent showed a higher reaction rate on initial sulfation than the regular copper sorbent. Both sorbents however had similar calculated activation energy. The proposed ERM model appeared to describe the SO/sub 2/ removal kinetics well in the temperature range 250-400 degree C. (author)

  20. Magnetic ordering in the static intermediate-valent cerium compound Ce2RuZn4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyert, Volker; Scheidt, Ernst-Wilhelm; Scherer, Wolfgang; Hermes, Wilfried; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2008-12-01

    The low-temperature behavior of Ce2RuZn4 has been investigated. Specific-heat and magnetic-susceptibility data reveal an antiferromagnetic transition at a Néel temperature of 2 K. Ce2RuZn4 is a static intermediate-valent compound with two crystallographically independent cerium atoms. The magnetic data clearly show that only one cerium site is magnetic (Ce3+) , while the second one carries no magnetic moment. The experimental data are interpreted with the help of first-principles electronic structure calculations using density-functional theory and the augmented spherical wave method. The calculations reveal the occurrence of two different cerium sites, which are characterized by strongly localized magnetic moments and strong Ce-Ru bonding.

  1. Electro-deposition of cerium thin film compound, elaboration and characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium oxide films are widely studied as a promising alternative to the toxic hexavalent Chromium Cr(VI) based pre-treatments for the corrosion protection of different metals and alloys. Cathodic electro-deposition of Cerium compound thin films was realised on Ti alloy (TA6V) substrates from a Ce(NO3)3, 6H2O in water-ethyl alcohol solutions at 0.01 M. Experimental conditions to obtain homogeneous and crack free thin films were determined. The deposited cerium quantity, as expected, is proportional to the used electric charge, following the Faraday law. Subsequent thermal treatment led to a CeO2 coating, which is expected to increase the TA6V oxidation resistance at high temperatures. The deposits were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), optical and scanning electron microscopies.(author)

  2. Effect of Impurities and Cerium on Stress Concentration Sensitivity of Al-Li Based Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟亮; 田丽

    2002-01-01

    A notch sensitivity factor was derived in order to evaluate the stress concentration sensitivity of Al-Li based alloys. The factor values for the Al-Li alloy sheets containing various contents of impurities and cerium addition were evaluated by determining the mechanical properties. It is found that the impurities Fe, Si, Na and K significantly enhance the stress concentration sensitivity of the alloys 2090 and 8090, whereas cerium addition reduces the stress concentration sensitivity to a certain degree for the high strength alloys. However, an excess amount of cerium addition in the high ductility alloy 1420 can significantly increase the stress concentration sensitivity. As compared with conventional aluminum alloys, the Al-Li based alloys generally show high stress concentration sensitivity. Therefore, a special attention must be paid to this problem in the practical application of Al-Li based alloys.

  3. Self-Correction of Lanthanum-Cerium Halide Gamma Spectra (pre-print)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Yuan, Paul Guss, and Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2009-04-01

    Lanthanum-cerium halide detectors generally exhibit superior energy resolutions for gamma radiation detection compared with conventional sodium iodide detectors. However, they are also subject to self-activities due to lanthanum-138 decay and contamination due to beta decay in the low-energy region and alpha decay in the high-energy region. The detector’s self-activity and crystal contamination jointly contribute a significant amount of uncertainties to the gamma spectral measurement and affect the precision of the nuclide identification process. This paper demonstrates a self-correction procedure for self-activity and contamination reduction from spectra collected by lanthanum-cerium halide detectors. It can be implemented as an automatic self-correction module for the future gamma radiation detector made of lanthanum-cerium halide crystals.

  4. Self-Correction of Lanthanum-Cerium Halide Gamma Spectra (pre-print)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanthanum-cerium halide detectors generally exhibit superior energy resolutions for gamma radiation detection compared with conventional sodium iodide detectors. However, they are also subject to self-activities due to lanthanum-138 decay and contamination due to beta decay in the low-energy region and alpha decay in the high-energy region. The detector's self-activity and crystal contamination jointly contribute a significant amount of uncertainties to the gamma spectral measurement and affect the precision of the nuclide identification process. This paper demonstrates a self-correction procedure for self-activity and contamination reduction from spectra collected by lanthanum-cerium halide detectors. It can be implemented as an automatic self-correction module for the future gamma radiation detector made of lanthanum-cerium halide crystals.

  5. Electrolytic technique for the chemical decontamination process with sulfuric acid-cerium (IV) for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrolyzer with an ion-exchange membrane as the separator has been used to study the electrolytic redox reaction of Ce4+ / Ce3+ in sulfuric acid solution, which is a reagent for predismantling system decontamination. Influencing factors such as current density, cerium concentration, acidity, electrolyte flow rate, membrane type and electrode material were studied experimentally. The results indicate that the redox can be achieved with high conversion even as the cerium concentration is below 0.005 M. However, the current efficiency strongly depends on the cerium concentration. In addition, the acid content and the electrolyte flow rate show little influence on the redox reaction. Both cation and anion membrane are feasible for this process. Therefore, the operation conditions are widely applicable. Moreover, two different electrode materials, platinized titanium meshes and graphite, were used. The results show that the platinized titanium meshes is preferable to the graphite for higher current efficiency. (author)

  6. Cathodic electrolysis method of depositing cerium conversion films on industrial pure aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two two-step techniques, called TS2/TS7 and TS3/TS7, respectively, have been developed to form cerium conversion films on the surface of industrial pure aluminum. The tested material was cathodically electrolyzed in the alkaline solution containing cerium salt, and uniform films containing cerium were obtained after the two-step treatment. It is found that the films obtained by TS2/TS7 and TS3/TS7 techniques are about 4.0 and 3.0 m in thickness, respectively. The material has better corrosion resistance in the chloride solution after the two-step electrolysis treatment compared with the one-step treated and naked specimens.

  7. Fabrication of Cerium Oxide and Uranium Oxide Microspheres for Space Nuclear Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey A. Katalenich; Michael R. Hartman; Robert C. O' Brien

    2013-02-01

    Cerium oxide and uranium oxide microspheres are being produced via an internal gelation sol-gel method to investigate alternative fabrication routes for space nuclear fuels. Depleted uranium and non-radioactive cerium are being utilized as surrogates for plutonium-238 (Pu-238) used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators and for enriched uranium required by nuclear thermal rockets. While current methods used to produce Pu-238 fuels at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) involve the generation of fine powders that pose a respiratory hazard and have a propensity to contaminate glove boxes, the sol-gel route allows for the generation of oxide microsphere fuels through an aqueous route. The sol-gel method does not generate fine powders and may require fewer processing steps than the LANL method with less operator handling. High-quality cerium dioxide microspheres have been fabricated in the desired size range and equipment is being prepared to establish a uranium dioxide microsphere production capability.

  8. Excitation induced spectroscopic study and quenching effect in cerium samarium codoped lithium aluminoborate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, Gurinder Pal; Arora, Deepawali; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Lithium aluminium borate host has been codoped with cerium and samarium to prepare glass by conventional melt quench technique. Their structural and spectroscopic investigation has been carried out using XRD, FTIR and density measurements. The UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra (λexc.=380 nm and 400 nm) have been studied for spectroscopic analysis. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is shown by XRD. The density is increasing with addition of cerium at the expense of aluminium, keeping other components constant. FTIR study also shows the presence of compact and stable tetrahedral BO4 units thus supporting the density results. The UV- Vis absorption spectra show a shift of optical absorption edge towards longer wavelength along with an increase in intensity of peaks with rising samarium concentration. The fluorescence spectra show a blue shift and subsequent suppression of cerium peaks with addition of samarium.

  9. Catalytic spectrophotometric determination of cerium by ion exchange separation coupled to a flow injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flow injection method is described intended for the determination of cerium based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of gallocyanine by peroxydisulfate in acidic media. The proposed flow injection manifold incorporates a ion exchange separation system in the carrier stream. The decolorisation of gallocyanine due to its oxidation was used to monitor the reaction by spectrophotometry at 524 nm. The variables which affected the reaction rate were fully investigated. By this method cerium(4) can be determined in the range of 0.30-10.0 μg with a limit of detection of 0.25 μg. The relative standard deviation for ten replicate determinations of 1.0 μg of cerium(4) was 1.8 %

  10. Protection against corrosion in marine environments of AA6060 aluminium alloy by cerium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanthanide salts are being considered as an environmentally friendly alternative to the classic systems based on chromates. The addition of small concentrations of cerium chloride to aerated aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution inhibits uniform and pitting corrosion processes of AA6060. Full immersion tests combined with different electrochemical techniques were involved to determine the protection degree and the inhibition character supplied by the cerium ion. Their microscopic and compositional features have been analyzed using SEM and EDS spectra. The results obtained show that the protective layer has heterogeneous composition. An alumina layer covers the aluminium matrix while dispersed cerium-rich islands deposited over the cathodic sites of the alloy. In the case of AA6060, α-Al(Fe,Mn)Si acts as permanent cathodic sites.

  11. Development of Biosensors for Real Time Analysis of Perchlorate in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Frankenberger, William T.; Okeke, Benedict C.; Cheng, Quan Jason

    2006-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) contamination of ground water is a widespread problem in the U.S., which can adversely affect human health and wildlife. Current methods for detecting and quantifying ClO4 - in water are time consuming, expensive, and subject to error due to complex procedures and various interferences. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop a method that can accurately detect and measure low concentrations of ClO4 - in the field. This study reports the construction of a ClO4 -- reducta...

  12. Bis(1,10-phenanthroline)lithium perchlorate: crystal structure and dissociation of complex in acetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composition of solid phase formed in acetone at concentration ratios of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and LiClO4 near 2:1 is established. Molecular structure of bis(1,10-phenanthroline)lithium perchlorate is determined by X-ray structural analysis: space group Pnna, a=7.191(2), b=39.929(9), c=14.494(3) A, Z=8, Dx=1.490 g/cm3. Data of IR spectroscopy in acetone denotes dissociation of the Li(phen)2ClO4 complex for the 1:1 composition complex and molecule phen in the solution equilibrium with the solid phase

  13. Lanthanide perchlorate complexes of quinoline-1-oxide and isoquinoline-2-oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyanasundaram, R; Navaneetham, NS; Soundararajan, S.

    1985-01-01

    Complexes of lanthanide perchlorates with quinoline-1-oxide and isoquinoline-2-oxide have been isolated for the first time characterised by analysis, conductance and IR, NMR and electronic spectoral studies. The complexes of quinoline-1-oxide have the composition $Ln(QNO)_8$$(ClO_4)_3$ where Ln = La, Pr or Nd and $Ln(QNO)_7$ where Ln = Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb. The isoquinoline-2-oxide complexes analyse for the formula $Ln(IsoQNO)_7(ClO_4)_3$ where Ln = La-Yb.

  14. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5–0.8 μm in diameter, and 2–8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37°C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H2/CO2 to acetate, usually as the only product. ...

  15. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, M.; Mehboob, F.; Gelder, van, M.; Rijpstra, I.; Sinninghe-Damsté, J.S.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually a...

  16. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, M.; Mehboob, F.; van Gelder, T; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; J. S. Sinninghe Damsté; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5–0.8 μm in diameter, and 2–8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37°C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H2/CO2 to acetate, usually as the only product. ...

  17. 2-(2-Hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecular salt, C14H13N2O2+·ClO4−, the ring systems in the cation are almost coplanar [dihedral angle = 5.53 (13°]. Intramolecular N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds generate S(6 and S(5 rings, respectively. In the crystal, the two H atoms involved in the intramolecular hydrogen bonds also participate in intermolecular links to acceptor O atoms of the perchlorate anions. A simple intermolecular N—H...O bond also occurs. Together, these form a double-chain structure along [101].

  18. Exposure of cerium oxide nanoparticles to kidney bean shows disturbance in the plant defense mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Kidney bean roots uptake nCeO2 primarily without biotransformation. • Cerium reached the root vascular tissues through gaps in the Casparian strip. • On longer exposure to high concentration, roots demonstrate stress response. • In leaves, guaiacol peroxidase plays a major role in ROS scavenging. - Abstract: Overwhelming use of engineered nanoparticles demands rapid assessment of their environmental impacts. The transport of cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2) in plants and their impact on cellular homeostasis as a function of exposure duration is not well understood. In this study, kidney bean plants were exposed to suspensions of ∼8 ± 1 nm nCeO2 (62.5 to 500 mg/L) for 15 days in hydroponic conditions. Plant parts were analyzed for cerium accumulation after one, seven, and 15 days of nCeO2 exposure. The primary indicators of stress like lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble protein and chlorophyll contents were studied. Cerium in tissues was localized using scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron μ-XRF mapping, and the chemical forms were identified using μ-XANES. In the root epidermis, cerium was primarily shown to exist as nCeO2, although a small fraction (12%) was biotransformed to Ce(III) compound. Cerium was found to reach the root vascular tissues and translocate to aerial parts with time. Upon prolonged exposure to 500 mg nCeO2/L, the root antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly reduced, simultaneously increasing the root soluble protein by 204%. In addition, leaf's guaiacol peroxidase activity was enhanced with nCeO2 exposure in order to maintain cellular homeostasis

  19. Exposure of cerium oxide nanoparticles to kidney bean shows disturbance in the plant defense mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN) (United States); Peralta-Videa, Jose R. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Environmental Science and Engineering PhD Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN) (United States); Bandyopadhyay, Susmita [Environmental Science and Engineering PhD Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN) (United States); Castillo-Michel, Hiram [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220-38043 Grenoble, Cedex (France); Hernandez-Viezcas, Jose-Angel [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN) (United States); Sahi, Shivendra [Department of Biology, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L., E-mail: jgardea@utep.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Environmental Science and Engineering PhD Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN) (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Kidney bean roots uptake nCeO{sub 2} primarily without biotransformation. • Cerium reached the root vascular tissues through gaps in the Casparian strip. • On longer exposure to high concentration, roots demonstrate stress response. • In leaves, guaiacol peroxidase plays a major role in ROS scavenging. - Abstract: Overwhelming use of engineered nanoparticles demands rapid assessment of their environmental impacts. The transport of cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO{sub 2}) in plants and their impact on cellular homeostasis as a function of exposure duration is not well understood. In this study, kidney bean plants were exposed to suspensions of ∼8 ± 1 nm nCeO{sub 2} (62.5 to 500 mg/L) for 15 days in hydroponic conditions. Plant parts were analyzed for cerium accumulation after one, seven, and 15 days of nCeO{sub 2} exposure. The primary indicators of stress like lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble protein and chlorophyll contents were studied. Cerium in tissues was localized using scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron μ-XRF mapping, and the chemical forms were identified using μ-XANES. In the root epidermis, cerium was primarily shown to exist as nCeO{sub 2}, although a small fraction (12%) was biotransformed to Ce(III) compound. Cerium was found to reach the root vascular tissues and translocate to aerial parts with time. Upon prolonged exposure to 500 mg nCeO{sub 2}/L, the root antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly reduced, simultaneously increasing the root soluble protein by 204%. In addition, leaf's guaiacol peroxidase activity was enhanced with nCeO{sub 2} exposure in order to maintain cellular homeostasis.

  20. The solvent extraction of cerium from sulphate solution - mini plant trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Mt. Weld deposit in Western Australia has a complex rare earth mineralisation. The rare earth phosphate minerals, which include monazite, are amenable to conventional caustic cracking followed by hydrochloric acid dissolution of the trivalent rare earths. The presence of the mineral cerianite in the ore, which is unaffected by the alkali attack, results in rejection of a considerable proportion of the cerium to the acid leach residue. The recovery of cerium from a sulphate solution, resulting from the processing of such a residue, is the subject of the current paper. The liquor treated by solvent extraction contained 63 g L-1 rare earths and the cerium to total rare earth ratio was 75%. Other impurities, including Fe and Th, totalled 2000 ppm. A solvent mixture of commercially available extractants in a low aromatic content diluent was used to extract Ce4+ selectively over the trivalent rare earths. Partial co-extraction of Fe and Th occurred but it was found that these elements were not easily stripped and therefore selective back extraction of cerium was possible. The cerium was stripped from the organic phase by hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide. In continuous counter-current trials two extraction stages and three strip stages were used. In order to produce two grades of strip liquor, stripping was divided into two circuits. The first strip circuit consisting of a single stage, contained proportionally more of the trivalent rare earths. The second strip circuit, consisting of two stages, removed the remaining cerium with proportionally less of the rare earths. A bleed solvent stream was treated for removal of impurities to prevent build-up in the solvent. In the continuous counter current trials, 95% Ce4+ extraction was achieved and the Ce to total rare earth ratio was upgraded to > 99%

  1. Luminescence properties and decay kinetics of nano ZnO powder doped with cerium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, Nihar Ranjan, E-mail: nihar@iitbbs.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Bhubaneswar 751013, Orissa (India); Acharya, B.S., E-mail: bsacharya1950@gmail.com [Department of Physics, C.V. Raman College of Engineering, Bhubaneswar 752054, Orissa (India); Singh, Th. Basanta [Luminescence Dating Laboratory, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India); Gartia, R.K. [Department of Physics, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India)

    2013-04-15

    ZnO nanopowders doped with cerium ions (1.2 and 1.5 at. wt.%) were synthesized through soft solution route using ultrasound. Sonication has been found to be an effective way for doping rare earth ions like cerium into ZnO. This was confirmed from energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) measurement. Further, optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) measurements corroborate this finding. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show the increase of crystallite size and unit cell volume with doping of cerium ions. Formation of fibrous structure of ZnO:Ce was observed from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. Although the structural measurements indicate Ce{sup 4+} ion occupying substitutional site in ZnO, PL and absorption studies confirmed the presence of Ce{sup 3+} ion in the powder. The coexistence of Ce{sup 3+} and Ce{sup 4+} ions has been explained on the basis of conversion of Ce{sup 3+} to Ce{sup 4+} in the oxidizing environment. Thermoluminescence (TL) and photo-stimulated decay of luminescence (PSDL) decay studies give an idea of various trapping levels present in the band gap of ZnO. These traps release electrons during optical stimulation to give bimolecular kinetics in nano ZnO:Ce powders. -- Highlights: ► Sonication: an effective way of incorporation of cerium ions into ZnO. ► Site dependent characteristic emission of cerium. ► Energy transfer from host lattice to cerium ions. ► Mono and bimolecular kinetics of ZnO:Ce.

  2. Combined effects of perchlorate, thiocyanate, and iodine on thyroid function in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmaus, Craig, E-mail: craigs@berkeley.edu [Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1515 Clay St. 16th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Miller, Mark D., E-mail: ucsfpehsumiller@gmail.com [Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1515 Clay St. 16th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Cushing, Lara, E-mail: lara.cushing@berkeley.edu [Energy and Resources Group, 310 Barrows Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 93720-3050 (United States); Blount, Benjamin C., E-mail: bkb3@cdc.gov [Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Mail Stop F47, Atlanta, GA (United States); Smith, Allan H., E-mail: ahsmith@berkeley.edu [Arsenic Health Effects Research Group, 1950 Addison St., Suite 204, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94704 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine intake can all decrease iodide intake into the thyroid gland. This can reduce thyroid hormone production since iodide is a key component of thyroid hormone. Previous research has suggested that each of these factors alone may decrease thyroid hormone levels, but effect sizes are small. We hypothesized that people who have all three factors at the same time have substantially lower thyroid hormone levels than people who do not, and the effect of this combined exposure is substantially larger than the effects seen in analyses focused on only one factor at a time. Using data from the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, subjects were categorized into exposure groups based on their urinary perchlorate, iodine, and thiocyanate concentrations, and mean serum thyroxine concentrations were compared between groups. Subjects with high perchlorate (n=1939) had thyroxine concentrations that were 5.0% lower (mean difference=0.40 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.14–0.65) than subjects with low perchlorate (n=2084). The individual effects of iodine and thiocyanate were even smaller. Subjects with high perchlorate, high thiocyanate, and low iodine combined (n=62) had thyroxine concentrations 12.9% lower (mean difference=1.07 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.55–1.59) than subjects with low perchlorate, low thiocyanate, and adequate iodine (n=376). Potential confounders had little impact on results. Overall, these results suggest that concomitant exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine markedly reduces thyroxine production. This highlights the potential importance of examining the combined effects of multiple agents when evaluating the toxicity of thyroid-disrupting agents. -- Highlights: ► Recent data suggest that essentially everyone in the US is exposed to perchlorate. ► Perchlorate exposure may be associated with lower thyroid hormone levels. ► Some groups may be more susceptible to

  3. Combined effects of perchlorate, thiocyanate, and iodine on thyroid function in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine intake can all decrease iodide intake into the thyroid gland. This can reduce thyroid hormone production since iodide is a key component of thyroid hormone. Previous research has suggested that each of these factors alone may decrease thyroid hormone levels, but effect sizes are small. We hypothesized that people who have all three factors at the same time have substantially lower thyroid hormone levels than people who do not, and the effect of this combined exposure is substantially larger than the effects seen in analyses focused on only one factor at a time. Using data from the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, subjects were categorized into exposure groups based on their urinary perchlorate, iodine, and thiocyanate concentrations, and mean serum thyroxine concentrations were compared between groups. Subjects with high perchlorate (n=1939) had thyroxine concentrations that were 5.0% lower (mean difference=0.40 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.14–0.65) than subjects with low perchlorate (n=2084). The individual effects of iodine and thiocyanate were even smaller. Subjects with high perchlorate, high thiocyanate, and low iodine combined (n=62) had thyroxine concentrations 12.9% lower (mean difference=1.07 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.55–1.59) than subjects with low perchlorate, low thiocyanate, and adequate iodine (n=376). Potential confounders had little impact on results. Overall, these results suggest that concomitant exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine markedly reduces thyroxine production. This highlights the potential importance of examining the combined effects of multiple agents when evaluating the toxicity of thyroid-disrupting agents. -- Highlights: ► Recent data suggest that essentially everyone in the US is exposed to perchlorate. ► Perchlorate exposure may be associated with lower thyroid hormone levels. ► Some groups may be more susceptible to

  4. Ultraviolet Laser Induced Photochromic Centers in Cerium Doped Calcium-Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogatshnik, Gerald Joseph

    The optical excitation of the lowest 4f to 5d transition in Ce('3+):CaF(,2) using the 308 nm output of a XeCl excimer laser results in a strong coloration of the sample. The centers created by the UV laser irradiation were identified, using low temperature absorption spectroscopy, and were found to be divalent cerium ions at cubic sites in the crystal. The system exhibits photochromic properties in that the crystal can be returned to the original transparent state by illuminating it with light which is absorbed by the divalent cerium ions. The creation process for these photochromic centers involves a resonant two-photon transition from the 4f ground state of the cerium ion to the conduction band of the CaF(,2) host. The lowest 5d level of the cerium ion serves as the real intermediate state for this transition. The photoionized electron can be trapped by another trivalent cerium ion at a site of cubic symmetry. These impurity sites with O(,h) symmetry result when the charge compensator associated with the rare earth ion is somewhat removed from the cerium ion site. The charge compensator is needed to maintain charge neutrality in the crystal when a trivalent rare earth is substituted for a Ca ion in the host lattice. The absence of a local charge compensator at a Ce('3+) site with O(,h) symmetry, provides a net positive Coulombic potential, which aids in the trapping of electrons from the conduction band. The capture of an electron by a cerium ion at cubic site, changes the valence state of the ion to Ce('2+). The presence of divalent cerium, with its broad absorption bands in the visible region of the spectrum, accounts for the coloration of the crystal after illumination with UV laser light. A model for the production of the photochromic centers, based on a rate equation is presented. This model reflects the two-photon nature of the photoionization process, as well as the optical bleaching characteristics of the photochromic center, and accurately reproduces the

  5. [Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-ming; Zhu, Feng-rong; Zhang, Zi-bin; Ren, Xiang-jun; Deng, Hu; Zhai, Li-hua; Zhang, Li-xing

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the investigation of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atoms by three-step three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS). Twenty-seven odd-parity highly excited levels, whose transition probability is high, were used in this research. One hundred and forty-one autoionization states were found by these channels with the third-step laser scanning in the wavelength range of 634-670 nm. The ionization probabilities of different channels, which had higher cross sections, were compared. On the basis of this, eight optimal photoionization schemes of cerium atom have been given. PMID:15828309

  6. Photocatalytic action of cerium molybdate and iron-titanium oxide hollow nanospheres on Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is focused on the production of hollow nanospheres that reveal antibacterial action. Cerium molybdate and iron-titanium oxide hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 175 ± 15 and 221 ± 10 nm, respectively, were synthesized using emulsion polymerization and the sol–gel process. Their morphology characterization was accomplished using scanning electron microscopy. Their antibacterial action was examined on pure culture of Escherichia coli considering the loss of their viability. Both hollow nanospheres presented photocatalytic action after illumination with blue–black light, but those of cerium molybdate also demonstrated photocatalytic action in the dark. Therefore, the produced nanospheres can be used for antibacterial applications.

  7. METHOD OF SEPARATING TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM CERIUM SUB-GROUP RARE EARTH VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, R.B.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for separating plutonium from the cerium sub-group of rare earths when both are present in an aqueous solution. The method consists in adding an excess of alkali metal carbonate to the solution, which causes the formation of a soluble plutonium carbonate precipitate and at the same time forms an insoluble cerium-group rare earth carbonate. The pH value must be adjusted to bctween 5.5 and 7.5, and prior to the precipitation step the plutonium must be reduced to the tetravalent state since only tetravalent plutonium will form the soluble carbonate complex.

  8. Cerium Binding Activity of Pectins Isolated from the Seagrasses Zostera marina and Phyllospadix iwatensis

    OpenAIRE

    Valeri Kovalev; Maxim Khotimchenko; Yuri Khotimchenko; Elena Khozhaenko

    2012-01-01

    Cerium binding activity of three different water soluble pectin compounds of different origin was studied in a batch sorption system. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were adopted to describe the binding reactions between metal ions and pectin molecules. The Langmuir model provided the best fit. Within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0, the largest amount of the cerium ions was bound by pectin isolated from the seagrass Phylospadix iwatensis in comparison to pectin extracted from t...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of two dimensional metal organic framework of cerium with tetraaza macrocyclic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bt Safiin, Nurul Atikah; Yarmo, Ambar; Yamin, Bohari M. [School of Chemical Science and Food Technology. Faculty Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    A two dimensional metal organic framework containing cerium sufate layers and ethylenediaminium between layers was obtained by refluxing the mixture of cerium sulphate and 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7, 14-diene bromide. The complex was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and microelemental analysis. X-ray study showed that the complex adopts eleven coordination environments about the central atom. Thermogravimetric study showed the removal of water molecules at about 70°C followed by a gradual mass loss until the whole structure collapsed at about 400°C.

  10. Thin film growth of epitaxial gadolinium oxide, gadolinium yttrium oxide, and gadolinium cerium oxide by electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of gadolinium oxide, gadolinium yttrium oxide, and gadolinium cerium oxide were electrodeposited from non-aqueous baths. The films were on the order of 15 nm thick, and were grown epitaxially on textured nickel-tungsten substrates. The effect of deposition rate, annealing temperature and secondary metals on crystallinity and crystal orientation was investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Slower rates, higher temperatures and low concentrations of yttrium improve the crystallinity of gadolinium oxide films, whereas the introduction of cerium induced polycrystallinity.

  11. A corrosion resistant cerium oxide based coating on aluminum alloy 2024 prepared by brush plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium oxide based coatings were prepared on AA2024 Al alloy by brush plating. The characteristic of this technology is that hydrogen peroxide, which usually causes the plating solution to be unstable, is not necessary in the plating electrolyte. The coating showed laminated structures and good adhesive strength with the substrate. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the coatings were composed of Ce(III) and Ce(IV) oxides. The brush plated coatings on Al alloys improved corrosion resistance. The influence of plating parameters on structure and corrosion resistance of the cerium oxide based coating was studied.

  12. Plasma-electrolytic formation of cerium-containing surface structures on titanium and aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of obtaining cerium-containing structures on aluminum and titanium by the plasma-electrolytic method with the use of aqueous solutions of electrolytes containing Ce3+ polyphosphate complexes was demonstrated. The amount of cerium in the films obtained depended on the molar ratio n [polyphosphate]/[Ce3+] in the electrolyte. The films contained crystalline CePO4. The growth of films on titanium was characterized by the formation of secondary layers by the mechanism involving the appearance of new phase nuclei followed by their expansion

  13. Thin film growth of epitaxial gadolinium oxide, gadolinium yttrium oxide, and gadolinium cerium oxide by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jonathan R., E-mail: jonathan.mann@nrel.gov; Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2010-10-29

    Thin films of gadolinium oxide, gadolinium yttrium oxide, and gadolinium cerium oxide were electrodeposited from non-aqueous baths. The films were on the order of 15 nm thick, and were grown epitaxially on textured nickel-tungsten substrates. The effect of deposition rate, annealing temperature and secondary metals on crystallinity and crystal orientation was investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Slower rates, higher temperatures and low concentrations of yttrium improve the crystallinity of gadolinium oxide films, whereas the introduction of cerium induced polycrystallinity.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of platinum supported on alumina doped with cerium catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis and characterization of gamma-alumina doped with cerium as platinum support for the automobile exhaust catalyst are described. Platinum/alumina/ceria catalyst were prepared by impregnation of hexachloroplatinic acid and sintered at 500 degree Celsius to obtain metal dispersions of 1.0 wt%. Catalyst distribution inside the powder and the effects of the addition of cerium to alumina were analyzed by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). The results showed that the alumina - supported catalysts contained well dispersion of the noble metal

  15. Electronic interaction in oxide copper-cerium catalysts according to exoemission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic properties of the oxide copper-cerium catalysts with different copper content are studied through the exoemission methods. It is shown, that the introduction of the copper increases the CeO2 emission activity and the number of the electrons, emitted from the catalysts surface, as compared to the surface of the CeO2 and CuO initial oxides. It is concluded, that the event of synergism in the exoemission from the studied systems surface is conditioned through the electronic interactions, including the electronic transitions on the cerium oxide - copper oxide boundary

  16. A corrosion resistant cerium oxide based coating on aluminum alloy 2024 prepared by brush plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Junlei; Han Zhongzhi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zuo Yu, E-mail: zuoy@mail.buct.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Tang Yuming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Cerium oxide based coatings were prepared on AA2024 Al alloy by brush plating. The characteristic of this technology is that hydrogen peroxide, which usually causes the plating solution to be unstable, is not necessary in the plating electrolyte. The coating showed laminated structures and good adhesive strength with the substrate. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the coatings were composed of Ce(III) and Ce(IV) oxides. The brush plated coatings on Al alloys improved corrosion resistance. The influence of plating parameters on structure and corrosion resistance of the cerium oxide based coating was studied.

  17. Evaluation of Antiproliferative Potential of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles on HeLa Human Cervical Tumor Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoriţa Diaconeasa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 nanoparticles as nanomaterials have promising biomedical applications. In this paper, the cytotoxicity induced by CONPs human cervical tumor cells was investigated. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using the precipitation method. The nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferation of HeLa human cervical tumor cells in a dose dependent manner but did not showed to be cytotoxic as analyzed by MTT assay. The administrated treatment decreased the HeLa cell viability cells from 100% to 65% at the dose of 100 μg/mL.

  18. XPS study of cerium conversion coating on the anodized 2024 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium-rich conversion coating was deposited on anodized aluminum alloy 2024 in a solution containing Ce(NO3)3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used as the analysis method. The composition of the Ce conversion coating deposited on the anodized 2024 alloy was investigated using this method. It was revealed that the coating predominately consisted of three-valent state cerium compound. Some of the CeIII was oxidized to CeIV in the outer layer coating

  19. Synthesis and characterization of two dimensional metal organic framework of cerium with tetraaza macrocyclic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two dimensional metal organic framework containing cerium sufate layers and ethylenediaminium between layers was obtained by refluxing the mixture of cerium sulphate and 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7, 14-diene bromide. The complex was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and microelemental analysis. X-ray study showed that the complex adopts eleven coordination environments about the central atom. Thermogravimetric study showed the removal of water molecules at about 70°C followed by a gradual mass loss until the whole structure collapsed at about 400°C

  20. Decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste by cerium IV redox process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste is an important aspect in the management of waste generated during dismantling and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Present work on cerium redox process targets decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste till it qualifies for the non alpha waste category for disposal in near surface disposal facility. Recovery of the alpha radio nuclides and cerium from aqueous secondary waste streams was also studied deploying solvent extraction process and established. The alpha-lean secondary waste stream has been immobilised in cement based matrix for final disposal. (author)

  1. Dissociation of outer membrane for Escherichia coli cell caused by cerium nitrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈爱美; 施庆珊; 冯劲; 欧阳友生; 陈仪本; 谭绍早

    2010-01-01

    The biological effect of cerium nitrate on the outer membrane(OM) of Escherichia coli(E.coli) cell was studied,and the antim-icrobial mechanism of rare earth elements was explored.The antimicrobial effect of cerium nitrate on E.coli cell was valued by plate count method,and the morphology change of E.coli cell was observed with scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and transmission electron microscopy(TEM).The results showed that the E.coli cell suspension was flocculated when the concentration of Ce(NO3)3?6H2O...

  2. Comparative Study of Magnetic Instabilities in Cerium Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variety of new phases and physical phenomena discovered in intermetallic compounds containing Rare Earths or Actinides has motivated, during the last four decades, the sustained study of their magnetic phase diagrams.The current interest is focused on the investigation of the region of the phase diagram where the magnetic order of Cerium, Ytterbium and Uranium based systems is destabilized.In this region different behaviours have been detected, such as non conventional superconductivity and the anomalous dependencies of the thermal, magnetic and transport properties at very low temperatures, associated to non-Fermi liquid behaviour.A simple model, the Doniach diagram, has guided the interpretation of the destabilization of the magnetic order in the previously mentioned systems.However, most of the systems that have been studied so far cannot be described within this model.This fact has motivated the development of a phenomenological classification of phase diagrams that has been mostly applied to cerium based compounds.This classification defines three types of phase diagrams, that can be distinguished by the way in which the magnetic transition is suppressed when a control parameter (such as doping or pressure) is driven towards its critical value.Within this scenario, we study the suppression of the antiferromagnetic order of the intermetallic compounds CeIn3, CeRh2Si2 and CePd2Al3 as a function of Ce-ligand alloying.The resulting systems, CeIn3-xSnx, Ce(CuxRh1-x)2Si2 and CePd2-xNixAl3, present different crystalline structures and the effects produced by the alloying process are different in each case.We analyse the resulting magnetic phase diagrams, and compare them with the above mentioned phenomenological classification.With such a purpose, we study in detail the region in which the magnetic instability takes place, in the proximity of the respective critical concentrations.Taking into account both our results and those reported in the literature, we

  3. Fate of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in endothelial cells: exocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although cytotoxicity and endocytosis of nanoparticles have been the subject of numerous studies, investigations regarding exocytosis as an important mechanism to reduce intracellular nanoparticle accumulation are rather rare and there is a distinct lack of knowledge. The current study investigated the behavior of human microvascular endothelial cells to exocytose cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (18.8 nm) by utilization of specific inhibitors [brefeldin A; nocodazole; methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβcD)] and different analytical methods (flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Overall, it was found that endothelial cells were able to release CeO2 nanoparticles via exocytosis after the migration of nanoparticle containing endosomes toward the plasma membrane. The exocytosis process occurred mainly by fusion of vesicular membranes with plasma membrane resulting in the discharge of vesicular content to extracellular environment. Nevertheless, it seems to be likely that nanoparticles present in the cytosol could leave the cells in a direct manner. MβcD treatment led to the strongest inhibition of the nanoparticle exocytosis indicating a significant role of the plasma membrane cholesterol content in the exocytosis process. Brefeldin A (inhibitor of Golgi-to-cell-surface-transport) caused a higher inhibitory effect on exocytosis than nocodazole (inhibitor of microtubules). Thus, the transfer from distal Golgi compartments to the cell surface influenced the exocytosis process of the CeO2 nanoparticles more than the microtubule-associated transport. In conclusion, endothelial cells, which came in contact with nanoparticles, e.g., after intravenously applied nano-based drugs, can regulate their intracellular nanoparticle amount, which is necessary to avoid adverse nanoparticle effects on cells

  4. Thermoluminescence of cerium and terbium -doped calcium pyrophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman L, J.; Cruz Z, E. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Lozano R, I. B.; Diaz G, J. A. I., E-mail: jesus.roman@nucleares.unam.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria No. 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this work is to report the thermoluminescence (Tl) response of Calcium Pyrophosphate phosphor doped with Cerium and Terbium impurities (Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+}). The phosphors were synthesized using the co-precipitation method and annealed at 900 degrees C by two hours for obtain the β phase. The intentional doping with Ce and Tb ions was 1 at.% and 0.1 at.%, whereas in the EDS results the concentration of impurities was 0.39 at.% and 0.05 at.%, respectively. The superficial morphology of phosphor is mainly composed by thin wafers of different size. All samples were exposed to gamma rays from {sup 60}Co in the Gammacell-200 irradiator. The Tl response of the phosphor was measured from Rt up to 350 degrees C and under nitrogen atmosphere in a Harshaw TLD 3500 reader. The glow curves of the Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+} powders showed a broad intense Tl peak centered at 165 degrees C and a shoulder at approximate 260 degrees C was observed. A linear Tl response in the range of absorbed dose of 0.2 to 10 Gy was obtained. Tl glow curves were analyzed using the initial rise (IR)and computerized glow curve deconvolution methods to evaluate the kinetics parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and kinetic order (b). (Author)

  5. Fate of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in endothelial cells: exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Claudia, E-mail: Claudia.Strobel@med.uni-jena.de [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Experimental Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Oehring, Hartmut [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Anatomy II (Germany); Herrmann, Rudolf [University of Augsburg, Department of Physics (Germany); Förster, Martin [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine I, Division of Pulmonary Medicine and Allergy/Immunology (Germany); Reller, Armin [University of Augsburg, Department of Physics (Germany); Hilger, Ingrid, E-mail: ingrid.hilger@med.uni-jena.de [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Experimental Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Although cytotoxicity and endocytosis of nanoparticles have been the subject of numerous studies, investigations regarding exocytosis as an important mechanism to reduce intracellular nanoparticle accumulation are rather rare and there is a distinct lack of knowledge. The current study investigated the behavior of human microvascular endothelial cells to exocytose cerium dioxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles (18.8 nm) by utilization of specific inhibitors [brefeldin A; nocodazole; methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβcD)] and different analytical methods (flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Overall, it was found that endothelial cells were able to release CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles via exocytosis after the migration of nanoparticle containing endosomes toward the plasma membrane. The exocytosis process occurred mainly by fusion of vesicular membranes with plasma membrane resulting in the discharge of vesicular content to extracellular environment. Nevertheless, it seems to be likely that nanoparticles present in the cytosol could leave the cells in a direct manner. MβcD treatment led to the strongest inhibition of the nanoparticle exocytosis indicating a significant role of the plasma membrane cholesterol content in the exocytosis process. Brefeldin A (inhibitor of Golgi-to-cell-surface-transport) caused a higher inhibitory effect on exocytosis than nocodazole (inhibitor of microtubules). Thus, the transfer from distal Golgi compartments to the cell surface influenced the exocytosis process of the CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles more than the microtubule-associated transport. In conclusion, endothelial cells, which came in contact with nanoparticles, e.g., after intravenously applied nano-based drugs, can regulate their intracellular nanoparticle amount, which is necessary to avoid adverse nanoparticle effects on cells.

  6. Effects of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles on Sorghum Plant Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, L.; Chen, Y.; Darnault, C. J. G.; Rauh, B.; Kresovich, S.; Korte, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nanotechnology and nanomaterials are considered as the development of the modern science. However, besides with that wide application, nanoparticles arouse to the side effects on the environment and human health. As the catalyst of ceramics and fuel industry, Cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) can be found in the environment following their use and life-cycle. Therefore, it is critical to assess the potential effects that CeO2 NPs found in soils may have on plants. In this study, CeO2 NPs were analyzed for the potential influence on the sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] (Reg. no. 126) (PI 154844) growth and traits. The objectives of this research were to determine whether CeO2 NPs impact the sorghum germination and growth characteristics. The sorghum was grown in the greenhouse located at Biosystems Research Complex, Clemson University under different CeO2 NPs treatments (0mg; 100mg; 500mg; 1000mg CeO2 NPs/Kg soil) and harvested around each month. At the end of the each growing period, above ground vegetative tissue was air-dried, ground to 2mm particle size and compositional traits estimated using near-infrared spectroscopy. Also, the NPK value of the sorghum tissue was tested by Clemson Agriculture Center. After the first harvest, the result showed that the height of above ground biomass under the nanoparticles stress was higher than that of control group. This difference between the control and the nanoparticles treatments was significant (F>F0.05; LSD). Our results also indicated that some of the compositional traits were impacted by the different treatments, including the presence and/or concentrations of the nanoparticles.

  7. Contribution to research on the metabolism of fission product. Studies on the physico-chemical state and the metabolic fate of radio-cerium solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a study of the physico-chemical state of radio-cerium in dilute solutions on the tracer scale, as a function of the pH of the solution. The way in which this radioelement is transported in the blood is studied in vitro and in vivo, with reference to the ionic or colloidal state of the radio-cerium used. The distribution of cerium amongst the various components of the blood is studied by a new method of blood fractionation and by paper electrophoresis. Evidence of a cerium globulin connection is shown in the case of ionic cerium. A study of the initial distribution of radio-cerium in rats, after intravenous administration of ionic or colloidal solutions, shows considerable differences according to the physico-chemical state of the cerium injected. (author)

  8. Extraction-spectrophotometric determination of niobium with 1,2,4,6-tetraphenylpyridinium perchlorate and thiocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1,2,4,6-Tetraphenylpyridinium (TPP+) as the acetate or perchlorate was used as a counter ion in the spectrophotometric determination of Nb(V) by extraction into toluene of the anionic Nb(V) -thiocyanate complex from 4 to 6 M hydrochloric acid. The molar absorptivity of the ion-association complex, whose composition was shown to be NbOCl(SCN)3-.TPP+, was 2.82 x 104 l mol-1cm-1 at 395 nm. Beer's law was obeyed over the range 0.1 to 2.5 μg ml-1 of Nb(V). The method was applied to the determination of niobium in standard steels and ores with good precision and accuracy. 1-(4'-Nitrophenyl)-2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium (nitro-TPP+) perchlorate was also synthesised and used in the spectrophotometric determination of Nb(V), but did not show advantages over TPP+. The fluorescence of TPP+ and Nb(V)-SCN--TPP+ solutions in toluene also disappeared when nitro-TPP+ was used, owing to the paramagnetic effect of the NO2 group. (author)

  9. Interfacial behavior of perchlorate versus chloride ions in saturated aqueous salt solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosal, S; Kuo, I W; Baer, M D; Bluhm, H

    2009-04-14

    In recent years combination of theoretical and experimental work have presented a novel view of the aqueous interface wherein hard and/or multiply charged ions are excluded from the interface, but large polarizable anions show interfacial enhancement relative to the bulk. The observed trend in the propensity of anions to adsorb at the air/water interface appears to be reverse of the Hofmeister series for anions. This study focuses on experimental and theoretical examination of the partitioning behavior of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) and chloride (Cl{sup -}) ions at the air/water interface. We have used ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique to directly probe the interfacial concentrations of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and Cl{sup -} ions in sodium perchlorate and sodium chloride solutions, respectively. Experimental observations are compared with first principles molecular dynamics simulations. Both experimental and simulation results show enhancement of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ion at the interface, compared with the absence of such enhancement in the case of Cl{sup -} ion. These observations are in agreement with the expected trend in the interfacial propensity of anions based on the Hofmeister series.

  10. 123Iodine scintigraphy and perchlorate discharge test in the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Thirty eight children suffering from congenital primary permanent hypothyroidism were studied to determine the diagnostic impact of 123I scintigraphy in comparison to laboratory findings and ultrasonography. Methods: In all patients 123I scintigraphy was performed after intravenous administration of 3,7 MBq 123I. If accumulation of the radiotracer in thyroid tissue occured a perchlorate discharge test was performed subsequently. Results: Scintigraphy revealed athyrosis in 7 children. In 9 children a lingual thyroid was observed. Deficiency in iodine organification was diagnosed by a significant discharge of 123I in 15 patients. In four of these children the diagnosis of Pendred's syndrome could be established. Ectopic thyroid tissue could be demonstrated only by scintigraphy where clinical examination and sonography failed in the diagnosis in all cases. Hypoplasia of the thyroid gland as it was diagnosed in 2 cases by ultrasonography appeared to be unlikely because of normal 123I uptake was seen in these patients. In 2 patients with scintigraphic proven athyrosis an orthotopic gland had been falsely considered by ultrasound. In 44% of our patients the final diagnosis could only be established if 123I scintigraphy and perchlorate discharge test were performed. Conclusion: This findings suggest that scintigraphy is indispensible in the correct diagnostic work up of congenital hypothyroidism. (orig.)

  11. Sol-gel preparation of a di-ureasil electrolyte doped with lithium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) synthesized by the sol-gel process and designated as di-ureasils have been prepared through the incorporation of lithium perchlorate, LiClO4, into the d-U(2000) organic-inorganic hybrid network. Electrolytes with lithium salt compositions of n (where n indicates the number of oxyethylene units per Li+ ion) between ∞ and 0.5 were characterized by conductivity measurements, cyclic voltammetry at a gold microelectrode, thermal analysis and Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy. The conductivity results obtained suggest that this system offers a quite significant improvement over previously characterized analogues doped with lithium triflate [S.C. Nunes, V. de Zea Bermudez, D. Ostrovskii, M.M. Silva, S. Barros, M.J. Smith, R.A. Sa Ferreira, L.D. Carlos, J. Rocha, E. Morales, J. Electrochem. Soc. 152 (2) (2005), A429]. 'Free' perchlorate ions, detected in all the samples examined, are identified as the main charge carriers in the sample that yields the highest room temperature conductivity (n = 20). In the di-ureasils with n ≤ 10 ionic association is favoured and the ionic conductivity drops

  12. Nano-Ammonium Perchlorate: Preparation, Characterization, and Evaluation in Composite Propellant Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, A.; Mehilal; Jain, S.; Jain, M. K.; Bhattacharya, B.

    2013-07-01

    Nanomaterials are finding applications in explosives and propellant formulations due to their large surface area and high surface energy. This high surface energy is responsible for the low activation energy and increase in burning rate of the composition. Therefore, a successful attempt has been made to prepare nano-ammonium perchlorate using a nonaqueous method by dissolving ammonium perchlorate (AP) in methanol followed by adding the dissolved AP to the hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), homogenization, and vacuum distillation of the solvent. The nano-AP thus formed was characterized using a NANOPHOX particle size analyzer (Sympatec, Germany), transmission electron microscopy (FEI, Hillsboro, OR), X-ray diffraction (PANalytical B.V., The Netherlands) and scanning electron microscopy (Ikon Analytical Equipment Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai, India) for particle size, purity, and morphology, respectively. The thermal behavior of nano-AP was also studied using differential thermal analysis-thermo gravimetric analysis (DTA-TGA). The data indicated that the particle size of the prepared AP was in the range of 21-52 nm and the thermal decomposition temperature was lower than that of coarse AP. Characterized nano-AP was subsequently used in composite propellant formulation up to 5% with 86% solid loading and studied for different properties. The results showed a 14% increase in burning rate in comparison to standard propellant composition with desired mechanical properties.

  13. Degradation of nitrobenzene using titania photocatalyst co-doped with nitrogen and cerium under visible light illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A type of nitrogen and cerium co-doped titania photocatalyst, which could degrade nitrobenzene under visible light irradiation, was prepared by the sol-gel route. Titanium isopropoxide, ammonium nitrate, and cerium nitrate were used as the sources of titanium, nitrogen, and cerium, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffusive reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm were employed to characterize the as-prepared photocatalyst. The degradation of nitrobenzene under visible light illumination was taken as probe reaction to evaluate the photoactivity of the co-doped photocatalyst. The commercial TiO2 photocatalyst (Degussa P25), which was thought as a high active photocatalyst, was chosen as standard photocatalyst to contrast the photoactivity of the nitrogen and cerium co-doped titania photocatalyst. The results showed that the photocatalytic performance of the nitrogen and cerium co-doped titania was related with the calcination temperature and the component. The nitrogen atoms were incorporated into the crystal of titania and could narrow the band gap energy. The doping cerium atoms existed in the forms of Ce2O3 and dispersed on the surface of TiO2. The improvement of the photocatalytic activity was ascribed to the synergistic effects of the nitrogen and cerium co-doping

  14. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles and Bulk Cerium Oxide Leading to Different Physiological and Biochemical Responses in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingmao; Wang, Qiang; Rossi, Lorenzo; Zhang, Weilan

    2016-07-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs) have been incorporated into many commercial products, and their potential release into the environment through the use and disposal of these products has caused serious concerns. Despite the previous efforts and rapid progress on elucidating the environmental impact of CeO2NPs, the long-term impact of CeO2NPs to plants, a key component of the ecosystem, is still not well understood. The potentially different impact of CeO2NPs and their bulk counterparts to plants is also unclear. The main objectives of this study were (1) to investigate whether continued irrigation with solutions containing different concentrations of CeO2NPs (0, 10, and 100 mg/L) would induce physiological and biochemical adjustments in Brassica rapa in soil growing conditions and (2) to determine whether CeO2NPs and bulk CeO2 particles exert different impacts on plants. The results indicated that bulk CeO2 at 10 and 100 mg/L enhanced plant biomass by 28% and 35%, respectively, while CeO2NPs at equivalent concentrations did not. While the bulk CeO2 treatment resulted in significantly higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in plant tissues at the vegetative stage, CeO2NPs led to significantly higher H2O2 levels in plant tissues at the floral stage. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Brassica rapa also displayed a growth-stage dependent response to different sizes of CeO2 while catalase (CAT) activity was not affected by either size of CeO2 throughout the life cycle of Brassica rapa. Altogether, the results demonstrated that plant responses to CeO2 exposure varied with the particle sizes and the growth stages of plants. PMID:26691446

  15. Cathodic electrodeposition of cerium based oxides on carbon steel from concentrated cerium nitrate. Part II: Influence of electrodeposition parameters and of the addition of PEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlaoui, Y. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Institut des Sciences et Sciences de l' Ingenieur, Centre Universitaire de Souk-Ahras, BP 1553, 41000 Souk-Ahras (Algeria); Tifouti, L. [Laboratoire de Genie de l' Environnement, Universite Badji Mokhtar, BP 1223, 23020, El Hadjar-Annaba (Algeria); Remazeilles, C. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Pedraza, F., E-mail: fpedraza@univ-lr.fr [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France)

    2010-03-15

    The mechanisms of formation of cerium based oxides on carbon steel by cathodic electrodeposition from relatively concentrated cerium nitrate solutions were investigated in a previous work (Part I). It was shown that some corrosion products developed on the steel upon and soon after coating, thereby suggesting the films were not protective. This work (Part II) focuses on the influence of various elaboration parameters on the composition and morphology of the deposits likely to improve the corrosion resistance of carbon steel. It will be shown that an increase of the precursor concentration increases the Ce(OH){sub 3} content of the deposits and brings about larger crystallite sizes at low to moderate applied current densities. As a result, the formation of the carbonated green rust corrosion product is not hindered. The kinetics of formation of the film follows a polynomial law in which concurrent deposition and dissolution steps are combined. However, an increase of the deposition time results in a reduced content of Ce(OH){sub 3} in the layers, hence in an evolution of the colour of the deposits. Similarly, the increase of the temperature of the bath brings about significant modifications of the surface morphology, of the crystallite size and of the content of oxygen vacancies that are suspected not to confer adequate protection. In contrast, the addition of 10 g L{sup -1} of PEG to the 0.1 M cerium nitrate solutions will be shown to inhibit the development of the carbonated green rust.

  16. Cathodic electrodeposition of cerium based oxides on carbon steel from concentrated cerium nitrate. Part II: Influence of electrodeposition parameters and of the addition of PEG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of formation of cerium based oxides on carbon steel by cathodic electrodeposition from relatively concentrated cerium nitrate solutions were investigated in a previous work (Part I). It was shown that some corrosion products developed on the steel upon and soon after coating, thereby suggesting the films were not protective. This work (Part II) focuses on the influence of various elaboration parameters on the composition and morphology of the deposits likely to improve the corrosion resistance of carbon steel. It will be shown that an increase of the precursor concentration increases the Ce(OH)3 content of the deposits and brings about larger crystallite sizes at low to moderate applied current densities. As a result, the formation of the carbonated green rust corrosion product is not hindered. The kinetics of formation of the film follows a polynomial law in which concurrent deposition and dissolution steps are combined. However, an increase of the deposition time results in a reduced content of Ce(OH)3 in the layers, hence in an evolution of the colour of the deposits. Similarly, the increase of the temperature of the bath brings about significant modifications of the surface morphology, of the crystallite size and of the content of oxygen vacancies that are suspected not to confer adequate protection. In contrast, the addition of 10 g L-1 of PEG to the 0.1 M cerium nitrate solutions will be shown to inhibit the development of the carbonated green rust.

  17. The effects of cerium doping on the size, morphology, and optical properties of α-hematite nanoparticles for ultraviolet filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Possible application of cerium-doped α-hematite as ultraviolet filter. • Nanoparticles obtained through co-precipitation technique using various cerium doping levels followed by annealing. • Comprehensive materials characterisation utilizing XRD, DSC/TGA, STEM, UV–vis spectroscopy. • Increasing cerium content reduces particle sizing and alters morphology. • Solubility of cerium in hematite seen between 5 and 10% doping, 10% cerium doping greatly enhances attenuation in ultraviolet region and increases optical bandgap. - Abstract: Metal oxide nanoparticles have potential use in energy storage, electrode materials, as catalysts and in the emerging field of nanomedicine. Being able to accurately tailor the desirable properties of these nanoceramic materials, such as particle size, morphology and optical bandgap (Eg) is integral in the feasibility of their use. In this study we investigate the altering of both the structure and physical properties through the doping of hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanocrystals with cerium at a range of concentrations, synthesised using a one-pot co-precipitation method. This extremely simple synthesis followed by thermal treatment results in stable Fe2−xCexOy nanoceramics resulting from the burning of any unreacted precursors and transformation of goethite-cerium doped nanoparticle intermediate. The inclusion of Ce into the crystal lattice of these α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles causes a significantly large reduction in mean crystalline size and alteration in particle morphology with increasing cerium content. Finally we report an increase optical semiconductor bandgap, along with a substantial increase in the ultraviolet attenuation found for a 10% Ce-doping concentration which shows the potential application of cerium-doped hematite nanocrystals to be used as a pigmented ultraviolet filter for cosmetic products

  18. Reversible, Selective Trapping of Perchlorate from Water in Record Capacity by a Cationic Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinas, Ian R; Silva, Rachel C; Oliver, Scott R J

    2016-02-16

    We report the capture of ppm-level aqueous perchlorate in record capacity and kinetics via the complete anion exchange of a cationic metal-organic framework. Ambient conditions were used for both the synthesis of silver 4,4'-bipyridine nitrate (SBN) and the exchange, forming silver 4,4'-bipyridine perchlorate (SBP). The exchange was complete within 90 min, and the capacity was 354 mg/g, representing 99% removal. These values are greater than current anion exchangers such as the resins Amberlite IRA-400 (249 mg/g), Purolite A530E (104 mg/g), and layered double hydroxides (28 mg/g). Moreover, unlike resins and layered double hydroxides, SBN is fully reusable and displays 96% regeneration to SBN in nitrate solution, with new crystal formation allowing the indefinite cycling for perchlorate. We show seven cycles as proof of concept. Perchlorate contamination of water represents a serious health threat because it is a thyroid endocrine disruptor. This noncomplexing anionic pollutant is significantly mobile and environmentally persistent. Removal of other anionic pollutants from water such as chromate, pertechnetate, or arsenate may be possible by this methodology. PMID:26765213

  19. Anomalous aryl strengthening of americium and europium complexes during extraction by alkylenediphosphine dioxides from perchloric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of americium and europium from perchlorate environments by solutions of three types of methylenediphosphine dioxides, namely (C6H5)P(O)(CH2)sub(n)(O)P(C6H5)2, (C6H5)2P(O)CH2(O)P(C8H17)2 and (C8H17)2P(O)(CH2)sub(n)(O)P(C8H17)2 has been studied (n is 1 or 2 ) The diluents used have been dichlorethane and chloroform. In perchlorate environments the distribuiton coefficients of americium and europium have proved to be by about 3 orders of magnitude higher than in nitric acid environments, i.e. in perchlorate media the complexes are far more stable. Separation coefficients of americium and REE in perchloric acid soutions are much higher than in nitrate environments. The average value of Am/Eu separation coeffecient at 1-5 M acidity was about 6 (with dichlorethane as diluent) or about 7 (with chloroform as diluent). The complexes essentially exist as trisolvated. Americium complexes display anomalous stability increase upon being diluted: by about 2 orders of magnitude with dichlorethane and by up to 3 orders of magnitude with chloroform used as diluent

  20. Evolution of the local environment of cerium and neodymium during simplified SON68 glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jollivet, Patrick [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)]. E-mail: patrick.jollivet@cea.fr; Lopez, Christophe [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Auwer, Christophe Den [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Simoni, Eric [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Batiment 100, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2005-11-15

    The evolution of the sites occupied by cerium and neodymium (coordination numbers and Ce, Nd-O distances) during alteration of simplified SON68 glass specimens was determined by L{sub III}-edge XAS. Cerium and neodymium are situated in a silicate environment in the glass, surrounded by eight oxygen atoms at an average distance of 2.44 and 2.48 A, respectively. These two rare earth elements exhibit different leaching behavior, however. The main environment of cerium becomes a silicate (d {sub Ce-O} = 2.19 A) with a second oxide or more probably oxyhydroxide site (d {sub Ce-O} = 2.32 A). The cerium coordination number increases by 1 to 3 compared with the glass, depending on the leaching conditions. Neodymium is found mainly in a hydroxycarbonate environment (d {sub Nd-O} = 2.46 A); the second site is a silicate (d {sub Nd-O} = 2.54 A). The neodymium coordination number increases by 1 compared with the glass. When glass containing neodymium is doped with phosphorus, Nd is situated in a phosphate environment; this change is also reflected in the coordination number and Nd-O distance (seven oxygen atoms at 2.42 A). During glass leaching, neodymium is present at two different sites, phosphate (d {sub Nd-O} = 2.52 A) and hydroxycarbonate (d {sub Nd-O} = 2.40 A)

  1. XPS and factor analysis study of initial stages of cerium oxide growth on polycrystalline tungsten

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polyak, Yaroslav; Bastl, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 6 (2015), s. 663-671. ISSN 0142-2421 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : XPS * FA * PLD * cerium oxide * WO 3 * Ce (3d) Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 1.245, year: 2014

  2. Demonstration of enhanced K-edge angiography using a cerium target x-ray generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerium target x-ray generator is useful in order to perform enhanced K-edge angiography using a cone beam because K-series characteristic x rays from the cerium target are absorbed effectively by iodine-based contrast mediums. The x-ray generator consists of a main controller, a unit with a Cockcroft-Walton circuit and a fixed anode x-ray tube, and a personal computer. The tube is a glass-enclosed diode with a cerium target and a 0.5-mm-thick beryllium window. The maximum tube voltage and current were 65 kV and 0.4 mA, respectively, and the focal-spot sizes were 1.0x1.3 mm. Cerium Kα lines were left using a barium sulfate filter, and the x-ray intensity was 0.48 μC/kg at 1.0 m from the source with a tube voltage of 60 kV, a current of 0.40 mA, and an exposure time of 1.0 s. Angiography was performed with a computed radiography system using iodine-based microspheres. In coronary angiography of nonliving animals, we observed fine blood vessels of approximately 100 μm with high contrasts

  3. Influences of the main anodic electroplating parameters on cerium oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yang; Yang, Yumeng; Du, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yu [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); Zhang, Zhao, E-mail: eaglezzy@zjuem.zju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); Zhang, Jianqing [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection of Metals, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Cerium oxide thin films were fabricated onto 316 L stainless steel via a potentiostatically anodic electrodeposition approach in the solutions containing cerium(III) nitrate (0.05 M), ammonia acetate (0.1 M) and ethanol (10% V/V). The electrochemical behaviors and deposition parameters (applied potential, bath temperature, dissolving O{sub 2} and bath pH) have been investigated. Results show that, the electrochemical oxidation of Ce{sup 3+} goes through one electrochemical step, which is under charge transfer control. The optimum applied potential for film deposition is 0.8 V. Bath temperature plays a significant effect on the deposition rate, composition (different colors of the film) and surface morphology of the deposits. Due to the hydrolysis of Ce{sup 3+}, cerous hydroxide is facility to form when the bath temperature is higher than 60 °C. The electroplating bath pH is another key role for the anodic deposition of cerium oxide thin films, and the best bath pH is around 6.20. N{sub 2} or O{sub 2} purged into the bath will result in film porosities and O{sub 2} favors cerium oxide particles and film generation.

  4. Influences of the main anodic electroplating parameters on cerium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium oxide thin films were fabricated onto 316 L stainless steel via a potentiostatically anodic electrodeposition approach in the solutions containing cerium(III) nitrate (0.05 M), ammonia acetate (0.1 M) and ethanol (10% V/V). The electrochemical behaviors and deposition parameters (applied potential, bath temperature, dissolving O2 and bath pH) have been investigated. Results show that, the electrochemical oxidation of Ce3+ goes through one electrochemical step, which is under charge transfer control. The optimum applied potential for film deposition is 0.8 V. Bath temperature plays a significant effect on the deposition rate, composition (different colors of the film) and surface morphology of the deposits. Due to the hydrolysis of Ce3+, cerous hydroxide is facility to form when the bath temperature is higher than 60 °C. The electroplating bath pH is another key role for the anodic deposition of cerium oxide thin films, and the best bath pH is around 6.20. N2 or O2 purged into the bath will result in film porosities and O2 favors cerium oxide particles and film generation.

  5. Influences of the main anodic electroplating parameters on cerium oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Yang, Yumeng; Du, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Jianqing

    2014-06-01

    Cerium oxide thin films were fabricated onto 316 L stainless steel via a potentiostatically anodic electrodeposition approach in the solutions containing cerium(III) nitrate (0.05 M), ammonia acetate (0.1 M) and ethanol (10% V/V). The electrochemical behaviors and deposition parameters (applied potential, bath temperature, dissolving O2 and bath pH) have been investigated. Results show that, the electrochemical oxidation of Ce3+ goes through one electrochemical step, which is under charge transfer control. The optimum applied potential for film deposition is 0.8 V. Bath temperature plays a significant effect on the deposition rate, composition (different colors of the film) and surface morphology of the deposits. Due to the hydrolysis of Ce3+, cerous hydroxide is facility to form when the bath temperature is higher than 60 °C. The electroplating bath pH is another key role for the anodic deposition of cerium oxide thin films, and the best bath pH is around 6.20. N2 or O2 purged into the bath will result in film porosities and O2 favors cerium oxide particles and film generation.

  6. Excimer Laser Deposition and Characterization of Cerium Doped TiO2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fajgar, Radek; Dřínek, Vladislav; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Murafa, Nataliya

    - : -, 2011, s. 131. ISSN N. [EuroCVD 18. Kinsale, Co. Cork (IE), 04.09.2011-09.09.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : laser deposition * TiO2 * cerium Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry

  7. Transient Dynamics of Fluoride-Based High Concentration Erbium/Cerium Co-Doped Fiber Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. S-H. Yam; Y. Akasaka; Y. Kubota; R. Huang; D. L. Harris; J. Pan

    2003-01-01

    We designed and evaluated a fluoride-based high concentration erbium/ cerium co-doped fiber amplifier. It is suitable for Metropolitan Area Networks due to faster transient, flatter (unfiltered) gain, smaller footprint and gain excursion than its silica-based counterpart.

  8. Separation of cerium from high level waste solution of Purex origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple solvent extraction procedure for the separation of 144Ce from Purex high level waste (HLW) is described. 2-ethylhexyl 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid (KSM-17) has been used as extractant. About 10 mCi of cerium was separated from HLW using this technique. This method is amenable for automation and scale up. (author)

  9. Cerium oxide coated anodes for aluminum electrowinning: Topical report, October 1, 1986-June 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J. K.

    1987-12-01

    Because of the cost of building and maintaining a carbon anode plant and the energy penalties associated with the use of carbon anodes in the production of aluminum, the use of inert anodes has long been proposed. Various cermet anodes have been investigated. In this paper, tests on a material, cerium oxyfluoride (CEROX), deposited in situ as an anode, are reported. (JDH)

  10. Growth and characterization of Sm3+ doped cerium oxalate single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minu Mary C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of Sm3+ doped cerium oxalate decahydrate were synthesized using single diffusion gel technique and the conditions influencing the size, morphology, nucleation density and quality of the crystals were optimized. Highly transparent single crystals of average size 3 mm × 2 mm × 1 mm with well-defined hexagonal morphology were grown during a time period of two weeks. X-ray powder diffraction analysis revealed that the grown crystals crystallize in the monoclinic system with space group P21/c as identical with the pure cerium oxalate. The various functional groups of the oxalate ligand and the water of crystallization were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectrum of the Sm3+ doped cerium oxalate indicated that the Sm3+ ions are optically active in the cerium oxalate matrix. The crystal has a strong and efficient orange red emission with a wavelength peak at 595 nm and hence can be effectively used for optical amplification. Microhardness measurements of the crystal revealed that they belong to the soft material category.

  11. EXAFS and XANES analysis of plutonium and cerium edges from titanate ceramics for fissile materials disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra from the plutonium LIII edge and XANES from the cerium LII edge in prototype titanate ceramic hosts. The titanate ceramics studied are based upon the hafnium-pyrochlore and zirconolite mineral structures and will serve as an immobilization host for surplus fissile materials, containing as much as 10 weight % fissile plutonium and 20 weight % (natural or depleted) uranium. Three ceramic formulations were studied: one employed cerium as a ''surrogate'' element, replacing both plutonium and uranium in the ceramic matrix, another formulation contained plutonium in a ''baseline'' ceramic formulation, and a third contained plutonium in a formulation representing a high-impurity plutonium stream. The cerium XANES from the surrogate ceramic clearly indicates a mixed III-IV oxidation state for the cerium. In contrast, XANES analysis of the two plutonium-bearing ceramics shows that the plutonium is present almost entirely as Pu(IV) and occupies the calcium site in the zirconolite and pyrochlore phases. The plutonium EXAFS real-space structure shows a strong second-shell peak, clearly distinct from that of PuO2, with remarkably little difference in the plutonium crystal chemistry indicated between the baseline and high-impurity formulations

  12. Cerium oxide nanoparticles inhibit lipopolysaccharide induced MAP kinase/NF-kB mediated severe sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vellaisamy Selvaraj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The life threatening disease of sepsis is associated with high mortality. Septic patient survivability with currently available treatments has failed to improve. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced sepsis mortality and associated hepatic dysfunction can be prevented by cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs treatment in male Sprague Dawley rats. Here we provide the information about the methods processing of raw data related to our study published in Biomaterials (Selvaraj et al., Biomaterials, 2015, In press and Data in Brief (Selvaraj et al., Data in Brief, 2015, In Press. The data present here provides confirmation of cerium oxide nanoparticle treatments ability to prevent the LPS induced sepsis associated changes in physiological, blood cell count, inflammatory protein and growth factors in vivo. In vitro assays investigation the treated of macrophages cells with different concentrations of cerium oxide nanoparticle demonstrate that concentration of cerium oxide nanoparticles below 1 µg/ml did not significantly influence cell survival as determined by the MTT assay.

  13. Cerium oxide nanoparticles inhibit lipopolysaccharide induced MAP kinase/NF-kB mediated severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Vellaisamy; Nepal, Niraj; Rogers, Steven; Manne, Nandini D P K; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Rice, Kevin M; Asano, Shinichi; Fankenhanel, Erin; Ma, J Y; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Maheshwari, Mani; Blough, Eric R

    2015-09-01

    The life threatening disease of sepsis is associated with high mortality. Septic patient survivability with currently available treatments has failed to improve. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced sepsis mortality and associated hepatic dysfunction can be prevented by cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs) treatment in male Sprague Dawley rats. Here we provide the information about the methods processing of raw data related to our study published in Biomaterials (Selvaraj et al., Biomaterials, 2015, In press) and Data in Brief (Selvaraj et al., Data in Brief, 2015, In Press). The data present here provides confirmation of cerium oxide nanoparticle treatments ability to prevent the LPS induced sepsis associated changes in physiological, blood cell count, inflammatory protein and growth factors in vivo. In vitro assays investigation the treated of macrophages cells with different concentrations of cerium oxide nanoparticle demonstrate that concentration of cerium oxide nanoparticles below 1 µg/ml did not significantly influence cell survival as determined by the MTT assay. PMID:26217772

  14. Phenotypic and genomic responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis germinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of exposure to two nanoparticles (NPs) -titanium dioxide (nano-titania) and cerium oxide (nano-ceria) at 500 mg NPs L-1 on gene expression and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana germinants were studied using microarrays and phenotype studies. After 12 days post treatment,...

  15. Magnetic hysteresis of cerium doped bismuth ferrite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of Cerium doping on the structural and magnetic properties of BiFeO3 thin films have been investigated. Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data and successive de-convolution of Raman scattering spectra of Bi1−xCexFeO3 (BCFO) thin films with x=0–0.20 reflect the single phase rhombohedral (R3c) formation for x<0.08, whereas concentration-driven gradual structural phase transition from rhombohedral (R3c) to partial tetragonal (P4mm) phase follows for x≥0.08. All low wavenumber Raman modes (<300 cm−1) showed a noticeable shift towards higher wavenumber with increase in doping concentration, except Raman E-1 mode (71 cm−1), shows a minor shift. Sudden evolution of Raman mode at 668 cm−1, manifested as A1-tetragonal mode, accompanied by the shift to higher wavenumber with increase in doping concentration (x) affirm partial structural phase transition. Anomalous wasp waist shaped (M–H) hysteresis curves with improved saturation magnetization (Ms) for BCFO thin films is attributed to antiferromagnetic interaction/hybridization between Ce 4f and Fe 3d electronic states. The contribution of both hard and soft phase to the total coercivity is calculated. Polycrystalline Bi0.88Ce0.12FeO3 thin film found to exhibit better magnetic properties with Ms=15.9 emu/g without any impure phase. - Highlights: • Synthesis of single phase Bi1−xCexFeO3 thin films with (x=0–0.2) on cost effective corning glass and silicon substrates using CSD technique. • Structural modification studies using Rietveld refinement of XRD and de-convolution of Raman spectra revealed partial phase transition from rhombohedral (R3c) to tetragonal (P4mm) phase. • Possible reasons for origin of pinched magnetic behavior of BCFO thin films are identified. • Contribution of both hard and soft magnetic phase in coercivity of BCFO thin films is calculated and practical applications of such materials exhibiting pinching behavior are conferred

  16. Magnetic hysteresis of cerium doped bismuth ferrite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Surbhi [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi (India); Tomar, Monika [Physics Department, Miranda House, University of Delhi (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drguptavinay@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi (India)

    2015-03-15

    The influence of Cerium doping on the structural and magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} thin films have been investigated. Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data and successive de-convolution of Raman scattering spectra of Bi{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (BCFO) thin films with x=0–0.20 reflect the single phase rhombohedral (R3c) formation for x<0.08, whereas concentration-driven gradual structural phase transition from rhombohedral (R3c) to partial tetragonal (P4mm) phase follows for x≥0.08. All low wavenumber Raman modes (<300 cm{sup −1}) showed a noticeable shift towards higher wavenumber with increase in doping concentration, except Raman E-1 mode (71 cm{sup −1}), shows a minor shift. Sudden evolution of Raman mode at 668 cm{sup −1}, manifested as A{sub 1}-tetragonal mode, accompanied by the shift to higher wavenumber with increase in doping concentration (x) affirm partial structural phase transition. Anomalous wasp waist shaped (M–H) hysteresis curves with improved saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) for BCFO thin films is attributed to antiferromagnetic interaction/hybridization between Ce 4f and Fe 3d electronic states. The contribution of both hard and soft phase to the total coercivity is calculated. Polycrystalline Bi{sub 0.88}Ce{sub 0.12}FeO{sub 3} thin film found to exhibit better magnetic properties with M{sub s}=15.9 emu/g without any impure phase. - Highlights: • Synthesis of single phase Bi{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}FeO{sub 3} thin films with (x=0–0.2) on cost effective corning glass and silicon substrates using CSD technique. • Structural modification studies using Rietveld refinement of XRD and de-convolution of Raman spectra revealed partial phase transition from rhombohedral (R3c) to tetragonal (P4mm) phase. • Possible reasons for origin of pinched magnetic behavior of BCFO thin films are identified. • Contribution of both hard and soft magnetic phase in coercivity of BCFO thin films is calculated and practical

  17. Band structure, cohesive properties, and Compton profile of γ- and α-cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podloucky, R.; Glötzel, D.

    1983-03-01

    Recent Compton scattering experiments on the high-volume (γ) and low-volume (α) phases of fcc cerium and their interpretation in terms of the renormalized-free-atom model cast severe doubts on the promotional model of Pauling and Zachariasen for the γ-α transition. Stimulated by these results, we have extended a previous self-consistent local-density band-structure investigation to study the Compton profiles of γ- and α-cerium. For the band structure, Bloch functions, and their Fourier transforms we use the linear muffin-tin orbital method in the atomic-sphere approximation. We analyze the calculated Compton profiles in terms of band structure and local angular momentum character of the wave functions. The change in band structure and wave functions under compression (with approximately one electron per atom in the 4f band of both phases) accounts well for the observed change in the Compton profile. This provides further evidence against the promotional model in agreement with the analysis of Kornstädt et al. In addition, we study the cohesive energy of fcc cerium as a function of volume in the local-density approximation. For α-cerium in the 4f1(5d 6s)3 configuration we find a cohesive energy of 5.4 eV/atom in good agreement with experiment, whereas the "promotional" 4f0(5d 6s)4 state yields a binding energy of 0.6 eV/atom only. Therefore the fourth valence electron has to be a 4f electron, and α-cerium has to be regarded as an f-band metal.

  18. High temperature condensation and thermal radiation properties of cerium dioxide in solid and liquid states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text: Measuring thermal radiation properties of cerium dioxide at high temperatures is very complicated problem from experimental point of view. It is connected with high evaporation of this material at high temperatures. In order to solve this problem with a subsecond laser technique the excess pressure of inert atmosphere is maintained in the working chamber to suppress surface evaporation in the focal area of the sample. In this paper it is shown that in this case the dense vapor phase formed above the investigated sample actively interacts with the sample surface and the laser radiation and distorts the experimental results. The developed polychromatic reflectometer with laser heating enabled one to discover the interesting phenomenon of the interaction of the vapor, liquid and solid phases in cerium dioxide under CO2 laser irradiation. This phenomenon is exhibited in the form of the exothermic peak of the condensation on the cooling curves moreover the temperature level of this transition is regulated by experimental parameters. The possibility of the change of the position of this floating phase transition on the temperature scale permits one to model the interaction of liquid-vapor and solid-vapor to estimate the contribution of the dense vapor phase formed above the sample to the thermal radiation properties of cerium dioxide at high temperatures. The experimental data on thermal radiation properties of stoichiometric cerium dioxide in the spectral range 0.4-1.1 μm and in the temperature region 2000-3500 K measured by the method developed are presented. Reflectivity and emissivity measurement error does not exceed ±3 %. The experimental results obtained are compared with the data of other authors and the recommended values for spectral reflectivity and emissivity of cerium dioxide at high temperatures are given. (author)

  19. The importance of cerium substituted phosphates as cation exchanger some unique properties and related application potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven different samples of an inorganic ion exchanger, cerium phosphate, suitable for column use have been prepared under varying conditions. The property of these exchangers has been characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy. These exchangers are stable in water, dilute mineral acids, ethanol, methanol, acetone and ether. However, in concentrated HCl and HNO3 they decompose. They retain about 50% of their exchange value after drying at 80 degC, and can be regenerated twice without any decrease in exchange capacity. The distribution coefficient measurements for alkaline earth metals, tellurium, iodine and molybdenum using these seven ion exchangers were studied. This revealed the relative affinity for each exchanger, where the sorption in general was most effective at P H 6-8. The titration curves of cerium phosphate (disodium) with alkaline earth metals showed that the selectivity sequence Ba2+>Sr2+>CA2+>Mg2+ is observed. Furthermore, it could be deduced that the adsorption of alkaline earth metal cations greatly depends on the cation. These studies have also shown that cerium phosphates with divalent ions are strongly preferred to monovalent ones. Therefore, as for the cerium phosphates with large monovalent ions, the lack of exchange for Ba2+, Mg2+ or other alkaline earth metal ions should be essentially due to steric hindrance and this could include any one of the following: the large crystalline radius of metal ions or large hydrated ionic radius and high energy of hydration for other divalent ions. Three binary separations of TeIV - MoIV, TeIV -I1 has been developed and the recovery ranging from 90 to 100% has been achieved on cerium phosphate (disodium) columns

  20. Using cerium anomaly as an indicator of redox reactions in constructed wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, R.

    2013-12-01

    The study area, Chiayi County located in southern Taiwan, has highly developed livestock. The surface water has very low dissolved oxygen and high NH4. Under the situation, constructed wetland becomes the most effective and economic choice to treat the wastewater in the natural waterways. Hebao Island free surface constructed wetland started to operate in late 2006. It covers an area of 0.28 km2 and is subdivided into 3 major cells, which are sedimentation cell, 1st aeration cell with rooted plants and 2nd aeration cell with float plants. The water depth of cells ranges from 0.6 m to 1.2 m. The total hydraulic retention time is about a half day. In this study, the water samples were sequentially collected along the flow path. The results of hydrochemical analysis show that the untreated inflow water can be characterized with enriched NH4 (11 ppm), sulfate (6 ppm) and arsenic (50 ppb). The removal efficiency of NH4 in the first two cells is pollutants from the wastewater; therefore, dissolved oxygen is traditionally considered as an important indicator to evaluate the operation efficiency of wetland. However, it would need longer time to achieve equilibrium state of redox reaction involving dissolved oxygen due to the slower reaction rate. For example, the input water in this study has fairly high dissolved oxygen (5 ppm) but the NH4 content is still high, which indicates a non-equilibrium condition. In this study, the cerium anomaly is alternatively utilized to evaluate the water redox state. The results demonstrate that the input water has the negative cerium anomaly of -0.16. Along the flow path, the cerium negative anomaly does not change in the first two cells and dramatically becomes -0.23 in cell 3. The trend of cerium anomaly is more close to the removal efficiency of NH4 rather than dissolve oxygen. Accordingly, cerium anomaly could become a better indicator of removal efficiency of constructed wetland.

  1. Equation of state measurements by radiography provide evidence for a liquid-liquid phase transition in cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, M. J.; Jenei, Zs; Ruddle, D.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Cynn, H.; Evans, W. J.; Kono, Y.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Park, C.

    2014-05-01

    A pressure-volume isotherm in cerium metal at 1100 K was measured in a large volume press of the Paris-Edinburgh type up to 6 GPa. The volume was determined by imaging a rectangular shape of the sample via white X-ray radiography. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction spectra were recorded to ensure that the highly reactive cerium in the cell assembly remained pure at this temperature. Even at 1100 K the p-V equation of state of liquid cerium shows a pronounced decrease of the bulk modulus above the y-phase region similar to the 775 K isotherm in the solid that also shows an inflection point between y- and a-type cerium. The inflection point in the 1100 K isotherm indicating the minimum in the bulk modulus separating the γ- from the α-type liquid is located at approximately 3.5 GPa.

  2. Effect of HCl pre-treatment on corrosion resistance of cerium-based conversion coatings on magnesium and magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunelli, Katya [Department of Mechanical Innovation and Management, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padua (Italy); Dabala, Manuele [Department of Mechanical Innovation and Management, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padua (Italy)]. E-mail: manuele.dabala@unipd.it; Calliari, Irene [Department of Mechanical Innovation and Management, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padua (Italy); Magrini, Maurizio [Department of Mechanical Innovation and Management, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padua (Italy)

    2005-04-01

    The corrosion protection afforded by a cerium conversion coating, formed by immersion in a solution containing rare earth salt and hydrogen peroxide, on pure magnesium and two magnesium alloys, AZ91 and AM50, has been studied. The effect of HCl pre-treatments on the morphology and on the corrosion resistance of the cerium conversion layer was investigated. A thicker and more homogeneous distribution of the conversion coating was obtained when the sample surface was pre-treated with acid. Higher amounts of cerium on the surface of the pre-treated samples were detected. The cerium conversion coating increased the corrosion resistance of the alloys because it ennobled the corrosion potential and decreased both the anodic and cathodic current. The acid pre-treatment further increased the corrosion resistance of the coated alloys. After five days of immersion in chloride environment the untreated samples showed localized corrosion while the chemical conversion coated samples appeared unaffected.

  3. Effect of Triethanolamine and Benzaldehyde on the Storage Stability of Polystyrene- Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of triethanolamine and benzaldehyde on the stability of polystyrene has been studied by dynamic thermogravimetry (TG. Slower decomposition of polymer in the presence of these compounds indicates their inhibiting ability on the oxidation of the polymer. The burning rate measurements of polystyrene (PS/ammonium perchlorate (AP propellants at ambient temperature and pressure shows an increase with the storage time. The percentage change in the burning rate of the propellants containing aldehyde and amine is less during the ageing which indicates the increased stability of the propellants. The safe-life time of the propellants for the ballistic stability has been calculated from the activation energy for the ageing process using an Arrhenius type equation. The safe-life of the propellants containing triethanolamine and benzaldehyde is more than the neat propellant.

  4. Potentiometric Electronic Tongue to Resolve Mixtures of Sulfide and Perchlorate Anions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivy Wilson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the use of an array of potentiometric sensors and an artificial neural network response model to determine perchlorate and sulfide ions in polluted waters, by what is known as an electronic tongue. Sensors used have been all-solid-state PVC membrane selective electrodes, where their ionophores were different metal-phtalocyanine complexes with specific and anion generic responses. The study case illustrates the potential use of electronic tongues in the quantification of mixtures when interfering effects need to be counterbalanced: relative errors in determination of individual ions can be decreased typically from 25% to less than 5%, if compared to the use of a single proposed ion-selective electrode.

  5. Structure and properties of 2-cyanopyridinium perchlorate [2-CNPyH][ClO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czupinski, O.; Wojtas, M.; Zaleski, J.; Jakubas, R.; Medycki, W.

    2006-03-01

    The crystal structure of 2-cyanopyridinium perchlorate, [2-CNPyH][ClO4], has been determined at 100 (phase II) and 293 K (phase I). It is monoclinic P 21 at 100 K and orthorhombic P 212121 at 293 K. The dynamic properties of the crystal were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, dilatometry, pyroelectric, dielectric, proton (1H NMR), chlorine (35Cl NMR) magnetic resonance spectroscopies and the infrared method. The crystal undergoes a structural phase transition (\\mathrm {I\\rightarrow II} ) at 170 K characterized by a complex mechanism involving both 'order-disorder' and 'displacive' contributions. It reveals pyroelectric properties below 170 K. The dielectric relaxation existing over phase I is due to the motion of the cyano group, whereas the dynamics of the [ClO4]- anions is reflected in the significant dielectric increment around the \\mathrm {I\\rightarrow II} phase transition.

  6. Structure and properties of 2-cyanopyridinium perchlorate [2-CNPyH][ClO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of 2-cyanopyridinium perchlorate, [2-CNPyH][ClO4], has been determined at 100 (phase II) and 293 K (phase I). It is monoclinic P 21 at 100 K and orthorhombic P 212121 at 293 K. The dynamic properties of the crystal were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, dilatometry, pyroelectric, dielectric, proton (1H NMR), chlorine (35Cl NMR) magnetic resonance spectroscopies and the infrared method. The crystal undergoes a structural phase transition (I →II) at 170K characterized by a complex mechanism involving both 'order-disorder' and 'displacive' contributions. It reveals pyroelectric properties below 170K. The dielectric relaxation existing over phase I is due to the motion of the cyano group, whereas the dynamics of the [ClO4]- anions is reflected in the significant dielectric increment around the I →II phase transition

  7. Degradation study of trichloroethylene and perchloric ethylene using high energy electron beam generated in industrial accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pollution of potable water with chlorinated hydrocarbons, mainly trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloric ethylene (PCE), is seriously increasing the problem of contamination of water, specially in highly industrialized areas. Recent studies show that depuration by ionizing radiation has been considered a possible alternative to the control of water pollution, wherein the process by ionizing radiation converts TCE and PCE into approximately 100% carbon dioxide ions. Water samples containing TCE e PCE were submitted to radiation in the pilot plant installed in the industrial electron accelerator at IPEN from Radiation Dynamics, Dynamitron II, of 1,5 MeV - 25 m A, with doses varying from 2 kGy to 8 kGy, being its parameters analyzed before and after irradiation TCE and PCE concentrations were determined by the gas chromatography method by liquid-liquid extraction using a gas chromatograph, model CG 90, with an electron capture detector. (author). 5 refs, 4 figs

  8. Thyroid scintigraphy and perchlorate discharge test in the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative thyroid scanning using low doses of technetium-99m sodium pertechnetate was performed on 147 infants (55 males and 92 females) with congenital hypothyroidism detected through the national neonatal screening programme. Thirty-two (21.8%) were athyrotic, while 62 (42.2%) had an ectopic thyroid and 53 (36%) had a eutopic gland with increased 99mTc uptake (mean 17%; range, 5%-38%). The perchlorate discharge test (PDT) was performed in nine of the infants with ectopic glands and 15 with eutopic glands; the findings were consistent with an organification defect in 22 cases (seven ectopic and 15 eutopic). Thyroid scintigraphy and PDT can add useful aetiological, genetic and prognostic information in the clinical evaluation of infants with congenital hypothyroidism detected by neonatal screening. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  9. Promethium-147 extraction with 1,1-diantipyrylalkanes from perchlorate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conditions for quantitative extraction of indicator amounts of promethium-147 from perchlorate solutions with 1,1-diantipyrylalkanes are found. The composition of oxtracted complexes is identified. Extraction concentration constants are calculated. The dependence between the extraction capacity and reagent structure is established. Promethium-147 is used as a radioactive label when studying La3+, Ce3+, Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Lu3+ extraction. The concentration constants of r.e.e. extraction with diantipyrylmethane are 3.1x1010; 3.5x1010; 3.5x1010; 3.8x1010; 4.0x1010; 6.2x1010, respectively, when μ=0.2

  10. Non-aqueous titrimetric assay of gabapentin in capsules using perchloric acid as titrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAMEER A.M. ABDULRAHMAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Two simple, rapid, accurate and inexpensive methods using visual and potentiometric titrimetric techniques are described for the determination of gabapentin (GBP in bulk drug as well as in capsules. The methods are based on the neutralization reaction of the primary amino group of GBP with acetous perchloric acid as titrant in anhydrous acetic acid medium. The end point was detected either visually using crystal violet as indicator or potentiometrically using a modified glass electrode SCE electrode system. Both methods are applicable over the range 1.0-16.0 mg of GBP and the titration reaction follows a 1:1 stoichiometry. The methods were successfully applied to the determination of GBP in capsules. The validity of the proposed methods was further ascertained by parallel determination by a reference method and by recovery studies via standard-addition technique.

  11. Thyroid scintigraphy and perchlorate discharge test in the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Desouki, M. [Dept. of Medicine, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jurayyan, N. [Dept. of Paediatrics, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Nuaim, A. [Div. of Endocrinology, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Herbish, A. [Dept. of Paediatrics, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Abo-Bakr, A. [Dept. of Paediatrics, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Mazrou, Y. [Ministry of Health, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Swailem, A. [Ministry of Health, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-09-01

    Quantitative thyroid scanning using low doses of technetium-99m sodium pertechnetate was performed on 147 infants (55 males and 92 females) with congenital hypothyroidism detected through the national neonatal screening programme. Thirty-two (21.8%) were athyrotic, while 62 (42.2%) had an ectopic thyroid and 53 (36%) had a eutopic gland with increased {sup 99m}Tc uptake (mean 17%; range, 5%-38%). The perchlorate discharge test (PDT) was performed in nine of the infants with ectopic glands and 15 with eutopic glands; the findings were consistent with an organification defect in 22 cases (seven ectopic and 15 eutopic). Thyroid scintigraphy and PDT can add useful aetiological, genetic and prognostic information in the clinical evaluation of infants with congenital hypothyroidism detected by neonatal screening. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effect of Microwave Heating on the Leaching of Lateritic Nickel Ore in Perchloric Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the leaching conditions of Sivrihisar (Adatepe) limonite type lateritic ore in acidic medium were investigated. Leaching experiments were carried out using conventional and microwave-assisted method. The effects of stirring speed, leaching temperature, perchloric acid concentration, solid/liquid ratio and particle size on conventional leaching were determined. Microwave-assisted leaching was carried out by using the optimum results of the conventional leaching. The pre-heating process was applied on different microwave powers (0, 90, 180, 360 and 600 W) and pre-processing time (0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20 min). These experimental results demonstrated that acid leaching was a convenient method for Ni extraction from lateritic ore. The higher dissolution and the higher Ni recoveries in the microwave-assisted leaching process were obtained in less leach time. (author)

  13. Hydration of some trivalent metal ions extracted as perchlorates with trioctylphosphine oxide in hexane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorates of Sc3+, Y3+, La3+, and Eu3+ have each been extracted from 0.1 mol x dem-3 aqueous solution of μ=1 with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in hexane. The hydration number of the extracted salts has been determined by Karl Fischer titration. Sc3+, Y3+, and Eu3+ are extracted as the tetra- and hexa-solvates of TOPO but the assumption of octa-solvate on addition to the tetra-solvate explains the extraction data of La3+ well. The hydration number of tetra-solvates is 2(Sc3+ and Eu3+), 3(Y3+) and probably 4 for La3+ ion. That of hexa-and octa-solvates is 4-5. (author)

  14. Hydration and Solvation of Metal Perchlorates Extracted with Trioctylphosphine Oxide in Hexane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorates of Sc3+, Y3+, La3+, and Eu3+ have each been extracted from 0.1 mol dm-3 aqueous solution of μ=1 with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in hexane. The hydration number of the extracted salts has been determined by Karl Fischer titration. Sc3+, Y3+, and Eu3+ are extracted as the tetra- and hexa-solvates of TOPO but the assumption of octa-solvate on addition to the tetra-solvate explains the extraction data of La3+ well. The hydration number of tetra-solvates is 2 (Sc3+ and Eu3+), 3 (Y3+) and probably 4 for La3+ ion. That of hexa-and octa- solvates is 4-5. (author). 1 tabs

  15. Extraction of lanthanide and scandium perchlorates by podands bearing diphenylphosphorylacetamide terminal groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interphase distribution of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu,Y and Sc perchlorate trace amounts between HClO4 aqueous solutions and phosphorus-containing podands with two end groups Ph2P(O)CH2C(O)NH- connected by di- and triethylene glycol chain in dichlorethane has been studied. Stoichiometry of extracted complexes is determined, effect of HClO4 concentration in aqueous phase and nature of organic solvent on the efficiency of metal ion transitions in organic phase are treated. Studied compounds reveal higher extraction ability regarding to metal ions in HClO4 solutions as compared with the same ability of (dibutylcarbamoylmethyl)diphenylphosphine oxide. Possibility for the using macroporous polymer sorbents impregnated by studied podands for the separation and concentration of rare earth(III) and Sc(III) ions from aqueous solutions containing ClO4- anions has been demonstrated

  16. A Consideration for Design of Ammonium Perchlorate/Hydroxyl Terminated Polybutadiene Composite Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohga, Makoto

    Specific impulse and burning rate characteristics are the important properties for the propellant design. Because of the requirements for the preparation of ammonium perchlorate (AP)/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) composite propellant, there is an upper limit content, φ of AP contained propellant. Specific impulse and burning rate increase with increasing the AP content. The specific impulse, Ispφ and the burning rate, rφ of the propellant prepared at φ, rφ are the highest values of the propellant prepared with AP used as an oxidizer. It is necessary for the propellant design to estimate φ, Ispφ and rφ. The φ, Ispφ and rφ are closely associated with the specific surface area, Swp measured by air-permeability method. Therefore, these values are estimated with Swp. A process for the design of AP/HTPB composite propellant would be proposed in this study.

  17. Large Angular Jump Mechanism Observed for Hydrogen Bond Exchange in Aqueous Perchlorate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Minbiao; /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Odelius3, Michael; /Stockholm U.; Gaffney1, K.J.; /aff SLAC, PULSE

    2010-06-11

    The mechanism for hydrogen bond (H-bond) switching in solution has remained subject to debate despite extensive experimental and theoretical studies. We have applied polarization-selective multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy to investigate the H-bond exchange mechanism in aqueous NaClO{sub 4} solution. The results show that a water molecule shifts its donated H-bonds between water and perchlorate acceptors by means of large, prompt angular rotation. Using a jump-exchange kinetic model, we extract an average jump angle of 49 {+-} 4{sup o}, in qualitative agreement with the jump angle observed in molecular dynamics simulations of the same aqueous NaClO{sub 4} solution.

  18. Complexes of rare-earth perchlorates with ditbutyl amides of di, tri and tetraglycolic acids

    OpenAIRE

    Premlatha, C; Soundararajan, S

    1981-01-01

    New complexes of lanthanide perchlorates with di-t-butyl amides of di, tri and tetraglycolic acids have been synthesised. The complexes have the general formula Ln(DiGA)3(ClO4)3; Ln(TriGA)2 (ClO4)3 and Ln(TetGA)2 (C1O4)3, where Ln = La-Yb and Y and DiGA = N,N′, di-t-butyl diglycolamide, TriGA N,N′, di-t-butyl triglycolamide and TetGA = N,N′ di-t-butyl tetraglycolamide, respectively. The complexes have been characterized by analysis, electrolytic conductance, infrared,1H and13C nuclear magneti...

  19. Effect of Perchlorates on Electron Radiolysis of Glycine with Application to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góbi, Sándor; Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-05-01

    This work explores the radiolytic decomposition of glycine (H2NCH2COOH) under simulated Martian conditions in the presence of perchlorates ({{{ClO}}4}-), which are abundant oxidizers on the surface of Mars, by energetic electrons at 10, 160, 210, and 260 K, mimicking the radiation exposure of the Martian regolith in the first 5-10 cm depths over about 250 million years. Our experiments present quantitative evidence that the rate constants of the glycine decomposition in the presence of magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2 · 6H2O) were a factor of about two higher than that of the pure glycine, suggesting that energetic oxygen atoms (O) released from the {{{ClO}}4}- have a significant effect on the decomposition rates and accelerate them by providing a unique oxidizing environment in the radiolyzed samples. Hence, two decay mechanisms exist: radiolysis by the electrons and oxidation by the O atoms. Within the Mars-relevant temperature range covering 160-260 K, the destruction rates are nearly temperature invariant with rates varying as little as 5%. Further, the formation rates of carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) are both accelerated in the presence of {{{ClO}}4}- by a factor of three to five, supporting our conclusion of an active oxygen-initiated chemistry. In addition, the degradation rates are significantly higher than the formation rates of CO2 and CO. This suggests that, besides the decarboxylation, alternative degradation pathways such as a polymerization of glycine must exist. Finally, besides CO2 and CO, three alternative products were identified tentatively: methylamine (CH3NH2), methane (CH4), and ammonia (NH3).

  20. Titrimetric and Spectrophotometric Assay of Ganciclovir in Pharmaceuticals Using Cerium(IV) Sulphate as the Oxidimetric Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Pavagada J. Ramesh; Kanakapura Basavaiah; Cijo M. Xavier; Prashanth, Kudige N.; Raghu, Madihalli S.; Kanakapura B. Vinay

    2012-01-01

    Titrimetric and spectrophotometric assay of ganciclovir (GNC) is described using cerium(IV) sulphate as the oxidimetric reagent. The methods are based on the oxidation of GNC with a measured excess of cerium(IV) sulphate in acid medium followed by determination of the unreacted oxidant by two different reaction schemes. In titrimetry, the unreacted oxidant was determined by back titration with ferrous ammonium sulphate (FAS) in sulphuric acid medium, and spectrophotometry involves the reactio...